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Sample records for radiation-induced oxidative damage

  1. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  2. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  3. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  4. Effects of ozone oxidative preconditioning on radiation-induced organ damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Guven, Berrak; Tasdoven, Ilhan; Bektas, Sibel; Can, Murat; Comert, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. It has been demonstrated that controlled ozone administration may promote an adaptation to oxidative stress, preventing the damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Thus, we hypothesized that ozone would ameliorate oxidative damage caused by total body irradiation (TBI) with a single dose of 6 Gy in rat liver and ileum tissues. Rats were randomly divided into groups as follows: control group; saline-treated and irradiated (IR) groups; and ozone oxidative preconditioning (OOP) and IR groups. Animals were exposed to TBI after a 5-day intraperitoneal pretreatment with either saline or ozone (1 mg/kg/day). They were decapitated at either 6 h or 72 h after TBI. Plasma, liver and ileum samples were obtained. Serum AST, ALT and TNF-α levels were elevated in the IR groups compared with the control group and were decreased after treatment with OOP. TBI resulted in a significant increase in the levels of MDA in the liver and ileal tissues and a decrease of SOD activities. The results demonstrated that the levels of MDA liver and ileal tissues in irradiated rats that were pretreated with ozone were significantly decreased, while SOD activities were significantly increased. OOP reversed all histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that ozone could increase the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism in rats and there by protect the animals from radiation-induced organ toxicity. PMID:22915786

  5. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with gamma-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH* radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH. radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  6. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with γ-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH· radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH· radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  7. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  8. Antagonistic effects of black tea against gamma radiation-induced oxidative damage to normal lymphocytes in comparison with cancerous K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debjani; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-11-01

    The potential of naturally occurring antioxidants to reduce the cellular oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation has been studied for more than a decade for their pharmacological application during cancer treatment. It is already known that radioprotective efficacy of phytochemicals might influence various end points of radiation damage. Flavonoids are well-known natural radioprotectors, and their biological effects depend upon their chemical structure. In the present study, radioprotective effect of black tea rich in flavonoids was evaluated against gamma radiation-induced oxidative damage on normal lymphocytes and compared with erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pre-treatment with black tea extract (BTE) significantly reduced radiation-induced loss of cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, activation of caspase-3 and apoptosis in normal lymphocytes compared to K562 cells. BTE also regulates the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. The changes in the mRNA expression of bax, bcl2, p53 and Nrf2 were also followed to evaluate regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis by BTE. These findings suggest that black tea may have the potential of a natural radioprotective agent which can be used as adjunct with radiation during cancer treatment.

  9. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  10. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  11. Differential protection by nitroxides and hydroxylamines to radiation-induced and metal ion-catalyzed oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Sandhya; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Samuni, Ayelet M; Samuni, Amram; DeGraff, William; Krishna, Murali C; Mitchell, James B

    2002-11-14

    Modulation of radiation- and metal ion-catalyzed oxidative-induced damage using plasmid DNA, genomic DNA, and cell survival, by three nitroxides and their corresponding hydroxylamines, were examined. The antioxidant property of each compound was independently determined by reacting supercoiled DNA with copper II/1,10-phenanthroline complex fueled by the products of hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HX/XO) and noting the protective effect as assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nitroxides and their corresponding hydroxylamines protected approximately to the same degree (33-47% relaxed form) when compared to 76.7% relaxed form in the absence of protectors. Likewise, protection by both the nitroxide and corresponding hydroxylamine were observed for Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, when plasmid DNA damage was induced by ionizing radiation (100 Gy), only nitroxides (10 mM) provide protection (32.4-38.5% relaxed form) when compared to radiation alone or in the presence of hydroxylamines (10 mM) (79.8% relaxed form). Nitroxide protection was concentration dependent. Radiation cell survival studies and DNA double-strand break (DBS) assessment (pulse field electrophoresis) showed that only the nitroxide protected or prevented damage, respectively. Collectively, the results show that nitroxides and hydroxylamines protect equally against the damage mediated by oxidants generated by the metal ion-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction, but only nitroxides protect against radiation damage, suggesting that nitroxides may more readily react with intermediate radical species produced by radiation than hydroxylamines.

  12. Simulated Microgravity and Low-Dose/Low-Dose-Rate Radiation Induces Oxidative Damage in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Nishiyama, Nina C; Pecaut, Michael J; Campbell-Beachler, Mary; Gifford, Peter; Haynes, Kristine E; Becronis, Caroline; Gridley, Daila S

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity and radiation are stressors unique to the spaceflight environment that can have an impact on the central nervous system (CNS). These stressors could potentially lead to significant health risks to astronauts, both acutely during the course of a mission or chronically, leading to long-term, post-mission decrements in quality of life. The CNS is sensitive to oxidative injury due to high concentrations of oxidizable, unsaturated lipids and low levels of antioxidant defenses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oxidative damage in the brain cortex and hippocampus in a ground-based model for spaceflight, which includes prolonged unloading and low-dose radiation. Whole-body low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) gamma radiation using (57)Co plates (0.04 Gy at 0.01 cGy/h) was delivered to 6 months old, mature, female C57BL/6 mice (n = 4-6/group) to simulate the radiation component. Anti-orthostatic tail suspension was used to model the unloading, fluid shift and physiological stress aspects of the microgravity component. Mice were hindlimb suspended and/or irradiated for 21 days. Brains were isolated 7 days or 9 months after irradiation and hindlimb unloading (HLU) for characterization of oxidative stress markers and microvessel changes. The level of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation, was significantly elevated in the cortex and hippocampus after LDR + HLU compared to controls (P < 0.05). The combination group also had the highest level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) expression compared to controls (P < 0.05). There was a significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression in the animals that received HLU only or combined LDR + HLU compared to control (P < 0.05). In addition, 9 months after LDR and HLU exposure, microvessel densities were the lowest in the combination group, compared to age-matched controls in the cortex (P < 0.05). Our data provide the first evidence

  13. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation induces oxidative DNA base damage in a mouse spermatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2013-03-27

    Whether exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted from mobile phones can induce DNA damage in male germ cells remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a 24h intermittent exposure (5 min on and 10 min off) of a mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line to 1800 MHz Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) signals in GSM-Talk mode at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1 W/kg, 2 W/kg or 4 W/kg. Subsequently, through the use of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) in a modified comet assay, we determined that the extent of DNA migration was significantly increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that levels of the DNA adduct 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were also increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. These increases were concomitant with similar increases in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); these phenomena were mitigated by co-treatment with the antioxidant α-tocopherol. However, no detectable DNA strand breakage was observed by the alkaline comet assay. Taking together, these findings may imply the novel possibility that RF-EMR with insufficient energy for the direct induction of DNA strand breaks may produce genotoxicity through oxidative DNA base damage in male germ cells.

  14. Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Damage in the Lung Tissue: May Acetylsalicylic Acid Have a Positive Role?

    PubMed

    Demirel, Can; Kilciksiz, Sevil Cagiran; Gurgul, Serkan; Erdal, Nurten; Yigit, Seyran; Tamer, Lulufer; Ayaz, Lokman

    2016-02-01

    The lung is relatively sensitive to irradiation. It is shown that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) might reduce oxidative injury and that it has a place in protection from cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential radioprotective effects of ASA. Whole-body irradiation (6 Gy, single dose) was applied to the rats. Glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the lung tissue were measured. Control (C), Radiation (R), Radiation + ASA (R + ASA; received irradiation and 25 mg/kg of ASA intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and Radiation + Amifostine (R + WR-2721; received irradiation and 200 mg/kg of WR-2721 i.p.) groups were used. The MPO levels decreased statistically significantly in the group administered ASA. Histopathologically, a radioprotective effect of ASA was more evident in the R + ASA group. ASA is an agent which has not been used as a radioprotector in the clinic yet, and it is worth supporting with more advanced studies. PMID:26276129

  15. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Aging: The Role of DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Epidermal Stem Cell Damage Mediated Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Panich, Uraiwan; Sittithumcharee, Gunya; Rathviboon, Natwarath

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the largest human organ. Skin continually reconstructs itself to ensure its viability, integrity, and ability to provide protection for the body. Some areas of skin are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stressors that can inflict direct and indirect damage to skin cell DNA. Skin homeostasis is maintained by mesenchymal stem cells in inner layer dermis and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the outer layer epidermis. Reduction of skin stem cell number and function has been linked to impaired skin homeostasis (e.g., skin premature aging and skin cancers). Skin stem cells, with self-renewal capability and multipotency, are frequently affected by environment. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a major cause of stem cell DNA damage, can contribute to depletion of stem cells (ESCs and mesenchymal stem cells) and damage of stem cell niche, eventually leading to photoinduced skin aging. In this review, we discuss the role of UV-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in the skin stem cell aging in order to gain insights into the pathogenesis and develop a way to reduce photoaging of skin cells. PMID:27148370

  16. Repair of radiation induced genetic damage under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Pross, H D; Kost, M; Kiefer, J

    1994-10-01

    The influence of microgravity on the repair of radiation induced genetic damage in a temperature-conditional repair mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad 54-3) was investigated onboard the IML-1 mission (January 22nd-30th 1992, STS-42). Cells were irradiated before the flight, incubated under microgravity at the permissive (22 degrees C) and restrictive (36 degrees C) temperature and afterwards tested for survival. The results suggest that repair may be reduced under microgravity.

  17. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  18. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantoǧlu, Ömer; Güven, Olgun

    2002-12-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units ( G(- u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  19. UVA and UVB radiation-induced oxidation products of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Brian M; Krol, Ed S

    2009-12-01

    The flavonol quercetin is believed to provide protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced damage in plants. As part of our investigations into the potential for quercetin to protect skin against UV radiation-induced damage we have investigated the products of quercetin exposed to UV radiation in vitro. UVA (740 microW cm(-2) at 365 nm) or UVB (1300 microW cm(-2) at 310 nm) irradiation of quercetin in methanol results in a small conversion (less than 20%) to C-ring breakdown products over 11 h. When the triplet sensitizer benzophenone is added, greater than 90% conversion by UVA or UVB occurs within 1h. The major photoproducts from either UVA or UVB radiation are 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde (1), 2-(3',4'-dihydroxybenzoyloxy)-4,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (3). Product 2 has previously been observed as a product of oxidative metabolism of quercetin, however products 1 and 3 appear to be the result of a unique UV-dependent pathway. In conclusion we have determined that quercetin undergoes slow decomposition to a mixture of C-ring-opened products, two of which to our knowledge have not been previously observed for quercetin decomposition, and that the presence of a triplet sensitizer greatly increases UV radiation-mediated quercetin decomposition. The presence of endogenous photosensitizers in the skin could potentially affect the UV stability of quercetin, suggesting that further study of quercetin for both its photoprotective properties and photostabilty in skin are warranted.

  20. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  1. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated. PMID:8862451

  2. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  3. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R

    2002-10-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations. PMID:12361786

  4. Protection against radiation-induced damage of 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Perona, Marina; Dagrosa, María A; Pagotto, Romina; Casal, Mariana; Pignataro, Omar P; Pisarev, Mario A; Juvenal, Guillermo J

    2013-03-01

    Many epidemiologic studies have shown that the exposure to high external radiation doses increases thyroid neoplastic frequency, especially when given during childhood or adolescence. The use of radioprotective drugs may decrease the damage caused by radiation therapy and therefore could be useful to prevent the development of thyroid tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible application of 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) as a radioprotector in the thyroid gland. Rat thyroid epithelial cells (FRTL-5) were exposed to different doses of γ irradiation with or without the addition of PTU, methimazole (MMI), reduced glutathione (GSH) and perchlorate (KClO4). Radiation response was analyzed by clonogenic survival assay. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Apoptosis was quantified by nuclear cell morphology and caspase 3 activity assays. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured using the fluorescent dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate. Catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were also determined. Pretreatment with PTU, MMI and GSH prior to irradiation significantly increased the surviving cell fraction (SF) at 2 Gy (P < 0.05), while no effect was observed with KClO4. An increase in extracellular levels of cAMP was found only in PTU treated cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Cells incubated with agents that stimulate cAMP (forskolin and dibutyril cAMP) mimicked the effect of PTU on SF. Moreover, pretreatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89, abolished the radioprotective effect of PTU. PTU treatment diminished radiation-induced apoptosis and protected cells against radiation-induced ROS elevation and suppression of the antioxidant enzyme's activity. PTU was found to radioprotect normal thyroid cells through cAMP elevation and reduction in both apoptosis and radiation-induced oxidative stress damage.

  5. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  6. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  7. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21861723

  8. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  10. [Tanning lamp radiation-induced photochemical retinal damage].

    PubMed

    Volkov, V V; Kharitonova, N N; Mal'tsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of original clinical research a rare case of bilateral retinal damage due to tanning lamp radiation exposure is presented. Along with significant decrease of visual acuity and light sensitivity of central visual field as well as color vision impairment, bilateral macular dystrophy was found during an ophthalmoscopy and confirmed by optical coherent tomography and fluorescent angiography. Intensive retinoprotective, vascular, and antioxidant therapy was effective and led to functional improvement and stabilization of the pathologic process associated with photochemical retinal damage. A brief review of literature compares mechanisms of retinal damage by either short or long-wave near visible radiation.

  11. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  12. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  13. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  14. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  15. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  16. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  17. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  18. Protection against radiation induced damage to spermatogenesis by Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Namita; Goel, H C

    2002-07-01

    Aqueous extract of rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum (RP-1) has been found to render protection against lethal whole body irradiation (10 Gy), damage to haemopoietic and gastrointestinal tissue etc. in mice. In order to assess its suitability from clinical point of view its effects were investigated on male germinal tissue in mice. Swiss albino strain 'A' male mice (10-12 weeks) were exposed to varied radiation doses (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 and 10 Gy) with and without 200 mg/kg b.w. of RP-1 and sacrificed at different time periods (10, 35 and 70 days) to collect the tissue. Administration of RP-1, 2 h before irradiation rendered a significant increase in the testis weight, repopulating tubules, resting primary spermatocytes, stem cell survival index, sperm counts and reduction in abnormalities of sperm morphology, at all the time periods studied here. RP-1 treatment alone did not generate any adverse effects. These results reveal that RP-1, if put to clinical application, will not be harmful to the testicular system.

  19. Podophyllum hexandrum prevents radiation-induced neuronal damage in postnatal rats exposed in utero.

    PubMed

    Sajikumar, S; Goel, H C

    2003-08-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum has been shown to mitigate radiation injuries and especially the haemopoietic syndrome in adult mice. To monitor the radiation-induced changes in the nervous system, the neurons of postnatal young mice and their modification by P. hexandrum, were studied histologically for differences in the apical and basal dendritic branching and intersections in the CA1 neurons of the hippocampal region of rats which were delivered a 2 Gy gamma dose while in utero (day 17 of gestation). Irradiation significantly reduced the dendritic branching and intersections but pre-irradiation administration of the extract of P. hexandrum (i.p. 200 mg/kg/b.w., 2 h) reduced the damage in postnatal young mice. These studies indicate that P. hexandrum provides protection to neurons against radiation-induced damage and the mechanism of neuronal damage and its repair need to be investigated further.

  20. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  1. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  2. Gamma Radiation-Induced Damage in the Zinc Finger of the Transcription Factor IIIA

    PubMed Central

    Miao, YuJi; Hu, XiaoDan; Min, Rui; Liu, PeiDang; Zhang, HaiQian

    2016-01-01

    A zinc finger motif is an element of proteins that can specifically recognize and bind to DNA. Because they contain multiple cysteine residues, zinc finger motifs possess redox properties. Ionizing radiation generates a variety of free radicals in organisms. Zinc finger motifs, therefore, may be a target of ionizing radiation. The effect of gamma radiation on the zinc finger motifs in transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a zinc finger protein, was investigated. TFIIIA was exposed to different gamma doses from 60Co sources. The dose rates were 0.20 Gy/min and 800 Gy/h, respectively. The binding capacity of zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA was determined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that 1000 Gy of gamma radiation impaired the function of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. The sites of radiation-induced damage in the zinc finger were the thiol groups of cysteine residues and zinc (II) ions. The thiol groups were oxidized to form disulfide bonds and the zinc (II) ions were indicated to be reduced to zinc atoms. These results indicate that the zinc finger motif is a target domain for gamma radiation, which may decrease 5S rRNA expression via impairment of the zinc finger motifs in TFIIIA. PMID:27803644

  3. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events.

  4. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events. PMID:20851533

  5. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  6. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  7. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  8. Protection from radiation-induced mitochondrial and genomic DNA damage by an extract of Hippophae rhamnoides.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, Indracanti Prem; Samanta, Namita; Afrin, Farhat; Gupta, Manju Lata; Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Yogendra Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-12-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides or seabuckthorn is used extensively in Indian and Tibetan traditional medicine for the treatment of circulatory disorders, ischemic heart disease, hepatic injury, and neoplasia. In the present study, we have evaluated the radioprotective potential of REC-1001, a fraction isolated from the berries of H. rhamnoides. Chemical analysis of the extract indicated that REC-1001 was approximately 68% by weight polyphenols, and contained kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and quercetin. The effect of REC-1001 on modulating radiation-induced DNA damage was determined in murine thymocytes by measuring nonspecific nuclear DNA damage at the whole genome level using the alkaline halo assay and by measuring sequence/gene-specific DNA damage both in nuclear DNA (beta-globin gene) and in mitochondrial DNA using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Treatment with 10 Gy resulted in a significant amount of DNA damage in the halo assay and reductions in the amplification of both the beta-globin gene and mitochondrial DNA. REC-1001 dose-dependently reduced the amount of damage detected in each assay, with the maximum protective effects observed at the highest REC-1001 dose evaluated (250 micro g/ml). Studies measuring the nicking of naked plasmid DNA further established the radioprotective effect of REC-1001. To elucidate possible mechanisms of action, the antioxidant properties and the free-radical scavenging activities of REC-1001 were evaluated. REC-1001 dose-dependently scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals, chemically-generated superoxide anions, stabilized DPPH radicals, and reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). The results of the study indicate that the REC-1001 extract of H. rhamnoides protects mitochondrial and genomic DNA from radiation-induced damage. The polyphenols/flavonoids present in the extract might be responsible for the free radical scavenging and DNA protection afforded by REC-1001. PMID:16948057

  9. The Efficacy of Nardostachys Jatamansi Against The Radiation Induced Haematological Damage In Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Damodara K M; Shetty, Lathika; A P, Krishna; Kumari, Suchetha N; Sanjeev, Ganesh; P, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is increasingly being used for medical purposes and it is an established weapon in the diagnosis and the therapy of cancer. An exposure to 1-2 Gys causes the NVD (Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea) syndrome, whereas an exposure to 2-6 Gys causes the haematopoietic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of the Nardostachys jatamansi root extract (NJE) on the radiation induced haematological damage in rats. Materials and Methods: EBR was performed at the Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, India. Rats were treated with NJE once daily for 15 days before and after the irradiation. After the irradiation, blood was collected for determining the peripheral blood counts (RBC and WBC), haemoglobin, the platelet count and the packed cell volume (PCV) at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 5, 10 and 15 days post irradiation. The data was analyzed by one way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons. Result: NJE provided protection against the radiation induced haematological disorders. The rats treated with NJE exhibited a time dependent significant elevation in all the haematological parameters which were studied and its modulation upto the near normal level was recorded. Conclusion: From this study, we concluded that, NJE provides protection by modulating the radiation induced damage on the haematopoietic system. PMID:23905085

  10. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure.

  11. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  12. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1984-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weight. A cationic mechanism is evidenced by the strongly retarding effect of tri-n-propylamine on the polymerization rate. At 25/sup 0/C, limonene oxide gives the highest polymerization rates, an average conversion of 36% per Mrad being obtained in comparison with values of 5.7 and 7.3% per Mrad for the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides, respectively. Similarly, the average anti DP/sub n/ decreases from 11.8 for the limonene oxide polymer to 5.6 and 4.0 for the ..cap alpha..-pinene oxide and ..beta..-pinene oxide polymers, respectively. A high frequency of chain transfer to monomer is indicated in each case by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be on the order of a hundred times larger than the anti DP/sub n/ values. Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that in the polymerization of these monomers, the opening of the epoxide ring is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-dimethyl group in the main chain. The detection of isopropenyl end groups in the pinene oxide polymers is also consistent with this mode of propagation being followed by chain (proton) transfer to monomer.

  13. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  14. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage. PMID:20680428

  15. Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body (60)Co-γ irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE. PMID:24634306

  16. Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body 60Co-γ irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE. PMID:24634306

  17. Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body (60)Co-γ irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE.

  18. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weights. A high frequency of chain (proton) transfer to monomer is indicated by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be several hundred times larger than the range of DP/sub n/ values (12-4). Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that the opening of the epoxide ring for these monomers is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-di-methyl group in the main chain.

  19. Targeting the renin-angiotensin system combined with an antioxidant is highly effective in mitigating radiation-induced lung damage

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the outcome of suppression of renin angiotensin system (RAS) using Captopril combined with an antioxidant (EUKarion-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Materials and Methods The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was irradiated with single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with Captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/day in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week (wk) post-irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 wks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were sacrificed at 32 wks PI when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine, Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1, and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-OHdG and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine TGF-β1 at 32 wks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining Captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 wks PI following treatment given 1–14 wks PI. Overall the combination of Captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone. PMID:24867538

  20. Targeting the Renin–Angiotensin System Combined With an Antioxidant Is Highly Effective in Mitigating Radiation-Induced Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Javed; Jelveh, Salomeh; Zaidi, Asif; Doctrow, Susan R.; Medhora, Meetha; Hill, Richard P.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of suppression of the renin angiotensin system using captopril combined with an antioxidant (Eukarion [EUK]-207) for mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Methods and Materials: The thoracic cavity of female Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated with a single dose of 11 Gy. Treatment with captopril at a dose of 40 mg/kg/d in drinking water and EUK-207 given by subcutaneous injection (8 mg/kg daily) was started 1 week after irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 weeks PI. Breathing rate was monitored until the rats were killed at 32 weeks PI, when lung fibrosis was assessed by lung hydroxyproline content. Lung levels of the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 and macrophage activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed by 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels, and lipid peroxidation was measured by a T-BARS assay. Results: The increase in breathing rate in the irradiated rats was significantly reduced by the drug treatments. The drug treatment also significantly decreased the hydroxyproline content, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde levels, and levels of activated macrophages and the cytokine transforming growth factor-β1 at 32 weeks. Almost complete mitigation of these radiation effects was observed by combining captopril and EUK-207. Conclusion: Captopril and EUK-207 can provide mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 32 weeks PI after treatment given 1-14 weeks PI. Overall the combination of captopril and EUK-207 was more effective than the individual drugs used alone.

  1. Protection of the hemopoietic system by Podophyllum hexandrum against gamma radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Ravinder Kumar; Chawla, Raman; Arora, Rajesh; Singh, Shikha; Krishna, Bal; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Puri, Satish Chandra; Singh, Pankaj; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Surender; Prasad, Jagdish; Gupta, Vinay; Ahmed, Bilal; Dhar, Kanaya Lal; Khan, Haider Ali; Gupta, Manju Lata; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi

    2006-02-01

    A semi-purified extract of low-altitude Podophyllum hexandrum (REC-2001) containing a relatively low content of podophyllotoxin (3.25 %) exhibited potent antioxidant ability in lipid media (at 1000 microg/mLagainst 0.25 kGy) and significant (p < 0.05) hydroxyl ion scavenging potential (78.83 % at 500 microg/mL). In vitro investigations revealed the ability of REC-2001 to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce radiation-induced hemolysis (2 microg/mL; 46.184 %) and nitric oxide scavenging levels (IC (50): 792 +/- 1.25 microg/mL). Protection of the hemopoietic system of Strain 'A' mice administered 20 mg/kg BW REC-2001 30 min prior to lethal irradiation (10 Gy) was recorded and was mediated by free radical scavenging and lowering of lipid oxidation. Further studies investigating the effects of REC-2001 on stem cell modulation are warranted.

  2. Radiation-induced deposition of transparent conductive tin oxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umnov, S.; Asainov, O.; Temenkov, V.

    2016-04-01

    The study of tin oxide films is stimulated by the search for an alternative replacement of indium-tin oxide (ITO) films used as transparent conductors, oxidation catalysts, material gas sensors, etc. This work was aimed at studying the influence of argon ions irradiation on optical and electrical characteristics of tin oxide films. Thin films of tin oxide (without dopants) were deposited on glass substrates at room temperature using reactive magnetron sputtering. After deposition, the films were irradiated with an argon ion beam. The current density of the beam was (were) 2.5 mA/cm2, and the particles energy was 300-400 eV. The change of the optical and electrical properties of the films depending on the irradiation time was studied. Films optical properties were investigated by photometry in the range of 300-1100 nm. Films structural properties were studied using X-ray diffraction. The diffractometric research showed that the films, deposited on a substrate, had a crystal structure, and after argon ions irradiation they became quasi-crystalline (amorphous). It has been found that the transmission increases proportionally with the irradiation time, however the sheet resistance increases disproportionally. Tin oxide films (thickness ~30 nm) with ~100% transmittance and sheet resistance of ~100 kOhm/sq. were obtained. The study has proved to be prospective in the use of ion beams to improve the properties of transparent conducting oxides.

  3. Characterization of radiation-induced damage in d(TpApCpG).

    PubMed

    Paul, C R; Budzinski, E E; Maccubbin, A; Wallace, J C; Box, H C

    1990-11-01

    The radiation chemistry of the oligomer d(TpApCpG) X-irradiated in aqueous solution containing glutathione was studied. Four products were isolated by HPLC and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Two of the major products are isomers of a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine modification of d(TpApCpG). A dihydrothymine modification is also formed. The other major product is a result of strand scission. These products are different from the major products identified previously in a study of d(TpApCpG) X-irradiated in oxygenated solution. The effect of specific radiation-induced lesions on the behaviour of d(TpApCpG) as substrate to a spleen phosphodiesterase-micrococcal nuclease combination of enzymes and to nuclease P1 was studied. These enzymes are of interest because they are used in postlabelling assays of DNA damage.

  4. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  5. Persistence of Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage in astronaut's peripheral blood lymphocytes is a useful in vivo marker of space radiation induced damage. Moreover, if radiation induced chromosome translocations persist in peripheral blood lymphocytes for many years, as has been assumed, they could potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low dose rate exposures. However, as more data becomes available, evidence suggests that the yield of translocations may decline with time after exposure, at least in the case of space radiation exposures. We present our latest follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by FISH painting and collected a various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Since the level of stable aberrations depends on the interplay between natural loss of circulating T-lymphocytes and replenishment from the stem or progenitor cells, the differences in the rates of decay could be explained by inter-individual variation in lymphocyte turn over. Biodosimetry estimates derived from cytogenetic analysis of samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  6. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. PMID:25824410

  7. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy.

  8. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities.

  9. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities. PMID:17387501

  10. Protective effect of an antithyroid compound against γ-radiation-induced damage in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Perona, Marina; Dagrosa, Maria A; Pagotto, Romina; Casal, Mariana; Pignataro, Omar; Pisarev, Mario A; Juvenal, Guillermo J

    2014-08-01

    We have previously reported the radioprotective effect of propylthiouracil (PTU) on thyroid cells. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether tumor cells and normal cells demonstrate the same response to PTU. Human colon carcinoma cells were irradiated with γ-irradiation with or without PTU. We evaluated the clonogenic survival, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and apoptosis by nuclear cell morphology and caspase-3 activity assays. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. PTU treatment increased surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) from 56.9 ± 3.6 in controls to 75.0 ± 3.5 (p < 0.05) and diminished radiation-induced apoptosis. In addition, we observed that the level of antioxidant enzymes' activity was increased in cells treated with PTU. Moreover, pretreatment with PTU increased intracellular levels of cAMP. Forskolin (p < 0.01) and dibutyryl cAMP (p < 0.05) mimicked the effect of PTU on SF2. Co-treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, abolished the radioprotective effect of PTU. PTU reduces the toxicity of ionizing radiation by increasing cAMP levels and also possibly through a reduction in apoptosis levels and in radiation-induced oxidative stress damage. We therefore conclude that PTU protects both normal and cancer cells during exposure to radiation in conditions mimicking the radiotherapy.

  11. Black tea extract: a supplementary antioxidant in radiation-induced damage to DNA and normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debjani; Pal, Sandip; Saha, Chabita; Chakrabarti, Amit Kumar; Datta, Salil C; Dey, Subrata Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Myriad research has contributed significantly toward the understanding and identification of health benefits stemming from tea polyphenols and many other naturally occurring flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables. These flavonoids are known to mitigate reactive oxygen species-induced damage by scavenging them. In this study, hot-water black tea extract rich in flavonoids is evaluated as a supplementary antioxidant. The antioxidant efficacy of black tea extract was investigated by evaluating radioprotection conferred to pBR322 DNA, calf thymus DNA, and normal lymphocytes during gamma irradiation. The protection was measured by gel electrophoresis, fluorimetric study, cell viability assay, cytokinesis-blocked micronuclei assay, and comet assay. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging ability of the tea extract used increased in a dose-dependent manner (IC50: 182.45 µg/mL). Positive correlation of radioprotection with antioxidant activity of black tea extract was observed in all systems. Maximum protection against radiation-induced damage was observed in pBR322 DNA and calf thymus DNA at ≥200 µg/mL of black tea extract. At a dose of black tea extract as low as 5 µg/mL, efficient radioprotection was observed in normal lymphocytes, which is encouraging and can be tested in the future as a natural antioxidant supplement during radiotherapy.

  12. Scavenging and antioxidant properties of different grape cultivars against ionizing radiation-induced liver damage ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Singha, Indrani; Das, Subir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has become an integral part of the modern medicine--both for diagnosis as well as therapy. However, normal tissues or even distant cells also suffer IR-induced free radical insult. It may be more damaging in longer term than direct radiation exposure. Antioxidants provide protection against IR-induced damage. Grapes are the richest source of antioxidants. Here, we assessed the scavenging properties of four grape (Vitis vinifera) cultivars, namely Flame seedless (Black), Kishmish chorni (Black with reddish brown), Red globe (Red) and Thompson seedless mutant (Green), and also evaluated their protective action against γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue ex vivo. The scavenging abilities of grape seeds [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC₅₀ = 0.008 ± 0.001 mg/mL), hydrogen peroxide (IC₅₀ = 0.49 to 0.8 mg/mL), hydroxyl radicals (IC₅₀ = 0.08 ± 0.008 mg/mL), and nitric oxide (IC₅₀ = 0.8 ± 0.08 mg/mL)] were higher than that of skin or pulp. Gamma (γ) radiation exposure to sliced liver tissues ex vivo from goat, @ 6 Gy significantly (P < 0.001) decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) content by 21.2% and also activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione s-transferase (GST) by 49.5, 66.0, 70.3, 73.6%, respectively. However, it increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) by 2.04-fold and nitric oxide level by 48.6% compared to untreated group. Further increase in doses (10 or 16 Gy) of γ-radiation correspondingly decreased GSH content and enzyme activities, and increased TBARS and nitric oxide levels. Grape extract treatment prior to ionizing radiation exposure ameliorated theses effects at varying extent. The seed extracts exhibited strong antioxidant potential compared to skin or pulp extracts of different grape cultivars against oxidative damage by ionizing radiation (6 Gy, 10 Gy and 16 Gy) in sliced liver tissues ex vivo. Grape extracts at

  13. Scavenging and antioxidant properties of different grape cultivars against ionizing radiation-induced liver damage ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Singha, Indrani; Das, Subir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has become an integral part of the modern medicine--both for diagnosis as well as therapy. However, normal tissues or even distant cells also suffer IR-induced free radical insult. It may be more damaging in longer term than direct radiation exposure. Antioxidants provide protection against IR-induced damage. Grapes are the richest source of antioxidants. Here, we assessed the scavenging properties of four grape (Vitis vinifera) cultivars, namely Flame seedless (Black), Kishmish chorni (Black with reddish brown), Red globe (Red) and Thompson seedless mutant (Green), and also evaluated their protective action against γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue ex vivo. The scavenging abilities of grape seeds [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC₅₀ = 0.008 ± 0.001 mg/mL), hydrogen peroxide (IC₅₀ = 0.49 to 0.8 mg/mL), hydroxyl radicals (IC₅₀ = 0.08 ± 0.008 mg/mL), and nitric oxide (IC₅₀ = 0.8 ± 0.08 mg/mL)] were higher than that of skin or pulp. Gamma (γ) radiation exposure to sliced liver tissues ex vivo from goat, @ 6 Gy significantly (P < 0.001) decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) content by 21.2% and also activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione s-transferase (GST) by 49.5, 66.0, 70.3, 73.6%, respectively. However, it increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) by 2.04-fold and nitric oxide level by 48.6% compared to untreated group. Further increase in doses (10 or 16 Gy) of γ-radiation correspondingly decreased GSH content and enzyme activities, and increased TBARS and nitric oxide levels. Grape extract treatment prior to ionizing radiation exposure ameliorated theses effects at varying extent. The seed extracts exhibited strong antioxidant potential compared to skin or pulp extracts of different grape cultivars against oxidative damage by ionizing radiation (6 Gy, 10 Gy and 16 Gy) in sliced liver tissues ex vivo. Grape extracts at

  14. Radiation-induced transgenerational alterations in genome stability and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Barber, R C; Hickenbotham, P; Hatch, T; Kelly, D; Topchiy, N; Almeida, G M; Jones, G D D; Johnson, G E; Parry, J M; Rothkamm, K; Dubrova, Y E

    2006-11-30

    Mutation induction in directly exposed cells is currently regarded as the main component of the genetic risk of ionizing radiation for humans. However, recent data on the transgenerational increases in mutation rates in the offspring of irradiated parents indicate that the genetic risk could be greater than predicted previously. Here, we have analysed transgenerational changes in mutation rates and DNA damage in the germline and somatic tissues of non-exposed first-generation offspring of irradiated inbred male CBA/Ca and BALB/c mice. Mutation rates at an expanded simple tandem repeat DNA locus and a protein-coding gene (hprt) were significantly elevated in both the germline (sperm) and somatic tissues of all the offspring of irradiated males. The transgenerational changes in mutation rates were attributed to the presence of a persistent subset of endogenous DNA lesions (double- and single-strand breaks), measured by the phosphorylated form of histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) and alkaline Comet assays. Such remarkable transgenerational destabilization of the F(1) genome may have important implications for cancer aetiology and genetic risk estimates. Our data also provide important clues on the still unknown mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability.

  15. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  16. Pudendal Nerve and Internal Pudendal Artery Damage May Contribute to Radiation-Induced Erectile Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael W.; Marolf, Angela J.; Ehrhart, E.J.; Rao, Sangeeta; Kraft, Susan L.; Engel, Stephanie; Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Golden, Anne E.; Wasserman, Todd H.; LaRue, Susan M.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: Erectile dysfunction is common after radiation therapy for prostate cancer; yet, the etiopathology of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (RI-ED) remains poorly understood. A novel animal model was developed to study RI-ED, wherein stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used to irradiate the prostate, neurovascular bundles (NVB), and penile bulb (PB) of dogs. The purpose was to describe vascular and neurogenic injuries after the irradiation of only the NVB or the PB, and after irradiation of all 3 sites (prostate, NVB, and PB) with varying doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: Dogs were treated with 50, 40, or 30 Gy to the prostate, NVB, and PB, or 50 Gy to either the NVB or the PB, by 5-fraction SBRT. Electrophysiologic studies of the pudendal nerve and bulbospongiosus muscles and ultrasound studies of pelvic perfusion were performed before and after SBRT. The results of these bioassays were correlated with histopathologic changes. Results: SBRT caused slowing of the systolic rise time, which corresponded to decreased arterial patency. Alterations in the response of the internal pudendal artery to vasoactive drugs were observed, wherein SBRT caused a paradoxical response to papaverine, slowing the systolic rise time after 40 and 50 Gy; these changes appeared to have some dose dependency. The neurofilament content of penile nerves was also decreased at high doses and was more profound when the PB was irradiated than when the NVB was irradiated. These findings are coincident with slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities in the pudendal nerve after SBRT. Conclusions: This is the first report in which prostatic irradiation was shown to cause morphologic arterial damage that was coincident with altered internal pudendal arterial tone, and in which decreased motor function in the pudendal nerve was attributed to axonal degeneration and loss. Further investigation of the role played by damage to these structures in RI-ED is

  17. Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage as a Predictor of Cancer Risk for Protons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jerry R.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully completed the series of experiments planned for year 1 and the first part of year 2 measuring the induction of chromosome aberrations induced in multiple cell types by three model space radiations: Fe-ions, protons and photons. Most of these data have now been compiled and a significant part subjected to detailed data analyses, although continuing data analysis is an important part of our current and future efforts. These analyses are directed toward defining the patterns of chromosomal damage induction by the three radiations and the extent to which such patterns are dependent on the type of cell irradiated. Our studies show significant differences, both quantitatively and qualitatively, between response of different cell types to these radiations however there is an overall pattern that characterizes each type of radiation in most cell lines. Thus our data identifies general dose-response patterns for each radiation for induction of multiple types of chromosomal aberrations but also identifies significant differences in response between some cell types. Specifically, we observe significant resistance for induction of aberrations in rat mammary epithelial cells when they are irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Further, we have observed some remarkable differences in susceptibility to certain radiation-induced aberrations in cells whose genome has been modulated for two cancer- relevant genes, TP53 and CDKNIA. This data, if confirmed, may represent the first evidence of gene-specific differences in cellular metabolism of damage induced by densely-ionizing radiation that confers substantial sensitivity to protons compared to photons.

