Science.gov

Sample records for radiative heat-loss function

  1. The effects of radiative heat loss on microgravity flame spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fakheri, Ahmad; Olson, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of radiative heat loss from the surface of a solid material burning in a zero gravity environment in an opposed flow is studied through the use of a numerical model. Radiative heat loss is found to decrease the flame spread rate, the boundary layer thickness, and pyrolysis lengths. Blowoff extinction is predicted to occur at slower opposesd flow velocities than would occur if the radiative loss is not present. The radiative heat fluxes are comparable to the conduction fluxes, indicating the significance of the surface energy loss.

  2. Chaos of radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Hikaru; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    We are intensively studying the chaos via the period-doubling bifurcation cascade in radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability by analytical methods based on dynamical systems theory and complex networks. Significant changes in flame front dynamics in the chaotic region, which cannot be seen in the bifurcation diagrams, were successfully extracted from recurrence quantification analysis and nonlinear forecasting and from the network entropy. The temporal dynamics of the fuel concentration in the well-developed chaotic region is much more complicated than that of the flame front temperature. It exhibits self-affinity as a result of the scale-free structure in the constructed visibility graph.

  3. Analytical study of the heat loss attenuation by clothing on thermal manikins under radiative heat loads.

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, Emiel A; Havenith, George

    2010-01-01

    For wearers of protective clothing in radiation environments there are no quantitative guidelines available for the effect of a radiative heat load on heat exchange. Under the European Union funded project ThermProtect an analytical effort was defined to address the issue of radiative heat load while wearing protective clothing. As within the ThermProtect project much information has become available from thermal manikin experiments in thermal radiation environments, these sets of experimental data are used to verify the analytical approach. The analytical approach provided a good prediction of the heat loss in the manikin experiments, 95% of the variance was explained by the model. The model has not yet been validated at high radiative heat loads and neglects some physical properties of the radiation emissivity. Still, the analytical approach provides a pragmatic approach and may be useful for practical implementation in protective clothing standards for moderate thermal radiation environments.

  4. Radiative Heat Loss Measurements During Microgravity Droplet Combustion in a Slow Convective Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Kaib, Nathan; Easton, John; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiative heat loss from burning droplets in a slow convective flow under microgravity conditions is measured using a broad-band (0.6 to 40 microns) radiometer. In addition, backlit images of the droplet as well as color images of the flame were obtained using CCD cameras to estimate the burning rates and the flame dimensions, respectively. Tests were carried out in air at atmospheric pressure using n-heptane and methanol fuels with imposed forced flow velocities varied from 0 to 10 centimeters per second and initial droplet diameters varied from 1 to 3 millimeters. Slow convective flows were generated using three different experimental configurations in three different facilities in preparation for the proposed International Space Station droplet experiments. In the 2.2 Second Drop-Tower Facility a droplet supported on the leading edge of a quartz fiber is placed within a flow tunnel supplied by compressed air. In the Zero-Gravity Facility (five-second drop tower) a tethered droplet is translated in a quiescent ambient atmosphere to establish a uniform flow field around the droplet. In the KC 135 aircraft an electric fan was used to draw a uniform flow past a tethered droplet. Experimental results show that the burn rate increases and the overall flame size decreases with increases in forced-flow velocities over the range of flow velocities and droplet sizes tested. The total radiative heat loss rate, Q(sub r), decreases as the imposed flow velocity increases with the spherically symmetric combustion having the highest values. These observations are in contrast to the trends observed for gas-jet flames in microgravity, but consistent with the observations during flame spread over solid fuels where the burning rate is coupled to the forced flow as here.

  5. The thermoregulatory function of the human hand: How do palm and digit proportions affect heat loss?

    PubMed

    Payne, Stephanie; Macintosh, Alison; Stock, Jay

    2018-03-30

    The current study assessed whether ecogeographical patterns seen in hand proportions correlate with heat loss directly. Using a brief severe cold immersion experiment on the hand, the influence of hand and digit dimensions on heat loss was evaluated. A sample of 113 living individuals were tested. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional scanning techniques were used to assess hand and digit dimensions. Thermal imaging analysis was used to quantify heat loss during a 3-min ice-water immersion of the hands. When body size was accounted for, hand width and digit length relative to total hand length were significant predictors of heat loss from the hand. The current study provides empirical evidence to support the link between thermodynamic principles relating to surface area-to-volume ratio, and ecogeographical patterns associated with temperature. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heat loss from giant extinct reptiles.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, G D

    2001-09-22

    There is disagreement in the literature about the relative rates of heat loss from a large animal surrounded by either air or water. Here, it is shown that, in most circumstances, the rate at which heat is lost by a large body is significantly greater when it is immersed in water than when it is surrounded by air, assuming that the two fluids are at the same temperature. The only circumstance when this may not apply is when comparing air with fresh water when both are at a temperature somewhere between 0 degrees C and 6 degrees C, the animal is still and water or air currents are negligible. Under these conditions, free convection in water is weak or non-existent, and so the combined effect of conduction and free convection in air becomes comparable to or even greater than that of conduction alone in water. However, in these circumstances, radiation is the dominant mode of heat loss to both media, and so heat losses are approximately the same in both air and water.

  8. Feasibility of determining flat roof heat losses using aerial thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The utility of aerial thermography for determining rooftop heat losses was investigated experimentally using several completely instrumented test roofs with known thermal resistances. Actual rooftop heat losses were obtained both from in-situ instrumentation and aerial thermography obtained from overflights at an altitude of 305 m. In general, the remotely determined roof surface temperatures agreed very well with those obtained from ground measurements. The roof heat losses calculated using the remotely determined roof temperature agreed to within 17% of those calculated from 1/R delta T using ground measurements. However, this agreement may be fortuitous since the convective component of the heat loss is sensitive to small changes in roof temperature and to the average heat transfer coefficient used, whereas the radiative component is less sensitive. This, at this time, it is felt that an acceptable quantitative determination of roof heat losses using aerial thermography is only feasible when the convective term is accurately known or minimized. The sensitivity of the heat loss determination to environmental conditions was also evaluated. The analysis showed that the most reliable quantitative heat loss determinations can probably be obtained from aerial thermography taken under conditions of total cloud cover with low wind speeds and at low ambient temperatures.

  9. Sliding, Insulating Window Panel Reduces Heat Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1984

    1984-01-01

    A new sliding insulated panel reduces window heat loss up to 86 percent, and infiltration 60-90 percent, paying for itself in 3-9 years. This article discusses the panel's use and testing in the upper Midwest, reporting both technical characteristics and users' reactions. (MCG)

  10. Test bench HEATREC for heat loss measurement on solar receiver tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, José M.; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; Zarza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) plants the thermal energy of solar radiation is absorbed by solar receiver tubes (HCEs) and it is transferred to a heat transfer fluid. Therefore, heat losses of receiver tubes have a direct influence on STE plants efficiency. A new test bench called HEATREC has been developed by Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in order to determinate the heat losses of receiver tubes under laboratory conditions. The innovation of this test bench consists in the possibility to determine heat losses under controlled vacuum.

  11. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined in...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined in...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined in...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined in...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined in...

  16. A model for allometric scaling of mammalian metabolism with ambient heat loss.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ho Sang; Im, Hong G; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-03-01

    Allometric scaling, which represents the dependence of biological traits or processes on body size, is a long-standing subject in biological science. However, there has been no study to consider heat loss to the ambient and an insulation layer representing mammalian skin and fur for the derivation of the scaling law of metabolism. A simple heat transfer model is proposed to analyze the allometry of mammalian metabolism. The present model extends existing studies by incorporating various external heat transfer parameters and additional insulation layers. The model equations were solved numerically and by an analytic heat balance approach. A general observation is that the present heat transfer model predicted the 2/3 surface scaling law, which is primarily attributed to the dependence of the surface area on the body mass. External heat transfer effects introduced deviations in the scaling law, mainly due to natural convection heat transfer, which becomes more prominent at smaller mass. These deviations resulted in a slight modification of the scaling exponent to a value < 2/3. The finding that additional radiative heat loss and the consideration of an outer insulation fur layer attenuate these deviation effects and render the scaling law closer to 2/3 provides in silico evidence for a functional impact of heat transfer mode on the allometric scaling law in mammalian metabolism.

  17. Generation of a Parabolic Trough Collector Efficiency Curve from Separate Measurements of Outdoor Optical Efficiency and Indoor Receiver Heat Loss

    SciT

    Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Stynes, J. K.

    2012-02-01

    The thermal efficiency of a parabolic trough collector is a function of both the fraction of direct normal radiation absorbed by the receiver (the optical efficiency) and the heat lost to the environment when the receiver is at operating temperature. The thermal efficiency can be determined by testing the collector under actual operating conditions or by separately measuring these two components. This paper describes how outdoor measurement of the optical efficiency is combined with laboratory measurements of receiver heat loss to obtain the thermal efficiency curve. This paper describes this approach and also makes the case that there are advantagesmore » to plotting collector efficiency versus the difference between the operating temperature and the ambient temperature at which the receiver heat loss was measured divided by radiation to a fractional power (on the order of 1/3 but obtained via data regression) - as opposed to the difference between operating and ambient temperatures divided by the radiation. The results are shown to be robust over wide ranges of ambient temperature, sky temperature, and wind speed.« less

  18. Influence of a Simple Heat Loss Profile on a Pure Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Anjan; Wichman, Indrek S.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of soot on the fuel side of a diffusion flame results in significant radiative heat losses. The influence of a fuel side heat loss zone on a pure diffusion flame established between a fuel and an oxidizer wall is investigated by assuming a hypothetical sech(sup 2) heat loss profile. The intensity and width of the loss zone are parametrically varied. The loss zone is placed at different distances from the Burke-Schumann flame location. The migration of the temperature and reactivity peaks are examined for a variety of situations. For certain cases the reaction zone breaks through the loss zone and relocates itself on the fuel side of the loss zone. In all cases the temperature and reactivity peaks move toward the fuel side with increased heat losses. The flame structure reveals that the primary balance for the energy equation is between the reaction term and the diffusion term. Extinction plots are generated for a variety of situations. The heat transfer from the flame to the walls and the radiative fraction is also investigated, and an analytical correlation formula, derived in a previous study, is shown to produce excellent predictions of our numerical results when an O(l) numerical multiplicative constant is employed.

