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Sample records for radiation-induced oxidative damage

  1. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  2. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  3. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shangcheng; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Xubu; Li, Maoquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Guangbin; Zhong, Min

    2010-01-22

    Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress may be involved in the adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on the brain. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are closely associated with various nervous system diseases and mtDNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency radiation can cause oxidative damage to mtDNA. In this study, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to pulsed RF electromagnetic fields at a frequency of 1800 MHz modulated by 217 Hz at an average special absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. At 24 h after exposure, we found that RF radiation induced a significant increase in the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG), a common biomarker of DNA oxidative damage, in the mitochondria of neurons. Concomitant with this finding, the copy number of mtDNA and the levels of mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) transcripts showed an obvious reduction after RF exposure. Each of these mtDNA disturbances could be reversed by pretreatment with melatonin, which is known to be an efficient antioxidant in the brain. Together, these results suggested that 1800 MHz RF radiation could cause oxidative damage to mtDNA in primary cultured neurons. Oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of RF radiation in the brain.

  4. Effects of ozone oxidative preconditioning on radiation-induced organ damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Guven, Berrak; Tasdoven, Ilhan; Bektas, Sibel; Can, Murat; Comert, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. It has been demonstrated that controlled ozone administration may promote an adaptation to oxidative stress, preventing the damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Thus, we hypothesized that ozone would ameliorate oxidative damage caused by total body irradiation (TBI) with a single dose of 6 Gy in rat liver and ileum tissues. Rats were randomly divided into groups as follows: control group; saline-treated and irradiated (IR) groups; and ozone oxidative preconditioning (OOP) and IR groups. Animals were exposed to TBI after a 5-day intraperitoneal pretreatment with either saline or ozone (1 mg/kg/day). They were decapitated at either 6 h or 72 h after TBI. Plasma, liver and ileum samples were obtained. Serum AST, ALT and TNF-α levels were elevated in the IR groups compared with the control group and were decreased after treatment with OOP. TBI resulted in a significant increase in the levels of MDA in the liver and ileal tissues and a decrease of SOD activities. The results demonstrated that the levels of MDA liver and ileal tissues in irradiated rats that were pretreated with ozone were significantly decreased, while SOD activities were significantly increased. OOP reversed all histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that ozone could increase the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism in rats and there by protect the animals from radiation-induced organ toxicity. PMID:22915786

  5. Grape seed extract Vitis vinifera protects against radiation-induced oxidative damage and metabolic disorders in rats.

    PubMed

    Saada, Helen N; Said, Ussama Z; Meky, Nefissa H; Abd El Azime, Afrag S

    2009-03-01

    Whole body exposure to ionizing radiation induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different tissues provoking oxidative damage, organ dysfunction and metabolic disturbances. The present study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of grape seed extract (GSE), rich in proanthocyanidins against gamma-radiation-induced oxidative stress in heart and pancreas tissues associated with serum metabolic disturbances. Irradiated rats were whole body exposed to 5 Gy gamma-radiation. GSE-treated irradiated rats received 100 mg GSE/kg/day, by gavage, for 14 days before irradiation. The animals were killed on days 1, 14 and 28 after irradiation. Significant decreases of SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities associated with significant increases of TBARS levels were recorded in both tissues after irradiation. GSE administration pre-irradiation significantly attenuated the radiation-induced oxidative stress in heart tissues which was substantiated by a significant amelioration of serum LDH, CPK and AST activities. GSE treatment also attenuated the oxidative stress in pancreas tissues which was associated with a significant improvement in radiation-induced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that GSE would protect the heart and pancreas tissues from oxidative damage induced by ionizing irradiation.

  6. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  7. DIETARY FLAXSEED PREVENTS RADIATION-INDUCED OXIDATIVE LUNG DAMAGE, INFLAMMATION AND FIBROSIS IN A MOUSE MODEL OF THORACIC RADIATION INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James C.; Krochak, Ryan; Blouin, Aaron; Kanterakis, Stathis; Chatterjee, Shampa; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vachani, Anil; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Cengel, Keith A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2009-01-01

    Flaxseed (FS) has high contents of omega-3 fatty acids and lignans with antioxidant properties. Its use in preventing thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)-induced pneumonopathy has never been evaluated. We evaluated FS supplementation given to mice given before and post-XRT. FS-derived lignans, known for their direct antioxidant properties, were evaluated in abrogating ROS generation in cultured endothelial cells following gamma radiation exposure. Mice were fed 10% FS or isocaloric control diet for three weeks and given 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT. Lungs were evaluated at 24 hours for markers of radiation-induced injury, three weeks for acute lung damage (lipid peroxidation, lung edema and inflammation), and at four months for late lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis). FS-Lignans blunted ROS generation in vitro, resulting from radiation in a dose-dependent manner. FS-fed mice had reduced expression of lung injury biomarkers (Bax, p21, and TGF-beta1) at 24 hours following XRT and reduced oxidative lung damage as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels at 3 weeks following XRT. In addition, FS-fed mice had decreased lung fibrosis as determined by hydroxyproline content and decreased inflammatory cell influx into lungs at 4 months post XRT. Importantly, when Lewis Lung carcinoma cells were injected systemically in mice, FS dietary supplementation did not appear to protect lung tumors from responding to thoracic XRT. Dietary FS is protective against pulmonary fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative lung damage in a murine model. Moreover, in this model, tumor radioprotection was not observed. FS lignans exhibited potent radiation-induced ROS scavenging action. Taken together, these data suggest that dietary flaxseed may be clinically useful as an agent to increase the therapeutic index of thoracic XRT by increasing the radiation tolerance of lung tissues. PMID:18981722

  8. The role of oxidative DNA damage in radiation induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Havaki, Sophia; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Kletsas, Dimitris; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has been described as a double-edged sword, since it is used for diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, and at the same time it is a well known human mutagen and carcinogen, causing wide-ranging chromosomal aberrations. It is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of IR are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects. This review presents the role of oxidative stress in the induction of bystander effects referring to the types of the implicated oxidative DNA lesions, the contributing intercellular and intracellular stress mediators, the way they are transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells and finally, the complex role of the bystander effect in the therapeutic efficacy of radiation treatment of cancer.

  9. Ferulic acid (FA) abrogates γ-radiation induced oxidative stress and DNA damage by up-regulating nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and activation of NHEJ pathway.

    PubMed

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Khan, Amitava; Sinha, Mahuya; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Chakraborty, Anindita; Dey, Sanjit

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of ferulic acid (FA), a naturally occurring plant flavonoid in terms of DNA damage and damage related alterations of repair pathways by gamma radiation. FA was administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for five consecutive days prior to exposing the swiss albino mice to a single dose of 10 Gy gamma radiation. Ionising radiation induces oxidative damage manifested by decreased expression of Cu, Zn-SOD (SOD stands for super oxide dismutase), Mn-SOD and catalase. Gamma radiation promulgated reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated DNA damage and modified repair pathways. ROS enhanced nuclear translocation of p53, activated ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein), increased expression of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein) gene and inactivated Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. The comet formation in irradiated mice peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reiterated the DNA damage in IR exposed groups. FA pretreatment significantly prevented the comet formation and regulated the nuclear translocation of p53, inhibited ATM activation and expression of GADD45a gene. FA promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and activated NHEJ repair pathway to overcome ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage. Therefore, the current study stated that FA can challenge the oxidative stress by (i) inducing nuclear translocation of Nrf2, (ii) scavenging ROS, and (iii) activating NHEJ DNA repair process.

  10. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  11. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  12. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation induces oxidative DNA base damage in a mouse spermatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2013-03-27

    Whether exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted from mobile phones can induce DNA damage in male germ cells remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a 24h intermittent exposure (5 min on and 10 min off) of a mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line to 1800 MHz Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) signals in GSM-Talk mode at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1 W/kg, 2 W/kg or 4 W/kg. Subsequently, through the use of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) in a modified comet assay, we determined that the extent of DNA migration was significantly increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that levels of the DNA adduct 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were also increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. These increases were concomitant with similar increases in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); these phenomena were mitigated by co-treatment with the antioxidant α-tocopherol. However, no detectable DNA strand breakage was observed by the alkaline comet assay. Taking together, these findings may imply the novel possibility that RF-EMR with insufficient energy for the direct induction of DNA strand breaks may produce genotoxicity through oxidative DNA base damage in male germ cells.

  13. Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Damage in the Lung Tissue: May Acetylsalicylic Acid Have a Positive Role?

    PubMed

    Demirel, Can; Kilciksiz, Sevil Cagiran; Gurgul, Serkan; Erdal, Nurten; Yigit, Seyran; Tamer, Lulufer; Ayaz, Lokman

    2016-02-01

    The lung is relatively sensitive to irradiation. It is shown that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) might reduce oxidative injury and that it has a place in protection from cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential radioprotective effects of ASA. Whole-body irradiation (6 Gy, single dose) was applied to the rats. Glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the lung tissue were measured. Control (C), Radiation (R), Radiation + ASA (R + ASA; received irradiation and 25 mg/kg of ASA intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and Radiation + Amifostine (R + WR-2721; received irradiation and 200 mg/kg of WR-2721 i.p.) groups were used. The MPO levels decreased statistically significantly in the group administered ASA. Histopathologically, a radioprotective effect of ASA was more evident in the R + ASA group. ASA is an agent which has not been used as a radioprotector in the clinic yet, and it is worth supporting with more advanced studies.

  14. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Radiation-induced Damages

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Marzia; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Buffa, Vitaliano; Musumeci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The long-term sequelae of mantle therapy include, especially lung and cardiac disease but also involve the vessels and the organs in the neck and thorax (such as thyroid, aorta, and esophagus). We presented the case of 66-year-old female admitted for congestive heart failure in radiation-induced heart disease. The patient had undergone to massive radiotherapy 42 years ago for Hodgkin's disease (type 1A). Transesophageal echocardiography was performed unsuccessfully with difficulty because of the rigidity and impedance of esophageal walls. Our case is an extraordinary report of radiotherapy's latency effect as a result of dramatic changes in the structure of mediastinum, in particular in the esophagus, causing unavailability of a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:27867461

  15. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Aging: The Role of DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Epidermal Stem Cell Damage Mediated Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Panich, Uraiwan; Sittithumcharee, Gunya; Rathviboon, Natwarath

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the largest human organ. Skin continually reconstructs itself to ensure its viability, integrity, and ability to provide protection for the body. Some areas of skin are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stressors that can inflict direct and indirect damage to skin cell DNA. Skin homeostasis is maintained by mesenchymal stem cells in inner layer dermis and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the outer layer epidermis. Reduction of skin stem cell number and function has been linked to impaired skin homeostasis (e.g., skin premature aging and skin cancers). Skin stem cells, with self-renewal capability and multipotency, are frequently affected by environment. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a major cause of stem cell DNA damage, can contribute to depletion of stem cells (ESCs and mesenchymal stem cells) and damage of stem cell niche, eventually leading to photoinduced skin aging. In this review, we discuss the role of UV-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in the skin stem cell aging in order to gain insights into the pathogenesis and develop a way to reduce photoaging of skin cells. PMID:27148370

  16. Impaired repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Cramers, Patricia; Verhoeven, Esther E; Filon, A Ronald; Rockx, Davy A P; Santos, Susy J; van der Leer, Anneke A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2011-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) and sensitive to oxidizing agents, including ionizing radiation. We examined the hypothesis that TCR plays a role in ionizing radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage repair or alternatively that CS plays a role in transcription elongation after irradiation. Irradiation with doses up to 100 Gy did not inhibit RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription in normal and CS-B fibroblasts. In contrast, RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription was severely inhibited at 5 Gy in normal cells, indicating different mechanisms of transcription response to X rays. The frequency of radiation-induced base damage was 2 × 10(-7) lesions/base/Gy, implying that 150 Gy is required to induce one lesion/30-kb transcription unit; no TCR of X-ray-induced base damage in the p53 gene was observed. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that defective TCR underlies the sensitivity of CS to ionizing radiation. Overall genome repair levels of radiation-induced DNA damage measured by repair replication were significantly reduced in CS-A and CS-B cells. Taken together, the results do not provide evidence for a key role of TCR in repair of radiation-induced oxidative damages in human cells; rather, impaired repair of oxidative lesions throughout the genome may contribute to the CS phenotype.

  17. Hesperidin ameliorates UV radiation-induced skin damage by abrogation of oxidative stress and inflammatory in HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Lin, Xiang-Fei; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Bing-Rong; Luo, Dan

    2016-12-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation contributes to skin photoaging. Hesperidin which is a flavanone glycoside found in citrus fruit peels, have been intensively studied for their UVA-protective activity, but its effects and mechanisms on UVA irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative stress have never been described. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of hesperidin in skin oxidative stress and inflammation induced by UVA irradiation. In this study, we firstly examined whether hesperidin may exert direct protective effects on the UVA-induced in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cell injury in vitro. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) were measured by using a commercially available kits. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and ELISA were used to determine messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. UVA significantly decreased the cell viability (P<0.05). In our study, hesperidin (220μg/ml) significantly reduced UVA-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response. In conclusion, hesperidin treatment effectively protected HaCaT keratinocytes from these UVA radiation-induced skin injuries, suggesting that the underlying mechanism involves the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacities, it is possible to be used as a sunscreen agent.

  18. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Cell Damage against UVB Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress via Enhancing Antioxidant Effects in Human HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Chae, Sung Wook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cytoprotective effect of rosmarinic acid (RA) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced oxidative stress in HaCaT keratinocytes. RA exerted a significant cytoprotective effect by scavenging intracellular ROS induced by UVB. RA also attenuated UVB-induced oxidative macromolecular damage, including protein carbonyl content, DNA strand breaks, and the level of 8-isoprostane. Furthermore, RA increased the expression and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, heme oxygenase-1, and their transcription factor Nrf2, which are decreased by UVB radiation. Collectively, these data indicate that RA can provide substantial cytoprotection against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating cellular antioxidant systems, and has potential to be developed as a medical agent for ROS-induced skin diseases. PMID:26759705

  19. Radiation-induced thymine base damage in replicating chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Childers, T.J.

    1982-06-01

    The efficiency of radiation-induced production of 5',6'-dihydroxydihydrothymine (t/sup ..gamma../)-type damage was determined in nascent and mature chromatin DNA for the dose range of 50 to 150 krad. These large doses affected neither the total fraction of nuclear DNA in chromatin subunits nor the nucleosome subunit repeat length. The DNA in nascent chromatin, however, was found to be 3.3 times more sensitive than mature chromatin DNA to ..gamma..-ray (/sup 137/Cs)-induced t/sup ..gamma../-type damage, while thymine damage of this type was uniformly distributed in the nucleosomal DNA of mature chromatin (i.e., in the nucleosome core and spacer DNA). The half-time for the transition of nascent DNA sensitivity to mature chromatin DNA sensitivity levels was the same as the half-time at 37/sup 0/C for the maturation of nascent into mature chromatin structure. The rate at which nascent chromatin matured was unaffected by radiation doses as large as 150 krad. The most logical explanation for the greater sensitivity of nascent DNA to radiation is the decreased concentration of histone chromosomal proteins in nascent chromatin.

  20. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated.

  1. Consequences of ionizing radiation-induced damage in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Lan, Mary L; Kan, Vickie H; Patel, Neal H; Giedzinski, Erich; Tseng, Bertrand P; Limoli, Charles L

    2010-12-15

    Cranial irradiation remains a frontline treatment for brain cancer, but also leads to normal tissue damage. Although low-dose irradiation (≤10 Gy) causes minimal histopathologic change, it can elicit variable degrees of cognitive dysfunction that are associated with the depletion of neural stem cells. To decipher the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced stem cell dysfunction, human neural stem cells (hNSCs) subjected to clinically relevant irradiation (0-5 Gy) were analyzed for survival parameters, cell-cycle alterations, DNA damage and repair, and oxidative stress. hNSCs showed a marked sensitivity to low-dose irradiation that was in part due to elevated apoptosis and the inhibition of cell-cycle progression that manifested as a G2/M checkpoint delay. Efficient removal of DNA double-strand breaks was indicated by the disappearance of γ-H2AX nuclear foci. A dose-responsive and persistent increase in oxidative and nitrosative stress was found in irradiated hNSCs, possibly the result of a higher metabolic activity in the fraction of surviving cells. These data highlight the marked sensitivity of hNSCs to low-dose irradiation and suggest that long-lasting perturbations in the CNS microenvironment due to radiation-induced oxidative stress can compromise the functionality of neural stem cells.

  2. Post-irradiation dietary vitamin E does not affect the development of radiation-induced lung damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Erwin M; van Gameren, Mieke M; Kampinga, Harm H; Szabó, Ben G; Coppes, Rob P

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of post-irradiation vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, could prevent the development of radiation induced lung damage. Wistar rats were given vitamin E enriched or vitamin E deprived food starting from 4 weeks after 18Gy single dose irradiation of the right thorax. Neither breathing frequencies nor CT density measurements revealed differences between the groups. It is concluded that post-irradiation vitamin E does not influence radiation-induced fibrosis to the lung.

  3. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  4. Non-Problematic Risks from Low-Dose Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage clusters have been proposed and are usually considered to pose the threat of serious biological damage. This has been attributed to DNA repair debilitation or cessation arising from the complexity of cluster damage. It will be shown here, contrary to both previous suggestions and perceived wisdom, that radiation induced damage clusters contribute to non-problematic risks in the low-dose, low-LET regime. The very complexity of cluster damage which inhibits and/or compromises DNA repair will ultimately be responsible for the elimination and/or diminution of precancer-ous and cancerous cells. PMID:18648573

  5. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  6. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  7. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  8. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

  10. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  11. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    significant defect in the repair of certain DNA damages, but of which damages needs to be determined. We have selected Chinese Hamster Ovary ( CHO ) as...chromosome (BAC) genomic fragment, which we isolated from a CHO BAC library, revealed that APE1 exists as a single copy gene in AA8 (see Appendix, Figure... cells , we first determined the APE1 gene copy number in the CHO AA8 cell line. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an APE1 bacterial artificial

  12. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  13. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  14. Sunscreens promote repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced dermal damage.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Akin, F J; Kligman, A M

    1983-08-01

    Chronic UV irradiation profoundly damages the dermis of human and animal skin. These alterations were thought to be irreversible. Recently, we showed that substantial repair occurred in hairless mice after stopping UV exposure. A band of new connective tissue was laid down subepidermally. The present study focussed on whether repair would occur if animals were protected by sunscreens after dermal damage was induced and irradiation was continued. Albino hairless mice were exposed to Westinghouse FS20 sunlamps thrice weekly for 30 weeks. The daily dose of UV (UVB + UVA) was 0.17 J/cm2. Sunscreens of sun protection factors (SPF) 6 and 15 were applied after 10 and 20 weeks of irradiation. Biopsies were taken at 10, 20, 30, and 45 weeks of the experiment. With both sunscreens, especially SPF-15, previously damaged dermis was repaired during continued irradiation. Repair occurred in situ and, in severely damaged skin, in the novel form of subepidermal reconstruction zones of new connective tissue with parallel collagen bundles and a network of fine elastic fibers.

  15. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical. (ACR)

  16. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  17. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  18. A new CT-based method to quantify radiation-induced lung damage in patients.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Wiegman, Erwin M; Langendijk, Johannes A; Widder, Joachim; Coppes, Robert P; van Luijk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A new method to assess radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) using CT-scans was developed. It is more sensitive in detecting damage and corresponds better to physician-rated radiation pneumonitis than routinely-used methods. Use of this method may improve lung toxicity assessment and thereby facilitate development of more accurate predictive models for RILT.

  19. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  20. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  1. Botanical Extracts as Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    seed extract supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. Three different commercial grape seed extracts were... supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. A novel assay was used to compare DNA damage in cellular and...concentrations of commercial grape seed extract supplements and Labrador tea. In addition, this work has identified and validated a set of procedures to use

  2. Extract of Xylopia aethiopica (Annonaceae) protects against gamma-radiation induced testicular damage in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Adedara, Isaac Adegboyega; Popoola, Bosede; Farombi, Ebenezer Olatunde

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important environmental risk factor and, a major therapeutic agent for cancer treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of extract of Xylopia aethiopica (XA) on gamma-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats. Vitamin C (VC) served as the reference antioxidant during the study. The study consists of 4 groups of 11 rats each. Group I received corn oil (vehicle), groups II and IV were pretreated with XA (250 mg/kg) and VC (250mg/kg) for 6 weeks before and 8 weeks after exposure to gamma-radiation; group III was exposed to a single dose of gamma-radiation (5 Gy). Biochemical analysis revealed that gamma-irradiation caused a significant increase (p < .05) in serum and testicular lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels by 217% and 221%, respectively. Irradiated rats had markedly decreased testicular catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Irradiation resulted in 59% and 40% decreases in spermatozoa motility and live/dead sperm count, respectively, and a 161% increase in total sperm abnormalities. Histologically, testes of the irradiated rats showed extensive degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules and defoliation of spermatocytes. Supplementation of XA and VC reversed the adverse effects of gamma-radiation on biochemical and histological indices of the rats. These findings demonstrated that Xylopia aethiopica has a protective effect by inhibiting oxidative damage in testes of irradiated rats.

  3. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  4. Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Wang, Yunlian; Wu, Ge; Mao, Rui; Yang, Ying; Bao, Yongxing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation‑induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague‑Dawley rats (6‑weeks‑old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF‑β1/Smads and NF‑κB65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery.

  5. Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E. )

    1989-08-01

    This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage.

  6. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  7. Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in the Zinc Finger of the Transcription Factor IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Miao, YuJi; Hu, XiaoDan; Min, Rui; Liu, PeiDang; Zhang, HaiQian

    2016-01-01

    A zinc finger motif is an element of proteins that can specifically recognize and bind to DNA. Because they contain multiple cysteine residues, zinc finger motifs possess redox properties. Ionizing radiation generates a variety of free radicals in organisms. Zinc finger motifs, therefore, may be a target of ionizing radiation. The effect of gamma radiation on the zinc finger motifs in transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a zinc finger protein, was investigated. TFIIIA was exposed to different gamma doses from 60Co sources. The dose rates were 0.20 Gy/min and 800 Gy/h, respectively. The binding capacity of zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA was determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that 1000 Gy of gamma radiation impaired the function of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. The sites of radiation-induced damage in the zinc finger were the thiol groups of cysteine residues and zinc (II) ions. The thiol groups were oxidized to form disulfide bonds and the zinc (II) ions were indicated to be reduced to zinc atoms. These results indicate that the zinc finger motif is a target domain for gamma radiation, which may decrease 5S rRNA expression via impairment of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. PMID:27803644

  8. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  9. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  10. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  11. Mitigation of whole-body gamma radiation-induced damages by Clerodendron infortunatum in mammalian organisms.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Tiju; Menon, Aditya; Majeed, Teeju; Nair, Sivaprabha V; John, Nithu Sara; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2016-11-17

    Several phytoceuticals and extracts of medicinal plants are reported to mitigate deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. The potential of hydro-alcoholic extract of Clerodendron infortunatum (CIE) for providing protection to mice exposed to gamma radiation was investigated. Oral administration of CIE bestowed a survival advantage to mice exposed to lethal doses of gamma radiation. Radiation-induced depletion of the total blood count and bone marrow cellularity were prevented by treatment with CIE. Damage to the cellular DNA (as was evident from the comet assay and the micronucleus index) was also found to be decreased upon CIE administration. Radiation-induced damages to intestinal crypt cells was also reduced by CIE. Studies on gene expression in intestinal cells revealed that there was a marked increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in mice exposed to whole-body 4 Gy gamma radiation, and that administration of CIE resulted in significant lowering of this ratio, suggestive of reduction of radiation-induced apoptosis. Also, in the intestinal tissue of irradiated animals, following CIE treatment, levels of expression of the DNA repair gene Atm were found to be elevated, and there was reduction in the expression of the inflammatory Cox-2 gene. Thus, our results suggest a beneficial use of Clerodendron infortunatum for mitigating radiation toxicity.

  12. Reconstitution studies on the involvement of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in damage to membrane enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, O; Nagatsuka, S; Nakazawa, T

    1983-04-01

    The effect of radiation on the drug-metabolizing enzyme system of microsomes, reconstituted with liposomes of microsomal phospholipids, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and cytochrome P-450, was examined to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation of membranes in radiation-induced damage to membrane-bound enzymes. The reconstituted system of non-irradiated enzymes with irradiated liposomes showed a low activity of hexobarbital hydroxylation, whereas irradiated enzymes combined with non-irradiated liposomes exhibited an activity equal to that of unirradiated controls. Irradiation of liposomes caused a decrease in cytochrome P-450 content by destruction of the haem of cytochrome P-450 and also inhibited the binding capacity of cytochrome P-450 for hexobarbital. The relationship between radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and membrane-bound enzymes is discussed.

  13. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD(R) in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanchita P; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Perkins, Michael W; Hieber, Kevin; Pessu, Roli L; Gambles, Kristen; Maniar, Manoj; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Seed, Thomas M; Kumar, K Sree

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD(®), also known as ON01210.Na (4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone, sodium salt), after total body radiation. In our previous study, we reported that Ex-RAD, a small-molecule radioprotectant, enhances survival of mice exposed to gamma radiation, and prevents radiation-induced apoptosis as measured by the inhibition of radiation-induced protein 53 (p53) expression in cultured cells. We have expanded this study to determine best effective dose, dose-reduction factor (DRF), hematological and gastrointestinal protection, and in vivo inhibition of p53 signaling. A total of 500 mg/kg of Ex-RAD administered at 24 h and 15 min before radiation resulted in a DRF of 1.16. Ex-RAD ameliorated radiation-induced hematopoietic damage as monitored by the accelerated recovery of peripheral blood cells, and protection of granulocyte macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFU) in bone marrow. Western blot analysis on spleen indicated that Ex-RAD treatment inhibited p53 phosphorylation. Ex-RAD treatment reduces terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay (TUNEL)-positive cells in jejunum compared with vehicle-treated mice after radiation injury. Finally, Ex-RAD preserved intestinal crypt cells compared with the vehicle control at 13 and 14 Gy. The results demonstrated that Ex-RAD ameliorates radiation-induced peripheral blood cell depletion, promotes bone marrow recovery, reduces p53 signaling in spleen and protects intestine from radiation injury.

  14. Role of nitric oxide in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Vasily A

    2015-12-01

    Cells that are not irradiated but are affected by "stress signal factors" released from irradiated cells are called bystander cells. These cells, as well as directly irradiated ones, express DNA damage-related proteins and display excess DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutations, and malignant transformation. This phenomenon has been studied widely in the past 20 years, since its first description by Nagasawa and Little in 1992, and is known as the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Several factors have been identified as playing a role in the bystander response. This review will focus on one of them, nitric oxide (NO), and its role in the stimulation and propagation of RIBE. The hydrophobic properties of NO, which permit its diffusion through the cytoplasm and plasma membranes, allow this signaling molecule to easily spread from irradiated cells to bystander cells without the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication. NO produced in irradiated tissues mediates cellular regulation through posttranslational modification of a number of regulatory proteins. The best studied of these modifications are S-nitrosylation (reversible oxidation of cysteine) and tyrosine nitration. These modifications can up- or down-regulate the functions of many proteins modulating different NO-dependent effects. These NO-dependent effects include the stimulation of genomic instability (GI) and the accumulation of DNA errors in bystander cells without direct DNA damage.

  15. Grapevine fruit extract protects against radiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Singha, Indrani; Das, Subir Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) causes oxidative stress through overwhelming generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the living cells leading the oxidative damage further to biomolecules. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) posses several bioactive phytochemicals and is the richest source of antioxidants. In this study, we investigated V. vinifera for its phytochemical content, enzymes profile and, ROS- and oxidant-scavenging activities. We have also studied the fruit extract of four different grapevine viz., Thompson seedless, Flame seedless, Kishmish chorni and Red globe for their radioprotective actions in human lymphocytes. The activities of ascorbic acid oxidase and catalase significantly (P < 0.01) differed among extracts within the same cultivar, while that of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase did not differ significantly. The superoxide radical-scavenging activity was higher in the seed as compared to the skin or pulp of the same cultivar. Pretreatment with grape extracts attenuated the oxidative stress induced by 4 Gy γ-radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro. Further, γ-radiation-induced increase in caspase 3/7 activity was significantly attenuated by grape extracts. These results suggest that grape extract serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants against the IR-induced oxidative stress and also inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, the protective action of grape depends on the source of extract (seed, skin or pulp) and type of the cultivars.

  16. Inflammation and chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced late normal tissue injury: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiling; Robbins, Mike E C

    2009-01-01

    The threat of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury limits the dose of radiation that can be delivered safely to cancer patients presenting with solid tumors. Tissue dysfunction and failure, associated with atrophy, fibrosis and/or necrosis, as well as vascular injury, have been reported in late responding normal tissues, including the central nervous system, gut, kidney, liver, lung, and skin. The precise mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury have not been fully elucidated. It has been proposed recently that the radiation-induced late effects are caused, in part, by chronic oxidative stress and inflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to lipid peroxidation, oxidation of DNA and proteins, as well as activation of pro-inflammatory factors has been observed in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will present direct and indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. To improve the long-term survival and quality of life for radiotherapy patients, new approaches have been examined in preclinical models for their efficacy in preventing or mitigating the radiation-induced chronic normal tissue injury. We and others have tested drugs that can either attenuate inflammation or reduce chronic oxidative stress in animal models of late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. The effectiveness of renin-angiotensin system blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, and antioxidants/antioxidant enzymes in preventing or mitigating the severity of radiation-induced late effects indicates that radiation-induced chronic injury can be prevented and/or treated. This provides a rationale for the design and development of anti-inflammatory-based interventional approaches for the treatment of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury.

  17. Baicalein protects mice against radiation-induced DNA damages and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nitin Motilal

    2013-07-01

    Baicalein is the major flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicaleins. This flavonoid is used extensively in Chinese herbal medicine. In the present study baicalein is evaluated for its radioprotective properties. Human blood cells when exposed to the γ-radiation ex vivo in presence of baicalein underwent the reduced DNA damage compared to the control. Baicalein administration prior to the whole-body γ-radiation (4 Gy) exposure of mice resulted in protecting the damage to the DNA as measured in their blood cells by alkaline comet assay. Mice when exposed to the radiation (whole body; 1.7 Gy) resulted in damage to the bone marrow as measured by micronucleated reticulocyte (MNRET) formation. Baicalein pre-treatment reduces the radiation induced damage to the bone marrow cells, as there was decrease in the percentage MNRET formation. These findings indicate radio-protecting ability of baicalein.

  18. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1984-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weight. A cationic mechanism is evidenced by the strongly retarding effect of tri-n-propylamine on the polymerization rate. At 25/sup 0/C, limonene oxide gives the highest polymerization rates, an average conversion of 36% per Mrad being obtained in comparison with values of 5.7 and 7.3% per Mrad for the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides, respectively. Similarly, the average anti DP/sub n/ decreases from 11.8 for the limonene oxide polymer to 5.6 and 4.0 for the ..cap alpha..-pinene oxide and ..beta..-pinene oxide polymers, respectively. A high frequency of chain transfer to monomer is indicated in each case by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be on the order of a hundred times larger than the anti DP/sub n/ values. Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that in the polymerization of these monomers, the opening of the epoxide ring is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-dimethyl group in the main chain. The detection of isopropenyl end groups in the pinene oxide polymers is also consistent with this mode of propagation being followed by chain (proton) transfer to monomer.

  19. Hesperidin as Radioprotector against Radiation-induced Lung Damage in Rat: A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Gholam Hassan; Rezaeyan, Abolhasan; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Fardid, Reza; Najafi, Masoud; Salajegheh, Ashkan

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by ionizing radiation, and one of the organs commonly affected by ROS is the lung. Radiation-induced lung injury including pneumonia and lung fibrosis is a dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy (RT) of patients with thorax irradiation. Administration of antioxidants has been proved to protect against ROS. The present study was aimed to assess the protective effect of hesperidin (HES) against radiation-induced lung injury of male rats. Fifty rats were divided into three groups. G1: Received no HES and radiation (sham). G2: Underwent γ-irradiation to the thorax. G3: Received HES and underwent γ-irradiation. The rats were exposed to a single dose of 18 Gy using cobalt-60 unit and were administered HES (100 mg/kg) for 7 days before irradiation. Histopathological analysis was performed 24 h and 8 weeks after RT. Histopathological results in 24 h showed radiation-induced inflammation and presence of more inflammatory cells as compared to G1 (P < 0.05). Administration of HES significantly decreased such an effect when compared to G2 (P < 0.05). Histopathological evaluation in 8 weeks showed a significant increase in mast cells, inflammation, inflammatory cells, alveolar thickness, vascular thickness, pulmonary edema, and fibrosis in G2 when compared to G1 (P < 0.05). HES significantly decreased inflammatory response, fibrosis, and mast cells when compared to G2 (P < 0.05). Administration of HES resulted in decreased radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis in the lung tissue. Thus, the present study showed HES to be an efficient radioprotector against radiation-induced damage in the lung of tissue rats.

  20. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  1. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weights. A high frequency of chain (proton) transfer to monomer is indicated by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be several hundred times larger than the range of DP/sub n/ values (12-4). Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that the opening of the epoxide ring for these monomers is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-di-methyl group in the main chain.

  2. Semiquinone glucoside derivative (SQGD) isolated from Bacillus sp. INM-1 protects against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Saurabh; Malhotra, Poonam; Gupta, Ashutosh K; Singh, Praveen K; Javed, Saleem; Kumar, Raj

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, radioprotective potential of Semiquinone glucoside derivative (SQGD) isolated from radioresistant bacterium Bacillus sp. INM-1 was evaluated. γ-Radiation induced protein carbonylation, plasmid DNA damage, enzyme functional impairment, lipid peroxidation, HO radicals generation and their protection by SQGD was assessed. As a result of SQGD treatment, significant inhibition (p<0.05) in protein carbonylation was observed with BSA. SQGD treatment was found to restore supercoiled (~70±3.21%) form of irradiated plasmid DNA against γ-irradiation. SQGD protects enzymes (EcoR1 and BamH1) against radiation-induced dysfunctioning. SQGD significantly inhibited (p<0.05) lipid peroxidation in liposomes, brain and liver homogenate. Higher HO(•) radicals-averting activity of SQGD was observed in the serum and liver homogenate of C57BL/6 mice against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, SQGD demonstrates excellent radical-scavenging activity towards bio-macromolecules in irradiated environment and can be developed as an ideal radioprotector against radiation-induced oxidative stress in future.

  3. Targeting the Renin–Angiotensin System Combined With an Antioxidant Is Highly Effective in Mitigating Radiation-Induced Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of suppression of the renin angiotensin system using captopril combined with an antioxidant (Eukarion [EUK]-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Methods and Materials: The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated with a single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/d in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week after irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 weeks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were killed at 32 weeks PI, when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels, and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results: The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 at 32 weeks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion: Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 weeks PI after treatment given 1-14 weeks PI. Overall the combination of captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone.

  4. Effects of inhibitors of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage repair on chemotherapy in murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1982-09-01

    Enhancement of various antitumor drugs effects by inhibitors of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair was studied in three murine tumors (EMT-6, RIF-1 and SQ-1). In EMT-6 tumors, PLD repair inhibitors, 3'-deoxyguanosine (3'dG) and 7904 (a derivative of 3'-deoxyadenosine) showed a marked enhancement of tumor growth inhibition by anticancerous drugs (FT-207 (a derivative of 5-FU), bleomycin, Ara-C, ACNU). However, the effects of mitomycin-C and vincristine were not potentiated by the inhibitors. In SQ-1 carcinomas, another repair inhibitor, ara-A (1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosyladenine) (32 mg/kg) potentiated the effect of ACNU. In RIF-1 sarcomas, in which a low PLD repair function has been reported after ionizing radiation exposure, the potentiation was not so marked as in EMT-6 or SQ-1 tumors. Thus, as a possibility, the potentiation by inhibitors of radiation-induced PLD repair might be a result of the inhibition of chemical-induced PLD repair. The study of this field may contribute to the improvement of cancer treatment not only by radiotherapy but also by chemotherapy.

  5. Radiation-induced trapped charge in metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor structure

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Fujimaki, T.; Yoshikawa, M.