  18. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  19. Melatonin as a possible antidote to UV radiation induced cutaneous damages and immune-suppression: An overview.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Soumik; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-12-01

    The sun rays brings along the ultraviolet radiations (UVRs) which prove deleterious for living organisms. The UVR is a known mutagen and is the prime cause of skin carcinomas. UVR causes acute oxidative stress and this in turn deteriorates other physiological functions. Inflammatory conditions and elevation of pro-inflammatory molecules are also associated with UVR mediated cellular damages. The inflammatory conditions can secondarily trigger the generation of free radicals and this act cumulatively in further deterioration of tissue homeostasis. Photoimmunologists have also related UVR to the suppression of not only cutaneous but also systemic immunity by different mechanisms. Some researchers have proposed the use of various plant products as antioxidants against UVR induced oxidative imbalances but Melatonin is gaining rapid interest as a product that can be utilized to delineate the pathological effects of UVR since it is an established antioxidant. Besides the antioxidative nature, the capacity of melatonin to attenuate apoptosis and more importantly the efficacy of its metabolites to further aid in the detoxification of free radicals have made it a key player to be utilized against UVR mediated aggravated conditions. However, there is need for further extensive investigation to speculate melatonin as an antidote to UVR. Although too early to prescribe melatonin as a clinical remedy, the hormone can be integrated into dermal formulations or oral supplements to prevent the ever increasing incidences of skin cancers due to the prevalence of the UVR on the surface of the earth. The present review focuses and substantiates the work by different photo-biologists demonstrating the protective effects of melatonin and its metabolites against solar UVR - Melatonin as a possible antidote to UV radiation induced cutaneous damages and immune-suppression: an overview. J Photochem Photobiol B.

  20. Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Zhaozong; Donahue, Jeremiah J.; Guan, Jun; Kennedy, Ann R. . E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treating the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.

  1. Debris and radiation-induced damage effects on EUV nanolithography source collector mirror optics performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, J. P.; Nieto, M.; Hendricks, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of collector mirrors facing the hot, dense pinch plasma in plasma-based EUV light sources to debris (fast ions, neutrals, off-band radiation, droplets) remains one of the highest critical issues of source component lifetime and commercial feasibility of nanolithography at 13.5-nm. Typical radiators used at 13.5-nm include Xe and Sn. Fast particles emerging from the pinch region of the lamp are known to induce serious damage to nearby collector mirrors. Candidate collector configurations include either multi-layer mirrors (MLM) or single-layer mirrors (SLM) used at grazing incidence. Studies at Argonne have focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms that hinder collector mirror performance at 13.5-nm under fast Sn or Xe exposure. This is possible by a new state-of-the-art in-situ EUV reflectometry system that measures real time relative EUV reflectivity (15-degree incidence and 13.5-nm) variation during fast particle exposure. Intense EUV light and off-band radiation is also known to contribute to mirror damage. For example offband radiation can couple to the mirror and induce heating affecting the mirror's surface properties. In addition, intense EUV light can partially photo-ionize background gas (e.g., Ar or He) used for mitigation in the source device. This can lead to local weakly ionized plasma creating a sheath and accelerating charged gas particles to the mirror surface and inducing sputtering. In this paper we study several aspects of debris and radiation-induced damage to candidate EUVL source collector optics materials. The first study concerns the use of IMD simulations to study the effect of surface roughness on EUV reflectivity. The second studies the effect of fast particles on MLM reflectivity at 13.5-nm. And lastly the third studies the effect of multiple energetic sources with thermal Sn on 13.5-nm reflectivity. These studies focus on conditions that simulate the EUVL source environment in a controlled way.

  2. Protection against radiation-induced testicular damage in Swiss albino mice by Mentha piperita (Linn.).

    PubMed

    Samarth, Ravindra M; Samarth, Meenakshi

    2009-04-01

    The protective effects of Mentha piperita leaf extract against radiation-induced damage in testis of Swiss albino mice have been studied. Animals (Male Swiss albino mice) were given M. piperita leaf extract orally (1 g/kg body weight/day) for three consecutive days before radiation exposure (8 Gy gamma-radiation). Mice were autopsied at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 30 days after irradiation to evaluate the radiomodulatory effect in terms of histological alterations, lipid peroxidation, and acid and alkaline phosphatases levels in testis. Radiation treatment showed reduction in the testis weight during all days of observation, however, in the M. piperita leaf extract-pretreated irradiated group there was a significant increase in testis weight. Radiation treatment induced moderate to severe testicular atrophy with degeneration of germ cells in seminiferous tubules. The tubules were shrunken and greatly depleted of germ cells. Sertoli cells with few germ cells were observed in the lumen. However, animals pre-treated with M. piperita leaf extract and exposed to radiation showed normal testicular morphology with regular arrangement of germ cells and slight degeneration of seminiferous epithelium. Significant decreases in the lipid peroxidation and acid phosphatase level and increase in level of alkaline phosphatase were observed in testis. The M. piperita leaf extract showed high amount of phenolic content, flavonoids content and flavonols. The results of the present study suggest that M. piperita has a significant radioprotective effect and the amount of phenolic compounds, the content of flavonoids and flavonols of M. piperita leaf extract may be held responsible for radioprotective effect due to their antioxidant and radical scavenging activity.

  3. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Kwon, Hee-Chung; Chung, Hee-Yong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  4. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A. |; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.; Ghidini, G.

    1998-12-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices.

  5. Cell to Cell Variability of Radiation-Induced Foci: Relation between Observed Damage and Energy Deposition.

    PubMed

    Gruel, Gaëtan; Villagrasa, Carmen; Voisin, Pascale; Clairand, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Most studies that aim to understand the interactions between different types of photon radiation and cellular DNA assume homogeneous cell irradiation, with all cells receiving the same amount of energy. The level of DNA damage is therefore generally determined by averaging it over the entire population of exposed cells. However, evaluating the molecular consequences of a stochastic phenomenon such as energy deposition of ionizing radiation by measuring only an average effect may not be sufficient for understanding some aspects of the cellular response to this radiation. The variance among the cells associated with this average effect may also be important for the behaviour of irradiated tissue. In this study, we accurately estimated the distribution of the number of radiation-induced γH2AX foci (RIF) per cell nucleus in a large population of endothelial cells exposed to 3 macroscopic doses of gamma rays from 60Co. The number of RIF varied significantly and reproducibly from cell to cell, with its relative standard deviation ranging from 36% to 18% depending on the macroscopic dose delivered. Interestingly, this relative cell-to-cell variability increased as the dose decreased, contrary to the mean RIF count per cell. This result shows that the dose effect, in terms of the number of DNA lesions indicated by RIF is not as simple as a purely proportional relation in which relative SD is constant with dose. To analyse the origins of this observed variability, we calculated the spread of the specific energy distribution for the different target volumes and subvolumes in which RIF can be generated. Variances, standard deviations and relative standard deviations all changed similarly from dose to dose for biological and calculated microdosimetric values. This similarity is an important argument that supports the hypothesis of the conservation of the association between the number of RIF per nucleus and the specific energy per DNA molecule. This comparison allowed us to

  6. Ionizing radiation induced leakage current on ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpa, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Montera, F.; Ghibaudo, G.; Pananakakis, G.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1997-12-01

    MOS capacitors with a 4.4 nm thick gate oxide have been exposed to {gamma} radiation from a Co{sup 60} source. As a result, the authors have measured a stable leakage current at fields lower than those required for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) is similar to the usual Stress Induced Leakage Currents (SILC) observed after electrical stresses of MOS devices. They have verified that these two currents share the same dependence on the oxide field, and the RILC contribution can be normalized to an equivalent injected charge for Constant Current Stresses. They have also considered the dependence of the RILC from the cumulative radiation dose, and from the applied bias during irradiation, suggesting a correlation between RILC and the distribution of trapped holes and neutral levels in the oxide layer.

  7. Role of cellular communication in the pathways of radiation-induced biological damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Facoetti, Angelica; Mariotti, Luca; Nano, Rosanna; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    During the last decade, a large number of experimental studies on the so-called "non-targeted effects", in particular bystander effects, outlined that cellular communication plays a signifi- cant role in the pathways leading to radiation-induced biological damage. This might imply a paradigm shift in (low-dose) radiobiology, according to which one has to consider the response of groups of cells behaving like a population rather than single cells behaving as individuals. Furthermore, bystander effects, which are observed both for lethal endpoints (e.g. clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis) and for non-lethal ones (e.g. mutations and neoplastic transformation), tend to show non-linear dose responses characterized by a sharp increase followed by a plateau. This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk, which is generally calculated on the basis of the "Linear No Threshold" hypothesis. Although it is known that two types of cellular communication (i.e. via gap junctions and/or molecular messengers diffusing in the extra-cellular environment, such as cytokines) play a major role, it is of utmost importance to better understand the underlying mechanisms, and how such mechanisms can be modulated by ionizing radiation. Though the "final" goal is to elucidate the in vivo scenario, in the meanwhile also in vitro studies can provide useful insights. In the present paper we will discuss key issues on the mechanisms underlying non-targeted effects and, more generally, cell communication, with focus on candidate molecular signals. Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms. In this framework, we will present a model and Monte Carlo code, under development at the University of Pavia, simulating the release, diffusion and internalization of candidate signals (typically cytokines) travelling in the extra-cellular environment, both by unirradiated (i.e., control) cells and by irradiated cells. The focus will be on the

  8. Astragalus polysaccharide ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Fang; Yang, Ya; Li, Di; Lv, Jun; Ou, Yangjin; Sun, Fengjun; Chen, Jianhong; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Radioprotective compounds from plant resources may represent safe and cost-effective prophylactic and therapeutic agents. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide derived from the dried roots of the Astragalus spp. (APS) against ionizing radiation (IR) injury in liver and to explore its role in radiation-induced oxidative stress using a mouse model. Prior to (60)Co γ-irradiation (5Gy, single dose), mice received 7 days of APS at low, mid and high doses (50, 100 or 200mg/kg/day, respectively; n=6 each group), vehicle alone (5mL normal saline orally/daily; n=6). A non-irradiated control group (n=6) received the 7-day distilled water regimen only. At 24h post-irradiation, the APS pre-treated mice showed significantly decreased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase levels, and NF-κB expression. All APS-treated mice also showed attenuation of the IR-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and resolution of the IR-induced decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione activities (all p<0.05). High dose APS pre-treatment led to remarkably less morphologic features of IR-induced hepatic and pulmonary injury. Thus, APS exerts protective effects against IR-induced injury in liver in mice, and the related molecular mechanism may involve suppressing the radiation-induced oxidative stress reaction. PMID:24820157

  9. Astragalus polysaccharide ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Fang; Yang, Ya; Li, Di; Lv, Jun; Ou, Yangjin; Sun, Fengjun; Chen, Jianhong; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Radioprotective compounds from plant resources may represent safe and cost-effective prophylactic and therapeutic agents. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide derived from the dried roots of the Astragalus spp. (APS) against ionizing radiation (IR) injury in liver and to explore its role in radiation-induced oxidative stress using a mouse model. Prior to (60)Co γ-irradiation (5Gy, single dose), mice received 7 days of APS at low, mid and high doses (50, 100 or 200mg/kg/day, respectively; n=6 each group), vehicle alone (5mL normal saline orally/daily; n=6). A non-irradiated control group (n=6) received the 7-day distilled water regimen only. At 24h post-irradiation, the APS pre-treated mice showed significantly decreased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase levels, and NF-κB expression. All APS-treated mice also showed attenuation of the IR-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and resolution of the IR-induced decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione activities (all p<0.05). High dose APS pre-treatment led to remarkably less morphologic features of IR-induced hepatic and pulmonary injury. Thus, APS exerts protective effects against IR-induced injury in liver in mice, and the related molecular mechanism may involve suppressing the radiation-induced oxidative stress reaction.

  10. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  11. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:24798949

  12. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21159746

  13. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury.

  14. Genetic compensation of high dose radiation-induced damage in an anhydrobiotic insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kikawada, Takahiro; Okuda, Takashi

    Anhydrobiotic larvae of African chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki are known to show an extremely high tolerance against a range of stresses. The tolerance against various extreme environments exhibited by that insect might be due to being almost completely desiccated replacing water with trehalose, a state where little or no chemical reactions occur. From 2005 dried larvae of this insect are being used in a number of space experiments, both inside and outside of ISS as a model organism for estimation the limits of higher organisms' resistance to space environment stresses and long-term storage of the alive anhydrobiotic organisms during continues spaceflight. We have shown previously that both hydrated and dried larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki have very higher tolerance against both highand low-linear energy transfer (LET), surviving after 7000Gy irradiation. It was suggested that the larvae would have effective DNA-reparation system in addition to artificial protection provided by glass-stage without water. In the present study we conducted analysis of stress-related gene expression in the larvae after 70-2000 Gy irradiations. Both DNA damage level and activity of DNA-reparation, anti-apoptotic and protein-damage related genes were analyzed. Direct visualization of DNA damage in the larvae fat body cells using Comet Assay showed that fragmented by radiation DNA is re-arranged within 76-98 hours after exposure. We found that massive overexpression of hsp and anti-oxidant genes occur in larvae entering anhydrobiosis , and provides refolding of proteins after rehydration. In the irradiated larvae overexpression of DNA-reparation enzymes anti-apoptotic genes was confirmed, suggesting that survival after high-dose irradiation is a result of combination of highly effective blocking of entering the apoptosis after severe DNA damage and DNA reparation.

  15. REC-2006-A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF) and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy) caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014) and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg(-1) body weight) 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  16. The use of ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of ionizing-radiation-induced damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C P; Jirasek, A

    2009-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) was used to determine damage done in both calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and a short stranded DNA oligomer (SS-DNA) due to ionizing radiation from a medical (60)Co radiation therapy unit used in the treatment of cancer. Spectra were acquired at incident UV wavelengths of 248, 257, and 264 nm in order to utilize the differences in UVRR cross-sections of the bases with wavelength. Through the analysis of difference spectra between irradiated and unirradiated DNA at each of the incident UV wavelengths, damage to CT- and SS-DNA was observed and identified. Significant radiation-induced increases in the difference spectra of the CT-DNA indicated disruption of the stable, stacked structure of its bases, as well as the disruption of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. Base unstacking was not as evident in the SS-DNA, while radiation-induced spectral decreases suggest disruption of the structure of the nucleotides. As demonstrated, UVRRS has the ability to highlight contributions from specific moieties with the use of varying incident UV wavelengths, thus enhancing the already information-rich content of the Raman spectra.

  17. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  18. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  19. Excision repair of UV radiation-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.S.; Hevelone, J.; Dwarakanath, V.; Mitchell, D.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Radioimmunoassays were used to monitor the removal of antibody-binding sites associated with the two major UV radiation-induced DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts). Unlike with cultured human cells, where (6-4) photoproducts are removed more rapidly than cyclobutane dimers, the kinetics of repair were similar for both lesions. Repair capacity in wild type diminished throughout development. The radioimmunoassays were also employed to confirm the absence of photoreactivation in C. elegans. In addition, three radiation-sensitive mutants (rad-1, rad-2, rad-7) displayed normal repair capacities. An excision defect was much more pronounced in larvae than embryos in the fourth mutant tested (rad-3). This correlates with the hypersensitivity pattern of this mutant and suggests that DNA repair may be developmentally regulated in C. elegans. The mechanism of DNA repair in C. elegans as well as the relationship between the repair of specific photoproducts and UV radiation sensitivity during development are discussed.

  20. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  1. Cross-generational trans fat intake exacerbates UV radiation-induced damage in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, R C S; Vey, L T; Segat, H J; Roversi, K; Roversi, Kr; Dias, V T; Trevizol, F; Kuhn, F T; Dolci, G S; Pase, C S; Piccolo, J; Veit, J C; Emanuelli, T; Luz, S C A; Bürger, M E

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the influence of dietary fats on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced oxidative damage in skin of rats. Animals from two consecutive generations born of dams supplemented with fats during pregnancy and breastfeeding were maintained in the same supplementation: soybean-oil (SO, rich in n-6 FA, control group), fish-oil (FO, rich in n-3 FA) or hydrogenated-vegetable-fat (HVF, rich in TFA). At 90 days of age, half the animals from the 2nd generation were exposed to UVR (0.25 J/cm(2)) 3×/week for 12 weeks. The FO group presented higher incorporation of n-3 FA in dorsal skin, while the HVF group incorporated TFA. Biochemical changes per se were observed in skin of the HVF group: greater generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lower mitochondrial integrity and increased Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity. UVR exposure increased skin wrinkles scores and ROS generation and decreased mitochondrial integrity and reduced-glutathione levels in the HVF group. In FO, UVR exposure was associated with smaller skin thickness and reduced levels of protein-carbonyl, together with increased catalase activity and preserved Na(+)K(+)-ATPase function. In conclusion, while FO may be protective, trans fat may be harmful to skin health by making it more vulnerable to UVR injury and thus more prone to develop photoaging and skin cancer.

  2. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  3. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-01

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage. PMID:12084616

  4. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  5. Spectrum of Radiation-Induced Clustered Non-DSB Damage - A Monte Carlo Track Structure Modeling and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the spectrum of initial radiation-induced cellular DNA damage [with particular focus on non-double-strand break (DSB) damage] generated by computer simulations. The radiation types modeled in this study were monoenergetic electrons (100 eV-1.5 keV), ultrasoft X-ray photons Ck, AlK and TiK, as well as some selected ions including 3.2 MeV/u proton; 0.74 and 2.4 MeV/u helium ions; 29 MeV/u nitrogen ions and 950 MeV/u iron ions. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to simulate damage induction by these radiation types in a cell-mimetic condition from a single-track action. The simulations took into account the action of direct energy deposition events and the reaction of hydroxyl radicals on atomistic linear B-DNA segments of a few helical turns including the water of hydration. Our results permitted the following conclusions: a. The absolute levels of different types of damage [base damage, simple and complex single-strand breaks (SSBs) and DSBs] vary depending on the radiation type; b. Within each damage class, the relative proportions of simple and complex damage vary with radiation type, the latter being higher with high-LET radiations; c. Overall, for both low- and high-LET radiations, the ratios of the yields of base damage to SSBs are similar, being about 3.0 ± 0.2; d. Base damage contributes more to the complexity of both SSBs and DSBs, than additional SSB damage and this is true for both low- and high-LET radiations; and e. The average SSB/DSB ratio for low-LET radiations is about 18, which is about 5 times higher than that for high-LET radiations. The hypothesis that clustered DNA damage is more difficult for cells to repair has gained currency among radiobiologists. However, as yet, there is no direct in vivo experimental method to validate the dependence of kinetics of DNA repair on DNA damage complexity (both DSB and non-DSB types). The data on the detailed spectrum of DNA damage presented here, in particular

  6. Protection against radiation induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice by Mentha piperita (Linn).

    PubMed

    Samarth, Ravindra M

    2007-11-01

    The protective effects of Mentha piperita (Linn) extract against radiation induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice have been studied. Mice were given either double distilled water or leaf extract of M. piperita orally (1 g/kg b.wt./day) once a day for three consecutive days, and after 30 min of treatments on the third day were exposed to 8 Gy gamma radiation. Mice were autopsied at 12, 24, 48 hrs and 5, 10 and 20 days post-irradiation to evaluate the percentage of bone marrow cells, frequency of micronuclei and erythropoietin level in serum. An exposure to gamma radiation resulted in a significant decline in the number of bone marrow cells such as leucoblasts, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band/stab forms, polymorphs, pronormoblasts and normoblasts, lymphocytes, and megakaryocytes. Pretreatment with leaf extract of M. piperita followed by radiation exposure resulted in significant increases in the numbers of leucoblasts, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band/stab forms, polymorphs, pronormoblasts and normoblasts, lymphocytes, and megakaryocytes in bone marrow as compared to the control group. Pretreatment with leaf extract of M. piperita followed by radiation exposure also resulted in significant decreases in micronucleus frequencies in bone marrow of Swiss albino mice. A significant increase in erythropoietin level was observed at all the studied intervals in leaf extract of M. piperita pretreated irradiated animals as compared to control animals (radiation alone). The results of the present investigation suggest the protective effects of leaf extract of M. piperita against radiation induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow may be attributed to the maintenance of EPO level in Swiss albino mice.

  7. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  8. Characterization of radiation-induced damage in high performance polymers by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleman, Naushadalli K.

    1992-01-01

    The potential for long-term human activity beyond the Earth's protective magnetosphere is limited in part by the lack of detailed information on the effectiveness and performance of existing structural materials to shield the crew and spacecraft from highly penetrating space radiations. The two radiations of greatest concern are high energy protons emitted during solar flares and galactic cosmic rays which are energetic ions ranging from protons to highly oxidized iron. Although the interactions of such high-energy radiations with matter are not completely understood at this time, the effects of the incident radiation are clearly expected to include the formation of paramagnetic spin centers via ionization and bond-scission reactions in the molecular matrices of structural materials. Since this type of radiation damage is readily characterized by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the NASA Langley Research Center EPR system was repaired and brought on-line during the 1991 ASEE term. A major goal of the 1992 ASEE term was to adapt the existing core of the LaRC EPR system to meet the requirements for EPR Imaging--a powerful new technique which provides detailed information on the internal structure of materials by mapping the spatial distribution of unpaired spin density in bulk media. Major impetus for this adaptation arises from the fact that information derived from EPRI complements other methods such as scanning electron microscopy which primarily characterize surface phenomena. The modification of the EPR system has been initiated by the construction of specially designed, counterwound Helmholtz coils which will be mounted on the main EPR electromagnet. The specifications of the coils have been set to achieve a static linear magnetic field gradient of 10 gauss/mm/amp along the principal (Z) axis of the Zeeman field. Construction is also in progress of a paramagnetic standard in which the spin distribution is known in all three dimensions. This

  9. Zinc administration modulates radiation-induced oxidative injury in lens of rat

    PubMed Central

    Taysi, Seyithan; Okumus, Seydi; Akyuz, Mehmet; Uzun, Naim; Aksoy, Adnan; Demir, Elif; Orkmez, Mustafa; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet; Adli, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant role of zinc (Zn) against radiation-induced cataract in the rat lens after total cranial irradiation with a single 5 Gray (Gy) dose of gamma irradiation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the experiment. The control group did not receive Zn or irradiation but received 1-ml saline orally plus sham-irradiation. The irradiation (IR) group received 5 Gy gamma irradiation to the total cranium as a single dose plus 0.1 ml physiological saline intraperitoneally. The IR plus Zn group received irradiation to total cranium plus 10 mg/kg/day Zn intraperitoneally. Biochemical parameters measured in rat lenses were carried out using spectrophotometric techniques. Results: Lens total (enzymatic plus non-enzymatic) superoxide scavenger activity (TSSA), glutathione reductase (GRD), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities significantly increased in the IR plus Zn groups when compared with the IR group. However, TSSA, GRD and GST activities were significantly lower in the IR group when compared with the control group. Lens non-enzymatic superoxide scavenger activity (NSSA) in the IR plus Zn group was significantly increased compared to that of the IR group. Lens xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in the IR group significantly increased compared to that of both the control and IR plus Zn groups. Conclusion: Zn has clear antioxidant properties and prevented oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation in rat lenses. PMID:24082625

  10. [Chemiluminescence method for the detection of radiation-induced oxidation products in fat-containing foods].

    PubMed

    Matthäus, B; Wiezorek, C; Eichner, K

    1994-10-01

    Radiation-induced oxidation of fatty foods was detected by a chemiluminescence method. Hazelnuts, peanuts and poultry were used as foodstuff samples. Additional investigations were performed with a model system and sunflower oil. The irradiation of the samples was carried out in a x-ray-fluorescence-apparatus. Thereby it is to note that the G-value of the x-ray-radiation is much higher than the G-value of a cobalt-60-source normally used for irradiation of food. A dependence of the integral of the light curve on the irradiation doses could be proved. Investigations with model systems which contained different amounts of alpha-tocopherol showed a decreasing chemiluminescence signal at low irradiation doses in presence of alpha-tocopherol. At higher doses the chemiluminescence signal enlarges with increasing amounts of alpha-tocopherol because irradiation products of alpha-tocopherol overlay its antioxidative effect. Irradiated poultry samples differ significantly from unirradiated samples after a deep-freeze storage of 26 weeks. A quantification of the doses is not possible without knowledge of the storage time, because the integrals decrease differently after irradiation during storage. In any case the chemiluminescence method is useful as a "screening method" for the detection of irradiation of foodstuffs with the possibility of automation and high sensitivity.

  11. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  12. Pharmacologic approaches to protection against radiation-induced lethality and other damage.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J F

    1997-01-01

    other cytokines. Their potential usefulness against radiation-induced mutagenesis of pre- and postexposure administration of phosphorothioates and other classes of protectors should be corroborated in humans. PMID:9467066

  13. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S. A.; Cooper, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribed genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, we examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. We found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. Our results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8248136

  14. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacement damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.

  15. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  16. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    DOE PAGES

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacementmore » damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.« less

  17. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay.

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, M K; Shyama, S K; Sonaye, B S; Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S B; Bipin, P D; D'costa, A; Chaubey, R C

    2014-05-01

    reveals that gamma radiation induces single strand breaks in DNA as measured by alkaline comet assay in bivalves and comet assay serves as a sensitive and rapid method to detect genotoxicity of gamma radiation. This study further indicates that both M. casta and P. malabarica exhibit almost identical sensitivity to gamma radiation as measured by DNA damage.

  18. Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

  19. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  20. TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  1. Persistence of space radiation induced cytogenetic damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts.

    PubMed

    George, K; Chappell, L J; Cucinotta, F A

    2010-08-14

    Cytogenetic damage was assessed in blood lymphocytes from 16 astronauts before and after they participated in long-duration space missions of 3 months or more. The frequency of chromosome damage was measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting before flight and at various intervals from a few days to many months after return from the mission. For all individuals, the frequency of chromosome exchanges measured within a month of return from space was higher than their preflight yield. However, some individuals showed a temporal decline in chromosome damage with time after flight. Statistical analysis using combined data for all astronauts indicated a significant overall decreasing trend in total chromosome exchanges with time after flight, although this trend was not seen for all astronauts and the yield of chromosome damage in some individuals actually increased with time after flight. The decreasing trend in total exchanges was slightly more significant when statistical analysis was restricted to data collected more than 220 days after return from flight. When analysis was restricted to data collected within 220 days of return from the mission there was no relationship between total exchanges and time. Translocation yields varied more between astronauts and there was only a slight non-significant decrease with time after flight that was similar for both later and earlier sampling times. PMID:20176126

  2. Persistence of space radiation induced cytogenetic damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts.

    PubMed

    George, K; Chappell, L J; Cucinotta, F A

    2010-08-14

    Cytogenetic damage was assessed in blood lymphocytes from 16 astronauts before and after they participated in long-duration space missions of 3 months or more. The frequency of chromosome damage was measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting before flight and at various intervals from a few days to many months after return from the mission. For all individuals, the frequency of chromosome exchanges measured within a month of return from space was higher than their preflight yield. However, some individuals showed a temporal decline in chromosome damage with time after flight. Statistical analysis using combined data for all astronauts indicated a significant overall decreasing trend in total chromosome exchanges with time after flight, although this trend was not seen for all astronauts and the yield of chromosome damage in some individuals actually increased with time after flight. The decreasing trend in total exchanges was slightly more significant when statistical analysis was restricted to data collected more than 220 days after return from flight. When analysis was restricted to data collected within 220 days of return from the mission there was no relationship between total exchanges and time. Translocation yields varied more between astronauts and there was only a slight non-significant decrease with time after flight that was similar for both later and earlier sampling times.

  3. TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  4. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  5. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-05-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data.

  6. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  7. Effect of Tinospora cordifolia on the reduction of ultraviolet radiation-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Masuma, Runa; Okuno, Tsutomu; Kabir Choudhuri, Mohammad Shahabuddin; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The safety of Tinospora cordifolia and its potential to protect against ultraviolet radiation-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage in PC12 cells were investigated. To evaluate the safety of T. cordifolia, cell viability and agarose gel electrophoresis were carried out using PC12 cells treated with 0 to 100 μg mL(-1) of methanol extract of T. cordifolia. T. cordifolia extracts did not show cytotoxicity ranging 0 to 100 μg mL(-1). In addition, T. cordifolia extracts significantly increased cell viability at 1 ng, 10 ng and 1 μg mL(-1) concentrations in serum-deprived medium compared to control. To confirm the protective role against UV-induced damage, PC12 cells alone or in the presence of 10 ng, 100 ng, or 1 μg mL(-1) of T. cordifolia extract were exposed to 250, 270 and 290 nm of UV radiation, which corresponded to doses of 120, 150 and 300 mJ cm(-2), respectively. Treatment with T. cordifolia extracts significantly increased the cell survival rate irradiated at 290 nm. In addition, T. cordifolia extracts significantly reduced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV irradiation at all wavelengths. In conclusion, T. cordifolia is not toxic and safe for cells. Our findings can support its application as phototherapy in the medical sector. PMID:24762179

  8. Proton beam radiation induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis in glioma stem cells through reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Alan Mitteer, R; Wang, Yanling; Shah, Jennifer; Gordon, Sherika; Fager, Marcus; Butter, Param-Puneet; Jun Kim, Hyun; Guardiola-Salmeron, Consuelo; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Fan, Yi

    2015-09-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most lethal of human malignancies. Most GBM tumors are refractory to cytotoxic therapies. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) significantly contribute to GBM progression and post-treatment tumor relapse, therefore serving as a key therapeutic target; however, GSCs are resistant to conventional radiation therapy. Proton therapy is one of the newer cancer treatment modalities and its effects on GSCs function remain unclear. Here, by utilizing patient-derived GSCs, we show that proton radiation generates greater cytotoxicity in GSCs than x-ray photon radiation. Compared with photon radiation, proton beam irradiation induces more single and double strand DNA breaks, less H2AX phosphorylation, increased Chk2 phosphorylation, and reduced cell cycle recovery from G2 arrest, leading to caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and cell apoptosis. Furthermore, proton radiation generates a large quantity of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is required for DNA damage, cell cycle redistribution, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. Together, these findings indicate that proton radiation has a higher efficacy in treating GSCs than photon radiation. Our data reveal a ROS-dependent mechanism by which proton radiation induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis in GSCs. Thus, proton therapy may be more efficient than conventional x-ray photon therapy for eliminating GSCs in GBM patients.

  9. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  10. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-05-12

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein

  11. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P; Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N; Matyunin, S N; Nazarov, M M; Cherkasova, O P

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  12. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis.

  13. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  14. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  15. Microbeam Radiation-Induced Tissue Damage Depends on the Stage of Vascular Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatasso, Sara; Laissue, Jean Albert; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Graber, Werner; Bravin, Alberto; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Corde, Stephanie; Blattmann, Hans; Gruber, Guenther; Djonov, Valentin

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of microbeam radiation (MR) on vascular biology, we used the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model of an almost pure vascular system with immature vessels (lacking periendothelial coverage) at Day 8 and mature vessels (with coverage) at Day 12 of development. Methods and Materials: CAMs were irradiated with microplanar beams (width, {approx}25 {mu}m; interbeam spacing, {approx}200 {mu}m) at entrance doses of 200 or 300 Gy and, for comparison, with a broad beam (seamless radiation [SLR]), with entrance doses of 5 to 40 Gy. Results: In vivo monitoring of Day-8 CAM vasculature 6 h after 200 Gy MR revealed a near total destruction of the immature capillary plexus. Conversely, 200 Gy MR barely affected Day-12 CAM mature microvasculature. Morphological evaluation of Day-12 CAMs after the dose was increased to 300 Gy revealed opened interendothelial junctions, which could explain the transient mesenchymal edema immediately after irradiation. Electron micrographs revealed cytoplasmic vacuolization of endothelial cells in the beam path, with disrupted luminal surfaces; often the lumen was engorged with erythrocytes and leukocytes. After 30 min, the capillary plexus adopted a striated metronomic pattern, with alternating destroyed and intact zones, corresponding to the beam and the interbeam paths within the array. SLR at a dose of 10 Gy caused growth retardation, resulting in a remarkable reduction in the vascular endpoint density 24 h postirradiation. A dose of 40 Gy damaged the entire CAM vasculature. Conclusions: The effects of MR are mediated by capillary damage, with tissue injury caused by insufficient blood supply. Vascular toxicity and physiological effects of MR depend on the stage of capillary maturation and appear in the first 15 to 60 min after irradiation. Conversely, the effects of SLR, due to the arrest of cell proliferation, persist for a longer time.

  16. Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of astronauts blood lymphocytes provides a direct in vivo measurement of space radiation damage, which takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. We present our latest analyses of chromosome damage in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting and collected at various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. Dose was derived from frequencies of chromosome exchanges using preflight calibration curves, and the Relative Biological Effect (RBE) was estimated by comparison with individually measured physically absorbed doses. Values for average RBE were compared to the average quality factor (Q), from direct measurements of the lineal energy spectra using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and radiation transport codes. Results prove that cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses on blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk after protracted exposure to space radiation of a few months or more. However, data collected several months or years after flight suggests that the yield of chromosome translocations may decline with time after the mission, indicating that retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember, who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years, provide limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  17. The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism in the propagation of ionizing radiation-induced biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai

    unlikely to be a substrate of glutathione peroxidase. To further understand the role of GJIC, we tested the effect of specific connexin channel permeabilities on radiation-induced cell killing and induction of DNA damage. We used human adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells in which specific connexins can be expressed in the absence of endogenous connexins. When exposed to protons, γ rays, α particles, or iron ions, connexin26 and connexin43 channels mediated the propagation of toxic effects among irradiated cells; in contrast, connexin32 channels conferred protective effects. Collectively, these studies provide a novel mechanistic understanding of the molecular events that mediate the fate of cell populations exposed to different types of ionizing radiation. They show that the LET of the radiation significantly impacts these events. The enhancement of cell killing in the hours after exposure of tumor cells to high charge and high energy particles and or α particles support the use of these particles in cancer radiotherapy. Characterization of the molecules that are communicated through junctional channels from tumor to normal cells would help formulate countermeasures to protect normal tissues during radiotherapy. Future in vivo research would contribute to validating these concepts.

  18. Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdoglu, B.; Wilson, G.; Parchuri, N.; Ye, W.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6 weeks with capsules containing testosterone and estradiol and then irradiated with doses from 2.5-7.0 Gy. Controls were irradiated with 1.8-3.5 Gy. Implants were removed 1 day after irradiation, and all animals were killed 10 weeks later for assessment of stem cell survival by counting repopulating tubules in histological sections and by sperm head counts. At doses of 2.5 and 3.5 Gy the repopulation indices and sperm head counts were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the rats treated with testosterone and estradiol than in the controls. Protection factors calculated from the dose-response curves were in the range of 1.5-2.2. Elucidation of the mechanism of protection is essential to apply it to clinical situations. The fact that the spermatogonia are protected against radiation as well as procarbazine indicates that the mechanism does not involve drug delivery or metabolism. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  20. A mechanistic description of radiation-induced damage to normal tissue and its healing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel mechanistic model of the yield of tissue damage at the end of radiation treatment and of the subsequent healing kinetics. We find explicit expressions for the total number of functional proliferating cells as well as doomed (functional but non-proliferating) cells as a function of time post treatment. This leads to the possibility of estimating—for any given cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy—the probability distribution of those kinetic parameters (e.g. proliferation rates) that determine times to injury onset and ensuing resolution. The model is suitable for tissues with simple duplication organization, meaning that functionally competent cells are also responsible for tissue renewal or regeneration following injury. An extension of the model to arbitrary temporal patterns of dose rate is presented. To illustrate the practical utility of the model, as well as its limitations, we apply it to data on the time course of urethral toxicity following fractionated radiation treatment and brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  1. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells. PMID:26396176

  2. Detection of some irradiated spices on the basis of radiation induced damage of starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, J.; Sharif, M. M.; Koncz, Á.

    Untreated and irradiated samples of spices were suspended in water, alkalized, and after heat-gelatinization, the apparent viscosity was determined by a rotational viscometer. Several spices, i.e. white pepper, black pepper, nutmeg and ginger showed considerable loss of viscosity as a function of γ-radiation dose in the dose range required for microbial decontamination of natural spices. Less promising results were obtained with spices such as allspice, garlic powder, and onion powder forming low-viscosity heat-treated suspensions even when unirradiated viscometric studies were also performed with a number of pepper samples of various origin to estimate the "natural" variation of rheological properties. Irradiation and storage studies were performed with ground black pepper samples of moisture contents in equilibrium with air of 25%, 50% and 75% R.H., respectively, either untreated or irradiated with 4, 8, 16 or 32 kGy, to study the effect of equilibrium relative humidity and storage time on detectability of radiation treatment. During the entire storage period of 100 days, statistically significant differences of the apparent viscosities of heat-gelatinized suspensions remained detectable between untreated samples and those irradiated with 8 kGy or higher doses. The apparent viscosity of high-moisture (75% E.R.H.) untreated samples was decreasing during long-term storage. Differences between viscosities of untreated and irradiated samples were enlarged when measured at elevated temperatures such as 50°C in the rotational viscometer, or in the boiling-water bath of a falling number apparatus. Other analytical indices such as onset and peak temperatures of gelatinization endotherms by DSC (damaged starch content), by colorimetry, reducing sugar content, alcohol-induced turbidity of hot water extracts of pepper samples, have been changed less dramatically by irradiation than the apparent viscosity of the gelatinized suspensions

  3. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  4. Reciprocal Paracrine Interactions Between Normal Human Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells Protect Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, Yuka; Saenko, Vladimir Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Matsuse, Michiko; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To explore whether interactions between normal epithelial and mesenchymal cells can modulate the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in one or both types of cells. Methods and Materials: Human primary thyrocytes (PT), diploid fibroblasts BJ, MRC-5, and WI-38, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), and endothelial human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUV-EC-C), cultured either individually or in co-cultures or after conditioned medium transfer, were irradiated with 0.25 to 5 Gy of {gamma}-rays and assayed for the extent of DNA damage. Results: The number of {gamma}-H2AX foci in co-cultures of PT and BJ fibroblasts was approximately 25% lower than in individual cultures at 1 Gy in both types of cells. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual cultures before irradiation resulted in approximately a 35% reduction of the number {gamma}-H2AX foci at 1 Gy in both types of cells, demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. The DNA-protected state of cells was achieved within 15 min after conditioned medium transfer; it was reproducible and reciprocal in several lines of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells but not in epithelial and endothelial cells. Unlike normal cells, human epithelial cancer cells failed to establish DNA-protected states in fibroblasts and vice versa. Conclusions: The results imply the existence of a network of reciprocal interactions between normal epithelial and some types of mesenchymal cells mediated by soluble factors that act in a paracrine manner to protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  5. The utility of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for early diagnosis of radiation-induced myocardial damage

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi . E-mail: kjingu-jr@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ichinose, Az; Oikawa, Minako; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Eiko; Sakayauchi, Toru; Takai, Kenji; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Narazaki, Kakutaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoki; Yamada, Shogo

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the clinical significance of focal increased uptake in the basal myocardium on F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with esophageal cancer after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between August 2004 and July 2005, a total of 64 patients who had been irradiated for thoracic esophageal cancer underwent FDG-PET at least three months after the completion of chemoradiotherapy. Some patients showed increased FDG uptake in the basal portion of the myocardium. To clarify the clinical significance of these findings, further examinations of hearts were performed. The dose distribution in the myocardium with high FDG uptake was also analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirteen (20.3%) of the 64 patients showed high FDG uptake in the basal myocardium corresponding to the irradiated fields compared with FDG uptake in the myocardium outside the irradiated fields. Eight of the 13 patients consented to undergo examinations of the heart. Five of those eight patients showed low {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake and four showed low {sup 201}TlCl uptake in the myocardium corresponding with high FDG uptake regions. In two patients, delayed enhancement was found in some parts of the area with high FDG uptake on Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the delay-enhanced lesion showed hypokinesia on cine-MRI in one patient. Conclusions: FDG-PET often shows focal increased uptake in the basal myocardium after radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This finding indicates the possibility of radiation-induced cardiac damage, and cardiac function and symptoms of such patients should be followed carefully.