  19. Heat Loss May Explain Bill Size Differences between Birds Occupying Different Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Russell; Cadena, Viviana; Danner, Raymond M.; Tattersall, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on variation in bill morphology has focused on the role of diet. Bills have other functions, however, including a role in heat and water balance. The role of the bill in heat loss may be particularly important in birds where water is limiting. Song sparrows localized in coastal dunes and salt marsh edge (Melospiza melodia atlantica) are similar in size to, but have bills with a 17% greater surface area than, those that live in mesic habitats (M. m. melodia), a pattern shared with other coastal sparrows. We tested the hypotheses that sparrows can use their bills to dissipate “dry” heat, and that heat loss from the bill is higher in M. m. atlantica than M. m. melodia, which would indicate a role of heat loss and water conservation in selection for bill size. Methodology/Principal Findings Bill, tarsus, and body surface temperatures were measured using thermal imaging of sparrows exposed to temperatures from 15–37°C and combined with surface area and physical modeling to estimate the contribution of each body part to total heat loss. Song sparrow bills averaged 5–10°C hotter than ambient. The bill of M. m atlantica dissipated up to 33% more heat and 38% greater proportion of total heat than that of M. m. melodia. This could potentially reduce water loss requirements by approximately 7.7%. Conclusions/Significance This >30% higher heat loss in the bill of M. m. atlantica is independent of evaporative water loss and thus could play an important role in the water balance of sparrows occupying the hot and exposed dune/salt marsh environments during the summer. Heat loss capacity and water conservation could play an important role in the selection for bill size differences between bird populations and should be considered along with trophic adaptations when studying variation in bill size. PMID:22848413

  20. Theoretical modeling of time-dependent skin temperature and heat losses during whole-body cryotherapy: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Marreiro, A; Pron, H; Lestriez, P; Boyer, F C; Quinart, H; Tourbah, A; Taïar, R

    2016-11-01

    This article establishes the basics of a theoretical model for the constitutive law that describes the skin temperature and thermolysis heat losses undergone by a subject during a session of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC). This study focuses on the few minutes during which the human body is subjected to a thermal shock. The relationship between skin temperature and thermolysis heat losses during this period is still unknown and have not yet been studied in the context of the whole human body. The analytical approach here is based on the hypothesis that the skin thermal shock during a WBC session can be thermally modelled by the sum of both radiative and free convective heat transfer functions. The validation of this scientific approach and the derivation of temporal evolution thermal laws, both on skin temperature and dissipated thermal power during the thermal shock open many avenues of large scale studies with the aim of proposing individualized cryotherapy protocols as well as protocols intended for target populations. Furthermore, this study shows quantitatively the substantial imbalance between human metabolism and thermolysis during WBC, the explanation of which remains an open question. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Generation of a Parabolic Trough Collector Efficiency Curve from Separate Measurements of Outdoor Optical Efficiency and Indoor Receiver Heat Loss: Preprint

    SciT

    Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Stynes, K.

    2010-10-01

    The overall efficiency of a parabolic trough collector is a function of both the fraction of direct normal radiation absorbed by the receiver (the optical efficiency) and the heat lost to the environment when the receiver is at operating temperature. The overall efficiency can be determined by testing the collector under actual operating conditions or by separately measuring these two components. This paper describes how outdoor measurement of the optical efficiency is combined with laboratory measurements of receiver heat loss to obtain an overall efficiency curve. Further, it presents a new way to plot efficiency that is more robust overmore » a range of receiver operating temperatures.« less

  2. 24 CFR 3280.510 - Heat loss certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat loss certificate. 3280.510... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.510 Heat... specify the following: (a) Heating zone certification. The design zone at which the manufactured home heat...

  3. 24 CFR 3280.510 - Heat loss certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat loss certificate. 3280.510... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.510 Heat... specify the following: (a) Heating zone certification. The design zone at which the manufactured home heat...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.510 - Heat loss certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat loss certificate. 3280.510... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.510 Heat... specify the following: (a) Heating zone certification. The design zone at which the manufactured home heat...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.510 - Heat loss certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat loss certificate. 3280.510... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.510 Heat... specify the following: (a) Heating zone certification. The design zone at which the manufactured home heat...

  6. 24 CFR 3280.510 - Heat loss certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat loss certificate. 3280.510... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.510 Heat... specify the following: (a) Heating zone certification. The design zone at which the manufactured home heat...

  7. Heat Loss Experiments: Teach Energy Savings with Cardboard "House"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Using two cardboard boxes, a light bulb socket, light bulbs of varying wattage, a thermometer, and some insulation, students can learn some interesting lessons about how heat loss occurs in homes. This article describes practical experiments that work well on units related to energy, sustainable energy, renewables, engineering, and construction.…

  8. Determining heat loss into the environment based on comprehensive investigation of boiler performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubov, V. K.; Malygin, P. V.; Popov, A. N.; Popova, E. I.

    2015-08-01

    A refined procedure for determining heat loss into the environment from heat-generating installations is presented that takes into account the state of their lining and heat insulation quality. The fraction of radiative component in the total amount of heat loss through the outer surfaces is determined. The results from experimental investigations of the thermal engineering and environmental performance characteristics of a foreign hot-water boiler in firing wood pellets are presented. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using such hot-water boilers for supplying heat to low-rise buildings, especially for the conditions of the North-Arctic region. The results from a thermal engineering investigation of wood pellets and furnace residue carried out on installations of a thermal analysis laboratory are presented together with the grain-size composition of fuel and indicators characterizing the mechanical strength of wood pellets. The velocity fields, flue gas flow rates, and soot particle concentrations are determined using the external filtration methods, and the composition of combustion products is investigated using a gas analyzer. The graphs of variation with time of boiler external surface temperature from the moment of achieving the nominal mode of operation and heat loss into the environment for stationary boilers are presented.

  9. On the Influence of a Fuel Side Heat-Loss (Soot) Layer on a Planar Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the response of a diffusion flame (DF) to an adjacent heat loss or 'soot' layer on the fuel side is investigated. The thermal influence of the 'soot' or heat-loss layer on the DF occurs through the enthalpy sink it creates. A sink distribution in mixture-fraction space is employed to examine possible DF extinction. It is found that (1) the enthalpy sink (or soot layer) must touch the DF for radiation-induced quenching to occur; and (2) for fuel-rich conditions extinction is possible only for a progressively narrower range of values ot the characteristic heat-loss parameter, N(sub R)(Delta Z(sub R)) Various interpretations ot the model are discussed. An attempt is made to place this work into the context created by previous experimental and computational studies.

  10. Modeling heat loss from the udder of a dairy cow.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic model that predicts sensible and latent heat fluxes from the udder of a dairy cow was developed. The prediction of the model was spot validated against measured data from the literature, and the result agreed within 7% of the measured value for the same ambient temperature. A dairy cow can lose a significant amount of heat (388W/m(2)) from the udder. This suggests that the udder could be considered as a heat sink. The temperature profile through the udder tissue (core to skin) approached the core temperature for an air temperature ≥37°C whereas the profile decreased linearly from the core to skin surface for an air temperature less than 37°C. Sensible heat loss was dominant when ambient air temperature was less than 37.5°C but latent heat loss was greater than sensible heat loss when air temperature was ≥37.5°C. The udder could lose a total (sensible + latent) heat flux of 338W/m(2) at an ambient temperature of 35°C and blood-flow rate of 3.2×10(-3)m(3)/(sm(3) tissue). The results of this study suggests that, in time of heat stress, a dairy cow could be cooled by cooling the udder only (e.g., using an evaporative cooling jacket). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of heat losses on nonlinear fingering dynamics of exothermic autocatalytic fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hernoncourt, J.; De Wit, A.

    2010-06-01

    Across traveling exothermic autocatalytic fronts, a density jump can be observed due to changes in composition and temperature. These density changes are prone to induce buoyancy-driven convection around the front when the propagation takes place in absence of gel within the gravity field. Most recent experiments devoted to studying such reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are performed in Hele-Shaw cells, two glass plates separated by a thin gap width and filled by the chemical solutions. We investigate here the influence of heat losses through the walls of such cells on the nonlinear fingering dynamics of exothermic autocatalytic fronts propagating in vertical Hele-Shaw cells. We show that these heat losses increase tip splittings and modify the properties of the flow field. A comparison of the differences between the dynamics in reactors with respectively insulating and conducting walls is performed as a function of the Lewis number Le, the Newton cooling coefficient α quantifying the amplitude of heat losses and the width of the system. We find that tip splitting is enhanced for intermediate values of α while coarsening towards one single finger dominates for insulated systems or large values of α leading to situations equivalent to isothermal ones.

  12. Radiant heat loss, an unexploited path for heat stress reduction in shaded cattle.

    PubMed

    Berman, A; Horovitz, T

    2012-06-01

    Reducing thermal radiation on shaded animals reduces heat stress independently of other means of stress relief. Radiant heat exchange was estimated as a function of climate, shade structure, and animal density. Body surface portion exposed to radiant sources in shaded environments was determined by geometrical relations to determine angles of view of radiation sources (roof underside, sky, sun-exposed ground, shaded ground) on the animal's surface. The relative representation of environment radiation sources on the body surface was determined. Animal thermal radiation balance was derived from radiant heat gained from radiation sources (including surrounding animals) and that lost from the animal surface. The animal environment was assumed to have different shade dimensions and temperatures. These were summed to the radiant heat balance of the cow. The data formed served to estimate the effect of changes in intensity of radiation sources, roof and shaded surface dimensions, and animal density on radiant heat balance (Rbal) of cattle. Roof height effect was expressed by effect of roof temperature on Rbal. Roof underside temperature (35 to 75°C) effect on Rbal was reduced by roof height. If roof height were 4m, an increase in its underside temperature from 35 to 75°C would increase mean Rbal from -63 to -2 W·m⁻², whereas if roof height were 10 m, Rbal would only increase from -99 to -88 W·m⁻². A hot ground temperature increase from 35 to 65°C reduced mean Rbal heat loss from -45 to 3 W·m⁻². Increasing the surface of the shaded area had only a minor effect on Rbal and on the effect of hot ground on Rbal. Increasing shade roof height reduced the effect of roof temperature on Rbal to minor levels when height was > 8m. Increasing the roof height from 4 to 10 m decreased Rbal from -32 to -94 W·m⁻². Increasing indirect radiation from 100 to 500 W·m⁻² was associated with an increase in Rbal from -135 to +23 W·m⁻². Their combined effects were lower

  13. Heat loss analysis-based design of a 12 MW wind power generator module having an HTS flux pump exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hae-Jin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Jiang, Zhenan; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2016-11-01

    The development of an effective high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generator is currently a research focus; however, the reduction of heat loss of a large-scale HTS generator is a challenge. This study deals with a heat loss analysis-based design of a 12 MW wind power generator module having an HTS flux pump exciter. The generator module consists of an HTS rotor of the generator and an HTS flux pump exciter. The specifications of the module were described, and the detailed configuration of the module was illustrated. For the heat loss analysis of the module, the excitation loss of the flux pump exciter, eddy current loss of all of the structures in the module, radiation loss, and conduction loss of an HTS coil supporter were assessed using a 3D finite elements method program. In the case of the conduction loss, different types of the supporters were compared to find out the supporter of the lowest conduction loss in the module. The heat loss analysis results of the module were reflected in the design of the generator module and discussed in detail. The results will be applied to the design of large-scale superconducting generators for wind turbines including a cooling system.

  14. Analysis of heat loss mechanisms for mobile tent-type refuge alternatives.

    PubMed

    Bissert, P T; Yantek, D S; Klein, M D; Yan, L

    2016-01-01

    Federal regulations require that refuge alternatives (RAs) be located within 305 m (1,000 ft) of the working face and spaced at one-hour travel distances in the outby area in underground coal mines, in the event that miners cannot escape during a disaster. The Mine Safety and Health Administration mandates that RAs provide safe shelter and livable conditions for a minimum of 96 hours while maintaining the apparent temperature below 35 °C (95 °F). The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health used a validated thermal simulation model to examine the mechanisms of heat loss from an RA to the ambient mine and the effect of mine strata composition on the final internal dry bulb temperature (DBT) for a mobile tent-type RA. The results of these studies show that 51 percent of the heat loss from the RA to the ambient mine is due to radiation and 31 percent to conduction. Three mine width and height configurations and four mine strata compositions were examined. The final DBT inside the RA after 96 hours varied by less than 1 °C (1.8 °F) for the three mine width/height configurations and by less than 2 °C (3.6 °F) for the four mine strata compositions.