    1999-12-01

    The radiation-induced trapped charge in insulation layer of metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) structure has been investigated. The mechanism of charge trapping under irradiation is studied by the radiation-induced mid-gap voltage shift using a simple charge trap model. The depth profile of fixed charge in insulator before irradiation was evaluated by the mid-gap voltage of MNOS structures with varying insulator thicknesses using slanted etching method. The irradiation tests were carried out using Co-60 gamma ray source up to 1 Mrad(Si) with the gate voltage of +6 or {minus}6 V. The calculated results using the model can be fitted well to the experimental results, and the authors confirmed the model is very useful to discuss the radiation-induced trapped charge. By simulating the mid-gap voltage shift of MNOS structures, they considered the possibility for radiation hardened device.

  6. Radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA: Chemical nature and mechanisms of lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard

    2016-11-01

    This mini-review focuses on the recent identification of several novel radiation-induced single and tandem modifications in cellular DNA. For this purpose accurate high-performance electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied allowing their quantitative measurement and unambiguous characterization. Exposure of human cells to gamma rays led to the formation of several modified bases arising from the rearrangement of the pyrimidine ring of thymine, cytosine and 5-methylcytosine subsequent to initial addition of an hydroxyl radical (•OH) to the 5,6-ethylenic bond. In addition, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an novel epigenetic mark, and 5-formylcytosine, were found to be generated consecutively to •OH-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine. Relevant mechanistic information on one-oxidation reactions of cellular DNA was also gained from the detection of 5-hydroxycytosine and guanine-thymine intra-strand adducts whose formation is rationalized by the generation of related base radical cation. Attempts to search for the radiation-induced formation of purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyribonucleosides were unsuccessful with the exception of trace amounts of (5‧S)-5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyadenosine.

  7. Persistence of Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage in astronaut's peripheral blood lymphocytes is a useful in vivo marker of space radiation induced damage. Moreover, if radiation induced chromosome translocations persist in peripheral blood lymphocytes for many years, as has been assumed, they could potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low dose rate exposures. However, as more data becomes available, evidence suggests that the yield of translocations may decline with time after exposure, at least in the case of space radiation exposures. We present our latest follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by FISH painting and collected a various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Since the level of stable aberrations depends on the interplay between natural loss of circulating T-lymphocytes and replenishment from the stem or progenitor cells, the differences in the rates of decay could be explained by inter-individual variation in lymphocyte turn over. Biodosimetry estimates derived from cytogenetic analysis of samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  8. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  9. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy.

  10. Polyphenolic glycoconjugates from medical plants of Rosaceae/Asteraceae family protect human lymphocytes against γ-radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Szejk, Magdalena; Poplawski, Tomasz; Sarnik, Joanna; Pawlaczyk-Graja, Izabela; Czechowski, Franciszek; Olejnik, Alicja Klaudia; Gancarz, Roman; Zbikowska, Halina Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of the water-soluble polyphenolic glycoconjugates, isolated from flowers of Sanguisorba officinalis L.(SO) and Erigeron canadensis L.(EC), and from leaves of Fragaria vesca L. (FV) and Rubus plicatus Whe. Et N. E. (RP), against γ-radiation-induced toxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated. Cell treatment with glycoconjugates (1, 5 and 25μg/mL) prior exposure to 10/15Gy radiation resulted in concentration-dependent reduction of DNA damage including oxidative DNA lesions (comet assay), substantial inhibition of lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and restoration of superoxide dismutase and S-glutathione transferase activities. Glycoconjugates isolated from SO and EC ensured better protection versus these from RP and FV, with the SO product potential comparable to that of the reference quercetin. Strong antioxidant/radioprotective activity of the SO and EC glycoconjugates could be attributed to high abundance of syringol-type and ferulic acid units in their matrices, respectively. Moreover, polyphenolic glycoconjugates (25μg/mL), including RP and FV products, significantly decreased DNA damage when applied post-radiation suggesting their modulating effects on DNA repair pathways. Preliminary data on the glycoconjugate phenolic structural units, based on GLC/MS of the products of pyrolysis and in situ methylation, in relation to application of plant products as potential radioprotectors is promising and deserves further investigation.

  11. Molecular Analysis of Base Damage Clustering Associated with a Site-Specific Radiation-Induced DNA Double-Strand Break

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Neumann, Ronald D.; Winters, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Base damage flanking a radiation-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) may contribute to DSB complexity and affect break repair. However, to date, an isolated radiation-induced DSB has not been assessed for such structures at the molecular level. In this study, an authentic site-specific radiation-induced DSB was produced in plasmid DNA by triplex forming oligonucleotide-targeted 125I decay. A restriction fragment terminated by the DSB was isolated and probed for base damage with the E. coli DNA repair enzymes, endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase. Our results demonstrate base damage clustering within 8 bases of the 125I-targeted base in the DNA duplex. An increased yield of base damage (purine>pyrimidine) was observed for DSBs formed by irradiation in the absence of DMSO. An internal control fragment 1354 bp upstream from the targeted base was insensitive to enzymatic probing, indicating the damage detected proximal to the DSB was produced by the 125I decay that formed the DSB. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified three types of damaged bases in the ~32 bp region proximal to the DSB. These base lesions were 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5-hydroxycytosine. Finally, evidence is presented for base damage >24 bp upstream from the 125I-decay site that may form via a charge migration mechanism. PMID:17067210

  12. Scavenging and antioxidant properties of different grape cultivars against ionizing radiation-induced liver damage ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Singha, Indrani; Das, Subir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has become an integral part of the modern medicine--both for diagnosis as well as therapy. However, normal tissues or even distant cells also suffer IR-induced free radical insult. It may be more damaging in longer term than direct radiation exposure. Antioxidants provide protection against IR-induced damage. Grapes are the richest source of antioxidants. Here, we assessed the scavenging properties of four grape (Vitis vinifera) cultivars, namely Flame seedless (Black), Kishmish chorni (Black with reddish brown), Red globe (Red) and Thompson seedless mutant (Green), and also evaluated their protective action against γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue ex vivo. The scavenging abilities of grape seeds [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC₅₀ = 0.008 ± 0.001 mg/mL), hydrogen peroxide (IC₅₀ = 0.49 to 0.8 mg/mL), hydroxyl radicals (IC₅₀ = 0.08 ± 0.008 mg/mL), and nitric oxide (IC₅₀ = 0.8 ± 0.08 mg/mL)] were higher than that of skin or pulp. Gamma (γ) radiation exposure to sliced liver tissues ex vivo from goat, @ 6 Gy significantly (P < 0.001) decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) content by 21.2% and also activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione s-transferase (GST) by 49.5, 66.0, 70.3, 73.6%, respectively. However, it increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) by 2.04-fold and nitric oxide level by 48.6% compared to untreated group. Further increase in doses (10 or 16 Gy) of γ-radiation correspondingly decreased GSH content and enzyme activities, and increased TBARS and nitric oxide levels. Grape extract treatment prior to ionizing radiation exposure ameliorated theses effects at varying extent. The seed extracts exhibited strong antioxidant potential compared to skin or pulp extracts of different grape cultivars against oxidative damage by ionizing radiation (6 Gy, 10 Gy and 16 Gy) in sliced liver tissues ex vivo. Grape extracts at

  13. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Adler, H I; Fisher, W D; Hardigree, A A; Stapleton, G E

    1966-02-01

    Adler, Howard I. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.), William D. Fisher, Alice A. Hardigree, and George E. Stapleton. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 91:737-742. 1966.-Microscopic observations of irradiated populations of filamentous Escherichia coli cells indicated that filaments can be induced to divide by a substance donated by neighboring cells. We have made this observation the basis for a quantitative technique in which filaments are incubated in the presence of nongrowing donor cells. The presence of "donor" organisms promotes division and subsequent colony formation in filaments. "Donor" bacteria do not affect nonfilamentous cells. An extract of "donor" cells retains the division-promoting activity. The extract has been partially fractionated, and consists of a heat-stable and a heat-labile component. The heat-stable component is inactive in promoting cell division, but enhances the activity of the heat-labile component. The division-promoting system is discussed as a radiation repair mechanism and as a normal component of the cell division system in E. coli.

  14. Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis in the androgen pretreated rat.

    PubMed

    Schlappack, O K; Delic, J I; Harwood, J R; Stanley, J A

    1988-07-01

    Protection of spermatogenesis from radiation-induced damage has been investigated in the adult Wistar rat. Silastic tubing containing either cholesterol or testosterone was implanted subcutaneously 7 weeks before 4 equal daily fractions of either 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 Gy of 230 kVp X-rays locally to the testes. Implants were removed on the day following the last fraction and 8 weeks after irradiation 88.6%, 83.8%, 63.6% and 28.9% tubule cross-sections respectively were found regenerating in rats pretreated with testosterone. In contrast, 68.45%, 58.6%, 38.2% and 17.3% tubule cross-sections regenerating were obtained in rats pretreated with cholesterol. Changes in testis weight however were found to show the reverse trend (i.e. a greater weight loss was observed following androgen pretreatment). These results show that protection of spermatogenesis from fractionated irradiation may be achieved in rat testis by androgen pretreatment.

  15. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  16. An ENDOR study of radiation-induced molecular damage to progesterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Thormod; Sagstuen, Einar

    Radiation-induced damage to the steroid progesterone has been studied. In the single-crystal form progesterone was exposed to X rays at room temperature and the stable radical thus formed was studied at that temperature. ENDOR observations in four planes of rotation showed that the induced radical is formed by hydrogen abstraction from C 6 which leaves unpaired spin density to the O 3, C 4, C 6 region. The hyperfine splitting tensors obtained are ascribed to five specific protons in the molecule (H4 and H6B, H7A, H7B, and H2A). Information on the radical structure is obtained by a correlation of the tensor data with directions in the undamaged molecule. The present data suggest that H6A is removed, whereupon some minor molecular changes take place involving a displacement of C 6 of approximately 0.1 Å and H6B of 0.4 Å The remaining part of the molecule seems to be unchanged.

  17. Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage as a Predictor of Cancer Risk for Protons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jerry R.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully completed the series of experiments planned for year 1 and the first part of year 2 measuring the induction of chromosome aberrations induced in multiple cell types by three model space radiations: Fe-ions, protons and photons. Most of these data have now been compiled and a significant part subjected to detailed data analyses, although continuing data analysis is an important part of our current and future efforts. These analyses are directed toward defining the patterns of chromosomal damage induction by the three radiations and the extent to which such patterns are dependent on the type of cell irradiated. Our studies show significant differences, both quantitatively and qualitatively, between response of different cell types to these radiations however there is an overall pattern that characterizes each type of radiation in most cell lines. Thus our data identifies general dose-response patterns for each radiation for induction of multiple types of chromosomal aberrations but also identifies significant differences in response between some cell types. Specifically, we observe significant resistance for induction of aberrations in rat mammary epithelial cells when they are irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Further, we have observed some remarkable differences in susceptibility to certain radiation-induced aberrations in cells whose genome has been modulated for two cancer- relevant genes, TP53 and CDKNIA. This data, if confirmed, may represent the first evidence of gene-specific differences in cellular metabolism of damage induced by densely-ionizing radiation that confers substantial sensitivity to protons compared to photons.

  18. Pudendal Nerve and Internal Pudendal Artery Damage May Contribute to Radiation-Induced Erectile Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael W.; Marolf, Angela J.; Ehrhart, E.J.; Rao, Sangeeta; Kraft, Susan L.; Engel, Stephanie; Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Golden, Anne E.; Wasserman, Todd H.; LaRue, Susan M.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: Erectile dysfunction is common after radiation therapy for prostate cancer; yet, the etiopathology of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (RI-ED) remains poorly understood. A novel animal model was developed to study RI-ED, wherein stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used to irradiate the prostate, neurovascular bundles (NVB), and penile bulb (PB) of dogs. The purpose was to describe vascular and neurogenic injuries after the irradiation of only the NVB or the PB, and after irradiation of all 3 sites (prostate, NVB, and PB) with varying doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: Dogs were treated with 50, 40, or 30 Gy to the prostate, NVB, and PB, or 50 Gy to either the NVB or the PB, by 5-fraction SBRT. Electrophysiologic studies of the pudendal nerve and bulbospongiosus muscles and ultrasound studies of pelvic perfusion were performed before and after SBRT. The results of these bioassays were correlated with histopathologic changes. Results: SBRT caused slowing of the systolic rise time, which corresponded to decreased arterial patency. Alterations in the response of the internal pudendal artery to vasoactive drugs were observed, wherein SBRT caused a paradoxical response to papaverine, slowing the systolic rise time after 40 and 50 Gy; these changes appeared to have some dose dependency. The neurofilament content of penile nerves was also decreased at high doses and was more profound when the PB was irradiated than when the NVB was irradiated. These findings are coincident with slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities in the pudendal nerve after SBRT. Conclusions: This is the first report in which prostatic irradiation was shown to cause morphologic arterial damage that was coincident with altered internal pudendal arterial tone, and in which decreased motor function in the pudendal nerve was attributed to axonal degeneration and loss. Further investigation of the role played by damage to these structures in RI-ED is

  19. Melatonin as a possible antidote to UV radiation induced cutaneous damages and immune-suppression: An overview.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Soumik; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-12-01

    The sun rays brings along the ultraviolet radiations (UVRs) which prove deleterious for living organisms. The UVR is a known mutagen and is the prime cause of skin carcinomas. UVR causes acute oxidative stress and this in turn deteriorates other physiological functions. Inflammatory conditions and elevation of pro-inflammatory molecules are also associated with UVR mediated cellular damages. The inflammatory conditions can secondarily trigger the generation of free radicals and this act cumulatively in further deterioration of tissue homeostasis. Photoimmunologists have also related UVR to the suppression of not only cutaneous but also systemic immunity by different mechanisms. Some researchers have proposed the use of various plant products as antioxidants against UVR induced oxidative imbalances but Melatonin is gaining rapid interest as a product that can be utilized to delineate the pathological effects of UVR since it is an established antioxidant. Besides the antioxidative nature, the capacity of melatonin to attenuate apoptosis and more importantly the efficacy of its metabolites to further aid in the detoxification of free radicals have made it a key player to be utilized against UVR mediated aggravated conditions. However, there is need for further extensive investigation to speculate melatonin as an antidote to UVR. Although too early to prescribe melatonin as a clinical remedy, the hormone can be integrated into dermal formulations or oral supplements to prevent the ever increasing incidences of skin cancers due to the prevalence of the UVR on the surface of the earth. The present review focuses and substantiates the work by different photo-biologists demonstrating the protective effects of melatonin and its metabolites against solar UVR - Melatonin as a possible antidote to UV radiation induced cutaneous damages and immune-suppression: an overview. J Photochem Photobiol B.

  20. Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Zhaozong; Donahue, Jeremiah J.; Guan, Jun; Kennedy, Ann R. . E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treating the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.

  1. Blood glutathione as an index of radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J; Obrador, E; Pellicer, J A; Aseni, M; Viña, J; Estrela, J M

    1997-01-01

    The effect of x-rays on GSH and GSSG levels in blood was studied in mice and humans. An HPLC method that we recently developed was applied to accurately determine GSSG levels in blood. The glutathione redox status (GSH/GSSG) decreases after irradiation. This effect is mainly due to an increase in GSSG levels. Mice received single fraction radiotherapy, at total doses of 1.0 to 7.0 Gy. Changes in GSSG in mouse blood can be detected 10 min after irradiation and last for 6 h within a range of 2.0-7.0 Gy. The highest levels of GSSG (20.1 +/- 2.9 microM), a 4.7-fold increase as compared with controls) in mouse blood are found 2 h after radiation exposure (5 Gy). Breast and lung cancer patients received fractionated radiotherapy at total doses of 50.0 or 60.0 Gy, respectively. GSH/GSSG also decreases in humans in a dose-response fashion. Two reasons may explain the radiation-induced increase in blood GSSG: (a) the reaction of GSH with radiation-induced free radicals resulting in the formation of thyl radicals that react to produce GSSG; and (b) an increase of GSSG release from different organs (e.g., the liver) into the blood. Our results indicate that the glutathione redox ratio in blood can be used as an index of radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  2. Debris- and radiation-induced damage effects on EUV nanolithography source collector mirror optics performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, J. P.; Nieto, M.; Hendricks, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2007-05-01

    Exposure of collector mirrors facing the hot, dense pinch plasma in plasma-based EUV light sources to debris (fast ions, neutrals, off-band radiation, droplets) remains one of the highest critical issues of source component lifetime and commercial feasibility of nanolithography at 13.5-nm. Typical radiators used at 13.5-nm include Xe and Sn. Fast particles emerging from the pinch region of the lamp are known to induce serious damage to nearby collector mirrors. Candidate collector configurations include either multi-layer mirrors (MLM) or single-layer mirrors (SLM) used at grazing incidence. Studies at Argonne have focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms that hinder collector mirror performance at 13.5-nm under fast Sn or Xe exposure. This is possible by a new state-of-the-art in-situ EUV reflectometry system that measures real time relative EUV reflectivity (15-degree incidence and 13.5-nm) variation during fast particle exposure. Intense EUV light and off-band radiation is also known to contribute to mirror damage. For example offband radiation can couple to the mirror and induce heating affecting the mirror's surface properties. In addition, intense EUV light can partially photo-ionize background gas (e.g., Ar or He) used for mitigation in the source device. This can lead to local weakly ionized plasma creating a sheath and accelerating charged gas particles to the mirror surface and inducing sputtering. In this paper we study several aspects of debris and radiation-induced damage to candidate EUVL source collector optics materials. The first study concerns the use of IMD simulations to study the effect of surface roughness on EUV reflectivity. The second studies the effect of fast particles on MLM reflectivity at 13.5-nm. And lastly the third studies the effect of multiple energetic sources with thermal Sn on 13.5-nm reflectivity. These studies focus on conditions that simulate the EUVL source environment in a controlled way.

  3. Protection against radiation-induced testicular damage in Swiss albino mice by Mentha piperita (Linn.).

    PubMed

    Samarth, Ravindra M; Samarth, Meenakshi

    2009-04-01

    The protective effects of Mentha piperita leaf extract against radiation-induced damage in testis of Swiss albino mice have been studied. Animals (Male Swiss albino mice) were given M. piperita leaf extract orally (1 g/kg body weight/day) for three consecutive days before radiation exposure (8 Gy gamma-radiation). Mice were autopsied at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 30 days after irradiation to evaluate the radiomodulatory effect in terms of histological alterations, lipid peroxidation, and acid and alkaline phosphatases levels in testis. Radiation treatment showed reduction in the testis weight during all days of observation, however, in the M. piperita leaf extract-pretreated irradiated group there was a significant increase in testis weight. Radiation treatment induced moderate to severe testicular atrophy with degeneration of germ cells in seminiferous tubules. The tubules were shrunken and greatly depleted of germ cells. Sertoli cells with few germ cells were observed in the lumen. However, animals pre-treated with M. piperita leaf extract and exposed to radiation showed normal testicular morphology with regular arrangement of germ cells and slight degeneration of seminiferous epithelium. Significant decreases in the lipid peroxidation and acid phosphatase level and increase in level of alkaline phosphatase were observed in testis. The M. piperita leaf extract showed high amount of phenolic content, flavonoids content and flavonols. The results of the present study suggest that M. piperita has a significant radioprotective effect and the amount of phenolic compounds, the content of flavonoids and flavonols of M. piperita leaf extract may be held responsible for radioprotective effect due to their antioxidant and radical scavenging activity.

  4. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Kwon, Hee-Chung; Chung, Hee-Yong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  5. Accumulation of radiation-induced charge in MNOS structures with different oxide thicknesses

    SciTech Connect

    Gurtov, V.A.; Evdokimov, V.D.; Nazarov, A.I.; Khrustalev, V.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors attempt to answer questions regarding the dosimetry of x-ray radiation sources, especially in the region of high exposure doses, using silicon nitride. SiO/sub 2/ was obtained by thermal oxidation in dry oxygen or in a mixture of oxygen and argon. Silicon nitride was obtained by ammonolysis of silicon tetrachloride. Aluminum was used for the gate. The magnitude of the radiation-induced space charge was determined from the shift in the flat-band voltage on the high-frequency volt-faraday curves.

  6. Gossypetin ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice liver--a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amitava; Manna, Krishnendu; Das, Dipesh Kr; Kesh, Swaraj Bandhu; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Ujjal; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Sikder, Kunal; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Banerji, Asoke; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-10-01

    Radioprotective action of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver was explored in the present article. Our main aim was to evaluate the protective efficacy of GTIN against radiation-induced alteration of liver in murine system. To evaluate the effect of GTIN, it was orally administered to mice at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight for three consecutive days prior to γ-radiation at a dose of 5 Gy. Radioprotective efficacy of GTIN were evaluated at physiological, cellular, and molecular level using biochemical analysis, comet assay, flow cytometry, histopathology, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting techniques. Ionizing radiation was responsible for augmentation of hepatic oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies showed that irradiation enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) level, which leads to hepatic inflammation. To investigate further, we found that radiation induced the activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK)-mediated apoptotic pathway and deactivation of the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated redox signaling pathway, whereas GTIN pretreatment ameliorated these radiation-mediated effects. This is the novel report where GTIN rationally validated the molecular mechanism in terms of the modulation of cellular signaling system' instead of ' This is the novel report where GTIN is rationally validated in molecular terms to establish it as promising radioprotective agents. This might be fruitful especially for nuclear workers and defense personnel assuming the possibility of radiation exposure.

  7. Role of cellular communication in the pathways of radiation-induced biological damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Facoetti, Angelica; Mariotti, Luca; Nano, Rosanna; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    During the last decade, a large number of experimental studies on the so-called "non-targeted effects", in particular bystander effects, outlined that cellular communication plays a signifi- cant role in the pathways leading to radiation-induced biological damage. This might imply a paradigm shift in (low-dose) radiobiology, according to which one has to consider the response of groups of cells behaving like a population rather than single cells behaving as individuals. Furthermore, bystander effects, which are observed both for lethal endpoints (e.g. clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis) and for non-lethal ones (e.g. mutations and neoplastic transformation), tend to show non-linear dose responses characterized by a sharp increase followed by a plateau. This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk, which is generally calculated on the basis of the "Linear No Threshold" hypothesis. Although it is known that two types of cellular communication (i.e. via gap junctions and/or molecular messengers diffusing in the extra-cellular environment, such as cytokines) play a major role, it is of utmost importance to better understand the underlying mechanisms, and how such mechanisms can be modulated by ionizing radiation. Though the "final" goal is to elucidate the in vivo scenario, in the meanwhile also in vitro studies can provide useful insights. In the present paper we will discuss key issues on the mechanisms underlying non-targeted effects and, more generally, cell communication, with focus on candidate molecular signals. Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms. In this framework, we will present a model and Monte Carlo code, under development at the University of Pavia, simulating the release, diffusion and internalization of candidate signals (typically cytokines) travelling in the extra-cellular environment, both by unirradiated (i.e., control) cells and by irradiated cells. The focus will be on the

  8. Autophagy Promotes the Repair of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Cells via Enhanced STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Li, Xin; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Fang, Yixuan; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xu, Lan; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Jiang, Gaoyue; Xie, Jialing; Zhang, Han; Jiang, Jiayi; Li, Xiaotian; Yao, Lei; Zhang, Suping; Zhou, Daohong; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy protects hematopoietic cells from radiation damage in part by promoting DNA damage repair. However, the molecular mechanisms by which autophagy regulates DNA damage repair remain largely elusive. Here, we report that this radioprotective effect of autophagy depends on STAT3 signaling in murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs). Specifically, we found that STAT3 activation and nuclear translocation in BM-MNCs were increased by activation of autophagy with an mTOR inhibitor and decreased by knockout of the autophagy gene Atg7. The autophagic regulation of STAT3 activation is likely mediated by induction of KAP1 degradation, because we showed that KAP1 directly interacted with STAT3 in the cytoplasm and knockdown of KAP1 increased the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3. Subsequently, activated STAT3 transcriptionally upregulated the expression of BRCA1, which increased the ability of BM-MNCs to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. This novel finding that activation of autophagy can promote DNA damage repair in BM-MNCs via the ATG-KAP1-STAT3-BRCA1 pathway suggests that autophagy plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity of BM-MNCs and its activation may confer protection of BM-MNCs against radiation-induced genotoxic stress.

  9. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  10. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury.

  11. Genetic compensation of high dose radiation-induced damage in an anhydrobiotic insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kikawada, Takahiro; Okuda, Takashi

    Anhydrobiotic larvae of African chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki are known to show an extremely high tolerance against a range of stresses. The tolerance against various extreme environments exhibited by that insect might be due to being almost completely desiccated replacing water with trehalose, a state where little or no chemical reactions occur. From 2005 dried larvae of this insect are being used in a number of space experiments, both inside and outside of ISS as a model organism for estimation the limits of higher organisms' resistance to space environment stresses and long-term storage of the alive anhydrobiotic organisms during continues spaceflight. We have shown previously that both hydrated and dried larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki have very higher tolerance against both highand low-linear energy transfer (LET), surviving after 7000Gy irradiation. It was suggested that the larvae would have effective DNA-reparation system in addition to artificial protection provided by glass-stage without water. In the present study we conducted analysis of stress-related gene expression in the larvae after 70-2000 Gy irradiations. Both DNA damage level and activity of DNA-reparation, anti-apoptotic and protein-damage related genes were analyzed. Direct visualization of DNA damage in the larvae fat body cells using Comet Assay showed that fragmented by radiation DNA is re-arranged within 76-98 hours after exposure. We found that massive overexpression of hsp and anti-oxidant genes occur in larvae entering anhydrobiosis , and provides refolding of proteins after rehydration. In the irradiated larvae overexpression of DNA-reparation enzymes anti-apoptotic genes was confirmed, suggesting that survival after high-dose irradiation is a result of combination of highly effective blocking of entering the apoptosis after severe DNA damage and DNA reparation.

  12. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  13. The use of ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of ionizing-radiation-induced damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C P; Jirasek, A

    2009-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) was used to determine damage done in both calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and a short stranded DNA oligomer (SS-DNA) due to ionizing radiation from a medical (60)Co radiation therapy unit used in the treatment of cancer. Spectra were acquired at incident UV wavelengths of 248, 257, and 264 nm in order to utilize the differences in UVRR cross-sections of the bases with wavelength. Through the analysis of difference spectra between irradiated and unirradiated DNA at each of the incident UV wavelengths, damage to CT- and SS-DNA was observed and identified. Significant radiation-induced increases in the difference spectra of the CT-DNA indicated disruption of the stable, stacked structure of its bases, as well as the disruption of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. Base unstacking was not as evident in the SS-DNA, while radiation-induced spectral decreases suggest disruption of the structure of the nucleotides. As demonstrated, UVRRS has the ability to highlight contributions from specific moieties with the use of varying incident UV wavelengths, thus enhancing the already information-rich content of the Raman spectra.

  14. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  15. Mobile Phone Radiation Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Production and DNA Damage in Human Spermatozoa In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    De Iuliis, Geoffry N.; Newey, Rhiannon J.; King, Bruce V.; Aitken, R. John

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent times there has been some controversy over the impact of electromagnetic radiation on human health. The significance of mobile phone radiation on male reproduction is a key element of this debate since several studies have suggested a relationship between mobile phone use and semen quality. The potential mechanisms involved have not been established, however, human spermatozoa are known to be particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress by virtue of the abundant availability of substrates for free radical attack and the lack of cytoplasmic space to accommodate antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, the induction of oxidative stress in these cells not only perturbs their capacity for fertilization but also contributes to sperm DNA damage. The latter has, in turn, been linked with poor fertility, an increased incidence of miscarriage and morbidity in the offspring, including childhood cancer. In light of these associations, we have analyzed the influence of RF-EMR on the cell biology of human spermatozoa in vitro. Principal Findings Purified human spermatozoa were exposed to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) tuned to 1.8 GHz and covering a range of specific absorption rates (SAR) from 0.4 W/kg to 27.5 W/kg. In step with increasing SAR, motility and vitality were significantly reduced after RF-EMR exposure, while the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation were significantly elevated (P<0.001). Furthermore, we also observed highly significant relationships between SAR, the oxidative DNA damage bio-marker, 8-OH-dG, and DNA fragmentation after RF-EMR exposure. Conclusions RF-EMR in both the power density and frequency range of mobile phones enhances mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by human spermatozoa, decreasing the motility and vitality of these cells while stimulating DNA base adduct formation and, ultimately DNA fragmentation. These findings have clear implications for the safety of

  16. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  17. Lymphocyte lifetime in the rabbit measured by the decline in radiation-induced chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    Decat, G; Leonard, A

    1980-08-01

    The life span of rabbit lymphocytes carrying radiation-induced chromosome aberrations has been studied by following the decline in aberration frequency as a function of the time after irradiation. Female rabbits were given a whole body X-ray dose of 300 rad. The day before exposure and at 2 hours, 14, 28, 42, 56, 84, 140, 250 and 500 days thereafter, blood samples were taken from a marginal ear vein of each animal. A plot of log abnormalities against time suggests an exponential decline for dicentrics and fragments up to 140 days, the half time for dicentrics and fragments being 70 and 46 days respectively. The results of the present investigation thus demonstrate that because of their shorter life span, in vivo observations on aberrations in rabbit lymphocytes are not suitable for extrapolation of information on chronic exposure to man.

  18. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  19. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  20. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-07

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage.

  1. Radioprotective effect of sesamol on gamma-radiation induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants levels in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N Rajendra; Menon, Venugopal P; Vasudev, V; Pugalendi, K V

    2005-05-05

    Sesamol pretreated (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) lymphocytes were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation, i.e., 1, 2 and 4 Gray (Gy) and the cellular changes were estimated by using cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (MN), dicentric aberration (DC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Radiation significantly increased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and decreased GSH and antioxidant enzyme levels in a dose dependent manner. The highest damage to lymphocytes was observed at 4 Gy irradiation. On the other hand, sesamol pretreatment significantly decreased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and increased GSH levels and SOD, CAT and GPx activities in a concentration dependent manner. At 1 Gy irradiation all concentrations of sesamol (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) significantly protects the lymphocytes from radiation damage. At 2 Gy irradiation 5 and 10 microg/ml of sesamol shows significant radioprotection. Since the highest damage was observed at 4 Gy irradiation both 1 and 5 microg/ml of sesamol pretreatment were not sufficient to protect the lymphocytes from radiation damage but 10 microg/ml of sesamol significantly (p<0.05) protects the lymphocytes from radiation effect. Thus, sesamol pretreatment gives significant protection to cultured human lymphocytes against gamma-radiation induced cellular damage. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective influence of sesamol is discussed.

  2. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  3. Spectrum of Radiation-Induced Clustered Non-DSB Damage - A Monte Carlo Track Structure Modeling and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the spectrum of initial radiation-induced cellular DNA damage [with particular focus on non-double-strand break (DSB) damage] generated by computer simulations. The radiation types modeled in this study were monoenergetic electrons (100 eV-1.5 keV), ultrasoft X-ray photons Ck, AlK and TiK, as well as some selected ions including 3.2 MeV/u proton; 0.74 and 2.4 MeV/u helium ions; 29 MeV/u nitrogen ions and 950 MeV/u iron ions. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to simulate damage induction by these radiation types in a cell-mimetic condition from a single-track action. The simulations took into account the action of direct energy deposition events and the reaction of hydroxyl radicals on atomistic linear B-DNA segments of a few helical turns including the water of hydration. Our results permitted the following conclusions: a. The absolute levels of different types of damage [base damage, simple and complex single-strand breaks (SSBs) and DSBs] vary depending on the radiation type; b. Within each damage class, the relative proportions of simple and complex damage vary with radiation type, the latter being higher with high-LET radiations; c. Overall, for both low- and high-LET radiations, the ratios of the yields of base damage to SSBs are similar, being about 3.0 ± 0.2; d. Base damage contributes more to the complexity of both SSBs and DSBs, than additional SSB damage and this is true for both low- and high-LET radiations; and e. The average SSB/DSB ratio for low-LET radiations is about 18, which is about 5 times higher than that for high-LET radiations. The hypothesis that clustered DNA damage is more difficult for cells to repair has gained currency among radiobiologists. However, as yet, there is no direct in vivo experimental method to validate the dependence of kinetics of DNA repair on DNA damage complexity (both DSB and non-DSB types). The data on the detailed spectrum of DNA damage presented here, in particular

  4. Protection against radiation induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice by Mentha piperita (Linn).

    PubMed

    Samarth, Ravindra M

    2007-11-01

    The protective effects of Mentha piperita (Linn) extract against radiation induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice have been studied. Mice were given either double distilled water or leaf extract of M. piperita orally (1 g/kg b.wt./day) once a day for three consecutive days, and after 30 min of treatments on the third day were exposed to 8 Gy gamma radiation. Mice were autopsied at 12, 24, 48 hrs and 5, 10 and 20 days post-irradiation to evaluate the percentage of bone marrow cells, frequency of micronuclei and erythropoietin level in serum. An exposure to gamma radiation resulted in a significant decline in the number of bone marrow cells such as leucoblasts, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band/stab forms, polymorphs, pronormoblasts and normoblasts, lymphocytes, and megakaryocytes. Pretreatment with leaf extract of M. piperita followed by radiation exposure resulted in significant increases in the numbers of leucoblasts, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band/stab forms, polymorphs, pronormoblasts and normoblasts, lymphocytes, and megakaryocytes in bone marrow as compared to the control group. Pretreatment with leaf extract of M. piperita followed by radiation exposure also resulted in significant decreases in micronucleus frequencies in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice. A significant increase in erythropoietin level was observed at all the studied intervals in leaf extract of M. piperita pretreated irradiated animals as compared to control animals (radiation alone). The results of the present investigation suggest the protective effects of leaf extract of M. piperita against radiation induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow may be attributed to the maintenance of EPO level in Swiss albino mice.

  5. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  6. Paeoniflorin protects human EA.hy926 endothelial cells against gamma-radiation induced oxidative injury by activating the NF-E2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Qi, Xin; Che, Juanjuan; Cao, Bangwei

    2013-04-26

    Pulmonary endothelial cells have been demonstrated to have a critical role in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lung injury. Our preliminary experiments indicated that paeoniflorin protected human EA.hy926 endothelial cells from radiation-induced oxidative injury. This study was designed to confirm the protective effect of paeoniflorin against radiation-induced endothelial cellular damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Preincubation of EA.hy926 cells with paeoniflorin before γ-radiation resulted in significant inhibition of apoptosis, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and enhanced cell viability. In particular, we showed that paeoniflorin significantly reduced the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, and enhanced production of the endogenous antioxidants, glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in EA.hy926 cells. Treatment of these cells with paeoniflorin significantly induced HO-1 expression. Moreover, paeoniflorin promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor-2 (Nrf-2). The paeoniflorin-induced HO-1 expression was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZNPP) significantly reversed the protective effect of paeoniflorin against radiation-induced damage in EA.hy926 cells. Our findings confirmed that paeoniflorin protected EA.hy926 cells against radiation-induced injury through the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  7. Characterization of radiation-induced damage in high performance polymers by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleman, Naushadalli K.

    1992-01-01

    The potential for long-term human activity beyond the Earth's protective magnetosphere is limited in part by the lack of detailed information on the effectiveness and performance of existing structural materials to shield the crew and spacecraft from highly penetrating space radiations. The two radiations of greatest concern are high energy protons emitted during solar flares and galactic cosmic rays which are energetic ions ranging from protons to highly oxidized iron. Although the interactions of such high-energy radiations with matter are not completely understood at this time, the effects of the incident radiation are clearly expected to include the formation of paramagnetic spin centers via ionization and bond-scission reactions in the molecular matrices of structural materials. Since this type of radiation damage is readily characterized by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the NASA Langley Research Center EPR system was repaired and brought on-line during the 1991 ASEE term. A major goal of the 1992 ASEE term was to adapt the existing core of the LaRC EPR system to meet the requirements for EPR Imaging--a powerful new technique which provides detailed information on the internal structure of materials by mapping the spatial distribution of unpaired spin density in bulk media. Major impetus for this adaptation arises from the fact that information derived from EPRI complements other methods such as scanning electron microscopy which primarily characterize surface phenomena. The modification of the EPR system has been initiated by the construction of specially designed, counterwound Helmholtz coils which will be mounted on the main EPR electromagnet. The specifications of the coils have been set to achieve a static linear magnetic field gradient of 10 gauss/mm/amp along the principal (Z) axis of the Zeeman field. Construction is also in progress of a paramagnetic standard in which the spin distribution is known in all three dimensions. This

  8. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  9. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A. ); Copper, P.K. )

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  10. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  11. Dietary Supplement Attenuates Radiation-Induced Osteoclastogenic and Oxidative Stress-Related Responses and Protects Adult Mice from Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Tahimic, Candice; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Alwood, Joshua; Shahnazari, Mohammed; Halloran, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Our central hypothesis is that oxidative stress plays a key role in cell dysfunction and progressive bone loss caused by radiation exposure during spaceflight. In animal studies, excess free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. We previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation rapidly increases expression levels of pro-osteoclastogenic and oxidative stress-related genes in bone and marrow, followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. To screen various antioxidants for radioprotective effects on bone, 4 month old, male C57Bl6/J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable alpha-lipoic acid, or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs total body radiation and one day later marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Of the candidates tested, DP was most effective in reducing bone resorption-related gene expression. Microcomputed tomography revealed that DP also prevented the radiation-induced deterioration of skeletal microarchitecture, as indicated by percent bone volume, trabecular spacing and trabecular number. DP had similar protective effects on skeletal structure after sequential exposure to protons (0.5 Gy, 150MeV/n) and 56Fe 0.5Gy, 600 MeV/n). When cultured ex vivo under osteogenic conditions, bone marrow-derived cells from DP-fed animals exhibited increased colony numbers compared to control diet-fed animals. These findings suggest that DP exerted pro-osteogenic effects apart from previously identified anti-resorptive actions, which may contribute to radioprotection of skeletal tissue. In conclusion, a diet enriched in certain types of antioxidants and polyphenols such as DP may be useful as an intervention to protect tissues from degenerative effects of ionizing radiation.