  6. Radiation induced DNA damage and damage repair in human tumor and fibroblast cell lines assessed by histone H2AX phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrhofer, Hartmut; Buerger, Susann; Oppitz, Ulrich; Flentje, Michael; Djuzenova, Cholpon S. . E-mail: djuzenova_t@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the radiation-induced levels of {gamma}H2AX and its decay kinetics in 10 human cell lines covering a wide range of cellular radiosensitivity (SF2, 0.06-0.63). Methods and Materials: Five tumor cell lines included Colo-800 melanoma, two glioblastoma (MO59J and MO59K), fibrosarcoma HT 1080, and breast carcinoma MCF7. Five primary skin fibroblasts lines included two normal strains, an ataxia telangiectasia strain, and two fibroblast strains from breast cancer patients with an adverse early skin reaction to radiotherapy. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by colony-forming test. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and repair were analyzed according to nuclear {gamma}H2AX foci intensity, with digital image analysis. Results: The cell lines tested showed a wide degree of variation in the background intensity of immunostained nuclear histone {gamma}H2AX, which was higher for the tumor cell lines compared with the fibroblast strains. It was not possible to predict clonogenic cell survival (SF2) for the 10 cell lines studied from the radiation-induced {gamma}H2AX intensity. In addition, the slopes of the dose-response (0-4 Gy) curves, the rates of {gamma}H2AX disappearance, and its residual expression ({<=}18 h after irradiation) did not correlate with SF2 values. Conclusions: The results from 10 cell lines showed that measurements of immunofluorescence intensity by digital image analysis of phosphorylated histone H2AX as a surrogate marker of DNA double-strand breaks did not allow reliable ranking of cell strains according to their clonogenic survival after irradiation.

  7. Inhibition of radiation-induced DNA damage by jamun, Syzygium cumini, in the cultured splenocytes of mice exposed to different doses of γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Shetty, Prakash Chandra; Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi Srinivasa

    2012-06-01

    The radioprotective property of 50 mg/kg body weight jamun (Syzygium cumini) extract was studied in the cultured splenocytes of mice exposed to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy of γ-radiation. The spleens of irradiated mice were removed aseptically and the splenocytes were extracted from the individual spleens and cultured. The micronuclei were prepared 72 hours after irradiation in binucleate splenocytes by blocking cytokinesis with cytochalasin-B. Irradiation of mice resulted in a dose-dependent elevation in the micronucleated splenocytes. The exposure of mice not only elevated splenocytes bearing one micronucleus but also cells bearing 2 and multiple (>2) micronuclei indicating induction of complex DNA damage after irradiation. Oral treatment of mice with 50 mg/kg body weight of jamun leaf extract protected against the radiation-induced micronuclei formation. Jamun extract also protected against the formation of 2 and multiple micronuclei indicating repair or inhibition of complex DNA damage. The assessment of lipid peroxidation in mice brain homogenate has indicated a concentration dependent inhibition of lipid peroxidation by jamun extract. Studies in a cell free system revealed that jamun extract inhibited the formation of OH, O(2)-, DPPH, and ABTS(+) free radicals in a concentration dependent manner. Our study demonstrates that jamun extract protected mice against the radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibition of radiation-induced free radical formation may be one of the mechanisms of radioprotection. PMID:21733986

  8. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  9. Profiling mitochondrial proteins in radiation-induced genome-unstable cell lines with persistent oxidative stress by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Wan, Yunhu; Aypar, Umut; Peters, Jonathan S.; Springer, David L.

    2008-06-01

    Radiation-induced genome instability (RIGI) is a response to radiation exposure in which the progeny of surviving cells exhibit increased frequency of chromosomal changes many generations after the initial insult. Persistently elevated oxidative stress accompanying RIGI and the ability of free-radical scavengers, given before irradiation, to reduce the incidence of instability suggest that radiation induced alterations to mitochondrial function likely play a role in RIGI. To further elucidate this mechanism, we performed high-throughput quantitative mass spectrometry on samples enriched in mitochondrial proteins from three chromosomally-unstable GM10115 Chinese-hamster-ovary cell lines and their stable parental cell line. Out of several hundred identified proteins, sufficient data were collected on 74 mitochondrial proteins to test for statistically significant differences in their abundance between unstable and stable cell lines. Each of the unstable cell lines showed a distinct profile of statistically-significant differential abundant mitochondrial proteins. The LS-12 cell line was characterized by 8 downregulated proteins, whereas the CS-9 cell line exhibited 5 distinct up-regulated proteins. The unstable 115 cell line had two down-regulated proteins, one of which was also downregulated in LS-12, and one up-regulated protein relative to stable parental cells. The mitochondrial protein profiles for LS-12 and C-9 provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the genome instability of these cell lines.

  10. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation induced DNA double strand damage and repair in V79 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Treacy, S. H.; Knapp, L. A.; Grdina, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation induced DNA double strand breaks are believed to be important lesions involved in processes related to cell killing, induction of chromosome aberrations and carcinogenesis. This paper reports the effects of the radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells using the neutral elution method performed at pH 7.2 or pH 9.6. WR-1065 (4 mM) was added to the culture medium either 30 minutes prior to and during irradiation with Cobalt-60 gamma rays (for dose response experiments) or during the repair times tested (for DNA rejoining experiments). The results indicate that WR-1065 is an effective protector against the formation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in DNA as measured using a neutral elution technique at either pH. The protector reduced the strand scission factors by 1.44 and 1.77 in experiments run at pH 9.6 and pH 7.2, respectively. The kinetics of DNA double-strand rejoining were dependent upon the pH at which the neutral elution procedure was performed. Unlike the results obtained with alkaline elution, rejoining of DNA breaks was unaffected by the presence of WR-1065 at either pH. PMID:3606941

  11. Protection of cellular DNA from gamma-radiation-induced damages and enhancement in DNA repair by troxerutin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Balakrishnan, Sreedevi; Salvi, Veena Prakash; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2005-12-01

    The effect of troxerutin on gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in different tissues of mice in vivo and formations of the micronuclei were studied in human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo and mice blood reticulocytes in vivo. Treatments with 1 mM troxerutin significantly inhibited the micronuclei induction in the human lymphocytes. Troxerutin protected the human peripheral blood leucocytes from radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in a concentration dependent manner under ex vivo condition of irradiation (2 Gy). Intraperitoneal administration of troxerutin (175 mg/kg body weight) to mice before and after whole body radiation exposure inhibited micronuclei formation in blood reticulocytes significantly. The administration of different doses (75, 125 and 175 mg/kg body weight) of troxerutin 1 h prior to 4 Gy gamma-radiation exposure showed dose-dependent decrease in the yield of DNA strand breaks in murine blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells. The dose-dependent protection was more pronounced in bone marrow cells than in blood leucocytes. Administration of 175 mg/kg body weight of the drug (i.p.) 1 h prior or immediately after whole body irradiation of mice showed that the decrease in strand breaks depended on the post-irradiation interval at which the analysis was done. The observed time-dependent decrease in the DNA strand breaks could be attributed to enhanced DNA repair in troxerutin administered animals. Thus in addition to anti-erythrocytic, anti-thrombic, fibrinolytic and oedema-protective rheological activity, troxerutin offers protection against gamma-radiation-induced micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks and enhances repair of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks.

  12. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  13. Effects of Xylopia aethiopica (Annonaceae) fruit methanol extract on gamma-radiation-induced oxidative stress in brain of adult male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, O A; Popoola, Bosede O; Farombi, E O

    2010-09-01

    Xylopia aethiopica (XA) (Annonaceae) possesses great nutritional and medicinal values. This study was designed to investigate the effects of XA fruit methanol extract on oxidative stress in brain of rats exposed to whole body gamma-radiation (5 Gy). Vitamin C (VC) served as standard antioxidant. Forty-four rats were divided into 4 groups of 11 rats each. One group served as control, two different groups were treated with XA and VC (250 mg/kg), 6 weeks before and 8 weeks after irradiation, and fourth group was only irradiated. Rats were sacrificed 1 and 8 weeks after irradiation. The antioxidant status, viz. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were estimated. Results indicate a significant increase (p < 0.05) in levels of brain LPO after irradiation. LPO increased by 90% and 151%, after 1 and 8 weeks of irradiation, respectively. Irradiation caused significant (p < 0.05) decreases in levels of GSH and GST by 61% and 43% after 1 week and, 75% and 73%, respectively, after 8 weeks of exposure. CAT and SOD levels were decreased by 62% and 68%, respectively, after 8 weeks of irradiation. Treatment with XA and VC ameliorated the radiation-induced decreases in antioxidant status of the animals. These suggest that XA could have beneficial effect by inhibiting oxidative damage in brain of exposed rats.

  14. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  15. Ionizing radiation induces structural and functional damage on the molecules of rat brain homogenate membranes: a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Demir, Pinar; Akkas, Sara B; Severcan, Mete; Zorlu, Faruk; Severcan, Feride

    2015-01-01

    Humans can be exposed to ionizing radiation, due to various reasons, whose structural effects on biological membranes are not well defined. The current study aims to understand the ionizing radiation-induced structural and functional alterations in biomolecules of brain membranes using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using rat animal models. For this purpose, 1000 cGy of ionizing radiation was specifically directed to the head of Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were decapitated after 24 h. The results revealed that the lipid-to-protein ratio decreased and that irradiation caused lipid peroxidation and increases in the amounts of olefinic =CH, carbonyl, and methylene groups of lipids. In addition, ionizing radiation induced a decrease in membrane fluidity, disordering of membrane lipids, strengthening of the hydrogen bonding of the phosphate groups of lipid head-groups, and weakening in the hydrogen bonding of the interfacial carbonyl groups of lipids. Radiation further caused significant decrements in the α-helix and turns, and significant increments in the β-sheet and random coil contents in the protein structure. Hierarchical cluster analyses, performed in the whole region (3030-1000 cm(-1)), lipid (3030-2800 cm(-1)), and protein (1700-1600 cm(-1)) regions separately, successfully differentiated the control and irradiated groups of rat brain membranes and showed that proteins in the membranes are affected more than lipids from the damages induced with ionizing radiation. As a result, the current study showed that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used successfully as a novel method to monitor radiation-induced alterations on biological membranes.

  16. Ionizing radiation induced catalysis on metal oxide particles. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, T.; Chambers, S.A.; Daschbach, J.L.; Henderson, M.A.; Peden, C.H.F.; Su, Y.; Wang, Y.

    1998-06-01

    'High-level radioactive waste storage tanks within DOE sites contain significant amounts of organic components (solid and liquid phases) in the form of solvents, extractants, complexing agents, process chemicals, cleaning agents and a variety of miscellaneous compounds. These organics pose several safety and pretreatment concerns, particularly for the Hanford tank waste. Remediation technologies are needed that significantly reduce the amounts of problem organics without resulting in toxic or flammable gas emissions, and without requiring thermal treatments. These restrictions pose serious technological barriers for current organic destruction methods which utilize oxidation achieved by thermal or chemical activation. This project focuses on using ionizing radiation (a,b,g) to catalytically destroy organics over oxide materials through reduction/oxidation (redox) chemistry resulting from electron-hole (e{sup -}/h{sup +}) pair generation. Conceptually this process is an extension of visible and near-UV photocatalytic processes known to occur at the interfaces of narrow bandgap semiconductors in both solution and gas phases. In these processes, an electron is excited across the energy gap between the filled and empty states in the semiconductor. The excited electron does reductive chemistry and the hole (where the electron was excited from) does oxidative chemistry. The energy separation between the hole and the excited electron reflects the redox capability of the e{sup -}/h{sup +} pair, and is dictated by the energy of the absorbed photon and the bandgap of the material. The use of ionizing radiation overcomes optical transparency limitations associated with visible and near-UV illumination (g-rays penetrate much farther into a solution than UV/Vis light), and permits the use of wider bandgap materials (such as ZrO{sub 2}) which possess potentially greater redox capabilities than those with narrow bandgap materials. Experiments have been aimed at understanding the

  17. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-09-02

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system.

  18. Radiation induced oxidation of sulphydryl molecules in aqueous solutions. A comprehensive review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Manohar

    1994-06-01

    Radiation degradation studies of thiols in aqueous solutions under variety of conditions during the past more than three decades are reviewed. Radiolytic mechanism of γ-irradiated air free, air and N 2O-saturated solutions of cysteine, cysteamine, dithiothreitol, mercaptoethanol, glutathione and papain are high lighted. A large variety of thiols repair organic radicals by H atom transfer from SH group. The repair rate constants are found to be between 5 × 10 6M -1s -1 to 4.0 × 10 8M -1s -1. The data are tabulated. The rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with variety of thiols evaluated by pulse radioanalysis and flash photolysis are found to be very high and are computed. Sulphur centered radicals e.g. RṠ;, RSSR ⨪ generated in the pulse radioanalysis of thiols are very important species. Their reactions with oxygen and other compounds are of relevance to radiation biology. The results, reaction mechanism, the repair rate constant, the rate constants of e -aq and ȮH radicals with thiols and the rate constants of sulphur centered radicals with oxygen and other compounds of biological interest can be of great use in the interpretation of the mechanism of the protection of cells, animals, DNA and other biological molecules and may well provide basic essential information for the understanding of radiation biology. The protection of biological target at chemical level is generally understood in terms of protecting compounds participating directly in the radiochemical event and reducing the damage to biological target. The damage to the biological target is repaired by the hydrogen transfer from the thiol. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms are quite complex. There is no single mechanism which explains all the experimental observations on the metabolism of thiols. More work needs to be done in order to understand the metabolic aspect of the protection mechanism.

  19. Effects of dietary supplements on space radiation-induced oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jun; Wan, X Steven; Zhou, Zhaozong; Ware, Jeffrey; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Kennedy, Ann R

    2004-11-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high-mass, high-atomic-number (Z), and high-energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by gamma rays, protons and HZE-particle radiation. The results demonstrate that the plasma level of total antioxidants in Sprague-Dawley rats was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner within 4 h after exposure to gamma rays. Exposure to protons and HZE-particle radiation also significantly decreased the serum or plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated animals. Diet supplementation with L-selenomethionine alone or a combination of selected antioxidant agents was shown to partially or completely prevent the decrease in the serum or plasma levels of total antioxidants in animals exposed to gamma rays, protons or HZE particles. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense and that this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with L-selenomethionine and antioxidants.

  20. Effects of dietary supplements on space radiation-induced oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jun; Wan, X Steven; Zhou, Zhaozong; Ware, Jeffrey; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Kennedy, Ann R

    2004-11-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high-mass, high-atomic-number (Z), and high-energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by gamma rays, protons and HZE-particle radiation. The results demonstrate that the plasma level of total antioxidants in Sprague-Dawley rats was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner within 4 h after exposure to gamma rays. Exposure to protons and HZE-particle radiation also significantly decreased the serum or plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated animals. Diet supplementation with L-selenomethionine alone or a combination of selected antioxidant agents was shown to partially or completely prevent the decrease in the serum or plasma levels of total antioxidants in animals exposed to gamma rays, protons or HZE particles. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense and that this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with L-selenomethionine and antioxidants. PMID:15624312

  1. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  2. Preventive efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract of Cymbopogon citratus against radiation-induced DNA damage on V79 cells and free radical scavenging ability against radicals generated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rao, B S S; Shanbhoge, R; Rao, B N; Adiga, S K; Upadhya, D; Aithal, B K; Kumar, M R S

    2009-04-01

    This study presents the findings of free radical scavenging and antigenotoxic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Cymbopogon citratus (CCE). The CCE at a concentration of 60 microg/mL resulted in a significant scavenging ability of 2,2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH; (85%), 2,2-azinobis (3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS; 77%), hydroxyl (70%), superoxide (76%), nitric oxide (78%) free radicals generated using in vitro and also a moderate anti-lipid peroxidative effect (57%). Further, the radiation-induced antigenotoxic potential of CCE was assessed in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (V79) using micronucleus assay. The CCE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the yield of radiation-induced micronuclei, with a maximum effect at 125 microg/mL CCE for 1 h before 2 Gy of radiation. Similarly, there was a significant (P < 0.05-0.0001) decrease in percentage of micronuclei when V79 cells were treated with optimal dose of CCE (125 microg/mL) before exposure to different doses of gamma radiation, that is, 0.5-4 Gy, compared with radiation alone groups. The results of the micronucleus study indicated antigenotoxic effect demonstrating the radioprotective potential of CCE and, which may partly due to its and antioxidant capacity as it presented its ability to scavenge various free radicals in vitro and anti-lipid peroxidative potential. PMID:19734270

  3. Radiation-induced graft copolymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate onto graphene oxide for Cr(VI) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Youwei; Zhang, Long; Wang, Liancai; Sun, Chao; Liu, Pinggui; He, Lihua; Zeng, Xinmiao; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-07-01

    Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA)-grafted graphene oxide hybrid materials (GO-g-P) were fabricated using γ-ray irradiation at ambient temperature. The morphology and structure of GO-g-P were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was confirmed that DMAEMA was grafted successfully on the surface of graphene sheet. The grafting yield of GO-g-P increased with monomer concentration (0-2.5 mol L-1) and dose (0-40 kGy). The resulting adsorbent (GO-g-P) with amine groups was highly efficient for removing Cr(VI) from its acidic aqueous solution and could be easily separated by filtration. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) removal was observed at pH 1.1 and the Cr(VI) uptake of GO-g-P at this pH was 82.4 mg g-1.

  4. Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), a potent mitigator of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Morita, Akinori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Fujita, Kazuko; Hosoi, Yoshio; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), an inorganic vanadium compound, could effectively suppress radiation-induced p53-mediated apoptosis via both transcription-dependent and transcription-independent pathways. As a potent radiation protector administered at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight (20 mg/kg) prior to total body irradiation (TBI) by intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, it completely protected mice from hematopoietic syndrome and partially from gastrointestinal syndrome. In the present study, radiation mitigation effects from vanadate were investigated by ip injection of vanadate after TBI in mice. Results showed that a single administration of vanadate at a dose of 20 mg/kg markedly improved the 30-day survival rate and the peripheral blood hemogram, relieved bone marrow aplasia and decreased occurrence of the bone marrow micronucleated erythrocytes in the surviving animals. The dose reduction factor was 1.2 when a single dose of 20 mg/kg was administered 15 min after TBI in mice using the 30-day survival test as the endpoint. Results also showed that either doubling the vanadate dose (40 mg/kg) in a single administration or continuing the vanadate treatment (after a single administration at 20 mg/kg) from the following day at a dose of 5 mg/kg per day for 4 consecutive days further significantly improved the efficacy for rescuing bone marrow failure in the 30-day survival test. Taken together, these findings indicate that vanadate would be a potent mitigator suppressing the acute lethality (hematopoietic syndrome) and minimizing the detrimental effects (anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) induced by TBI in mice. PMID:23349341

  5. Heterogeneity in radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in tumor and normal cells measured using the comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, P.L.; Banath, J.P.; Durand, R.E. )

    1990-04-01

    A method for measuring DNA damage to individual cells, based on the technique of microelectrophoresis, was described by Ostling and Johanson in 1984. Cells embedded in agarose are lysed, subjected briefly to an electric field, stained with a fluorescent DNA-binding stain, and viewed using a fluorescence microscope. Broken DNA migrates farther in the electric field, and the cell then resembles a comet with a brightly fluorescent head and a tail region which increases as damage increases. We have used video image analysis to define appropriate features of the comet as a measure of DNA damage, and have quantified damage and repair by ionizing radiation. The assay was optimized for lysing solution, lysing time, electrophoresis time, and propidium iodide concentration using Chinese hamster V79 cells. To assess heterogeneity of response of normal versus malignant cells, damage to both tumor cells and normal cells within mouse SCC-VII tumors was assessed. Tumor cells were separated from macrophages using a cell-sorting method based on differential binding of FITC-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. The tail moment, the product of the amount of DNA in the tail and the mean distance of migration in the tail, was the most informative feature of the comet image. Tumor and normal cells showed significant heterogeneity in damage produced by ionizing radiation, although the average amount of damage increased linearly with dose (0-15 Gy) and suggested similar net radiosensitivities for the two cell types. Similarly, DNA repair rate was not significantly different for tumor and normal cells, and most of the cells had repaired the damage by 30 min following exposure to 15 Gy. The heterogeneity in response did not appear to be a result of differences in response through the cell cycle.

  6. Interaction of thiols and non-thiol {center_dot}OH scavengers in the modification of radiation-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, R.E.; Ayene, I.S.; Koch, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Oxygen has long been known to sensitize cells to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and is widely believed to do so by the fixation of potentially reversible radical damage to cellular DNA. A number of studies have suggested that this widely observed oxygen enhancement of cell killing requires the presence of reduced thiols. Published in vitro studies of the modification of DNA damage by glutathione or other thiols have generally shown peak oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) much higher than those observed for cell killing. However, these studies measured loss of DNA transforming activity or induction of single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs), related endpoints which are not thought to represent lethal lesions, rather than double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are generally believed to be the dominant lethal lesions from ionizing radiation. In addition, non-thiol scavengers of OH radicals were not generally present. There is also evidence that, in addition to their protective effects, some non-thiol {center_dot}OH scavengers can produce radicals which are damaging to DNA under anoxic conditions. In the present investigation, the authors have adapted a previously used in vitro model system to simultaneously investigate the effects on radiation-induced single- and double-strand DNA breaks of various combinations of glutathione and glycerol, a widely used non-thiol scavenger, in the presence and absence of oxygen.

  7. Persistence of Space Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts and the Effects of Repeat Long Duration Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    The yield of chromosome damage in astronauts blood lymphocytes has been shown to increase after long duration space missions of a few months or more. This provides a useful in vivo measurement of space radiation induced damage that takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. We present our latest follow-up analyses of chromosome damage in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting and collected at various times, from directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Dose was derived from frequencies of chromosome exchanges using preflight calibration curves, and estimates derived from samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. Limited data on three individuals who have participated in repeat long duration space flights indicates a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields, and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  8. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage in White, Hispanic and Black Skin Melanocytes: A Risk for Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Amrita; Katdare, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous Melanoma (CM) is a leading cause of cancer deaths, with reports indicating a rising trend in the incidence rate of melanoma among Hispanics in certain U.S. states. The level of melanin pigmentation in the skin is suggested to render photoprotection from the DNA-damaging effects of Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR). UVR-induced DNA damage leads to cytogenetic defects visualized as the formation of micronuclei, multinuclei and polymorphic nuclei in cells, and a hallmark of cancer risk. The causative relationship between Sun exposure and CM is controversial, especially in Hispanics and needs further evaluation. This study was initiated with melanocytes from White, Hispanic and Black neonatal foreskins which were exposed to UVR to assess their susceptibility to UVR-induced modulation of cellular growth, cytogenetic damage, intracellular and released melanin. Our results show that White and Hispanic skin melanocytes with similar levels of constitutive melanin are susceptible to UVR-induced cytogenetic damage, whereas Black skin melanocytes are not. Our data suggest that the risk of developing UVR-induced CM in a skin type is correlated with the level of cutaneous pigmentation and its ethnic background. This study provides a benchmark for further investigation on the damaging effects of UVR as risk for CM in Hispanics. PMID:26287245

  9. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work.

  10. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage in White, Hispanic and Black Skin Melanocytes: A Risk for Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Amrita; Katdare, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous Melanoma (CM) is a leading cause of cancer deaths, with reports indicating a rising trend in the incidence rate of melanoma among Hispanics in certain U.S. states. The level of melanin pigmentation in the skin is suggested to render photoprotection from the DNA-damaging effects of Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR). UVR-induced DNA damage leads to cytogenetic defects visualized as the formation of micronuclei, multinuclei and polymorphic nuclei in cells, and a hallmark of cancer risk. The causative relationship between Sun exposure and CM is controversial, especially in Hispanics and needs further evaluation. This study was initiated with melanocytes from White, Hispanic and Black neonatal foreskins which were exposed to UVR to assess their susceptibility to UVR-induced modulation of cellular growth, cytogenetic damage, intracellular and released melanin. Our results show that White and Hispanic skin melanocytes with similar levels of constitutive melanin are susceptible to UVR-induced cytogenetic damage, whereas Black skin melanocytes are not. Our data suggest that the risk of developing UVR-induced CM in a skin type is correlated with the level of cutaneous pigmentation and its ethnic background. This study provides a benchmark for further investigation on the damaging effects of UVR as risk for CM in Hispanics. PMID:26287245

  11. Alleviation of radiation-induced genomic damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by active principles of Podophyllum hexandrum: an in vitro study using chromosomal and CBMN assay.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sangeeta; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2014-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the protection against radiation of human peripheral blood lymphocytic DNA by a formulation of three isolated active principles of Podophyllum hexandrum (G-002M). G-002M in various concentrations was administered 1h prior to irradiation in culture media containing blood. Radioprotective efficacy of G-002M to lymphocytic DNA was estimated using various parameters such as dicentrics, micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NuB) in binucleated cells. Certain experiments to ascertain the G2/M arrest potential of G-002M were also conducted. It was effective in arresting the cells even at half of the concentration of colchicine used. Observations demonstrated a radiation-dose-dependent increase in dicentric chromosomes (DC), acentric fragments, MN, NPB and NuB upto 5Gy. These changes were found significantly decreased by pre-administration of G-002M. A highly significant dose modifying factor (DMF) 1.43 and 1.39 based on dicentric assay and cytokinesis block micronuclei assay, respectively, was observed against 5Gy exposure in the current experiments. G-002M alone in its effective dose did not induct any change in any of the parameters mentioned above. Observations on cell cycle arrest by G-002M showed that the formulation has potential in arresting cells at G2/M, compared with colchicine. Based on significant DMF at highest radiation dose (5Gy) studied currently and meaningful reduction in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations, we express that G-002M has a potential of minimising radiation-induced DNA (cytogenetic) damage.

  12. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a rangemore » of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation, below spontaneous levels observed in control mice. Lastly, the 18F-FDG RBE was <1.0, indicating that the mixed radiation quality

  13. Telomerase activation as a repair response to radiation-induced DNA damage in Y79 retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masaharu; Ozaki, Kohji; Kawano, Takeshi; Yamada, Osamu; Kawauchi, Kiyotaka; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Hisashi

    2013-10-28

    The molecular mechanism of telomerase activation induced by ionizing radiation (IR) remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that DNA damage induced by IR at doses of 2-5 Gy triggers activation of Akt, predominant to that of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), resulting in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) phosphorylation and increased telomerase activity in Y79 cells. DNA damage induced by IR at doses greater than 10 Gy might trigger PP2A activation, predominant to that of Akt, resulting in hTERT dephosphorylation and decreased telomerase activity. Our results suggest that differential activation of Akt and PP2A may be responsible for telomerase regulation. PMID:23850566

  14. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  15. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  16. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  17. Radiation-induced DNA damage in canine hemopoietic cells and stromal cells as measured by the comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, L.; Selig, C.; Plappert, U.; Nothdurft, W.

    1996-12-31

    Stromal cell progenitors (fibroblastoid colony-forming unit; CFU-Fs) are representative of the progenitor cell population of the hemopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). Previous studies of the radiation dose-effect relationships for colony formation have shown that canine CFU-Fs are relatively radioresistant as characterized by a D{sub 0} value of about 2.4 Gy. In contrast, hemopoietic progenitors are particularly radiosensitive (D{sub 0} values = 0.12-0.60 Gy). In the present study, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique for the in situ quantitation of DNA strand breaks and alkalilabile site was employed. Canine buffy coat cells from BM aspirates and cells harvested from CFU-F colonies or from mixed populations of adherent BM stromal cell (SC) layers were exposed to increasing doses of X-rays, embedded in agarose gel on slides, lysed with detergents, and placed in an electric field. DNA migrating from single cells in the gel was made visible as {open_quotes}comets{close_quotes} by ethidium bromide staining. Immediate DNA damage was much less in cultured stromal cells than in hemopoietic cells in BM aspirates. These results suggest that the observed differences in clonogenic survival could be partly due to differences in the type of the initial DNA damage between stromal cells and hemopoietic cells. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress at Out-of-Field Lung Tissues after Pelvis Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Masoud; Fardid, Reza; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Rezaeyan, Abol-Hassan; Salajegheh, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The out-of-field/non-target effect is one of the most important phenomena of ionizing radiation that leads to molecular and cellular damage to distant non-irradiated tissues. The most important concern about this phenomenon is carcinogenesis many years after radiation treatment. In vivo mechanisms and consequences of this phenomenon are not known completely. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the oxidative damages to out-of-field lung tissues 24 and 72 hours after pelvic irradiation in rats. Materials and Methods In this experimentalinterventional study, Sprague-Dawleymale rats (n=49) were divided into seven groups (n=7/each group), including two groups of pelvis- exposed rats (out-of-field groups), two groups of whole bodyexposed rats (scatter groups), two groups of lung-exposed rats (direct irradiation groups), and one control sham group. Out- of-field groups were irradiated at a 2×2 cm area in the pelvis region with 3 Gy using 1.25 MeV cobalt-60 gamma-ray source, and subsequently, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in out-of-field lung tissues were measured. Results were compared to direct irradiation, control and scatter groups at 24 and 72 hours after exposure. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results SOD activity decreased in out-of-field lung tissue 24 and 72 hours after irradiation as compared with the controls and scatter groups. GSH level decreased 24 hours after exposure and increased 72 hours after exposure in the out-of-field groups as compared with the scatter groups. MDA level in out-of-field groups only increased 24 hours after irradiation. Conclusion Pelvis irradiation induced oxidative damage in distant lung tissue that led to a dramatic decrease in SOD activity. This oxidative stress was remarkable, but it was less durable as compared to direct irradiation. PMID:27602315

  19. Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress at Out-of-Field Lung Tissues after Pelvis Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Masoud; Fardid, Reza; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Rezaeyan, Abol-Hassan; Salajegheh, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The out-of-field/non-target effect is one of the most important phenomena of ionizing radiation that leads to molecular and cellular damage to distant non-irradiated tissues. The most important concern about this phenomenon is carcinogenesis many years after radiation treatment. In vivo mechanisms and consequences of this phenomenon are not known completely. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the oxidative damages to out-of-field lung tissues 24 and 72 hours after pelvic irradiation in rats. Materials and Methods In this experimentalinterventional study, Sprague-Dawleymale rats (n=49) were divided into seven groups (n=7/each group), including two groups of pelvis- exposed rats (out-of-field groups), two groups of whole bodyexposed rats (scatter groups), two groups of lung-exposed rats (direct irradiation groups), and one control sham group. Out- of-field groups were irradiated at a 2×2 cm area in the pelvis region with 3 Gy using 1.25 MeV cobalt-60 gamma-ray source, and subsequently, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in out-of-field lung tissues were measured. Results were compared to direct irradiation, control and scatter groups at 24 and 72 hours after exposure. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results SOD activity decreased in out-of-field lung tissue 24 and 72 hours after irradiation as compared with the controls and scatter groups. GSH level decreased 24 hours after exposure and increased 72 hours after exposure in the out-of-field groups as compared with the scatter groups. MDA level in out-of-field groups only increased 24 hours after irradiation. Conclusion Pelvis irradiation induced oxidative damage in distant lung tissue that led to a dramatic decrease in SOD activity. This oxidative stress was remarkable, but it was less durable as compared to direct irradiation.

  20. Differential Processing of Low and High LET Radiation Induced DNA Damage: Investigation of Switch from ATM to ATR Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The members of the phosphatidylinositol kinase-like kinase family of proteins namely ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) are directly responsible for the maintenance of genomic integrity by mounting DDR through signaling and facilitating the recruitment of repair factors at the sites of DNA damage along with coordinating the deployment of cell cycle checkpoints to permit repair by phosphorylating Checkpoint kinase Chk1, Chk2 and p53. High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of protons and high energy and charged (HZE) particles from SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk for astronauts on their space flight missions. The determination of these risks and the design of potential safeguards require sound knowledge of the biological consequences of lesion induction and the capability of the cells to counter them. We here strive to determine the coordination of ATM and ATR kinases at the break sites directly affecting checkpoint signaling and DNA repair and whether differential processing of breaks induced by low and high LET radiation leads to possible augmentation of swap of these damage sensors at the sites of DNA damage. Exposure of cells to IR triggers rapid autophosphorylation of serine-1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates monomer formation of ATM. ATM kinase activity depends on the disruption of the dimer, which allows access and phosphorylation of downstream ATM substrates like Chk2. Evidence suggests that ATM is activated by the alterations in higher-order chromatin structure although direct binding of ATM to DSB ends may be a crucial step in its activation. On the other hand, in case of ATR, RPA (replication protein A)-coated ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) generated as a result of stalled DNA replication or during processing of chromosomal lesions is crucial for the localization of ATR to sites of DNA damage in association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP). Although the

  1. Radiation-Induced Astrogliosis and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage Can Be Abrogated Using Anti-TNF Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christy M.; Gaber, M. Waleed Sabek, Omaima M.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: In this article, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in the initiation of acute damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain tissue following radiotherapy (RT) for CNS tumors. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a closed cranial window technique were used to measure quantitatively BBB permeability to FITC-dextran 4.4-kDa molecules, leukocyte adhesion (Rhodamine-6G) and vessel diameters before and after 20-Gy cranial radiation with and without treatment with anti-TNF. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify astrogliosis post-RT and immunofluorescence was used to visualize protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 post-RT. Recombinant TNF (rTNF) was used to elucidate the role of TNF in leukocyte adhesion and vessel diameter. Results: Mice treated with anti-TNF showed significantly lower permeability and leukocyte adhesion at 24 and 48 h post-RT vs. RT-only animals. We observed a significant decrease in arteriole diameters at 48 h post-RT that was inhibited in TNF-treated animals. We also saw a significant increase in activated astrocytes following RT that was significantly lower in the anti-TNF-treated group. In addition, immunofluorescence showed protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 in the cerebral cortex that was inhibited with anti-TNF treatment. Finally, administration of rTNF induced a decrease in arteriole diameter and a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion in venules and arterioles. Conclusions: TNF plays a significant role in acute changes in BBB permeability, leukocyte adhesion, arteriole diameter, and astrocyte activation following cranial radiation. Treatment with anti-TNF protects the brain's microvascular network from the acute damage following RT.

  2. Relieved residual damage in the hematopoietic system of mice rescued by radiation-induced adaptive response (Yonezawa Effect).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Varès, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Existence of adaptive response (AR) was previously demonstrated in C57BL/6J mice. Irradiations were performed by delivering a priming low dose of X-rays (0.50 Gy) in combination with a challenge high dose of accelerated carbon or neon ion particles. AR was characterized by significantly decreased mortality in the 30-day survival test. This mouse AR model ('Yonezawa Effect') was originally established by using X-rays as both the priming and challenge irradiations. The underlying mechanism was due to radio-resistance occurring in blood-forming tissues. In this study, we verified the existence of AR and further investigated residual damage in the hematopoietic system in surviving animals. Results showed that the priming low dose of X-rays could relieve the detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system. We observed both an improvement in the blood platelet count and the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) to the sum of PCEs and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) and a marked reduction of the incidences of micronucleated PCEs and micronucleated NCEs. These findings suggest that the priming low dose of low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays induced a protective effect on the hematopoietic system, which may play an important role in both rescue from acute lethal damage (mouse killing) and prevention of late detrimental consequences (residual anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) caused by exposure to a high challenge dose from low-LET (X-ray) or high-LET (carbon and neon ion) irradiations. These findings provide new knowledge of the characterization of the Yonezawa Effect by providing new insight into the mechanistic study of AR in vivo. PMID:22923746

  3. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Increases Radiosensitivity of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Prolonging Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Khoram, Nastaran Masoudi; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Nikoofar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is an important cause of death among women. The development of radioresistance in breast cancer leads to recurrence after radiotherapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a polyphenolic compound of honeybee propolis, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether CAPE enhanced the radiation sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and T47D (estrogen receptor-positive) cell lines. Methods The cytotoxic effect of CAPE on MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells was evaluated by performing an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess clonogenic ability, MDA-MB-231 and T47D cells were treated with CAPE (1 µM) for 72 hours before irradiation, and then, a colony assay was performed. A comet assay was used to determine the number of DNA strand breaks at four different times. Results CAPE decreased the viability of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the clonogenic assay, pretreatment of cells with CAPE before irradiation significantly reduced the surviving fraction of MDA-MB-231 cells at doses of 6 and 8 Gy. A reduction in the surviving fraction of T47D cells was observed relative to MDA-MB-231 at lower doses of radiation. Additionally, CAPE maintained radiation-induced DNA damage in T47D cells for a longer period than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that CAPE impairs DNA damage repair immediately after irradiation. The induction of radiosensitivity by CAPE in radioresistant breast cancer cells may be caused by prolonged DNA damage. PMID:27066092

  4. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes abrogate radiation-induced DNA damage responses in vivo through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Gulliver, G A; Lambert, P F

    1998-03-01

    E6 and E7 oncoproteins from high risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) transform cells in tissue culture and induce tumors in vivo. Both E6, which inhibits p53 functions, and E7, which inhibits pRb, can also abrogate growth arrest induced by DNA-damaging agents in cultured cells. In this study, we have used transgenic mice that express HPV-16 E6 or E7 in the epidermis to determine how these two proteins modulate DNA damage responses in vivo. Our results demonstrate that both E6 and E7 abrogate the inhibition of DNA synthesis in the epidermis after treatment with ionizing radiation. Increases in the levels of p53 and p21 proteins after irradiation were suppressed by E6 but not by E7. Through the study of p53-null mice, we found that radiation-induced growth arrest in the epidermis is mediated through both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways. The abrogation of radiation responses in both E6 and E7 transgenic mice was more complete than was seen in the p53-null epidermis. We conclude that E6 and E7 each have the capacity to modulate p53-dependent as well as p53-independent cellular responses to radiation. Additionally, we found that the conserved region (CR) 1 and CR2 domains in E7 protein, which are involved in the inactivation of pRb function and required for E7's transforming function, were also required for E7 to modulate DNA damage responses in vivo. Thus pRb and/or pRb-like proteins likely mediate both p53-dependent and p53-independent responses to radiation.