  15. Effect of Wind Flow on Convective Heat Losses from Scheffler Solar Concentrator Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nene, Anita Arvind; Ramachandran, S.; Suyambazhahan, S.

    2018-05-01

    Receiver is an important element of solar concentrator system. In a Scheffler concentrator, solar rays get concentrated at focus of parabolic dish. While radiation losses are more predictable and calculable since strongly related to receiver temperature, convective looses are difficult to estimate in view of additional factors such as wind flow direction, speed, receiver geometry, prior to current work. Experimental investigation was carried out on two geometries of receiver namely cylindrical and conical with 2.7 m2 Scheffler to find optimum condition of tilt to provide best efficiency. Experimental results showed that as compared to cylindrical receiver, conical receiver gave maximum efficiency at 45° tilt angle. However effect of additional factors like wind speed, wind direction on especially convective losses could not be separately seen. The current work was undertaken to investigate further the same two geometries using computation fluid dynamics using FLUENT to compute convective losses considering all variables such at tilt angle of receiver, wind velocity and wind direction. For cylindrical receiver, directional heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is remarkably high to tilt condition meaning this geometry is critical to tilt leading to higher convective heat losses. For conical receiver, directional average HTC is remarkably less to tilt condition leading to lower convective heat loss.

  16. Head insulation and heat loss in the newborn.

    PubMed Central

    Stothers, J K

    1981-01-01

    The thermal balance of 13 term infants was measured in a closed-circuit metabolism chamber. Each was studied naked, then with a gamgee-lined hat, and finally with a 'cummerbund' made of a similar material and of similar dimensions. At 27 degrees C the oxygen consumption of the 'hatted' babies was only 85% and the total heat loss 75% of the values measured with the infants naked. The cummerbund offered no detectable benefit. An additional 10 infants were studied while wearing a tubegauze hat at environmental temperatures of 28.5 (+/- 0.5) degrees C. This type of hat gave no measurable thermal protection. It is concluded that a substantial reduction of thermal stress in adverse environments can be achieved simply and clearly by adequately covering the vault of the skull. PMID:7271287

  17. Heat loss and drag of spherical drop tube samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis techniques for three aspects of the performance of the NASA/MSFC 32 meter drop tube are considered. Heat loss through the support wire in a pendant drop sample, temperature history of a drop falling through the drop tube when the tube is filled with helium gas at various pressures, and drag and resulting g-levels experienced by a drop falling through the tube when the tube is filled with helium gas at various pressures are addressed. The developed methods apply to systems with sufficiently small Knudsen numbers for which continuum theory may be applied. Sample results are presented, using niobium drops, to indicate the magnitudes of the effects. Helium gas at one atmosphere pressure can approximately double the amount of possible undercooling but it results in an apparent gravity levels of up to 0.1 g.

  18. Sauropod necks: are they really for heat loss?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating.

  19. Sauropod Necks: Are They Really for Heat Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

  20. Impact of Next Generation District Heating Systems on Distribution Network Heat Losses: A Case Study Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Rezgui, Yacine

    2018-01-01

    District heating (DH) is a promising energy pathway to alleviate environmental negative impacts induced by fossil fuels. Improving the performance of DH systems is one of the major challenges facing its wide adoption. This paper discusses the heat losses of the next generation DH based on the constructed Simulink model. Results show that lower distribution temperature and advanced insulation technology greatly reduce network heat losses. Also, the network heat loss can be further minimized by a reduction of heat demand in buildings.

  1. Aging impairs heat loss, but when does it matter?

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Jill M.; Poirier, Martin P.; Flouris, Andreas D.; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J.; Malcolm, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with an attenuated physiological ability to dissipate heat. However, it remains unclear if age-related impairments in heat dissipation only occur above a certain level of heat stress and whether this response is altered by aerobic fitness. Therefore, we examined changes in whole body evaporative heat loss (HE) as determined using whole body direct calorimetry in young (n = 10; 21 ± 1 yr), untrained middle-aged (n = 10; 48 ± 5 yr), and older (n = 10; 65 ± 3 yr) males matched for body surface area. We also studied a group of trained middle-aged males (n = 10; 49 ± 5 yr) matched for body surface area with all groups and for aerobic fitness with the young group. Participants performed intermittent aerobic exercise (30-min exercise bouts separated by 15-min rest) in the heat (40°C and 15% relative humidity) at progressively greater fixed rates of heat production equal to 300 (Ex1), 400 (Ex2), and 500 (Ex3) W. Results showed that HE was significantly lower in middle-aged untrained (Ex2: 426 ± 34; and Ex3: 497 ± 17 W) and older (Ex2: 424 ± 38; and Ex3: 485 ± 44 W) compared with young (Ex2: 472 ± 42; and Ex3: 558 ± 51 W) and middle-aged trained (474 ± 21; Ex3: 552 ± 23 W) males at the end of Ex2 and Ex3 (P < 0.05). No differences among groups were observed during recovery. We conclude that impairments in HE in older and middle-aged untrained males occur at exercise-induced heat loads of ≥400 W when performed in a hot environment. These impairments in untrained middle-aged males can be minimized through regular aerobic exercise training. PMID:25505030

  2. Ceramic tube seals cut heat loss, achieve six month payback

    SciT

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The methane reformer at the Celanese Chemical Company's Bishop, TX plant operates at approximately 1900/sup 0/F. The reformer has 32 tubes (9'' diameter) that pass through the firebox. Openings around the tubes measure 11'' in diameter to accommodate horizontal and vertical thermal expansion and movement as well as to facilitate tube removal. The gaps around the tubes permitted cool air to be drawn into the firebox (caused by slight negative pressure) and also allowed radiant heat to escape causing the reformer to operate at a lower than desired level of thermal efficiency. Celanese contracted to retrofit the old rigid firebrickmore » roof in the methane reformer with a 10'' thick ceramic fiber module lining. The gaps around the tubes were sealed by using a special tube seal made from Nextel woven ceramic fiber fabric, a 1984 CHEMICAL PROCESSING Vaaler Award winner (Mid-November 1984, p.52). The Nextel fabric used in this application is a heat resistant textile that has a continuous use temperature of 2200/sup 0/F - well above the 1900/sup 0/F operating temperature of the reformer. The tube seals have been working exactly as intended, verified by observation through inspection ports. Temperatures in the penthouse area above the roof dropped from 240/sup 0/F to 150/sup 0/F. The reduction in heat losses has been attributed to the elimination of the gaps around each tube by the seals and to the improved K-factor of the ceramic module lining. The tube seals have paid for themselves within six months of installation. At that time, the seal boots were inspected and showed no signs of wear. With these results, the improved efficiency of the methane reformer promises to yield additional economic benefits.« less

  3. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values... Loads—Manufactured Homes—February 1992-PNL 8006, HUD User No. 0005945. (c) Areas where the insulation... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values... Loads—Manufactured Homes—February 1992-PNL 8006, HUD User No. 0005945. (c) Areas where the insulation... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values... Loads—Manufactured Homes—February 1992-PNL 8006, HUD User No. 0005945. (c) Areas where the insulation... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling...

  6. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values... Loads—Manufactured Homes—February 1992-PNL 8006, HUD User No. 0005945. (c) Areas where the insulation... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling...

  7. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values... Loads—Manufactured Homes—February 1992-PNL 8006, HUD User No. 0005945. (c) Areas where the insulation... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling...

  8. Do metaboreceptors alter heat loss responses following dynamic exercise?

    PubMed

    McGinn, Ryan; Swift, Brendan; Binder, Konrad; Gagnon, Daniel; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-01-01

    Metaboreceptor activation during passive heating is known to influence cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate (SR). However, whether metaboreceptors modulate the suppression of heat loss following dynamic exercise remains unclear. On separate days, before and after 15 min of high-intensity treadmill running in the heat (35°C), eight males underwent either 1) no isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) or ischemia (CON), 2) 1 min IHG (60% of maximum, IHG), 3) 1 min IHG followed by 2 min of ischemia (IHG+OCC), 4) 2 min of ischemia (OCC), or 5) 1 min IHG followed by 2 min of ischemia with application of lower body negative pressure (IHG+LBNP). SR (ventilated capsule), cutaneous blood flow (Laser-Doppler), and mean arterial pressure (Finometer) were measured continuously before and after dynamic exercise. Following dynamic exercise, CVC was reduced with IHG exercise (P < 0.05) and remained attenuated with post-IHG ischemia during IHG+OCC relative to CON (39 ± 2 vs. 47 ± 6%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the reduction in CVC was exacerbated by application of LBNP during post-IHG ischemia (35 ± 3%, P < 0.05) relative to IHG+OCC. SR increased during IHG exercise (P < 0.05) and remained elevated during post-IHG ischemia relative to CON following dynamic exercise (0.94 ± 0.15 vs. 0.53 ± 0.09 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2), P < 0.05). In contrast, application of LBNP during post-IHG ischemia had no effect on SR (0.93 ± 0.09 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2), P > 0.05) relative to post-IHG ischemia during IHG+OCC. We show that CVC is reduced and that SR is increased by metaboreceptor activation following dynamic exercise. In addition, we show that the metaboreflex-induced loading of the baroreceptors can influence the CVC response, but not the sweating response.

  9. Jeans instability of rotating magnetized quantum plasma: Influence of radiation

    SciT

    Joshi, H., E-mail: hjoshi8525@yahoo.com; Pensia, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The effect of radiative heat-loss function and rotation on the Jeans instability of quantum plasma is investigated. The basic set of equations for this problem is constructed by considering quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using normal mode analysis, the general dispersion relation is obtained. This dispersion relation is studied in both, longitudinal and transverse direction of propagations. In both case of longitudinal and transverse direction of propagation, the Jeans instability criterion is modified due to presence of radiative heat-loss function and quantum correction.