  12. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23523584

  13. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacement damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.

  14. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    DOE PAGES

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA; ...

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacementmore » damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.« less

  15. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  16. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay.

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, M K; Shyama, S K; Sonaye, B S; Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S B; Bipin, P D; D'costa, A; Chaubey, R C

    2014-05-01

    reveals that gamma radiation induces single strand breaks in DNA as measured by alkaline comet assay in bivalves and comet assay serves as a sensitive and rapid method to detect genotoxicity of gamma radiation. This study further indicates that both M. casta and P. malabarica exhibit almost identical sensitivity to gamma radiation as measured by DNA damage.

  17. Considerations for evaluating ultraviolet radiation-induced genetic damage relative to Antarctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Karentz, D

    1994-01-01

    Springtime ozone depletion over the Antarctic results in increased UVB in local marine environments. It has been established that decreases in primary productivity occur with decreases in ozone concentrations, but the impact of increased UVB on the functioning and stability of the ecosystem has not yet been determined. Very little has been done to evaluate the potential for genetic damage caused by the increase in UVB, and this type of damage is most significant relative to the fitness and maintenance of populations. An essential problem in evaluating genotoxic effects is the lack of appropriate techniques to sample and quantify genetic damage in field populations under ambient UVB levels. In addition, it is currently not feasible to estimate exposure levels for organisms in their natural habitats. PMID:7713036

  18. Prevention of UVB Radiation-induced Epidermal Damage by Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Minoru; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Maji, Daisuke; Sato, Keizo; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Ihn, Hironobu; Funasaka, Yoko; Mizushima, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light, especially UVB, causes epidermal damage via the induction of apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and DNA damage. Various stressors, including UV light, induce heat shock proteins (HSPs) and the induction, particularly that of HSP70, provides cellular resistance to such stressors. The anti-inflammatory activity of HSP70, such as its inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), was recently revealed. These in vitro results suggest that HSP70 protects against UVB-induced epidermal damage. Here we tested this idea by using transgenic mice expressing HSP70 and cultured keratinocytes. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB caused epidermal damage such as induction of apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. UVB-induced apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes was suppressed by overexpression of HSP70. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB decreased the cutaneous level of IκB-α (an inhibitor of NF-κB) and increased the infiltration of leukocytes and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the epidermis. These inflammatory responses were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. In vitro, the overexpression of HSP70 suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased the level of IκB-α in keratinocytes irradiated with UVB. UVB induced an increase in cutaneous levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, both of which were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. This study provides genetic evidence that HSP70 protects the epidermis from UVB-induced radiation damage. The findings here also suggest that the protective action of HSP70 is mediated by anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-DNA damage effects. PMID:20018843

  19. Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

  20. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  1. Novel regenerative peptide TP508 mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by activating stem cells and preserving crypt integrity.

    PubMed

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M; Houchen, Courtney W; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis, and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin) 24 h after lethal radiation exposure (9 Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post exposure prevents the disintegration of GI crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also upregulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24 h post exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment.

  2. TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  3. TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  4. Persistence of space radiation induced cytogenetic damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts.

    PubMed

    George, K; Chappell, L J; Cucinotta, F A

    2010-08-14

    Cytogenetic damage was assessed in blood lymphocytes from 16 astronauts before and after they participated in long-duration space missions of 3 months or more. The frequency of chromosome damage was measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting before flight and at various intervals from a few days to many months after return from the mission. For all individuals, the frequency of chromosome exchanges measured within a month of return from space was higher than their preflight yield. However, some individuals showed a temporal decline in chromosome damage with time after flight. Statistical analysis using combined data for all astronauts indicated a significant overall decreasing trend in total chromosome exchanges with time after flight, although this trend was not seen for all astronauts and the yield of chromosome damage in some individuals actually increased with time after flight. The decreasing trend in total exchanges was slightly more significant when statistical analysis was restricted to data collected more than 220 days after return from flight. When analysis was restricted to data collected within 220 days of return from the mission there was no relationship between total exchanges and time. Translocation yields varied more between astronauts and there was only a slight non-significant decrease with time after flight that was similar for both later and earlier sampling times.

  5. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  6. Effect of intercellular contact on DNA conformation, radiation-induced DNA damage, and mutation in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, P.L.; Durand, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells, when grown as small spheroids in suspension culture, are more resistant to killing by ionizing radiation than when grown as monolayers. The authors have attempted to determine whether this enhanced survival following irradiation is reflected in DNA damage and repair at the structural level (by measuring alkali-induced DNA unwinding rates from strand breaks) and at the functional level (by measuring resistance to forward mutation at the HGPRT locus). For a given dose of radiation, the unwinding of DNA in high salt/weak alkali was less complete for spheroid DNA than for monolayer DNA, and the rate of repair of radiation damage was faster in spheroid DNA. These differential responses were lost 8 hr after separation of spheroids into single cells, coinciding with loss of radioresistance measured by clonogenicity. In addition, spheroid cells showed fewer numbers of induced mutants per Gray, although, for a given level of survival, the mutation frequency for monolayers and spheroids was identical. These results suggest that conformational changes in DNA resulting from cell growth as spheroids might enhance repair of radiation-induced lesions.

  7. Effect of Tinospora cordifolia on the reduction of ultraviolet radiation-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Masuma, Runa; Okuno, Tsutomu; Kabir Choudhuri, Mohammad Shahabuddin; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The safety of Tinospora cordifolia and its potential to protect against ultraviolet radiation-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in PC12 cells were investigated. To evaluate the safety of T. cordifolia, cell viability and agarose gel electrophoresis were carried out using PC12 cells treated with 0 to 100 μg mL(-1) of methanol extract of T. cordifolia. T. cordifolia extracts did not show cytotoxicity ranging 0 to 100 μg mL(-1). In addition, T. cordifolia extracts significantly increased cell viability at 1 ng, 10 ng and 1 μg mL(-1) concentrations in serum-deprived medium compared to control. To confirm the protective role against UV-induced damage, PC12 cells alone or in the presence of 10 ng, 100 ng, or 1 μg mL(-1) of T. cordifolia extract were exposed to 250, 270 and 290 nm of UV radiation, which corresponded to doses of 120, 150 and 300 mJ cm(-2), respectively. Treatment with T. cordifolia extracts significantly increased the cell survival rate irradiated at 290 nm. In addition, T. cordifolia extracts significantly reduced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV irradiation at all wavelengths. In conclusion, T. cordifolia is not toxic and safe for cells. Our findings can support its application as phototherapy in the medical sector.

  8. Analytical studies into radiation-induced starch damage in black and white peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M. M.; Farkas, J.

    1993-07-01

    Temperature dependency of the apparent viscosity of heat-gelatinized suspensions of untreated and irradiated pepper samples has been investigated. There was a close linear correlation between the logaritm of "fluidity" /reciprocal of the apparent viscosity) and the reciprocal absolute temperature of the measurement. The slope of the regression line(the temperature dependence of fluidity) increased with the radiation dose. Gelatinization thermograms of aqueous suspensions of ground pepper samples were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature characteristics of heat-gelatinization endotherms showed no significant differences between untreated and irradiated samples. A colorimetric method for damaged starch, the estimation of reducing power, and the alcohol-induced turbidity of aqueous extracts showed statistically significant increases of starch damage at doses higher than 4 kGy. These indices of starch-depolymerization have been changed less dramatically by irradiation than the apparent viscosity of the heat-gelatinized suspensions.

  9. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  10. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel; Watanabe, Sugiko; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Andersen, Jens S

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. Apart from cataloging acetylation sites through SILAC proteomic analyses before IR and at 5 and 60 min after IR exposure of U2OS cells, we report that: (1) key components of the transcriptional machinery, such as EP300 and CREBBP, are dynamically acetylated; (2) that nuclear acetyltransferases themselves are regulated, not on the protein abundance level, but by (de)acetylation; and (3) that the recently reported p53 co-activator and methyltransferase MLL3 is acetylated on five lysines during the DDR. For selected examples, protein immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were used to assess lysine acetylation status and thereby validate the mass spectrometry data. We thus present evidence that nuclear proteins, including those known to regulate cellular functions via epigenetic modifications of histones, are regulated by (de)acetylation in a timely manner upon cell's exposure to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.

  11. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-05-12

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  12. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P; Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N; Matyunin, S N; Nazarov, M M; Cherkasova, O P

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  13. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  14. Protective effects of extracts of Vernonia amygdalina, Hibiscus sabdariffa and vitamin C against radiation-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin; Ogungbenro, Bayo; Anyaegbu, Oluchi; Fafunso, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The radioprotective efficacy of methanolic extracts of leaves of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) and Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS), and vitamin C (VIT C) against gamma radiation (4 Gy) induced liver damage was studied in male Wistar albino rats. VIT C was administered at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight, while VA and HS were administered at doses; 200, 400 and 800-mg/kg body weight, orally for 4 weeks prior to radiation and 5 weeks after irradiation. The rats were sacrificed at 24 hours and 5 weeks after irradiation. Treatment with VIT C and VA (800 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the gamma radiation-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities at 24 hours after irradiation, whereas, HS (400 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the serum ALT activity only. Similarly, treatment with VIT C and VA (800 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the serum conjugated bilirubin levels by 56% and 29%, respectively at 24 hours. Furthermore, VIT C, VA and HS significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the levels of serum lipid peroxidation (LPO) and increased the hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities at 24 hours. Treatment for 5 weeks after irradiation with VITC, VA and HS significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the levels of unconjugated bilirubin, while VIT C and VA alone decreased the levels of conjugated bilirubin. Furthermore, treatment with VA (400 and 800 mg/kg) decreased the serum ALT activities by 25% and 34%, respectively, at 5 weeks after irradiation. Similarly, alkaline phosphatase and LPO levels were significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated following treatment with VIT C and VA (400 and 800 mg/kg) at 5 weeks after irradiation. In addition, treatment with VIT C, VA (800 mg/kg) and HS (400 and 800 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) elevated the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) by 61%, 56%, 41% and 44%, respectively, at 5 weeks. Similar elevation of antioxidant enzymes; SOD, glutathione-s-transferase and catalase

  15. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  16. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  17. Influence of cysteamine on the protection and repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroż, Hanna B.; Kornacka, Ewa M.; Przybytniak, Grażyna K.

    2004-08-01

    Studies of the influence of cysteamine on damage to DNA by ionising radiation, using two methods of examination: EPR and gel-electrophoresis under air and oxygen-free conditions, and at cryogenic and ambient temperatures, enabled us to draw some conclusions as to the most probable reaction pathways in the complicated system of DNA/thiol/oxygen. The DNA-peroxyl radicals formed in the presence of oxygen seem to be effectively deactivated by cysteamine as they were not detected by EPR at higher thiol concentration. The peroxyl radicals, if formed, increase double strand breaks of DNA. The competitive reactions of oxygen/DNA and oxygen/thiol, and their non-linear dependence on the thiol concentration, observed previously, are confirmed by the results of electrophoresis.

  18. Microbeam Radiation-Induced Tissue Damage Depends on the Stage of Vascular Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatasso, Sara; Laissue, Jean Albert; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Graber, Werner; Bravin, Alberto; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Corde, Stephanie; Blattmann, Hans; Gruber, Guenther; Djonov, Valentin

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of microbeam radiation (MR) on vascular biology, we used the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model of an almost pure vascular system with immature vessels (lacking periendothelial coverage) at Day 8 and mature vessels (with coverage) at Day 12 of development. Methods and Materials: CAMs were irradiated with microplanar beams (width, {approx}25 {mu}m; interbeam spacing, {approx}200 {mu}m) at entrance doses of 200 or 300 Gy and, for comparison, with a broad beam (seamless radiation [SLR]), with entrance doses of 5 to 40 Gy. Results: In vivo monitoring of Day-8 CAM vasculature 6 h after 200 Gy MR revealed a near total destruction of the immature capillary plexus. Conversely, 200 Gy MR barely affected Day-12 CAM mature microvasculature. Morphological evaluation of Day-12 CAMs after the dose was increased to 300 Gy revealed opened interendothelial junctions, which could explain the transient mesenchymal edema immediately after irradiation. Electron micrographs revealed cytoplasmic vacuolization of endothelial cells in the beam path, with disrupted luminal surfaces; often the lumen was engorged with erythrocytes and leukocytes. After 30 min, the capillary plexus adopted a striated metronomic pattern, with alternating destroyed and intact zones, corresponding to the beam and the interbeam paths within the array. SLR at a dose of 10 Gy caused growth retardation, resulting in a remarkable reduction in the vascular endpoint density 24 h postirradiation. A dose of 40 Gy damaged the entire CAM vasculature. Conclusions: The effects of MR are mediated by capillary damage, with tissue injury caused by insufficient blood supply. Vascular toxicity and physiological effects of MR depend on the stage of capillary maturation and appear in the first 15 to 60 min after irradiation. Conversely, the effects of SLR, due to the arrest of cell proliferation, persist for a longer time.

  19. Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of astronauts blood lymphocytes provides a direct in vivo measurement of space radiation damage, which takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. We present our latest analyses of chromosome damage in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting and collected at various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. Dose was derived from frequencies of chromosome exchanges using preflight calibration curves, and the Relative Biological Effect (RBE) was estimated by comparison with individually measured physically absorbed doses. Values for average RBE were compared to the average quality factor (Q), from direct measurements of the lineal energy spectra using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and radiation transport codes. Results prove that cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses on blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk after protracted exposure to space radiation of a few months or more. However, data collected several months or years after flight suggests that the yield of chromosome translocations may decline with time after the mission, indicating that retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember, who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years, provide limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  20. Nuclear localization of Beclin 1 promotes radiation-induced DNA damage repair independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Suping; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xie, Jialing; Jiang, Gaoyue; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Zhou, Daohong; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-01-01

    Beclin 1 is a well-established core mammalian autophagy protein that is embryonically indispensable and has been presumed to suppress oncogenesis via an autophagy-mediated mechanism. Here, we show that Beclin 1 is a prenatal primary cytoplasmic protein but rapidly relocated into the nucleus during postnatal development in mice. Surprisingly, deletion of beclin1 in in vitro human cells did not block an autophagy response, but attenuated the expression of several DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and formation of repair complexes, and reduced an ability to repair DNA in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Overexpressing Beclin 1 improved the repair of IR-induced DSB, but did not restore an autophagy response in cells lacking autophagy gene Atg7, suggesting that Beclin 1 may regulate DSB repair independent of autophagy in the cells exposed to IR. Indeed, we found that Beclin 1 could directly interact with DNA topoisomerase IIβ and was recruited to the DSB sites by the interaction. These findings reveal a novel function of Beclin 1 in regulation of DNA damage repair independent of its role in autophagy particularly when the cells are under radiation insult. PMID:28345663

  1. Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdoglu, B.; Wilson, G.; Parchuri, N.; Ye, W.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6 weeks with capsules containing testosterone and estradiol and then irradiated with doses from 2.5-7.0 Gy. Controls were irradiated with 1.8-3.5 Gy. Implants were removed 1 day after irradiation, and all animals were killed 10 weeks later for assessment of stem cell survival by counting repopulating tubules in histological sections and by sperm head counts. At doses of 2.5 and 3.5 Gy the repopulation indices and sperm head counts were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the rats treated with testosterone and estradiol than in the controls. Protection factors calculated from the dose-response curves were in the range of 1.5-2.2. Elucidation of the mechanism of protection is essential to apply it to clinical situations. The fact that the spermatogonia are protected against radiation as well as procarbazine indicates that the mechanism does not involve drug delivery or metabolism. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  3. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells. PMID:26396176

  4. Antigenotoxic Effect Against Ultraviolet Radiation-induced DNA Damage of the Essential Oils from Lippia Species.

    PubMed

    Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Córdoba Campo, Yuri; Stashenko, Elena E; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2017-02-08

    The antigenotoxicity against ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage of essential oils (EO) from Lippia species was studied using SOS Chromotest. Based on the minimum concentration that significantly inhibits genotoxicity, the genoprotective potential of EO from highest to lowest was Lippia graveolens, thymol-RC ≈ Lippia origanoides, carvacrol-RC ≈ L. origanoides, thymol-RC > Lippia alba, citral-RC ≈ Lippia citriodora, citral-RC ≈ Lippia micromera, thymol-RC > L. alba, myrcenone-RC. EO from L. alba, carvone/limonene-RC, L. origanoides, α-phellandrene-RC and L. dulcis, trans-β-caryophyllene-RC did not reduce the UV genotoxicity at any of the doses tested. A gas chromatography with flame ionization detection analysis (GC-FID) was conducted to evaluate the solubility of the major EO constituents under our experimental conditions. GC-FID analysis showed that, at least partially, major EO constituents were water-soluble and therefore, they were related with the antigenotoxicity detected for EO. Constituents such as p-cymene, geraniol, carvacrol, thymol, citral and 1,8-cineole showed antigenotoxicity. The antioxidant activity of EO constituents was also determined using the oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay. The results showed that the antigenotoxicity of the EO constituents was unconnected with their antioxidant activity. The antigenotoxicity to different constituent binary mixtures suggests that synergistic effects can occur in some of the studied EO.

  5. A mechanistic description of radiation-induced damage to normal tissue and its healing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel mechanistic model of the yield of tissue damage at the end of radiation treatment and of the subsequent healing kinetics. We find explicit expressions for the total number of functional proliferating cells as well as doomed (functional but non-proliferating) cells as a function of time post treatment. This leads to the possibility of estimating—for any given cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy—the probability distribution of those kinetic parameters (e.g. proliferation rates) that determine times to injury onset and ensuing resolution. The model is suitable for tissues with simple duplication organization, meaning that functionally competent cells are also responsible for tissue renewal or regeneration following injury. An extension of the model to arbitrary temporal patterns of dose rate is presented. To illustrate the practical utility of the model, as well as its limitations, we apply it to data on the time course of urethral toxicity following fractionated radiation treatment and brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  6. Nuclear localization of Beclin 1 promotes radiation-induced DNA damage repair independent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Suping; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xie, Jialing; Jiang, Gaoyue; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Zhou, Daohong; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-27

    Beclin 1 is a well-established core mammalian autophagy protein that is embryonically indispensable and has been presumed to suppress oncogenesis via an autophagy-mediated mechanism. Here, we show that Beclin 1 is a prenatal primary cytoplasmic protein but rapidly relocated into the nucleus during postnatal development in mice. Surprisingly, deletion of beclin1 in in vitro human cells did not block an autophagy response, but attenuated the expression of several DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and formation of repair complexes, and reduced an ability to repair DNA in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Overexpressing Beclin 1 improved the repair of IR-induced DSB, but did not restore an autophagy response in cells lacking autophagy gene Atg7, suggesting that Beclin 1 may regulate DSB repair independent of autophagy in the cells exposed to IR. Indeed, we found that Beclin 1 could directly interact with DNA topoisomerase IIβ and was recruited to the DSB sites by the interaction. These findings reveal a novel function of Beclin 1 in regulation of DNA damage repair independent of its role in autophagy particularly when the cells are under radiation insult.

  7. Animal models and medical countermeasures development for radiation-induced lung damage: report from an NIAID Workshop.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jacqueline P; Jackson, Isabel L; Shah, Jui R; Czarniecki, Christine W; Maidment, Bert W; DiCarlo, Andrea L

    2012-05-01

    Since 9/11, there have been concerns that terrorists may detonate a radiological or nuclear device in an American city. Aside from several decorporation and blocking agents for use against internal radionuclide contamination, there are currently no medications within the Strategic National Stockpile that are approved to treat the immediate or delayed complications resulting from accidental exposure to radiation. Although the majority of research attention has focused on developing countermeasures that target the bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract, since they represent the most acutely radiosensitive organs, individuals who survive early radiation syndromes will likely suffer late effects in the months that follow. Of particular concern are the delayed effects seen in the lung that play a major role in late mortality seen in radiation-exposed patients and accident victims. To address these concerns, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a workshop to discuss pulmonary model development, mechanisms of radiation-induced lung injury, targets for medical countermeasures development, and end points to evaluate treatment efficacy. Other topics covered included guidance on the challenges of developing and licensing drugs and treatments specific to a radiation lung damage indication. This report reviews the data presented, as well as key points from the ensuing discussion.

  8. Detection of some irradiated spices on the basis of radiation induced damage of starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, J.; Sharif, M. M.; Koncz, Á.

    Untreated and irradiated samples of spices were suspended in water, alkalized, and after heat-gelatinization, the apparent viscosity was determined by a rotational viscometer. Several spices, i.e. white pepper, black pepper, nutmeg and ginger showed considerable loss of viscosity as a function of γ-radiation dose in the dose range required for microbial decontamination of natural spices. Less promising results were obtained with spices such as allspice, garlic powder, and onion powder forming low-viscosity heat-treated suspensions even when unirradiated viscometric studies were also performed with a number of pepper samples of various origin to estimate the "natural" variation of rheological properties. Irradiation and storage studies were performed with ground black pepper samples of moisture contents in equilibrium with air of 25%, 50% and 75% R.H., respectively, either untreated or irradiated with 4, 8, 16 or 32 kGy, to study the effect of equilibrium relative humidity and storage time on detectability of radiation treatment. During the entire storage period of 100 days, statistically significant differences of the apparent viscosities of heat-gelatinized suspensions remained detectable between untreated samples and those irradiated with 8 kGy or higher doses. The apparent viscosity of high-moisture (75% E.R.H.) untreated samples was decreasing during long-term storage. Differences between viscosities of untreated and irradiated samples were enlarged when measured at elevated temperatures such as 50°C in the rotational viscometer, or in the boiling-water bath of a falling number apparatus. Other analytical indices such as onset and peak temperatures of gelatinization endotherms by DSC (damaged starch content), by colorimetry, reducing sugar content, alcohol-induced turbidity of hot water extracts of pepper samples, have been changed less dramatically by irradiation than the apparent viscosity of the gelatinized suspensions

  9. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction and cerebellar oxidative stress in mice: protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Manda, Kailash; Ueno, Megumi; Moritake, Takashi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2007-02-12

    Reactive oxygen species are implicated in neurodegeneration and cognitive disorders due to higher vulnerability of neuronal tissues. The cerebellum is recently reported to be involved in cognitive function. Therefore, present study aimed at investigating the role alpha-lipoic acid against radiation-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant status in cerebellum and its correlation with cognitive dysfunction. We observed spontaneous motor activities and spatial memory task of mice using pyroelectric infrared sensor and programmed video tracking system, respectively. Whole body X-irradiation (6 Gy) of mice substantially impaired the reference memory and motor activities of mice. However, acute intraperitoneal treatment of mice with alpha-lipoic acid prior to irradiation significantly attenuated such cognitive dysfunction. Alpha-lipoic acid pretreatment exerted a very high magnitude of protection against radiation-induced augmentation of protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in mice cerebellum. Further, radiation-induced deficit of total, nonprotein and protein-bound sulfhydryl (T-SH, NP-SH, PB-SH) contents of cerebellum and plasma ferric reducing power (FRAP) was also inhibited by alpha-lipoic acid pre-treatment. Moreover, alpha-lipoic acid treated mice showed an intact cytoarchitecture of cerebellum, higher counts of intact Purkinje cells and granular cells in comparison to untreated irradiated mice. Results clearly indicate that alpha-lipoic acid is potent neuroprotective antioxidant.

  10. Reciprocal Paracrine Interactions Between Normal Human Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells Protect Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, Yuka; Saenko, Vladimir Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Matsuse, Michiko; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To explore whether interactions between normal epithelial and mesenchymal cells can modulate the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in one or both types of cells. Methods and Materials: Human primary thyrocytes (PT), diploid fibroblasts BJ, MRC-5, and WI-38, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), and endothelial human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUV-EC-C), cultured either individually or in co-cultures or after conditioned medium transfer, were irradiated with 0.25 to 5 Gy of {gamma}-rays and assayed for the extent of DNA damage. Results: The number of {gamma}-H2AX foci in co-cultures of PT and BJ fibroblasts was approximately 25% lower than in individual cultures at 1 Gy in both types of cells. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual cultures before irradiation resulted in approximately a 35% reduction of the number {gamma}-H2AX foci at 1 Gy in both types of cells, demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. The DNA-protected state of cells was achieved within 15 min after conditioned medium transfer; it was reproducible and reciprocal in several lines of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells but not in epithelial and endothelial cells. Unlike normal cells, human epithelial cancer cells failed to establish DNA-protected states in fibroblasts and vice versa. Conclusions: The results imply the existence of a network of reciprocal interactions between normal epithelial and some types of mesenchymal cells mediated by soluble factors that act in a paracrine manner to protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  11. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Sublethal Total Body Irradiation Leads to Early Cerebellar Damage and Oxidative Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    and myogenic differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in inflammatory myopathies . J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 2008; 67(7): 711-19. [26] Porto...following sublethal TBI. Oxidative stress, inflammatory response and calcium neurotoxicity-associated mechanisms are involved in radiation-induced...neuronal damage. Keyword: Calcium, cerebellum, inflammatory response, oxidative stress, Purkinje cell, sublethal radiation. INTRODUCTION Acute radiation

  13. A Topical Mitochondria-Targeted Redox-Cycling Nitroxide Mitigates Oxidative Stress-Induced Skin Damage.

    PubMed

    Brand, Rhonda M; Epperly, Michael W; Stottlemyer, J Mark; Skoda, Erin M; Gao, Xiang; Li, Song; Huq, Saiful; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E; Greenberger, Joel S; Falo, Louis D

    2017-03-01

    Skin is the largest human organ, and it provides a first line of defense that includes physical, chemical, and immune mechanisms to combat environmental stress. Radiation is a prevalent environmental stressor. Radiation-induced skin damage ranges from photoaging and cutaneous carcinogenesis caused by UV exposure, to treatment-limiting radiation dermatitis associated with radiotherapy, to cutaneous radiation syndrome, a frequently fatal consequence of exposures from nuclear accidents. The major mechanism of skin injury common to these exposures is radiation-induced oxidative stress. Efforts to prevent or mitigate radiation damage have included development of antioxidants capable of reducing reactive oxygen species. Mitochondria are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis plays a major role in radiation-induced tissue damage. We reasoned that targeting a redox cycling nitroxide to mitochondria could prevent reactive oxygen species accumulation, limiting downstream oxidative damage and preserving mitochondrial function. Here we show that in both mouse and human skin, topical application of a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant prevents and mitigates radiation-induced skin damage characterized by clinical dermatitis, loss of barrier function, inflammation, and fibrosis. Further, damage mitigation is associated with reduced apoptosis, preservation of the skin's antioxidant capacity, and reduction of irreversible DNA and protein oxidation associated with oxidative stress.

  14. Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle: an in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Verma, Savita; Gupta, Manju Lata; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Flora, Swaran J S

    2010-01-01

    The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 microg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 microg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 microg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 55.65% at 500 microg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of

  15. Ionizing radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress and prolonged cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Edouard I.; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-01-01

    Cellular exposure to ionizing radiation leads to oxidizing events that alter atomic structure through direct interactions of radiation with target macromolecules or via products of water radiolysis. Further, the oxidative damage may spread from the targeted to neighboring, non-targeted bystander cells through redox-modulated intercellular communication mechanisms. To cope with the induced stress and the changes in the redox environment, organisms elicit transient responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels to counteract toxic effects of radiation. Metabolic pathways are induced during and shortly after the exposure. Depending on radiation dose, dose-rate and quality, these protective mechanisms may or may not be sufficient to cope with the stress. When the harmful effects exceed those of homeostatic biochemical processes, induced biological changes persist and may be propagated to progeny cells. Physiological levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play critical roles in many cellular functions. In irradiated cells, levels of these reactive species may be increased due to perturbations in oxidative metabolism and chronic inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the long-term effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on genomic stability. Here, in addition to immediate biological effects of water radiolysis on DNA damage, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in the delayed outcomes of ionization radiation. Defects in mitochondrial functions lead to accelerated aging and numerous pathological conditions. Different types of radiation vary in their linear energy transfer (LET) properties, and we discuss their effects on various aspects of mitochondrial physiology. These include short and long-term in vitro and in vivo effects on mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial protein import and metabolic and antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22182453

  16. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  17. Investigation into the role of the cholinergic system in radiation-induced damage in the rat liver and ileum.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Hazan; Özden, A Sevgi; Çevik, Özge; Özgen, Zerrin; Cadirci, Selin; Elmas, Merve Açıkel; Ercan, Feriha; Şener, Göksel; Gören, M Z

    2014-09-01

    It has been previously shown that acetylcholine (ACh) may affect pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The role of the cholinergic system in radiation-induced inflammatory responses and tissue damage remains unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the radio-protective properties of the cholinergic system in the ileum and the liver of rats. Rats were exposed to 8-Gy single-fraction whole-abdominal irradiation and were then decapitated at either 36 h or 10 d post-irradiation. The rats were treated either with intraperitoneal physiological saline (1 ml/kg), physostigmine (80 µg/kg) or atropine (50 μg/kg) twice daily for 36 h or 10 d. Cardiac blood samples and liver and ileal tissues were obtained in which TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10 levels were assayed using ELISA. In the liver and ileal homogenates, caspase-3 immunoblots were performed and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was analyzed. Plasma levels of IL-1β and TNF-α increased significantly following radiation (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively) as compared with non-irradiated controls, and physostigmine treatment prevented the increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). Plasma IL-10 levels were not found to be significantly changed following radiation, whereas physostigmine augmented IL-10 levels during the late phase (P < 0.01). In the liver and ileum homogenates, IL-1β and TNF-α levels were also elevated following radiation, and this effect was inhibited by physostigmine treatment but not by atropine. Similarly, physostigmine also reversed the changes in MPO activity and in the caspase-3 levels in the liver and ileum. Histological examination revealed related changes. Physostigmine experiments suggested that ACh has a radio-protective effect not involving the muscarinic receptors.

  18. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    PubMed

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Carabajal, Eliana; Prestifilippo, Juan P; Rossi, Luis; Elverdin, Juan C; Merani, Susana; Bergoc, Rosa M; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG) function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01). This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01). JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  19. Inhibition of radiation-induced DNA damage by jamun, Syzygium cumini, in the cultured splenocytes of mice exposed to different doses of γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Shetty, Prakash Chandra; Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi Srinivasa

    2012-06-01

    The radioprotective property of 50 mg/kg body weight jamun (Syzygium cumini) extract was studied in the cultured splenocytes of mice exposed to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy of γ-radiation. The spleens of irradiated mice were removed aseptically and the splenocytes were extracted from the individual spleens and cultured. The micronuclei were prepared 72 hours after irradiation in binucleate splenocytes by blocking cytokinesis with cytochalasin-B. Irradiation of mice resulted in a dose-dependent elevation in the micronucleated splenocytes. The exposure of mice not only elevated splenocytes bearing one micronucleus but also cells bearing 2 and multiple (>2) micronuclei indicating induction of complex DNA damage after irradiation. Oral treatment of mice with 50 mg/kg body weight of jamun leaf extract protected against the radiation-induced micronuclei formation. Jamun extract also protected against the formation of 2 and multiple micronuclei indicating repair or inhibition of complex DNA damage. The assessment of lipid peroxidation in mice brain homogenate has indicated a concentration dependent inhibition of lipid peroxidation by jamun extract. Studies in a cell free system revealed that jamun extract inhibited the formation of OH, O(2)-, DPPH, and ABTS(+) free radicals in a concentration dependent manner. Our study demonstrates that jamun extract protected mice against the radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibition of radiation-induced free radical formation may be one of the mechanisms of radioprotection.

  20. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M H; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (-1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC(+) cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury.

  1. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (−1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC+ cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury. PMID:28289414

  2. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates radiation-induced acute skin damage in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Hanxi; Sun, Xiaorong; Meng, Xiangjiao; Zhao, Xianguang; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming; Zheng, Meizhu

    2016-01-01

    There are few effective treatment options for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients. We conducted a single-arm trial to tested the hypothesis that topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is effective against radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Forty-nine patients participated in this study. The patients underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Topical EGCG was applied daily, starting when grade I dermatitis appeared and ending two weeks after radiotherapy. The maximum dermatitis observed during the EGCG treatment was as follows: Grade 1 toxicity, 71.4% (35 patients); grade 2 toxicity, 28.6% (14 patients); there were no patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The majority of the radiation-induced dermatitis was observed 1 week after the end of radiotherapy. EGCG reduced the pain in 85.7% of patients, burning-feeling in 89.8%, itching in 87.8%, pulling in 71.4%, and tenderness in 79.6%. These findings suggest topical EGCG may be an effective treatment for radiation-induced dermatitis and has acceptable toxicity. PMID:27224910

  3. Profiling mitochondrial proteins in radiation-induced genome-unstable cell lines with persistent oxidative stress by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Wan, Yunhu; Aypar, Umut; Peters, Jonathan S.; Springer, David L.

    2008-06-01

    Radiation-induced genome instability (RIGI) is a response to radiation exposure in which the progeny of surviving cells exhibit increased frequency of chromosomal changes many generations after the initial insult. Persistently elevated oxidative stress accompanying RIGI and the ability of free-radical scavengers, given before irradiation, to reduce the incidence of instability suggest that radiation induced alterations to mitochondrial function likely play a role in RIGI. To further elucidate this mechanism, we performed high-throughput quantitative mass spectrometry on samples enriched in mitochondrial proteins from three chromosomally-unstable GM10115 Chinese-hamster-ovary cell lines and their stable parental cell line. Out of several hundred identified proteins, sufficient data were collected on 74 mitochondrial proteins to test for statistically significant differences in their abundance between unstable and stable cell lines. Each of the unstable cell lines showed a distinct profile of statistically-significant differential abundant mitochondrial proteins. The LS-12 cell line was characterized by 8 downregulated proteins, whereas the CS-9 cell line exhibited 5 distinct up-regulated proteins. The unstable 115 cell line had two down-regulated proteins, one of which was also downregulated in LS-12, and one up-regulated protein relative to stable parental cells. The mitochondrial protein profiles for LS-12 and C-9 provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the genome instability of these cell lines.

  4. Lycopene as a natural protector against gamma-radiation induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in primary culture of isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, M; Sudheer, A Ram; Pillai, K Raveendran; Kumar, P Raghu; Sudhakaran, P R; Menon, V P

    2007-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of lycopene, a naturally occurring dietary carotenoid, on gamma-radiation induced toxicity in cultured rat hepatocytes. The cellular changes were estimated using lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), ceruloplasmin, vitamins A, E, C and uric acid. The DNA damage was analysed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). The increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase in gamma-radiation dose (1, 2 and 4 Gy) in cultured rat hepatocytes. TBARS were increased significantly whereas the levels of GSH, vitamins C, E and A, ceruloplasmin, uric acid and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in gamma-irradiated groups. The maximum damage to hepatocytes was observed at 4 Gy irradiation. Pretreatment with lycopene (1.86, 9.31 and 18.62 microM) showed a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. The antioxidant enzymes increased significantly along with the levels of GSH, vitamins A, E, C, uric acid and ceruloplasmin. The maximum protection of hepatocytes was observed at 9.31 muM of lycopene pretreatment. Thus, our results show that pretreatment with lycopene offers protection against gamma-radiation induced cellular damage and can be developed as an effective radioprotector during radiotherapy.