  5. Preventive or Potential Therapeutic Value of Nutraceuticals against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Exposed Subjects and Frequent Fliers

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure. PMID:23965979

  6. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  7. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  8. Lung oxidative damage by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Tuesta, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  9. Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva extract attenuates ultraviolet B radiation-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, M J; Kim, K C; Zheng, J; Yao, C W; Cha, J W; Kang, H K; Yoo, E S; Koh, Y S; Ko, M H; Lee, N H; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the protective effects of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva (GBE) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human HaCaT keratinocytes. GBE exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. In addition, both the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical were scavenged by GBE in cell-free systems. GBE absorbed light in the UVB range (280-320 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum and lessened the extent of UVB-induced oxidative damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and DNA. Finally, GBE-treated keratinocytes showed a reduction in UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that GBE exerts cytoprotective actions against UVB-stimulated oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby attenuating injury to cellular constituents and preventing cell death.

  10. Amelioration of both early and late radiation-induced damage to pig skin by essential fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Van den Aardweg, G.J.M.J.; Morris, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    To evaluate the possible role of essential fatty acids, specifically gamma-linolenic and eicosapentaenoic acid, in the amelioration of early and late radiation damage to the skin. Skin sites on the flank of 22-25 kg female large white pigs were irradiated with either single or fractionated doses (20 F/28 days) of {beta}-rays from 22.5 mm diameter {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y plaques at a dose rate of {approximately}3 Gy/min. Essential fatty acids were administered orally in the form of two {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} oils, So-1100 and So-5407, which contained gamma-linolenic acid and a mixture of that oil with eicosapentaenoic acid, respectively. Oils (1.5-6.0 ml) were given daily for 4 weeks prior, both 4 weeks prior and 10-16 weeks after, or in the case of one single dose study, just for 10 weeks after irradiation. Control animals received a {open_quotes}placebo{close_quotes} oil, So-1129, containing no gamma linolenic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid over similar time scales before and after irradiation. Acute and late skin reactions were assessed visually and the dose-related incidence of a specific reaction used to compare the effects of different treatment schedules. A reduction in the severity of both the early and late radiation reactions in the skin was only observed when {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} oils were given over the time course of the expression of radiation damage. Prior treatment with oils did not modify the radiation reaction. A 3.0 ml daily dose of either So-1100 or So-5407 given prior to, but also after irradiation with single and fractionated doses of {beta}-rays produced the most significant modification to the radiation reactions, effects consistent with dose modification factors between 1.06-1.24 for the acute reactions of bright red erythema and/or moist desquamation, and of 1.14-1.35 for the late reactions of dusky/mauve erythema and dermal necrosis. 38 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Protective effect of topically applied polypeptide from Chlamys farreri against ultraviolet radiation-induced chronic skin damage in guinea pig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Mingliang; Cao, Pengli; Yu, Guoying; Zhu, Li; Wang, Yuejun; Wang, Chunbo

    2003-12-01

    Polypeptide from Chlamys farreri (PCF), a topical polypeptide isolated from Chlamys farreri, was used in this experiment aimed to investigate the photoprotective effect of PCF against chronic skin damage induced by ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. The chronic ultraviolet-irradiated guinea pig model was established, and visible changes in the skin including wrinkling, sagging and erythema were observed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) in the dorsal skin were determined using biochemical methods. The results showed: (1) PCF (5 % and 20%) could greatly protect the dorsal skin of guinea pig against wrinkling, sagging and erythema induced by UV radiation in a concentration-dependent manner. (2) PCF could reduce MDA formation in the dorsal skin caused by UV irradiation, while increasing the activities of SOD and GSH-px. (3) The differences among the PCF groups and UV model group were significant ( P<0.05, P<0.01). These results indicated that topical application, of PCF provided broad solar UV spectrum photoprotection; and that the antioxidant property of PCF might play a role in photoprotection.

  12. Vacuum Ultraviolet and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Effect of Hydrogenated Silicon Nitride Etching: Surface Reaction Enhancement and Damage Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Masanaga; Miyawaki, Yudai; Kondo, Yusuke; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Matsugai, Hiroyasu; Honda, Takayoshi; Minami, Masaki; Uesawa, Fumikatsu; Hori, Masaru; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2012-02-01

    Photon-enhanced etching of SiNx:H films caused by the interaction between vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/ultraviolet (UV) radiation and radicals in the fluorocarbon plasma was investigated by a technique with a novel sample setup of the pallet for plasma evaluation. The simultaneous injection of UV radiation and radicals causes a dramatic etch rate enhancement of SiNx:H films. Only UV radiation causes the film shrinkage of SiNx:H films owing to hydrogen desorption from the film. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of SiNx:H/Si substrates were studied before and after UV radiation. The interface trap density increased monotonically upon irradiating the UV photons with a wavelength of 248 nm. The estimated effective interface trap generation probability is 4.74 ×10-7 eV-1·photon-1. Therefore, the monitoring of the VUV/UV spectra during plasma processing and the understanding of its impact on the surface reaction, film damage and electrical performance of underlying devices are indispensable to fabricate advanced devices.

  13. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC.

  14. Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Modulated in Hypoxia for Remodeling of Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    PubMed Central

    An, Hye-Young; Shin, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Hun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether a secretome from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) modulated by hypoxic conditions to contain therapeutic factors contributes to salivary gland (SG) tissue remodeling and has the potential to improve irradiation (IR)-induced salivary hypofunction in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSC) were isolated, expanded, and exposed to hypoxic conditions (O2 < 5%). The hypoxia-conditioned medium was then filtered to a high molecular weight fraction and prepared as a hAdMSC secretome. The hAdMSC secretome was subsequently infused into the tail vein of C3H mice immediately after local IR once a day for seven consecutive days. The control group received equal volume (500 μL) of vehicle (PBS) only. SG function and structural tissue remodeling by the hAdMSC secretome were investigated. Human parotid epithelial cells (HPEC) were obtained, expanded in vitro, and then irradiated and treated with either the hypoxia-conditioned medium or a normoxic control medium. Cell proliferation and IR-induced cell death were examined to determine the mechanism by which the hAdMSC secretome exerted its effects. Results The conditioned hAdMSC secretome contained high levels of GM-CSF, VEGF, IL-6, and IGF-1. Repeated systemic infusion with the hAdMSC secretome resulted in improved salivation capacity and increased levels of salivary proteins, including amylase and EGF, relative to the PBS group. The microscopic structural integrity of SG was maintained and salivary epithelial (AQP-5), endothelial (CD31), myoepithelial (α-SMA) and SG progenitor cells (c-Kit) were successfully protected from radiation damage and remodeled. The hAdMSC secretome strongly induced proliferation of HPEC and led to a significant decrease in cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic effects of the hAdMSC secretome were found to be promoted after hypoxia-preconditioning relative to normoxia

  15. Protective effect of maize silks (Maydis stigma) ethanol extract on radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hua; Hai, Chunxu; Xi, Miaomiao; Liang, Xin; Liu, Rui

    2010-09-01

    Maize silks, dried cut stigmata of maize female flowers, are a traditional medicinal plant. This study was conducted to investigate the antioxidant effect of maize silks ethanol extract (MSE) against oxidative damage in vivo. γ-radiation was employed to induce oxidative stress in mice and the variation of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio (GSH/GSSG), blood cells, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and related antioxidant enzymes were examined. The results showed that radiation elevate levels of MDA, induce hematological abnormalities and decrease levels of GSH/GSSG and Nrf2 expression in liver and kidney. MSE administration significantly abolished elevation of MDA levels in liver, maintained hepatic GSH/GSSG ratio and ameliorated hematological abnormalities dose dependently. Moreover, MSE up-regulated the hepatic protein expression of Nrf2 dose dependently and the activities as well as protein expression of Nrf2-related antioxidant enzymes were also increased. However, the antioxidant ability of MSE seemed not to be as effective in kidney as in liver. These findings firstly proved the protective role of MSE against oxidative stress, which was in part via up-regulation of Nrf2 and seemed to be tissue specific.

  16. As(III) inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers repair via generation of nitric oxide in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Hudson, Laurie G.; Sun, Xi; Feng, Changjian; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The inhibition of DNA damage repair by arsenic has been hypothesized to contribute to the co-carcinogenic activities of arsenic observed in vivo. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are an important mutagenic UVR photoproduct and implicated in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. The current study demonstrates that low concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) inhibit UVR-induced CPDs repair in a human keratinocyte cell line via nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following As(III) treatment, NO production and iNOS expression are elevated. Little is known about regulation of iNOS by As(III) and further investigations indicated that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and NF-κB are required for As(III) induction of iNOS expression. This As(III)-stimulated signaling cascade was involved in inhibition of UVR-induced CPDs repair as disruption of p38 MAPK activity and NF-κB nuclear translocation counteracted the effects of As(III) on CPD repair. Selective inhibition of iNOS ameliorated As(III) inhibition of CPDs repair thereby suggesting that iNOS is a downstream mediator of As(III) activity. These findings provide evidence that an As(III) stimulated signal transduction cascade culminating in elevated iNOS expression and NO generation is an underlying mechanism for inhibition of UVR-induced DNA damage repair by arsenic. PMID:18621123

  17. Tissue Damage and Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance

    PubMed Central

    Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Borekci, Bunyamin; Yapca, O. Erkan; Bilen, Habib; Suleyman, Halis

    2013-01-01

    The oxidant/antioxidant balance in healthy tissues is maintained with a predominance of antioxidants. Various factors that can lead to tissue damage disrupt the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants. In this study, disruptions of the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants were found to be a consequence of the over-consumption of antioxidants. For this reason, antioxidants are considered to be of importance in the prevention and treatment of various types of tissue damage that are aggravated by stress. PMID:25610248

  18. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  19. Functional Consequences of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Neural Stem Cells and the Brain Exposed to Charged Particle Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Bertrand P.; Giedzinski, Erich; Izadi, Atefeh; Suarez, Tatiana; Lan, Mary L.; Tran, Katherine K.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Raber, Jacob; Parihar, Vipan K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Redox homeostasis is critical in regulating the fate and function of multipotent cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated whether low dose charged particle irradiation could elicit oxidative stress in neural stem and precursor cells and whether radiation-induced changes in redox metabolism would coincide with cognitive impairment. Results: Low doses (<1 Gy) of charged particles caused an acute and persistent oxidative stress. Early after (<1 week) irradiation, increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were generally dose responsive, but were less dependent on dose weeks to months thereafter. Exposure to ion fluences resulting in less than one ion traversal per cell was sufficient to elicit radiation-induced oxidative stress. Whole body irradiation triggered a compensatory response in the rodent brain that led to a significant increase in antioxidant capacity 2 weeks following exposure, before returning to background levels at week 4. Low dose irradiation was also found to significantly impair novel object recognition in mice 2 and 12 weeks following irradiation. Innovation: Data provide evidence that acute exposure of neural stem cells and the CNS to very low doses and fluences of charged particles can elicit a persisting oxidative stress lasting weeks to months that is associated with impaired cognition. Conclusions: Exposure to low doses of charged particles causes a persistent oxidative stress and cognitive impairment over protracted times. Data suggest that astronauts subjected to space radiation may develop a heightened risk for mission critical performance decrements in space, along with a risk of developing long-term neurocognitive sequelae. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1410–1422. PMID:23802883

  20. Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts: Persistence of Damage After Flight and the Effects of Repeat Long Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Chappell, L. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage was assessed in blood lymphocytes from astronauts before and after they participated in long-duration space missions of three months or more. The frequency of chromosome damage was measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting before flight and at various intervals from a few days to many months after return from the mission. For all individuals, the frequency of chromosome exchanges measured within a month of return from space was higher than their prefight yield. However, some individuals showed a temporal decline in chromosome damage with time after flight. Statistical analysis using combined data for all astronauts indicated a significant overall decreasing trend in total chromosome exchanges with time after flight, although this trend was not seen for all astronauts and the yield of chromosome damage in some individuals actually increased with time after flight. The decreasing trend in total exchanges was slightly more significant when statistical analysis was restricted to data collected more than 220 days after return from flight. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from three crewmembers who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions provide limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  1. The empirical dependence of radiation-induced charge neutralization on negative bias in dosimeters based on the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Chris; Albadri, Abdulrahman; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Price, Robert A.

    2006-08-15

    The dependence of radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) has been studied in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. These devices were first exposed to x rays under positive bias and then to further dose increments at a selection of reverse bias levels. A nonlinear empirical trend has been established that is consistent with that identified in the data obtained in this work. Estimates for the reverse bias level corresponding to the maximum rate of RICN have been extracted from the data. These optimum bias levels appear to be independent of the level of initial absorbed dose under positive bias. The established models for threshold voltage change have been considered and indicate a related nonlinear trend for neutralization cross section {sigma}{sub N} as a function of oxide field. These data are discussed in the context of dose measurement with MOSFETs and within the framework of statistical mechanics associated with neutral traps and their field dependence.

  2. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate treatment of human skin inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Afaq, F; Perez, A; Mukhtar, H

    2001-02-01

    The use of naturally occurring botanicals with substantial antioxidant activity to afford protection to human skin against UV damage is receiving increasing attention. The green tea constituent (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a potent antioxidant and has shown remarkable preventive effects against photocarcinogenesis and phototoxicity in mouse models. In this study we have investigated the effects of topical application of EGCG, the major polyphenol present in green tea, to human skin before UV irradiation on UV-induced markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes. Using immunohistochemistry and analytical enzyme assays, we found that application of EGCG (mg/cm(2) skin) before a single UV exposure of 4x minimal erythema dose (MED) markedly decreases UV-induced production of hydrogen peroxide (68-90%, P < 0.025-0.005) and nitric oxide (30-100%, P < 0.025-0.005) in both epidermis and dermis in a time-dependent manner. EGCG pretreatment also inhibits UV-induced infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes, particularly CD11b(+) cells (a surface marker of monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils), into the skin, which are considered to be the major producers of reactive oxygen species. EGCG treatment was also found to inhibit UV-induced epidermal lipid peroxidation at each time point studied (41-84%, P < 0.05). A single UV exposure of 4x MED to human skin was found to increase catalase activity (109-145%) and decrease glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity (36-54%) and total glutathione (GSH) level (13-36%) at different time points studied. Pretreatment with EGCG was found to restore the UV-induced decrease in GSH level and afforded protection to the antioxidant enzyme GPx. Further studies are warranted to study the preventive effects of EGCG against multiple exposures to UV light of human skin.

  3. TH-E-BRF-04: Characterizing the Response of Texture-Based CT Image Features for Quantification of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, S; Court, L; Briere, T; Martel, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung damage (RILD) is an important dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with radiation therapy. Scoring systems for RILD are subjective and limit our ability to find robust predictors of toxicity. We investigate the dose and time-related response for texture-based lung CT image features that serve as potential quantitative measures of RILD. Methods: Pre- and post-RT diagnostic imaging studies were collected for retrospective analysis of 21 patients treated with photon or proton radiotherapy for NSCLC. Total lung and selected isodose contours (0–5, 5–15, 15–25Gy, etc.) were deformably registered from the treatment planning scan to the pre-RT and available follow-up CT studies for each patient. A CT image analysis framework was utilized to extract 3698 unique texture-based features (including co-occurrence and run length matrices) for each region of interest defined by the isodose contours and the total lung volume. Linear mixed models were fit to determine the relationship between feature change (relative to pre-RT), planned dose and time post-RT. Results: Seventy-three follow-up CT scans from 21 patients (median: 3 scans/patient) were analyzed to describe CT image feature change. At the p=0.05 level, dose affected feature change in 2706 (73.1%) of the available features. Similarly, time affected feature change in 408 (11.0%) of the available features. Both dose and time were significant predictors of feature change in a total of 231 (6.2%) of the extracted image features. Conclusion: Characterizing the dose and time-related response of a large number of texture-based CT image features is the first step toward identifying objective measures of lung toxicity necessary for assessment and prediction of RILD. There is evidence that numerous features are sensitive to both the radiation dose and time after RT. Beyond characterizing feature response, further investigation is warranted to determine the utility of these features as

  4. Age associated oxidative damage in lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Nandeslu; Das, Subhasis; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Kundu, Pratip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytes are an important immunological cell and have been played a significant role in acquired immune system; hence, may play in pivotal role in immunosenescence. Oxidative stress has been reported to increase in elderly subjects, possibly arising from an uncontrolled production of free radicals with aging and decreased antioxidant defenses. This study was aimed to evaluate the level of lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in lymphocytes of healthy individuals to correlate between oxidative damage with the aging process. Twenty healthy individuals of each age group (11–20; 21–30; 31–40; 41–50; and 51–60 years) were selected randomly. Blood samples were drawn by medical practitioner and lymphocytes were isolated from blood samples. Malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC) level were evaluated to determine the lipid and protein damage in lymphocytes. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione and glutathione dependent enzymes were estimated to evaluate the antioxidant status in the lymphocytes. Increased MDA and PC levels strongly support the increased oxidative damage in elderly subject than young subjects. The results indicated that, balance of oxidant and antioxidant systems in lymphocytes shifts in favor of accelerated oxidative damage during aging. Thus oxidative stress in lymphocytes may particular interest in aging and may play important role in immunosenescence. PMID:20972374

  5. An ethanol extract derived from Bonnemaisonia hamifera scavenges ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced reactive oxygen species and attenuates UVB-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Hyun, Yu Jae; Cho, Suk Ju; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Lee, Nam Ho; Ko, Mi Hee; Hyun, Jin Won

    2012-12-14

    The present study investigated the photoprotective properties of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced cell damage in human HaCaT keratinocytes. The Bonnemaisonia hamifera ethanol extract (BHE) scavenged the superoxide anion generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO₄ + H₂O₂), both of which were detected by using electron spin resonance spectrometry. In addition, BHE exhibited scavenging activity against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. BHE reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, as shown by decreased apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. BHE also attenuated DNA damage and the elevated levels of 8-isoprostane and protein carbonyls resulting from UVB-mediated oxidative stress. Furthermore, BHE absorbed electromagnetic radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm). These results suggest that BHE protects human HaCaT keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative damage by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB photons, thereby reducing injury to cellular components.

  6. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  7. Oxidative damage and mitochondrial decay in aging.

    PubMed Central

    Shigenaga, M K; Hagen, T M; Ames, B N

    1994-01-01

    We argue for the critical role of oxidative damage in causing the mitochondrial dysfunction of aging. Oxidants generated by mitochondria appear to be the major source of the oxidative lesions that accumulate with age. Several mitochondrial functions decline with age. The contributing factors include the intrinsic rate of proton leakage across the inner mitochondrial membrane (a correlate of oxidant formation), decreased membrane fluidity, and decreased levels and function of cardiolipin, which supports the function of many of the proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Acetyl-L-carnitine, a high-energy mitochondrial substrate, appears to reverse many age-associated deficits in cellular function, in part by increasing cellular ATP production. Such evidence supports the suggestion that age-associated accumulation of mitochondrial deficits due to oxidative damage is likely to be a major contributor to cellular, tissue, and organismal aging. PMID:7971961

  8. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation.

  9. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation. PMID:22236285

  10. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage. PMID:27656146

  11. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage.

  12. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage. PMID:27656146

  13. Protective Effect of Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Cell Damage in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Ma, Yuetang; Wu, Shi; Chen, Tianfeng; He, Yong; Sun, Jianxia; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Xinwei; Huang, Yadong; Deng, Liehua; Bai, Weibin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the major environmental harmful factor that has emotional impact on human skin. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of protection of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage to human HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results show that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by UVB treatment. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside also decreased the UVB-augmented levels of the DNA damage indicators phospho-p53 and phospho-ATM/ATR. In addition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protected keratinocytes from UVB-induced injury by overturning the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and reversing apoptosis. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) was attenuated in UVB-exposed cells but restored in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. Furthermore, expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and the key apoptosis executer cleaved caspase-3 were increased in UVB-irradiated cells and decreased in UVB/cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-treated cells. For these reasons, the results demonstrate that cyanidin-3-O-glucoside protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for the use of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside in the fight against light damage.

  14. Electron beam damage in oxides: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes a variety of beam damage phenomena relating to oxides in (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, and underlines the shortcomings of currently popular mechanisms. These phenomena include mass loss, valence state reduction, phase decomposition, precipitation, gas bubble formation, phase transformation, amorphization and crystallization. Moreover, beam damage is also dependent on specimen thickness, specimen orientation, beam voltage, beam current density and beam size. This article incorporates all of these damage phenomena and experimental dependences into a general description, interpreted by a unified mechanism of damage by induced electric field. The induced electric field is produced by positive charges, which are generated from excitation and ionization. The distribution of the induced electric fields inside a specimen is beam-illumination- and specimen-shape- dependent, and associated with the experimental dependence of beam damage. Broadly speaking, the mechanism operates differently in two types of material. In type I, damage increases the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus divergent, resulting in phase separation. In type II, damage reduces the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus convergent, resulting in phase transformation. Damage by this mechanism is dependent on electron-beam current density. The two experimental thresholds are current density and irradiation time. The mechanism comes into effect when these thresholds are exceeded, below which the conventional mechanisms of knock-on and radiolysis still dominate.

  15. Electron beam damage in oxides: a review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes a variety of beam damage phenomena relating to oxides in (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, and underlines the shortcomings of currently popular mechanisms. These phenomena include mass loss, valence state reduction, phase decomposition, precipitation, gas bubble formation, phase transformation, amorphization and crystallization. Moreover, beam damage is also dependent on specimen thickness, specimen orientation, beam voltage, beam current density and beam size. This article incorporates all of these damage phenomena and experimental dependences into a general description, interpreted by a unified mechanism of damage by induced electric field. The induced electric field is produced by positive charges, which are generated from excitation and ionization. The distribution of the induced electric fields inside a specimen is beam-illumination- and specimen-shape- dependent, and associated with the experimental dependence of beam damage. Broadly speaking, the mechanism operates differently in two types of material. In type I, damage increases the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus divergent, resulting in phase separation. In type II, damage reduces the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus convergent, resulting in phase transformation. Damage by this mechanism is dependent on electron-beam current density. The two experimental thresholds are current density and irradiation time. The mechanism comes into effect when these thresholds are exceeded, below which the conventional mechanisms of knock-on and radiolysis still dominate.

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester attenuates ionize radiation-induced intestinal injury through modulation of oxidative stress, apoptosis and p38MAPK in rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liu-Gen; Chu, Jian-Jun; Pang, Qing-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Zheng; Wu, Gang; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Xing, Chun-Gen

    2015-07-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and it can eliminate the free radicals. This study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of CAPE on X-ray irradiation induced intestinal injury in rats. Rats were intragastrically administered with 10 μmol/kg/d CAPE for 7 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of X-ray irradiation (9Gy) to abdomen. Rats were sacrificed 72 h after exposure to radiation. We found that pretreatment with CAPE effectively attenuated intestinal pathology changes, apoptosis, oxidative stress, bacterial translocation, the content of nitric oxide and myeloperoxidase as well as the concentration of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α. Pretreatment with CAPE also reversed the activation of p38MAPK and the increased expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced by radiation in intestinal mucosa. Taken together, these results suggest that pretreatment with CAPE could be a promising candidate for treating radiation-induced intestinal injury. PMID:26122083

  17. Impact of α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol on the radiation induced oxidation of rapeseed oil triacylglycerols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunrath, Robert; Isnardy, Bettina; Solar, Sonja; Elmadfa, Ibrahim

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-irradiation (doses: 2, 4, 7, and 10 kGy) was used as oxidation tool to study the antioxidant effects of α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol (enrichments 500-5000 ppm) in purified rapeseed oil triacylglycerols (RSOTG). Fatty acid composition, tocopherol degradation, primary (conjugated dienes (CD) and peroxide value (POV)) and secondary (p-anisidine value) oxidation products were chosen as test parameters. Fatty acid composition did not change. While secondary oxidation products could not be found in the irradiated samples, the POVs and CDs showed a significant, dose-dependent increase. α-Tocopherol did not inhibit the formation of peroxides, whereas γ- and δ-tocopherol reduced the POVs by more than 30%. No uniform effect of the different tocopherol concentrations at the particular doses could be established. The influence of the individual tocopherols on the CD formation was not pronounced. The degradation of the tocopherols decreased with increasing concentration. None of the tocopherols showed a prooxidant effect.

  18. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction.

  19. The oxidative damage initiation hypothesis for meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hörandl, Elvira; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    The maintenance of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes is still a major enigma in evolutionary biology. Meiosis represents the only common feature of sex in all eukaryotic kingdoms, and thus, we regard it a key issue for discussing its function. Almost all asexuality modes maintain meiosis either in a modified form or as an alternative pathway, and facultatively apomictic plants increase frequencies of sexuality relative to apomixis after abiotic stress. On the physiological level, abiotic stress causes oxidative stress. We hypothesize that repair of oxidative damage on nuclear DNA could be a major driving force in the evolution of meiosis. We present a hypothetical model for the possible redox chemistry that underlies the binding of the meiosis-specific protein Spo11 to DNA. During prophase of meiosis I, oxidized sites at the DNA molecule are being targeted by the catalytic tyrosine moieties of Spo11 protein, which acts like an antioxidant reducing the oxidized target. The oxidized tyrosine residues, tyrosyl radicals, attack the phosphodiester bonds of the DNA backbone causing DNA double strand breaks that can be repaired by various mechanisms. Polyploidy in apomictic plants could mitigate oxidative DNA damage and decrease Spo11 activation. Our hypothesis may contribute to explaining various enigmatic phenomena: first, DSB formation outnumbers crossovers and, thus, effective recombination events by far because the target of meiosis may be the removal of oxidative lesions; second, it offers an argument for why expression of sexuality is responsive to stress in many eukaryotes; and third, repair of oxidative DNA damage turns meiosis into an essential characteristic of eukaryotic reproduction. PMID:23995700

  20. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  2. Oxidative DNA damage in relation to nutrition.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Dusinská, M

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage in humans could arise also from incorrect nutritional habit and life style. DNA strand breaks with apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, oxidized purines and oxidized pyrimidines were assessed in 24 subjectively healthy vegetarians (plant food, dairy products, eggs) and compared with 24 non-vegetarians (traditional diet, general population). DNA strand breaks + oxidized purines are significantly reduced in vegetarians (p<0.05), DNA strand breaks are nonsignificantly decreased. The sufficient antioxidative status (overthreshold values of natural essential antioxidants, which mean a reduced risk of free radical disease) is crucial in free radical defense. Intake of protective food commodities (fruit, vegetables, dark grain products, grain sprouts, oil seeds) is significantly higher in vegetarians. Alternative nutrition subjects have a significantly increased plasma levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene with high incidence of overthreshold values (92% vs. 42% - vitamin C, 67% vs. 33% - vitamin E, 67% vs. 17% - beta-carotene). There is recorded a significant inverse linear correlation between values of DNA strand breaks + oxidized purines and vitamin C or beta-carotene levels (p<0.01, p<0.05). Vegetarian diet is significantly more rich source of antioxidants. The results of reduced endogenous DNA damage and higher antioxidative status in vegetarians document that a correct vegetarian nutrition might represent an effective cancer prevention.

  3. Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    David, Sheila S.; O’Shea, Valerie L.; Kundu, Sucharita

    2010-01-01

    Base excision repair plays an important role in preventing mutations associated with the common product of oxidative damage, 8-oxoguanine. Recent structural studies have shown that 8-oxoguanine glycosylases use an intricate series of steps to efficiently search and locate 8-oxoguanine lesions within the multitude of undamaged bases. The importance of prevention of mutations associated with 8-oxoguanine has also been illustrated by direct connections between defects in the BER glycosylase MUTYH and colorectal cancer. In addition, the properties of other guanine oxidation products and the BER glycosylases that remove them are being uncovered. This work is providing surprising and intriguing new insights into the process of base excision repair. PMID:17581577

  4. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  5. Oxidant damage during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Leskiw, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess oxidant damage during and after spaceflight and to compare the results against bed rest with 6 degrees head-down tilt. We measured the urinary excretion of the F(2) isoprostane, 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG) F(2alpha), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine (8-OH DG) before, during, and after long-duration spaceflight (4-9 mo) on the Russian space station MIR, short-duration spaceflight on the shuttle, and 17 days of bed rest. Sample collections on MIR were obtained between 88 and 186 days in orbit. 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) and 8-OH DG are markers for oxidative damage to membrane lipids and DNA, respectively. Data are mean +/- SE. On MIR, isoprostane levels were decreased inflight (96. 9 +/- 11.6 vs. 76.7 +/- 14.9 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05, n = 6) due to decreased dietary intake secondary to impaired thermoregulation. Isoprostane excretion was increased postflight (245.7 +/- 55.8 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.01). 8-OH DG excretion was unchanged with spaceflight and increased postflight (269 +/- 84 vs 442 +/- 180 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). On the shuttle, 8-OH DG excretion was unchanged in- and postflight, but 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) excretion was decreased inflight (15.6 +/- 4.3 vs 8.0 +/- 2.7 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). No changes were found with bed rest, but 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) was increased during the recovery phase (48.9 +/- 23.0 vs 65.4 +/- 28.3 ng. kg(-1). day(-1), P < 0.05). The changes in isoprostane production were attributed to decreased production of oxygen radicals from the electron transport chain due to the reduced energy intake inflight. The postflight increases in the excretion of the products of oxidative damage were attributed to a combination of an increase in metabolic activity and the loss of some host antioxidant defenses inflight. We conclude that 1) oxidative damage was decreased inflight, and 2) oxidative damage was increased postflight.

  6. The Analysis of the Patterns of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Foci by a Stochastic Monte Carlo Model of DNA Double Strand Breaks Induction by Heavy Ions and Image Segmentation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    To create a generalized mechanistic model of DNA damage in human cells that will generate analytical and image data corresponding to experimentally observed DNA damage foci and will help to improve the experimental foci yields by simulating spatial foci patterns and resolving problems with quantitative image analysis. Material and Methods: The analysis of patterns of RIFs (radiation-induced foci) produced by low- and high-LET (linear energy transfer) radiation was conducted by using a Monte Carlo model that combines the heavy ion track structure with characteristics of the human genome on the level of chromosomes. The foci patterns were also simulated in the maximum projection plane for flat nuclei. Some data analysis was done with the help of image segmentation software that identifies individual classes of RIFs and colocolized RIFs, which is of importance to some experimental assays that assign DNA damage a dual phosphorescent signal. Results: The model predicts the spatial and genomic distributions of DNA DSBs (double strand breaks) and associated RIFs in a human cell nucleus for a particular dose of either low- or high-LET radiation. We used the model to do analyses for different irradiation scenarios. In the beam-parallel-to-the-disk-of-a-flattened-nucleus scenario we found that the foci appeared to be merged due to their high density, while, in the perpendicular-beam scenario, the foci appeared as one bright spot per hit. The statistics and spatial distribution of regions of densely arranged foci, termed DNA foci chains, were predicted numerically using this model. Another analysis was done to evaluate the number of ion hits per nucleus, which were visible from streaks of closely located foci. In another analysis, our image segmentaiton software determined foci yields directly from images with single-class or colocolized foci. Conclusions: We showed that DSB clustering needs to be taken into account to determine the true DNA damage foci yield, which helps to

  7. Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko; Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru; Akashi, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

  8. Comparative study of radiation-induced damage in magnesium aluminate spinel by means of IL, CL and RBS/C techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwik, Iwona; Jagielski, Jacek; Gawlik, Grzegorz; Jozwik, Przemyslaw; Ratajczak, Renata; Panczer, Gerard; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Wajler, Anna; Sidorowicz, Agata; Thomé, Lionel

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study of damage accumulation in magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) has been conducted using ionoluminescence (IL), cathodoluminescence (CL) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry/channeling (RBS/C) techniques. MgAl2O4 single crystal and polycrystalline samples were irradiated with 320 keV Ar+ ions at fluencies ranging from 1 × 1012 to 2 × 1016 cm-2 in order to create various levels of radiation damage. RBS/C measurements provided quantitative data about damage concentration in the samples. These values were then compared to the luminescence measurements. The results obtained by IL and RBS/C methods demonstrate a two-step character of damage buildup process. The CL data analysis points to the three-step damage accumulation mechanism involving the first defect transformation at fluencies of about 1013 cm-2 and second at about 1015 cm-2. The rate of changes resulting from the formation of nonluminescent recombination centers is clearly nonlinear and cannot be described in terms of continuous accumulation of point defects. Both, IL and CL techniques, appear as new, complementary tools bringing new possibilities in the damage accumulation studies in single- and polycrystalline materials.

  9. Oxidation of DNA: damage to nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Kanvah, Sriram; Joseph, Joshy; Schuster, Gary B; Barnett, Robert N; Cleveland, Charles L; Landman, Uzi

    2010-02-16

    All organisms store the information necessary to maintain life in their DNA. Any process that damages DNA, causing a loss or corruption of that information, jeopardizes the viability of the organism. One-electron oxidation is such a process. In this Account, we address three of the central features of one-electron oxidation of DNA: (i) the migration of the radical cation away from the site of its formation; (ii) the electronic and structural factors that determine the nucleobases at which irreversible reactions most readily occur; (iii) the mechanism of reaction for nucleobase radical cations. The loss of an electron (ionization) from DNA generates an electron "hole" (a radical cation), located most often on its nucleobases, that migrates reversibly through duplex DNA by hopping until it is trapped in an irreversible chemical reaction. The particular sequence of nucleobases in a DNA oligomer determines both the efficiency of hopping and the specific location and nature of the damaging chemical reaction. In aqueous solution, DNA is a polyanion because of the negative charge carried by its phosphate groups. Counterions to the phosphate groups (typically Na(+)) play an important role in facilitating both hopping and the eventual reaction of the radical cation with H(2)O. Irreversible reaction of a radical cation with H(2)O in duplex DNA occurs preferentially at the most reactive site. In normal DNA, comprising the four common DNA nucleobases G, C, A, and T, reaction occurs most commonly at a guanine, resulting in its conversion primarily to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-OxoG). Both electronic and steric effects control the outcome of this process. If the DNA oligomer does not contain a suitable guanine, then reaction of the radical cation occurs at the thymine of a TT step, primarily by a tandem process. The oxidative damage of DNA is a complex process, influenced by charge transport and reactions that are controlled by a combination of enthalpic, entropic, steric, and

  10. Therapeutic approaches of melatonin in microwave radiations-induced oxidative stress-mediated toxicity on male fertility pattern of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ramovatar; Kumari, Kajal; Kumar, Jitendra; Rajamani, Paulraj; Verma, H N; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Microwave (MW) radiation produced by wireless telecommunications and a number of electrical devices used in household or in healthcare institutions may adversely affects the reproductive pattern. Present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin (is well known antioxidant that protects DNA, lipids and proteins from free radical damage) against oxidative stress-mediated testicular impairment due to long-term exposure of MWs. For this, 70-day-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 6/group): Sham exposed, Melatonin (Mel) treated (2 mg/kg), 2.45 GHz MWs exposed and MWs + Mel treated. Exposure took place in Plexiglas cages for 2 h a day for 45 days where, power density (0.21 mW/cm(2)) and specific absorption rate (SAR 0.14 W/Kg) were estimated. After the completion of exposure period, rats were sacrificed and various stress related parameters, that is LDH-X (lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme) activity, xanthine oxidase (XO), ROS (reactive oxygen species), protein carbonyl content, DNA damage and MDA (malondialdehyde) were performed. Result shows that melatonin prevent oxidative damage biochemically by significant increase (p < 0.001) in the levels of testicular LDH-X, decreased (p < 0.001) levels of MDA and ROS in testis (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, it reversed the effects of MWs on XO, protein carbonyl content, sperm count, testosterone level and DNA fragmentation in testicular cells. These results concluded that the melatonin has strong antioxidative potential against MW induced oxidative stress mediated DNA damage in testicular cells.