  10. Cutaneous Heat Loss with Three Surgical Drapes, One Impervious to Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Maglinger, Paul E.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Lenhardt, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    A new surgical drape, which is impervious to moisture, presumably reduces evaporative heat loss. We compared cutaneous heat loss and skin temperature in volunteers covered with this drape to two conventional surgical drapes (Large Surgical Drape and Medline Proxima). With IRB approval and informed consent, we calculated cutaneous heat loss and skin-surface temperatures from 15 area-weighted thermal flux transducers in 8 volunteers. In random order, each of the drapes was evaluated with dry transducers and moistened transducers (simulating wet skin). After a 20-minute uncovered control period, volunteers were covered from the neck down for 40 minutes. Data were recorded continuously and averaged over 10-minutes. Results were similar for all three drapes for dry or moist conditions. Under dry conditions, baseline heat loss was 82±14 watts (W) and decreased 30% with a surgical drape (P<0.001). Under moist conditions, baseline heat loss was 231±45 W and decreased 29% with a drape covering (P<0.001). Moist skin increased heat loss 282% (P<0.001). There were no clinically important differences in skin temperature among the covers with dry or moist skin. Moist skin increased heat loss nearly three-fold, but there were no differences among the drapes. We conclude that loss is comparable with impervious and conventional drapes with either moist or dry skin. PMID:15728062

  11. Infrared thermal imaging as a method to evaluate heat loss in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Labeur, L; Villiers, G; Small, A H; Hinch, G N; Schmoelzl, S

    2017-12-01

    Thermal imaging technology has been identified as a potential method for non-invasive study of thermogenesis in the neonatal lamb. In comparison to measurement of the core body temperature, infrared thermography may observe thermal loss and thermogenesis linked to subcutaneous brown fat depots. This study aimed to identify a suitable method to measure heat loss in the neonatal lamb under a cold challenge. During late pregnancy (day 125), ewes were subjected to either shearing (n=15) or mock handling (sham-shorn for 2min mimicking the shearing movements) (n=15). Previous studies have shown an increase in brown adipose tissue deposition in lambs born to ewes shorn during pregnancy and we hypothesized that the shearing treatment would impact thermoregulatory capacities in newborn lambs. Lambs born to control ewes (n=14; CONTROL) and shorn ewes (n=13; SHORN) were subjected to a cold challenge of 1h duration at 4h after birth. During the cold challenge, thermography images were taken every 10min, from above, at a fixed distance from the dorsal midline. On each image, four fixed-size areas were identified (shoulder, mid loin, hips and rump) and the average and maximum temperatures of each recorded. In all lambs, body surface temperature decreased over time. Overall the SHORN lambs appeared to maintain body surface temperature better than CONTROL lambs, while CONTROL lambs appeared to have higher core temperature. At 30min post cold challenge SHORN lambs tended to have higher body surface temperatures than lambs (P=0.0474). Both average and maximum temperatures were highest at the hips. Average temperature was lowest at the shoulder (P<0.05), while maximum temperatures were lowest at both shoulder and rump (P<0.005). These results indicate that lambs born to shorn ewes maintained their radiated body surface temperature better than CONTROL lambs. In conjunction with core temperature changes under cold challenge, this insight will allow us to understand whether increased

  12. Detecting structural heat losses with mobile infrared thermography. Part IV. Estimating quantitative heat loss at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire

    SciT

    Munis, R.H.; Marshall, S.J.; Bush, M.A.

    1976-09-01

    During the winter of 1973-74 a mobile infrared thermography system was used to survey campus buildings at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire. Both qualitative and quantitative data are presented regarding heat flow through a small area of a wall of one brick dormitory building before and after installation of aluminum reflectors between radiators and the wall. These data were used to estimate annual cost savings for 22 buildings of similar construction having aluminum reflectors installed behind 1100 radiators. The data were then compared with the actual savings which were calculated from condensate meter data. The discrepancy between estimated and actualmore » annual cost savings is explained in detail along with all assumptions required for these calculations.« less

  13. Impact of Subgrid Scale Models and Heat Loss on Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Burner Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.; Im, Hong G.; Lee, Bok Jik; Fancello, Alessio; Donini, Andrea; van Oijen, Jeroen A.; de Goey, L. Philip H.

    2017-11-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber are performed employing the flamelet-generated manifold (FGM) method for tabulation of chemical kinetics and thermochemical properties, as well as the OpenFOAM framework for computational fluid dynamics. The burner has been experimentally studied by Lammel et al. (2011) and features an off-center nozzle, feeding a preheated lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the FGM tabulation via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence-chemistry interaction is modeled via presumed filtered density functions. The impact of heat loss inclusion as well as SGS modeling for both the SGS stresses and SGS variance of progress variable on the numerical results is investigated. Comparisons of the LES results against measurements show a significant improvement in the prediction of temperature when heat losses are incorporated into FGM. While further enhancements in the LES results are accomplished by using SGS models based on transported quantities and/or dynamically computed coefficients as compared to the Smagorinsky model, heat loss inclusion is more relevant. This research was sponsored by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and made use of computational resources at KAUST Supercomputing Laboratory.

  14. Heat losses and thermal imaging of ferroic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyashenko, S. E.; Ivanova, A. I.; Gasanov, O. V.; Grechishkin, R. M.; Tretiakov, S. A.; Yushkov, K. B.; Linde, B. B. J.

    2015-03-01

    A study is made of spatial and temporal temperature variations in working devices based on ferroic functional materials. The measurement of the sample's temperature is complemented with direct observation of its distribution over the sample surface. For the latter purpose a thermovision infrared videocamera technique was employed. Specific features of the temperature distribution and its evolution during heating and cooling of a number of piezoelectric, acoustooptic and shape memory components are revealed. Examples of hot spot observations indicative of structural defects in the samples under study are given thus suggesting the use of thermal vision for nondestructive testing. A proposal is made to combine the thermovision method with that of thermomagnetic analysis for the study of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

  15. Parabolic trough receiver heat loss and optical efficiency round robin 2015/2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernpeintner, Johannes; Schiricke, Björn; Sallaberry, Fabienne; de Jalón, Alberto García; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; de Luca, Antonio; Georg, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    A round robin for parabolic trough receiver heat loss and optical efficiency in the laboratory was performed between five institutions using five receivers in 2015/2016. Heat loss testing was performed at three cartridge heater test benches and one Joule heating test bench in the temperature range between 100 °C and 550 °C. Optical efficiency testing was performed with two spectrometric test bench and one calorimetric test bench. Heat loss testing results showed standard deviations at the order of 6% to 12 % for most temperatures and receivers and a standard deviation of 17 % for one receiver at 100 °C. Optical efficiency is presented normalized for laboratories showing standard deviations of 0.3 % to 1.3 % depending on the receiver.

  16. Causes and Consequences of Exceptional North Atlantic Heat Loss in Recent Winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, Simon; Grist, Jeremy; Duchez, Aurelie; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Hirschi, Joel; Marsh, Robert; Sinha, Bablu

    2016-04-01

    The mid-high latitude North Atlantic loses large amounts of heat to the atmosphere in winter leading to dense water formation. An examination of reanalysis datasets (ERA-Interim, NCEP/NCAR) reveals that heat loss in the recent winters 2013-14 and 2014-15 was exceptionally strong. The causes and consequences of this extraordinary ocean heat loss will be discussed. In 2013-2014, the net air-sea heat flux anomaly averaged over the whole winter exceeded 100 Wm-2 in the eastern subpolar gyre (the most extreme in the period since 1979 spanned by ERA-Interim). The causes of this extreme heat loss will be shown to be severe latent and sensible heat fluxes driven primarily by anomalously strong westerly airflows from North America and northerly airflows originating in the Nordic Seas. The associated sea level pressure anomaly field reflects the dominance of the second mode of atmospheric variability, the East Atlantic Pattern (EAP) over the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in this winter. The extreme winter heat loss had a significant impact on the ocean extending from the sea surface into the deeper layers and a re-emergent cold Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomaly is evident in November 2014. The following winter 2014-15 experienced further extreme heat loss that served to amplify the strength of the re-emergent SST anomaly. By summer 2015, an unprecedented cold mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean surface temperature anomaly is evident in observations and has been widely referred to as the 'big blue blob'. The role played by the extreme surface heat loss in the preceding winters in generating this feature and it subsequent evolution through winter 2015-16 will be explored.

  17. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  18. Estimation of heat loss from a cylindrical cavity receiver based on simultaneous energy and exergy analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madadi, Vahid; Tavakoli, Touraj; Rahimi, Amir

    2015-03-01

    This study undertakes the experimental and theoretical investigation of heat losses from a cylindrical cavity receiver employed in a solar parabolic dish collector. Simultaneous energy and exergy equations are used for a thermal performance analysis of the system. The effects of wind speed and its direction on convection loss has also been investigated. The effects of operational parameters, such as heat transfer fluid mass flow rate and wind speed, and structural parameters, such as receiver geometry and inclination, are investigated. The portion of radiative heat loss is less than 10%. An empirical and simplified correlation for estimating the dimensionless convective heat transfer coefficient in terms of the Re mathrm {Re} number and the average receiver wall temperature is proposed. This correlation is applicable for a wind speed range of 0.10.1 to 10 m/s. Moreover, the proposed correlation for Nu mathrm {Nu} number is validated using experimental data obtained through the experiments carried out with a conical receiver with two aperture diameters. The coefficient of determination R2 and the normalized root

  19. Head insulation and heat loss in naked and clothed newborns using a thermal mannequin.

    PubMed

    Elabbassi, Elmountacer Billah; Chardon, Karen; Bach, Véronique; Telliez, Frédéric; Delanaud, Stéphane; Libert, Jean-Pierre

    2002-06-01

    In newborns, large amounts of heat are lost from the head, due to its high skin surface area. Insulating the head (for example, with a hat or bonnet) can be a simple and effective method of reducing dry heat loss. In the present study, we evaluated the safety aspects of insulating the head of low-birth-weight naked or clothed newborns by using a heated mannequin that simulates a low-birth-weight newborn. Experimental conditions (comprising a nude and three clothed setups) were performed in a closed incubator at three different air temperatures (29 degrees C, 32 degrees C, and 34 degrees C) and with and without the head being covered with a bonnet in each case, i.e., 24 experimental conditions in all. The study shows that added clothing elements and insulating the head decreases the total heat loss of the mannequin as a whole. As regards the dry heat exchange from the head, wearing a bonnet decreases the local heat loss by an average of 18.9% in all clothed and thermal conditions. This phenomenon could be at the origin of brain overheating in heavily dressed newborns, when unrestricted heat loss is limited to the face only. Our results suggest that--apart from accidental hypothermia-in order to achieve thermal equilibrium of the body, it is preferable to leave the head unprotected and to increase the level of clothing insulation over the rest of the body.

  20. Aging Impairs Whole-Body Heat Loss in Women under Both Dry and Humid Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Notley, Sean R; Poirier, Martin P; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Flouris, Andreas D; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-11-01

    This study was designed to determine whether age-related impairments in whole-body heat loss, which are known to exist in dry heat, also occur in humid heat in women. To evaluate this possibility, 10 young (25 ± 4 yr) and 10 older (51 ± 7 yr) women matched for body surface area (young, 1.69 ± 0.11; older, 1.76 ± 0.14 m, P = 0.21) and peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak) (young, 38.6 ± 4.6; older, 34.8 ± 6.6 mL·kg·min, P = 0.15) performed four 15-min bouts of cycling at a fixed metabolic heat production rate (300 W; equivalent to ~45% V˙O2peak), each separated by a 15-min recovery, in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity). Total heat loss (evaporative ± dry heat exchange) and metabolic heat production were measured using direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and loss. Total heat loss was lower in humid conditions compared with dry conditions during all exercise bouts in both groups (all P < 0.05), resulting in 49% and 39% greater body heat storage in young and older women, respectively (both P < 0.01). Total heat loss was also lower in older women compared with young women during exercise bouts 1, 2 and 3 in dry heat (all P < 0.05) and bouts 1 and 2 in humid heat (both P < 0.05). Consequently, body heat storage was 29% and 16% greater in older women compared with young women in dry and humid conditions, respectively (both P < 0.05). Increasing ambient humidity reduces heat loss capacity in young and older women. However, older women display impaired heat loss relative to young women in both dry and humid heat, and may therefore be at greater risk of heat-related injury during light-to-moderate activity.