  5. Influence of graphene-oxide nanosheets impregnation on properties of sterculia gum-polyacrylamide hydrogel formed by radiation induced polymerization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljit; Singh, Baldev

    2017-06-01

    Present work is an attempt, to explore the potential of graphene oxide nanoplates impregnation, on the mechanical and drug delivery properties of sterculia gum-polyacrylamide composite hydrogel formed by radiation induced polymerization. These polymers were characterized by SEM, cryo-SEM, AFM, FTIR's, (13)C NMR and swelling studies. Release profile of an anticancer drug 'gemcitabine' was studied to determine the drug release mechanism and best fit kinetic model. Furthermore, some important biomedical properties of the polymers such as blood compatibility, mucoadhesion, antioxidant properties and gel strength were also studied. Impregnation of GO into sterculia gum-poly(AAm) hydrogels decreased the swelling of hydrogels but improved the mechanical, drug loading and drug release properties of the hydrogels. Release of gemcitabine from drug loaded hydrogels occurred through non-Fickian diffusion mechanism and release profile was best fitted in first order kinetic model. These hydrogels have been found as haemocompatible, mucoadhesive, and antioxidant in nature.

  6. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  7. Acidic polysaccharide of Panax ginseng regulates the mitochondria/caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway in radiation-induced damage to the jejunum in mice.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Ahn, Ginnae; Im, Jaehak; Kim, Dae Seung; Ha, Danbee; Cho, Jinhee; Kim, Areum; Jee, Youngheun

    2014-04-01

    Owing to its susceptibility to radiation, the small intestine of mice is valuable for studying radioprotective effects. When exposed to radiation, intestinal crypt cells immediately go through apoptosis, which impairs swift differentiation necessary for the regeneration of intestinal villi. Our previous studies have elucidated that acidic polysaccharide of Panax ginseng (APG) protects the mouse small intestine from radiation-induced damage by lengthening villi with proliferation and repopulation of crypt cells. In the present study, we identified the molecular mechanism involved. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with gamma-rays with or without APG and the expression levels of apoptosis-related molecules in the jejunum were investigated using immunohistochemistry. APG pretreatment strongly decreased the radiation-induced apoptosis in the jejunum. It increased the expression levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-XS/L) and dramatically reduced the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (p53, BAX, cytochrome c and caspase-3). Therefore, APG attenuated the apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, which is controlled by p53 and Bcl-2 family members. Results presented in this study suggest that APG protects the mouse small intestine from irradiation-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the p53-dependent pathway and the mitochondria/caspase pathway. Thus, APG may be a potential agent for preventing radiation induced injuries in intestinal cells during radio-therapy such as in cancer treatment.

  8. [Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

  9. A transcriptome signature of endothelial lymphatic cells coexists with the chronic oxidative stress signature in radiation-induced post-radiotherapy breast angiosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Hamou, Nabila-Sandra; Laé, Marick; Almeida, Anna; de la Grange, Pierre; Kirova, Youlia; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Malfoy, Bernard

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced breast angiosarcomas are rare but recognized complication of breast cancer radiotherapy and are of poor prognosis. Little is known about the genetic abnormalities present in these secondary tumors. Herein, we investigated the differences in the genome and in the transcriptome that discriminate these tumors as a function of their etiology. Seven primary breast angiosarcomas and 18 secondary breast angiosarcomas arising in the irradiation field of a radiotherapy were analyzed. Copy number alterations and gene expression were analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Array and Affymetrix Exon Arrays, respectively. We showed that two transcriptome signatures of the radiation tumorigenesis coexisted in these tumors. One was histology specific and correctly discriminated 100% of the primary tumors from the radiation-induced tumors. The deregulation of marker genes, including podoplanin (PDPN), prospero homeobox 1 (PROX-1), vascular endothelial growth factor 3 (VEGFR3) and endothelin receptor A (EDNRA), suggests that the radiation-induced breast angiosarcomas developed from radiation-stimulated lymphatic endothelial cells. None of the genes of the histology-specific signature were present in our previously published signature of the radiation tumorigenesis which shows the presence of a chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced sarcomas of various histologies. Nevertheless, this oxidative stress signature classified correctly 88% of the breast angiosarcomas as a function of the etiology. In contrast, MYC amplification, which is observed in all radiation-induced tumors but also at a low rate in primary tumors, was not a marker of the radiation tumorigenesis.

  10. Effects of Xylopia aethiopica (Annonaceae) fruit methanol extract on gamma-radiation-induced oxidative stress in brain of adult male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, O A; Popoola, Bosede O; Farombi, E O

    2010-09-01

    Xylopia aethiopica (XA) (Annonaceae) possesses great nutritional and medicinal values. This study was designed to investigate the effects of XA fruit methanol extract on oxidative stress in brain of rats exposed to whole body gamma-radiation (5 Gy). Vitamin C (VC) served as standard antioxidant. Forty-four rats were divided into 4 groups of 11 rats each. One group served as control, two different groups were treated with XA and VC (250 mg/kg), 6 weeks before and 8 weeks after irradiation, and fourth group was only irradiated. Rats were sacrificed 1 and 8 weeks after irradiation. The antioxidant status, viz. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were estimated. Results indicate a significant increase (p < 0.05) in levels of brain LPO after irradiation. LPO increased by 90% and 151%, after 1 and 8 weeks of irradiation, respectively. Irradiation caused significant (p < 0.05) decreases in levels of GSH and GST by 61% and 43% after 1 week and, 75% and 73%, respectively, after 8 weeks of exposure. CAT and SOD levels were decreased by 62% and 68%, respectively, after 8 weeks of irradiation. Treatment with XA and VC ameliorated the radiation-induced decreases in antioxidant status of the animals. These suggest that XA could have beneficial effect by inhibiting oxidative damage in brain of exposed rats.

  11. Day and night variations in the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Philipp; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Mangerich, Aswin

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, biological rhythms synchronize physiological and behavioral processes to the 24-h light-dark (LD) cycle. At the molecular level, self-sustaining processes, such as oscillations of transcription-translation feedback loops, control the circadian clock, which in turn regulates a wide variety of cellular processes, including gene expression and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, previous studies reported circadian oscillations in the repair capacity of DNA lesions specifically repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, it is so far only poorly understood if DNA repair pathways other than NER are under circadian control, in particular base excision and DNA strand break repair. In the present study, we analyzed potential day and night variations in the repair of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation (i.e., mainly oxidative damage and DNA strand breaks) in living mouse splenocytes using a modified protocol of the automated FADU assay. Our results reveal that splenocytes isolated from mice during the light phase (ZT06) displayed higher DNA repair activity than those of the dark phase (ZT18). As analyzed by highly sensitive and accurate qPCR arrays, these alterations were accompanied by significant differences in expression profiles of genes involved in the circadian clock and DNA repair. Notably, the majority of the DNA repair genes were expressed at higher levels during the light phase (ZT06). This included genes of all major DNA repair pathways with the strongest differences observed for genes of base excision and DNA double strand break repair. In conclusion, here we provide novel evidence that mouse splenocytes exhibit significant differences in the repair of IR-induced DNA damage during the LD cycle, both on a functional and on a gene expression level. It will be interesting to test if these findings could be exploited for therapeutic purposes, e.g. time-of-the-day-specific application of DNA-damaging treatments used against blood

  12. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  13. Effect of bromodeoxyuridine on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair based on DNA fragment size using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, T.S.; Davis, M.A.; Normolle, D.P.

    1995-12-01

    We have used biphasic linear ramping pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to understand the effect of incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair. This technique permits a determination of the fragment size distribution produced immediately after irradiation as well as during the repair period. We found that incorporation of BrdUrd increased the induction and decreased the repair of radiation damage. The fragment size distribution was consistent with a random breakage model. When we found that significantly more damage was detected after irradiation of deproteinized DNA compared to intact cells, we studied the effects of BrdUrd incorporation on the radiation response of cells or DNA at various phases of preparation for electrophoresis: cells adherent to the culture dish (A), trypsinized cells (B), agarose-embedded cells (C) and deproteinized DNA (D). Although there was a general tendency to detect more damage when irradiation was performed later in the preparation process, steps B and C were the only successive steps which were significantly different. These findings demonstrate that incorporation of BrdUrd randomly increases the induction of radiation damage and decreases its repair at the level of 200 kbp to 5 Mbp fragments. Furthermore, they confirm that the amount of damage detected depends upon the conditions of the cells or DNA at the time of irradiation. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Ionizing radiation induces structural and functional damage on the molecules of rat brain homogenate membranes: a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Demir, Pinar; Akkas, Sara B; Severcan, Mete; Zorlu, Faruk; Severcan, Feride

    2015-01-01

    Humans can be exposed to ionizing radiation, due to various reasons, whose structural effects on biological membranes are not well defined. The current study aims to understand the ionizing radiation-induced structural and functional alterations in biomolecules of brain membranes using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using rat animal models. For this purpose, 1000 cGy of ionizing radiation was specifically directed to the head of Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were decapitated after 24 h. The results revealed that the lipid-to-protein ratio decreased and that irradiation caused lipid peroxidation and increases in the amounts of olefinic =CH, carbonyl, and methylene groups of lipids. In addition, ionizing radiation induced a decrease in membrane fluidity, disordering of membrane lipids, strengthening of the hydrogen bonding of the phosphate groups of lipid head-groups, and weakening in the hydrogen bonding of the interfacial carbonyl groups of lipids. Radiation further caused significant decrements in the α-helix and turns, and significant increments in the β-sheet and random coil contents in the protein structure. Hierarchical cluster analyses, performed in the whole region (3030-1000 cm(-1)), lipid (3030-2800 cm(-1)), and protein (1700-1600 cm(-1)) regions separately, successfully differentiated the control and irradiated groups of rat brain membranes and showed that proteins in the membranes are affected more than lipids from the damages induced with ionizing radiation. As a result, the current study showed that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used successfully as a novel method to monitor radiation-induced alterations on biological membranes.

  15. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Radiation-induced repair. Progress report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Progress in research on the description and interpretation of radiation-induced repair in cells is reported. It has been found that for the p-recA data induction seems to follow a model of fractional site occupancy rather than being all-or-none. Other areas investigated include: (1) the induction of the RecA-gene product; (2) the effect of uv-phage lambda infection on Rec-A protein synthesis; (3) induced uv radioresistance; (4) cold-shock effects; (5) lambda-prophage induction by x-rays and uv; (6) photoreactivation of uv-induced dimers; and (7) a comparative study of S.O.S. phenomena in various strains of E. coli. (ACR)

  16. Radiation induces progenitor cell death, microglia activation, and blood-brain barrier damage in the juvenile rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Boström, Martina; Ek, C. Joakim; Li, Tao; Xie, Cuicui; Xu, Yiran; Sun, Yanyan; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa tumors are the most common childhood intracranial tumors, and radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments. However, irradiation induces long-term adverse effects that can have significant negative impacts on the patient’s quality of life. The purpose of this study was to characterize irradiation-induced cellular and molecular changes in the cerebellum. We found that irradiation-induced cell death occurred mainly in the external germinal layer (EGL) of the juvenile rat cerebellum. The number of proliferating cells in the EGL decreased, and 82.9% of them died within 24 h after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiation induced oxidative stress, microglia accumulation, and inflammation in the cerebellum. Interestingly, blood-brain barrier damage and blood flow reduction was considerably more pronounced in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions. The cerebellar volume decreased by 39% and the migration of proliferating cells to the internal granule layer decreased by 87.5% at 16 weeks after irradiation. In the light of recent studies demonstrating that the cerebellum is important not only for motor functions, but also for cognition, and since treatment of posterior fossa tumors in children typically results in debilitating cognitive deficits, this differential susceptibility of the cerebellum to irradiation should be taken into consideration for future protective strategies. PMID:28382975

  17. Radiation induced oxidation of sulphydryl molecules in aqueous solutions. A comprehensive review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Manohar

    1994-06-01

    Radiation degradation studies of thiols in aqueous solutions under variety of conditions during the past more than three decades are reviewed. Radiolytic mechanism of γ-irradiated air free, air and N 2O-saturated solutions of cysteine, cysteamine, dithiothreitol, mercaptoethanol, glutathione and papain are high lighted. A large variety of thiols repair organic radicals by H atom transfer from SH group. The repair rate constants are found to be between 5 × 10 6M -1s -1 to 4.0 × 10 8M -1s -1. The data are tabulated. The rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with variety of thiols evaluated by pulse radioanalysis and flash photolysis are found to be very high and are computed. Sulphur centered radicals e.g. RṠ;, RSSR ⨪ generated in the pulse radioanalysis of thiols are very important species. Their reactions with oxygen and other compounds are of relevance to radiation biology. The results, reaction mechanism, the repair rate constant, the rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with thiols and the rate constants of sulphur centered radicals with oxygen and other compounds of biological interest can be of great use in the interpretation of the mechanism of the protection of cells, animals, DNA and other biological molecules and may well provide basic essential information for the understanding of radiation biology. The protection of biological target at chemical level is generally understood in terms of protecting compounds participating directly in the radiochemical event and reducing the damage to biological target. The damage to the biological target is repaired by the hydrogen transfer from the thiol. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms are quite complex. There is no single mechanism which explains all the experimental observations on the metabolism of thiols. More work needs to be done in order to understand the metabolic aspect of the protection mechanism.

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced alterations in oxidative stress and cytokine expression in lung tissue by Panax ginseng extract.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seong Soon; Kim, Hyeong Geug; Han, Jong Min; Lee, Jin Seok; Choi, Min Kyung; Huh, Gil Ja; Son, Chang Gue

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the modulating effect of Panax ginseng extract (PGE) on radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) by measuring early changes in oxidative stress levels, cytokine expression, and the histopathology of mouse lung tissue treated with high dose of X-ray radiation. The mice were pretreated with 25, 50, and 100-mg/kg doses of PGE orally for four consecutive days, and their thoraces were then exposed to 15-Gy X-ray radiation 1 h after the last administration of PGE on day 4. The pretreatments with 50 and 100 mg/kg PGE led to significant reductions in the elevation of lipid peroxidation levels at 2 and 10 days, respectively, after irradiation. The mice pretreated with PGE exhibited dose-dependent reductions in the irradiation-induced production of tumor necrosis factor α and transforming growth factor β1 cytokines 10 days after irradiation, with these reductions nearly reaching the control levels after the 100-mg/kg dose. Furthermore, together with providing significant protection against reductions in catalase activity and glutathione content, pretreatment with 100 mg/kg PGE resulted in a marked attenuation of the severity of inflammatory changes in lung tissue 10 days after irradiation. A high pretreatment dose of PGE may be a useful pharmacological approach for protection against RILI.

  19. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-09-02

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system.

  20. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Mei Jing; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system. PMID:26404324

  1. BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 are potential molecular targets for the modulation of a radiation-induced DNA damage response in bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Rothkamm, Kai; McClelland, Keeva; Al Rashid, Shahnaz T; Prise, Kevin M

    2015-01-28

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment option for many human cancers. Current research is investigating the use of molecular targeted drugs in order to improve responses to radiotherapy in various cancers. The cellular response to irradiation is driven by both direct DNA damage in the targeted cell and intercellular signalling leading to a broad range of bystander effects. This study aims to elucidate radiation-induced DNA damage response signalling in bystander cells and to identify potential molecular targets to modulate the radiation induced bystander response in a therapeutic setting. Stalled replication forks in T98G bystander cells were visualised via bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) nuclear foci detection at sites of single stranded DNA. γH2AX co-localised with these BrdU foci. BRCA1 and FANCD2 foci formed in T98G bystander cells. Using ATR mutant F02-98 hTERT and ATM deficient GM05849 fibroblasts it could be shown that ATR but not ATM was required for the recruitment of FANCD2 to sites of replication associated DNA damage in bystander cells whereas BRCA1 bystander foci were ATM-dependent. Phospho-Chk1 foci formation was observed in T98G bystander cells. Clonogenic survival assays showed moderate radiosensitisation of directly irradiated cells by the Chk1 inhibitor UCN-01 but increased radioresistance of bystander cells. This study identifies BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 as potential targets for the modulation of radiation response in bystander cells. It adds to our understanding of the key molecular events propagating out-of-field effects of radiation and provides a rationale for the development of novel molecular targeted drugs for radiotherapy optimisation.

  2. sup 32 P-postlabeling detection of radiation-induced DNA damage: Identification and estimation of thymine glycols and phosphoglycolate termini

    SciTech Connect

    Weinfeld, M.; Soderlind, K.J.M. )

    1991-01-29

    A {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay has been developed that permits detection of several radiogenic base and sugar lesions of DNA at the femtomole level. The technique is based on the inability of DNase I and snake venom phosphodiesterase to cleave the internucleotide phosphodiester bond immediately 5{prime} to the site of damage so that complete digestion of irradiated DNA with these nucleases and alkaline phosphatase yields lesion-bearing dinucleoside monophosphates. Because these fragments contain an unmodified nucleoside at the 5{prime}-end of each molecule, they can be readily phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase and ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse-phase HPLC. The authors observed a linear induction of total damage in DNA irradiated with 5-50 Gy. Virtually no damage was detected when the DNA was irradiated in solution containing 1 M DMSO, implicating hydroxyl radicals in the formation of these lesions. Evidence for the presence of thymine glycols and phosphoglycolate groups came from (1) a comparison of the radiation-induced products with those produced by OsO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} and (2) incubation of irradiated DNA with Escherichia coli endonuclease 3 and exonuclease 3 before analysis by the postlabeling procedure. This confirmed by comigration of the radiogenic products with chemically synthesized markers. The identity of the 5{prime}-nucleotide of each isolated compound was obtained by nuclease P1 digestion. This analysis of nearest-neighbor bases to thymine glycols and phosphoglycolates indicated a nonrandom interaction between radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals and DNA.

  3. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  4. Radiation-induced graft copolymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate onto graphene oxide for Cr(VI) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Youwei; Zhang, Long; Wang, Liancai; Sun, Chao; Liu, Pinggui; He, Lihua; Zeng, Xinmiao; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-07-01

    Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA)-grafted graphene oxide hybrid materials (GO-g-P) were fabricated using γ-ray irradiation at ambient temperature. The morphology and structure of GO-g-P were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was confirmed that DMAEMA was grafted successfully on the surface of graphene sheet. The grafting yield of GO-g-P increased with monomer concentration (0-2.5 mol L-1) and dose (0-40 kGy). The resulting adsorbent (GO-g-P) with amine groups was highly efficient for removing Cr(VI) from its acidic aqueous solution and could be easily separated by filtration. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) removal was observed at pH 1.1 and the Cr(VI) uptake of GO-g-P at this pH was 82.4 mg g-1.

  5. Preventive efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract of Cymbopogon citratus against radiation-induced DNA damage on V79 cells and free radical scavenging ability against radicals generated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rao, B S S; Shanbhoge, R; Rao, B N; Adiga, S K; Upadhya, D; Aithal, B K; Kumar, M R S

    2009-04-01

    This study presents the findings of free radical scavenging and antigenotoxic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Cymbopogon citratus (CCE). The CCE at a concentration of 60 microg/mL resulted in a significant scavenging ability of 2,2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH; (85%), 2,2-azinobis (3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS; 77%), hydroxyl (70%), superoxide (76%), nitric oxide (78%) free radicals generated using in vitro and also a moderate anti-lipid peroxidative effect (57%). Further, the radiation-induced antigenotoxic potential of CCE was assessed in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (V79) using micronucleus assay. The CCE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the yield of radiation-induced micronuclei, with a maximum effect at 125 microg/mL CCE for 1 h before 2 Gy of radiation. Similarly, there was a significant (P < 0.05-0.0001) decrease in percentage of micronuclei when V79 cells were treated with optimal dose of CCE (125 microg/mL) before exposure to different doses of gamma radiation, that is, 0.5-4 Gy, compared with radiation alone groups. The results of the micronucleus study indicated antigenotoxic effect demonstrating the radioprotective potential of CCE and, which may partly due to its and antioxidant capacity as it presented its ability to scavenge various free radicals in vitro and anti-lipid peroxidative potential.

  6. Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), a potent mitigator of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Morita, Akinori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Fujita, Kazuko; Hosoi, Yoshio; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), an inorganic vanadium compound, could effectively suppress radiation-induced p53-mediated apoptosis via both transcription-dependent and transcription-independent pathways. As a potent radiation protector administered at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight (20 mg/kg) prior to total body irradiation (TBI) by intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, it completely protected mice from hematopoietic syndrome and partially from gastrointestinal syndrome. In the present study, radiation mitigation effects from vanadate were investigated by ip injection of vanadate after TBI in mice. Results showed that a single administration of vanadate at a dose of 20 mg/kg markedly improved the 30-day survival rate and the peripheral blood hemogram, relieved bone marrow aplasia and decreased occurrence of the bone marrow micronucleated erythrocytes in the surviving animals. The dose reduction factor was 1.2 when a single dose of 20 mg/kg was administered 15 min after TBI in mice using the 30-day survival test as the endpoint. Results also showed that either doubling the vanadate dose (40 mg/kg) in a single administration or continuing the vanadate treatment (after a single administration at 20 mg/kg) from the following day at a dose of 5 mg/kg per day for 4 consecutive days further significantly improved the efficacy for rescuing bone marrow failure in the 30-day survival test. Taken together, these findings indicate that vanadate would be a potent mitigator suppressing the acute lethality (hematopoietic syndrome) and minimizing the detrimental effects (anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) induced by TBI in mice. PMID:23349341

  7. Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), a potent mitigator of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Morita, Akinori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Fujita, Kazuko; Hosoi, Yoshio; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), an inorganic vanadium compound, could effectively suppress radiation-induced p53-mediated apoptosis via both transcription-dependent and transcription-independent pathways. As a potent radiation protector administered at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight (20 mg/kg) prior to total body irradiation (TBI) by intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, it completely protected mice from hematopoietic syndrome and partially from gastrointestinal syndrome. In the present study, radiation mitigation effects from vanadate were investigated by ip injection of vanadate after TBI in mice. Results showed that a single administration of vanadate at a dose of 20 mg/kg markedly improved the 30-day survival rate and the peripheral blood hemogram, relieved bone marrow aplasia and decreased occurrence of the bone marrow micronucleated erythrocytes in the surviving animals. The dose reduction factor was 1.2 when a single dose of 20 mg/kg was administered 15 min after TBI in mice using the 30-day survival test as the endpoint. Results also showed that either doubling the vanadate dose (40 mg/kg) in a single administration or continuing the vanadate treatment (after a single administration at 20 mg/kg) from the following day at a dose of 5 mg/kg per day for 4 consecutive days further significantly improved the efficacy for rescuing bone marrow failure in the 30-day survival test. Taken together, these findings indicate that vanadate would be a potent mitigator suppressing the acute lethality (hematopoietic syndrome) and minimizing the detrimental effects (anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) induced by TBI in mice.

  8. Enhanced radiation-induced cytotoxic effect by 2-ME in glioma cells is mediated by induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage via activation of ATM pathways.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huichao; Zhao, Shiguang; Zhang, Jianhua; Lv, Gongwei; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Huibo; Wang, Ligang

    2007-12-14

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults, but there remains no effective therapeutic approach. 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), which is a naturally occurring metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, was shown to enhance radiotherapeutic effect in certain tumors; however, whether 2-ME can also enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to radiotherapy remains unknown. The present study, therefore, was to address this issue using two human glioma cell lines (T98G and U251MG). These cells were irradiated with and without 2-ME and then clonogenic assay, apoptosis assay, DNA damage, and cell cycle change were examined. Results showed that 2-ME significantly enhances radiation-induced cell death in both glioma cells, shown by decreasing cell viability and increasing apoptotic cell death. No such radiosensitizing effect was observed if cells pre-treated with Estrodiol, suggesting the specifically radiosensitizing effect of 2-ME rather than a general effect of estrodials. The enhanced radio-cytotoxic effect in glioma cells by 2-ME was found to be associated with its enhancement of G(2)/M arrest and DNA damage, and phosphorylated ATM protein kinases as well as cell cycle checkpoint protein Chk2. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM by ATM inhibitor abolished 2-ME-activated Chk2 and enhanced radio-cytotoxic effects. These results suggest that 2-ME enhancement of the sensitivity of glioma cell lines to radiotherapy is mediated by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased DNA damage via activation of ATM kinases.

  9. Persistence of Space Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts and the Effects of Repeat Long Duration Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    The yield of chromosome damage in astronauts blood lymphocytes has been shown to increase after long duration space missions of a few months or more. This provides a useful in vivo measurement of space radiation induced damage that takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. We present our latest follow-up analyses of chromosome damage in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting and collected at various times, from directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Dose was derived from frequencies of chromosome exchanges using preflight calibration curves, and estimates derived from samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. Limited data on three individuals who have participated in repeat long duration space flights indicates a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields, and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  10. Interaction of thiols and non-thiol {center_dot}OH scavengers in the modification of radiation-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, R.E.; Ayene, I.S.; Koch, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Oxygen has long been known to sensitize cells to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and is widely believed to do so by the fixation of potentially reversible radical damage to cellular DNA. A number of studies have suggested that this widely observed oxygen enhancement of cell killing requires the presence of reduced thiols. Published in vitro studies of the modification of DNA damage by glutathione or other thiols have generally shown peak oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) much higher than those observed for cell killing. However, these studies measured loss of DNA transforming activity or induction of single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs), related endpoints which are not thought to represent lethal lesions, rather than double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are generally believed to be the dominant lethal lesions from ionizing radiation. In addition, non-thiol scavengers of OH radicals were not generally present. There is also evidence that, in addition to their protective effects, some non-thiol {center_dot}OH scavengers can produce radicals which are damaging to DNA under anoxic conditions. In the present investigation, the authors have adapted a previously used in vitro model system to simultaneously investigate the effects on radiation-induced single- and double-strand DNA breaks of various combinations of glutathione and glycerol, a widely used non-thiol scavenger, in the presence and absence of oxygen.

  11. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work.

  12. Oxidative damage in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Seet, Raymond C S; Lee, Chung-Yung J; Lim, Erle C H; Quek, Amy M L; Yeo, Leonard L L; Huang, Shan-Hong; Halliwell, Barry

    2009-08-15

    Oxidative stress may be important in the pathogenesis of dengue infection. Using accurate markers of oxidative damage, we assessed the extent of oxidative damage in dengue patients. The levels of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid products (HETEs), F(2)-isoprostanes (F(2)-IsoPs), and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were measured in 28 adult dengue patients and 28 age-matched study controls during the febrile, defervescent, and convalescent stages of infection. We compared the absolute and the percentage change in these markers in relation to key clinical parameters and inflammatory markers. The levels of total HETEs and total HETEs/arachidonate, total F(2)-IsoPs/arachidonate, and COPs/cholesterol were higher during the febrile compared to the convalescent level. Total HETEs correlated positively with admission systolic blood pressure (r=0.52, p<0.05), whereas an inverse relationship was found between 7beta-hydroxycholesterol and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r=-0.61 and -0.59, respectively, p<0.01). The urinary F(2)-IsoP level was higher in urine during the febrile stage compared to the convalescent level. Despite lower total cholesterol levels during the febrile stage compared to convalescent levels, a higher percentage of cholesterol was found as COPs (7beta-, 24-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol). The levels of platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase activity, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were higher during the febrile stage compared to their convalescent levels (p<0.01). Markers of oxidative damage are altered during the various stages of dengue infection.

  13. Electromagnetic noise inhibits radiofrequency radiation-induced DNA damage and reactive oxygen species increase in human lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Wang, KaiJun; Ni, Shuang; Ye, PanPan; Yu, YiBo; Ye, Juan; Sun, LiXia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate whether superposing of electromagnetic noise could block or attenuate DNA damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase of cultured human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) induced by acute exposure to 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field (RF) of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). Methods An sXc-1800 RF exposure system was used to produce a GSM signal at 1.8 GHz (217 Hz amplitude-modulated) with the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 W/kg. After 2 h of intermittent exposure, the ROS level was assessed by the fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DNA damage to HLECs was examined by alkaline comet assay and the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation assay. Results After exposure to 1.8 GHz RF for 2 h, HLECs exhibited significant intracellular ROS increase in the 2, 3, and 4 W/kg groups. RF radiation at the SAR of 3 W/kg and 4 W/kg could induce significant DNA damage, examined by alkaline comet assay, which was used to detect mainly single strand breaks (SSBs), while no statistical difference in double strand breaks (DSBs), evaluated by γH2AX foci, was found between RF exposure (SAR: 3 and 4 W/kg) and sham exposure groups. When RF was superposed with 2 μT electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS increase and DNA damage. Conclusions DNA damage induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field for 2 h, which was mainly SSBs, may be associated with the increased ROS production. Electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS formation and DNA damage. PMID:18509546

  14. Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. ); Poon, P.Y. )

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a rangemore » of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation, below spontaneous levels observed in control mice. Lastly, the 18F-FDG RBE was <1.0, indicating that the mixed radiation quality

  16. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  17. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  18. Detection of Low Level Microwave Radiation Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Vis-à-vis Genotoxicity in Brain of Fischer Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Chandna, Sudhir; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation has been increasingly used in industry, commerce, medicine and especially in mobile phone technology and has become a matter of serious concern in present time. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaging effects of low-level microwave radiation in brain of Fischer rats. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to microwave radiation for 30 days at three different frequencies: 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: Group I (Sham exposed): Animals not exposed to microwave radiation but kept under same conditions as that of other groups, Group II: Animals exposed to microwave radiation at frequency 900 MHz at specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10−4 W/kg, Group III: Animals exposed to 1800 MHz at SAR 5.835 × 10−4 W/kg and Group IV: Animals exposed to 2450 MHz at SAR 6.672 × 10−4 W/kg. At the end of the exposure period animals were sacrificed immediately and DNA damage in brain tissue was assessed using alkaline comet assay. Results: In the present study, we demonstrated DNA damaging effects of low level microwave radiation in brain. Conclusion: We concluded that low SAR microwave radiation exposure at these frequencies may induce DNA strand breaks in brain tissue. PMID:23833433

  19. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  20. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  1. Protective effects of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone against x-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schally, A.V.; Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Schlosser, J.V.; Karashima, T.; Debeljuk, L.; Gandle, B.; Sampson, M.

    1987-02-01

    Possible protective effects of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH and antagonist N-Ac(D-Phe(pCl)/sup 1,2/,D-Trp/sup 3/,D-Arg/sup 6/,D-Ala/sup 10/)LH-RH against testicular damage caused by x-radiation were investigated in rats. Three months after being subjected to x-irradiation of the testes with 415 or 622 rads, control rats showed marked reduction in the weights of the testes and elevated levels of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), indicating tubular damage. Histological studies demonstrated that, in testes of rats given 415 rads, most seminiferous tubules had only Sertoli cells and no germinal cells, and, in the group give 622 rads, the depression of spermatogenesis was even more marked. Rats pretreated for 50 days with LH-RH antagonist showed a complete recovery of testicular weights and spermatogenesis 3 months after 415 rads and showed partial recovery after 622 rads, and LH and FSH levels returned to normal in both of these groups. Three experiments were also carried out in which the rats were pretreated for 1-2 months with long-acting microcapsules of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH. Some rats were then subjected to gonadal irradiation with 415 or 622 rads and allowed a recovery period of 2-4 months. On the basis of testicular weights, histology, and gonadotropin levels, it could be concluded that the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH did not protect the rat testes exposed to 622 rads and, at most, only partially protected against 415 rads. These results suggest that pretreatment with LH-RH antagonists and possibly agonists, might decrease the testicular damage caused by radiation and accelerate the recovery of reproductive functions.

  2. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response.

  3. Radiation-induced DNA damage in canine hemopoietic cells and stromal cells as measured by the comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, L.; Selig, C.; Plappert, U.; Nothdurft, W.

    1996-12-31

    Stromal cell progenitors (fibroblastoid colony-forming unit; CFU-Fs) are representative of the progenitor cell population of the hemopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). Previous studies of the radiation dose-effect relationships for colony formation have shown that canine CFU-Fs are relatively radioresistant as characterized by a D{sub 0} value of about 2.4 Gy. In contrast, hemopoietic progenitors are particularly radiosensitive (D{sub 0} values = 0.12-0.60 Gy). In the present study, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique for the in situ quantitation of DNA strand breaks and alkalilabile site was employed. Canine buffy coat cells from BM aspirates and cells harvested from CFU-F colonies or from mixed populations of adherent BM stromal cell (SC) layers were exposed to increasing doses of X-rays, embedded in agarose gel on slides, lysed with detergents, and placed in an electric field. DNA migrating from single cells in the gel was made visible as {open_quotes}comets{close_quotes} by ethidium bromide staining. Immediate DNA damage was much less in cultured stromal cells than in hemopoietic cells in BM aspirates. These results suggest that the observed differences in clonogenic survival could be partly due to differences in the type of the initial DNA damage between stromal cells and hemopoietic cells. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Preventive or potential therapeutic value of nutraceuticals against ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in exposed subjects and frequent fliers.

    PubMed

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-08-20

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure.

  5. Preventive or Potential Therapeutic Value of Nutraceuticals against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Exposed Subjects and Frequent Fliers

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure. PMID:23965979

  6. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Han, W; Yu, K N; Wu, L J; Wu, Y C; Wang, H Z

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that α-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system.

  7. Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva extract attenuates ultraviolet B radiation-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, M J; Kim, K C; Zheng, J; Yao, C W; Cha, J W; Kang, H K; Yoo, E S; Koh, Y S; Ko, M H; Lee, N H; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the protective effects of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva (GBE) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human HaCaT keratinocytes. GBE exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. In addition, both the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical were scavenged by GBE in cell-free systems. GBE absorbed light in the UVB range (280-320 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum and lessened the extent of UVB-induced oxidative damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and DNA. Finally, GBE-treated keratinocytes showed a reduction in UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that GBE exerts cytoprotective actions against UVB-stimulated oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby attenuating injury to cellular constituents and preventing cell death.

  8. Differential Processing of Low and High LET Radiation Induced DNA Damage: Investigation of Switch from ATM to ATR Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The members of the phosphatidylinositol kinase-like kinase family of proteins namely ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) are directly responsible for the maintenance of genomic integrity by mounting DDR through signaling and facilitating the recruitment of repair factors at the sites of DNA damage along with coordinating the deployment of cell cycle checkpoints to permit repair by phosphorylating Checkpoint kinase Chk1, Chk2 and p53. High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of protons and high energy and charged (HZE) particles from SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk for astronauts on their space flight missions. The determination of these risks and the design of potential safeguards require sound knowledge of the biological consequences of lesion induction and the capability of the cells to counter them. We here strive to determine the coordination of ATM and ATR kinases at the break sites directly affecting checkpoint signaling and DNA repair and whether differential processing of breaks induced by low and high LET radiation leads to possible augmentation of swap of these damage sensors at the sites of DNA damage. Exposure of cells to IR triggers rapid autophosphorylation of serine-1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates monomer formation of ATM. ATM kinase activity depends on the disruption of the dimer, which allows access and phosphorylation of downstream ATM substrates like Chk2. Evidence suggests that ATM is activated by the alterations in higher-order chromatin structure although direct binding of ATM to DSB ends may be a crucial step in its activation. On the other hand, in case of ATR, RPA (replication protein A)-coated ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) generated as a result of stalled DNA replication or during processing of chromosomal lesions is crucial for the localization of ATR to sites of DNA damage in association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP). Although the

  9. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Increases Radiosensitivity of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Prolonging Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Khoram, Nastaran Masoudi; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Nikoofar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is an important cause of death among women. The development of radioresistance in breast cancer leads to recurrence after radiotherapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a polyphenolic compound of honeybee propolis, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether CAPE enhanced the radiation sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and T47D (estrogen receptor-positive) cell lines. Methods The cytotoxic effect of CAPE on MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells was evaluated by performing an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess clonogenic ability, MDA-MB-231 and T47D cells were treated with CAPE (1 µM) for 72 hours before irradiation, and then, a colony assay was performed. A comet assay was used to determine the number of DNA strand breaks at four different times. Results CAPE decreased the viability of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the clonogenic assay, pretreatment of cells with CAPE before irradiation significantly reduced the surviving fraction of MDA-MB-231 cells at doses of 6 and 8 Gy. A reduction in the surviving fraction of T47D cells was observed relative to MDA-MB-231 at lower doses of radiation. Additionally, CAPE maintained radiation-induced DNA damage in T47D cells for a longer period than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that CAPE impairs DNA damage repair immediately after irradiation. The induction of radiosensitivity by CAPE in radioresistant breast cancer cells may be caused by prolonged DNA damage. PMID:27066092

  10. Radiation-Induced Astrogliosis and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage Can Be Abrogated Using Anti-TNF Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christy M.; Gaber, M. Waleed Sabek, Omaima M.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: In this article, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in the initiation of acute damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain tissue following radiotherapy (RT) for CNS tumors. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a closed cranial window technique were used to measure quantitatively BBB permeability to FITC-dextran 4.4-kDa molecules, leukocyte adhesion (Rhodamine-6G) and vessel diameters before and after 20-Gy cranial radiation with and without treatment with anti-TNF. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify astrogliosis post-RT and immunofluorescence was used to visualize protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 post-RT. Recombinant TNF (rTNF) was used to elucidate the role of TNF in leukocyte adhesion and vessel diameter. Results: Mice treated with anti-TNF showed significantly lower permeability and leukocyte adhesion at 24 and 48 h post-RT vs. RT-only animals. We observed a significant decrease in arteriole diameters at 48 h post-RT that was inhibited in TNF-treated animals. We also saw a significant increase in activated astrocytes following RT that was significantly lower in the anti-TNF-treated group. In addition, immunofluorescence showed protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 in the cerebral cortex that was inhibited with anti-TNF treatment. Finally, administration of rTNF induced a decrease in arteriole diameter and a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion in venules and arterioles. Conclusions: TNF plays a significant role in acute changes in BBB permeability, leukocyte adhesion, arteriole diameter, and astrocyte activation following cranial radiation. Treatment with anti-TNF protects the brain's microvascular network from the acute damage following RT.