  11. Therapeutic approaches of melatonin in microwave radiations-induced oxidative stress-mediated toxicity on male fertility pattern of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ramovatar; Kumari, Kajal; Kumar, Jitendra; Rajamani, Paulraj; Verma, H N; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Microwave (MW) radiation produced by wireless telecommunications and a number of electrical devices used in household or in healthcare institutions may adversely affects the reproductive pattern. Present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin (is well known antioxidant that protects DNA, lipids and proteins from free radical damage) against oxidative stress-mediated testicular impairment due to long-term exposure of MWs. For this, 70-day-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 6/group): Sham exposed, Melatonin (Mel) treated (2 mg/kg), 2.45 GHz MWs exposed and MWs + Mel treated. Exposure took place in Plexiglas cages for 2 h a day for 45 days where, power density (0.21 mW/cm(2)) and specific absorption rate (SAR 0.14 W/Kg) were estimated. After the completion of exposure period, rats were sacrificed and various stress related parameters, that is LDH-X (lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme) activity, xanthine oxidase (XO), ROS (reactive oxygen species), protein carbonyl content, DNA damage and MDA (malondialdehyde) were performed. Result shows that melatonin prevent oxidative damage biochemically by significant increase (p < 0.001) in the levels of testicular LDH-X, decreased (p < 0.001) levels of MDA and ROS in testis (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, it reversed the effects of MWs on XO, protein carbonyl content, sperm count, testosterone level and DNA fragmentation in testicular cells. These results concluded that the melatonin has strong antioxidative potential against MW induced oxidative stress mediated DNA damage in testicular cells. PMID:23676079

  12. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Pi, Jingbo; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The role of metallothionein (MT) in mitigation of oxidative DNA damage (ODD) induced either by cadmium (Cd) or the direct oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was systematically examined by using MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or MT-competent wild-type (WT) cells. Both toxicants were much more lethal to MT-null cells (Cd LC50 = 6.6 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 550 μM) than WT cells (Cd LC50 = 16.5 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 930 μM). Cd induced concentration-related MT increases in WT cells, while the basal levels were undetectable and not increased by Cd in MT-null cells. ODD, measured by the immuno-spin trapping method, was minimally induced by sub-toxic Cd levels (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) in WT cells, but markedly increased in MT-null cells (> 430%). Similarly, ODD was induced to higher levels by lower concentrations of H2O2 in MT-null cells than WT cells. Transfection of MT-I into MT-null cells reduced both Cd- and H2O2-induced cytolethality and ODD. Cd increased expression of the oxidant defense genes, HO-1 and GSTa2 to a much greater extent in MT-null cells than WT. Cd or H2O2 exposure increased expression of key transport genes, Mrp1 and Mrp2, in WT cells but not in MT-null cells. MT protects against Cd- and H2O2-induced ODD in MT competent cells possibly by multiple mechanisms, potentially including direct metal ion sequestration and sequestration of oxidant radicals by MT. MT-deficient cells appear to adapt to Cd primarily by turning on oxidant response systems, while MT-competent cells activate MT and transport systems. PMID:22914987

  13. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  14. Eating increases oxidative damage in a reptile.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; Lutz, Thomas J; Fokidis, H Bobby; Stahlschmidt, Zachary R

    2016-07-01

    While eating has substantial benefits in terms of both nutrient and energy acquisition, there are physiological costs associated with digesting and metabolizing a meal. Frequently, these costs have been documented in the context of energy expenditure while other physiological costs have been relatively unexplored. Here, we tested whether the seemingly innocuous act of eating affects either systemic pro-oxidant (reactive oxygen metabolite, ROM) levels or antioxidant capacity of corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) by collecting plasma during absorptive (peak increase in metabolic rate due to digestion of a meal) and non-absorptive (baseline) states. When individuals were digesting a meal, there was a minimal increase in antioxidant capacity relative to baseline (4%), but a substantial increase in ROMs (nearly 155%), even when controlling for circulating nutrient levels. We report an oxidative cost of eating that is much greater than that due to long distance flight or mounting an immune response in other taxa. This result demonstrates the importance of investigating non-energetic costs associated with meal processing, and it begs future work to identify the mechanism(s) driving this increase in ROM levels. Because energetic costs associated with eating are taxonomically widespread, identifying the taxonomic breadth of eating-induced ROM increases may provide insights into the interplay between oxidative damage and life history theory. PMID:27099366

  15. Dynamic alteration in H3 serine 10 phosphorylation is G1-phase specific during ionization radiation induced DNA damage response in human cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajit K; Bhattacharya, Saikat; Khan, Shafqat A; Khade, Bharat; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    Chromatin acts as a natural barrier in DNA-damage recognition and repair. Histones undergo differential post-translational modification(s) to facilitate DNA damage response (DDR). Importance of modifications like phosphorylation of histone variant H2A.X in DNA repair is very well understood, however, ambiguous results exist in literature regarding the levels of certain histone modifications and their possible role in repair. In the present study, we have investigated in depth the alteration in the level of the highly dynamic histone mark H3S10P as it plays a dual role in different phases of the cell cycle. We show here that H3S10P decreases specifically from irradiated G1-enriched cells irrespective of the damaging agent or the cell line used in the study. Interestingly, the loss occurs predominantly from H3.3 variant which is a transcription activation mark like H3S10P itself, suggesting that the alteration might be implicated in transcription repression. The decrease in other transcription marks like H3K9Ac, H3K14Ac, H3K56Ac and H3S28P along with the occurrence of chromatin condensation in response to DNA damage in G1 phase strengthens the hypothesis. In addition, the alteration in the level of H3S10P shows an inverse correlation with that of γH2AX in a dose-dependent manner and probably occurs from the same mononucleosome. We propose that the drop in the levels of histone H3S10 phosphorylation is a universal phenomenon in response to DNA damage and is a trigger to induce transcription repressive state to facilitate repair.

  16. Oxidative damage to RNA: mechanisms, consequences, and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qiongman

    2010-01-01

    Overproduction of free radicals can damage cellular components resulting in progressive physiological dysfunction, which has been implicated in many human diseases. Oxidative damage to RNA received little attention until the past decade. Recent studies indicate that RNA, such as messenger RNA and ribosomal RNA, is very vulnerable to oxidative damage. RNA oxidation is not a consequence of dying cells but an early event involved in pathogenesis. Oxidative modification to RNA results in disturbance of the translational process and impairment of protein synthesis, which can cause cell deterioration or even cell death. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of oxidative damage to RNA and the possible biological consequences of damaged RNA. Furthermore, we review recent evidence suggesting that oxidative damage to RNA may contribute to progression of many human diseases. PMID:20148281

  17. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  18. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels. PMID:26046974

  19. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a range of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation

  20. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  1. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  2. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer. PMID:25658450

  3. Normal repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in familial melanoma without CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Shannon, J A; Matias, C; Luxford, C; Kefford, R F; Mann, G J

    1999-04-01

    Excessive sun exposure and family history are strong risk factors for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Inherited susceptibility to this type of skin cancer could therefore result from constitutively impaired capacity to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. While a proportion of familial melanoma kindreds exhibit germline mutations in the cell cycle regulatory gene CDKN2A (p16INK4a) or its protein target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the biochemical basis of most familial melanoma is unknown. We have examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from melanoma-affected and unaffected individuals from large hereditary melanoma kindreds which are not attributable to CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation. These lines were tested for sensitivity of clonogenic growth to UV radiation and for their ability to repair transfected UV-damaged plasmid templates (host cell reactivation). Two of seven affected-unaffected pairs differed in colony survival after exposure to UVB radiation; however, no significant differences were observed in the host-cell reactivation assays. These results indicate that melanoma susceptibility genes other than CDKN2A and CDK4 do not impair net capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  4. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, July 1, 1991--June 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The primary goal of this program is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to resist DNA damage. Concurrently this effort contributes to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was initially chosen as a model organism for investigating functions that control mutagen resistance because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize mutagen-sensitive mutants in this multicellular organism. This laboratory then went on to investigate the DNA repair defects of such mutants while others performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. Currently, recombinant DNA technology is being employed to investigate the mechanisms of mutagen resistance defined by those mutants. The following two studies experienced the most significant progress during the past year: cloning and genetic characterization of the mus209 gene, and genetic and molecular analysis of the mus308 gene.

  5. Postmenopausal loss of Ra acquired in adolescence or young adulthood: quantitative relationship to radiation-induced skeletal damage and dosimetric implications

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, A.T.; Rundo, J.; Essling, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    From the results of serial measurements of body /sup 226/Ra activity in 13 former luminous dial workers 30-60 y after relatively brief periods of intake of luminous compounds in adolescence or young adulthood, we determined the postmenopausal rate of elimination of Ra in percent of contemporary body Ra content per year. This rate was negatively correlated with the reduced x-ray score, a measure of radiation osteonecrosis observed radiographically in the 13 subjects (r = -0.85, P less than 0.001). The clearance rates of subjects retaining low Ra activity were greater than predicted by retention models. We conclude that for those members of the Ra-exposed population under study for health effects at our institution who sustained the lesser degrees of macroscopic skeletal damage, present estimates of skeletal absorbed dose are systematically low, by at most a factor of 2.

  6. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  7. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  8. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm.

  9. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  10. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  11. Protective Effects of Hydrogen against Low-Dose Long-Term Radiation-Induced Damage to the Behavioral Performances, Hematopoietic System, Genital System, and Splenic Lymphocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiao; Zhao, Hainan; Liu, Pengfei; Xu, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chuai, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been previously reported playing an important role in ameliorating damage caused by acute radiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of H2 on the alterations induced by low-dose long-term radiation (LDLTR). All the mice in hydrogen-treated or radiation-only groups received 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, and 2.0 Gy whole-body gamma radiation, respectively. After the last time of radiation exposure, all the mice were employed for the determination of the body mass (BM) observation, forced swim test (FST), the open field test (OFT), the chromosome aberration (CA), the peripheral blood cells parameters analysis, the sperm abnormality (SA), the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and the histopathological studies. And significant differences between the treatment group and the radiation-only groups were observed, showing that H2 could diminish the detriment induced by LDLTR and suggesting the protective efficacy of H2 in multiple systems in mice against LDLTR. PMID:27774116

  12. Phloroglucinol enhances the repair of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage via promotion of the nucleotide excision repair system in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Ahn, Mee Jung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kim, Ki Cheon; Cha, Ji Won; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-04-01

    Exposure to solar UVB radiation can lead to the formation of DNA lesions such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is critical for the repair of CPDs induced by UV radiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of phloroglucinol to protect against the formation of UVB-induced CPDs in vitro and in vivo. Exposure to UVB radiation increased the number of CPDs in both HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse skin; however, these increases were reduced by treatment with phloroglucinol. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementation 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were reduced following UVB exposure, although phloroglucinol treatment recovered these levels in both HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse skin. Phloroglucinol also inhibited UVB-induced reductions in binding of the transcription factors specificity protein 1 to the XPC promoter. These results demonstrate that phloroglucinol can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing NER. PMID:25766644

  13. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  14. The study of radiation-induced damage and remodeling of extracellular matrix of rectum and bladder by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochueva, Marina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatjeva, Natalya Yu.; Zakharkina, Olga L.; Kuznetzov, Sergej S.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Babak, Ksenia V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Maslennikova, Anna V.

    2014-02-01

    Adverse events in normal tissues after irradiation of malignant tumors are of great importance in modern radiation oncology. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy allows observe the structure of collagen fibers and bundles without additional staining. The study objective was evaluation the dose-time dependences of the structural changes occurring in collagen of rat rectum and bladder after gamma-irradiation. Animals were irradiated by a local field at single doses of 10 Gy and 40 Gy. The study of collagen state was carried out in a week and a month after radiation exposure. Paraffin-embedded material was sectioned on the slices 10 mkm thick and SHG-imaging was performed by LSM 510 Meta (Carl Zeiss, Germany). Excitation was implemented with a pulsed (100-fs) titanium-sapphire laser at a wavelength of 800 nm and a pulse repetition frequency of 80 MHz, registration was performed at two wavelengths: 362-415 nm according to collagen fluorescence and 512-576 nm according to myoglobin fluorescence. In a week after irradiation, sings of epithelial damage and edema of submucosal layer, more significant after the dose of 40 Gy were observed on LSM-images. The SHG signal decreased at this time reflecting the processes of collagen degradation independently either in bladder or in rectum. In a month after radiation the increase of size and number of collagen-bearing structures was observed, more essential after irradiation in a dose of 40 Gy. LSM microscopy with SHG allows evaluate changes of normal tissues after ionizing radiation and get information in addition to standard and special histological staining.

  15. Spatio-temporal changes in glutathione and thioredoxin redox couples during ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress regulate tumor radio-resistance.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, R S; Sharma, D; Checker, R; Thoh, M; Sandur, S K

    2015-10-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced oxidative stress in tumor cells is effectively managed by constitutive and inducible antioxidant defense systems. This study was initiated to understand the relative contribution of different redox regulatory systems in determining the tumor radio-resistance. In this study, human T-cell lymphoma (Jurkat) cells were exposed to IR (4 Gy) and monitored for the spatio-temporal changes in cellular redox regulatory parameters. We monitored the changes in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (total, mitochondrial, primary, and secondary), thiols (total, surface, and intracellular), GSH/GSSG ratio, antioxidant enzyme activity viz. thioredoxin (Trx), Trx reductase (TrxR), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase with respect to time. We have also measured protein glutathionylation. We observed that tumor cells mount a biphasic response after IR exposure which can be divided into early (0-6 h) and late (16-48 h) responses in terms of changes in cellular redox parameters. During early response, constitutively active GSH and Trx systems respond to restore cellular redox balance to pre-exposure levels and help in activation of redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf-2. During late response, increase in the levels of antioxidants GSH and Trx rescue cells against IR-mediated damage. We observed that disruption of either glutathione or thioredoxin metabolism led to partial impairment of ability of cells to survive against IR-induced damage. But simultaneous disruption of both the pathways significantly increased radio sensitivity of Jurkat cells. This highlighted the importance of these two antioxidant pathways in regulating redox homeostasis under conditions of IR-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26021764

  16. Spatio-temporal changes in glutathione and thioredoxin redox couples during ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress regulate tumor radio-resistance.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, R S; Sharma, D; Checker, R; Thoh, M; Sandur, S K

    2015-10-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced oxidative stress in tumor cells is effectively managed by constitutive and inducible antioxidant defense systems. This study was initiated to understand the relative contribution of different redox regulatory systems in determining the tumor radio-resistance. In this study, human T-cell lymphoma (Jurkat) cells were exposed to IR (4 Gy) and monitored for the spatio-temporal changes in cellular redox regulatory parameters. We monitored the changes in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (total, mitochondrial, primary, and secondary), thiols (total, surface, and intracellular), GSH/GSSG ratio, antioxidant enzyme activity viz. thioredoxin (Trx), Trx reductase (TrxR), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase with respect to time. We have also measured protein glutathionylation. We observed that tumor cells mount a biphasic response after IR exposure which can be divided into early (0-6 h) and late (16-48 h) responses in terms of changes in cellular redox parameters. During early response, constitutively active GSH and Trx systems respond to restore cellular redox balance to pre-exposure levels and help in activation of redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf-2. During late response, increase in the levels of antioxidants GSH and Trx rescue cells against IR-mediated damage. We observed that disruption of either glutathione or thioredoxin metabolism led to partial impairment of ability of cells to survive against IR-induced damage. But simultaneous disruption of both the pathways significantly increased radio sensitivity of Jurkat cells. This highlighted the importance of these two antioxidant pathways in regulating redox homeostasis under conditions of IR-induced oxidative stress.

  17. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  18. Long-term consequences of radiation-induced bystander effects depend on radiation quality and dose and correlate with oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Manuela; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pain, Debkumar; Azzam, Edouard I

    2011-04-01

    Widespread evidence indicates that exposure of cell populations to ionizing radiation results in significant biological changes in both the irradiated and nonirradiated bystander cells in the population. We investigated the role of radiation quality, or linear energy transfer (LET), and radiation dose in the propagation of stressful effects in the progeny of bystander cells. Confluent normal human cell cultures were exposed to low or high doses of 1GeV/u iron ions (LET ∼ 151 keV/µm), 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ∼ 51 keV/µm), or 1 GeV protons (LET ∼ 0.2 keV/µm). Within minutes after irradiation, the cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with nonirradiated cells for 5 h. During this time, irradiated and nonirradiated cells were grown on either side of an insert with 3-µm pores. Nonirradiated cells were then harvested and allowed to grow for 20 generations. Relative to controls, the progeny of bystander cells that were co-cultured with cells irradiated with iron or silicon ions, but not protons, exhibited reduced cloning efficiency and harbored higher levels of chromosomal damage, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. This correlated with decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes, inactivation of the redox-sensitive metabolic enzyme aconitase, and altered translation of proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Together, the results demonstrate that the long-term consequences of the induced nontargeted effects greatly depend on the quality and dose of the radiation and involve persistent oxidative stress due to induced perturbations in oxidative metabolism. They are relevant to estimates of health risks from exposures to space radiation and the emergence of second malignancies after radiotherapy. PMID:21319986

  19. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  20. Punica granatum peel extract protects against ionizing radiation-induced enteritis and leukocyte apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Sehirli, Ozer; Ozyurt, Hazan; Mayadağli, A Alpaslan; Ekşioğlu-Demiralp, Emel; Cetinel, Sule; Sahin, Hülya; Yeğen, Berrak C; Ulusoylu Dumlu, Melek; Gökmen, Vural; Sener, Göksel

    2009-07-01

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a well-recognized sequel of therapeutic irradiation. Therefore we examined the radioprotective properties of Punica granatum peel extract (PPE) on the oxidative damage in the ileum. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body X-ray irradiation of 800 cGy. Irradiated rats were pretreated orally with saline or PPE (50 mg/kg/day) for 10 days before irradiation and the following 10 days, while control rats received saline or PPE but no irradiation. Then plasma and ileum samples were obtained. Irradiation caused a decrease in glutathione and total antioxidant capacity, which was accompanied by increases in malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activity, collagen content of the tissue with a concomitant increase 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (an index of oxidative DNA damage). Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6) and lactate dehydrogenase were elevated in irradiated groups as compared to control. PPE treatment reversed all these biochemical indices, as well as histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. Furthermore, flow cytometric measurements revealed that leukocyte apoptosis and cell death were increased in irradiated animals, while PPE reversed these effects. PPE supplementation reduced oxidative damage in the ileal tissues, probably by a mechanism that is associated with the decreased production of reactive oxygen metabolites and enhancement of antioxidant mechanisms. Adjuvant therapy of PPE may have a potential to support a successful radiotherapy by protecting against radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:19478462

  1. Role of oxidative damage in toxicity of particulates.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Folkmann, Janne K; Danielsen, Pernille H; Mikkelsen, Lone; Hemmingsen, Jette G; Vesterdal, Lise K; Forchhammer, Lykke; Wallin, Håkan; Loft, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Particulates are small particles of solid or liquid suspended in liquid or air. In vitro studies show that particles generate reactive oxygen species, deplete endogenous antioxidants, alter mitochondrial function and produce oxidative damage to lipids and DNA. Surface area, reactivity and chemical composition play important roles in the oxidative potential of particulates. Studies in animal models indicate that particles from combustion processes (generated by combustion of wood or diesel oil), silicate, titanium dioxide and nanoparticles (C60 fullerenes and carbon nanotubes) produce elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products and oxidatively damaged DNA. Biomonitoring studies in humans have shown associations between exposure to air pollution and wood smoke particulates and oxidative damage to DNA, deoxynucleotides and lipids measured in leukocytes, plasma, urine and/or exhaled breath. The results indicate that oxidative stress and elevated levels of oxidatively altered biomolecules are important intermediate endpoints that may be useful markers in hazard characterization of particulates.

  2. Gate oxide damage reduction using a protective dielectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Calvin T.; Weling, Milind G.

    1994-08-01

    Gate oxide damage from charge entering through the top surface of the gate electrode during plasma ashing, ion implantation, and LDD spacer oxide etching was measured using antenna structures. Significant charge damage to the 9.0 nm-thick gate oxide was detected for each of these processes. The damage was reduced by using a protective dielectric layer, in this case a thermally deposited TEOS oxide, over the polycide gate electrode before gate definition. The dielectric appears to block charge penetration into the antenna. Damage can be reduced further by increasing the thickness of the dielectric layer; for a sufficiently thick layer (about 150 nm), charge entering through the top surface of the antenna was effectively eliminated.

  3. Radiation-Induced Reduction of Ceria in Single and Polycrystalline Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Shutthanandan, V.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Yang, Yong; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-12

    Ceria (CeO{sub 2}) is a technologically important ceramic material with a wide range of neoteric applications in catalysis, solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen gas sensors, hydrogen production, and ultraviolet shielding. Recent research has revealed promising biomedical applications of ceria. Nanoparticles of ceria have been shown to protect healthy cells from radiation-induced cellular damage. The mechanisms governing the radioprotection characteristics of ceria nanoparticles are not well understood and it has been hypothesized that reversible switching between Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} states may enable ceria nanoparticles to mop up free radicals.

  4. Metabolic activation of carcinogenic ethylbenzene leads to oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Uchida, Takafumi; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Toda, Chitose; Sakai, Yoshie; Ueda, Koji; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Kojima, Nakao

    2004-12-01

    Ethylbenzene is carcinogenic to rats and mice, while it has no mutagenic activity. We have investigated whether ethylbenzene undergoes metabolic activation, leading to DNA damage. Ethylbenzene was metabolized to 1-phenylethanol, acetophenone, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol by rat liver microsomes. Furthermore, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol were metabolically transformed to ring-dihydroxylated metabolites such as ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol, respectively. Experiment with 32P-labeled DNA fragment revealed that both ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II). These dihydroxylated compounds also induced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in calf thymus DNA in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase, methional and Cu(I)-specific chelator, bathocuproine, significantly (P<0.05) inhibited oxidative DNA damage, whereas free hydroxyl radical scavenger and superoxide dismutase did not. These results suggest that Cu(I) and H2O2 produced via oxidation of ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol are involved in oxidative DNA damage. Addition of an endogenous reductant NADH dramatically enhanced 4-ethylcatechol-induced oxidative DNA damage, whereas ethylhydroquinone-induced DNA damage was slightly enhanced. Enhancing effect of NADH on oxidative DNA damage by 4-ethylcatechol may be explained by assuming that reactive species are generated from the redox cycle. In conclusion, these active dihydroxylated metabolites would be involved in the mechanism of carcinogenesis by ethylbenzene. PMID:15560893

  5. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  6. Oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Kisby, Glen E; Muniz, Juan F; Scherer, Jennifer; Lasarev, Michael R; Koshy, Mary; Kow, Yoke W; McCauley, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage have been proposed as mechanisms linking pesticide exposure to health effects such as cancer and neurological diseases. A pilot study of pesticide applicators and farm workers working in the fruit orchards of Oregon (i.e., apples, pears) was conducted to examine the relationship between organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure and oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urine samples were analyzed for OP metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG). Lymphocytes were analyzed for oxidative DNA repair activity and DNA damage (Comet assay) and serum analyzed for lipid peroxides (i.e., malondialdehyde [MDA]). Cellular DNA damage in agricultural workers was validated using lymphocyte cell cultures. Urinary OP metabolites were significantly higher in farm workers and applicators (p < .001) when compared to controls. 8-OH-dG levels were 8.5 times and 2.3 times higher in farm workers and applicators, respectively, than in controls. Serum MDA levels were 4.9 times and 24 times higher in farm workers and applicators, respectively, than in controls. DNA damage and oxidative DNA repair were significantly greater in lymphocytes from applicators and farm workers when compared with controls. A separate field study showed that DNA damage was also significantly greater (p < .001) in buccal cells (i.e., leukocytes) collected from migrant farm workers working with fungicides in the berry crops in Oregon. Markers of oxidative stress (i.e., reactive oxygen species, reduced levels of glutathione) and oxidative DNA damage were also observed in lymphocyte cell cultures treated with an OP. The findings from these in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that pesticides induce oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers. These biomarkers may be useful for increasing our understanding of the link between pesticides and cancer. PMID:19437279

  7. Radiation-Induced Phase Transformations in Ilmenite-Group Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. N.

    1997-12-31

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool for characterizing and understanding radiation-induced structural changes in materials. We have irradiated single crystals of ilmenite (FeTiO{sub 3}) and geikielite (MgTiO{sub 3}) using ions and electrons to better understand the response of complex oxides to radiation. Ion irradiation experiments of bulk single crystals at 100 K show that ilmenite amorphized at doses of less than 1x10(exp15) Ar(2+)/sq cm and at a damage level in the peak damage region of 1 displacement per atom (dpa). Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction of a cross-sectioned portion of this crystal confirmed the formation of a 150 am thick amorphous layer. Geikielite proved to be more radiation resistant, requiring a flux of 2x10(exp 15) Xe(2+)/sq cm to induce amorphization at 100 K. This material did not amorphize at 470 K, despite a dose of 2.5 x10(exp 16) Xe(2+)/sq cm and a damage level as high as 25 dpa. Low temperature irradiations of electron- transparent crystals with 1 MeV Kr(+) also show that ilmenite amorphized after a damage level of 2.25 dpa at 175 K.Similar experiments on geikielite show that the microstructure is partially amorphous and partially crystalline after 10 dpa at 150 K. Concurrent ion and electron irradiation of both materials with 1 MeV Kr(+) and 0.9 MeV electrons produced dislocation loops in both materials, but no amorphous regions were formed. Differences in the radiation response of these isostructural oxides suggests that in systems with Mg-Fe solid solution, the Mg-rich compositions may be more resistant to structural changes.

  8. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE IN DIESEL BUS MECHANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale:

    Diesel exposure has been associated with adverse health effects, including susceptibility to asthma, allergy and cancer. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated increased cancer incidence among workers exposed to diesel. This is likely due to oxid...

  9. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    cationic polyelectrolytes to have a positive surface charge and then dipped into diluted, negatively-charged AlPO4 colloidal suspension (0.05M) at pH 7.5. Amorphous AlPO4 (crystallizes to tridymite- and cristobalite-forms at 1080°C) nano particles were coated on fibers layer-by-layer using an electrostatic attraction protocol. A uniform and smooth coating was formed which allowed fiber pullout from the matrix of a Nextel 720/alumina mini-composite hot-pressed at 1250°C/20MPa. Reaction-bonded mullite (RBM), with low formation temperature and sintering shrinkage was synthesized by incorporation of mixed-rare-earth-oxide (MREO) and mullite seeds. Pure mullite formed with 7.5wt% MREO at 1300°C. Introduction of 5wt% mullite seeds gave RBM with less than 3% shrinkage and 20% porosity. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720/RBM composites were successful fabricated by EPID and pressureless sintering at 1300°C. Significant fiber pullout occurred and the 4-point bend strength was around 170MPa (with 25-30vol% fibers) at room temperature and 1100°C and a Work-of-Fracture 7KJ/m2. At 1200°C, the composite failed in shear due to the MREO-based glassy phase in the matrix. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720 fiber/aluminosilicate (no MREO) showed damage tolerance at 1200°C with a bend strength 170MPa.

  10. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  11. Oxidative status and DNA damage in chidren with marasmic malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Celik, Maruf; Sermatov, Kabil; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Zeyrek, Dost; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Iscan, Akin

    2012-05-01

    Malnutrition as a lack of several substances containing antioxidants such as vitamins and micronutrients, while showing a predisposition for lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, is also characterized by a slowing down of the metabolic processes, which may then have protective properties against DNA damage due to a reduction in endogenous free radical production. This study aimed to examine the oxidative status and DNA damage in cases of marasmus. The study comprised 28 infants aged 6-24 months with marasmus only and 28 age-matched healthy infants. DNA damage was examined by the alkali single cell electrophoresis method (Comet assay) on mononuclear leukocytes. The total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured by colormetric auto-analyzer and the oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. The TOS, TAS, and OSI levels of the patient group were found to be significantly lower compared to the control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, respectively). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of mononuclear leukocyte DNA damage (P > 0.05). The findings of this study showed that in marasmus cases, the oxidative and antioxidative processes, which have a counteractive effect, decreased together. The other results of the study indicate that there is no increase in DNA damage in marasmus cases.

  12. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  13. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  14. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin.

  15. Oxidative DNA damage stalls the human mitochondrial replisome

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Makarova, Alena V.; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Forslund, Josefin; Burgers, Peter M.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is capable of causing damage to various cellular constituents, including DNA. There is however limited knowledge on how oxidative stress influences mitochondrial DNA and its replication. Here, we have used purified mtDNA replication proteins, i.e. DNA polymerase γ holoenzyme, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein mtSSB, the replicative helicase Twinkle and the proposed mitochondrial translesion synthesis polymerase PrimPol to study lesion bypass synthesis on oxidative damage-containing DNA templates. Our studies were carried out at dNTP levels representative of those prevailing either in cycling or in non-dividing cells. At dNTP concentrations that mimic those in cycling cells, the replication machinery showed substantial stalling at sites of damage, and these problems were further exacerbated at the lower dNTP concentrations present in resting cells. PrimPol, the translesion synthesis polymerase identified inside mammalian mitochondria, did not promote mtDNA replication fork bypass of the damage. This argues against a conventional role for PrimPol as a mitochondrial translesion synthesis DNA polymerase for oxidative DNA damage; however, we show that Twinkle, the mtDNA replicative helicase, is able to stimulate PrimPol DNA synthesis in vitro, suggestive of an as yet unidentified role of PrimPol in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:27364318

  16. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  17. Subcutaneous Administration of Bovine Superoxide Dismutase Protects Lungs from Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to determine whether single administration of the antioxidant enzyme bovine superoxide dismutase (bSOD) after radiation (RT) exposure mitigates development of pulmonary toxicity in rats. Methods Female F344 rats (n=60) were divided among six experimental groups: (1) RT, single dose of 21 Gy to the right hemithorax; (2) RT+5 mg/kg bSOD; (3) RT+15 mg/kg bSOD; (4) No RT; (5) sham RT+5mg/kg bSOD; and (6) sham RT+15mg/kg bSOD. A single subcutaneous injection of bSOD (5 or 15 mg/kg) was administered 24 hours postradiation. The effects of bSOD on radiation-induced lung injury were assessed by measurement of body weight, breathing frequency and histopathological changes. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate oxidative stress (8-OHdG+, NOX4+, nitrotyrosine+, 4HNE+ cells), macrophage activation (ED1+), and expression of profibrotic TGF-β in irradiated tissue. Results Radiation led to an increase in all evaluated parameters. Treatment with 15mg/kg bSOD significantly decreased levels of all evaluated parameters including tissue damage and breathing frequency starting 6 weeks post-radiation. Animals treated with 5 mg/kg bSOD trended toward a suppression of radiation-induced lung damage but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The single application of bSOD (15mg/kg) ameliorates radiation induced lung injury through suppression of ROS/RNS dependent tissue damage. PMID:26110460

  18. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  19. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  20. Neuroendocrine system response modulates oxidative cellular damage in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Qi; Shinozawa, Yotaro; Sasaki, Junichi; Takuma, Kiyotsugu; Akaishi, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Endo, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Ryosuke; Kobayashi, Michio; Kudo, Daisuke; Hojo, Nobuko

    2007-02-01

    Oxygen-derived free radicals play important roles in pathophysiological processes in critically ill patients, but the data characterizing relationships between radicals and neuroendocrine system response are sparse. To search the cue to reduce the oxidative cellular damage from the point of view of neuroendocrine system response, we studied the indicators of neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses excreted in urine in 14 burn patients (42.3 +/- 31.4 years old, and 32.3 +/- 27.6% burn of total body surface area [%TBSA]) during the first seven days post burn. The daily mean amounts of urinary excretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative cellular damage, were above the upper limit of the standard value during the studied period. The total amount of urinary excretion of 8-OHdG in the first day post burn correlated with burn severity indices: %TBSA (r = 0.63, p = 0.021) and burn index (r = 0.70, p = 0.008). The daily urinary excretion of 8-OHdG correlated with the daily urinary excretion of norepinephrine and nitrite plus nitrate (NOx) during the studied period except day 2 post burn, and correlated with the daily urinary excretion of 17-hydroxycorticosteriod (17-OHCS) in days 2, 3, and 7 post burn. These data suggest that oxidative cellular damage correlates with burn severity and neuroendocrine system response modulates inflammation and oxidative cellular damage. Modulation of neuroendocrine system response and inflammation in the treatment in the early phase of burn may be useful to reduce the oxidative cellular damage and to prevent multiple organ failures in patients with extensive burn.

  1. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  2. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Popov, A. I.; Schwartz, K.; Shablonin, E.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic-covalent Lu3Al5O12 single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions (197Au, 209Bi, 238U, fluence of 1012 ions/cm2) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|Al or Ce|Al - a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce3+ single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|Lu-Ce|Al or Cr3+-Cr3+ in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|Al strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  3. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  4. Preventing metal-mediated oxidative DNA damage with selenium compounds.

    PubMed

    Battin, Erin E; Zimmerman, Matthew T; Ramoutar, Ria R; Quarles, Carolyn E; Brumaghim, Julia L

    2011-05-01

    Copper and iron are two widely studied transition metals associated with hydroxyl radical (˙OH) generation, oxidative damage, and disease development. Because antioxidants ameliorate metal-mediated DNA damage, DNA gel electrophoresis assays were used to quantify the ability of ten selenium-containing compounds to inhibit metal-mediated DNA damage by hydroxyl radical. In the Cu(I)/H(2)O(2) system, selenocystine, selenomethionine, and methyl-selenocysteine inhibit DNA damage with IC(50) values ranging from 3.34 to 25.1 μM. Four selenium compounds also prevent DNA damage from Fe(II) and H(2)O(2). Additional gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that Cu(I) or Fe(II) coordination is responsible for the selenium antioxidant activity. Mass spectrometry studies show that a 1 : 1 stoichiometry is the most common for iron and copper complexes of the tested compounds, even if no antioxidant activity is observed, suggesting that metal coordination is necessary but not sufficient for selenium antioxidant activity. A majority of the selenium compounds are electroactive, regardless of antioxidant activity, and the glutathione peroxidase activities of the selenium compounds show no correlation to DNA damage inhibition. Thus, metal binding is a primary mechanism of selenium antioxidant activity, and both the chemical functionality of the selenium compound and the metal ion generating damaging hydroxyl radical significantly affect selenium antioxidant behavior. PMID:21286651

  5. Regulation of ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis by a manganese porphyrin complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hyup; Lee, You Mie; Park, Jeen-Woo . E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr

    2005-08-26

    Ionizing radiation induces the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important causative role in apoptotic cell death. Therefore, compounds that scavenge reactive oxygen species may confer regulatory effects on apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics have been shown to be protective against cell injury caused by reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of the manganese (III) tetrakis(N-methyl-2-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP), a cell-permeable SOD mimetic, on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis. Upon exposure to 2 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation, there was a distinct difference between the control cells and the cells pre-treated with 5 {mu}M MnTMPyP for 2 h with regard to apoptotic parameters, cellular redox status, mitochondria function, and oxidative damage to cells. MnTMPyP effectively suppressed morphological evidence of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation in U937 cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The [GSSG]/[GSH + GSSG] ratio and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species were higher and the [NADPH]/[NADP{sup +} + NADPH] ratio was lower in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. The ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial damage reflected by the altered mitochondrial permeability transition, the increase in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and the reduction of ATP production were significantly higher in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. MnTMPyP pre-treated cells showed significant inhibition of apoptotic features such as activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and p53, and down-regulation of Bcl-2 compared to control cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation. This study indicates that MnTMPyP may play an important role in regulating the apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation presumably through scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Increased DNA damage and oxidative stress among silver jewelry workers.

    PubMed

    Aktepe, Necmettin; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Yukselten, Yunus; Taskin, Abdullah; Keskin, Cumali; Celik, Hakim

    2015-04-01

    Silver has long been valued as a precious metal, and it is used to make ornaments, jewelry, high-value tableware, utensils, and currency coins. Human exposures to silver and silver compounds can occur oral, dermal, or by inhalation. In this study, we investigated genotoxic and oxidative effects of silver exposure among silver jewelry workers. DNA damage in peripheral mononuclear leukocytes was measured by using the comet assay. Serum total antioxidative status (TAS), total oxidative status (TOS), total thiol contents, and ceruloplasmin levels were measured by using colorimetric methods among silver jewelry workers. Moreover, oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Results were compared with non-exposed healthy subjects. The mean values of mononuclear leukocyte DNA damage were significantly higher than control subjects (p < 0.001). Serum TOS, OSI, and ceruloplasmin levels were also found to be higher in silver particles exposed group than those of non-exposed group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.01, respectively). However, serum TAS levels and total thiol contents of silver exposed group were found significantly lower (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). Exposure to silver particles among silver jewelry workers caused oxidative stress and accumulation of severe DNA damage.

  7. NDE for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter s thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using NDE methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating. The results of that study are briefly reviewed in this article as well. Additionally, a short discussion on the future role of simulation to aid in these studies is provided.

  8. Protective properties of ginsenoside Rb3 against UV-B radiation-induced oxidative stress in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Joo; Oh, Yuri; Ryu, In Wang; Kim, Kyunghoon; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the skin anti-photoaging properties of ginsenoside Rb3 (Rb3), one of the main protopanaxdiol-type ginsenosides from ginseng, in HaCaT keratinocytes. The skin anti-photoaging activity was assessed by analyzing the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2), pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9 (proMMP-9), total glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as well as cell viability in HaCaT keratinocytes under UV-B irradiation. When HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to Rb3 prior to UV-B irradiation, Rb3 exhibited suppressive activities on UV-B-induced ROS, proMMP-2, and proMMP-9 enhancements. On the contrary, Rb3 displayed enhancing activities on UV-B-reduced total GSH and SOD activity levels. Rb3 could not interfere with cell viabilities in UV-B-irradiated HaCaT keratinocytes. Rb3 plays a protective role against UV-B-induced oxidative stress in human HaCaT keratinocytes, proposing its potential skin anti-photoaging properties. PMID:26287932

  9. Reduction in oxidatively generated DNA damage following smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a known cause of cancer, and cancer may be in part due to effects of oxidative stress. However, whether smoking cessation reverses oxidatively induced DNA damage unclear. The current study sought to examine the extent to which three DNA lesions showed significant reductions after participants quit smoking. Methods Participants (n = 19) in this study were recruited from an ongoing 16-week smoking cessation clinical trial and provided blood samples from which leukocyte DNA was extracted and assessed for 3 DNA lesions (thymine glycol modification [d(TgpA)]; formamide breakdown of pyrimidine bases [d(TgpA)]; 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine [d(Gh)]) via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Change in lesions over time was assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for gender, age, and treatment condition. Results Overall time effects for the d(TgpA) (χ2(3) = 8.068, p < 0.045), d(PfpA) (χ2(3) = 8.477, p < 0.037), and d(Gh) (χ2(3) = 37.599, p < 0.001) lesions were seen, indicating levels of each decreased significantly after CO-confirmed smoking cessation. The d(TgpA) and d(PfpA) lesions show relatively greater rebound at Week 16 compared to the d(Gh) lesion (88% of baseline for d(TgpA), 64% of baseline for d(PfpA), vs 46% of baseline for d(Gh)). Conclusions Overall, results from this analysis suggest that cigarette smoking contributes to oxidatively induced DNA damage, and that smoking cessation appears to reduce levels of specific damage markers between 30-50 percent in the short term. Future research may shed light on the broader array of oxidative damage influenced by smoking and over longer durations of abstinence, to provide further insights into mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. PMID:21569419

  10. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal. PMID:9257424

  11. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal.