  1. The effect of wind on the rate of heat loss from avian cup-shaped nests.

    PubMed

    Heenan, Caragh B; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    Forced convection can significantly influence the heat loss from birds and their offspring but effects may be reduced by using sheltered micro-sites such as cavities or constructing nests. The structural and thermal properties of the nests of two species, the spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis) and yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula), were measured in relation to three wind speeds. Nest dimensions differ between the two species, despite the similar body mass of the incubating adults, however nest conductance is comparable. As wind speed increases, so does the rate of heat loss from the nests of both species, and further still during incubation recesses. The significance of forced convection through the nest is a near-doubling in heat production required by the parent, even when incubating at relatively low wind speeds. This provides confirmation that selecting a sheltered nest site is important for avian reproductive success.

  2. The Effect of Wind on the Rate of Heat Loss from Avian Cup-Shaped Nests

    PubMed Central

    Heenan, Caragh B.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    Forced convection can significantly influence the heat loss from birds and their offspring but effects may be reduced by using sheltered micro-sites such as cavities or constructing nests. The structural and thermal properties of the nests of two species, the spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis) and yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula), were measured in relation to three wind speeds. Nest dimensions differ between the two species, despite the similar body mass of the incubating adults, however nest conductance is comparable. As wind speed increases, so does the rate of heat loss from the nests of both species, and further still during incubation recesses. The significance of forced convection through the nest is a near-doubling in heat production required by the parent, even when incubating at relatively low wind speeds. This provides confirmation that selecting a sheltered nest site is important for avian reproductive success. PMID:22389689

  3. Heat Loss Testing of Schott's 2008 PTR70 Parabolic Trough Receiver

    SciT

    Burkholder, Frank; Kutscher, Chuck

    2009-05-01

    Two Schott 2008 model year PTR70 HCEs were tested on NREL's heat loss test stand from 100 - 500 deg C in 50 deg C increments. Absorber emittance was determined from the laboratory testing so that the performance of the HCEs could be modeled in a parabolic trough collector. Collector/HCE simulation results for many different field operation conditions were used to create heat loss correlationcoefficients for Excelergy and SAM. SAM estimates that the decreased emittance of the 2008 PTR70 will decrease the LCOE for parabolic trough power plants by 0.5 cents/kWh and increase the electricity generated by 5% relative tomore » previous PTR70s. These conclusions assume that the 2008 PTR70 is supplied at the same cost and with the same optical performance as earlier PTR70 models.« less

  4. Effects of thickness, insulation, and surface color on the net heat loss through an adobe wall

    SciT

    Herman, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A finite difference computer program was written and run to study the net thermal losses through a large variety of adobe walls. Fifty-four different combinations of surface color, wall thickness, and insulation position and R value were modeled over a typical two week winter period for locations similar to Albuquerque, New Mexico. A transient analysis of the heat loss from the room to the interior wall surface was compared to both conventional U value and steady-state calculations.

  5. Comparison of IR thermography and thermocouple measurement of heat loss from rabbit pinna.

    PubMed

    Mohler, F S; Heath, J E

    1988-02-01

    The temperature of the pinnae of male New Zealand White rabbits was measured by use of infrared thermography. At ambient temperatures of 15, 20, and 25 degrees C, the average pinna temperatures were 23.0, 28.7, and 36.2 degrees C, respectively. From these temperatures, average heat loss from the total pinna surface area was calculated to be 2.8, 3.3, and 4.4 W, respectively. Preoptic temperature changes also affect the vasomotor state of the rabbit. At an ambient temperature of 20 degrees C, cooling the preoptic area of the rabbit by approximately 1 degree C resulted in an average pinna temperature of 26.5 degrees C and a heat loss of 2.4 W. Heating the preoptic area by approximately 1 degree C resulted in an average pinna temperature of 33.5 degrees C and a heat loss of 5.4 W. Finally, pinna temperatures were measured by use of a thermocouple and infrared thermography simultaneously. When the pinnae were vasodilated, the thermocouple measurements were consistently higher than the pinna surface temperatures measured thermographically. When the pinnae were vasoconstricted, the thermocouple measurements were consistently lower than the pinna surface temperatures measured thermographically. The discrepancy between the two methods of measurement is discussed.

  6. Metabolic heat production, heat loss and the circadian rhythm of body temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2003-05-01

    Metabolic heat production (calculated from oxygen consumption), dry heat loss (measured in a calorimeter) and body temperature (measured by telemetry) were recorded simultaneously at 6 min intervals over five consecutive days in rats maintained in constant darkness. Robust circadian rhythmicity (confirmed by chi square periodogram analysis) was observed in all three variables. The rhythm of heat production was phase-advanced by about half an hour in relation to the body temperature rhythm, whereas the rhythm of heat loss was phase-delayed by about half an hour. The balance of heat production and heat loss exhibited a daily oscillation 180 deg out of phase with the oscillation in body temperature. Computations indicated that the amount of heat associated with the generation of the body temperature rhythm (1.6 kJ) corresponds to less than 1 % of the total daily energy budget (172 kJ) in this species. Because of the small magnitude of the fraction of heat balance associated with the body temperature rhythm, it is likely that the daily oscillation in heat balance has a very slow effect on body temperature, thus accounting for the 180 deg phase difference between the rhythms of heat balance and body temperature.

  7. Correction of the heat loss method for calculating clothing real evaporative resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Zhang, Chengjiao; Lu, Yehu

    2015-08-01

    In the so-called isothermal condition (i.e., Tair [air temperature]=Tmanikin [manikin temperature]=Tr [radiant temperature]), the actual energy used for moisture evaporation detected by most sweating manikins was underestimated due to the uncontrolled fabric 'skin' temperature Tsk,f (i.e., Tsk,fheat loss from the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system was proposed and experimentally validated on a 'Newton' sweating manikin. The real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the nude fabric 'skin' calculated by the corrected heat loss method was also reported and compared with that by the mass loss method. Results revealed that, depending on the types of tested clothing, different amounts of heat were drawn from the ambient environment. In general, a greater amount of heat was drawn from the ambient environment by the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system in lower thermal insulation clothing than that in higher insulation clothing. There were no significant differences between clothing real evaporative resistances calculated by the corrected heat loss method and those by the mass loss method. It was therefore concluded that the correction method proposed in this study has been successfully validated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental investigation of a multicylinder unmodified diesel engine performance, emission, and heat loss characteristics using different biodiesel blends: rollout of B10 in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abedin, M J; Masjuki, H H; Kalam, M A; Varman, M; Arbab, M I; Fattah, I M Rizwanul; Masum, B M

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the performance and emission analysis of a multicylinder diesel engine using biodiesel along with an in-depth analysis of the engine heat losses in different subsystems followed by the energy balance of all the energy flows from the engine. Energy balance analysis allows the designer to appraise the internal energy variations of a thermodynamic system as a function of ''energy flows" across the control volume as work or heat and also the enthalpies associated with the energy flows which are passing through these boundaries. Palm and coconut are the two most potential biodiesel feed stocks in this part of the world. The investigation was conducted in a four-cylinder diesel engine fuelled with 10% and 20% blends of palm and coconut biodiesels and compared with B5 at full load condition and in the speed range of 1000 to 4000 RPM. Among the all tested blends, palm blends seemed more promising in terms of engine performance, emission, and heat losses. The influence of heat losses on engine performance and emission has been discussed thoroughly in this paper.

  9. Experimental Investigation of a Multicylinder Unmodified Diesel Engine Performance, Emission, and Heat Loss Characteristics Using Different Biodiesel Blends: Rollout of B10 in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Abedin, M. J.; Masjuki, H. H.; Kalam, M. A.; Varman, M.; Arbab, M. I.; Fattah, I. M. Rizwanul; Masum, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the performance and emission analysis of a multicylinder diesel engine using biodiesel along with an in-depth analysis of the engine heat losses in different subsystems followed by the energy balance of all the energy flows from the engine. Energy balance analysis allows the designer to appraise the internal energy variations of a thermodynamic system as a function of ‘‘energy flows” across the control volume as work or heat and also the enthalpies associated with the energy flows which are passing through these boundaries. Palm and coconut are the two most potential biodiesel feed stocks in this part of the world. The investigation was conducted in a four-cylinder diesel engine fuelled with 10% and 20% blends of palm and coconut biodiesels and compared with B5 at full load condition and in the speed range of 1000 to 4000 RPM. Among the all tested blends, palm blends seemed more promising in terms of engine performance, emission, and heat losses. The influence of heat losses on engine performance and emission has been discussed thoroughly in this paper. PMID:25162046

  10. Heat Loss is Impaired in Older Men on the Day following Prolonged Work in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Notley, Sean R; Meade, Robert D; DʼSouza, Andrew W; Friesen, Brian J; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-04-21

    Prolonged work in the heat may exacerbate the rise in core temperature on the next work day, especially in older workers who display impairments in whole-body heat loss that increase body heat storage and core temperature relative to young adults during heat stress. We therefore evaluated whether whole-body heat loss in older adults was impaired on the day following prolonged work in the heat. Whole-body heat exchange and heat storage were assessed in nine older (53-64 years) males during three, 30-min bouts of semi-recumbent cycling at fixed rates of metabolic heat production (150 (Ex1), 200 (Ex2), 250 Wm (Ex3)), each separated by 15-min recovery, in hot-dry conditions (40°C, 20% relative humidity), immediately prior to (Day 1), and on the day following (Day 2), a prolonged, work simulation (~7.5 h) involving moderate-intensity intermittent exercise in hot-dry conditions (38°C, 34% relative humidity). Total heat loss (evaporative ± dry heat exchange) and metabolic heat production were measured using direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was quantified as the temporal summation of heat production and loss. Total heat loss (mean±SD) during Ex1 did not differ between Day 1 and 2 (151±15 and 147±14 Wm, respectively; P=0.27), but was attenuated on Day 2 during Ex2 (181±15 Wm) and Ex3 (218±16 Wm) relative to Day 1 (192±14 and 230±19 Wm, respectively; both P<0.01). Consequently, body heat storage throughout the protocol on Day 2 (276±114 kJ) was 31% greater than on Day 1 (191±87 kJ; P<0.01). Prolonged work in the heat causes next-day impairments in whole-body heat loss, which exacerbate heat storage and may elevate the risk of heat-injury on the following day in older workers.

  11. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    SciT

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokinemore » secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur

  12. Body fatness, body core temperature, and heat loss during moderate-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Limbaugh, Jayme D; Wimer, Gregory S; Long, Lynn H; Baird, William H

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the influence of body fatness on body core temperature and heat loss responses during moderate-intensity exercise. Nine men with lower body fat and eight men with higher body fat, matched for aerobic fitness, completed 1 h of recumbent cycling at the same absolute intensity in a warm environment (30 degrees C, 40% RH). Percent body fat was measured by hydrostatic weighing, using oxygen dilution to determine residual volume. Esophageal temperature (T(es)), mean skin temperature (T(sk)), and local sweat rate (m(sw)) were measured at rest and continuously during exercise while forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured at rest and every 10 min during exercise. The lower body fat and higher body fat groups were successfully matched for aerobic fitness, removing the influence of body fatness, given that V/O2(peak) was 50.72 +/- 7.34 and 50.43 +/- 5.01 ml x kg LBM(-1) x min(-1), respectively. When compared to lower body fat individuals, % body fat, body surface area (A(D)), and body mass were higher and A(D)/ mass was lower in higher body fat individuals. T(es), T(sk), FBF, m(sw), and the slope of m(sw):T(es) were not different between groups. Metabolic heat production was similar between the lower body fat (299.7 +/- 40.5 W x m(-2)) and higher body fat (288.1 +/- 30.6 W x m(-2)) subjects, respectively. Dry and evaporative heat loss, as well as heat storage during exercise, were not different between groups. These data suggest that there is no effect of body fatness on body core temperature or heat loss responses during moderate-intensity exercise in a warm environment.