  11. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response. PMID:23979077

  12. The preventive effect of Se-methylselenocysteine on γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ho-Sang; Yang, Woo-Jung; Choi, Eun-Mi

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the preventive effect of Se-methylselenocysteine (MSC) administration on γ-radiation (whole body irradiation, single 10-Gy dose)-induced oxidative damage in rat lungs. Rats were pretreated with MSC (0.75mg/rat/day) for 1 week before γ-irradiation. The MSC pretreatment prevented the irradiation-induced increase in lipid peroxidation and the concomitant decrease in cellular glutathione content. The prevention of irradiation-induced oxidative damage in MSC-pretreated rat lungs appeared to be associated with increased antioxidant capacity, particularly in the glutathione system. The 1-week MSC treatment resulted in an increase in glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, which are involved in glutathione redox cycling. An increase in catalase activity was also observed in the rat lungs. Additionally, a significantly increased level of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was exhibited in the MSC-treated rat lungs. Heme oxygenase 1, glutathione S-transferase pi, and peroxiredoxin 1, which are known target proteins of Nrf2, were also increased in MSC-treated lungs. These results implicate Nrf2 signaling in the MSC-induced activation of the antioxidant system.

  13. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC.

  14. Role of oxygen-derived free radicals in radiation-induced damage and death of nondividing eucaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    McLennan, G.; Oberley, L.W.; Autor, A.P.

    1980-10-01

    Isolated alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to varying doses of x-radiation. Using dye exclusion as a test for viability, this cell was found to be quite radioresistant relative to other eucaryotic cells. A dose of 11,500 rad was required to kill 50% of the cells when viability was assessed 24 hr after irradiation. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DETAPAC) gave significant protection, whereas ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and mannitol provided little or no protection. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy confirmed these results. In addition to the assessment of macrophage viability, a characteristic function of these cells was measured following exposure to radiation in the absence and presence of the putative protective agents. Phagocytic function as assessed by the rate of ingestion of killed yeast particles was measured before and after exposure of a population of pulmonary macrophages to 2850 rad. This dose of radiation caused a 75% loss of phagocytic function in the irradiated cells. DETAPAC when present during irradiation of the pulmonary macrophages provided nearly complete protection against loss of function. Pulmonary macrophages incubated under specific conditions with superoxide dismutase and catalase retained 50% of the activity of nonirradiated cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that hydroxyl radicals generated from superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and iron are the agents of oxygen-induced cell damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  15. Hydrogel containing silibinin-loaded pomegranate oil based nanocapsules exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on skin damage UVB radiation-induced in mice.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Marila Crivellaro Lay; Rigon, Cristina; Camponogara, Camila; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Cruz, Letícia

    2017-03-23

    The present study shows the development of a topical formulation (hydrogel) containing silibinin-loaded pomegranate oil based nanocapsules suspension and its evaluation as an alternative for the treatment of cutaneous UVB radiation-induced damages. For this, an animal model of skin injury induced by UVB radiation was employed. Gellan gum was used as gel forming agent by its direct addition to nanocapsules suspension. The hydrogels showed adequate pH values (5.6-5.9) and a silibinin content close to the theoretical value (1mg/g). Through vertical Franz diffusion cells it was demonstrated that nanocapsules decreased the silibinin retention in the semisolid formulation. All formulations were effective in reducing mice ear edema and leukocyte infiltration induced by UVB radiation 24h after the treatments. After 48h, only the hydrogels containing nanocapsules or silibinin associated with pomegranate oil demonstrated anti-edematogenic effect, as well as the positive control (hydrogel containing silver sulfadiazine 1%). After 72h, the hydrogel containing unloaded pomegranate oil based nanocapsules still presented a small activity. In conclusion, the results of this investigation demonstrated the feasibility to prepare a semisolid formulation presenting performance comparable to the traditional therapeutic option for skin burns (silver sulfadiazine) and with prolonged in vivo anti-inflammatory activity compared to the non-nanoencapsulated compounds.

  16. Radiation induced cytochrome c release causes loss of rat colonic fluid absorption by damage to crypts and pericryptal myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, J; Gourmelon, P; Griffiths, N; Lebrun, F; Naftalin, R; Pedley, K

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Therapeutic or accidental exposure to radiation commonly causes gastrointestinal disturbances, including diarrhoea. Rats subjected to whole body ionising radiation at a dose of 8 Gy lose their capacity to absorb fluid via the descending colon after four days. After seven days, fluid absorption recovers to control levels.
AIMS—To investigate the effect of ionising radiation on colonic permeability together with its effect on mitochondria dependent apoptotic signals and intercellular adhesion molecules.
METHODS—Rats were irradiated with doses of 0-12 Gy. Colonic permeability was measured by accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextran in crypt lumens. Changes in levels of cytochrome c, caspase 3, E and OB cadherin, β-catenin smooth muscle actin, and collagen IV were assessed using immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy.
RESULTS—Cytosolic cytochrome c increased after 8 Gy (t1/2 1.4 (0.6) hours) and peaked at approximately six hours. Caspase 3 increased more slowly, particularly in crypt epithelial cells (t1/2 57 (14.5) hours). Pericryptal myofibroblasts disintegrated within 24 hours as was evident from loss of OB cadherin and smooth muscle actin. This coincided with increased crypt permeability to dextran. Intercellular adhesion between crypt luminal cells was not lost until day 4 when both β-catenin and E-cadherin were minimal. The half maximal dose-response for these effects was in the range 2-4 Gy. Recovery of colonic transport was concurrent with recovery of pericryptal smooth muscle actin and OB cadherin. The pan caspase inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp.fluoromethylketone (1 mg/kg per day) had a small effect in conserving the pericryptal sheath myofibroblasts and sheath permeability but had no systemic therapeutic effects.
CONCLUSIONS—These data suggest that radiation damage to the colon may be initiated by mitochondrial events. Loss of crypt fluid absorption and increased permeability coincided with decreased

  17. Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Modulated in Hypoxia for Remodeling of Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    PubMed Central

    An, Hye-Young; Shin, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Hun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether a secretome from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) modulated by hypoxic conditions to contain therapeutic factors contributes to salivary gland (SG) tissue remodeling and has the potential to improve irradiation (IR)-induced salivary hypofunction in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSC) were isolated, expanded, and exposed to hypoxic conditions (O2 < 5%). The hypoxia-conditioned medium was then filtered to a high molecular weight fraction and prepared as a hAdMSC secretome. The hAdMSC secretome was subsequently infused into the tail vein of C3H mice immediately after local IR once a day for seven consecutive days. The control group received equal volume (500 μL) of vehicle (PBS) only. SG function and structural tissue remodeling by the hAdMSC secretome were investigated. Human parotid epithelial cells (HPEC) were obtained, expanded in vitro, and then irradiated and treated with either the hypoxia-conditioned medium or a normoxic control medium. Cell proliferation and IR-induced cell death were examined to determine the mechanism by which the hAdMSC secretome exerted its effects. Results The conditioned hAdMSC secretome contained high levels of GM-CSF, VEGF, IL-6, and IGF-1. Repeated systemic infusion with the hAdMSC secretome resulted in improved salivation capacity and increased levels of salivary proteins, including amylase and EGF, relative to the PBS group. The microscopic structural integrity of SG was maintained and salivary epithelial (AQP-5), endothelial (CD31), myoepithelial (α-SMA) and SG progenitor cells (c-Kit) were successfully protected from radiation damage and remodeled. The hAdMSC secretome strongly induced proliferation of HPEC and led to a significant decrease in cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic effects of the hAdMSC secretome were found to be promoted after hypoxia-preconditioning relative to normoxia

  18. As(III) inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers repair via generation of nitric oxide in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Hudson, Laurie G.; Sun, Xi; Feng, Changjian; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The inhibition of DNA damage repair by arsenic has been hypothesized to contribute to the co-carcinogenic activities of arsenic observed in vivo. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are an important mutagenic UVR photoproduct and implicated in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. The current study demonstrates that low concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) inhibit UVR-induced CPDs repair in a human keratinocyte cell line via nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following As(III) treatment, NO production and iNOS expression are elevated. Little is known about regulation of iNOS by As(III) and further investigations indicated that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and NF-κB are required for As(III) induction of iNOS expression. This As(III)-stimulated signaling cascade was involved in inhibition of UVR-induced CPDs repair as disruption of p38 MAPK activity and NF-κB nuclear translocation counteracted the effects of As(III) on CPD repair. Selective inhibition of iNOS ameliorated As(III) inhibition of CPDs repair thereby suggesting that iNOS is a downstream mediator of As(III) activity. These findings provide evidence that an As(III) stimulated signal transduction cascade culminating in elevated iNOS expression and NO generation is an underlying mechanism for inhibition of UVR-induced DNA damage repair by arsenic. PMID:18621123

  19. Role of nitric oxide synthase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in radiation-induced decrease in norepinephrine release

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.

    1994-11-17

    Although the central nervous system (CNS) is considered to be relatively resistant to the direct effects of ionizing radiation, the dose and the time elapsed after radiation exposure can have a complex effect on the CNS. The hippocampus is important in critical functions such as learning, memory, and motor performance, and these functions are impaired after exposure to ionizing radiation. Noradrenergic systems are important in mediating arousal, food intake, and to some extent motor functions. Histofluorescence and immunohistochemical techniques have shown noradrenergic pathways in the hippocampus. Several factors can contribute to acute nervous system damage in vivo: (1) reduced systemic blood pressure following exposure to 25-100 Gy of gamma radiation, (2) decreased cerebral blood flow in various regions of the brain, including the hippocampus, (3) ischemia produced by the decreased blood flow, which is likely to affect neuronal activity; (4) free radical generation with resulting oxygen radicals implicated in cell damage following ischemia; (5) brain ischemia-induced release of an excessive amount of glutamate in the hippocampus, which acts on nitric oxide (NO) synthase to form NO through N-methvl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, causing toxic effects.

  20. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  1. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  2. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  3. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  4. Functional Consequences of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Neural Stem Cells and the Brain Exposed to Charged Particle Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Bertrand P.; Giedzinski, Erich; Izadi, Atefeh; Suarez, Tatiana; Lan, Mary L.; Tran, Katherine K.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Raber, Jacob; Parihar, Vipan K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Redox homeostasis is critical in regulating the fate and function of multipotent cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated whether low dose charged particle irradiation could elicit oxidative stress in neural stem and precursor cells and whether radiation-induced changes in redox metabolism would coincide with cognitive impairment. Results: Low doses (<1 Gy) of charged particles caused an acute and persistent oxidative stress. Early after (<1 week) irradiation, increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were generally dose responsive, but were less dependent on dose weeks to months thereafter. Exposure to ion fluences resulting in less than one ion traversal per cell was sufficient to elicit radiation-induced oxidative stress. Whole body irradiation triggered a compensatory response in the rodent brain that led to a significant increase in antioxidant capacity 2 weeks following exposure, before returning to background levels at week 4. Low dose irradiation was also found to significantly impair novel object recognition in mice 2 and 12 weeks following irradiation. Innovation: Data provide evidence that acute exposure of neural stem cells and the CNS to very low doses and fluences of charged particles can elicit a persisting oxidative stress lasting weeks to months that is associated with impaired cognition. Conclusions: Exposure to low doses of charged particles causes a persistent oxidative stress and cognitive impairment over protracted times. Data suggest that astronauts subjected to space radiation may develop a heightened risk for mission critical performance decrements in space, along with a risk of developing long-term neurocognitive sequelae. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1410–1422. PMID:23802883

  5. Radiation-induced oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder by gamma rays and electron beams: A clear dependence of dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglong; Xu, Lu; Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2015-10-01

    Oxidation is an important effect of irradiation on polyethylene in air. In this work, oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder (ca. 110 μm in diameter) induced by gamma rays (γ ray) and electron beams (EB) in air resulted in some large differences in properties, such as oxidative scission due to dose rate differences. However, other properties, such as surface wettability and thermal stability were not that greatly affected. The dose-rates used were 0.0019 kGy/s from a cobalt-60 gamma source and 92 kGy/s from an electron beam. The chemical structure, oxidation level, surface wettability and thermal stability of irradiated UHMWPE were analyzed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA and the static contact angle. Hydrophilic carboxyl and carbonyl groups were present on the surface of irradiated UHMWPE after irradiation in air, resulting in a decrease in the contact angle. After irradiation at 300 kGy, the gel content of the γ ray-irradiated UHMWPE samples decreased to almost zero, while that of EB irradiated UHMWPE decreased to 57%. For UHMWPE powder irradiated by gamma rays at lower doses, radiation-induced oxidation was complete and consistent with a simple theoretic estimation. Surface wettability was primarily affected by surface oxidation, and the oxidation level of UHMWPE could be easily predicted.

  6. Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts: Persistence of Damage After Flight and the Effects of Repeat Long Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Chappell, L. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage was assessed in blood lymphocytes from astronauts before and after they participated in long-duration space missions of three months or more. The frequency of chromosome damage was measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting before flight and at various intervals from a few days to many months after return from the mission. For all individuals, the frequency of chromosome exchanges measured within a month of return from space was higher than their prefight yield. However, some individuals showed a temporal decline in chromosome damage with time after flight. Statistical analysis using combined data for all astronauts indicated a significant overall decreasing trend in total chromosome exchanges with time after flight, although this trend was not seen for all astronauts and the yield of chromosome damage in some individuals actually increased with time after flight. The decreasing trend in total exchanges was slightly more significant when statistical analysis was restricted to data collected more than 220 days after return from flight. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from three crewmembers who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions provide limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  7. Tissue damage and oxidant/antioxidant balance.

    PubMed

    Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Borekci, Bunyamin; Yapca, O Erkan; Bilen, Habib; Suleyman, Halis

    2013-02-01

    The oxidant/antioxidant balance in healthy tissues is maintained with a predominance of antioxidants. Various factors that can lead to tissue damage disrupt the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants. In this study, disruptions of the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants were found to be a consequence of the over-consumption of antioxidants. For this reason, antioxidants are considered to be of importance in the prevention and treatment of various types of tissue damage that are aggravated by stress.

  8. UV-B radiation-induced oxidative stress and p38 signaling pathway involvement in the benthic copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Kyun-Woo; Kim, Min-Jung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation presents an environmental hazard to aquatic organisms. To understand the molecular responses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus to UV-B radiation, we measured the acute toxicity response to 96 h of UV-B radiation, and we also assessed the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glutathione (GSH) content, and antioxidant enzyme (GST, GR, GPx, and SOD) activities after 24 h of exposure to UV-B with LD50 and half LD50 values. Also, expression patterns of p53 and hsp gene families with phosphorylation of p38 MAPK were investigated in UV-B-exposed copepods. We found that the ROS level, GSH content, and antioxidant enzyme activity levels were increased with the transcriptional upregulation of antioxidant-related genes, indicating that UV-B induces oxidative stress by generating ROS and stimulating antioxidant enzymatic activity as a defense mechanism. Additionally, we found that p53 expression was significantly increased after UV-B irradiation due to increases in the phosphorylation of the stress-responsive p38 MAPK, indicating that UV-B may be responsible for inducing DNA damage in T. japonicus. Of the hsp family genes, transcriptional levels of hsp20, hsp20.7, hsp70, and hsp90 were elevated in response to a low dose of UV-B radiation (9 kJ m(-2)), suggesting that these hsp genes may be involved in cellular protection against UV-B radiation. In this paper, we performed a pathway-oriented mechanistic analysis in response to UV-B radiation, and this analysis provides a better understanding of the effects of UV-B in the intertidal benthic copepod T. japonicus.

  9. TH-E-BRF-04: Characterizing the Response of Texture-Based CT Image Features for Quantification of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, S; Court, L; Briere, T; Martel, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung damage (RILD) is an important dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with radiation therapy. Scoring systems for RILD are subjective and limit our ability to find robust predictors of toxicity. We investigate the dose and time-related response for texture-based lung CT image features that serve as potential quantitative measures of RILD. Methods: Pre- and post-RT diagnostic imaging studies were collected for retrospective analysis of 21 patients treated with photon or proton radiotherapy for NSCLC. Total lung and selected isodose contours (0–5, 5–15, 15–25Gy, etc.) were deformably registered from the treatment planning scan to the pre-RT and available follow-up CT studies for each patient. A CT image analysis framework was utilized to extract 3698 unique texture-based features (including co-occurrence and run length matrices) for each region of interest defined by the isodose contours and the total lung volume. Linear mixed models were fit to determine the relationship between feature change (relative to pre-RT), planned dose and time post-RT. Results: Seventy-three follow-up CT scans from 21 patients (median: 3 scans/patient) were analyzed to describe CT image feature change. At the p=0.05 level, dose affected feature change in 2706 (73.1%) of the available features. Similarly, time affected feature change in 408 (11.0%) of the available features. Both dose and time were significant predictors of feature change in a total of 231 (6.2%) of the extracted image features. Conclusion: Characterizing the dose and time-related response of a large number of texture-based CT image features is the first step toward identifying objective measures of lung toxicity necessary for assessment and prediction of RILD. There is evidence that numerous features are sensitive to both the radiation dose and time after RT. Beyond characterizing feature response, further investigation is warranted to determine the utility of these features as

  10. An ethanol extract derived from Bonnemaisonia hamifera scavenges ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced reactive oxygen species and attenuates UVB-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Hyun, Yu Jae; Cho, Suk Ju; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Lee, Nam Ho; Ko, Mi Hee; Hyun, Jin Won

    2012-12-14

    The present study investigated the photoprotective properties of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced cell damage in human HaCaT keratinocytes. The Bonnemaisonia hamifera ethanol extract (BHE) scavenged the superoxide anion generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO₄ + H₂O₂), both of which were detected by using electron spin resonance spectrometry. In addition, BHE exhibited scavenging activity against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. BHE reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, as shown by decreased apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. BHE also attenuated DNA damage and the elevated levels of 8-isoprostane and protein carbonyls resulting from UVB-mediated oxidative stress. Furthermore, BHE absorbed electromagnetic radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm). These results suggest that BHE protects human HaCaT keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative damage by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB photons, thereby reducing injury to cellular components.

  11. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Marcy B.; Singh, Vijay K.; Rhee, Juong G.; Jackson, William E.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:22843381

  12. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Grace, Marcy B; Singh, Vijay K; Rhee, Juong G; Jackson, William E; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H

    2012-11-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

  13. Inhibition of gamma-radiation induced DNA damage in plasmid pBR322 by TMG, a water-soluble derivative of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Rema; Wani, Khalida; Huilgol, Nagaraj G; Kagiya, Tsutomu V; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water-soluble derivative of alpha-tocopherol, has been examined for its ability to protect DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks. Gamma radiation, up to a dose of 6 Gy (dose rate, 0.7 Gy/minute), induced a dose-dependent increase in single strand breaks (SSBs) in plasmid pBR322 DNA. TMG inhibited the formation of gamma-radiation induced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in a concentration-dependent manner; 500 microM of TMG protected the single strand breaks completely. It also protected thymine glycol formation induced by gamma-radiation in a dose-dependent manner, based on an estimation of thymine glycol by HPLC.

  14. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  15. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation.

  16. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage.

  17. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage. PMID:27656146

  18. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  19. Radiation-induced heart disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Kiszel, Z.; Buschmann, J.; Trott, K.R.

    1985-04-01

    After local irradiation of the rat heart with X ray doses of over 10 Gy (single dose), animals developed symptoms of radiation-induced heart disease, which at higher doses would lead to fatal cardiac failure. The LD 50 at 1 year was between 15 Gy and 20 Gy. The pericardium and epicardium responded to irradiation with exudative pericarditis after 4 months. Focal myocardial damage was secondary to progressive capillary damage.

  20. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  1. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction.

  2. DNA damage, oxidative mutagen sensitivity, and repair of oxidative DNA damage in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andrés; Michel, Alejandra; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Salazar, Ana M; Podoswa, Nancy; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and oxidative DNA damage, caused either by UV radiation itself or by other agents, may be involved in its induction. Increased sensitivity to oxidative damage and an altered DNA repair capacity (DRC) increase the risk of many types of cancer; however, sensitivity to oxidizing agents has not been evaluated for NMSC, and results regarding DRC in NMSC are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated DNA damage and repair in leukocytes from 41 NMSC patients and 45 controls. The Comet assay was used to measure basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, as well as the DRC, while the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to measure the basal level of chromosome damage. Although basal DNA damage was higher for the controls than for the patients, this finding was mainly due to sampling more controls in the summer, which was associated with longer comet tails. In contrast, H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was significantly higher in cases than in controls, and this parameter was not influenced by the season of the year. The DRC for the H(2)O(2)-induced damage was similar for cases and controls and unrelated to seasonality. Finally, the frequency of binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei was similar for cases and controls. The results of this study indicate that NMSC patients are distinguished from controls by an increased sensitivity to oxidative DNA damage.

  3. Understanding and preventing mitochondrial oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative damage has long been known to contribute to damage in conditions such as ischaemia–reperfusion (IR) injury in heart attack. Over the past years, we have developed a series of mitochondria-targeted compounds designed to ameliorate or determine how this damage occurs. I will outline some of this work, from MitoQ to the mitochondria-targeted S-nitrosating agent, called MitoSNO, that we showed was effective in preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in IR injury with therapeutic implications. In addition, the protection by this compound suggested that ROS production in IR injury was mainly coming from complex I. This led us to investigate the mechanism of the ROS production and using a metabolomic approach, we found that the ROS production in IR injury came from the accumulation of succinate during ischaemia that then drove mitochondrial ROS production by reverse electron transport at complex I during reperfusion. This surprising mechanism led us to develop further new therapeutic approaches to have an impact on the damage that mitochondrial ROS do in pathology and also to explore how mitochondrial ROS can act as redox signals. I will discuss how these approaches have led to a better understanding of mitochondrial oxidative damage in pathology and also to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27911703

  4. Recovery of radiation-induced dry eye and corneal damage by pretreatment with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of erythropoietin to the salivary glands in mice.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cotrim, Ana P; Zheng, Changyu; Riveros, Paola Perez; Baum, Bruce J; Chiorini, John A

    2013-04-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation (RTx) causes dry eye syndrome (DES), dry mouth, and as in other sicca syndromes, they are incurable. The aims of this work are as follows: (a) to evaluate a mouse model of DES induced by clinically relevant doses of radiation, and (b) to evaluate the protective effect of erythropoietin (Epo) in preventing DES. C3H female mice were subjected to five sessions of RTx, with or without pre-RTx retroductal administration of the AdLTR2EF1a-hEPO (AdEpo) vector in the salivary glands (SG), and compared with naïve controls at Day 10 (10d) (8 Gy fractions) and 56 days (56d) (6 Gy fractions) after RTx treatment. Mice were tested for changes in lacrimal glands (LG), tear secretion (phenol red thread), weight, hematocrit (Hct), and markers of inflammation, as well as microvessels and oxidative damage. Tear secretion was reduced in both RTx groups, compared to controls, by 10d. This was also seen at 56d in RTx but not AdEpo+RTx group. Hct was significantly higher in all AdEpo+RTx mice at 10d and 56d. Corneal epithelium was significantly thinner at 10d in the RTx group compared with AdEpo+RTx or the control mice. There was a significant reduction at 10d in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 in LG in the RTx group that was prevented in the AdEpo+RTx group. In conclusion, RTx is able to induce DES in mice. AdEpo administration protected corneal epithelia and resulted in some recovery of LG function, supporting the value of further studies using gene therapy for extraglandular diseases.

  5. Coccidian Infection Causes Oxidative Damage in Greenfinches

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Blount, Jonathan D.; Sild, Elin; Männiste, Marju; Hõrak, Peeter

    2012-01-01

    The main tenet of immunoecology is that individual variation in immune responsiveness is caused by the costs of immune responses to the hosts. Oxidative damage resulting from the excessive production of reactive oxygen species during immune response is hypothesized to form one of such costs. We tested this hypothesis in experimental coccidian infection model in greenfinches Carduelis chloris. Administration of isosporan coccidians to experimental birds did not affect indices of antioxidant protection (TAC and OXY), plasma triglyceride and carotenoid levels or body mass, indicating that pathological consequences of infection were generally mild. Infected birds had on average 8% higher levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA, a toxic end-product of lipid peroxidation) than un-infected birds. The birds that had highest MDA levels subsequent to experimental infection experienced the highest decrease in infection intensity. This observation is consistent with the idea that oxidative stress is a causative agent in the control of coccidiosis and supports the concept of oxidative costs of immune responses and parasite resistance. The finding that oxidative damage accompanies even the mild infection with a common parasite highlights the relevance of oxidative stress biology for the immunoecological research. PMID:22615772

  6. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    of Parkinson’s Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism. In the past year, we have developed a novel column switching assay for measurement of...oxidative damage to DNA in human body fluids. We have applied to this plasma samples of Parkinson’s Disease patients. We have also developed a novel...methodology. We have found a relatively high mutation rate and control samples and intend to apply this to Parkinson’s Disease . We have continued our

  7. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-12-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis.

  8. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J G; Adams, D O

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is thought that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. Many studies support the multistep nature of carcinogenesis, and a significant amount of evidence indicates that more than one genetic event is necessary for neoplastic transformation. Selective growth stimulation of initiated cells by TPA does not explain how further genetic events may occur by chronic exposure to this nongenotoxic agent. We and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H2O2 and oxidized lipid products. Furthermore, macrophage populations that release both H2O2 and metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) are more efficient at inducing oxidative DNA damage in surrounding cells than populations which only release H2O2 or metabolites of AA. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin than C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H2O2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B PMID:3129286

  9. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized.

  10. The Analysis of the Patterns of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Foci by a Stochastic Monte Carlo Model of DNA Double Strand Breaks Induction by Heavy Ions and Image Segmentation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    To create a generalized mechanistic model of DNA damage in human cells that will generate analytical and image data corresponding to experimentally observed DNA damage foci and will help to improve the experimental foci yields by simulating spatial foci patterns and resolving problems with quantitative image analysis. Material and Methods: The analysis of patterns of RIFs (radiation-induced foci) produced by low- and high-LET (linear energy transfer) radiation was conducted by using a Monte Carlo model that combines the heavy ion track structure with characteristics of the human genome on the level of chromosomes. The foci patterns were also simulated in the maximum projection plane for flat nuclei. Some data analysis was done with the help of image segmentation software that identifies individual classes of RIFs and colocolized RIFs, which is of importance to some experimental assays that assign DNA damage a dual phosphorescent signal. Results: The model predicts the spatial and genomic distributions of DNA DSBs (double strand breaks) and associated RIFs in a human cell nucleus for a particular dose of either low- or high-LET radiation. We used the model to do analyses for different irradiation scenarios. In the beam-parallel-to-the-disk-of-a-flattened-nucleus scenario we found that the foci appeared to be merged due to their high density, while, in the perpendicular-beam scenario, the foci appeared as one bright spot per hit. The statistics and spatial distribution of regions of densely arranged foci, termed DNA foci chains, were predicted numerically using this model. Another analysis was done to evaluate the number of ion hits per nucleus, which were visible from streaks of closely located foci. In another analysis, our image segmentaiton software determined foci yields directly from images with single-class or colocolized foci. Conclusions: We showed that DSB clustering needs to be taken into account to determine the true DNA damage foci yield, which helps to

  11. Oxidant damage during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Leskiw, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess oxidant damage during and after spaceflight and to compare the results against bed rest with 6 degrees head-down tilt. We measured the urinary excretion of the F(2) isoprostane, 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG) F(2alpha), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OH DG) before, during, and after long-duration spaceflight (4-9 mo) on the Russian space station MIR, short-duration spaceflight on the shuttle, and 17 days of bed rest. Sample collections on MIR were obtained between 88 and 186 days in orbit. 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) and 8-OH DG are markers for oxidative damage to membrane lipids and DNA, respectively. Data are mean +/- SE. On MIR, isoprostane levels were decreased inflight (96. 9 +/- 11.6 vs. 76.7 +/- 14.9 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05, n = 6) due to decreased dietary intake secondary to impaired thermoregulation. Isoprostane excretion was increased postflight (245.7 +/- 55.8 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.01). 8-OH DG excretion was unchanged with spaceflight and increased postflight (269 +/- 84 vs 442 +/- 180 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). On the shuttle, 8-OH DG excretion was unchanged in- and postflight, but 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) excretion was decreased inflight (15.6 +/- 4.3 vs 8.0 +/- 2.7 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). No changes were found with bed rest, but 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) was increased during the recovery phase (48.9 +/- 23.0 vs 65.4 +/- 28.3 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). The changes in isoprostane production were attributed to decreased production of oxygen radicals from the electron transport chain due to the reduced energy intake inflight. The postflight increases in the excretion of the products of oxidative damage were attributed to a combination of an increase in metabolic activity and the loss of some host antioxidant defenses inflight. We conclude that 1) oxidative damage was decreased inflight, and 2) oxidative damage was increased postflight.

  12. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko; Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru; Akashi, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  13. Oxidative and non-oxidative DNA damage and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Malik, Qudsia; Herbert, Karl E

    2012-04-01

    Evidence for the association of DNA damage with cardiovascular disease has been obtained from in vitro cell culture models, experimental cardiovascular disease and analysis of samples obtained from humans with disease. There is general acceptance that several factors associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease cause oxidative damage to DNA in cell culture models with both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as targets. Moreover, evidence obtained over the past 10 years points to a possible mechanistic role for DNA damage in experimental atherosclerosis culminating in recent studies challenging the assumption that DNA damage is merely a biomarker of the disease process. This kind of mechanistic insight provides a renewed impetus for further studies in this area.

  14. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  15. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  16. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Epithelial Damage by the TLR5 Agonist Entolimod in a Mouse Model of Fractionated Head and Neck Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Toshkov, Ilia A; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Mett, Vadim L; Hutson, Alan D; Singh, Anurag K; Gudkov, Andrei V; Burdelya, Lyudmila G

    2017-03-21

    Radiation treatment of head and neck cancer frequently causes severe collateral damage to normal tissues including mouth mucosa, salivary glands and skin. This toxicity limits the radiation dose that can be delivered and affects the patient's quality of life. Previous studies in mice and nonhuman primates showed that entolimod, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist derived from bacterial flagellin, effectively reduced radiation damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues in both total-body and local irradiation scenarios, with no protection of tumors. Here, using a mouse model, we analyzed the efficacy of entolimod administered before or after irradiation in reducing damage to normal tissues. Animals received local fractionated radiation to the head and neck area, thus modeling radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Tissue damage was evaluated through histomorphological examination of samples collected at different time points up to four weeks, mice were exposed locally to five daily fractions of 5, 6 or 7 Gy. A semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the severity of observed pathomorphological changes. In this model, radiation damage was most severe in the lips, tongue and skin, moderate in the upper esophagus and minor in salivary glands. The kinetics of injury appearance and recovery of normal morphology varied among tissues, with maximal damage to the tongue, esophagus and salivary glands developing at earlier times (days 8-11 postirradiation) relative to that of lip and skin mucosa (days 11-15 postirradiation). While both tested regimens of entolimod significantly reduced the extent of radiation damage and accelerated restoration of normal structure in all tissues analyzed, administration of entolimod 1 h after each irradiation was more effective than treatment 30 min before irradiation. These results support the potential clinical use of entolimod as an adjuvant for improving the therapeutic index of head and neck cancer radiotherapy by

  17. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  18. Profiling oxidative DNA damage: effects of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Box, Harold C; Patrzyc, Helen B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Dawidzik, Jean B; Freund, Harold G; Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Mahoney, Martin C

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether antioxidant usage could be correlated with changes in DNA damage levels. Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to simultaneously measure five different oxidatively-induced base modifications in the DNA of WBC. Measurements of the five modifications were made before and after an 8-week trial during which participants took the SU.VI.MAX supplement. Levels of the five DNA modifications were compared among different groupings: users versus non-users of antioxidant supplements, before versus after the supplement intervention and men versus women. The statistical significance of differences between groups was most significant for pyrimidine base modifications and the observed trends reflect trends reported in epidemiological studies of antioxidant usage. A combination of modifications derived from pyrimidine bases is suggested as a superior indicator of oxidative stress.

  19. Silibinin inhibits ultraviolet B radiation-induced DNA-damage and apoptosis by enhancing interleukin-12 expression in JB6 cells and SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Narayanapillai, Sreekanth; Agarwal, Chapla; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated silibinin efficacy against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis via different mechanisms in cell lines and animal models; however, its role in regulating interleukin-12 (IL-12), an immunomodulatory cytokine that reduces UVB-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, is not known. Here, we report that UVB irradiation causes caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and apoptosis, and addition of recombinant IL-12 or silibinin immediately after UVB significantly protects UVB-induced apoptosis in JB6 cells. IL-12 antibody-mediated blocking of IL-12 activity compromised the protective effects of both IL-12 and silibinin. Both silibinin and IL-12 also accelerated the repair of UVB-caused cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in JB6 cells. Additional studies confirmed that indeed silibinin causes a significant increase in IL-12 levels in UVB-irradiated JB6 cells as well as in mouse skin epidermis, and that similar to cell-culture findings, silibinin topical application immediately after UVB exposure causes a strong protection against UVB-induced TUNEL positive cells in epidermis possibly through a significantly accelerated repair of UVB-caused CPDs. Together, these findings for the first time provide an important insight regarding the pharmacological mechanism wherein silibinin induces endogenous IL-12 in its efficacy against UVB-caused skin damages. In view of the fact that an enhanced endogenous IL-12 level could effectively remove UVB-caused DNA damage and associated skin cancer, our findings suggest that the use of silibinin in UVB-damaged human skin would also be a practical and translational strategy to manage solar radiation-caused skin damages as well as skin cancer.

  20. Amifostine alleviates radiation-induced lethal small bowel damage via promotion of 14-3-3σ-mediated nuclear p53 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Fan; Wang, Chung-Chi; Lin, I-Hui; Huang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Kuender D

    2014-10-30

    Amifostine (AM) is a radioprotector that scavenges free radicals and is used in patients undergoing radiotherapy. p53 has long been implicated in cell cycle arrest for cellular repair after radiation exposure. We therefore investigated the protective p53-dependent mechanism of AM on small bowel damage after lethal whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI). AM increased both the survival rate of rats and crypt survival following lethal 18 Gy WAI. The p53 inhibitor PFT-α compromised AM-mediated effects when administered prior to AM administration. AM significantly increased clonogenic survival in IEC-6 cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53 knockdown cells. AM significantly increased p53 nuclear accumulation and p53 tetramer expression before irradiation through the inhibition of p53 degradation. AM inhibited p53 interactions with MDM2 but enhanced p53 interactions with 14-3-3σ. Knockdown of 14-3-3σ also compromised the effect of AM on clonogenic survival and p53 nuclear accumulation in IEC-6 cells. For the first time, our data reveal that AM alleviates lethal small bowel damage through the induction of 14-3-3σ and subsequent accumulation of p53. Enhancement of the p53/14-3-3σ interaction results in p53 tetramerization in the nucleus that rescues lethal small bowel damage.