  12. Dietary nickel chloride induces oxidative intestinal damage in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxidative damage induced by dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) in the intestinal mucosa of different parts of the intestine of broilers, including duodenum, jejunum and ileum. A total of 240 one-day-old broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 300, 600 or 900 mg/kg NiCl2 during a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) decreased in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of the control group. In contrast, malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) higher in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than that in the control group. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg could cause oxidative damage in the intestinal mucosa in broilers, which finally impaired the intestinal functions including absorptive function and mucosal immune function. The oxidative damage might be a main mechanism on the effects of NiCl2 on the intestinal health of broilers. PMID:23702803

  13. Inhibition of proteolysis in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins.

    PubMed

    Zamora, R; Hidalgo, F J

    2001-12-01

    The proteolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified by reaction with the lipid peroxidation product 4,5(E)-epoxy-2(E)-heptenal was studied to better understand the loss of digestibility observed in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins. BSA was incubated for different periods of time with eight concentrations of the epoxyalkenal and, then, treated for 24 h with chymotrypsin, pancreatin, Pronase, or trypsin. The treatment of BSA with the aldehyde always decreased its proteolysis in relation to that of native BSA, and this inhibition of the proteolysis was related to the concentration of the epoxyalkenal and the reaction time. In fact, this inhibition was correlated with the damage suffered by the protein as a consequence of its reaction with the aldehyde: mainly the development of browning, the denaturation of the protein, and the formation of the oxidized lipid/amino acid reaction product epsilon-N-pyrrolylnorleucine (p < or = 0.0011, 0.0045, and 0.0031, respectively). In addition, epsilon-N-pyrrolylnorleucine added at 0.1 or 1 mM inhibited the proteases assayed and suggested that the inhibition of the proteolysis observed in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins may be related to the formation and accumulation of pyrrolized amino acid residues. PMID:11743800

  14. Plasmalogen phospholipids protect internodal myelin from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Kuo, Fonghsu; Cakici, Ozgur; Crowther, Michelle N; Denninger, Andrew R; Avila, Robin L; Brites, Pedro; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in a range of degenerative conditions, including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Myelin is a lipid-rich multilamellar sheath that facilitates rapid nerve conduction in vertebrates. Given the high energetic demands and low antioxidant capacity of the cells that elaborate the sheaths, myelin is considered intrinsically vulnerable to oxidative damage, raising the question whether additional mechanisms prevent structural damage. We characterized the structural and biochemical basis of ROS-mediated myelin damage in murine tissues from both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To determine whether ROS can cause structural damage to the internodal myelin, whole sciatic and optic nerves were incubated ex vivo with a hydroxyl radical-generating system consisting of copper (Cu), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and ortho-phenanthroline (OP). Quantitative assessment of unfixed tissue by X-ray diffraction revealed irreversible compaction of myelin membrane stacking in both sciatic and optic nerves. Incubation in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger sodium formate prevented this damage, implicating hydroxyl radical species. Myelin membranes are particularly enriched in plasmalogens, a class of ether-linked phospholipids proposed to have antioxidant properties. Myelin in sciatic nerve from plasmalogen-deficient (Pex7 knockout) mice was significantly more vulnerable to Cu/OP/HP-mediated ROS-induced compaction than myelin from WT mice. Our results directly support the role of plasmalogens as endogenous antioxidants providing a defense that protects ROS-vulnerable myelin.

  15. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  16. Prevention of oxidative DNA damage in rats by brussels sprouts.

    PubMed

    Deng, X S; Tuo, J; Poulsen, H E; Loft, S

    1998-03-01

    The alleged cancer preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables could be related to protection from mutagenic oxidative DNA damage. We have studied the effects of Brussels sprouts, some non-cruciferous vegetables and isolated glucosinolates on spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in terms of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in groups of 6-8 male Wistar rats. Excess oxidative DNA damage was induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP 100 mg/kg). Four days oral administration of 3 g of cooked Brussels sprouts homogenate reduced the spontaneous urinary 8-oxodG excretion by 31% (p<0.05) whereas raw sprouts, beans and endive (1:1), isolated indolyl glucosinolates and breakdown products had no significant effect. An aqueous extract of cooked Brussels sprouts (corresponding to 6.7 g vegetable per day for 4 days) decreased the spontaneous 8-oxodG excretion from 92 +/- 12 to 52 +/- 15 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). After 2-NP administration the 8-oxodG excretion was increased to 132 +/- 26 pmol/24 h (p<0.05) whereas pretreatment with the sprouts extract reduced this to 102 +/- 30 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). The spontaneous level of 8-oxodG in nuclear DNA from liver and bone marrow was not significantly affected by the sprouts extract whereas the level decreased by 27% in the kidney (p<0.05). In the liver 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels in nuclear DNA 8.7 and 3.8 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. The sprouts extract reduced this increase by 57% (p<0.05) at 6 h whereas there was no significant effect at 24 h. In the kidneys 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels 2.2 and 1.2 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. Pretreatment with the sprouts extract abolished these increases (p<0.05). Similarly, in the bone marrow the extract protected completely (p<0.05) against a 4.9-fold 2-NP induced increase (p<0.05) in the 8-oxodG level. These findings demonstrate that cooked Brussels sprouts contain bioactive substance(s) with a potential for reducing the physiological

  17. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  18. Garlic supplementation prevents oxidative DNA damage in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Veena; Jain, Sanjay

    2005-07-01

    Oxygen-free radicals and other oxygen/nitrogen species are constantly generated in the human body. Most are intercepted by antioxidant defences and perform useful metabolic roles, whereas others escape to damage biomolecules like DNA, lipids and proteins. Garlic has been shown to contain antioxidant phytochemicals that prevent oxidative damage. These include unique water-soluble organosulphur compounds, lipid-soluble organosulphur compounds and flavonoids. Therefore, in the present study, we have tried to explore the antioxidant effect of garlic supplementation on oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide generation and on the total antioxidant status (TAS) in patients of essential hypertension (EH). Twenty patients of EH as diagnosed by JNC VI criteria (Group I) and 20 age and sex-matched normotensive controls (Group II) were enrolled in the study. Both groups were given garlic pearls (GP) in a dose of 250 mg per day for 2 months. Baseline samples were taken at the start of the study, i.e. 0 day, and thereafter 2 months follow-up. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), lipids, lipid peroxidation (MDA), NO and antioxidant vitamins A, E and C were determined. A moderate decline in blood pressure (BP) and a significant reduction in 8-OHdG, NO levels and lipid peroxidation were observed in Group I subjects with GP supplementation. Further, a significant increase in vitamin levels and TAS was also observed in this group as compared to the control subjects. These findings point out the beneficial effects of garlic supplementation in reducing blood pressure and counteracting oxidative stress, and thereby, offering cardioprotection in essential hypertensives. PMID:16335787

  19. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates. PMID:27233112

  20. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  1. Sleep protects excitatory cortical circuits against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Georg

    2004-01-01

    Activity in excitatory cortical pathways increases the oxidative metabolism of the brain and the risk of oxidative damage. Oxyradicals formed during periods of activity are mopped up by neural pools of nuclear factor kappa-B resulting in their activation and translocation to cell nuclei. During waking hours, glucocorticoids inhibit transactivation by nuclear factor kappa-B, increase central norepinephrine release, and elevate expression of prostaglandin D2. The build-up of nuclear factor kappa-B and prostaglandin D2 produces sleep pressures leading to sleep onset, normally gated by circadian melatonin release. During slow wave sleep nuclear factor kappa-B induces transcription of synaptogenic and antioxidant products and synaptic remodeling follows. Synaptically remodeled neural circuits have modified conductivity patterns and timescales and need to be resynchronized with existing unmodified neural circuits. The resynchronization process, mediated by theta rhythm, occurs during rapid eye movement sleep and is orchestrated from pontine centers. Resynchronization of remodeled neural circuits produces dreams. The waking state results upon successful resynchronization. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation results in a lack of resynchronization and leads to cognitive inefficiencies. The model presented here proposes that the primary purpose of sleep is to protect cortical circuits against oxidative damage by reducing cortical activity and by remodeling and resynchronizing cortical circuits during this period of reduced activity to sustain new patterns of activation more effectively.

  2. Radiation-induced apoptosis in the eye structures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacémi, Yazid; Huchet, Aymeri; Baudouin, Christophe; Lartigau, Éric

    2005-02-01

    Apoptosis plays a crucial role in tissue homeostasis and in the removal of damaged cells from tissues. Both increased and insufficient cell death can lead to human diseases. Apoptotic process is under the control of physiological metabolism as well as a panel of genes. After exposure to radiation, membrane damages induce the membrane pathway signal transduction for cell apoptosis. The importance of the radiation-induced apoptosis in the different ocular tissues and its relationship to the radiation parameters are reviewed in this article. This topic of ocular research has not been addressed in detail in the literature.

  3. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  4. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  5. Nitroxides block DNA scission and protect cells from oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Godinger, D.; Aronovitch, J. ); Russo, A.; Mitchell, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The protective effect of cyclic stable nitroxide free radicals, having SOD-like activity, against oxidative damage was studied by using Escherichia coli xthA DNA repair-deficient mutant hypersensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Oxidative damage induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was assayed by monitoring cell survival. The metal chelator 1,10-phenanthroline (OP), which readily intercalates into DNA, potentiated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damage. The extent of in vivo DNA scission and degradation was studied and compared with the loss of cell viability. The extent of DNA breakage correlated with cell killing, supporting previous suggestions that DNA is the crucial cellular target of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cytotoxicity. The xthA cells were protected by catalase but not by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Both five- and six-membered ring nitroxides, having SOD-like activity, protected growing and resting cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2} toxicity, without lowering H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration. To check whether nitroxides protect against O{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}}-independent injury also, experiments were repeated under hypoxia. These nitroxides also protected hypoxic cells against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, suggesting alternative modes of protection. Since nitroxides were found to reoxidize DNA-bound iron(II), the present results suggest that nitroxides protect by oxidizing reduced transition metals, thus interfering with the Fenton reaction.

  6. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 hours following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 µM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F2-IsoPs and PGE2 in adult mouse brain 24 hours following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:19607852

  7. Radiation-induced Cochlea hair cell death: mechanisms and protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pei-Xin; Du, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chen; Yao, Qi-Wei; Yuan, Ya-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Cochlea hair cell death is regarded to be responsible for the radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is one of the principal complications of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers. In this mini- review, we focus on the current progresses trying to unravel mechanisms of radiation-induced hair cell death and find out possible protection. P53, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways have been proposed as pivotal in the processes leading to radiation hair cell death. Potential protectants, such as amifostine, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and epicatechin (EC) , are claimed to be effective at reducing radiation- inducedhair cell death. The RT dosage, selection and application of concurrent chemotherapy should be pre- examined in order to minimize the damage to cochlea hair cells.

  8. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; He, Li; Bao, Guoqiang; He, Xin; Fan, Saijun; Wang, Haichao

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells, thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses. In this study we aimed to test the possibility that ionizing radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and extracellular release. Method Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and animals (rats) were exposed to X-ray radiation, and HMGB1 translocation and release were assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay, respectively. Results At a wide dose range (4.0 – 12.0 Gy), X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation, and triggered a time- and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo. The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability. Conclusion radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes. PMID:27331198

  9. Molecular targets in radiation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Nordal, Robert A.; Wong, C. Shun . E-mail: shun.wang@sw.ca

    2005-05-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key feature of radiation injury to the central nervous system. Studies suggest that endothelial cell apoptosis, gene expression changes, and alteration of the microenvironment are important in initiation and progression of injury. Although substantial effort has been directed at understanding the impact of radiation on endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes, growing evidence suggests that other cell types, including astrocytes, are important in responses that include induced gene expression and microenvironmental changes. Endothelial apoptosis is important in early BBB disruption. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in the later period that precedes tissue damage might lead to astrocytic responses that impact cell survival and cell interactions. Cell death, gene expression changes, and a toxic microenvironment can be viewed as interacting elements in a model of radiation-induced disruption of the BBB. These processes implicate particular genes and proteins as targets in potential strategies for neuroprotection.

  10. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent.

  11. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent. PMID:26710178

  12. Spaceflight environment induces mitochondrial oxidative damage in ocular tissue.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao W; Pecaut, Michael J; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Bouxsein, Mary; Jones, Tamako A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Chieu, Jenny; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-10-01

    A recent report shows that more than 30% of the astronauts returning from Space Shuttle missions or the International Space Station (ISS) were diagnosed with eye problems that can cause reduced visual acuity. We investigate here whether spaceflight environment-associated retinal damage might be related to oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the space shuttle Atlantis (STS-135), and within 3-5 h of landing, the spaceflight and ground-control mice, similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEMs) were euthanized and their eyes were removed for analysis. Changes in expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, mitochondrial and endothelial cell biology were examined. Apoptosis in the retina was analyzed by caspase-3 immunocytochemical analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation were also measured. Evaluation of spaceflight mice and AEM ground-control mice showed that expression of several genes playing central roles in regulating the mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathway were significantly altered in mouse ocular tissue after spaceflight compared to AEM ground-control mice. In addition, the mRNA levels of several genes, which are responsible for regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were also significantly up-regulated in spaceflight samples compared to AEM ground-control mice. Further more, the level of HNE protein was significantly elevated in the retina after spaceflight compared to controls. Our results also revealed that spaceflight conditions induced significant apoptosis in the retina especially inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) compared to AEM ground controls. The data provided the first evidence that spaceflight conditions induce oxidative damage that results in mitochondrial apoptosis in the retina. This data suggest

  13. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  14. Radiation-inducible Silencing of uPA and uPAR in vitro and in vivo in meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Gupta, Reshu; Gorantla, Bharathi; Gujrati, Meena; Dinh, Dzung H.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Stereospecific radiation treatment offers a distinct opportunity for temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression at tumor sites by means of inducible promoters. To this end, a plasmid, pCArG-U2, was constructed by incorporating nine CArG elements (in tandem) of EGR1 gene upstream to uPA and uPAR siRNA oligonucleotides in a pCi-Neo vector. Radiation-induced siRNA expression was detected in a meningioma cell line (IOMM-Lee). Immunoblotting and RT-PCR analyses confirmed downregulation of uPA and uPAR. A similar effect was observed in transfected cells followed by H2O2 treatment. Moreover, pre-treatment of transfected cells with N-Acetyl L-Cysteine blocked the silencing of uPA and uPAR, which further confirmed the oxidative damage-mediated downregulation. Cell proliferation assays and western blot analysis for apoptotic molecules confirmed cell death in a radiation-inducible fashion. Migration and matrigel invasion assays also revealed a marked decrease in migration and invasion. Immunocytochemistry showed a marked decrease in uPA and uPAR levels in transfected and irradiated cells. H&E staining revealed a decrease in the pre-established tumor volume among the animals treated with pCArG-U2 and radiation. Immunohistochemistry of the brain sections established with intracranial tumors also revealed a marked decrease in uPA and uPAR in a radiation-inducible fashion. Taken together, our data suggest pCArG-U2 as a suitable candidate for radiation-inducible gene therapy. PMID:20198323

  15. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  16. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  17. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  18. Reproductive Benefit of Oxidative Damage: An Oxidative Stress “Malevolence”?

    PubMed Central

    Poljsak, B.; Milisav, I.; Lampe, T.; Ostan, I.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to antioxidant defenses are considered to play a major role in diverse chronic age-related diseases and aging. Here we present an attempt to synthesize information about proximate oxidative processes in aging (relevant to free radical or oxidative damage hypotheses of aging) with an evolutionary scenario (credited here to Dawkins hypotheses) involving tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of oxidative stress to reproducing organisms. Oxidative stress may be considered a biological imperfection; therefore, the Dawkins' theory of imperfect adaptation of beings to environment was applied to the role of oxidative stress in processes like famine and infectious diseases and their consequences at the molecular level such as mutations and cell signaling. Arguments are presented that oxidative damage is not necessarily an evolutionary mistake but may be beneficial for reproduction; this may prevail over its harmfulness to health and longevity in evolution. Thus, Dawkins' principle of biological “malevolence” may be an additional biological paradigm for explaining the consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:21969876

  19. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  20. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si-O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si-O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E' centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz. PMID:26178116

  1. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  2. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  3. Radiation-induced physical changes in UHMWPE implant components.

    PubMed

    Naidu, S H; Bixler, B L; Moulton, M J

    1997-02-01

    Post-irradiation aging of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is not well understood. Retrieval studies and in vitro aged specimens have shown oxidative changes along with increases in crystallinity. Critical analysis and review of the polymer science and polymer physics literature shows that while oxidation may be important during the first year post-irradiation, subsequent aging occurs because of initial gamma radiation-induced chain scission leading to eventual isothermal crystallization of polymer chains in the amorphous regions of the UHMWPE bulk. Mechanical properties of aged UHMWPE are not as yet clear and, until such data become available, gamma irradiation sterilization must be used with caution.

  4. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  5. Oxidative Damage and Inflammation in Obese Diabetic Emirati Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gariballa, Salah; Kosanovic, Melita; Yasin, Javed; El Essa, Awad

    2014-01-01

    Visceral obesity is more common in the Arab population and more closely related to morbidity, including diabetes and related cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Possible mechanisms that link visceral fat/obesity to diabetes and CVD complications include inflammation and increased oxidative stress; however, few data are available from the Arab population. Our aim was to determine whether increased adiposity in obese diabetic United Arab Emirates citizens is associated with sub-clinical inflammation and/or increased oxidative stress. A hundred diabetic patients who were part of a randomized controlled trial of nutritional supplements had their baseline characteristics assessed from anthropometric and clinical data following informed written consent. We used WHO figures to classify general and central obesity. Fasting blood samples were collected for the measurement of antioxidants and markers of oxidative damage and inflammation. We found that increased adiposity measured by both body mass index and waist circumference was associated with increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and decreased vitamin C after adjusting for age, duration and treatment of diabetes (p < 0.05). Although there is a clear trend of increased inflammatory markers, notably CRP, and decreased antioxidants with increased BMI and waist circumference in both men and women, the results are statistically significant for women only. CRP were also inversely associated with HDL. Overall, we found that BMI underestimates the rates of obesity compared to waist circumference and that increased adiposity is associated with increased inflammation and decreased HDL and antioxidant status. PMID:25375631

  6. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  7. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  8. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  9. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  10. Electrochemically reduced water protects neural cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Taichi; Yan, Hanxu; Hamasaki, Takeki; Kinjo, Tomoya; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Kabayama, Shigeru; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50-200 μM) induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca(2+) influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW. PMID:25383141

  11. DNA repair of oxidative DNA damage in human carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Elinger, Dalia; Roisman, Laila; Livneh, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Efficient DNA repair mechanisms comprise a critical component in the protection against human cancer, as indicated by the high predisposition to cancer of individuals with germ-line mutations in DNA repair genes. This includes biallelic germ-line mutations in the MUYH gene, encoding a DNA glycosylase that is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage, which strongly predispose humans to a rare hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Extensive research efforts including biochemical, enzymological and genetic studies in model organisms established that the oxidative DNA lesion 8-oxoguanine is mutagenic, and that several DNA repair mechanisms operate to prevent its potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic outcome. Epidemiological studies on the association with sporadic cancers of single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes such as OGG1, involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine yielded conflicting results, and suggest a minor effect at best. A new approach based on the functional analysis of DNA repair enzymatic activity showed that reduced activity of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG) is a risk factor in lung and head and neck cancer. Moreover, the combination of smoking and low OGG activity was associated with a higher risk, suggesting a potential strategy for risk assessment and prevention of lung cancer, as well as other types of cancer. PMID:18374480

  12. In vitro apoptotic and DNA damaging potential of nanobarium oxide.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Al-Bishri, Widad

    2016-01-01

    Barium oxide nanoparticles (BaONPs) are an important industrial compound and are widely used in polymers and paints. In this study, apoptotic and genotoxic effects of BaONPs in mouse embryonic fibroblast (L929) cells were determined by using single-cell gel test. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed to assess BaONPs' toxicity in L929 cells. Mild cytotoxicity was observed in L929 cells due to BaONPs. BaONPs increased lipid peroxidation, catalase, and superoxide dismutase levels and lowered glutathione levels in L929 cells. This was accompanied by concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspase-3 in BaONPs-treated L929 cells. On the other hand, when we exposed L929 cells to BaONPs for 24 and 48 hours (comet assay), there was a duration- and dose-dependent increase in DNA impairment detected in the single-cell gel test. Thus, BaONPs exhibit genotoxic and apoptotic effects in L929 cells, most likely due to initiation of oxidative damage. PMID:26834473

  13. Resveratrol Protects the Brain of Obese Mice from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Shraddha D.; Kumar, Sruthi; Wilson, David N.; Tamura, Leslie; Geetha, Thangiah; Mathews, Suresh T.; Huggins, Kevin W.; Broderick, Tom L.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a polyphenolic phytoalexin that exerts cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antioxidant effects. Recently it has been shown that obesity is associated with an increase in cerebral oxidative stress levels, which may enhance neurodegeneration. The present study evaluates the neuroprotective action of resveratrol in brain of obese (ob/ob) mice. Resveratrol was administered orally at the dose of 25 mg kg−1 body weight daily for three weeks to lean and obese mice. Resveratrol had no effect on body weight or blood glucose levels in obese mice. Lipid peroxides were significantly increased in brain of obese mice. The enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and nonenzymatic antioxidants tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and glutathione were decreased in obese mice brain. Administration of resveratrol decreased lipid peroxide levels and upregulated the antioxidant activities in obese mice brain. Our findings indicate a neuroprotective effect of resveratrol by preventing oxidative damage in brain tissue of obese mice. PMID:24163719

  14. Senescence of Primary Amniotic Cells via Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ramkumar; Boldogh, Istvan; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Polettini, Jossimara; Syed, Tariq Ali; Saade, George R.; Papaconstantinou, John; Taylor, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is a postulated etiology of spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) and preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes (pPROM); however, the precise mechanistic role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these complications is unclear. The objective of this study is to examine impact of a water soluble cigarette smoke extract (wsCSE), a predicted cause of pregnancy complications, on human amnion epithelial cells. Methods Amnion cells isolated from fetal membranes were exposed to wsCSE prepared in cell culture medium and changes in ROS levels, DNA base and strand damage was determined by using 2′7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein and comet assays as well as Fragment Length Analysis using Repair Enzymes (FLARE) assays, respectively. Western blot analyses were used to determine the changes in mass and post-translational modification of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK1), phospho-p38 (P-p38 MAPK), and p19arf. Expression of senescence-associated β-galectosidase (SAβ-gal) was used to confirm cell ageing in situ. Results ROS levels in wsCSE-exposed amnion cells increased rapidly (within 2 min) and significantly (p<0.01) at all-time points, and DNA strand and base damage was evidenced by comet and FLARE assays. Activation of ASK1, P-p38 MAPK and p19Arf correlated with percentage of SAβ-gal expressing cells after wsCSE treatment. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevented ROS-induced DNA damage and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, whereas activation of ASK1 and increased expression of p19Arf were not significantly affected by NAC. Conclusions The findings support the hypothesis that compounds in wsCSE induces amnion cell senescence via a mechanism involving ROS and DNA damage. Both pathways may contribute to PTB and pPROM. Our results imply that antioxidant interventions that control ROS may interrupt pathways leading to pPROM and other causes of PTB. PMID:24386195

  15. Ionizing radiation, antioxidant response and oxidative damage: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Einor, D; Bonisoli-Alquati, A; Costantini, D; Mousseau, T A; Møller, A P

    2016-04-01

    One mechanism proposed as a link between exposure to ionizing radiation and detrimental effects on organisms is oxidative damage. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the scientific literature on the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on antioxidant responses and oxidative damage. We found 40 publications and 212 effect sizes for antioxidant responses and 288 effect sizes for effects of oxidative damage. We performed a meta-analysis of signed and unsigned effect sizes. We found large unsigned effects for both categories (0.918 for oxidative damage; 0.973 for antioxidant response). Mean signed effect size weighted by sample size was 0.276 for oxidative damage and -0.350 for antioxidant defenses, with significant heterogeneity among effects for both categories, implying that ionizing radiation caused small to intermediate increases in oxidative damage and small to intermediate decreases in antioxidant defenses. Our estimates are robust, as shown by very high fail-safe numbers. Species, biological matrix (tissue, blood, sperm) and age predicted the magnitude of effects for oxidative damage as well as antioxidant response. Meta-regression models showed that effect sizes for oxidative damage varied among species and age classes, while effect sizes for antioxidant responses varied among species and biological matrices. Our results are consistent with the description of mechanisms underlying pathological effects of chronic exposure to LDIR. Our results also highlight the importance of resistance to oxidative stress as one possible mechanism associated with variation in species responses to LDIR-contaminated areas. PMID:26851726

  16. Combined Treatment With Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Gamma Ligands and Gamma Radiation Induces Apoptosis by PPARγ-Independent Up-Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Signals in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Jong; Im, Chang-Nim; Park, Seon Hwa; Moon, Eun-Yi; Hong, Sung Hee

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate possible radiosensitizing activities of the well-known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ ligand ciglitazone and novel PPARγ ligands CAY10415 and CAY10506 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic cell survival assay. To investigate the mechanism underlying PPARγ ligand-induced radiosensitization, the subdiploid cellular DNA fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry. Activation of the caspase pathway by combined PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation treatment was detected by immunoblot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry. Results: The 3 PPARγ ligands induced cell death and ROS generation in a PPARγ-independent manner, enhanced γ-radiation–induced apoptosis and caspase-3–mediated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in vitro. The combined PPARγ ligand/γ-radiation treatment triggered caspase-8 activation, and this initiator caspase played an important role in the combination-induced apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligands may enhance the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response, possibly by increasing γ-H2AX expression. Moreover, the combination treatment significantly increased ROS generation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine inhibited the combined treatment-induced ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicated that the combined treatment of PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation synergistically induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was regulated by ROS.

  17. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  18. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods.

  19. Microdosimetry of DNA conformations: relation between direct effect of (60)Co gamma rays and topology of DNA geometrical models in the calculation of A-, B- and Z-DNA radiation-induced damage yields.

    PubMed

    Semsarha, Farid; Raisali, Gholamreza; Goliaei, Bahram; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In order to obtain the energy deposition pattern of ionizing radiation in the nanometric scale of genetic material and to investigate the different sensitivities of the DNA conformations, direct effects of (60)Co gamma rays on the three A, B and Z conformations of DNA have been studied. For this purpose, single-strand breaks (SSB), double-strand breaks (DSB), base damage (BD), hit probabilities and three microdosimetry quantities (imparted energy, mean chord length and lineal energy) in the mentioned DNA conformations have been calculated and compared by using GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (Geant4) toolkit. The results show that A-, B- and Z-DNA conformations have the highest yields of DSB (1.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), SSB (25.2 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and BD (4.81 Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)), respectively. Based on the investigation of direct effects of radiation, it can be concluded that the DSB yield is largely correlated to the topological characteristics of DNA models, although the SSB yield is not. Moreover, according to the comparative results of the present study, a reliable candidate parameter for describing the relationship between DNA damage yields and geometry of DNA models in the theoretical radiation biology research studies would be the mean chord length (4 V/S) of the models.

  20. Nitroxide stable radicals protect beating cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Winkelsberg, D.; Pinson, A.; Hahn, S.M.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A. )

    1991-05-01

    The protective effect of stable nitroxide radicals against oxidative damage was studied using cardiomyocyte cultures obtained from newborn rats. Monolayered cardiomyocytes were exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the effect on spontaneous beating and leakage of LDH was determined. Hydrogen peroxide irreversibly blocked rhythmic beating and resulted in a significant membrane injury as shown by release of LDH. The injury was prevented by catalase which removes H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and by cell-permeable, metal-chelating agents such as desferrioxamine or bipyridine. In contrast, reagents which are excluded from the cell such as superoxide dismutase or DTPA did not protect the cells against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Five- and six-membered ring, stable nitroxide radicals which have previously been shown to chemically act as low-molecular weight, membrane-permeable, SOD-mimetic compounds provided full protection. The nitroxides prevented leakage of LDH and preserved normal cardiomyocyte contractility, presumably by intercepting intracellular O{sub 2}-radicals. Alternatively, protection may result through nitroxides reacting with reduced transition metal ions or by detoxifying secondary organic radicals.

  1. An Update on Oxidative Damage to Spermatozoa and Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Opuwari, Chinyerum S.; Henkel, Ralf R.

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mandatory mediators for essential cellular functions including the function of germ cells (oocytes and spermatozoa) and thereby the fertilization process. However, the exposure of these cells to excessive levels of oxidative stress by too high levels of ROS or too low levels of antioxidative protection will render these cells dysfunctional thereby failing the fertilization process and causing couples to be infertile. Numerous causes are responsible for the delicate bodily redox system being out of balance and causing disease and infertility. Many of these causes are modifiable such as lifestyle factors like obesity, poor nutrition, heat stress, smoking, or alcohol abuse. Possible correctable measures include foremost lifestyle changes, but also supplementation with antioxidants to scavenge excessive ROS. However, this should only be done after careful examination of the patient and establishment of the individual bodily antioxidant needs. In addition, other corrective measures include sperm separation for assisted reproductive techniques. However, these techniques have to be carried out very carefully as they, if applied wrongly, bear risks of generating ROS damaging the germ cells and preventing fertilization. PMID:26942204

  2. An Update on Oxidative Damage to Spermatozoa and Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Opuwari, Chinyerum S; Henkel, Ralf R

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mandatory mediators for essential cellular functions including the function of germ cells (oocytes and spermatozoa) and thereby the fertilization process. However, the exposure of these cells to excessive levels of oxidative stress by too high levels of ROS or too low levels of antioxidative protection will render these cells dysfunctional thereby failing the fertilization process and causing couples to be infertile. Numerous causes are responsible for the delicate bodily redox system being out of balance and causing disease and infertility. Many of these causes are modifiable such as lifestyle factors like obesity, poor nutrition, heat stress, smoking, or alcohol abuse. Possible correctable measures include foremost lifestyle changes, but also supplementation with antioxidants to scavenge excessive ROS. However, this should only be done after careful examination of the patient and establishment of the individual bodily antioxidant needs. In addition, other corrective measures include sperm separation for assisted reproductive techniques. However, these techniques have to be carried out very carefully as they, if applied wrongly, bear risks of generating ROS damaging the germ cells and preventing fertilization. PMID:26942204

  3. Modified hydroxyethyl starch protects cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey K; Sergeeva, Olga Yu; Vlasov, Petr S; Zavyalova, Margarita S; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Garamus, Vasil M; Khrustaleva, Raisa S; Stepanek, Petr; Domnina, Nina S

    2015-12-10

    This article describes the synthesis of novel starch-antioxidant conjugates, which show great potential for biomedical applications to protect cells from oxidative damage. These conjugates were synthesized by the modification of a hydroxyethyl starch (molecular weight=200,000g/mol) with various sterically hindered phenols that differ in radical scavenging activity. They possess substantial radical scavenging activity toward a model free radical. It was found that the polymer conjugate conformation depends on the antioxidant structure and degree of substitution. We constructed the complete conformational phase behavior for the polymers with increasing degrees of substitution from small-angle neutron scattering data. It was observed that the conjugate conformation changes are the result of water shifting from a thermodynamically favorable solvent to an unfavorable one, a process that then leads to compaction of the conjugate. We selected the conjugates that possess high substitution degree but still exhibit coil conformation for biological studies. The high efficiency of the conjugates was confirmed by different in vitro (hypotonic hemolysis of erythrocytes/osmotic resistance of erythrocytes and the change of [Ca(2+)]i inside freshly isolated cardiomyocytes) and in vivo (acute hemorrhage/massive blood loss) methods. PMID:26428130

  4. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  5. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  6. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-01

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. PMID:25797627

  7. Effects of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides on Apoptosis, Cellular Adhesion, and Oxidative Damage in Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells of Mice Exposed to Ionizing Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Pang, Hua; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Qiong; Xu, Lu; Liu, Qian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lycium barbarum has been used for more than 2500 years as a traditional herb and food in China. We investigated the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on apoptosis, oxidative damage, and expression of adhesion molecules in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNC) of mice injured by ionizing radiation. Kunming mice were exposed to X-rays; then mice in the LBP groups were continuously injected with various concentrations of LBP intraperitoneally for 14 days. Mice in the control group were continuously injected with normal saline (NS) by the same route for 14 days. A normal group was set up. After 1, 7, and 14 days of treatment, mice were killed and BMNC were extracted. Cell cycle, apoptosis, and the expression of adhesion molecules CD44 and CD49d were detected by flow cytometry. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were identified by colorimetric analyses. LBP significantly decreased the percentage of G0/G1 phase, apoptosis, MDA level, and expression of CD44 and CD49d and distinctly increased the activity of SOD. LBP showed a protective effect on BMNC against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage and altered the expression of adhesion molecule. PMID:27314019

  8. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, N.B.R.; Rangel, M.P.; Martins, V.; Hage, M.; Gelain, D.P.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Grisolia, C.K.; Parra, E.R.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days) significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26200231

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  10. Measurement of oxidative damage to DNA in nanomaterial exposed cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Roursgaard, Martin; Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Klingberg, Henrik; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2015-03-01

    Increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA have been documented in studies of metal, metal oxide, carbon-based and ceramic engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In particular, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is widely assessed as a DNA nucleobase oxidation product, measured by chromatographic assays, antibody-based methods or the comet assay with DNA repair enzymes. However, spurious oxidation of DNA has been a problem in certain studies applying chromatographic assays, yielding high baseline levels of 8-oxodG. Antibody-based assays detect high 8-oxodG baseline levels, related to cross-reactivity with other molecules in cells. This review provides an overview of efforts to reliably detect oxidatively damaged DNA and a critical assessment of the published studies on DNA damage levels. Animal studies with high baseline levels of oxidatively damaged DNA are more likely to show positive associations between exposure to ENMs and oxidized DNA in tissue than studies showing acceptable baseline levels (odds ratio = 12.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-124). Nevertheless, reliable studies indicate that intratracheal instillation of nanosized carbon black is associated with increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung tissue. Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black, TiO2 , carbon nanotubes and ZnO is associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in tissues. These observations are supported by cell culture studies showing concentration-dependent associations between ENM exposure and oxidatively damaged DNA measured by the comet assay. Cell culture studies show relatively high variation in the ability of ENMs to oxidatively damage DNA; hence, it is currently impossible to group ENMs according to their DNA damaging potential. PMID:25196723

  11. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Toolis, F.; Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  12. Interactions between Biliverdin, Oxidative Damage, and Spleen Morphology after Simulated Aggressive Encounters in Veiled Chameleons.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; Ligon, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    Stressors frequently increase oxidative damage--unless organisms simultaneously mount effective antioxidant responses. One putative mitigative mechanism is the use of biliverdin, an antioxidant produced in the spleen during erythrocyte degradation. We hypothesized that both wild and captive-bred male veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus), which are highly aggressive to conspecifics, would respond to agonistic displays with increased levels of oxidative damage, but that increased levels of biliverdin would limit this increase. We found that even just visual exposure to a potential combatant resulted in decreased body mass during the subsequent 48-hour period, but that hematocrit, biliverdin concentration in the bile, relative spleen size, and oxidative damage in plasma, liver, and spleen were unaffected. Contrary to our predictions, we found that individuals with smaller spleens exhibited greater decreases in hematocrit and higher bile biliverdin concentrations, suggesting a revision to the idea of spleen-dependent erythrocyte processing. Interestingly, individuals with larger spleens had reduced oxidative damage in both the liver and spleen, demonstrating the spleen's importance in modulating oxidative damage. We also uncovered differences in spleen size and oxidative damage between wild and captive-bred chameleons, highlighting environmentally dependent differences in oxidative physiology. Lastly, we found no relationship between oxidative damage and biliverdin concentration, calling into question biliverdin's antioxidant role in this species.

  13. Space radiation-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and memory impairment in mice: ameliorative potential of the melatonin metabolite, AFMK.

    PubMed

    Manda, Kailash; Ueno, Megumi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-11-01

    Evaluation of potential health effects from high energy charged particle radiation exposure during long duration space travel is important for the future of manned missions. Cognitive health of an organism is considered to be maintained by the capacity of hippocampal precursors to proliferate and differentiate. Environmental stressors including irradiation have been shown to inhibit neurogenesis and are associated with the onset of cognitive impairments. The present study reports on the protective effects of N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK), a melatonin metabolite, against high energy charged particle radiation-induced oxidative damage to the brain. We observed that radiation exposure (2.0 Gy of 500 MeV/nucleon (56)Fe beams, a ground-based model of space radiation) impaired the spatial memory of mice at later intervals without affecting the motor activities. AFMK pretreatment significantly ameliorated these neurobehavioral ailments. Radiation-induced changes in the population of immature and proliferating neurons in the dentate gyrus were localized using anti-doublecortin (Dcx) and anti-Ki-67 expression. AFMK pretreatment significantly inhibited the loss of Dcx and Ki-67 positive cells. Moreover, AFMK pretreatment ameliorated the radiation-induced augmentation of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxyalkenal + malondialdehyde (MDA + HAE) in the brain and maintained the total antioxidant capacity of plasma and nonprotein sulfhydryl contents in brain.

  14. Space radiation-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and memory impairment in mice: ameliorative potential of the melatonin metabolite, AFMK.