  13. Is there evidence for nonthermal modulation of whole body heat loss during intermittent exercise?

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Gagnon, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    This study compared the effect of active, passive, and inactive recoveries on whole body evaporative and dry heat loss responses during intermittent exercise at an air temperature of 30 degrees C and a relative humidity of 20%. Nine males performed three 15-min bouts of upright seated cycling at a fixed external workload of 150 W. The exercise bouts were separated by three 15-min recoveries during which participants 1) performed loadless pedaling (active recovery), 2) had their lower limbs passively compressed with inflatable sleeves (passive recovery), or 3) remained upright seated on the cycle ergometer (inactive recovery). Combined direct and indirect calorimetry was employed to measure rates of whole body evaporative heat loss (EHL) and metabolic heat production (M-W). Mean body temperature (T(b)) was calculated from esophageal and mean skin temperatures, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured continuously. Active and passive recoveries both reversed the reduction in MAP associated with inactive recovery (P

  14. Ice Slurry Ingestion Leads to a Lower Net Heat Loss during Exercise in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nathan B; Coombs, Geoff; Jay, Ollie

    2016-01-01

    To compare the reductions in evaporative heat loss from the skin (Esk) to internal heat loss (Hfluid) induced by ice slurry (ICE) ingestion relative to 37 °C fluid and the accompanying body temperature and local thermoeffector responses during exercise in warm, dry conditions (33.5 °C ± 1.4 °C; 23.7% ± 2.6% relative humidity [RH]). Nine men cycled at approximately 55% VO2peak for 75 min and ingested 3.2 mL · kg(-1) aliquots of 37 °C fluid or ICE after 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. Metabolic heat production (M-W), rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (Tsk), whole-body sweat loss (WBSL), local sweat rate (LSR), and skin blood flow (SkBF) were measured throughout. Net heat loss (HLnet) and heat storage (S) were estimated using partitional calorimetry. Relative to the 37 °C trial, M-W was similar (P = 0.81) with ICE ingestion; however, the 200 ± 20 kJ greater Hfluid (P < 0.001) with ICE ingestion was overcompensated by a 381 ± 199-kJ lower Esk (P < 0.001). Net heat loss (HLnet) was consequently 131 ± 120 kJ lower (P = 0.01) and S was greater (P = 0.05) with ICE ingestion compared with 37 °C fluid ingestion. Concurrently, LSR and WBSL were lower by 0.16 ± 0.14 mg · min(-1) · cm(-2) (P < 0.01) and 191 ± 122 g (P < 0.001), respectively, and SkBF tended to be lower (P = 0.06) by 5.4%maxAU ± 13.4%maxAU in the ICE trial. Changes in Tre and Tsk were similar throughout exercise with ICE compared to 37 °C fluid ingestion. Relative to 37 °C, ICE ingestion caused disproportionately greater reductions in Esk relative to Hfluid, resulting in a lower HLnet and greater S. Mechanistically, LSR and possibly SkBF were suppressed independently of Tre or Tsk, reaffirming the concept of human abdominal thermoreception. From a heat balance perspective, recommendations for ICE ingestion during exercise in warm, dry conditions should be reconsidered.

  15. Radiation Power as Function of Current in Wall-stabilized AC Arc of Water-cooled Vortex Type with Small Caliber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwao, Toru; Naito, Yuto; Shimizu, Yuta; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    The problem of an emergency large-scale lighting with the high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp is the lack of radiation intensity because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched that the radiation power depended on the arc temperature increases with increasing the current. However, the heat loss and the erosion of the electrode as well as the radiation power increases with increasing the current excessively. AC current replaces alternately the cathode and the anode. Thus, it is possible to avoid the concentration of the heat transfer to the anode. Moreover, the lamp efficiency decreases with increasing the current excessively because of ultra violet rays increment. It is necessary to control the temperature distribution with controlling the current and radius. In this paper, the radiation power as a function of the current in the wall-stabilized AC arc of water-cooled vortex type with small caliber was measured. As a result, the radiation power increased with increasing the current and appropriate wall radius. The radiation of AC arc is smaller than it of DC arc. And, the erosion of electrode decreases.

  16. A Global Assessment of Oceanic Heat Loss: Conductive Cooling and Hydrothermal Redistribution of Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D. P.; Chapman, D. S.; Davis, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    A new dataset of ~15000 oceanic heat flow measurements is analyzed to determine the conductive heat loss through the seafloor. Many heat flow values in seafloor younger than 60 Ma are lower than predicted by models of conductively cooled lithosphere. This heat flow deficit is caused by ventilated hydrothermal circulation discharging at crustal outcrops or through thin sedimentary cover. Globally filtering of heat flow data to retain sites with sediment cover >400 m thick and located >60 km from the nearest seamount minimizes the effect of hydrothermal ventilation. Filtered heat flow exhibit a much higher correlation coefficient with seafloor age (up to 0.95 for filtered data in contrast to 0.5 for unfiltered data) and lower variability (reduction by 30%) within an age bin. A small heat flow deficit still persists at ages <25 Ma, possibly as a result of global filtering limitations and incomplete thermal rebound following sediment burial. Detailed heat flow surveys co-located with seismic data can identify environments favoring conductive heat flow; heat flow collected in these environments is higher than that determined by the global dataset, and is more consistent with conductive cooling of the lithosphere. The new filtered data analysis and a growing number of site specific surveys both support estimates of global heat loss in the range 40-47 TW. The estimated hydrothermal deficit is consistent with estimates from geochemical studies ~7 TW, but is a few TW lower than previous estimates derived from heat flow determinations.

  17. Thermal Capacitance (Slug) Calorimeter Theory Including Heat Losses and Other Decaying Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; Olivares, Ricardo A.; Philippidis, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model, termed the Slug Loss Model, has been developed for describing thermal capacitance (slug) calorimeter behavior when heat losses and other decaying processes are not negligible. This model results in the temperature time slope taking the mathematical form of exponential decay. When data is found to fit well to this model, it allows a heat flux value to be calculated that corrects for the losses and may be a better estimate of the cold wall fully catalytic heat flux, as is desired in arc jet testing. The model was applied to the data from a copper slug calorimeter inserted during a particularly severe high heating rate arc jet run to illustrate its use. The Slug Loss Model gave a cold wall heat flux 15% higher than the value of 2,250 W/sq cm obtained from the conventional approach to processing the data (where no correction is made for losses). For comparison, a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model was created and applied to the same data, where conduction heat losses from the slug were simulated. The heat flux determined by the FEA model was found to be in close agreement with the heat flux determined by the Slug Loss Model.

  18. Life cycle biological efficiency of mice divergently selected for heat loss.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, A S; Nielsen, M K

    2014-08-01

    Divergent selection in mice for heat loss was conducted in 3 independent replicates creating a high maintenance, high heat loss (MH) and low maintenance, low heat loss (ML) line and unselected control (MC). Improvement in feed efficiency was observed in ML mice due to a reduced maintenance energy requirement but there was also a slight decline in reproductive performance, survivability, and lean content, particularly when compared to MC animals. The objective of this study was to model a life cycle scenario similar to a livestock production system and calculate total inputs and outputs to estimate overall biological efficiency of these lines and determine if reduced feed intake resulted in improved life cycle efficiency. Feed intake, reproductive performance, growth, and body composition were recorded on 21 mating pairs from each line × replicate combination, cohabitated at 7 wk of age and maintained for up to 1 yr unless culled. Proportion of animals at each parity was calculated from survival rates estimated from previous research when enforcing a maximum of 4, 8, or 12 allowed parities. This parity distribution was then combined with values from previous studies to calculate inputs and outputs of mating pairs and offspring produced in a single cycle at equilibrium. Offspring output was defined as kilograms of lean output of offspring at 49 d. Offspring input was defined as megacalories of energy intake for growing offspring from 21 to 49 d. Parent output was defined as kilograms of lean output of culled parents. Parent input was defined as megacalories of energy intake for mating pairs from weaning of one parity to weaning of the next. Offspring output was greatest in MC mice due to superior BW and numbers weaned, while output was lowest in ML mice due to smaller litter sizes and lean content. Parent output did not differ substantially between lines but was greatest in MH mice due to poorer survival rates resulting in more culled animals. Input was greatest in

  19. Alterations in heat loss and heat production mechanisms in rat exposed to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of studies investigating the thermal response of rats exposed to hypergravic fields well below maximum tolerance levels is presented. It is concluded that several lines of evidence indicate that the neural switching network for temperature regulation and cardiovascular channeling of blood flow is transiently affected during the first hour a rat is exposed to hypergravity. Moreover, even after one hour of exposure, when the core temperature has fallen several degrees, shivering and nonshivering thermogenesis are not fully activated. Only after prolonged exposure to hypergravic fields do heat production mechanisms recover sufficiently to bring the core temperature back to a normal level. Thus, the data indicate a more rapid recovery of effector mechanisms for heat loss than for heat production.

  20. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Environmental Monitoring with Special Reference to Heat Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anweiler, Stanisław; Piwowarski, Dawid; Ulbrich, Roman

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of device for remote and automatic monitoring of temperature field of large objects. The project aimed to create a quadcopter flying platform equipped with a thermal imaging camera. The object of the research was district heating installations above ground and underground. The results of the work on the implementation of low-cost (below 750 EUR) and efficient heat loss monitoring system. The system consists of a small (<2kg) multirotor platform. To perform thermal images micro camera FlirOne with microcomputer Raspberry Pi3 was used. Exploitation of UAVs in temperature field monitoring reveals only a fraction of their capabilities. The fast-growing multirotor platform market continues to deliver new solutions and improvements. Their use in monitoring the environment is limited only by the imagination of the user.

  1. Experimentally-determined external heat loss of automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Wulf, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    An external heat balance was conducted on a 150 HP two-shaft automotive gas turbine engine. The engine was enclosed in a calorimeter box and the temperature change of cooling air passing through the box was measured. Cooling airflow ranges of 1.6 to 2.1 lb-per-second and 0.8 to 1.1 lb-per-second were used. The engine housing heat loss increased as the cooling airflow through the calorimeter box was increased, as would be the case in a moving automobile. The heat balance between the total energy input and the sum of shaft power output and various losses compared within 30 percent at engine idle speeds and within 7 percent at full power.

  2. Heat loss and hypothermia in free diving: Estimation of survival time under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Alcaraz, Antonio; Aguilella, Vicente M.