  1. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  2. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a range of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation

  3. French maritime pine bark (Pinus maritima Lam.) extract (Flavangenol) prevents chronic UVB radiation-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis in melanin-possessing hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho

    2010-01-01

    A French maritime pine bark extract, Flavangenol, is widely used as a nutritional supplement for protection against atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, etc. Chronic exposure to solar UV radiation damages skin, increasing cutaneous thickness, wrinkling and pigmentation, as well as reducing elasticity, and causes skin cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of flavangenol on skin damage and the incidence of skin tumors caused by long-term UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing hairless mice. The oral administration of flavangenol (60, 200 or 600 mg kg(-1), twice daily) significantly inhibited increases in skin thickness, and the formation of wrinkles and melanin granules, as well as increases in the diameter and length of skin blood vessels. Furthermore, it prevented increases in numbers of apoptotic, Ki-67-positive and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells, and the expression of skin vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced by chronic UVB irradiation. The effect on these biomarkers was associated with a reduction in the incidence of tumors in mice. The antiphotoaging and anticarcinogenetic activities of flavangenol may be due to inhibition of the expression of Ki-67, 8-OHdG and VEGF through a scavenging effect on reactive oxygen species.

  4. Using natural dietary sources of antioxidants to protect against ultraviolet and visible radiation-induced DNA damage: an investigation of human green tea ingestion.

    PubMed

    Malhomme de la Roche, Helena; Seagrove, Susan; Mehta, Anisha; Divekar, Preshita; Campbell, Sandra; Curnow, Alison

    2010-11-03

    Oral ingestion of green tea is a potent dietary source of antioxidant polyphenols. These compounds are of interest as they may be able to provide additional protection to the body to help prevent the deleterious effects of ultraviolet A and visible radiation (UVA/VIS) produced indirectly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sunlight exposed skin. A small clinical study was conducted in ten healthy adult volunteers. Samples of whole blood were obtained from each before and 30, 60 and 90 min following ingestion of three breakfast cups of green tea (540 ml in total) prepared in a standardised manner. Peripheral leucocytes were isolated from each blood sample and exposed to increasing periods of UVA/VIS irradiation in the laboratory (0, 9, 12 or 18 min). Alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay) was then conducted to determine the level of DNA damage in each sample from each individual. The findings support those of our previous pilot study and indicate that drinking green tea did significantly reduce the genotoxic effects observed in peripheral blood cells 60 min following ingestion when artificially exposed to 12 min of UVA/VIS irradiation in the laboratory. It is postulated that this protection is afforded by the polyphenol compounds (known to be contained within green tea) via scavenging or quenching of the damaging ROS induced by this form of light exposure. Further investigation should consider whether this dietary-induced protection could be extended to cells of the skin.

  5. Normal repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in familial melanoma without CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Shannon, J A; Matias, C; Luxford, C; Kefford, R F; Mann, G J

    1999-04-01

    Excessive sun exposure and family history are strong risk factors for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Inherited susceptibility to this type of skin cancer could therefore result from constitutively impaired capacity to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. While a proportion of familial melanoma kindreds exhibit germline mutations in the cell cycle regulatory gene CDKN2A (p16INK4a) or its protein target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the biochemical basis of most familial melanoma is unknown. We have examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from melanoma-affected and unaffected individuals from large hereditary melanoma kindreds which are not attributable to CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation. These lines were tested for sensitivity of clonogenic growth to UV radiation and for their ability to repair transfected UV-damaged plasmid templates (host cell reactivation). Two of seven affected-unaffected pairs differed in colony survival after exposure to UVB radiation; however, no significant differences were observed in the host-cell reactivation assays. These results indicate that melanoma susceptibility genes other than CDKN2A and CDK4 do not impair net capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  6. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  7. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2006-10-01

    Chronic administration of acrylonitrile results in a dose-related increase in astrocytomas in rat brain, but the mechanism of acrylonitrile carcinogenicity is not fully understood. The potential of acrylonitrile or its metabolites to induce direct DNA damage as a mechanism for acrylonitrile carcinogenicity has been questioned, and recent studies indicate that the mechanism involves the induction of oxidative stress in rat brain. The present study examined the ability of acrylonitrile to induce DNA damage in the DI TNC1 rat astrocyte cell line using the alkaline Comet assay. Oxidized DNA damage also was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment in the modified Comet assay. No increase in direct DNA damage was seen in astrocytes exposed to sublethal concentrations of acrylonitrile (0-1.0 mM) for 24 hr. However, acrylonitrile treatment resulted in a concentration-related increase in oxidative DNA damage after 24 hr. Antioxidant supplementation in the culture media (alpha-tocopherol, (-)-epigallocathechin-3 gallate, or trolox) reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage. Depletion of glutathione using 0.1 mM DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine increased acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (22-46%), while cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 2.5 mM L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a precursor for glutathione biosynthesis, significantly reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (7-47%). Cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 0.5 mM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a suicidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450, prevented the oxidative DNA damage produced by acrylonitrile. Cyanide (0.1-0.5 mM) increased oxidative DNA damage (44-160%) in astrocytes. These studies demonstrate that while acrylonitrile does not directly damage astrocyte DNA, it does increase oxidative DNA damage. The oxidative DNA damage following acrylonitrile exposure appears to arise mainly through the P450 metabolic pathway; moreover, glutathione depletion may contribute to the

  8. The effect of melatonin against oxidative damage during total-body irradiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Koc, Mehmet; Taysi, Seyithan; Emin Buyukokuroglu, M; Bakan, Nuri

    2003-08-01

    Melatonin has been reported to participate in the regulation of a number of important physiological and pathological processes. Melatonin, which is a powerful endogenous antioxidant, may play a role in the prevention of oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg kg(-1) and 10 mg kg(-1)) on gamma-radiation-induced oxidative damage in plasma and erythrocytes after total-body irradiation with a single dose of 5 Gy. Total-body irradiation resulted in a significant increase in plasma and erythrocyte MDA levels. Melatonin alone increased the levels of SOD and GSH-Px. Erythrocyte and plasma MDA levels in irradiated rats that were pretreated with melatonin (5 or 10 mg kg(-1)) were significantly lower than those in rats that were not pretreated. There was no significant difference between the effects of 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) on plasma MDA activities and CAT activities. However, erythrocyte MDA levels showed a dose-dependent decrease, while GSH-Px activities increased with dose. Our study suggests that melatonin administered prior to irradiation may protect against the damage produced by radiation by the up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and by scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation.

  9. Postmenopausal loss of Ra acquired in adolescence or young adulthood: quantitative relationship to radiation-induced skeletal damage and dosimetric implications

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, A.T.; Rundo, J.; Essling, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    From the results of serial measurements of body /sup 226/Ra activity in 13 former luminous dial workers 30-60 y after relatively brief periods of intake of luminous compounds in adolescence or young adulthood, we determined the postmenopausal rate of elimination of Ra in percent of contemporary body Ra content per year. This rate was negatively correlated with the reduced x-ray score, a measure of radiation osteonecrosis observed radiographically in the 13 subjects (r = -0.85, P less than 0.001). The clearance rates of subjects retaining low Ra activity were greater than predicted by retention models. We conclude that for those members of the Ra-exposed population under study for health effects at our institution who sustained the lesser degrees of macroscopic skeletal damage, present estimates of skeletal absorbed dose are systematically low, by at most a factor of 2.

  10. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, July 1, 1991--June 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The primary goal of this program is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to resist DNA damage. Concurrently this effort contributes to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was initially chosen as a model organism for investigating functions that control mutagen resistance because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize mutagen-sensitive mutants in this multicellular organism. This laboratory then went on to investigate the DNA repair defects of such mutants while others performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. Currently, recombinant DNA technology is being employed to investigate the mechanisms of mutagen resistance defined by those mutants. The following two studies experienced the most significant progress during the past year: cloning and genetic characterization of the mus209 gene, and genetic and molecular analysis of the mus308 gene.

  11. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  12. Exposure of nondividing populations of primary human fibroblasts to UV (254 nm) radiation induces a transient enhancement in capacity to repair potentially lethal cellular damage

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrrell, R.M.

    1984-02-01

    Nondividing (arrested) populations of primary human fibroblasts from normal individuals exposed to an intial dose (1.5 or 3 Jm/sup -2/) of far-UV (254 nm) radiation and then incubated in medium containing low (0.5%) serum develop enhanced resistance to inactivation of cloning efficiency by a second (challenge) dose of UV. The resistance develops within 2-4 days, after which there is a decline. Resistance develops to a higher degree and more rapidly (1-2 days) in cells derived from patients with the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum. Excision-deficient cells from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A individuals also develop UV resistance after a lower (0.2 Jm/sup -2/) exposure to UV. Enhanced UV resistance does not develop in UV-irradiated cell populations incubated with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (5 ..mu..M). These observations are consistent with the interpretation that exposure of human fibroblasts to low doses of UV induces synthesis of a protein involved in a metabolic pathway that transiently enhances the capacity of cells to repair potentially lethal damage resulting from a subsequent dose of UV.

  13. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  14. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiao; Zhao, Hainan; Liu, Pengfei; Xu, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chuai, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR). All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM) observation, forced swim test (FST), the open field test (OFT), the chromosome aberration (CA), the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA), the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR. PMID:27774116

  15. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  16. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  17. The study of radiation-induced damage and remodeling of extracellular matrix of rectum and bladder by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochueva, Marina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatjeva, Natalya Yu.; Zakharkina, Olga L.; Kuznetzov, Sergej S.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Babak, Ksenia V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Maslennikova, Anna V.

    2014-02-01

    Adverse events in normal tissues after irradiation of malignant tumors are of great importance in modern radiation oncology. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy allows observe the structure of collagen fibers and bundles without additional staining. The study objective was evaluation the dose-time dependences of the structural changes occurring in collagen of rat rectum and bladder after gamma-irradiation. Animals were irradiated by a local field at single doses of 10 Gy and 40 Gy. The study of collagen state was carried out in a week and a month after radiation exposure. Paraffin-embedded material was sectioned on the slices 10 mkm thick and SHG-imaging was performed by LSM 510 Meta (Carl Zeiss, Germany). Excitation was implemented with a pulsed (100-fs) titanium-sapphire laser at a wavelength of 800 nm and a pulse repetition frequency of 80 MHz, registration was performed at two wavelengths: 362-415 nm according to collagen fluorescence and 512-576 nm according to myoglobin fluorescence. In a week after irradiation, sings of epithelial damage and edema of submucosal layer, more significant after the dose of 40 Gy were observed on LSM-images. The SHG signal decreased at this time reflecting the processes of collagen degradation independently either in bladder or in rectum. In a month after radiation the increase of size and number of collagen-bearing structures was observed, more essential after irradiation in a dose of 40 Gy. LSM microscopy with SHG allows evaluate changes of normal tissues after ionizing radiation and get information in addition to standard and special histological staining.

  18. Radio protective effect of black mulberry extract on radiation-induced damage in bone marrow cells and liver in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemnezhad Targhi, Reza; Homayoun, Mansour; Mansouri, Somaieh; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Seghatoleslam, Masoumeh

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation by producing free radicals induces tissue oxidative stress and has clastogenic and cytotoxic effects. The radio protective effect of black mulberry extract (BME) has been investigated on liver tissue and bone marrow cells in the rat. Intraperitoneal (ip) administration of 200 mg/kg BME three days before and three days after 3 Gy and 6 Gy gamma irradiation significantly reduced the frequencies of micro nucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs) and micro nucleated norm chromatic erythrocyte (MnNCEs) and increased PCE/PCE+NCE ratio in rat bone marrow compared to the non-treated irradiated groups. Moreover, this concentration of BME extract decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as enhanced the total thiol content and catalase activity in rat's liver compared to the non-treated irradiated groups. It seems that BME extract with antioxidant activity reduced the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation in bone marrow cells and liver in the rat.

  19. Effect of curcumin and curcumin copper complex (1:1) on radiation-induced changes of anti-oxidant enzymes levels in the livers of Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Koiram, Prabhakar R; Veerapur, Veeresh P; Kunwar, Amit; Mishra, Beena; Barik, Atanu; Priyadarsini, Indira K; Mazhuvancherry, Unnikrishnan K

    2007-05-01

    The effect of mononuclear copper (II) complex of curcumin in 1:1 stoichiometry (hereafter referred to as complex) administered 30 min before gamma-irradiation (4.5 Gy) on alterations in antioxidant and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in livers was studied in comparison to curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg. The different antioxidants like GSH, GST, catalase, SOD, TBARS and total thiols were estimated in the liver homogenates excised at different time intervals (1, 2 and 4 h) post irradiation using colorimetric methods. There was a radiation-induced decrease in the levels of all the studied enzymes at 1 h post irradiation, while an increase was observed at later time points. Both curcumin and complex treatment in sham-irradiated mice decreased the levels of GSH and total thiols, whereas there was an increase in the levels of catalase, GST and SOD compared to normal control. Under the influence of irradiation, both curcumin and complex treatment protected the decline in the levels of GSH, GST, SOD, catalase and total thiols, and inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation. Further, the complex was found to be more effective in protecting the enzymes at 1 h post irradiation compared to curcumin treated group. This may be due to the higher rate constants of the complex compared to curcumin for their reactions with various free radicals.

  20. Type-dependent oxidative damage in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: cortical astrocytes are targets of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Anna; Carmona, Margarita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Naudí, Alba; Pamplona, Reinald; Ferrer, Isidre

    2008-12-01

    Oxidative injury and stress responses are common features of many neurodegenerative diseases. To assess oxidative stress responses in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), we identified increased 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) adducts using gel electrophoresis and Western blotting in frontal cortex samples in 6 of 6 cases of FTLD with the P301L mutation in the tau gene (FTLD-tau), in 3 of 10 cases with tau-negative ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions, and in 2 of 3 cases associated with motor neuron disease. Selectively increased lipoxidation-derived protein damage associated with altered membrane unsaturation and fatty acid profiles was verified by mass spectrometry in FTLD-tau and FTLD associated with motor neuron disease. All FTLD-tau and most cases with increased HNE-positive bands had marked astrocytosis as determined by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry and increased GFAP expression on Western blotting; 2 FTLD cases with tau-negative ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions and with increased GFAP expression did not have increased HNE adducts. Bidimensional gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, in-gel digestion, and mass spectrometry identified GFAP as a major target of lipoxidation in all positive cases; confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of HNE and GFAP in cortical astrocytes, superoxide dismutase 1 in astrocytes, and superoxide dismutase 2 in astrocytes and neurons in all FTLD types. Thus, in FTLD, there is variable disease-dependent oxidative damage that is prominent in FTLD-tau, astrocytes are targets of oxidative damage, and GFAP is a target of lipoxidation. Astrocytes are, therefore, crucial elements of oxidative stress responses in FTLD.

  1. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  2. Protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester against acute radiation-induced hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, JianJun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Jin, Liugen; Chen, Junliang; Du, Bin; Pang, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and it can eliminate the free radicals. The current study was intended to evaluate the protective effect of CAPE against the acute radiation-induced liver damage in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally administered with CAPE (30 mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 30 Gy of β-ray irradiation to upper abdomen. We found that pretreatment with CAPE significantly decreased the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione. Histological evaluation further confirmed the protection of CAPE against radiation-induced hepatotoxicity. TUNEL assay showed that CAPE pretreatment inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis. Moreover, CAPE inhibited the nuclear transport of NF-κB p65 subunit, decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Taken together, these results suggest that pretreatment with CAPE offers protection against radiation-induced hepatic injury.

  3. Quercetin liposomes protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xue, Jian-Xing; Li, Xing; Ao, Rui; Lu, You

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that quercetin liposomes are able to effectively protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model was tested. C57BL/6J mice receiving whole-thorax radiotherapy (16 Gy) were randomly divided into three groups: control, radiation therapy plus saline (RT+NS) and RT plus quercetin (RT+QU). At 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks post-irradiation, lung injury was assessed by measuring oxidative damage and the extent of acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis. In the lung tissues from the RT+NS group, the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were significantly reduced; the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 concentrations and the hydroxyproline (HP) content were significantly increased. Quercetin liposome administration significantly reduced the MDA content and increased SOD and GSH-PX activities in the lung tissues, and reduced the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the BALF, plasma TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations and the HP content in the lung tissues. A histological examination revealed suppression of the inflammatory response and reduced TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scores. Radiation-induced oxidative damage ranged from pneumonitis to lung fibrosis. Quercetin liposomes were shown to protect against radiation-induced acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis, potentially by reducing oxidative damage.

  4. Quercetin liposomes protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAO; XUE, JIAN-XING; LI, XING; AO, RUI; LU, YOU

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that quercetin liposomes are able to effectively protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model was tested. C57BL/6J mice receiving whole-thorax radiotherapy (16 Gy) were randomly divided into three groups: control, radiation therapy plus saline (RT+NS) and RT plus quercetin (RT+QU). At 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks post-irradiation, lung injury was assessed by measuring oxidative damage and the extent of acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis. In the lung tissues from the RT+NS group, the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were significantly reduced; the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 concentrations and the hydroxyproline (HP) content were significantly increased. Quercetin liposome administration significantly reduced the MDA content and increased SOD and GSH-PX activities in the lung tissues, and reduced the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the BALF, plasma TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations and the HP content in the lung tissues. A histological examination revealed suppression of the inflammatory response and reduced TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scores. Radiation-induced oxidative damage ranged from pneumonitis to lung fibrosis. Quercetin liposomes were shown to protect against radiation-induced acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis, potentially by reducing oxidative damage. PMID:24137346

  5. Radiation-Induced Reduction of Ceria in Single and Polycrystalline Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Shutthanandan, V.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Yang, Yong; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-12

    Ceria (CeO{sub 2}) is a technologically important ceramic material with a wide range of neoteric applications in catalysis, solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen gas sensors, hydrogen production, and ultraviolet shielding. Recent research has revealed promising biomedical applications of ceria. Nanoparticles of ceria have been shown to protect healthy cells from radiation-induced cellular damage. The mechanisms governing the radioprotection characteristics of ceria nanoparticles are not well understood and it has been hypothesized that reversible switching between Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} states may enable ceria nanoparticles to mop up free radicals.

  6. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  7. A selenocysteine derivative therapy affects radiation-induced pneumonitis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Amit; Jain, V K; Priyadarsini, K I; Haston, Christina K

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism leading to the radiation-induced lung response of pneumonitis is largely unknown. Here we investigated whether treatment with 3,3'-diselenodipropionic acid (DSePA), which reduces radiation-induced oxidative stress in acute response models, decreases the lung response to irradiation. Mice of the C3H/HeJ (alveolitis/pneumonitis-responding) strain received 18 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of these mice was treated with DSePA (2 mg/kg) three times per week, beginning at 2 hours after radiation treatment, and continuing in the postirradiation period until death because of respiratory distress symptoms. DSePA treatment increased the postirradiation survival time of mice by an average of 32 days (P = 0.0002). Radiation-treated and DSePA-treated mice presented lower levels of lipid peroxidation and augmented glutathione peroxidase in the lungs, compared with those levels measured in mice receiving radiation only, when mice receiving radiation only were killed because of distress symptoms, whereas catalase and superoxide dismutase levels did not show consistent differences among treatment groups. DSePA treatment decreased pneumonitis and the numbers of mast cells, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively, of irradiated mice relative to mice exposed to radiation alone. DSePA treatment also decreased the radiation-induced increase in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage and lung-tissue expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin, while increasing the expression of glutathione peroxidase-4. We conclude that DSePA treatment reduces radiation-induced pneumonitis in mice by delaying oxidative damage and the inflammatory cell influx.

  8. Oxidative base damage in RNA detected by reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Y; Valentine, M R; Termini, J

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative base damage in DNA and metabolic defects in the recognition and removal of such damage play important roles in mutagenesis and human disease. The extent to which cellular RNA is a substrate for oxidative damage and the possible biological consequences of RNA base oxidation, however, remain largely unexplored. Since oxidatively modified RNA may contribute to the high mutability of retroviral genomic DNA, we have been interested in developing methods for the sequence specific detection of such damage. We show here that a primer extension assay using AMV reverse transcriptase (RT) can be used to reveal oxidatively damaged sites in RNA. This finding extends the currently known range of RNA modifications detectable with AMV reverse transcriptase. Analogous assays using DNA polymerases to detect base damage in DNA substrates appear to be restricted to lesions at thymine. Oxidative base damage in the absence of any detectable chain breaks was produced by dye photosensitization of RNA. Six out of 20 dyes examined were capable of producing RT detectable lesions. RT stops were seen predominantly at purines, although many pyrimidine sites were also detected. Dye specific photofootprints revealed by RT analysis suggests differential dye binding to the RNA substrate. Some of the photoreactive dyes described here may have potential utility in RNA structural analysis, particularly in the identification of stem-loop regions in complex RNAs. Images PMID:7545285

  9. Amelioration of radiation-induced skin injury by HIV-TAT-mediated protein transduction of RP-1 from Rana pleurade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyu; Wang, Wenjie; Peng, Ying; Gu, Qing; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Hou, Yinglong; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage DNA and most other biological macromolecules in skin and radiation-induced skin injury is a serious concern for radiation therapy. Skin possesses an extremely efficient antioxidant system, which is conferred by two systems: antioxidant enzymes and small molecules that can scavenge ROS by donating electrons. Amphibian skin is a multifunctional organ, which protects against dangers of various oxidative stresses. Recently, a small peptide called RP-1 was isolated from the skin secretions of Rana pleurade, which shows strong antioxidant activity. However, this RP-1 peptide is limited because its inability to across the cell membrane. Protein transduction domains (PTDs) have demonstrated high efficiency for facilitating the internalization of both homologous and heterogeneous proteins into cells. This study aims to elucidate the protective effects of a HIV-TAT (TAT) PTD-coupled RP-1 fusion protein (TAT-RP1) on radiation-induced skin injury in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized fusion TAT-RP1 peptide can be incorporated into human keratinocyte HaCaT cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. We then evaluated the protective role of TAT-RP1 against ionizing radiation. TAT-RP1 supplementation increased anti-superoxide anion ability of HaCaT cells and decreased HaCaT cell radiosensitivity to irradiation. Moreover, TAT-RP1 was able to penetrate the skin of rats, entering epidermis as well as the dermis of the subcutaneous layer in skin tissue. Topical spread of TAT-RP1 promoted the amelioration of radiation-induced skin damage in rats. These results suggest that TAT-RP1 has potential as a protein therapy for radiation-induced skin injury.

  10. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  11. Electrochemical study of DNA damaged by oxidation stress.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Krizkova, Sona; Skalickova, Sylvie; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-02-01

    Many compounds can interact with DNA leading to changes of DNA structure as point mutation and bases excision, which could trigger some metabolic failures, which leads to the changes in DNA structure resulting in cancer. Oxidation of nucleic acid bases belongs to the one of the mostly occurred type of DNA damaging leading to the above mentioned phenomena. The investigation of processes of DNA oxidation damage is topical and electrochemical methods include a versatile and sensitive tool for these purposes. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is the most widely accepted marker of DNA damage. Oxidative damage to DNA by free radicals and exposure to ionizing radiation generate several other products within the double helix besides mentioned oxidation products of nucleic acid bases. The basic electrochemical behaviour of nucleic acids bases on various types of carbon electrodes is reviewed. Further, we address our attention on description of oxidation mechanisms and on detection of the most important products of nucleic bases oxidation. The miniaturization of detector coupled with some microfluidic devices is suggested and discussed. The main aim of this review is to report the advantages and features of the electrochemical detection of guanine oxidation product as 8-OHdG and other similarly produced molecules as markers for DNA damage.

  12. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  13. Oxidative damage in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Fischer, Marie T; Frischer, Josa M; Bauer, Jan; Höftberger, Romana; Botond, Gergö; Esterbauer, Harald; Binder, Christoph J; Witztum, Joseph L; Lassmann, Hans

    2011-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are currently poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Since mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, we analysed by immunocytochemistry the presence and cellular location of oxidized lipids and oxidized DNA in lesions and in normal-appearing white matter of 30 patients with multiple sclerosis and 24 control patients without neurological disease or brain lesions. As reported before in biochemical studies, oxidized lipids and DNA were highly enriched in active multiple sclerosis plaques, predominantly in areas that are defined as initial or 'prephagocytic' lesions. Oxidized DNA was mainly seen in oligodendrocyte nuclei, which in part showed signs of apoptosis. In addition, a small number of reactive astrocytes revealed nuclear expression of 8-hydroxy-d-guanosine. Similarly, lipid peroxidation-derived structures (malondialdehyde and oxidized phospholipid epitopes) were seen in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and some astrocytes. In addition, oxidized phospholipids were massively accumulated in a fraction of axonal spheroids with disturbed fast axonal transport as well as in neurons within grey matter lesions. Neurons stained for oxidized phospholipids frequently revealed signs of degeneration with fragmentation of their dendritic processes. The extent of lipid and DNA oxidation correlated significantly with inflammation, determined by the number of CD3 positive T cells and human leucocyte antigen-D expressing macrophages and microglia in the lesions. Our data suggest profound oxidative injury of oligodendrocytes and neurons to be associated with active demyelination and axonal or neuronal injury in multiple sclerosis.

  14. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE IN DIESEL BUS MECHANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale:

    Diesel exposure has been associated with adverse health effects, including susceptibility to asthma, allergy and cancer. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated increased cancer incidence among workers exposed to diesel. This is likely due to oxid...

  15. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    cationic polyelectrolytes to have a positive surface charge and then dipped into diluted, negatively-charged AlPO4 colloidal suspension (0.05M) at pH 7.5. Amorphous AlPO4 (crystallizes to tridymite- and cristobalite-forms at 1080°C) nano particles were coated on fibers layer-by-layer using an electrostatic attraction protocol. A uniform and smooth coating was formed which allowed fiber pullout from the matrix of a Nextel 720/alumina mini-composite hot-pressed at 1250°C/20MPa. Reaction-bonded mullite (RBM), with low formation temperature and sintering shrinkage was synthesized by incorporation of mixed-rare-earth-oxide (MREO) and mullite seeds. Pure mullite formed with 7.5wt% MREO at 1300°C. Introduction of 5wt% mullite seeds gave RBM with less than 3% shrinkage and 20% porosity. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720/RBM composites were successful fabricated by EPID and pressureless sintering at 1300°C. Significant fiber pullout occurred and the 4-point bend strength was around 170MPa (with 25-30vol% fibers) at room temperature and 1100°C and a Work-of-Fracture 7KJ/m2. At 1200°C, the composite failed in shear due to the MREO-based glassy phase in the matrix. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720 fiber/aluminosilicate (no MREO) showed damage tolerance at 1200°C with a bend strength 170MPa.

  16. Photoexcited riboflavin induces oxidative damage to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Yoshioka, Takuto

    2015-08-01

    Photoexcited riboflavin induced damage of human serum albumin (HSA), a water soluble protein, resulting in the diminishment of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue. Because riboflavin hardly photosensitized singlet oxygen generation and sodium azide, a singlet oxygen quencher, did not inhibit protein damage, electron transfer-mediated oxidation of HSA was speculated. Fluorescence lifetime of riboflavin was not affected by HSA, suggesting that the excited triplet state of riboflavin is responsible for protein damage through electron transfer. In addition, the preventive effect of xanthone derivatives, triplet quenchers, on photosensitized protein damage could be evaluated using this photosensitized reaction system of riboflavin and HSA.

  17. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  18. Oxidative DNA Damage in Blood of CVD Patients Taking Detralex

    PubMed Central

    Krzyściak, Wirginia; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Kózka, Mariusz; Kozieł, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the work reported here was to determine the degree of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in peripheral blood as well as in the blood stasis from varicose vein of (chronic venous disorder) CVD patients. Moreover, determination of the impact of Detralex usage on the level of (oxidative) DNA damages in CVD patients was evaluated as well. The degree of oxidative DNA damages was studied in a group consisted of thirty patients with diagnosed chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in the 2nd and 3rd degree, according to clinical state, etiology, anatomy and pathophysiology (CEAP), and qualified to surgical procedure. The control group consisted of normal volunteers (blood donors) qualified during standard examinations at Regional Centers of Blood Donation and Blood Therapy. The comet assay was used for determination of DNA damages. Analyses of the obtained results showed increase in the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in lymphocytes originating from antebrachial blood of CVD patients as compared to the control group (Control) (p < 0.002; ANOVA). In addition, it was demonstrated that the usage of Detralex® resulted in decrease of the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in CVD patients as compared to patients without Detralex® treatment (p < 0.001; ANOVA). Based on findings from the study, it may be hypothesized about occurrence of significant oxidative DNA damages as the consequence of strong oxidative stress in CVD. In addition, antioxidative effectiveness of Detralexu® was observed at the recommended dose, one tablet twice daily. PMID:21912579

  19. Oxidative DNA damage in osteoarthritic porcine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Davies, Catrin M.; De Lin, Ming; Fermor, Beverley

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species. This study investigated if increased oxidative DNA damage accumulates in OA articular cartilage compared with non-OA articular cartilage from pigs with spontaneous OA. Additionally, the ability of nitric oxide (NO) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-) induced DNA damage in non-OA chondrocytes to undergo endogenous repair was investigated. Methods Porcine femoral condyles were graded for the stage of OA, macroscopically by the Collins Scale, and histologically by the modified Mankin Grade. Levels of DNA damage were determined in non-OA and OA cartilage, using the comet assay. For calibration, DNA damage was measured by exposing non-OA chondrocytes to 0-12 Gray of x-ray irradiation. Non-OA articular chondrocytes were treated with 0-500 μM of NO donors (NOC-18 or SIN-1), and DNA damage assessed after treatment and 5 days recovery. Results A significant increase (p<0.01) in oxidative DNA damage occurred in OA chondrocytes in joints with Mankin Grades 3 or greater, compared to non-OA chondrocytes. The percentage of nuclei containing DNA damage increased significantly (p<0.001) from early to late grades of OA. An increase of approximately 0.65-1.7 breaks/1000kB of DNA occurred in OA, compared to non-OA nuclei. NOC-18 or SIN-1 caused significant DNA damage (p<0.001) in non-OA chondrocytes that did not undergo full endogenous repair after 5 days (p<0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest significant levels of oxidative DNA damage occur in OA chondrocytes that accumulates with OA progression. Additionally, DNA damage induced by NO and ONOO- in non-OA chondrocytes does not undergo full endogenous repair. PMID:18720406

  20. The antioxidant effect of Green Tea Mega EGCG against electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress in the hippocampus and striatum of rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nawal A; Radwan, Nasr M; Aboul Ezz, Heba S; Salama, Noha A

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of cellular phones may affect biological systems by increasing free radicals and changing the antioxidant defense systems of tissues, eventually leading to oxidative stress. Green tea has recently attracted significant attention due to its health benefits in a variety of disorders, ranging from cancer to weight loss. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of EMR (frequency 900 MHz modulated at 217 Hz, power density 0.02 mW/cm(2), SAR 1.245 W/kg) on different oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus and striatum of adult rats. This study also extends to evaluate the therapeutic effect of green tea mega EGCG on the previous parameters in animals exposed to EMR after and during EMR exposure. The experimental animals were divided into four groups: EMR-exposed animals, animals treated with green tea mega EGCG after 2 months of EMR exposure, animals treated with green tea mega EGCG during EMR exposure and control animals. EMR exposure resulted in oxidative stress in the hippocampus and striatum as evident from the disturbances in oxidant and antioxidant parameters. Co-administration of green tea mega EGCG at the beginning of EMR exposure for 2 and 3 months had more beneficial effect against EMR-induced oxidative stress than oral administration of green tea mega EGCG after 2 months of exposure. This recommends the use of green tea before any stressor to attenuate the state of oxidative stress and stimulate the antioxidant mechanism of the brain.

  1. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  2. Acrylonitrile-Induced Oxidative Stress and Oxidative DNA Damage in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Klaunig, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the induction of oxidative stress may be involved in brain tumor induction in rats by acrylonitrile. The present study examined whether acrylonitrile induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in rats and whether blood can serve as a valid surrogate for the biomonitoring of oxidative stress induced by acrylonitrile in the exposed population. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 0, 3, 30, 100, and 200 ppm acrylonitrile in drinking water for 28 days. One group of rats were also coadministered N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) (0.3% in diet) with acrylonitrile (200 ppm in drinking water) to examine whether antioxidant supplementation was protective against acrylonitrile-induced oxidative stress. Direct DNA strand breakage in white blood cells (WBC) and brain was measured using the alkaline comet assay. Oxidative DNA damage in WBC and brain was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (fpg)-modified comet assay and with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. No significant increase in direct DNA strand breaks was observed in brain and WBC from acrylonitrile-treated rats. However, oxidative DNA damage (fpg comet and 8′hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine) in brain and WBC was increased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, plasma levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in rats administered acrylonitrile. Dietary supplementation with NAC prevented acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in brain and WBC. A slight, but significant, decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio was seen in brain at acrylonitrile doses > 30 ppm. These results provide additional support that the mode of action for acrylonitrile-induced astrocytomas involves the induction of oxidative stress and damage. Significant associations were seen between oxidative DNA damage in WBC and brain, ROS formation in plasma, and the reported tumor incidences. Since oxidative DNA damage in brain correlated with oxidative damage in WBC, these results suggest

  3. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    supranuclear palsy brains. There were no significant alterations in 8-hydroxy-2- deoxyguanosine in the plasma of PD patients. We found that...patients and a number of specific genes linked to oxidative stress were reduced in expression. There was increased lipid peroxidation in progressive

  4. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  5. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  6. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  7. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  8. Measurement of oxidative damage at pyrimidine bases in gamma-irradiated DNA.

    PubMed

    Douki, T; Delatour, T; Paganon, F; Cadet, J

    1996-01-01

    Oxidized nucleobases represent one of the main classes of damage induced in DNA by ionizing radiation. Emphasis was placed in this work on the measurement of four oxidized pyrimidine bases, including 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil (5-HMUra), 5-formyluracil (5-ForUra), 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHCyt), and 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHUra), in isolated DNA upon exposure to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. For this purpose, both high performance liquid chromatography associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used. Conditions of hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond were carefully checked in order to achieve a quantitative release of the lesions. We showed that 60% formic acid treatment leads to the decomposition of the four lesions studied. On the other hand, hydrolysis based on the use of either 88% formic acid or 70% hydrogen fluoride in pyridine (HF/Pyr) allowed the quantitative release of the modified bases, with the exception of 5-HMUra when the latter reagent was utilized. A dose course study of the radiation-induced formation of 5-HMUra and 5-ForUra in DNA by using the GC-MS assay showed that the latter lesion was produced in a 2.1-fold higher yield than the former one. HF/Pyr and 88% formic acid hydrolysis provided similar results for 5-ForUra, indicating the reliability of both techniques for the measurement of this lesion. For 5-OHUra and 5-OHCyt, the level of modification determined by GC-MS analysis was higher after 88% formic acid treatment than upon HF/Pyr hydrolysis. When DNA was enzymatically digested and analyzed by HPLC-EC for 5-OHdCyd and 5-OHdUrd, the results were very close to those obtained by GC-MS following HF/Pyr treatment. It was concluded that additional amounts of both 5-OHUra and 5-OHCyt are produced during the 88% formic acid treatment from radiation-induced 5,6-saturated pyrimidine precursors. It is likely that cytosine and uracil diols are involved in this reaction. The

  9. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  10. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  11. Oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm chromosomes: Size matters.

    PubMed

    Kocer, Ayhan; Henry-Berger, Joelle; Noblanc, Anais; Champroux, Alexandre; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Saez, Fabrice; Johnson, Graham D; Krawetz, Stephen A; Alvarez, Juan G; Aitken, R John; Drevet, Joël R

    2015-12-01

    Normal embryo and foetal development as well as the health of the progeny are mostly dependent on gamete nuclear integrity. In the present study, in order to characterize more precisely oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm we used two mouse models that display high levels of sperm oxidative DNA damage, a common alteration encountered both in in vivo and in vitro reproduction. Immunoprecipitation of oxidized sperm DNA coupled to deep sequencing showed that mouse chromosomes may be largely affected by oxidative alterations. We show that the vulnerability of chromosomes to oxidative attack inversely correlated with their size and was not linked to their GC richness. It was neither correlated with the chromosome content in persisting nucleosomes nor associated with methylated sequences. A strong correlation was found between oxidized sequences and sequences rich in short interspersed repeat elements (SINEs). Chromosome position in the sperm nucleus as revealed by fluorescent in situ hybridization appears to be a confounder. These data map for the first time fragile mouse sperm chromosomal regions when facing oxidative damage that may challenge the repair mechanisms of the oocyte post-fertilization.