    PubMed

    Manda, Kailash; Ueno, Megumi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-11-01

    Evaluation of potential health effects from high energy charged particle radiation exposure during long duration space travel is important for the future of manned missions. Cognitive health of an organism is considered to be maintained by the capacity of hippocampal precursors to proliferate and differentiate. Environmental stressors including irradiation have been shown to inhibit neurogenesis and are associated with the onset of cognitive impairments. The present study reports on the protective effects of N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK), a melatonin metabolite, against high energy charged particle radiation-induced oxidative damage to the brain. We observed that radiation exposure (2.0 Gy of 500 MeV/nucleon (56)Fe beams, a ground-based model of space radiation) impaired the spatial memory of mice at later intervals without affecting the motor activities. AFMK pretreatment significantly ameliorated these neurobehavioral ailments. Radiation-induced changes in the population of immature and proliferating neurons in the dentate gyrus were localized using anti-doublecortin (Dcx) and anti-Ki-67 expression. AFMK pretreatment significantly inhibited the loss of Dcx and Ki-67 positive cells. Moreover, AFMK pretreatment ameliorated the radiation-induced augmentation of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxyalkenal + malondialdehyde (MDA + HAE) in the brain and maintained the total antioxidant capacity of plasma and nonprotein sulfhydryl contents in brain. PMID:18631288

  15. Whole Brain Radiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Woo; Cho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Won Hee; Sonntag, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy, the most commonly used for the treatment of brain tumors, has been shown to be of major significance in tu-mor control and survival rate of brain tumor patients. About 200,000 patients with brain tumor are treated with either partial large field or whole brain radiation every year in the United States. The use of radiation therapy for treatment of brain tumors, however, may lead to devastating functional deficits in brain several months to years after treatment. In particular, whole brain radiation therapy results in a significant reduction in learning and memory in brain tumor patients as long-term consequences of treatment. Although a number of in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated brain injury, the cel-lular and molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces damage to normal tissue in brain remain largely unknown. Therefore, this review focuses on the pathophysiological mechanisms of whole brain radiation-induced cognitive impairment and the iden-tification of novel therapeutic targets. Specifically, we review the current knowledge about the effects of whole brain radiation on pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory pathways, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) system and extracellular matrix (ECM), and physiological angiogenesis in brain. These studies may provide a foundation for defin-ing a new cellular and molecular basis related to the etiology of cognitive impairment that occurs among patients in response to whole brain radiation therapy. It may also lead to new opportunities for therapeutic interventions for brain tumor patients who are undergoing whole brain radiation therapy. PMID:24009822

  16. Polymorphic trial in oxidative damage of arsenic exposed Vietnamese

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihara, Junko; Soejima, Mikiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Koda, Yoshiro; Kunito, Takashi; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takeshita, Haruo

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic causes DNA damage and changes the cellular capacity for DNA repair. Genes in the base excision repair (BER) pathway influence the generation and repair of oxidative lesions. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) Ser326Cys; apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) Asp148Glu; X-ray and repair and cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg280His and Arg399Gln in the BER genes were analyzed, and the relationship between these 4 SNPs and the urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations of 100 Vietnamese population exposed to arsenic was investigated. Individuals with hOGG1 326Cys/Cys showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those with 326 Ser/Cys and Ser/Ser. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, heterozygous subjects showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those homozygous for Asp/Asp. Moreover, global ethnic comparison of the allelic frequencies of the 4SNPs was performed in 10 population and previous reported data. The mutant allele frequencies of hOGG1 Ser326Cys in the Asian populations were higher than those in the African and Caucasian populations. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, Caucasians showed higher mutant frequencies than those shown by African and Asian populations. Among Asian populations, the Bangladeshi population showed relatively higher mutant allele frequencies of the APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism. This study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a worldwide distribution of SNPs (hOGG1 Ser326Cys, APE1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg280His, and XRCC1 Arg399Gln) in the BER genes. - Highlights: > We showed that hOGG1 and APE1 are associated with urinary 8-OHdG concentrations. > We showed the existence of inter-ethnic differences in hOGG1 and APE1 polymorphism. > These polymorphisms is a genetic marker of susceptibility to oxidative stress.

  17. Antioxidants, Oxidative Damage and Oxygen Deprivation Stress: a Review

    PubMed Central

    BLOKHINA, OLGA; VIROLAINEN, EIJA; FAGERSTEDT, KURT V.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative stress is induced by a wide range of environmental factors including UV stress, pathogen invasion (hypersensitive reaction), herbicide action and oxygen shortage. Oxygen deprivation stress in plant cells is distinguished by three physiologically different states: transient hypoxia, anoxia and reoxygenation. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is characteristic for hypoxia and especially for reoxygenation. Of the ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2·–) are both produced in a number of cellular reactions, including the iron‐catalysed Fenton reaction, and by various enzymes such as lipoxygenases, peroxidases, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase. The main cellular components susceptible to damage by free radicals are lipids (peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in membranes), proteins (denaturation), carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Consequences of hypoxia‐induced oxidative stress depend on tissue and/or species (i.e. their tolerance to anoxia), on membrane properties, on endogenous antioxidant content and on the ability to induce the response in the antioxidant system. Effective utilization of energy resources (starch, sugars) and the switch to anaerobic metabolism and the preservation of the redox status of the cell are vital for survival. The formation of ROS is prevented by an antioxidant system: low molecular mass antioxidants (ascorbic acid, glutathione, tocopherols), enzymes regenerating the reduced forms of antioxidants, and ROS‐interacting enzymes such as SOD, peroxidases and catalases. In plant tissues many phenolic compounds (in addition to tocopherols) are potential antioxidants: flavonoids, tannins and lignin precursors may work as ROS‐scavenging compounds. Antioxidants act as a cooperative network, employing a series of redox reactions. Interactions between ascorbic acid and glutathione, and ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds are well known. Under oxygen deprivation stress some contradictory results on the

  18. Polymorphic trial in oxidative damage of arsenic exposed Vietnamese.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Junko; Soejima, Mikiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Koda, Yoshiro; Kunito, Takashi; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takeshita, Haruo

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic causes DNA damage and changes the cellular capacity for DNA repair. Genes in the base excision repair (BER) pathway influence the generation and repair of oxidative lesions. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) Ser326Cys; apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) Asp148Glu; X-ray and repair and cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg280His and Arg399Gln in the BER genes were analyzed, and the relationship between these 4 SNPs and the urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations of 100 Vietnamese population exposed to arsenic was investigated. Individuals with hOGG1 326Cys/Cys showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those with 326 Ser/Cys and Ser/Ser. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, heterozygous subjects showed significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG concentrations than did those homozygous for Asp/Asp. Moreover, global ethnic comparison of the allelic frequencies of the 4SNPs was performed in 10 population and previous reported data. The mutant allele frequencies of hOGG1 Ser326Cys in the Asian populations were higher than those in the African and Caucasian populations. As for APE1 Asp148Glu, Caucasians showed higher mutant frequencies than those shown by African and Asian populations. Among Asian populations, the Bangladeshi population showed relatively higher mutant allele frequencies of the APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism. This study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a worldwide distribution of SNPs (hOGG1 Ser326Cys, APE1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg280His, and XRCC1 Arg399Gln) in the BER genes.

  19. Evaluation of Gate Oxide Damage Caused by Ionization Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaka, Shigeki; Iyanagi, Katsumi; Fukuhara, Jota; Hayase, Shuzi

    2007-11-01

    An unbalanced magnet (UM) is commonly employed in ionization magnetron sputtering (IMS) in order to increase the ionization rates of sputtering species. In this paper, sputtering using an UM is compared with that using a balanced magnet (BM) during the deposition of Ti thin layers. Ti layers were fabricated on the top of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate electrodes of antenna metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with various thicknesses of gate SiO2 layers ranging from 25 to 80 Å, and the durability of the gate SiO2 layers was monitored by current-voltage (I-V) measurements. It was found that the MOS capacitors with thin SiO2 layers fabricated with the UM were much more damaged than those fabricated with the BM. This characteristic became more marked for thinner SiO2 layers. Its origin was investigated by monitoring the current injected from the plasma to the substrate using a specially designed electrical configuration, and was explained as follows. Electrons are carried toward substrates by curvature drift originating from the diverging magnetic field perpendicular to the substrate. This causes the accumulation of electrons on the gate SiO2 thin layers where the diverging magnetic field is developed at the beginning of discharge, i.e., before the uniform Ti deposition starts to occur. Consequently, the accumulated electrons break the gate SiO2 layer. These results suggest that a new design of magnetic fields for the UM is needed so that the magnetic field does not reach the substrate. It is particularly important to keep the diverging magnetic fields away from the substrates at the beginning of discharge.

  20. Role of DNA damage and repair in the function of eukaryotic genes: radiation-induced single-strand breaks and their rejoining in chromosomal and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1980-04-01

    The production and rejoining of single-strand breaks (SSB) in chromosomal DNA and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were investigated after sublethal doses of ..gamma.. radiation to exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Hydrogen-3-labeled total nuclear DNA isolated from either control or irradiated cells was heat denatured and electrophoresed in agarose gels containing formaldehyde. Ribosomal DNA was identified by hybridization to (/sup 32/P)rRNA after transferring the DNA from the gels to nitrocellulose strips. It was found that (a) approximately 0.68 SSB is produced in each strand of rDNA exposed to 40 krad; (b) greater than 80% of SSB were rejoined within the first 20 min after irradiation in both chromosomal and rDNA; and (c) the rejoining process in both chromosomal and rDNA proceeded in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, RNA synthesis, or oxidative metabolism. While the majority of SSB induced by 40 krad is rejoined within 20 min after irradiation, the resumption of rRNA synthesis does not occur until 30 min thereafter; it is concluded that the restoration of the normal size of the rDNA template is probably necessary but not sufficient for the resumption of rRNA synthesis.

  1. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration. PMID:27098922

  2. Interactions between Biliverdin, Oxidative Damage, and Spleen Morphology after Simulated Aggressive Encounters in Veiled Chameleons

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Michael W.; Ligon, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Stressors frequently increase oxidative damage–unless organisms simultaneously mount effective antioxidant responses. One putative mitigative mechanism is the use of biliverdin, an antioxidant produced in the spleen during erythrocyte degradation. We hypothesized that both wild and captive-bred male veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus), which are highly aggressive to conspecifics, would respond to agonistic displays with increased levels of oxidative damage, but that increased levels of biliverdin would limit this increase. We found that even just visual exposure to a potential combatant resulted in decreased body mass during the subsequent 48-hour period, but that hematocrit, biliverdin concentration in the bile, relative spleen size, and oxidative damage in plasma, liver, and spleen were unaffected. Contrary to our predictions, we found that individuals with smaller spleens exhibited greater decreases in hematocrit and higher bile biliverdin concentrations, suggesting a revision to the idea of spleen-dependent erythrocyte processing. Interestingly, individuals with larger spleens had reduced oxidative damage in both the liver and spleen, demonstrating the spleen’s importance in modulating oxidative damage. We also uncovered differences in spleen size and oxidative damage between wild and captive-bred chameleons, highlighting environmentally dependent differences in oxidative physiology. Lastly, we found no relationship between oxidative damage and biliverdin concentration, calling into question biliverdin’s antioxidant role in this species. PMID:26368930

  3. Effects of diet and age on oxidative damage products in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Valachovicová, M; Pauková, V; Dusinská, M

    2008-01-01

    Damage of molecules as a consequence of oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases related to aging. Diet is a key environmental factor affecting the incidence of many chronic diseases. Antioxidant substances in diet enhance the DNA, lipid and protein protection by increasing the scavenging of free radicals. Products of oxidative damage of DNA (DNA strand breaks with oxidized purines or oxidized pyrimidines), lipids (conjugated dienes of fatty acids) and proteins (carbonyls) in relation to nutrition (vegetarian diet vs. non-vegetarian, traditional mixed diet) were measured in young women aged 20-30 years (46 vegetarians, 48 non-vegetarians) vs. older women aged 60-70 years (33 vegetarians, 34 non-vegetarians). In young subjects, no differences in values of oxidative damage as well as plasma values of antioxidative vitamins (C,beta-carotene) were observed between vegetarian and non-vegetarian groups. In older vegetarian group significantly reduced values of DNA breaks with oxidized purines, DNA breaks with oxidized pyrimidines and lipid peroxidation and on the other hand, significantly increased plasma values of vitamin C and beta-carotene were found compared to the respective non-vegetarian group. Significant age dependences of measured parameters (increase in all oxidative damage products and decrease in plasma vitamin concentrations in older women) were noted only in non-vegetarians. Vegetarian values of older women vs. young women were similar or non-significantly changed. The results suggest that increase of oxidative damage in aging may be prevented by vegetarian nutrition.

  4. Nitric Oxide Suppresses β-Cell Apoptosis by Inhibiting the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Naatz, Aaron; Hogg, Neil; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide, produced in pancreatic β cells in response to proinflammatory cytokines, plays a dual role in the regulation of β-cell fate. While nitric oxide induces cellular damage and impairs β-cell function, it also promotes β-cell survival through activation of protective pathways that promote β-cell recovery. In this study, we identify a novel mechanism in which nitric oxide prevents β-cell apoptosis by attenuating the DNA damage response (DDR). Nitric oxide suppresses activation of the DDR (as measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1 and p53) in response to multiple genotoxic agents, including camptothecin, H2O2, and nitric oxide itself, despite the presence of DNA damage. While camptothecin and H2O2 both induce DDR activation, nitric oxide suppresses only camptothecin-induced apoptosis and not H2O2-induced necrosis. The ability of nitric oxide to suppress the DDR appears to be selective for pancreatic β cells, as nitric oxide fails to inhibit DDR signaling in macrophages, hepatocytes, and fibroblasts, three additional cell types examined. While originally described as the damaging agent responsible for cytokine-induced β-cell death, these studies identify a novel role for nitric oxide as a protective molecule that promotes β-cell survival by suppressing DDR signaling and attenuating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:27185882

  5. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  6. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  7. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  8. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, Juan F. McCauley, Linda; Scherer, J.; Lasarev, M.; Koshy, M.; Kow, Y.W.; Nazar-Stewart, Valle; Kisby, G.E.

    2008-02-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage have been proposed as mechanisms linking pesticide exposure to health effects such as cancer and neurological diseases. A study of pesticide applicators and farmworkers was conducted to examine the relationship between organophosphate pesticide exposure and biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urine samples were analyzed for OP metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG). Lymphocytes were analyzed for oxidative DNA repair activity and DNA damage (Comet assay), and serum was analyzed for lipid peroxides (i.e., malondialdehyde, MDA). Cellular damage in agricultural workers was validated using lymphocyte cell cultures. Urinary OP metabolites were significantly higher in farmworkers and applicators (p < 0.001) when compared to controls. 8-OH-dG levels were 8.5 times and 2.3 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. Serum MDA levels were 4.9 times and 24 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. DNA damage (Comet assay) and oxidative DNA repair were significantly greater in lymphocytes from applicators and farmworkers when compared with controls. Markers of oxidative stress (i.e., increased reactive oxygen species and reduced glutathione levels) and DNA damage were also observed in lymphocyte cell cultures treated with an OP. The findings from these in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that organophosphate pesticides induce oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers. These biomarkers may be useful for increasing our understanding of the link between pesticides and a number of health effects.

  9. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  10. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  11. Ferritin and ceruloplasmin in oxidative damage: review and recent findings.

    PubMed

    de Silva, D M; Aust, S D

    1993-09-01

    The oxidation of biomolecules such as lipid, protein, and DNA is associated with a variety of toxicities and pathologies. In an all-encompassing definition these oxidative processes have been referred to as "oxidative stress." Although the direct reaction between molecular oxygen and most biomolecules is spin forbidden, this reaction can be efficiently catalyzed by transition metals such as iron and copper. Iron especially has been demonstrated to be a potent catalyst of biological oxidations. This review focuses on the relationship between iron and copper with respect to the copper protein ceruloplasmin, which may play a role in iron homeostasis by catalyzing the oxidation of iron as it is placed in ferritin.

  12. The polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} protects mice from ionizing-radiation-induced immune and mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Xiaoqing; Hao Jiejie; Zhang Xiaoyong; Yu Bozhang; Ren Jinming; Luo Cheng; Li Qingnuan; Huang Qing; Shi Xianglin; Li Wenxin; Liu Jiankang

    2010-02-15

    Although the protective effect of the polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C{sub 60}(OH){sub n} against ionizing radiation is an area of much interest, the mechanisms relating to how polyhydroxylated fullerene derivatives improve mitochondrial dysfunction remain unknown. In order to find new and effective radioprotective agents, we synthesized a new polyhydroxylated fullerene molecule with 24 hydroxyl groups of known positions on C{sub 60} and studied its protective effects in mice subjected to irradiation. Mice were pretreated with C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} for 2 weeks (daily, 40 mg/kg i. p.), then subjected to a lethal dose of whole body gamma-irradiation (from a {sup 60}Co source). Survival was observed for 30 days after irradiation. Immune and mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage were analyzed in mice with the same C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} pretreatment and irradiation except that the animals were euthanized at day 5 after the irradiation. It was found that 2-week C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} pretreatment effectively reduced whole body irradiation-induced mortality without apparent toxicity. C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} pretreatment also showed significant protective effects against ionizing-radiation-induced decreases in immune and mitochondrial function and antioxidant defense in the liver and spleen. These results suggest that the polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} protects against ionizing-radiation-induced mortality, possibly by enhancing immune function, decreasing oxidative damage and improving mitochondrial function.

  13. Requirement of Arsenic Biomethylation for Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Chikara; Ramirez, Dario C.; Tokar, Erik J.; Himeno, Seiichiro; Drobná, Zuzana; Stýblo, Miroslav; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inorganic arsenic is an environmental carcinogen that may act through multiple mechanisms including formation of methylated derivatives in vivo. Sodium arsenite (up to 5.0 μM) renders arsenic methylation–competent TRL1215 rat liver epithelial cells tumorigenic in nude mice at 18 weeks of exposure and arsenic methylation-deficient RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic at 30 weeks of exposure. We assessed the role of arsenic biomethylation in oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using a recently developed immuno-spin trapping method. Methods Immuno-spin trapping was used to measure ODD after chronic exposure of cultured TRL1215 vs RWPE-1 cells, or of methylation-competent UROtsa/F35 vs methylation-deficient UROtsa human urothelial cells, to sodium arsenite. Secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 activity, as analyzed by zymography, cellular invasiveness by using a transwell assay, and colony formation by using soft agar assay were compared in cells exposed to arsenite with and without selenite, an arsenic biomethylation inhibitor, to assess the role of ODD in the transition to an in vitro cancer phenotype. Results Exposure of methylation-competent TRL1215 cells to up to 1.0 μM sodium arsenite was followed by a substantial increase in ODD at 5–18 weeks (eg, at 16 weeks with 1.0 μM arsenite, 1138% of control, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 797% to 1481%), whereas exposure of methylation-deficient RWPE-1 cells to up to 5.0 μM arsenite did not increase ODD for a 30-week period. Inhibition of arsenic biomethylation with sodium selenite abolished arsenic-induced ODD and invasiveness, colony formation, and MMP-2 and -9 hypersecretion in TRL1215 cells. Arsenic induced ODD in methylation-competent UROtsa/F35 cells (eg, at 16 weeks, with 1.0 μM arsenite 225% of control, 95% CI = 188% to 262%) but not in arsenic methylation-deficient UROtsa cells, and ODD levels corresponded to the levels of increased invasiveness, colony formation, and

  14. Quercetin inhibits radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-08-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis.

  15. Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  16. Detection of oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Ela; Sardas, Semra; Aslan, Selcuk; Isik, Erdal; Esat Karakaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA may play an important role in both normal ageing and in neurodegenerative diseases. The deleterious consequences of excessive oxidations and the pathophysiological role of reactive oxygen species have been intensively studied in Alzheimer's disease. Although the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease is still not clear, the detection of an increased damage status in the cells of patients could have important therapeutic implications. The levels of oxidative damage in peripheral lymphocytes of 24 Alzheimer's disease patients and of 21 age-matched controls were determined by comet assay applied to freshly isolated blood samples with oxidative lesion-specific DNA repair endonucleases (endonuclease III for oxidized pyrimidines, formamidopyrimidine glycosylase for oxidized purines). It was demonstrated that Alzheimer's disease is associated with elevated levels of oxidized pyrimidines and purines (p<0.0001) as compared with age-matched control subjects. It was also demonstrated that the comet assay is useful as a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage when used with oxidative lesion-specific enzymes.

  17. Vertebrate POLQ and POLβ Cooperate in Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Michio; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nakamura, Jun; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Hou, Esther; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; Tano, Keizo; Yasui, Akira; Lan, Li; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D.; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Hochegger, Helfrid; Okada, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Takeda, Shunichi

    2007-01-01

    Summary Base excision repair (BER) plays an essential role in protecting cells from mutagenic base damage caused by oxidative stress, hydrolysis, and environmental factors. POLQ is a DNA polymerase, which appears to be involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) past base damage. We disrupted POLQ, and its homologs HEL308 and POLN in chicken DT40 cells, and also created polq/hel308 and polq/poln double mutants. We found that POLQ-deficient mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to oxidative base damage induced by H2O2, but not to UV or cisplatin. Surprisingly, this phenotype was synergistically increased by concomitant deletion of the major BER polymerase, POLβ. Moreover, extracts from a polq null mutant cell line show reduced BER activity, and POLQ, like POLβ, accumulated rapidly at sites of base damage. Accordingly, POLQ and POLβ share an overlapping function in the repair of oxidative base damage. Taken together, these results suggest a role for vertebrate POLQ in BER. PMID:17018297

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  19. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN MICROGLIA AND DAMAGES NEURONS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) damages biological targets through oxidative stress (OS) pathways. Several reports indicate that the brain is one of those targets. Since microglia (brain macrophage) are critical to OS-mediated neurodegeneration, their response to concentrated amb...

  20. Nanoencapsulation of rice bran oil increases its protective effects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; da Silva, Cássia Regina; de Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Cabreira, Thaíssa Nunes; de Bona da Silva, Cristiane; Ferreira, Juliano; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2015-06-01

    Excessive UV-B radiation by sunlight produces inflammatory and oxidative damage of skin, which can lead to sunburn, photoaging, and cancer. This study evaluated whether nanoencapsulation improves the protective effects of rice bran oil against UVB radiation-induced skin damage in mice. Lipid-core nanocapsules containing rice bran oil were prepared, and had mean size around 200 nm, negative zeta potential (∼-9 mV), and low polydispersity index (<0.20). In order to allow application on the skin, a hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil was prepared. This formulation was able to prevent ear edema induced by UVB irradiation by 60 ± 9%, when compared with a hydrogel containing LNC prepared with a mixture of medium chain triglycerides instead of rice bran oil. Protein carbonylation levels (biomarker of oxidative stress) and NF-κB nuclear translocation (biomarker of pro-inflammatory and carcinogenesis response) were reduced (81% and 87%, respectively) in animals treated with the hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil. These in vivo results demonstrate the beneficial effects of nanoencapsulation to improve the protective properties of rice bran oil on skin damage caused by UVB exposure.

  1. UV-radiation-induced degradation of fluorinated polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Hsin; Saha, Naresh C.

    1994-12-01

    Fully cured fluorinated polyimide (FPI) films with low dielectric constants ( less than or equal to 3.0) have been found to be chemically altered when exposed to UV radiation during a process integration study. This chemical modification is manifested in the loss of film thickness after it is subjected to UV radiation followed by photoresist stripping. The UV-radiation-induced surface modifications of the FPI film have been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data show the presence of C=O and COO(-) sites in the FPI molecule following UV exposure. Under prolonged UV exposure in a stepper, the FPI film acts as a positive working photoresist. However, a 2 kA plasma enhanced chemically vapor-deposited oxide mask and/or a typical 12 kA photoresist mask effectively shields the FPI from UV-radiation-induced degradation. The effects of FPI on UV radiation present during other normal wafer processing steps such as plasma deposition and reactive ion-etching were also studied and found to be negligible.

  2. Radiation induced corrosion of copper for spent nuclear fuel storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-11-01

    The long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste is one of the main concerns for countries utilizing nuclear power. The integrity of engineered and natural barriers in such repositories must be carefully evaluated in order to minimize the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. One of the most developed concepts of long term storage of spent nuclear fuel is the Swedish KBS-3 method. According to this method, the spent fuel will be sealed inside copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and placed 500 m down in stable bedrock. Despite the importance of the process of radiation induced corrosion of copper, relatively few studies have been reported. In this work the effect of the total gamma dose on radiation induced corrosion of copper in anoxic pure water has been studied experimentally. Copper samples submerged in water were exposed to a series of total doses using three different dose rates. Unirradiated samples were used as reference samples throughout. The copper surfaces were examined qualitatively using IRAS and XPS and quantitatively using cathodic reduction. The concentration of copper in solution after irradiation was measured using ICP-AES. The influence of aqueous radiation chemistry on the corrosion process was evaluated based on numerical simulations. The experiments show that the dissolution as well as the oxide layer thickness increase upon radiation. Interestingly, the evaluation using numerical simulations indicates that aqueous radiation chemistry is not the only process driving the corrosion of copper in these systems.

  3. Evaluation of Charge Passed through Gate-Oxide Films Using a Charging Damage Measurement Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Seiichi; Sumiya, Masahiro; Tamura, Hitoshi; Yoshioka, Ken; Tokunaga, Takafumi; Mizutani, Tatsumi

    2000-02-01

    A charging damage measurement electrode was used to model device structures. The charge passed through gate-oxide films (Qp) was measured in a cavity-resonator-type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher for 12-inch wafers and the reduction of charging damage was investigated. Parallel circuits composed of resistors and condensers were modeled after the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the gate-oxide film. The electron shading effect was introduced by mounting a Si chip with line and space (L&S)-patterned photoresist on the probe, which corresponded to the gate electrode. The reduction of charging damage using the time modulation (TM) bias was determined by evaluating Qp and the damaged test element group (TEG) wafer. This charging damage measurement electrode is effective for investigating the reduction of charging damage in particular, of the etcher used for 12-inch wafers.

  4. A novel strategy of natural plant ferritin to protect DNA from oxidative damage during iron oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiayun; Lv, Chenyan; Zhang, Xiuqing; Masuda, Taro; Li, Meiliang; Zhao, Guanghua

    2012-07-15

    Plant ferritin is a naturally occurring heteropolymer in plastids, where Fe(2+) is oxidatively deposited into the protein. However, the effect of this process on the coexistence of DNA and plant ferritin in the plastids is unknown. To investigate this effect, we built a system in which various plant ferritins and DNA coexist, followed by treatment with ferrous ions under aerobic conditions. Interestingly, naturally occurring soybean seed ferritin (SSF), a heteropolymer with an H-1/H-2 ratio of 1 to 1 in the apo form, completely protected DNA from oxidative damage during iron oxidative deposition into protein, and a similar result was obtained with its recombinant form, but not with its homopolymeric counterparts, apo rH-1 and apo rH-2. We demonstrate that the difference in DNA protection between heteropolymeric and homopolymeric plant ferritins stems from their different strategies to control iron chemistry during the above oxidative process. For example, the detoxification reaction occurs only in the presence of apo heteropolymeric SSF (hSSF), thereby preventing the production of hydroxyl radicals. In contrast, hydroxyl radicals are apparently generated via the Fenton reaction when apo rH-1 or rH-2 is used instead of apo hSSF. Thus, a combination of H-1 and H-2 subunits in hSSF seems to impart a unique DNA-protective function to the protein, which was previously unrecognized. This new finding advances our understanding of the structure and function of ferritin and of the widespread occurrence of heteropolymeric plant ferritin in nature. PMID:22580341

  5. In situ analysis of repair processes for oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Oohata, Yoshitsugu; Takao, Masashi; Okano, Satoshi; Masutani, Mitsuko; Wilson, Samuel H.; Yasui, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative DNA damage causes blocks and errors in transcription and replication, leading to cell death and genomic instability. Although repair mechanisms of the damage have been extensively analyzed in vitro, the actual in vivo repair processes remain largely unknown. Here, by irradiation with an UVA laser through a microscope lens, we have conditionally produced single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage at restricted nuclear regions of mammalian cells. We showed, in real time after irradiation by using antibodies and GFP-tagged proteins, rapid and ordered DNA repair processes of oxidative DNA damage in human cells. Furthermore, we characterized repair pathways by using repair-defective mammalian cells and found that DNA polymerase accumulated at single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage by means of its 31- and 8-kDa domains, respectively, and that XRCC1 is essential for both polymerase -dependent and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent repair pathways of single-strand breaks. Thus, the repair of oxidative DNA damage is based on temporal and functional interactions among various proteins operating at the site of DNA damage in living cells.

  6. Iodinated contrast media cause direct tubular cell damage, leading to oxidative stress, low nitric oxide, and impairment of tubuloglomerular feedback.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi Zhao; Schmerbach, Kristin; Lu, Yuan; Perlewitz, Andrea; Nikitina, Tatiana; Cantow, Kathleen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Persson, Pontus B; Patzak, Andreas; Liu, Ruisheng; Sendeski, Mauricio M

    2014-04-15

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) have adverse effects that may result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in CM-induced kidney injury. We test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide in tubules are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage and that increased local oxidative stress may increase tubuloglomerular feedback. Rat thick ascending limbs (TAL) were isolated and perfused. Superoxide and nitric oxide were quantified using fluorescence techniques. Cell death rate was estimated using propidium iodide and trypan blue. The function of macula densa and tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness were measured in isolated, perfused juxtaglomerular apparatuses (JGA) of rabbits. The expression of genes related to oxidative stress and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were investigated in the renal medulla of rats that received CM. CM increased superoxide concentration and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability in TAL. Propidium iodide fluorescence and trypan blue uptake increased more in CM-perfused TAL than in controls, indicating increased rate of cell death. There were no marked acute changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative stress in medullary segments of Henle's loop. SOD activity did not differ between CM and control groups. The tubuloglomerular feedback in isolated JGA was increased by CM. Tubular cell damage and accompanying oxidative stress in our model are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage, which also modifies the tubulovascular interaction at the macula densa, and may therefore contribute to disturbances of renal perfusion and filtration.

  7. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  8. Iodinated contrast media cause direct tubular cell damage, leading to oxidative stress, low nitric oxide, and impairment of tubuloglomerular feedback

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi Zhao; Schmerbach, Kristin; Lu, Yuan; Perlewitz, Andrea; Nikitina, Tatiana; Cantow, Kathleen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Persson, Pontus B.; Liu, Ruisheng; Sendeski, Mauricio M.

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) have adverse effects that may result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in CM-induced kidney injury. We test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide in tubules are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage and that increased local oxidative stress may increase tubuloglomerular feedback. Rat thick ascending limbs (TAL) were isolated and perfused. Superoxide and nitric oxide were quantified using fluorescence techniques. Cell death rate was estimated using propidium iodide and trypan blue. The function of macula densa and tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness were measured in isolated, perfused juxtaglomerular apparatuses (JGA) of rabbits. The expression of genes related to oxidative stress and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were investigated in the renal medulla of rats that received CM. CM increased superoxide concentration and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability in TAL. Propidium iodide fluorescence and trypan blue uptake increased more in CM-perfused TAL than in controls, indicating increased rate of cell death. There were no marked acute changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative stress in medullary segments of Henle's loop. SOD activity did not differ between CM and control groups. The tubuloglomerular feedback in isolated JGA was increased by CM. Tubular cell damage and accompanying oxidative stress in our model are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage, which also modifies the tubulovascular interaction at the macula densa, and may therefore contribute to disturbances of renal perfusion and filtration. PMID:24431205

  9. Imaging for assessment of radiation-induced normal tissue effects

    PubMed Central

    Jeraj, Robert; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hahn, Carol; Marks, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Imaging can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal tissue effects. Identifying an early sign of normal tissue damage with imaging would have the potential to predict organ dysfunction, thereby allowing re-optimization of treatment strategies based upon individual patients’ risks and benefits. Early detection with non-invasive imaging may enable interventions to mitigate therapy-associated injury prior to its clinical manifestation. Further, successive imaging may provide an objective assessment of the impact of such mitigation therapies. However, many problems make application of imaging to normal tissue assessment challenging, and further work is required to establish imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints of clinical outcome. The performance of clinical trials where normal tissue injury is a clearly defined endpoint would greatly aid in realization of these goals. PMID:20171509

  10. A model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis in space.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R D; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Jones, T D

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space. PMID:11771552

  11. Metal Oxide Silicon /MOS/ transistors protected from destructive damage by wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Devine, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    Loop of flexible, small diameter, nickel wire protects metal oxide silicon /MOS/ transistors from a damaging electrostatic potential. The wire is attached to a music-wire spring, slipped over the MOS transistor case, and released so the spring tensions the wire loop around all the transistor leads, shorting them together. This allows handling without danger of damage.

  12. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY STYRENE OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple assay to detect DNA damage to calf thymus DNA caused by styrene oxide (SO) is reported. This assay is based on changes observed in the melting and annealing behavior of the damaged DNA. The melting annealing process was monitored using a fluorescence indicat...

  13. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors.

  14. Elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes from patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mórocz, Mónika; Kálmán, János; Juhász, Anna; Sinkó, Ildikó; McGlynn, Angela P; Downes, C Stephen; Janka, Zoltán; Raskó, István

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence of the involvement of oxidative damage in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of the disease is still not clear, the detection of an increased damage status in the cells of patients could have important therapeutic implications. The level of oxidative damage and repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes of AD patients and of age-matched controls was determined by the Comet assay applied to freshly isolated blood samples with oxidative lesion-specific DNA repair endonucleases. This is less prone to errors arising from oxidative artifacts than chemical analytical methods; and is therefore a relatively reliable, as well as rapid method for assay of oxidative DNA damage in cells. Statistically significant elevations (P < 0.05) of oxidized purines were observed in nuclear DNA of peripheral lymphocytes from AD patients, compared to age matched control subjects, both at basal level and after oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2.) AD patients also showed a diminished repair of H(2)O(2) -induced oxidized purines.

  15. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  16. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  17. Oxidative damage to poultry: from farm to fork.

    PubMed

    Estévez, M

    2015-06-01

    Poultry and poultry meat are particularly susceptible to oxidative reactions. Oxidation processes have been for decades the focus of animal and meat scientists owing to the negative impact of these reactions on animal growth, performance, and food quality. Lipid oxidation has been recognized a major threat to the quality of processed poultry products. The recent discoveries on the occurrence of protein oxidation in muscle foods have increased the scientific and technological interest in a topic that broadens the horizons of food biochemistry into innovative fields. Furthermore, in recent years we have witnessed a growing interest in consumers on the impact of diet and oxidation on health and aging. Hence, the general description of oxidative reactions as harmful phenomena goes beyond the actual impact on animal production and food quality and reaches the potential influence of oxidized foods on consumer health. Likewise, the current antioxidant strategies aim for the protection of the living tissues, the food systems, and a potential health benefit in the consumer upon ingestion. Along these lines, the application of phytochemicals and other microelements (Se, Cu) with antioxidant potential in the feeds or directly in the meat product are strategies of substantial significance. The present paper reviews in a concise manner the most relevant and novel aspects of the mechanisms and consequences of oxidative reactions in poultry and poultry meat, and describes current antioxidant strategies against these undesirable reactions.

  18. [Radiation-Induced Radiculopathy with Paresis of the Neck and Autochthonous Back Muscles with Additional Myopathy].

    PubMed

    Ellrichmann, G; Lukas, C; Adamietz, I A; Grunwald, C; Schneider-Gold, C; Gold, R

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced tissue damage is caused by ionizing radiation mainly affecting the skin, vascular, neuronal or muscle tissue. Early damages occur within weeks and months while late damages may occur months or even decades after radiation.Radiation-induced paresis of the spine or the trunk muscles with camptocormia or dropped-head syndrome are rare but have already been described as long-term sequelae after treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The differential diagnosis includes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) or lysosomal storage diseases (e. g. Acid Maltase Deficiency). We present the case of a patient with long lasting diagnostics over many months due to different inconclusive results. PMID:27391986

  19. Phytochemicals for prevention of solar ultraviolet radiation-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Adhami, Vaqar M; Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh

    2008-01-01

    While solar light is indispensable for sustenance of life, excessive exposure can cause several skin-related disorders. The UV part of solar radiation, in particular, is linked to disorders ranging from mild inflammatory effects of the skin to as serious as causing several different types of cancers. Changes in lifestyle together with depletion in the atmospheric ozone layer during the last few decades have led to an increase in the incidence of skin cancer. Skin cancers consisting of basal and squamous cell carcinomas are especially linked to the UVB part of solar radiation. Reducing excessive exposure to solar radiation is desirable; however, as this approach is unavoidable, it is suggested that other novel strategies be developed to reduce the effects of solar radiation to skin. One approach to reduce the harmful effects of solar radiation is through the use of phytochemicals, an approach that is popularly known as "Photochemoprotection." In recent years many phytochemicals with potential antioxidant properties have been identified and found to be photoprotective in nature. We describe here some of the most popular phytochemicals being studied that have the potential to reduce the harmful effects associated with solar UV radiation.

  20. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D. C.; Dolphin, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. This paper outlines the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosome aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatiod arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. Images PMID:338021

  1. Redox-dependent regulation, redox control and oxidative damage in plant cells subjected to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Stress development intricately involves uncontrolled redox reactions and oxidative damage to functional macromolecules. Three phases characterize progressing abiotic stress and the stress strength; in the first phase redox-dependent deregulation in metabolism, in the second phase detectable development of oxidative damage and in the third phase cell death. Each phase is characterized by traceable biochemical features and specific molecular responses that reflect on the one hand cell damage but on the other hand indicate specific regulation and redox signalling aiming at compensation of stress impact. PMID:20387040

  2. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J.; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  3. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M; DeGregori, James

    2015-10-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  4. Effect of topically applied tocopherol on ultraviolet radiation-mediated free radical damage in skin.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, B A; Bissett, D L; Buettner, G R

    1995-04-01

    Previously, we demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy that ultraviolet radiation induces free-radical formation in Skh-1 hairless mouse skin. Because free-radical oxidative stress is thought to play a principal role in skin photoaging and cancer, oxidative stress and subsequent photodamage should be decreased by supplementation of skin with antioxidants. Using both the ascorbate free radical and an EPR spin-trapping system to detect short-lived radicals, we evaluated the effect of the topically applied antioxidants tocopherol sorbate, alpha-tocopherol, and tocopherol acetate on ultraviolet radiation-induced free-radical formation. We show that tocopherol sorbate significantly decreases the ultraviolet radiation-induced radical flux in skin. With our chronically exposed mouse model, tocopherol sorbate was also found to be significantly more protective against skin photoaging than alpha-tocopherol and tocopherol acetate. These results extend our previous observations of ultraviolet radiation-induced free-radical generation in skin and indicate the utility of tocopherol sorbate as an antioxidant in providing significant protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative damage.