    2003-04-01

    The heat exchange between a diver and the colder surrounding water is analyzed on the basis of the fundamental equations of thermal transport. To estimate the decrease in the diver's body temperature as a function of time, we discuss the complex interplay of several factors including the body heat production rate, the role of the diver's wet suit, and the way different heat exchange mechanisms (conduction, convection, and radiation) contribute to thermal transport. This knowledge could be useful to prevent physiological disorders that occur when the human body temperature drops below 35 °C.

  3. Functionalized carbon nanotube-polymer composites and interactions with radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  4. Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Interactions with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  5. Cooling of a dwelling by nocturnal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahim, Othmane; Belouaggadia, Naoual; Taqi, Mohamed; Abid, Chérifa

    2018-05-01

    Atmospheric transparency in the infrared, responsible for night cooling, is exploited to obtain a cooling effect. Radiative cooling to the night sky is based on the principle of infrared radiation heat loss from a surface to a body at a lower temperature. The use of the emissivity equation allowed us to evaluate its variation as a function of wavelength and temperature. A comparison of the temperature variation was made between granite and the materials most often used in the manufacture of radiant panels of hybrid systems. The results show that the temperature of Tedlar-based plates or plastics considerably decreases, and, therefore are rather promising.

  6. Light masking of circadian rhythms of heat production, heat loss, and body temperature in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine their relative contributions to light masking of the circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of body temperature and activity. Feeding was also measured. Responses to an entraining light-dark (LD) cycle (LD 12:12) and a masking LD cycle (LD 2:2) were compared. HP and HL contributed to both the daily rhythm and the masking changes in Tb. All variables showed phase-dependent masking responses. Masking transients at L or D transitions were generally greater during subjective day; however, L masking resulted in sustained elevation of Tb, HP, and HL during subjective night. Parallel, apparently compensatory, changes of HL and HP suggest action by both the circadian timing system and light masking on Tb set point. Furthermore, transient HL increases during subjective night suggest that gain change may supplement set point regulation of Tb.

  7. Air-induction aspirator-aerators cut heat loss to the atmosphere

    SciT

    Hodel, A.E.

    1993-04-01

    The efficiency of biological treatment at the Amoco Chemical's Cedar Bayou plant's activated-sludge wastewater-treatment system was reduced when outdoor temperatures fell below 65[degrees]F. Amoco experienced microbe fragmenting and failure to settle in final clarification, especially during winter. Meeting permit standards during winter was a concern. With mechanical aerators, water is pumped upward and thrown into the air. Much heat loss in the aerated basin was from evaporation and conduction of the mechanical aerator spray. The plant's wastewater staff decided to replace the aerators with subsurface, propeller-type aerator-mixers. These air-induction, aspirating aerator-mixers employ a system that eliminates the spray action throughmore » which evaporation and conduction can occur. The aspirator-aeration systems also have saved energy. The units do not have to overcome the forces of gravity, as with mechanical, surface splasher aerators, which required more horsepower and higher energy consumption to throw the water up into the air. The new units can be conveniently turned on and off to match a fluctuating flow. Since the Cedar Bayou plant installed the system, the aspirator-aerators' subsurface mixing capabilities have made winter permit compliance a steadfast routine.« less

  8. The dry-heat loss effect of melt-spun phase change material fibres.

    PubMed

    Tjønnås, Maria Suong; Færevik, Hilde; Sandsund, Mariann; Reinertsen, Randi E

    2015-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) have the ability to store latent heat when they change phases, a property that gives clothing that incorporates PCM its cooling effect. This study investigated the effect of dry-heat loss (cooling) of a novel melt-spun PCM fibre on the basis of the area covered, mass, the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature, compared to a known PCM clothing product. PCM fibres with melting temperatures of 28.4 and 32.0°C and PCM packs with melting temperatures of 28.0 and 32.0°C were studied. The results showed that the PCM fibres had a larger initial peak cooling effect than that of the PCM packs. The duration of the cooling effect of PCM fibres was primarily dependent on the PCM mass and the latent heat of fusion capacity, and secondly on the covered area and melting temperature of the PCM. This study investigates the cooling effect of PCM fibres on a thermal manikin. The PCM fibres had a high but short-lasting cooling effect. This study contributes to the knowledge of how the body's temperature regulation may be affected by the cooling properties of clothing that incorporates PCM.

  9. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands ( P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  10. Modeling Heat Loss through Piston and Effects of Thermal Boundary Coatings in Diesel Engine Simulations using Conjugate Heat Transfer models

    SciT

    Kundu, Prithwish; Scarcelli, Riccardo; Som, Sibendu

    Heat loss through wall boundaries play a dominant role in the overall performance and efficiency of internal combustion engines. Typical engine simulations use constant temperature wall boundary conditions. These boundary conditions cannot be estimated accurately from experiments due to the complexities involved with engine combustion. As a result they introduce a large uncertainty in engine simulations and serve as a tuning parameter. Modeling the process of heat transfer through the solid walls in an unsteady engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation can lead to the development of higher fidelity engine calculations. These models can be used to study the impactmore » of heat loss on engine efficiency and explore new design methodologies that can reduce heat losses. In this work, a single cylinder diesel engine is modeled along with the solid piston coupled to the fluid domain. Conjugate heat transfer (CHT) modeling techniques were implemented to model heat losses for a full cycle of a Navistar diesel engine. This CFD model is then validated against experimental data available from thermocouples embedded inside the piston surface. The overall predictions from the model match closely with the experimental observations. The validated model is further used to explore the benefits of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) on piston bowls. The effect of TBC coatings were modeled as a thermal resistance in the heat transfer models. Full cycle 3D engine simulations provide quantitative insights into heat loss and thus calculate the efficiency gain by the use of TBC coatings. The work establishes a validated modeling framework for CHT modeling in reciprocating engine simulations.« less

  11. Hyperthermia modifies muscle metaboreceptor and baroreceptor modulation of heat loss in humans.

    PubMed

    Binder, Konrad; Lynn, Aaron G; Gagnon, Daniel; Kondo, Narihiko; Kenny, Glen P

    2012-02-15

    The relative influence of muscle metabo- and baroreflex activity on heat loss responses during post-isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise ischemia remains unknown, particularly under heat stress. Therefore, we examined the separate and integrated influences of metabo- and baroreceptor-mediated reflex activity on sweat rate and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) under increasing levels of hyperthermia. Twelve men performed 1 min of IHG exercise at 60% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2 min of ischemia with simultaneous application of lower body positive pressure (LBPP, +40 mmHg), lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -20 mmHg), or no pressure (control) under no heat stress. On separate days, trials were repeated under heat stress conditions of 0.6°C (moderate heat stress) and 1.4°C (high heat stress) increase in esophageal temperature. For all conditions, mean arterial pressure was greater with LBPP and lower with LBNP than control during ischemia (all P ≤ 0.05). No differences in sweat rate were observed between pressure conditions, regardless of the level of hyperthermia (P > 0.05). Under moderate heat stress, no differences in CVC were observed between pressure conditions. However, under high heat stress, LBNP significantly reduced CVC by 21 ± 4% (P ≤ 0.05) and LBPP significantly elevated CVC by 14 ± 5% (P ≤ 0.05) relative to control. These results show that sweating during post-IHG exercise ischemia is activated by metaboreflex stimulation, and not by baroreflexes. In contrast, our results suggest that baroreflexes can influence the metaboreflex modulation of CVC, but only at greater levels of hyperthermia.

  12. Three insulation methods to minimize intravenous fluid administration set heat loss.

    PubMed

    Piek, Richardt; Stein, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of three methods for insulating an intravenous (IV) fluid administration set on the temperature of warmed fluid delivered rapidly in a cold environment. The three chosen techniques for insulation of the IV fluid administration set involved enclosing the tubing of the set in 1) a cotton conforming bandage, 2) a reflective emergency blanket, and 3) a combination of technique 2 followed by technique 1. Intravenous fluid warmed to 44°C was infused through a 20-drop/mL 180-cm-long fluid administration set in a controlled environmental temperature of 5°C. Temperatures in the IV fluid bag, the distal end of the fluid administration set, and the environment were continuously measured with resistance thermosensors. Twenty repetitions were performed in four conditions, namely, a control condition (with no insulation) and the three different insulation methods described above. One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the mean difference in temperature between the IV fluid bag and the distal fluid administration set under the four conditions. In the control condition, a mean of 5.28°C was lost between the IV fluid bag and the distal end of the fluid administration set. There was a significant difference found between the four conditions (p < 0.001). A mean of 3.53°C was lost between the IV fluid bag and the distal end of the fluid administration set for both the bandage and reflective emergency blanket, and a mean of 3.06°C was lost when the two methods were combined. Using inexpensive and readily available materials to insulate a fluid administration set can result in a reduction of heat loss in rapidly infused, warmed IV fluid in a cold environment.

  13. Heat loss regulation: role of appendages and torso in the deer mouse and the white rabbit.

    PubMed

    Conley, K E; Porter, W P

    1985-01-01

    Thermal conductance was subdivided into the component conductances of the appendages and torso using a heat transfer analysis for the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, and the white rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus. Our analysis was based on laboratory measurements of skin temperature and respiratory gas exchange made between air temperatures of 8 and 34 degrees C for the deer mouse, and from published data for the white rabbit. Two series conductances to heat transfer for each appendage and torso were evaluated: internal (hin), for blood flow and tissue conduction to the skin surface, and external (hex), for heat loss from the skin surface to the environment. These two series conductances were represented in a single, total conductance (htot). The limit to htot was set by hex and was reached by the torso htot of both animals. The increase in torso htot observed with air temperature for the mouse suggests that a pilomotor change in fur depth occurred. A control of htot below the limit set by hex was achieved by the hin of each appendage. Elevation of mouse thermal conductance (C) resulted from increases in feet, tail, and torso htot. In contrast, the rabbit showed no change in torso htot between 5 and 30 degrees C and ear htot exclusively increased C over these air temperatures. We suggest that the hyperthermia reported for the rabbit at 35 degrees C resulted from C reaching the physical limit set by torso and near hex. Thus the ear alone adjusted rabbit C, whereas the feet, tail, and the torso contributed to the adjustment of mouse C.

  14. Heat loss during carbon dioxide insufflation: comparison of a nebulization based humidification device with a humidification and heating system.

    PubMed

    Noll, Eric; Schaeffer, Roland; Joshi, Girish; Diemunsch, Sophie; Koessler, Stefanie; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the heat loss observed with the use of MR860 AEA Humidifier™ system (Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, New Zealand), which humidifies and heats the insufflated CO(2), and the use of the AeronebPro™ device (Aerogen, Ireland), which humidifies but does not heat the insufflated CO(2). With institutional approval, 16 experiments were conducted in 4 pigs. Each animal, acting as its own control, was studied at 8-day intervals in randomized sequence with the following four conditions: (1) control (C) no pneumoperitoneum; (2) standard (S) insufflation with nonhumidified, nonheated CO(2); (3) Aeroneb™ (A): insufflation with humidified, nonheated CO(2); and (4) MR860 AEA humidifier™ (MR): insufflation with humidified and heated CO(2). The measured heat loss after 720L CO(2) insufflation during the 4 h was 1.03 ± 0.75 °C (mean ± SEM) in group C; 3.63 ± 0.31 °C in group S; 3.03 ± 0.39 °C in group A; and 1.98 ± 0.09 °C in group MR. The ANOVA showed a significant difference with time (p = 0.0001) and with the insufflation technique (p = 0.024). Heat loss in group C was less than in group S after 60 min (p = 0.03), less than in group A after 70 min (p = 0.03), and less than in group MR after 150 min (p = 0.03). The heat loss in group MR was less than in group S after 50 min (p = 0.04) and less than in group A after 70 min (p = 0.02). After 160 min, the heat loss in group S was greater than in group A (p = 0.03). As far as heat loss is concerned, for laparoscopic procedures of less than 60 min, there is no benefit of using any humidification with or without heating. However, for procedures greater than 60 min, use of heating along with humidification, is superior.