  12. Hippocampal-related memory deficits and histological damage induced by neonatal ionizing radiation exposure. Role of oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Lucila Guadalupe; Aon Bertolino, Laura; Saraceno, Gustavo Ezequiel; Zorrilla Zubilete, María Aurelia; Uran, Soledad Lucía; Capani, Francisco; Guelman, Laura Ruth

    2010-02-02

    Ionizing radiations induce oxidative stress on target tissues, mainly through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, there are few data available on the behavioral effects of moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the performance of adult rats irradiated at birth in different hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks and to establish a relationship with the oxidative status and histological changes in rat hippocampus (Hip). Male Wistar rats were irradiated with 5 Gy of X rays between 24 and 48 h after birth. Thirty days later, rats were subjected to open field, object recognition and inhibitory avoidance tasks. In addition, oxidative status markers as well as protein kinase C (PKC) activity and histological changes were assessed in control and irradiated Hip. Results show an impairment in recognition and habituation memories in 30-day-old animals exposed to neonatal ionizing radiation, both at short- (ST) and at long-term (LT), whereas an improvement in associative memory was observed at ST. In addition, histological alterations were observed in irradiated Hip. Although an increase in ROS levels and PKC activity were found in irradiated Hip, no changes in the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were observed. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that an increased PKC activity, induced by neonatal ionizing radiation on rat Hip, could play a role in the generation of an imbalance between ROS levels and antioxidant systems and might underlie radiation-induced hippocampal histological damage as well as the Hip-dependent behavioral changes found in irradiated rats.

  13. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin.

  14. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  15. Tetrahydrobiopterin Protects against Radiation-induced Growth Inhibition in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng-Yi; Li, Yi; Li, Rui; Zhang, An-An; Shang, Bo; Yu, Jing; Xie, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). BH4 therapy can reverse the disease-related redox disequilibrium observed with BH4 deficiency. However, whether BH4 exerts a protective effect against radiation-induced damage to cardiomyocytes remains unknown. Methods: Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the effects of X-ray on H9c2 cells with or without BH4 treatment. The contents of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in H9c2 cells were measured to investigate oxidative stress levels. The cell cycle undergoing radiation with or without BH4 treatment was detected using flow cytometry. The expression levels of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/P53 signaling pathway, inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) were examined using Western blotting. Results: X-ray radiation significantly inhibited the growth of H9c2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas BH4 treatment significantly reduced the X-ray radiation-induced growth inhibition (control group vs. X-ray groups, respectively, P < 0.01). X-ray radiation induced LDH release, apoptosis, and G0/G1 peak accumulation, significantly increasing the level of MDA and the production of NO, and decreased the level of SOD (control group vs. X-ray groups, respectively, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). By contrast, BH4 treatment can significantly reverse these processes (BH4 treatment groups vs. X-ray groups, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). BH4 reversed the X-ray radiation-induced expression alterations of apoptosis-related molecules, including B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein, and caspase-3, and molecules of the PI3K/Akt/P53 signaling pathway. BH4 enhanced the production of NO in 2 Gy and 4 Gy radiated groups by upregulating eNOS protein expression and downregulating iNOS protein expression. Conclusions: BH4 treatment can protect

  16. Increased oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in non-remission schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Sertan Copoglu, U; Virit, Osman; Hanifi Kokacya, M; Orkmez, Mustafa; Bulbul, Feridun; Binnur Erbagci, A; Semiz, Murat; Alpak, Gokay; Unal, Ahmet; Ari, Mustafa; Savas, Haluk A

    2015-09-30

    Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. But there is not any study which examines the effects of oxidative stress on DNA in schizophrenia patients. Therefore we aimed to assess the oxidative stress levels and oxidative DNA damage in schizophrenia patients with and without symptomatic remission. A total of 64 schizophrenia patients (38 with symptomatic remission and 26 without symptomatic remission) and 80 healthy volunteers were included in the study. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured in plasma. TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI) and 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher in non-remission schizophrenic (Non-R-Sch) patients than in the controls. TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher in remission schizophrenic (R-Sch) patients than in the controls. TAS level were significantly lower and TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher in R-Sch patients than in Non-R-Sch patients. Despite the ongoing oxidative stress in patients with both R-Sch and Non-R-Sch, oxidative DNA damage was higher in only Non-R-Sch patients compared to controls. It is suggested that oxidative stress can cause the disease via DNA damage, and oxidative stress plays a role in schizophrenia through oxidative DNA damage.

  17. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal.

  18. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  19. Prosthodontic management of radiation induced xerostomic patient using flexible dentures

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; V, Yuvraj; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2012-01-01

    Xerostomia causes discomfort for complete denture wearers as the tissues become dry and friable due to lack of lubricating properties of saliva. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular chelitis, dysgeusia and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. This case report describes a new method in addressing such issues by using flexible complete denture construction in radiation induced xerostomic patient with minimal tissue damage during and after denture construction procedures. PMID:22605708

  20. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Popov, A. I.; Schwartz, K.; Shablonin, E.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic-covalent Lu3Al5O12 single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions (197Au, 209Bi, 238U, fluence of 1012 ions/cm2) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|Al or Ce|Al - a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce3+ single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|Lu-Ce|Al or Cr3+-Cr3+ in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|Al strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  1. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  2. Anti- and pro-oxidant effects of (+)-catechin on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Puqing; Yang, Qin; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme proteins as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Flavonoids have been widely used to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and in vitro, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action was usually dependent on their anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of (+)-catechin, a polyphenol identified in tea, cocoa, and red wine, on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage. It was found that (+)-catechin had the capacities to act as a free radical scavenger and reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl hemoglobin, demonstrating apparent anti-oxidant activities. However, the presence of (+)-catechin surprisingly promoted hemoglobin-induced protein oxidation, which was probably due to the ability of this anti-oxidant to rapidly trigger the oxidative degradation of normal hemoglobin. In addition, hemoglobin-H2O2-induced protein carbonyl formation was significantly enhanced by (+)-catechin at lower concentrations, while it was efficiently inhibited when higher concentrations were used. These novel results showed that the dietary intake and therapeutic use of catechins might possess pro-oxidant activity through aggravating hemoglobin-related oxidative damage. The dual effects on hemoglobin redox reactions may provide new insights into the physiological implications of tea extract and wine (catechins) with cellular heme proteins.

  3. Alternative Interventions to Prevent Oxidative Damage following Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lara, Simón Quetzalcoatl; Ramírez-Lizardo, Ernesto Javier; Totsuka-Sutto, Sylvia Elena; Castillo-Romero, Araceli; García-Cobián, Teresa Arcelia

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) lesions are a phenomenon that occurs in multiple pathological states and results in a series of events that end in irreparable damage that severely affects the recovery and health of patients. The principal therapeutic approaches include preconditioning, postconditioning, and remote ischemic preconditioning, which when used separately do not have a great impact on patient mortality or prognosis. Oxidative stress is known to contribute to the damage caused by I/R; however, there are no pharmacological approaches to limit or prevent this. Here, we explain the relationship between I/R and the oxidative stress process and describe some pharmacological options that may target oxidative stress-states. PMID:28116037

  4. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  5. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy.

  6. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  7. NDE for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter s thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using NDE methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating. The results of that study are briefly reviewed in this article as well. Additionally, a short discussion on the future role of simulation to aid in these studies is provided.

  8. Bee products prevent agrichemical-induced oxidative damage in fish.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L(-1) of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased.

  9. Bee Products Prevent Agrichemical-Induced Oxidative Damage in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; Santos da Rosa, João Gabriel; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L−1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased. PMID:24098336

  10. Oxidative damage to macromolecules in the thyroid - experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Whereas oxidative reactions occur in all tissues and organs, the thyroid gland constitutes such an organ, in which oxidative processes are indispensable for thyroid hormone synthesis. It is estimated that huge amount of reactive oxygen species, especially of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are produced in the thyroid under physiological conditions, justifying the statement that the thyroid gland is an organ of “oxidative nature”. Apart from H2O2, also other free radicals or reactive species, formed from iodine or tyrosine residues, participate in thyroid hormone synthesis. Under physiological conditions, there is a balance between generation and detoxification of free radicals. Effective protective mechanisms, comprising antioxidative molecules and the process of compartmentalization of potentially toxic molecules, must have been developed in the thyroid to maintain this balance. However, with additional oxidative abuse caused by exogenous or endogenous prooxidants (ionizing radiation being the most spectacular), increased damage to macromolecules occurs, potentially leading to different thyroid diseases, cancer included. PMID:23270549

  11. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  12. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in coronary artery bypass graft surgery: effects of antioxidant treatments.

    PubMed

    Milei, J; Ferreira, R; Grana, D R; Boveris, A

    2001-01-01

    We examined antioxidant actions in 73 patients undergoing coronary artery surgery by assessing mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in ventricular biopsies obtained at preischemia and postreperfusion. Those patients who received antioxidant therapy benefited by less oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage.

  13. Reduction in oxidatively generated DNA damage following smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a known cause of cancer, and cancer may be in part due to effects of oxidative stress. However, whether smoking cessation reverses oxidatively induced DNA damage unclear. The current study sought to examine the extent to which three DNA lesions showed significant reductions after participants quit smoking. Methods Participants (n = 19) in this study were recruited from an ongoing 16-week smoking cessation clinical trial and provided blood samples from which leukocyte DNA was extracted and assessed for 3 DNA lesions (thymine glycol modification [d(TgpA)]; formamide breakdown of pyrimidine bases [d(TgpA)]; 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine [d(Gh)]) via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Change in lesions over time was assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for gender, age, and treatment condition. Results Overall time effects for the d(TgpA) (χ2(3) = 8.068, p < 0.045), d(PfpA) (χ2(3) = 8.477, p < 0.037), and d(Gh) (χ2(3) = 37.599, p < 0.001) lesions were seen, indicating levels of each decreased significantly after CO-confirmed smoking cessation. The d(TgpA) and d(PfpA) lesions show relatively greater rebound at Week 16 compared to the d(Gh) lesion (88% of baseline for d(TgpA), 64% of baseline for d(PfpA), vs 46% of baseline for d(Gh)). Conclusions Overall, results from this analysis suggest that cigarette smoking contributes to oxidatively induced DNA damage, and that smoking cessation appears to reduce levels of specific damage markers between 30-50 percent in the short term. Future research may shed light on the broader array of oxidative damage influenced by smoking and over longer durations of abstinence, to provide further insights into mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. PMID:21569419

  14. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  15. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  16. Overloaded training increases exercise-induced oxidative stress and damage.

    PubMed

    Palazzetti, Stephane; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Favier, Alain; Margaritis, Irene

    2003-08-01

    We hypothesized that overloaded training (OT) in triathlon would induce oxidative stress and damage on muscle and DNA. Nine male triathletes and 6 male sedentary subjects participated in this study. Before and after a 4-week OT, triathletes exercised for a duathlon. Blood ratio of reduced vs. oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), leukocyte DNA damage, creatine kinase (CK), and CK-MB mass in plasma, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, erythrocyte and plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured before and after OT in pre- and postexercise situations. Triathletes were overloaded in response to OT. In rest conditions, OT induced plasma GSH-Px activity increase and plasma TAS decrease (both p < 0.05). In exercise conditions, OT resulted in higher exercise-induced variations of blood GSH/GSSG ratio, TBARS level (both p < 0.05), and CK-MB mass (p < 0.01) in plasma; and decreased TAS response (p < 0.05). OT could compromise the antioxidant defense mechanism with respect to exercise-induced response. The resulting increased exercise-induced oxidative stress and further cellular susceptibility to damage needs more study.

  17. Radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes - Molecular mechanism based on inactivation of dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Gerszon, Joanna; Puchala, Mieczyslaw; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2016-11-01

    Proteins, which have enzymatic activities play a fundamental role in the cell due to participation in most of biological processes. Oxidative-induced damage of enzymes often have marked effects on cellular processes, which in consequence determine cell functioning and survival. In this review, we focused on the radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes with particular emphasis on the inactivation of dehydrogenases. For a better understanding of this issue, the efficiency of products of water radiolysis (•OH, O2•- and H2O2) in enzyme inactivation has been analysed. Reactions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with amino acids present in the active site of enzymes appear to have the greatest impact on enzyme inactivation.

  18. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  19. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  20. Measurement of oxidatively generated base damage in cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2011-06-03

    This survey focuses on the critical evaluation of the main methods that are currently available for monitoring single and complex oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. Among chromatographic methods, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and to a lesser extent HPLC-ECD which is restricted to a few electroactive nucleobases and nucleosides are appropriate for measuring the formation of single and clustered DNA lesions. Such methods that require optimized protocols for DNA extraction and digestion are sensitive enough for measuring base lesions formed under conditions of severe oxidative stress including exposure to ionizing radiation, UVA light and high intensity UVC laser pulses. In contrast application of GC-MS and HPLC-MS methods that are subject to major drawbacks have been shown to lead to overestimated values of DNA damage. Enzymatic methods that are based on the use of DNA repair glycosylases in order to convert oxidized bases into strand breaks are suitable, even if they are far less specific than HPLC methods, to deal with low levels of single modifications. Several other methods including immunoassays and (32)P-postlabeling methods that are still used suffer from drawbacks and therefore are not recommended. Another difficult topic is the measurement of oxidatively generated clustered DNA lesions that is currently achieved using enzymatic approaches and that would necessitate further investigations.

  1. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites.

  2. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial oxidative stress damage induced by copper orthophenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Correa, Francisco; Díaz-Ruiz, Jorge Luis; Chávez, Edmundo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of tamoxifen and cyclosporin A on mitochondrial permeability transition caused by addition of the thiol-oxidizing pair Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline. The findings indicate that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A circumvent the oxidative membrane damage manifested by matrix Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and transmembrane electrical gradient collapse. Furthermore, it was found that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A prevent the generation of TBARs promoted by Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline, as well as the inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and disruption of mDNA. Electrophoretic analysis was unable to demonstrate a cross-linking reaction between membrane proteins. Yet, it was found that Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline induced the generation of reactive oxygen species. It is thus plausible that membrane leakiness is due to an oxidative stress injury.

  3. Prevention of oxidative DNA damage in rats by brussels sprouts.

    PubMed

    Deng, X S; Tuo, J; Poulsen, H E; Loft, S

    1998-03-01

    The alleged cancer preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables could be related to protection from mutagenic oxidative DNA damage. We have studied the effects of Brussels sprouts, some non-cruciferous vegetables and isolated glucosinolates on spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in terms of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in groups of 6-8 male Wistar rats. Excess oxidative DNA damage was induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP 100 mg/kg). Four days oral administration of 3 g of cooked Brussels sprouts homogenate reduced the spontaneous urinary 8-oxodG excretion by 31% (p<0.05) whereas raw sprouts, beans and endive (1:1), isolated indolyl glucosinolates and breakdown products had no significant effect. An aqueous extract of cooked Brussels sprouts (corresponding to 6.7 g vegetable per day for 4 days) decreased the spontaneous 8-oxodG excretion from 92 +/- 12 to 52 +/- 15 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). After 2-NP administration the 8-oxodG excretion was increased to 132 +/- 26 pmol/24 h (p<0.05) whereas pretreatment with the sprouts extract reduced this to 102 +/- 30 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). The spontaneous level of 8-oxodG in nuclear DNA from liver and bone marrow was not significantly affected by the sprouts extract whereas the level decreased by 27% in the kidney (p<0.05). In the liver 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels in nuclear DNA 8.7 and 3.8 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. The sprouts extract reduced this increase by 57% (p<0.05) at 6 h whereas there was no significant effect at 24 h. In the kidneys 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels 2.2 and 1.2 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. Pretreatment with the sprouts extract abolished these increases (p<0.05). Similarly, in the bone marrow the extract protected completely (p<0.05) against a 4.9-fold 2-NP induced increase (p<0.05) in the 8-oxodG level. These findings demonstrate that cooked Brussels sprouts contain bioactive substance(s) with a potential for reducing the physiological

  4. Radiation-induced accelerated coronary arteriosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Thompson, M.; Dameshek, H.L.

    1986-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on radiation-induced coronary heart disease. A young patient with myocardial infarction following mediastinal irradiation is described. The role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the subsequent development of coronary heart disease is discussed.

  5. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  6. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  7. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  8. In vitro toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticle: oxidative damages on Hep G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Leila; Tanwir, Farzeen; Yousefi Babadi, Vahid

    2015-02-01

    During the past years many studies have been done highlighting the great need for a more thorough understanding of cell-iron oxide nanoparticle interactions. To improve our knowledge in this field, there is a great need for standardized protocols that would allow to comparing the cytotoxic potential of any Fe2O3-NP type with previously studied particles. Several approaches are reported that several parameters which are of great importance for Fe2O3 nanoparticle induced toxicity. Nanoparticles because of their very small size can pass through the cell membrane and can make oxidative damage in all parts of the cells such as mitochondria, membrane, DNA due to high surface area. This study focuses on acute cytotoxicity of reactive oxygen species and DNA damaging effects of mentioned nanoparticles. Results showed increase of the oxidative damage leads cells to the apoptosis, therefore reduced cell viability. It is interesting that all of the results are concentration and time dependent.

  9. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates.

  10. Protective Effect of Carvacrol on Oxidative Stress and Cellular DNA Damage Induced by UVB Irradiation in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Al-Numair, Khalid S; Al-Assaf, Abdullah H; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biological system. In this study, we examined the protective effect of carvacrol on UVB-induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage with reference to alterations in cellular an-tioxidant status in human lymphocytes. A series of in vitro assays (hydroxyl radical, superoxide, nitric oxide, DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl), and ABTS (2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging assays) demonstrate antioxidant property of carvacrol in our study. UVB exposure significantly increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LHPs), % tail DNA and tail moment; decreased % cell viability and antioxidant status in UVB-irradiated lymphocytes. Treatment with carvacrol 30 min prior to UVB-exposure resulted in a significant decline of TBARS, LHP, % tail DNA, and tail moment and increased % cell viability as carvacrol concentration increased. UVB irradiated lymphocytes with carvacrol alone (at 10 μg/mL) gave no significant change in cell viability, TBARS, LHP, % tail DNA, and tail moment when compared with normal lymphocytes. On the basis of our results, we conclude that carvacrol, a dietary antioxidant, mediates its protective effect through modulation of UVB-induced ROS.

  11. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  12. Oxidant-induced DNA damage of target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstätter, I; Hyslop, P A; Jackson, J H; Cochrane, C G

    1988-01-01

    In this study we examined the leukocytic oxidant species that induce oxidant damage of DNA in whole cells. H2O2 added extracellularly in micromolar concentrations (10-100 microM) induced DNA strand breaks in various target cells. The sensitivity of a specific target cell was inversely correlated to its catalase content and the rate of removal of H2O2 by the target cell. Oxidant species produced by xanthine oxidase/purine or phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated monocytes induced DNA breakage of target cells in proportion to the amount of H2O2 generated. These DNA strand breaks were prevented by extracellular catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase. Cytotoxic doses of HOCl, added to target cells, did not induce DNA strand breakage, and myeloperoxidase added extracellularly in the presence of an H2O2-generating system, prevented the formation of DNA strand breaks in proportion to its H2O2 degrading capacity. The studies also indicated that H2O2 formed hydroxyl radical (.OH) intracellularly, which appeared to be the most likely free radical responsible for DNA damage: .OH was detected in cells exposed to H2O2; the DNA base, deoxyguanosine, was hydroxylated in cells exposed to H2O2; and intracellular iron was essential for induction of DNA strand breaks. PMID:2843565

  13. Oxidative Damage in the Aging Heart: an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Gustavo Lenci; Neto, Francisco Filipak; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto de Oliveira; Liebel, Samuel; de Fraga, Rogério; Bueno, Ronaldo da Rocha Loures

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of ‘aging’; however, the factors that affect this complex process are still poorly understood. Of these theories, the accumulation of oxidative damage over time is among the most accepted. Particularly, the heart is one of the most affected organs by oxidative stress. The current study, therefore, aimed to investigate oxidative stress markers in myocardial tissue of rats at different ages. Methods: Seventy-two rats were distributed into 6 groups of 12 animals each and maintained for 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and the levels of non-protein thiols, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, as well as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were determined. Results: Superoxide dismutase, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation were reduced in the older groups of animals, when compared with the younger group. However, protein carbonylation showed an increase in the 12-month group followed by a decrease in the older groups. In addition, the levels of non-protein thiols were increased in the 12-month group and not detected in the older groups. Conclusion: Our data showed that oxidative stress is not associated with aging in the heart. However, an increase in non-protein thiols may be an important factor that compensates for the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the oldest rats, to maintain appropriate antioxidant defenses against oxidative insults. PMID:27006709

  14. SOS processing of unique oxidative DNA damages in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Laspia, M F; Wallace, S S

    1989-05-05

    phi X174 replicative form (RF) I transfecting DNA containing thymine glycols (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine), urea glycosides or apurinic (AP) sites was used to study SOS processing of unique DNA damages in Escherichia coli. All three lesions can be found in DNA damaged by chemical oxidants or radiation and are representative of several common structural modifications of DNA bases. When phi X DNA containing thymine glycols was transfected into host cells that were ultraviolet-irradiated to induce the SOS response, a substantial increase in survival was observed compared to transfection into uninduced hosts. Studies with mutants demonstrated that both the activated form of RecA and UmuDC proteins were required for this reactivation. In contrast, no increase in survival was observed when DNA containing urea glycosides or AP sites was transfected into ultraviolet-induced hosts. These data suggest that SOS-induced reactivation does not reflect a generalized repair system for all replication-blocking, lethal lesions but rather that the efficiency of reactivation is damage dependent. Further, we found that a significant fraction of potentially lethal thymine glycols could be ultraviolet-reactivated in an umuC lexA recA-independent manner, suggesting the existence of an as yet uncharacterized damage-inducible SOS-independent mode of thymine glycol repair.

  15. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  16. Radiation-induced alterations in histone modification patterns and their potential impact on short-term radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, Anna A.; Mazurek, Belinda; Seiler, Doris M.

    2012-01-01

    Detection and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage occur in the context of chromatin. An intricate network of mechanisms defines chromatin structure, including DNA methylation, incorporation of histone variants, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. In the last years it became clear that the cellular response to radiation-induced DNA damage involves all of these mechanisms. Here we focus on the current knowledge on radiation-induced alterations in post-translational histone modification patterns and their effect on the chromatin accessibility, transcriptional regulation and chromosomal stability. PMID:23050241

  17. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  18. Mechanisms of Radiation Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-17-5 Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced...CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 00-10-2016 Final Oct 5, 2010 - Dec 31, 2015 Mechanisms of...primary outcome of this program, determined using both theory and experiment, has been a complete understanding of the mechanisms of radiation damage

  19. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells. PMID:22254082

  20. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  1. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  2. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced gene expression in reconstructed skin in vitro and in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marionnet, Claire; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Seité, Sophie; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Lejeune, François; Bastien, Philippe; Rougier, André; Bernerd, Françoise; Krutmann, Jean

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is usually assessed by measuring erythema formation and pigmentation. The biological relevance of these endpoints for UVA-induced skin damage, however, is not known. We therefore carried out two complementary studies to determine UVA protection provided by a broad-spectrum sunscreen product at a molecular level by studying UVA radiation-induced gene expression. One study was performed on human reconstructed skin in vitro with a semi-global gene expression analysis of 227 genes in fibroblasts and 244 in keratinocytes. The second one was conducted in vivo in human volunteers and focused on genes involved in oxidative stress response and photo-ageing (haeme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-2, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, matrix metalloproteinase-1). In-vitro UVA radiation induced modulation of genes involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress, heat shock responses, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen pre-application abrogated or significantly reduced these effects, as underlined by unsupervised clustering analysis. The in vivo study confirmed that the sunscreen prevented UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of the five studied genes. These findings indicate the high efficacy of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in protecting human skin against UVA-induced gene responses and suggest that this approach is a biologically relevant complement to existing methods.

  3. Reproductive Benefit of Oxidative Damage: An Oxidative Stress “Malevolence”?

    PubMed Central

    Poljsak, B.; Milisav, I.; Lampe, T.; Ostan, I.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to antioxidant defenses are considered to play a major role in diverse chronic age-related diseases and aging. Here we present an attempt to synthesize information about proximate oxidative processes in aging (relevant to free radical or oxidative damage hypotheses of aging) with an evolutionary scenario (credited here to Dawkins hypotheses) involving tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of oxidative stress to reproducing organisms. Oxidative stress may be considered a biological imperfection; therefore, the Dawkins' theory of imperfect adaptation of beings to environment was applied to the role of oxidative stress in processes like famine and infectious diseases and their consequences at the molecular level such as mutations and cell signaling. Arguments are presented that oxidative damage is not necessarily an evolutionary mistake but may be beneficial for reproduction; this may prevail over its harmfulness to health and longevity in evolution. Thus, Dawkins' principle of biological “malevolence” may be an additional biological paradigm for explaining the consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:21969876

  4. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  5. Oxidative damage involves in the inhibitory effect of nitric oxide on spore germination of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tongfei; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2011-01-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on spore germination of Penicillium expansum were investigated and a possible mechanism was evaluated. The results indicated that NO released by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) significantly suppressed fungal growth. With the use of an oxidant sensitive probe and Western blot analysis, an increased level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhanced carbonylation damage were detected in spores of P. expansum under NO stress. Exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbic acid (Vc) could increase the resistance of the spore to the inhibitory effect of NO. The activities of SOD and catalase (CAT), as well as ATP content in spores under NO stress were also lower than those in the control. We suggest that NO in high concentration induces the generation of ROS which subsequently causes severe oxidative damage to proteins crucial to the process of spore germination of P. expansum.

  6. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  7. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  8. PAI-1-Dependent Endothelial Cell Death Determines Severity of Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abderrahmani, Rym; François, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Tarlet, Georges; Blirando, Karl; Hneino, Mohammad; Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1) was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 −/− mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs) death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 −/− compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 −/− mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 −/− mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury. PMID:22563394

  9. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  10. Oxidative damage and redox in Lysosomal Storage Disorders: Biochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Donida, Bruna; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Rodrigues, Daiane Grigolo Bardemaker; Marchetti, Desirèe Padilha; Ribas, Graziela; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2017-03-01

    Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSD) comprise a heterogeneous group of >50 genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes that encode lysosomal enzymes, transport proteins or other gene products essential for a functional lysosomal system. As a result, abnormal accumulation of substrates within the lysosome leads to a progressive cellular impairment and dysfunction of numerous organs and systems. The exact mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of LSD remain obscure. Previous studies proposed a relationship between oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of several inborn errors of metabolism, including LSD. Considering these points, in this paper it was reviewed oxidative stress and emerging antioxidant therapy in LSD, emphasizing studies with biological samples from patients affected by this group of conditions. These studies allow presuming that metabolites accumulated in LSD cause an increase of lysosomes' number and size, which may induce excessive production of reactive species and/or deplete the tissue antioxidant capacity, leading to damage in biomolecules. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that cell oxidative process occurs in LSD and probably contributes to the pathophysiology of these disorders. In this context, it is possible to suggest that, in the future, antioxidants could come to be used as adjuvant therapy for LSD patients.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in parkin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Palacino, James J; Sagi, Dijana; Goldberg, Matthew S; Krauss, Stefan; Motz, Claudia; Wacker, Maik; Klose, Joachim; Shen, Jie

    2004-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in parkin are the predominant cause of familial Parkinson's disease. We previously reported that parkin-/- mice exhibit nigrostriatal deficits in the absence of nigral degeneration. Parkin has been shown to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Loss of parkin function, therefore, has been hypothesized to cause nigral degeneration via an aberrant accumulation of its substrates. Here we employed a proteomic approach to determine whether loss of parkin function results in alterations in abundance and/or modification of proteins in the ventral midbrain of parkin-/- mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry revealed decreased abundance of a number of proteins involved in mitochondrial function or oxidative stress. Consistent with reductions in several subunits of complexes I and IV, functional assays showed reductions in respiratory capacity of striatal mitochondria isolated from parkin-/- mice. Electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross morphological abnormalities in striatal mitochondria of parkin-/- mice. In addition, parkin-/- mice showed a delayed rate of weight gain, suggesting broader metabolic abnormalities. Accompanying these deficits in mitochondrial function, parkin-/- mice also exhibited decreased levels of proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress. Consistent with these findings, parkin-/- mice showed decreased serum antioxidant capacity and increased protein and lipid peroxidation. The combination of proteomic, genetic, and physiological analyses reveal an essential role for parkin in the regulation of mitochondrial function and provide the first direct evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the absence of nigral degeneration in a genetic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  12. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  13. Rhubarb extract has a protective role against radiation-induced brain injury and neuronal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kui; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Wenjun; Zhou, Min; Tang, Yamei; Peng, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress caused by ionizing radiation is involved in neuronal damage in a number of disorders, including trauma, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ionizing radiation can lead to the formation of free radicals, which cause neuronal apoptosis and have important roles in the development of some types of chronic brain disease. The present study evaluated the effects of varying concentrations (2, 5 and 10 µg/ml) of ethanolic rhubarb extract on the neuronal damage caused by irradiation in primary neuronal cultures obtained from the cortices of rat embryos aged 20 days. Brain damage was induced with a single dose of γ-irradiation that induced DNA fragmentation, increased lactate dehydrogenase release in neuronal cells and acted as a trigger for microglial cell proliferation. Treatment with rhubarb extract significantly decreased radiation-induced lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation, which are important in the process of cell apoptosis. The rhubarb extract exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase release and neuronal cell apoptosis that were induced by the administration of ionizing radiation. The effect of a 10 µg/ml dose of rhubarb extract on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by radiation was also investigated. This dose led to significant inhibition of ROS generation. In conclusion, the present study showed a protective role of rhubarb extract against irradiation-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death and ROS generation.

  14. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  15. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Cobley, James N; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Malone, John K

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical ((·)OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and (·)OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation.

  16. Combined Treatment With Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Gamma Ligands and Gamma Radiation Induces Apoptosis by PPARγ-Independent Up-Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Signals in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Jong; Im, Chang-Nim; Park, Seon Hwa; Moon, Eun-Yi; Hong, Sung Hee

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate possible radiosensitizing activities of the well-known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ ligand ciglitazone and novel PPARγ ligands CAY10415 and CAY10506 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic cell survival assay. To investigate the mechanism underlying PPARγ ligand-induced radiosensitization, the subdiploid cellular DNA fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry. Activation of the caspase pathway by combined PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation treatment was detected by immunoblot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry. Results: The 3 PPARγ ligands induced cell death and ROS generation in a PPARγ-independent manner, enhanced γ-radiation–induced apoptosis and caspase-3–mediated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in vitro. The combined PPARγ ligand/γ-radiation treatment triggered caspase-8 activation, and this initiator caspase played an important role in the combination-induced apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligands may enhance the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response, possibly by increasing γ-H2AX expression. Moreover, the combination treatment significantly increased ROS generation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine inhibited the combined treatment-induced ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicated that the combined treatment of PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation synergistically induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was regulated by ROS.

  17. Oxidative damage induced in Vicia faba by coke plant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxiang; Lv, Yongkang

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigated toxic impacts of coke plant wastewater over a concentration gradient of COD( Cr) 40-640 mg/l on malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in roots and leaves of Vicia faba. MDA levels and SOD activities were significantly increased at all concentrations both in roots and leaves of Vicia faba; CAT and POD activities were significantly enhanced in roots at low concentrations and were significantly decreased at high concentrations (COD(Cr) 320 and 640 mg/l for CAT; COD( Cr) 640 mg/l for POD). In leaves, CAT and POD activities remained enhanced at all concentration and did not show significant difference at COD( Cr) 640 mg/l for CAT and COD(Cr) 40, 640 mg/l for POD. These results suggest that coke plant wastewater can cause oxidative damage in roots and leaves of Vicia faba and root enzymes seemed more sensitive to the wastewater.

  18. Oxidative damage of the male reproductive system induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Jin-Yan; Lu, Xiao-Ning; Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Xue, Xiang

    2016-10-20

    The effects of paraquat (PQ) on the male reproductive system are unclear. In this study, male rats were divided into four groups (0, 0.5, 2, and 8 mg/kg) and treated with PQ by oral gavage for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment, a significant decline in sperm count, motility, and viability and an increase in teratospermia were observed in the PQ-treated group (P < 0.05). Further investigation found that PQ resulted in enhanced lipid peroxidation and more apoptosis in the testis tissues, and apoptosis was likely to be associated with activation of the mitochondrial pathway. In summary, our study demonstrated oxidative damage due to PQ on the male reproductive system.

  19. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  20. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  1. Factors that modify radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2009-11-01

    It is known that numerous factors can influence radiation carcinogenesis in animals; these factors include the specific characteristics of the radiation (radiation type and dose, dose-rate, dose-fractionation, dose distribution, etc.) as well as many other contributing elements that are not specific to the radiation exposure, such as animal genetic characteristics and age, the environment of the animal, dietary factors and whether specific modifying agents for radiation carcinogenesis have been utilized in the studies. This overview focuses on the modifying factors for radiation carcinogenesis, in both in vivo and in vitro systems, and includes a discussion of agents that enhance (e.g., promoting agents) or suppress (e.g., cancer preventive agents) radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The agents that enhance or suppress radiation carcinogenesis in experimental model systems have been shown to lead to effects equally as large as other known modifying factors for radiation-induced carcinogenesis (e.g., dose-rate, dose-fractionation, linear energy transfer). It is known that dietary factors play an important role in determining the yields of radiation-induced cancers in animal model systems, and it is likely that they also influence radiation-induced cancer risks in human populations.

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved.

  3. Microdosimetry of DNA conformations: relation between direct effect of (60)Co gamma rays and topology of DNA geometrical models in the calculation of A-, B- and Z-DNA radiation-induced damage yields.

    PubMed

    Semsarha, Farid; Raisali, Gholamreza; Goliaei, Bahram; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In order to obtain the energy deposition pattern of ionizing radiation in the nanometric scale of genetic material and to investigate the different sensitivities of the DNA conformations, direct effects of (60)Co gamma rays on the three A, B and Z conformations of DNA have been studied. For this purpose, single-strand breaks (SSB), double-strand breaks (DSB), base damage (BD), hit probabilities and three microdosimetry quantities (imparted energy, mean chord length and lineal energy) in the mentioned DNA conformations have been calculated and compared by using GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (Geant4) toolkit. The results show that A-, B- and Z-DNA conformations have the highest yields of DSB (1.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), SSB (25.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and BD (4.81 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), respectively. Based on the investigation of direct effects of radiation, it can be concluded that the DSB yield is largely correlated to the topological characteristics of DNA models, although the SSB yield is not. Moreover, according to the comparative results of the present study, a reliable candidate parameter for describing the relationship between DNA damage yields and geometry of DNA models in the theoretical radiation biology research studies would be the mean chord length (4 V/S) of the models.

  4. Oxidative damage to rat brain in iron and copper overloads.

    PubMed

    Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Semprine, Jimena; Fuda, Julián; Torti, Horacio; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-08-01

    This study reports on the acute brain toxicity of Fe and Cu in male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) that received 0 to 60 mg kg(-1) (ip) FeCl2 or CuSO4. Brain metal contents and time-responses were determined for rat survival, in situ brain chemiluminescence and phospholipid and protein oxidation products. Metal doses hyperbolically defined brain metal content. Rat survival was 91% and 60% after Fe and Cu overloads. Brain metal content increased from 35 to 114 μg of Fe per g and from 3.6 to 34 μg of Cu per g. Brain chemiluminescence (10 cps cm(-2)) increased 3 and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses (C50) of 38 μg of Fe per g of brain and 15 μg of Cu per g of brain, and with half time responses (t1/2) of 12 h for Fe and 20 h for Cu. Phospholipid peroxidation increased by 56% and 31% with C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 20 μg of Cu per g and with t1/2 of 9 h and 14 h. Protein oxidation increased by 45% for Fe with a C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 18% for Cu with a C50 of 10 μg of Cu per g and a t1/2 of 12 h for both metals. Fe and Cu brain toxicities are likely mediated by Haber-Weiss type HO˙ formation with subsequent oxidative damage.