  5. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Gary M

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  6. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees.

  7. Protective Effects of Gelam Honey against Oxidative Damage in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahhugi, Zulaikha; Jubri, Zakiah

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline in physiological and body function due to increase in oxidative damage. Gelam honey has been accounted to have high phenolic and nonphenolic content to attenuate oxidative damage. This study was to determine the effect of local gelam honey on oxidative damage of aged rats. Twenty-four male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into young (2 months) and aged (19 months) groups. Each group was further divided into control (fed with plain water) and supplemented with 2.5 mg/kg body weight of gelam honey for 8 months. DNA damage level was determined by comet assay and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activity of blood and cardiac antioxidant enzymes was determined by spectrophotometer. The DNA damage and MDA level were reduced in both gelam honey supplemented groups. Gelam honey increases erythrocytes CAT and cardiac SOD activities in young and cardiac CAT activity in young and aged groups. The DNA damage was increased in the aged group compared to young group, but reduced at the end of the study. The decline of oxidative damage in rats supplemented with gelam honey might be through the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:25505937

  8. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Wound Healing in Mice in Relation to Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rongjian; Wasser, Martin; Du, Tiehua; Ng, Wee Thong; Halliwell, Barry

    2012-01-01

    It has been established that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are produced in wounds and is required for optimal healing. Yet at the same time, there is evidence that excessive oxidative damage is correlated with poor-healing wounds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether topical application of H2O2 can modulate wound healing and if its effects are related to oxidative damage. Using a C57BL/6 mice excision wound model, H2O2 was found to enhance angiogenesis and wound closure at 10 mM but retarded wound closure at 166 mM. The delay in closure was also associated with decreased connective tissue formation, increased MMP-8 and persistent neutrophil infiltration. Wounding was found to increase oxidative lipid damage, as measured by F2-isoprostanes, and nitrative protein damage, as measured by 3-nitrotyrosine. However H2O2 treatment did not significantly increase oxidative and nitrative damage even at concentrations that delay wound healing. Hence the detrimental effects of H2O2 may not involve oxidative damage to the target molecules studied. PMID:23152875

  9. Oxidative stress, DNA damage, and the telomeric complex as therapeutic targets in acute neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Park, Sookyoung; Krause, James S.; Banik, Naren L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been identified as an important contributor to neurodegeneration associated with acute CNS injuries and diseases such as spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ischemic stroke. In this review, we briefly detail the damaging effects of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, etc.) with a particular emphasis on DNA damage. Evidence for DNA damage in acute CNS injuries is presented along with its downstream effects on neuronal viability. In particular, unchecked oxidative DNA damage initiates a series of signaling events (e.g. activation of p53 and PARP-1, cell cycle re-activation) which have been shown to promote neuronal loss following CNS injury. These findings suggest that preventing DNA damage might be an effective way to promote neuronal survival and enhance neurological recovery in these conditions. Finally, we identify the telomere and telomere-associated proteins (e.g. telomerase) as novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurodegeneration due to their ability to modulate the neuronal response to both oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:23422879

  10. Oxidative damage induced by copper in mouse primary hepatocytes by single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Liu, Yang; Song, Wei; Yan, Yunxing; Yan, Wenbao; Liu, Rutao

    2016-01-01

    Copper can disturb the intracellular redox balance, induce oxidative stress, and subsequently cause irreversible damage, leading to a variety of diseases. In the present study, mouse primary hepatocytes were chosen to elucidate the in vitro oxidative damage of short-term copper exposure (10-200 μM) by single-cell analysis. We evaluated the toxicity of copper by reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and oxidative DNA damage at the single-cell level. Oxidative damage induced by copper was verified by the morphological changes, persistent elevations of excessive ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), a decrease in GSH level, and the oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, the average ROS generation, GSH consumption, and the indicators in DNA damage did not significantly change at relatively low concentrations (10 or 50 μM), but we can find the alterations of parameters in some single cells clearly. Emphasis on the analysis of single cells is conducive to gain a better understanding on the toxicity of copper. This study will also complement studies on the environmental risk assessment of copper pollution.

  11. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and Cancer: Recent Progress in DNA Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Timothy L.; Rangaswamy, Suganya; Wicker, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by exogenous and environmental genotoxins, but also arise from mitochondria as byproducts of respiration in the body. ROS generate DNA damage of which pathological consequence, including cancer is well established. Research efforts are intense to understand the mechanism of DNA base excision repair, the primary mechanism to protect cells from genotoxicity caused by ROS. Recent Advances: In addition to the notion that oxidative DNA damage causes transformation of cells, recent studies have revealed how the mitochondrial deficiencies and ROS generation alter cell growth during the cancer transformation. Critical Issues: The emphasis of this review is to highlight the importance of the cellular response to oxidative DNA damage during carcinogenesis. Oxidative DNA damage, including 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, play an important role during the cellular transformation. It is also becoming apparent that the unusual activity and subcellular distribution of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, an essential DNA repair factor/redox sensor, affect cancer malignancy by increasing cellular resistance to oxidative stress and by positively influencing cell proliferation. Future Directions: Technological advancement in cancer cell biology and genetics has enabled us to monitor the detailed DNA repair activities in the microenvironment. Precise understanding of the intracellular activities of DNA repair proteins for oxidative DNA damage should provide help in understanding how mitochondria, ROS, DNA damage, and repair influence cancer transformation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 708–726. PMID:23901781

  12. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage: The role of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A H; Zariyantey, A H; Budin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines-including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α-exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  13. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue

  14. Nutritional and lifestyle determinants of DNA oxidative damage: a study in a Mediterranean population.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lisa; Saieva, Calogero; Masala, Giovanna; Testa, Giovanna; Salvini, Simonetta; Pitozzi, Vanessa; Riboli, Elio; Dolara, Piero; Palli, Domenico

    2002-09-01

    In order to evaluate dietary and lifestyle determinants of oxidative DNA damage we used a modification of the 'comet assay' (single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis), with the fpg enzyme (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosilase), to measure the basal level of DNA oxidation in peripheral lymphocytes donated by 71 healthy adults living in Florence, Italy. Detailed information about dietary and lifestyle habits was collected by two validated and standardized questionnaires; we also measured plasma concentrations of selected micro-nutrients (six carotenoids, retinol, alpha- and gamma-tocopherol). DNA damage, measured as percent DNA migrated in the comet tail (mean 4.67%, interquartile range 2.36-6.62%), was not associated with gender, age, weight, body mass index, physical activity or smoking history. A positive correlation with height and period of blood sampling emerged: DNA damage tended to be higher among taller subjects (P = 0.02) and in samples obtained in summer months (P = 0.02). Multivariate analyses showed a positive association with coffee (P = 0.01) and tomato consumption (P = 0.05). Instead, the consumption of cruciferous vegetables tended to be negatively associated with oxidative damage (P = 0.09). Furthermore, a positive non-significant association between the consumption of total vegetables and fresh fruit and DNA damage emerged (P = 0.08 and P = 0.10, respectively). The estimated intake of simple sugars showed a strong positive association with oxidative DNA damage (P = 0.01), while vitamin E showed a borderline positive association (P = 0.06). The plasma levels of several micro-nutrients did not appear to influence DNA damage. Our results, although based on a relatively small group of subjects, indicate that individual dietary and lifestyle habits only modestly affect the levels of lymphocyte DNA oxidation and suggest that specific dietary patterns, rich in fresh fruit and vegetables, are not clearly related to decreased oxidative damage in peripheral

  15. Modulation of ischemia-induced NMDAR1 activation by environmental enrichment decreases oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Briones, Teresita L; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Woods, Julie

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we examined whether enriched environment (EE) housing has direct neuroprotective effects on oxidative damage following transient global cerebral ischemia. Fifty-two adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and received either ischemia or sham surgery. Once fully awake, rats in each group were randomly assigned to either: EE housing or socially paired housing (CON). Animals remained in their assigned environment for 7 days, and then were killed. Our data showed that glutamate receptor expression was significantly higher in the hippocampus of the ischemia CON group than in the ischemia EE group. Furthermore, the oxidative DNA damage, protein oxidation, and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus of the ischemia CON group were significantly increased compared to the ischemia EE group. These results suggest that EE housing possibly modulated the ischemia-induced glutamate excitotoxicity, which then attenuated the oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in the ischemia EE rats.

  16. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  17. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms. PMID:26949445

  18. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Bae Kwon; Song, Jin Ho; Jeong, Hojin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Woo, Seung Hoon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kang, Ki Mun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Results Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group. Conclusions ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death. PMID:26943777

  19. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage. PMID:25668145

  20. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage.

  1. Oxidative Damage and Cellular Defense Mechanisms in Sea Urchin Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging due to the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate lifespan. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age-pigment lipofuscin measured in muscle, nerve and esophagus, increased with age however it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species, however further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage. PMID:23707327

  2. Products of DNA, protein and lipid oxidative damage in relation to vitamin C plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Dusinská, M; Valachovicová, M; Blazícek, P; Pauková, V

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous chronic age-related free radical-induced diseases. Improved antioxidant status minimizes oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules. Diet-derived antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids and related plant pigments are important in antioxidative defense and maintaining health. The results of long-term epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that protective vitamin C plasma concentration for minimum risk of free radical disease is higher than 50 micromol/l. Products of oxidative damage to DNA (DNA strand breaks with oxidized purines and pyrimidines), proteins (carbonyls) and lipids (conjugated dienes of fatty acids, malondialdehyde) were estimated in a group of apparently healthy adult non-smoking population in dependence on different vitamin C plasma concentrations. Under conditions of protective plasma vitamin C concentrations (>50 micromol/l) significantly lower values of DNA, protein and lipid oxidative damage were found in comparison with the vitamin C-deficient group (<50 micromol/l). The inhibitory effect of higher fruit and vegetable consumption (leading to higher vitamin C intake and higher vitamin C plasma concentrations) on oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids is also expressed by an inverse significant correlation between plasma vitamin C and products of oxidative damage. The results suggest an important role of higher and frequent consumption of protective food (fruit, vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and cereal grains) in prevention of free radical disease.

  3. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2 prime -deoxyguanosine as a biological marker of in vivo oxidative DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shigenaga, M.K.; Gimeno, C.J.; Ames, B.N. )

    1989-12-01

    DNA is subject to constant oxidative damage from endogenous oxidants. The oxidized DNA is continuously repaired and the oxidized bases are excreted in the urine. A simple routine analytical procedure is described for urinary 8-hydroxy-2{prime}-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative DNA damage adduct, as an indicator of oxidative damage in humans and rodents. This adduct was purified from human urine and characterized. The described assay employs a series of solid-phase extraction steps that separate 8-hydroxy-2{prime}-deoxyguanosine from other urinary constituents, followed by analysis by gradient reversed-phase HPLC coupled to a dual-electrode high-efficient electrochemical detection system. Analysis of urine from three species by this method indicates that mice excrete approximately 3.3-fold more 8-hydroxy-2{prime}-deoxyguanosine than humans (582 vs. 178 residues per cell day), a result that supports the proposal that oxidative damage to DNA increases in proportion to species-specific basal metabolic rates.

  4. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative damage in muscle of mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Jill E; Safdar, Adeel; Abadi, Arkan; MacNeil, Lauren G; Crane, Justin D; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Kaufman, Brett A

    2014-10-01

    A causal role for mitochondrial dysfunction in mammalian aging is supported by recent studies of the mtDNA mutator mouse ("PolG" mouse), which harbors a defect in the proofreading-exonuclease activity of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. These mice exhibit accelerated aging phenotypes characteristic of human aging, including systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, exercise intolerance, alopecia and graying of hair, curvature of the spine, and premature mortality. While mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to cause increased oxidative stress in many systems, several groups have suggested that PolG mutator mice show no markers of oxidative damage. These mice have been presented as proof that mitochondrial dysfunction is sufficient to accelerate aging without oxidative stress. In this study, by normalizing to mitochondrial content in enriched fractions we detected increased oxidative modification of protein and DNA in PolG skeletal muscle mitochondria. We separately developed novel methods that allow simultaneous direct measurement of mtDNA replication defects and oxidative damage. Using this approach, we find evidence that suggests PolG muscle mtDNA is indeed oxidatively damaged. We also observed a significant decrease in antioxidants and expression of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway components and DNA repair enzymes in these mice, indicating an association of maladaptive gene expression with the phenotypes observed in PolG mice. Together, these findings demonstrate the presence of oxidative damage associated with the premature aging-like phenotypes induced by mitochondrial dysfunction.

  5. Tempol protects blood proteins and lipids against peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Bani-Ahmad, Mohammad A; Jaradat, Ahmad Q

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by excessive production of various free radicals and reactive species among which, peroxynitrite is most frequently produced in several pathological conditions. Peroxynitrite is the product of the superoxide anion reaction with nitric oxide, which is reported to take place in the intravascular compartment. Several studies have reported that peroxynitrite targets red blood cells, platelets and plasma proteins, and induces various forms of oxidative damage. This in vitro study was designed to further characterize the types of oxidative damage induced in platelets and plasma proteins by peroxynitrite. This study also determined the ability of tempol to protect blood plasma and platelets against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. The ability of various concentrations of tempol (25, 50, 75, and 100 µM) to antagonize peroxynitrite-induced oxidation was evaluated by measuring the levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances in experimental groups. Exposure of platelets and plasma to 100 µM peroxynitrite resulted in an increased levels of carbonyl groups and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Tempol significantly inhibited carbonyl group formation in plasma and platelet proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, tempol significantly reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in both plasma and platelet samples (P < 0.05). Thus, tempol has antioxidative properties against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage in blood plasma and platelets. PMID:25107897

  6. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  7. Curcumin reduces oxidative and nitrative DNA damage through balancing of oxidant-antioxidant status in hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Pinlaor, Somchai; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Prakobwong, Suksanti; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Khoontawad, Jarinya; Pinlaor, Porntip; Hiraku, Yusuke

    2009-10-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection is endemic in northeastern Thailand. We have previously reported that OV infection induces oxidative and nitrative DNA damage via chronic inflammation, which contributes to the disease and cholangiocarcinogenesis. Here, we examined the effect of curcumin, an antioxidant, on pathogenesis in OV-infected hamsters. DNA lesions were detected by double immunofluorescence and the hepatic expression of oxidant-generating and antioxidant genes was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Dietary 1.0% curcumin significantly decreased OV-induced accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an oxidative DNA lesion, and 8-nitroguanine, a nitrative DNA lesion, in the nucleus of bile duct epithelial and inflammatory cells. Expression of oxidant-generating genes (inducible nitric oxide synthase; iNOS, its nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-kappaB, and cyclooxygenase-2), and plasma levels of nitrate, malondialdehyde, and alanine aminotransferase, were also decreased in curcumin-treated group. In contrast, curcumin increased the mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes (Mn-superoxide dismutase and catalase), and ferric-reducing anti-oxidant power in the plasma. In conclusion, curcumin reduced oxidative and nitrative DNA damage by suppression of oxidant-generating genes and enhancement of antioxidant genes, leading to inhibition of oxidative and nitrative stress. Therefore, curcumin may be used as a chemopreventive agent to reduce the severity of OV-associated diseases and the risk of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA).

  8. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  9. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  10. Iron release and oxidant damage in human myoblasts by divicine.

    PubMed

    Ninfali, P; Perini, M P; Bresolin, N; Aluigi, G; Cambiaggi, C; Ferrali, M; Pompella, A

    2000-01-01

    Divicine is an aglycone derived from vicine, a glucosidic compound contained in fava beans (Vicia faba major or broad beans). In this study, we investigated the effect of divicine on cultured human myoblasts from normal subjects, in order to see if the drug may induce signs of oxidant stress in these cells. Myoblasts incubated 24 hours in the presence of 1 mM divicine, showed an increase of carbonyl groups and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) bound to cell proteins, as well as a significant release of iron and lactate dehydrogenase in the culture medium. Desferrioxamine (DFO), an iron chelator, significantly prevented protein oxidation and formation 4-HNE adducts. Our results can be interpreted as indicating that divicine autooxidizes both at extracellular level and into myoblasts thus inducing the release of free iron, which initiates oxidation of cellular proteins and lipids. DFO protects the cells by subtracting the free iron both at intracellular and extracellular level. PMID:10794072

  11. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases. PMID:25036887

  12. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-02-20

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA and this could be related to metabolic disturbances. This study investigated the association between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and metabolic risk factors in 1,019 subjects, aged 18-93 years. DNA damage was analyzed as strand breaks by the comet assay and levels of formamidopyrimidine (FPG-) and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-sensitive sites There was an association between age and levels of FPG-sensitive sites for women, but not for men. The same tendency was observed for the level of hOGG1-sensitive sites, whereas there was no association with the level of strand breaks. The effect of age on oxidatively damaged DNA in women disappeared in multivariate models, which showed robust positive associations between DNA damage and plasma levels of triglycerides, cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all metabolic syndrome criteria. In summary, positive associations between age and levels of oxidatively damaged DNA appeared mediated by age-related increases in metabolic risk factors. PMID:25650665

  13. Repeated autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell injections improve radiation-induced proctitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Linard, Christine; Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Lhomme, Bruno; Prat, Marie; Devauchelle, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bonneau, Michel; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Benderitter, Marc

    2013-11-01

    The management of proctitis in patients who have undergone very-high-dose conformal radiotherapy is extremely challenging. The fibrosis-necrosis, fistulae, and hemorrhage induced by pelvic overirradiation have an impact on morbidity. Augmenting tissue repair by the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an important advance in treating radiation-induced toxicity. Using a preclinical pig model, we investigated the effect of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs on high-dose radiation-induced proctitis. Irradiated pigs received repeated intravenous administrations of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the MSCs' effect on inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis, in radiation-induced anorectal and colon damages. In humans, as in pigs, rectal overexposure induces mucosal damage (crypt depletion, macrophage infiltration, and fibrosis). In a pig model, repeated administrations of MSCs controlled systemic inflammation, reduced in situ both expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage recruitment, and augmented interleukin-10 expression in rectal mucosa. MSC injections limited radiation-induced fibrosis by reducing collagen deposition and expression of col1a2/col3a1 and transforming growth factor-β/connective tissue growth factor, and by modifying the matrix metalloproteinase/TIMP balance. In a pig model of proctitis, repeated injections of MSCs effectively reduced inflammation and fibrosis. This treatment represents a promising therapy for radiation-induced severe rectal damage. PMID:24068742

  14. Electron Beam Induced Damage of MOS Gate Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Morikazu; Kubota, Michitaka; Koike, Kaoru

    1998-03-01

    Threshold voltage (Vth) shift of a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) system due to electron beam (EB) exposure can be expressed quantitatively as a function of the EB dosage which was derived easily as a solution of a differential equation based on the hole capturing model in the gate oxide. The theoretical model assumes two steps for hole capturing. First is the hole capturing by intrinsic hole traps leading to steep Vth shift with EB dosage at early exposure stages. The second is the hole capturing by newborn hole traps due to the EB injection, leading to a rather slow Vth variation at a higher EB dosage. The model shows good agreement with the experimental result over a wide range of electron beam dosages. Moreover, hole injection efficiency in the gate oxide is found to be higher for the third Aluminum interconnection layer exposure than for the first Al layer, corresponding to higher deposition energy around the gate oxide obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  15. UV radiation induces delayed hyperrecombination associated with hypermutation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Durant, Stephen T; Paffett, Kimberly S; Shrivastav, Meena; Timmins, Graham S; Morgan, William F; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2006-08-01

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed genomic instability in human cells, including chromosomal abnormalities and hyperrecombination. Here, we investigate delayed genome instability of cells exposed to UV radiation. We examined homologous recombination-mediated reactivation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in p53-proficient human cells. We observed an approximately 5-fold enhancement of delayed hyperrecombination (DHR) among cells surviving a low dose of UV-C (5 J/m2), revealed as mixed GFP+/- colonies. UV-B did not induce DHR at an equitoxic (75 J/m2) dose or a higher dose (150 J/m2). UV is known to induce delayed hypermutation associated with increased oxidative stress. We found that hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) mutation frequencies were approximately 5-fold higher in strains derived from GFP+/- (DHR) colonies than in strains in which recombination was directly induced by UV (GFP+ colonies). To determine whether hypermutation was directly caused by hyperrecombination, we analyzed hprt mutation spectra. Large-scale alterations reflecting large deletions and insertions were observed in 25% of GFP+ strains, and most mutants had a single change in HPRT. In striking contrast, all mutations arising in the hypermutable GFP+/- strains were small (1- to 2-base) changes, including substitutions, deletions, and insertions (reminiscent of mutagenesis from oxidative damage), and the majority were compound, with an average of four hprt mutations per mutant. The absence of large hprt deletions in DHR strains indicates that DHR does not cause hypermutation. We propose that UV-induced DHR and hypermutation result from a common source, namely, increased oxidative stress. These two forms of delayed genome instability may collaborate in skin cancer initiation and progression. PMID:16880516

  16. Combined activation of methyl paraben by light irradiation and esterase metabolism toward oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Matsunami, Shinpei; Ueda, Koji; Kojima, Nakao

    2008-08-01

    Methyl paraben (MP) is often used as a preservative in foods, drugs, and cosmetics because of its high reliability in safety based on the rapid excretion and nonaccumulation following administration. Light irradiation sometimes produces unexpected activity from chemicals such as MP; furthermore, there is ample opportunity for MP to be exposed to sunlight. Here, we investigated whether MP shows DNA damage after sunlight irradiation. Two major photoproducts, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) and 3-hydroxy methyl paraben (MP-3OH), were detected after sunlight irradiation to an aqueous MP solution. Both photoproducts were inactive in the in vitro DNA damage assay that measures oxidized guanine formed in calf thymus DNA in the presence of divalent copper ion, a known mediator of oxidative DNA damage. Simulated MP metabolism using dermal tissues after light irradiation produced these two photoproducts, which reacted with a microsomal fraction (S9) of the skin. A metabolite from MP-3OH, not PHBA, caused distinct DNA damage in the in vitro assay. This active metabolite was identified as protocatechuic acid, a hydrolyzed MP-3OH product. In addition, NADH, a cellular reductant, enhanced DNA damage by approximately five times. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species generated by the redox cycle via metal ion and catechol autoxidation are participating in oxidative DNA damage. This study reveals that MP might cause skin damage involving carcinogenesis through the combined activation of sunlight irradiation and skin esterases.

  17. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Jeffrey M.; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D.; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. Methods A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords “Radiation-Induced Fibrosis,” “Radiotherapy Complications,” “Fibrosis Therapy,” and other closely related terms. Results RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Conclusion Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:25910988

  18. MECHANISMS FOR COUNTERING OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DAMAGE IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; O’Mealey, Gary B.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence supports that chronic oxidative stress is a primary contributing factor to numerous retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eyes obtained postmortem from AMD patients have extensive free radical damage to the proteins, lipids, DNA, and mitochondria of their retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In addition, several mouse models of chronic oxidative stress develop many of the pathological hallmarks of AMD. However, the extent to which oxidative stress is an etiologic component versus its involvement in disease progression remains a major unanswered question. Further, whether the primary target of oxidative stress and damage is photoreceptors or RPE cells, or both, is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the major functions of RPE cells with an emphasis on the oxidative challenges these cells encounter and the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms employed to neutralize the deleterious effects that such stresses can elicit if left unchecked. PMID:22878106

  19. CDDO-Me protects against space radiation-induced transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, Ugur; Kim, Sang Bum; Roig, Andres I; Kitten, Erin; Batten, Kimberly; Cornelius, Crystal; Zou, Ying S; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-01

    Radiation-induced carcinogenesis is a major concern both for astronauts on long-term space missions and for cancer patients being treated with therapeutic radiation. Exposure to radiation induces oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, which are critical initiators and promoters of carcinogenesis. Many studies have demonstrated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxidants can reduce the risk of radiation-induced cancer. In this study, we found that a synthetic triterpenoid, CDDO-Me (bardoxolone methyl), was able to protect human colon epithelial cells (HCECs) against radiation-induced transformation. HCECs that were immortalized by ectopic expression of hTERT and cdk4 and exhibit trisomy for chromosome 7 (a non-random chromosome change that occurs in 37% of premalignant colon adenomas) can be transformed experimentally with one combined exposure to 2 Gy of protons at 1 GeV/nucleon followed 24 h later by 50 cGy of (56)Fe ions at 1 GeV/nucleon. Transformed cells showed an increase in proliferation rate and in both anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation ability. A spectrum of chromosome aberrations was observed in transformed cells, with 40% showing loss of 17p (e.g. loss of one copy of p53). Pretreatment of cells with pharmacological doses of CDDO-Me, which has been shown to induce antioxidative as well as anti-inflammatory responses, prevented the heavy-ion-induced increase in proliferation rate and anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation efficiencies. Taken together, these results demonstrate that experimentally immortalized human colon epithelial cells with a non-random chromosome 7 trisomy are valuable premalignant cellular reagents that can be used to study radiation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. The utility of premalignant HCECs to test novel compounds such as CDDO-Me that can be used to protect against radiation-induced neoplastic transformation is also demonstrated. PMID:20681796

  20. Effects of pH on nicotine-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ju; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Tsung-Yun

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that chewing betel quid and smoking have synergistic potential in the development of oral squamous-cell carcinoma in Taiwan. Chewing betel quid produces alkalization of saliva. This study investigated the response of human oral cancer OEC-M1 cells to nicotine in different pH environments (6.5 and 8) by examining its effects on DNA damage as evidenced by single-cell gel electrophoresis. Nicotine (1 and 10 muM) significantly induced DNA strand breakage when cultured at pH 8 for 6 h but did not induce DNA damage at pH 6.5. Nicotine-induced DNA damage was also time dependent. When cells were pretreated with catalase or N-acetylcysteine, a significant reduction in nicotine-induced DNA damage was observed. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the production of 8-oxoguanine was significantly increased following nicotine (10 muM) treatment. Posttreatment of nicotine-damaged DNA by endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, recognizing oxidized DNA bases, increased the extent of DNA damage. These results suggest that nicotine-induced DNA strand breakage is pH dependent, and oxidative stress might be involved in nicotine-induced DNA damage. Finally, cigarette smoke condensate (equivalent to 8 muM nicotine) induced significant DNA strand breaks in OEC-M1 cells at pH 8 and correlated with the generation of oxidative DNA damage. Thus, alkaline saliva generated by chewing betel quid plays an important role in cigarette-related nicotine-induced DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species may be involved in generating this DNA damage. PMID:16076763

  1. Alpinia protocatechuic acid protects against oxidative damage in vitro and reduces oxidative stress in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gui-Fang; An, Li-Jia; Jiang, Bo; Guan, Shui; Bao, Yong-Ming

    2006-08-01

    In this study, the neuroprotective effects of Alpinia protocatechuic acid (PCA), a phenolic compound isolated from the dried fruits of Alpinia Oxyphylla Miq. was found. The protective effect of Alpinia PCA against H2O2-induced oxidative damage on PC12 cells was investigated by measuring cell viability via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with Alpinia PCA at a dose of 5mg/kg per day for 7 days, behavioral testing was performed in Y-maze. In order to make clear the neuroprotective mechanism of Alpinia PCA, the activities of endogenous antioxidants and the content of lipid peroxide in brain were assayed. The results proved that Alpinia PCA significantly prevented the H2O2-induced reduction in cell survival, improved the cognition of aged rats, reduced the content of lipid peroxide, increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. All these suggested that Alpinia PCA was a potential neuroprotective agent and its neuroprotective effects were achieved at least partly by promoting endogenous antioxidant enzymatic activities and inhibiting free radical generation.

  2. Biomarkers of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense capacity in Caiman latirostris blood.

    PubMed

    Poletta, Gisela L; Simoniello, María Fernanda; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-01-01

    Several xenobiotics, and among them pesticides, can produce oxidative stress, providing a mechanistic basis for their observed toxicity. Chronic oxidative stress induces deleterious modifications to DNA, lipids and proteins that are used as effective biomarkers to study pollutant-mediated oxidative stress. No previous report existed on the application of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense biomarkers in Caiman latirostris blood, while few studies reported in other crocodilians were done in organs or muscles of dead animals. The aim of this study was to characterize a new set of oxidative stress biomarkers in C. latirostris blood, through the modification of conventional techniques: 1) damage to lipids by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), 2) damage to DNA by comet assay modified with the enzymes FPG and Endo III, and 3) antioxidant defenses: catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione; in order to apply them in future biomonitoring studies. We successfully adapted standard procedures for CAT, SOD, GSH and TBARS determination in C. latirostris blood. Calibration curves for FPG and Endo III showed that the three dilutions tested were appropriate to conduct the modified comet assay for the detection of oxidized bases in C. latirostris erythrocytes. One hour of incubation allowed a complete repair of the damage generated. The incorporation of these biomarkers in biomonitoring studies of caiman populations exposed to xenobiotics is highly important considering that this species has recovered from a serious endangered state through the implementation of sustainable use programs in Argentina, and represents nowadays a relevant economic resource for many human communities. PMID:26299575

  3. Neutrophil-derived ROS contribute to oxidative DNA damage induction by quartz particles.

    PubMed

    van Berlo, Damien; Wessels, Anton; Boots, Agnes W; Wilhelmi, Verena; Scherbart, Agnes M; Gerloff, Kirsten; van Schooten, Frederik J; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P F

    2010-12-01

    The carcinogenicity of respirable quartz is considered to be driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in association with chronic inflammation. The contribution of phagocyte-derived ROS to inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage responses was investigated in the lungs of C57BL/6J wild-type and p47(phox-/-) mice, 24h after pharyngeal aspiration of DQ12 quartz (100 mg/kg bw). Bone-marrow-derived neutrophils from wild-type and p47(phox-/-) mice were used for parallel in vitro investigations in coculture with A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. Quartz induced a marked neutrophil influx in both wild-type and p47(phox-/-) mouse lungs. Significant increases in mRNA expression of the oxidative stress markers HO-1 and γ-GCS were observed only in quartz-treated wild-type animals. Oxidative DNA damage in lung tissue was not affected by quartz exposure and did not differ between p47(phox-/-) and WT mice. Differences in mRNA expression of the DNA repair genes OGG1, APE-1, DNA Polβ, and XRCC1 were also absent. Quartz treatment of cocultures containing wild-type neutrophils, but not p47(phox-/-) neutrophils, caused increased oxidative DNA damage in epithelial cells. Our study demonstrates that neutrophil-derived ROS significantly contribute to pulmonary oxidative stress responses after acute quartz exposure, yet their role in the associated induction of oxidative DNA damage could be shown only in vitro.

  4. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  5. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  6. Sources and consequences of oxidative damage from mitochondria and neurotransmitter signaling.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Arron, Sarah T; Chou, Kai-Ming; Cunningham, Eric; Cleaver, James E

    2016-06-01

    Cancer and neurodegeneration represent the extreme responses of growing and terminally differentiated cells to cellular and genomic damage. The damage recognition mechanisms of nucleotide excision repair, epitomized by xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Cockayne syndrome (CS), lie at these extremes. Patients with mutations in the DDB2 and XPC damage recognition steps of global genome repair exhibit almost exclusively actinic skin cancer. Patients with mutations in the RNA pol II cofactors CSA and CSB, that regulate transcription coupled repair, exhibit developmental and neurological symptoms, but not cancer. The absence of skin cancer despite increased photosensitivity in CS implies that the DNA repair deficiency is not associated with increased ultraviolet (UV)-induced mutagenesis, unlike DNA repair deficiency in XP that leads to high levels of UV-induced mutagenesis. One attempt to explain the pathology of CS is to attribute genomic damage to endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that inhibition of complex I of the mitochondria generates increased ROS, above an already elevated level in CSB cells, but without nuclear DNA damage. CSB, but not CSA, quenches ROS liberated from complex I by rotenone. Extracellular signaling by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in neurons, however, generates ROS enzymatically through oxidase that does lead to oxidative damage to nuclear DNA. The pathology of CS may therefore be caused by impaired oxidative phosphorylation or nuclear damage from neurotransmitters, but without damage-specific mutagenesis. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:322-330, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311994

  7. Oxidative stress and inflammation generated DNA damage by exposure to air pollution particles.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Jantzen, Kim; Roursgaard, Martin; Klingberg, Henrik; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Cao, Yi; Loft, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Generation of oxidatively damaged DNA by particulate matter (PM) is hypothesized to occur via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing ROS production, inflammation and oxidatively damaged DNA in different experimental systems investigating air pollution particles. There is substantial evidence indicating that exposure to air pollution particles was associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged nucleobases in circulating blood cells and urine from humans, which is supported by observations of elevated levels of genotoxicity in cultured cells exposed to similar PM. Inflammation is most pronounced in cultured cells and animal models, whereas an elevated level of oxidatively damaged DNA is more pronounced than inflammation in humans. There is non-congruent data showing corresponding variability in effect related to PM sampled at different locations (spatial variability), times (temporal variability) or particle size fraction across different experimental systems of acellular conditions, cultured cells, animals and humans. Nevertheless, there is substantial variation in the genotoxic, inflammation and oxidative stress potential of PM sampled at different locations or times. Small air pollution particles did not appear more hazardous than larger particles, which is consistent with the notion that constituents such as metals and organic compounds also are important determinants for PM-generated oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, the results indicate that PM-mediated ROS production is involved in the generation of inflammation and activated inflammatory cells can increase their ROS production. The observations indicate that air pollution particles generate oxidatively damaged DNA by promoting a milieu of oxidative stress and inflammation.

  8. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  9. Oxidative Damage and Antioxidative Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder of unknown etiology. This disease is characterized by a large variety of clinical patterns, which include the fibrosis of skin and visceral organs causing a variety of clinical manifestations. Genetic and environmental factors participate in the etiology of this disease; however, recently many studies underline the oxidative background influencing the course and complications of this disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesized in SSc can mediate extra- and intracellular oxidative processes affecting endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The estimation of prooxidative markers in the pathogenesis of SSc can enable the identification of useful markers for disease activity and, thus, may help in planning appropriate therapy focusing on the fibrotic or vascular pattern. Recently, many attempts have been made to find antioxidative molecules (nutritional and pharmacological) reducing the prooxidant state in a variety of cells—mainly in endothelium and proliferating fibroblasts. This paper presents both the background of oxidative stress processes in systemic sclerosis mediated by different mechanisms and the evidence suggesting which of the dietary and pharmacological antioxidants can be used as therapeutic targets for this disease. PMID:25313270

  10. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  11. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  12. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  13. Effects of oxide charge and surface recombination velocity on the excess base current of BJTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kosier, S.L.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Wei, A.; DeLaus, M.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Combs, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    The role of net positive oxide trapped charge and surface recombination velocity on excess base current in BJTs is identified. The effects of the two types of damage can be detected by plotting the excess base current versus base-emitter voltage. Differences and similarities between ionizing-radiation-induced and hot electron-induced degradation are discussed.

  14. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  15. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy myoblasts efficiently repair moderate levels of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bou Saada, Yara; Dib, Carla; Dmitriev, Petr; Hamade, Aline; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscular dystrophy linked to a deletion of a subset of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats accompanied by a chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 array on chromosome 4q. In vitro, FSHD primary myoblasts show altered expression of oxidative-related genes and are more susceptible to oxidative stress. Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene, encoded within each D4Z4 unit, is normally transcriptionally silenced but is found aberrantly expressed in skeletal muscles of FSHD patients. Its expression leads to a deregulation of DUX4 target genes including those implicated in redox balance. Here, we assessed DNA repair efficiency of oxidative DNA damage in FSHD myoblasts and DUX4-transfected myoblasts. We have shown that the DNA repair activity is altered neither in FSHD myoblasts nor in immortalized human myoblasts transiently expressing DUX4. DNA damage caused by moderate doses of an oxidant is efficiently repaired while FSHD myoblasts exposed for 24 h to high levels of oxidative stress accumulated more DNA damage than normal myoblasts, suggesting that FSHD myoblasts remain more vulnerable to oxidative stress at high doses of oxidants. PMID:26860865

  16. Elevated oxidative damage is correlated with reduced fitness in interpopulation hybrids of a marine copepod

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Felipe S.; Burton, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic energy production occurs via the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (OXPHOS), which is critically dependent on interactions between the 13 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded and approximately 70 nuclear-encoded protein subunits. Disruptive mutations in any component of OXPHOS can result in impaired ATP production and exacerbated oxidative stress; in mammalian systems, such mutations are associated with ageing as well as numerous diseases. Recent studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays a role in fitness trade-offs in life-history evolution and functional ecology. Here, we show that outcrossing between populations with divergent mtDNA can exacerbate cellular oxidative stress in hybrid offspring. In the copepod Tigriopus californicus, we found that hybrids that showed evidence of fitness breakdown (low fecundity) also exhibited elevated levels of oxidative damage to DNA, whereas those with no clear breakdown did not show significantly elevated damage. The extent of oxidative stress in hybrids appears to be dependent on the degree of genetic divergence between their respective parental populations, but this pattern requires further testing using multiple crosses at different levels of divergence. Given previous evidence in T. californicus that hybridization disrupts nuclear/mitochondrial interactions and reduces hybrid fitness, our results suggest that such negative intergenomic epistasis may also increase the production of damaging cellular oxidants; consequently, mtDNA evolution may play a significant role in generating postzygotic isolating barriers among diverging populations. PMID:23902912

  17. Radiation-induced mutation at mi