  5. Poly(ADP-ribose) protects vascular smooth muscle cells from oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Luo, Tao; Cui, Shijun; Gu, Yongquan; Bian, Chunjing; Chen, Yibin; Yu, Xiaochun; Wang, Zhonggao

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) undergo death during atherosclerosis, a widespread cardiovascular disease. Recent studies suggest that oxidative damage occurs in VSMCs and induces atherosclerosis. Here, we analyzed oxidative damage repair in VSMCs and found that VSMCs are hypersensitive to oxidative damage. Further analysis showed that oxidative damage repair in VSMCs is suppressed by a low level of poly (ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a key post-translational modification in oxidative damage repair. The low level of PARylation is not caused by the lack of PARP-1, the major poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activated by oxidative damage. Instead, the expression of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase, PARG, the enzyme hydrolyzing poly(ADP-ribose), is significantly higher in VSMCs than that in the control cells. Using PARG inhibitor to suppress PARG activity facilitates oxidative damage-induced PARylation as well as DNA damage repair. Thus, our study demonstrates a novel molecular mechanism for oxidative damage-induced VSMCs death. This study also identifies the use of PARG inhibitors as a potential treatment for atherosclerosis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(6): 354-359] PMID:25748172

  6. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  7. Aging-associated oxidized albumin promotes cellular senescence and endothelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Alique, Matilde; Navalmoral, Estefanía; Noci, Maria-Victoria; Bohorquez-Magro, Lourdes; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidized proteins with aging have been considered a cardiovascular risk factor. However, it is unclear whether oxidized albumin, which is the most abundant serum protein, induces endothelial damage. The results of this study indicated that with aging processes, the levels of oxidized proteins as well as endothelial microparticles release increased, a novel marker of endothelial damage. Among these, oxidized albumin seems to play a principal role. Through in vitro studies, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin exhibited an increment of endothelial damage markers such as adhesion molecules and apoptosis levels. In addition, albumin oxidation increased the amount of endothelial microparticles that were released. Moreover, endothelial cells with increased oxidative stress undergo senescence. In addition, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin shown a reduction in endothelial cell migration measured by wound healing. As a result, we provide the first evidence that oxidized albumin induces endothelial injury which then contributes to the increase of cardiovascular disease in the elderly subjects. PMID:27042026

  8. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  9. Comparative analysis of the relative potential of silver, Zinc-oxide and titanium-dioxide nanoparticles against UVB-induced DNA damage for the prevention of skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Arora, Sumit; Omar, Yousef; Ijaz, Zohaib Mohammad; Al-Ghadhban, Ahmed; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Carter, James E; Singh, Ajay P; Singh, Seema

    2016-12-01

    Sunscreen formulations containing UVB filters, such as Zinc-oxide (ZnO) and titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to limit the exposure of human skin to UV-radiations. Unfortunately, these UVB protective agents have failed in controlling the skin cancer incidence. We recently demonstrated that silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) could serve as novel protective agents against UVB-radiations. Here our goal was to perform comparative analysis of direct and indirect UVB-protection efficacy of ZnO-, TiO2- and Ag-NPs. Sun-protection-factor calculated based on their UVB-reflective/absorption abilities was the highest for TiO2-NPs followed by Ag- and ZnO-NPs. This was further confirmed by studying indirect protection of UVB radiation-induced death of HaCaT cells. However, only Ag-NPs were active in protecting HaCaT cells against direct UVB-induced DNA-damage by repairing bulky-DNA lesions through nucleotide-excision-repair mechanism. Moreover, Ag-NPs were also effective in protecting HaCaT cells from UVB-induced oxidative DNA damage by enhancing SOD/CAT/GPx activity. In contrast, ZnO- and TiO2-NPs not only failed in providing any direct protection from DNA-damage, but rather enhanced oxidative DNA-damage by increasing ROS production. Together, these findings raise concerns about safety of ZnO- and TiO2-NPs and establish superior protective efficacy of Ag-NPs.

  10. [Radiation-induced genomic instability: phenomenon, molecular mechanisms, pathogenetic significance].

    PubMed

    Mazurik, V K; Mikhaĭlov, V F

    2001-01-01

    The recent data on the radiation-induced genome instability as a special state of progeny of cells irradiated in vitro as well as after a whole body exposure to ionizing radiation, that make these cells considerably different from normal, unirradiated cells, were considered. This state presents a number of cytogenetical, molecular-biological, cytological and biochemical manifestations untypical for normal cells. The state is controlled by the mechanisms of regulation of checkpoints of cell cycle, and apoptosis, that is under gene p53 control. The proof has been found that this state transfers from irradiated maternal cells to their surviving progeny by the epigenetical mechanisms and would exist until the cells restore the original state of response on the DNA damage. From the point of view of the genome instability conception, that considers the chromatine rearrangement as the adaptive-evolution mechanism of adaptation of the species to changeable environmental conditions, the radiation-induced genome instability may be considered as transition of irradiated progeny to the state of read these to adaptation changes with two alternative pathways. The first leads to adaptation to enviromental conditions and restoring of normal cell functions. The second presents the cell transition into the transformed state with remain genome instability and with increase of tumour growth probability.

  11. Effects of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides on Apoptosis, Cellular Adhesion, and Oxidative Damage in Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells of Mice Exposed to Ionizing Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Pang, Hua; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Qiong; Xu, Lu; Liu, Qian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lycium barbarum has been used for more than 2500 years as a traditional herb and food in China. We investigated the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on apoptosis, oxidative damage, and expression of adhesion molecules in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNC) of mice injured by ionizing radiation. Kunming mice were exposed to X-rays; then mice in the LBP groups were continuously injected with various concentrations of LBP intraperitoneally for 14 days. Mice in the control group were continuously injected with normal saline (NS) by the same route for 14 days. A normal group was set up. After 1, 7, and 14 days of treatment, mice were killed and BMNC were extracted. Cell cycle, apoptosis, and the expression of adhesion molecules CD44 and CD49d were detected by flow cytometry. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were identified by colorimetric analyses. LBP significantly decreased the percentage of G0/G1 phase, apoptosis, MDA level, and expression of CD44 and CD49d and distinctly increased the activity of SOD. LBP showed a protective effect on BMNC against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage and altered the expression of adhesion molecule. PMID:27314019

  12. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods.

  13. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Moss, S D; Rockswold, G L; Chou, S N; Yock, D; Berger, M S

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  14. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  15. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  16. An Update on Oxidative Damage to Spermatozoa and Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Opuwari, Chinyerum S.; Henkel, Ralf R.

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mandatory mediators for essential cellular functions including the function of germ cells (oocytes and spermatozoa) and thereby the fertilization process. However, the exposure of these cells to excessive levels of oxidative stress by too high levels of ROS or too low levels of antioxidative protection will render these cells dysfunctional thereby failing the fertilization process and causing couples to be infertile. Numerous causes are responsible for the delicate bodily redox system being out of balance and causing disease and infertility. Many of these causes are modifiable such as lifestyle factors like obesity, poor nutrition, heat stress, smoking, or alcohol abuse. Possible correctable measures include foremost lifestyle changes, but also supplementation with antioxidants to scavenge excessive ROS. However, this should only be done after careful examination of the patient and establishment of the individual bodily antioxidant needs. In addition, other corrective measures include sperm separation for assisted reproductive techniques. However, these techniques have to be carried out very carefully as they, if applied wrongly, bear risks of generating ROS damaging the germ cells and preventing fertilization. PMID:26942204

  17. Biological oxidative damage by carbon nanotubes: fingerprint or footprint?

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Feng; Bello, Dhimiter; Schmidt, Daniel F; Pal, Anoop K; Rogers, Eugene J

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received much attention for performance and toxicity, but vary substantially in terms of impurity type and content, morphology, and surface activity. This study determined the decrease of antioxidant capacity, defined as biological oxidative damage (BOD), of CNTs-exposed serum. The variability in several physicochemical properties of CNTs and their links to BOD elicited in human serum were explored. Tremendous variation in transition metal type and content (104-fold), specific surface area (SSA, nine-fold), and BOD were observed. Mass specific BOD (mBOD) varied from 0.006-0.187 μmol TEU mg(-1), whereas surface area specific BOD (sBOD) varied from 0.068-0.42 μmol TEU m(-2). The sBOD increased in a stepwise fashion from ∼0.1-0.32 μmol TEU m(-2) for tubes with outer diameter less than 10 nm. The mBOD and sBOD may be useful denominators of surface activity and impurity content and assist in designing safer CNTs.

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  19. Nitric oxide alleviates oxidative damage induced by high temperature stress in wheat.

    PubMed

    Bavita, A; Shashi, B; Navtej, S B

    2012-05-01

    Effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a donor of nitric oxide (NO) was examined in two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, C 306 (heat tolerant) and PBW 550 (comparatively heat susceptible) to study the extent of oxidative injury and activities of antioxidant enzyme in relation to high temperature (HT) stress. HT stress resulted in a marked decrease in membrane thermostability (MTS) and 2, 3, 5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) cell viability whereas content of lipid peroxide increased in both the cultivars. The tolerant cultivar C 306 registered less damage to cellular membranes compared to PBW 550 under HT stress. Activities of antioxidant enzymes viz, superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaicol peroxidase and glutathione reductase increased with HT in both the cultivars. Following treatment with SNP, activities of all antioxidant enzymes further increased in correspondence with an increase in MTS and TTC. Apparently, lipid peroxide content was reduced by SNP more in shoots of heat tolerant cultivar C 306 indicating better protection over roots under HT stress. The up-regulation of the antioxidant system by NO possibly contributed to better tolerance against HT induced oxidative damage in wheat.

  20. Induction of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in rat glial cells by acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kamendulis, L M; Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1999-08-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylonitrile (ACN) resulted in a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas). While the exact mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unresolved, non-genotoxic and possibly tumor promotion modes of action appear to be involved in the induction of glial tumors. Recent studies have shown that ACN induced oxidative stress selectively in rat brain in a dose-responsive manner. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in a rat glial cell line, a target tissue, and in cultured rat hepatocytes, a non-target tissue of ACN carcinogenicity. Glial cells and hepatocytes were treated for 1, 4 and 24 h with sublethal concentrations of ACN. ACN induced an increase in oxidative DNA damage, as evidenced by increased production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in glial cells but not in rat hepatocytes. Hydroxyl radical formation following ACN treatment was also selectively increased in glial cells. Following 1 and 4 h of ACN exposure, the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione, as well as the activities of the enzymatic antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the rat glial cells. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of glutathione peroxidase were not affected by ACN treatment in rat glial cells. No changes in any of these biomarkers of oxidative stress were observed in hepatocytes treated with ACN. These data indicate that ACN selectively induced oxidative stress in rat glial cells.

  1. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  2. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  3. Nanoencapsulation of rice bran oil increases its protective effects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; da Silva, Cássia Regina; de Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Cabreira, Thaíssa Nunes; de Bona da Silva, Cristiane; Ferreira, Juliano; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2015-06-01

    Excessive UV-B radiation by sunlight produces inflammatory and oxidative damage of skin, which can lead to sunburn, photoaging, and cancer. This study evaluated whether nanoencapsulation improves the protective effects of rice bran oil against UVB radiation-induced skin damage in mice. Lipid-core nanocapsules containing rice bran oil were prepared, and had mean size around 200 nm, negative zeta potential (∼-9 mV), and low polydispersity index (<0.20). In order to allow application on the skin, a hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil was prepared. This formulation was able to prevent ear edema induced by UVB irradiation by 60 ± 9%, when compared with a hydrogel containing LNC prepared with a mixture of medium chain triglycerides instead of rice bran oil. Protein carbonylation levels (biomarker of oxidative stress) and NF-κB nuclear translocation (biomarker of pro-inflammatory and carcinogenesis response) were reduced (81% and 87%, respectively) in animals treated with the hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil. These in vivo results demonstrate the beneficial effects of nanoencapsulation to improve the protective properties of rice bran oil on skin damage caused by UVB exposure.

  4. Polymorphic trial in oxidative damage of arsenic exposed Vietnamese

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihara, Junko; Soejima, Mikiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Koda, Yoshiro; Kunito, Takashi; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takeshita, Haruo

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic causes DNA damage and changes the cellular capacity for DNA repair. Genes in the base excision repair (BER) pathway influence the generation and repair of oxidative lesions. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) Ser326Cys; apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) Asp148Glu; X-ray and repair and cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg280His and Arg399Gln in the BER genes were analyzed, and the relationship between these 4 SNPs and the urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations of 100 Vietnamese population exposed to arsenic was investigated. Individuals with hOGG1 326Cys/Cys showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those with 326 Ser/Cys and Ser/Ser. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, heterozygous subjects showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those homozygous for Asp/Asp. Moreover, global ethnic comparison of the allelic frequencies of the 4SNPs was performed in 10 population and previous reported data. The mutant allele frequencies of hOGG1 Ser326Cys in the Asian populations were higher than those in the African and Caucasian populations. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, Caucasians showed higher mutant frequencies than those shown by African and Asian populations. Among Asian populations, the Bangladeshi population showed relatively higher mutant allele frequencies of the APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism. This study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a worldwide distribution of SNPs (hOGG1 Ser326Cys, APE1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg280His, and XRCC1 Arg399Gln) in the BER genes. - Highlights: > We showed that hOGG1 and APE1 are associated with urinary 8-OHdG concentrations. > We showed the existence of inter-ethnic differences in hOGG1 and APE1 polymorphism. > These polymorphisms is a genetic marker of susceptibility to oxidative stress.

  5. A molecular dynamics study of radiation induced diffusion in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Maillard, S.; Brutzel, L. Van; Garcia, P.; Dorado, B.; Valot, C.

    2009-03-01

    The nuclear oxide fuels are submitted 'in-pile' to strong structural and chemical modifications due to the fissions and temperature. The diffusion of species is notably the result of a thermal activation and of radiation induced diffusion. This study proposes to estimate to what extent the radiation induced diffusion contributes to the diffusion of lattice atoms in UO2. Irradiations are simulated using molecular dynamics simulation by displacement cascades induced by uranium primary knock-on atoms between 1 and 80 keV. As atoms are easier to displace when their vibration amplitude increases, the temperature range which have been investigated is 300-1400 K. Cascade overlaps were also simulated. The material is shown to melt at the end of cascades, yielding a reduced threshold energy displacement. The nuclear contribution to the radiation induced diffusion is compared to thermally activated diffusion under in-reactor and long-term storage conditions.

  6. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  7. Radiation-Induced Liver Fibrosis Is Mitigated by Gene Therapy Inhibiting Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Signaling in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Ming; Zeng Zhaochong; Zhou Jian; Tan Yunshan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: We determined whether anti-transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) intervention could halt the progression of established radiation-induced liver fibrosis (RILF). Methods and Materials: A replication-defective adenoviral vector expressing the extracellular portion of human T{beta}RII and the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G fusion protein (AdT{beta}RIIFc) was produced. The entire rat liver was exposed to 30 Gy irradiation to generate a RILF model (RILFM). Then, RILFM animals were treated with AdT{beta}RIIFc (1 x 10{sup 11} plaque-forming units [PFU] of T{beta}RII), control virus (1 x 10{sup 11} PFU of AdGFP), or saline. Delayed radiation liver injury was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Chronic oxidative stress damage, hepatic stellate cell activation, and hepatocyte regeneration were also analyzed. Results: In rats infected with AdT{beta}RIIFc, fibrosis was significantly improved compared with rats treated with AdGFP or saline, as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline content, and serum level of hyaluronic acid. Compared with AdGFP rats, AdT{beta}RIIFc-treated rats exhibited decreased oxidative stress damage and hepatic stellate cell activation and preserved liver function. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in the progression of liver fibrosis and suggest that anti-TGF-{beta} intervention is feasible and ameliorates established liver fibrosis. In addition, chronic oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of RILF.

  8. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  9. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  10. Radiation-induced injury of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Lepke, R.A.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1983-08-01

    Forty patients with functional or morphologic esophageal abnormalities following radiotherapy were identified. Abnormalities included abnormal motility with and without mucosal edema, stricture, ulceration and pseudodiverticulum, and fistula. Abnormal motility occurred 4 to 12 weeks following radiotherapy alone and as early as 1 week after therapy when concomitant chemotherapy had been given. Strictures developed 4 to 8 months following completion of radiotherapy. Ulceration, pseudodiverticulum, and fistula formation did not develop in a uniform time frame. Radiation-induced esophageal injury is more frequent when radiotherapy and chemotherapy are combined than it is with radiotherapy alone.

  11. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  12. Does the oxidative stress theory of aging explain longevity differences in birds? II. Antioxidant systems and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Buttemer, William A; Hulbert, A J

    2012-03-01

    The oxidative damage hypothesis of aging posits that the accumulation of oxidative damage is a determinant of an animal species' maximum lifespan potential (MLSP). Recent findings in extremely long-living mammal species such as naked mole-rats challenge this proposition. Among birds, parrots are exceptionally long-living with an average MLSP of 25 years, and with some species living more than 70 years. By contrast, quail are among the shortest living bird species, averaging about 5-fold lower MLSP than parrots. To test if parrots have correspondingly (i) superior antioxidant protection and (ii) lower levels of oxidative damage compared to similar-sized quail, we measured (i) total antioxidant capacity, uric acid and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase), and (ii) markers of mitochondrial DNA damage (8-OHdG), protein damage (protein carbonyls) and lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides and TBARS) in three species of long-living parrots and compared these results to corresponding measures in two species of short-living quails (average MLSP=5.5 years). All birds were fed the same diet to exclude differences in dietary antioxidant levels. Tissue antioxidants and oxidative damage were determined both 'per mg protein' and 'per g tissue'. Only glutathione peroxidase was consistently higher in tissues of the long-living parrots and suggests higher protection against the harmful effects of hydroperoxides, which might be important for parrot longevity. The levels of oxidative damage were mostly statistically indistinguishable between parrots and quails (67%), occasionally higher (25%), but rarely lower (8%) in the parrots. Despite indications of higher protection against some aspects of oxidative stress in the parrots, the pronounced longevity of parrots appears to be independent of their antioxidant mechanisms and their accumulation of oxidative damage.

  13. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D. C.; Dolphin, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. This paper outlines the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosome aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatiod arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. Images PMID:338021

  14. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Chinese hamster CHO cell line as the system for producing knockout mutations, since they present the many advantages described in the original...Rainbow, and R. S. Nairn. 1997. Survival, mutagenesis, and host cell reactivation in a Chinese hamster ovary cell ERCC1 knock-out mutant. Mutagenesis...recombination at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase locus in Chinese hamster cells . Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86:4574-4578. 8

  15. Radiation Induced Cystitis and Proctitis - Prediction, Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Madan, Renu; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K

    2015-01-01

    Cystitis and proctitis are defined as inflammation of bladder and rectum respectively. Haemorrhagic cystitis is the most severe clinical manifestation of radiation and chemical cystitis. Radiation proctitis and cystitis are major complications following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis has been investigated using various oral agents with minimal benefit. Bladder irrigation remains the most frequently adopted modality followed by intra-vesical instillation of alum or formalin. In intractable cases, surgical intervention is required in the form of diversion ureterostomy or cystectomy. Proctitis is more common in even low dose ranges but is self-limiting and improves on treatment interruption. However, treatment of radiation proctitis is broadly non-invasive or invasive. Non-invasive treatment consists of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), anti-oxidants, sucralfate, short chain fatty acids and hyperbaric oxygen. Invasive treatment consists of ablative procedures like formalin application, endoscopic YAG laser coagulation or argon plasma coagulation and surgery as a last resort.

  16. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  17. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, Juan F. McCauley, Linda; Scherer, J.; Lasarev, M.; Koshy, M.; Kow, Y.W.; Nazar-Stewart, Valle; Kisby, G.E.

    2008-02-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage have been proposed as mechanisms linking pesticide exposure to health effects such as cancer and neurological diseases. A study of pesticide applicators and farmworkers was conducted to examine the relationship between organophosphate pesticide exposure and biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urine samples were analyzed for OP metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG). Lymphocytes were analyzed for oxidative DNA repair activity and DNA damage (Comet assay), and serum was analyzed for lipid peroxides (i.e., malondialdehyde, MDA). Cellular damage in agricultural workers was validated using lymphocyte cell cultures. Urinary OP metabolites were significantly higher in farmworkers and applicators (p < 0.001) when compared to controls. 8-OH-dG levels were 8.5 times and 2.3 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. Serum MDA levels were 4.9 times and 24 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. DNA damage (Comet assay) and oxidative DNA repair were significantly greater in lymphocytes from applicators and farmworkers when compared with controls. Markers of oxidative stress (i.e., increased reactive oxygen species and reduced glutathione levels) and DNA damage were also observed in lymphocyte cell cultures treated with an OP. The findings from these in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that organophosphate pesticides induce oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers. These biomarkers may be useful for increasing our understanding of the link between pesticides and a number of health effects.

  18. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  19. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue

  20. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  1. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage.

  2. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Bae Kwon; Song, Jin Ho; Jeong, Hojin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Woo, Seung Hoon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kang, Ki Mun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Results Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group. Conclusions ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death. PMID:26943777

  3. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN MICROGLIA AND DAMAGES NEURONS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) damages biological targets through oxidative stress (OS) pathways. Several reports indicate that the brain is one of those targets. Since microglia (brain macrophage) are critical to OS-mediated neurodegeneration, their response to concentrated amb...

  4. Oxidatively generated base damage to cellular DNA by hydroxyl radical and one-electron oxidants: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) and one-electron oxidants that may be endogenously formed through oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, inflammation and pathological conditions constitute the main sources of oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. It is worth mentioning that exposure of cells to exogenous physical agents (UV light, high intensity UV laser, ionizing radiation) and chemicals may also induce oxidatively generated damage to DNA. Emphasis is placed in this short review article on the mechanistic aspects of OH and one-electron oxidant-mediated formation of single and more complex damage (tandem lesions, intra- and interstrand cross-links, DNA-protein cross-links) in cellular DNA arising from one radical hit. This concerns DNA modifications that have been accurately measured using suitable analytical methods such as high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Evidence is provided that OH and one-electron oxidants after generating neutral radicals and base radical cations respectively may partly induce common degradation pathways. In addition, selective oxidative reactions giving rise to specific degradation products of OH and one-electron oxidation reactions that can be used as representative biomarkers of these oxidants have been identified.

  5. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    PubMed

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  6. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  7. Repeated Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Injections Improve Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Lhomme, Bruno; Prat, Marie; Devauchelle, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bonneau, Michel; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Benderitter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The management of proctitis in patients who have undergone very-high-dose conformal radiotherapy is extremely challenging. The fibrosis-necrosis, fistulae, and hemorrhage induced by pelvic overirradiation have an impact on morbidity. Augmenting tissue repair by the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an important advance in treating radiation-induced toxicity. Using a preclinical pig model, we investigated the effect of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs on high-dose radiation-induced proctitis. Irradiated pigs received repeated intravenous administrations of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the MSCs' effect on inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis, in radiation-induced anorectal and colon damages. In humans, as in pigs, rectal overexposure induces mucosal damage (crypt depletion, macrophage infiltration, and fibrosis). In a pig model, repeated administrations of MSCs controlled systemic inflammation, reduced in situ both expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage recruitment, and augmented interleukin-10 expression in rectal mucosa. MSC injections limited radiation-induced fibrosis by reducing collagen deposition and expression of col1a2/col3a1 and transforming growth factor-β/connective tissue growth factor, and by modifying the matrix metalloproteinase/TIMP balance. In a pig model of proctitis, repeated injections of MSCs effectively reduced inflammation and fibrosis. This treatment represents a promising therapy for radiation-induced severe rectal damage. PMID:24068742

  8. Protective effects of curcumin on amyloid-β-induced neuronal oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Chang; Chang, Ping; Dai, Xue-Ling; Jiang, Zhao-Feng

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the protective effects of curcumin against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced neuronal damage. Primary rat cortical neurons were cultured with different treatments of Aβ and curcumin. Neuronal morphologies, viability and damage were assessed. Neuronal oxidative stress was assessed, including extracellular hydrogen peroxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species. The abilities of curcumin to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit Aβ aggregation and β-sheeted formation are further assessed and discussed. Curcumin preserves cell viability, which is decreased by Aβ. The results of changed morphology, released Lactate dehydrogenases and cell viability assays indicate that curcumin protects Aβ-induced neuronal damage. Curcumin depresses Aβ-induced up-regulation of neuronal oxidative stress. The treatment sequence impacts the protective effect of curcumin on Aβ-induced neuronal damage. Curcumin shows a more protective effect on neuronal oxidative damage when curcumin was added into cultured neurons not later than Aβ, especially prior to Aβ. The abilities of curcumin to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit the formation of β-sheeted aggregation are both beneficial to depress Aβ-induced oxidative damage. Curcumin prevents neurons from Aβ-induced oxidative damage, implying the therapeutic usage for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients.

  9. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Jeffrey M.; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D.; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. Methods A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords “Radiation-Induced Fibrosis,” “Radiotherapy Complications,” “Fibrosis Therapy,” and other closely related terms. Results RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Conclusion Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:25910988

  10. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY STYRENE OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple assay to detect DNA damage to calf thymus DNA caused by styrene oxide (SO) is reported. This assay is based on changes observed in the melting and annealing behavior of the damaged DNA. The melting annealing process was monitored using a fluorescence indicat...

  11. Metal Oxide Silicon /MOS/ transistors protected from destructive damage by wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Devine, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    Loop of flexible, small diameter, nickel wire protects metal oxide silicon /MOS/ transistors from a damaging electrostatic potential. The wire is attached to a music-wire spring, slipped over the MOS transistor case, and released so the spring tensions the wire loop around all the transistor leads, shorting them together. This allows handling without danger of damage.

  12. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  13. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  15. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  16. Oxidative damage to poultry: from farm to fork.

    PubMed

    Estévez, M

    2015-06-01

    Poultry and poultry meat are particularly susceptible to oxidative reactions. Oxidation processes have been for decades the focus of animal and meat scientists owing to the negative impact of these reactions on animal growth, performance, and food quality. Lipid oxidation has been recognized a major threat to the quality of processed poultry products. The recent discoveries on the occurrence of protein oxidation in muscle foods have increased the scientific and technological interest in a topic that broadens the horizons of food biochemistry into innovative fields. Furthermore, in recent years we have witnessed a growing interest in consumers on the impact of diet and oxidation on health and aging. Hence, the general description of oxidative reactions as harmful phenomena goes beyond the actual impact on animal production and food quality and reaches the potential influence of oxidized foods on consumer health. Likewise, the current antioxidant strategies aim for the protection of the living tissues, the food systems, and a potential health benefit in the consumer upon ingestion. Along these lines, the application of phytochemicals and other microelements (Se, Cu) with antioxidant potential in the feeds or directly in the meat product are strategies of substantial significance. The present paper reviews in a concise manner the most relevant and novel aspects of the mechanisms and consequences of oxidative reactions in poultry and poultry meat, and describes current antioxidant strategies against these undesirable reactions.

  17. Oxidative Stress Induces Persistent Telomeric DNA Damage Responsible for Nuclear Morphology Change in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Elisa; Colamartino, Monica; Cozzi, Renata; Leone, Stefano; Meneghini, Carlo; O’Callaghan, Nathan; Sgura, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    One main function of telomeres is to maintain chromosome and genome stability. The rate of telomere shortening can be accelerated significantly by chemical and physical environmental agents. Reactive oxygen species are a source of oxidative stress and can produce modified bases (mainly 8-oxoG) and single strand breaks anywhere in the genome. The high incidence of guanine residues in telomeric DNA sequences makes the telomere a preferred target for oxidative damage. Our aim in this work is to evaluate whether chromosome instability induced by oxidative stress is related specifically to telomeric damage. We treated human primary fibroblasts (MRC-5) in vitro with hydrogen peroxide (100 and 200 µM) for 1 hr and collected data at several time points. To evaluate the persistence of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage up to 24 hrs after treatment, we analysed telomeric and genomic oxidative damage by qPCR and a modified comet assay, respectively. The results demonstrate that the genomic damage is completely repaired, while the telomeric oxidative damage persists. The analysis of telomere length reveals a significant telomere shortening 48 hrs after treatment, leading us to hypothesise that residual telomere damage could be responsible for the telomere shortening observed. Considering the influence of telomere length modulation on genomic stability, we quantified abnormal nuclear morphologies (Nucleoplasmic Bridges, Nuclear Buds and Micronuclei) and observed an increase of chromosome instability in the same time frame as telomere shortening. At subsequent times (72 and 96 hrs), we observed a restoration of telomere length and a reduction of chromosome instability, leaving us to conjecture a correlation between telomere shortening/dysfunction and chromosome instability. We can conclude that oxidative base damage leads to abnormal nuclear morphologies and that telomere dysfunction is an important contributor to this effect. PMID:25354277

  18. LOX-1, oxidant stress, mtDNA damage, autophagy, and immune response in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zufeng; Liu, Shijie; Wang, Xianwei; Dai, Yao; Khaidakov, Magomed; Romeo, Francesco; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2014-07-01

    As a major receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is upregulated in many pathophysiological events, including endothelial cell dysfunction and smooth muscle cell growth, as well as monocyte migration and transformation into foam cells, which are present in atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia. Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases LOX-1 expression, induces mitochondrial DNA damage, and activates autophagy. Damaged mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy induces an inflammatory response. This paper reviews the potential link between LOX-1, mitochondrial DNA damage, autophagy, and immune response in atherosclerosis.

  19. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  20. Radiation-induced spinal cord hemorrhage (hematomyelia).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-10-23

    Intraspinal hemorrhage is very rare and intramedullary hemorrhage, also called hematomyelia, is the rarest form of intraspinal hemorrhage, usually related to trauma. Spinal vascular malformations such intradural arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of atraumatic hematomyelia. Other considerations include warfarin or heparin anticoagulation, bleeding disorders, spinal cord tumors. Radiation-induced hematomyelia of the cord is exceedingly rare with only one case in literature to date. We report the case of an 8 year old girl with Ewing's sarcoma of the thoracic vertebra, under radiation therapy, presenting with hematomyelia. We describe the clinical course, the findings on imaging studies and the available information in the literature. Recognition of the clinical pattern of spinal cord injury should lead clinicians to perform imaging studies to evaluate for compressive etiologies.

  1. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  2. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  3. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  4. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  5. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  6. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  7. The acute toxicity of iron and copper: biomolecule oxidation and oxidative damage in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Boveris, Alberto; Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Torti, Horacio; Massot, Francisco; Repetto, Marisa G

    2012-11-01

    The transition metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are needed at low levels for normal health and at higher levels they become toxic for humans and animals. The acute liver toxicity of Fe and Cu was studied in Sprague Dawley male rats (200 g) that received ip 0-60 mg/kg FeCl(2) or 0-30 mg/kg CuSO(4). Dose and time-responses were determined for spontaneous in situ liver chemiluminescence, phospholipid lipoperoxidation, protein oxidation and lipid soluble antioxidants. The doses linearly defined the tissue content of both metals. Liver chemiluminescence increased 4 times and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses at contents (C(50%)) of 110 μgFe/g and 42 μgCu/g liver, and with half maximal time responses (t(1/2)) of 4h for both metals. Phospholipid peroxidation increased 4 and 1.8 times with C(50%) of 118 μg Fe/g and 45 μg Cu/g and with t(1/2) of 7h and 8h. Protein oxidation increased 1.6 times for Fe with C(50%) at 113 μg Fe/g and 1.2 times for Cu with 50 μg Cu/g and t(1/2) of 4h and 5h respectively. The accumulation of Fe and Cu in liver enhanced the rate of free radical reactions and produced oxidative damage. A similar free radical-mediated process, through the formation HO(•) and RO(•) by a Fenton-like homolytic scission of H(2)O(2) and ROOH, seems to operate as the chemical mechanism for the liver toxicity of both metals.

  8. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees.

  9. Progesterone prevents radiation-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Ory, Katherine; Lectard, Bruno; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Chevillard, Sylvie; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2004-06-03

    Sex steroid hormones play an essential role in the control of homeostasis in the mammary gland. Although the involvement of progesterone in cellular proliferation and differentiation is well established, its exact role in the control of cell death still remains unclear. As dysregulation of the apoptotic process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, we investigated the regulation of apoptosis by progesterone in various breast cancer cell lines. Our results show that progesterone treatment protects against radiation-induced apoptosis. This prevention appears to be mediated by the progesterone receptor and is unrelated to p53 status. There is also no correlation with the intrinsic hormonal effect on cell proliferation, as the presence of cells in a particular phase of the cell cycle. Surprisingly, progesterone partly allows bypassing of the irradiation-induced growth arrest in G(2)/M in PgR+ cells, leading to an increase in cell proliferation after irradiation. One consequence of this effect is a higher rate of chromosome damage in these proliferating progesterone-treated cells compared to what is observed in untreated irradiated cells. We propose that progesterone, by inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the proliferation of cells with DNA damage, potentially facilitates the emergence of genetic mutations that may play a role in malignant transformation.

  10. Protective effects of gelam honey against oxidative damage in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sahhugi, Zulaikha; Hasenan, Siti Maisarah; Jubri, Zakiah

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline in physiological and body function due to increase in oxidative damage. Gelam honey has been accounted to have high phenolic and nonphenolic content to attenuate oxidative damage. This study was to determine the effect of local gelam honey on oxidative damage of aged rats. Twenty-four male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into young (2 months) and aged (19 months) groups. Each group was further divided into control (fed with plain water) and supplemented with 2.5 mg/kg body weight of gelam honey for 8 months. DNA damage level was determined by comet assay and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activity of blood and cardiac antioxidant enzymes was determined by spectrophotometer. The DNA damage and MDA level were reduced in both gelam honey supplemented groups. Gelam honey increases erythrocytes CAT and cardiac SOD activities in young and cardiac CAT activity in young and aged groups. The DNA damage was increased in the aged group compared to young group, but reduced at the end of the study. The decline of oxidative damage in rats supplemented with gelam honey might be through the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities.

  11. Oxidative damage induced by copper in mouse primary hepatocytes by single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Liu, Yang; Song, Wei; Yan, Yunxing; Yan, Wenbao; Liu, Rutao

    2016-01-01

    Copper can disturb the intracellular redox balance, induce oxidative stress, and subsequently cause irreversible damage, leading to a variety of diseases. In the present study, mouse primary hepatocytes were chosen to elucidate the in vitro oxidative damage of short-term copper exposure (10-200 μM) by single-cell analysis. We evaluated the toxicity of copper by reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and oxidative DNA damage at the single-cell level. Oxidative damage induced by copper was verified by the morphological changes, persistent elevations of excessive ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), a decrease in GSH level, and the oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, the average ROS generation, GSH consumption, and the indicators in DNA damage did not significantly change at relatively low concentrations (10 or 50 μM), but we can find the alterations of parameters in some single cells clearly. Emphasis on the analysis of single cells is conducive to gain a better understanding on the toxicity of copper. This study will also complement studies on the environmental risk assessment of copper pollution.

  12. Oxidative damage to the promoter region of SQSTM1/p62 is common to neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yifeng; Wooten, Michael C; Wooten, Marie W.

    2009-01-01

    Recently we reported that declined SQSTM1/p62 expression in Alzheimer disease brain was age-correlated with oxidative damage to the p62 promoter. The objective of this study was to examine whether oxidative damage to the p62 promoter is common to DNA recovered from brain of individuals with neurodegenerative disease. Increased 8-OHdG staining was observed in brain sections from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington disease (HD), Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and Pick’s disease compared to control subjects. In parallel, the p62 promoter exhibited elevated oxidative damage in samples from various diseases compared to normal brain, and damage was negatively correlated with p62 expression in FTD samples. Oxidative damage to the p62 promoter induced by H2O2 treatment decreased its transcriptional activity. In keeping with this observation, the transcriptional activity of a Sp-1 element deletion mutant displayed reduced stimulus-induced activity. These findings reveal that oxidative damage to the p62 promoter decreased its transcriptional activity and might therefore account for decreased expression of p62. Altogether these results suggest that pharmacological means to increase p62 expression may be beneficial in delaying the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:19481605

  13. Pre-fledgling oxidative damage predicts recruitment in a long-lived bird

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, José Carlos; Kim, Sin-Yeon; Velando, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Empirical evidence has shown that stressful conditions experienced during development may exert long-term negative effects on life-history traits. Although it has been suggested that oxidative stress has long-term effects, little is known about delayed consequences of oxidative stress experienced early in life in fitness-related traits. Here, we tested whether oxidative stress during development has long-term effects on a life-history trait directly related to fitness in three colonies of European shags Phalacrocorax aristotelis. Our results revealed that recruitment probability decreased with oxidative damage during the nestling period; oxidative damage, in turn, was related to the level of antioxidant capacity. Our results suggest a link between oxidative stress during development and survival to adulthood, a key element of population dynamics. PMID:21865247