  15. Episodic Southern Ocean Heat Loss and Its Mixed Layer Impacts Revealed by the Farthest South Multiyear Surface Flux Mooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, S. E.; Tamsitt, V.; Josey, S. A.; Gille, S. T.; Cerovečki, I.; Talley, L. D.; Weller, R. A.

    2018-05-01

    The Ocean Observatories Initiative air-sea flux mooring deployed at 54.08°S, 89.67°W, in the southeast Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean, is the farthest south long-term open ocean flux mooring ever deployed. Mooring observations (February 2015 to August 2017) provide the first in situ quantification of annual net air-sea heat exchange from one of the prime Subantarctic Mode Water formation regions. Episodic turbulent heat loss events (reaching a daily mean net flux of -294 W/m2) generally occur when northeastward winds bring relatively cold, dry air to the mooring location, leading to large air-sea temperature and humidity differences. Wintertime heat loss events promote deep mixed layer formation that lead to Subantarctic Mode Water formation. However, these processes have strong interannual variability; a higher frequency of 2 σ and 3 σ turbulent heat loss events in winter 2015 led to deep mixed layers (>300 m), which were nonexistent in winter 2016.

  16. FUNCTIONAL CHANGES OF INTERNAL ORGANS AND SYSTEMS DURING SEVERE RADIATION SICKNESS FROM EXTERNAL RADIATION (in Russian)

    SciT

    Zedgenidze, G.A.

    1957-01-01

    Animals display different degrees of sensitivity to the action of ionizing radiation. At first increased intestinal motility of the alimentary tract is observed followed by a significant decrease in intestinal motility with radiation sickness of the third degree. Irradiation of the thoracic cage results in zonal atelectasis followed by emphysema. severe pneumonia resulting in death may develop. Contraction of the small bronchioles and expansion of the larger bronchioles is observed during radiation sickness. A decrease in muscle tone of the alimentary tract is accompanied by a decrease in muscle tone of the bronchial tubes. During moderate or severe radiation sicknessmore » it was noted that the flow of bile through the gall bladder was slowed down considerably. This disturbance in function of the liver and gall bladder could be frequently observed even during the latent period of radiation sickness. Damage to the kidneys during severe radiation sickness was noted by the fact that the sergosine clearance test took 300 min instead of the usual 40 to 80 min. A slowdown in kidney elimination was observed in all phases of radiation sickness, and hence, a determination of kidney function by urography is of value as a clinical test in the detection of mild radiation sickness. The subcutaneous injection of vitamins C, B/sub 1/, and B/sub 2/ moderated the course of the radiation sickness. It is concluded that the functional disturbances in internal organs such as the liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, etc., are much more severe than the anatomical changes observed by histological examination. (TTT)« less

  17. The impact of functional imaging on radiation medicine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Neumann, Donald; Macklis, Roger

    2008-09-15

    Radiation medicine has previously utilized planning methods based primarily on anatomic and volumetric imaging technologies such as CT (Computerized Tomography), ultrasound, and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). In recent years, it has become apparent that a new dimension of non-invasive imaging studies may hold great promise for expanding the utility and effectiveness of the treatment planning process. Functional imaging such as PET (Positron Emission Tomography) studies and other nuclear medicine based assays are beginning to occupy a larger place in the oncology imaging world. Unlike the previously mentioned anatomic imaging methodologies, functional imaging allows differentiation between metabolically dead and dying cells and those which are actively metabolizing. The ability of functional imaging to reproducibly select viable and active cell populations in a non-invasive manner is now undergoing validation for many types of tumor cells. Many histologic subtypes appear amenable to this approach, with impressive sensitivity and selectivity reported. For clinical radiation medicine, the ability to differentiate between different levels and types of metabolic activity allows the possibility of risk based focal treatments in which the radiation doses and fields are more tightly connected to the perceived risk of recurrence or progression at each location. This review will summarize many of the basic principles involved in the field of functional PET imaging for radiation oncology planning and describe some of the major relevant published data behind this expanding trend.

  18. Heat loss through the glabrous skin surfaces of heavily insulated, heat-stressed individuals.

    PubMed

    Grahn, D A; Dillon, J L; Heller, H C

    2009-07-01

    Insulation reduces heat exchange between a body and the environment. Glabrous (nonhairy) skin surfaces (palms of the hands, soles of the feet, face, and ears) constitute a small percentage of total body surface area but contain specialized vascular structures that facilitate heat loss. We have previously reported that cooling the glabrous skin surfaces is effective in alleviating heat stress and that the application of local subatmospheric pressure enhances the effect. In this paper, we compare the effects of cooling multiple glabrous skin surfaces with and without vacuum on thermal recovery in heavily insulated heat-stressed individuals. Esophageal temperatures (T(es)) and heart rates were monitored throughout the trials. Water loss was determined from pre- and post-trial nude weights. Treadmill exercise (5.6 km/h, 9-16% slope, and 25-45 min duration) in a hot environment (41.5 degrees C, 20-30% relative humidity) while wearing insulating pants and jackets was used to induce heat stress (T(es)>or=39 degrees C). For postexercise recovery, the subjects donned additional insulation (a balaclava, winter gloves, and impermeable boot covers) and rested in the hot environment for 60 min. Postexercise cooling treatments included control (no cooling) or the application of a 10 degrees C closed water circulating system to (a) the hand(s) with or without application of a local subatmospheric pressure, (b) the face, (c) the feet, or (d) multiple glabrous skin regions. Following exercise induction of heat stress in heavily insulated subjects, the rate of recovery of T(es) was 0.4+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12), but with application of cooling to one hand, the rate was 0.8+/-0.3 degrees C/h(n=12), and with one hand cooling with subatmospheric pressure, the rate was 1.0+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12). Cooling alone yielded two responses, one resembling that of cooling with subatmospheric pressure (n=8) and one resembling that of no cooling (n=4). The effect of treating multiple surfaces was

  19. The Rapalogue, CCI-779, improves salivary gland function following radiation.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Harris, Zoey I; Arnett, Deborah G; Klein, Rob R; Burd, Randy; Ann, David K; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for head and neck cancer typically includes surgical resection of the tumor followed by targeted head and neck radiation. However depending on tumor location and stage, some cases may not require surgical resection while others may be treated with chemoradiation. Unfortunately, these radiation treatments cause chronic negative side effects for patients. These side effects are associated with damage to surrounding normal salivary gland tissue and include xerostomia, changes in taste and malnutrition. The underlying mechanisms of chronic radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction are unknown, however, in rodent models persistently elevated proliferation is correlated with reduced stimulated salivary flow. The rapalogue, CCI-779, has been used in other cell systems to induce autophagy and reduce proliferation, therefore the aim of this study was to determine if CCI-779 could be utilized to ameliorate chronic radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Four to six week old Atg5f/f; Aqp5-Cre, Atg5+/+; Aqp5-Cre and FVB mice were treated with targeted head and neck radiation. FVB mice were treated with CCI-779, chloroquine, or DMSO post-radiation. Stimulated salivary flow rates were determined and parotid and submandibular salivary gland tissues were collected for analyses. Mice with a defect in autophagy, via a conditional knockout of Atg5 in the salivary glands, display increased compensatory proliferation in the acinar cell compartment and hypertrophy at 24-72 hours following radiation. FVB mice treated with post-therapy CCI-779 have significant improvements in salivary gland physiology as determined by stimulated salivary flow rates, proliferation indices and amylase production and secretion. Consequently, post-radiation use of CCI-779 allows for improvement of salivary gland function and reestablishment of glandular homeostasis. As CCI-779 is already FDA approved for other uses, it could have a secondary use to alleviate the chronic side

  20. Separation of variables solution for non-linear radiative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1987-01-01

    A separation of variables solution has been obtained for transient radiative cooling of an absorbing-scattering plane layer. The solution applies after an initial transient period required for adjustment of the temperature and scattering source function distributions. The layer emittance, equal to the instantaneous heat loss divided by the fourth power of the instantaneous mean temperature, becomes constant. This emittance is a function of only the optical thickness of the layer and the scattering albedo; its behavior as a function of these quantities is considerably different than for a layer at constant temperature.

  1. NO formation in the burnout region of a partially premixed methane-air flame with upstream heat loss

    SciT

    Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    Measurements of temperature and NO concentration in laminar, partially premixed methane-air flames stabilized on a ceramic burner in coflow are reported. The NO concentration and temperature were determined by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), respectively. Upstream heat loss to the burner was varied by changing the exit velocity of the fuel-air mixture at a constant equivalence ratio of 1,3; this alters the structure of the flame from an axisymmetric Bunsen-type to a strongly stabilized flat flame. To facilitate analysis of the results, a method is derived for separating the effects of dilution from those of chemicalmore » reaction based on the relation between the measured temperature and the local mixture fraction, including the effects of upstream heat loss. Using this method, the amount of NO formed during burnout of the hot, fuel-rich combustion products can be ascertained. In the Bunsen-type flame, it is seen that {approximately}40 ppm of NO are produced in this burnout region, at temperatures between {approximately}2,100 K and {approximately}1,900 K, probably via the Zeldovich mechanism. Reducing the exit velocity of 12 cm/s reduces the flame temperature substantially, and effectively eliminates this contribution. At velocities of 12 and 8 cm/s, {approximately}10 ppm of NO are formed in the burnout region, even though the gas temperatures are too low for Zeldovich NO to be significant. Although the mechanism responsible for these observations is as yet unclear, the results are consistent with the idea that the low temperatures in the fuel-rich gases caused by upstream heat loss retard the conversion of HCN (formed via the Fenimore mechanism) to NO, with this residual HCN then being converted to NO during burnout.« less

  2. Locomotor activity, core body temperature, and circadian rhythms in mice selected for high or low heat loss.

    PubMed

    Mousel, M R; Stroup, W W; Nielsen, M K

    2001-04-01

    Daily locomotor activity, core body temperature, and their circadian rhythms were measured in lines of mice selected for high (MH) or low (ML) heat loss and unselected controls (MC). Lines were created by selecting for 16 generations in each of three replicates. Collection of locomotor activity and core temperature data spanned Generations 20 and 21 for a total of 352 mice. Physical activity and core body temperature data were accumulated using implanted transmitters and continuous automated collection. Measurement for each animal was for 3 d. Activity was recorded for each half hour and then averaged for the day; temperature was averaged daily; circadian rhythm was expressed in 12-h (light vs dark) or 6-h periods as well as by fitting cyclic models. Activity means were transformed to log base 2 to lessen heterogeneity of variance within lines. Heat loss for a 15-h period beginning at 1630 and feed intake for 7 d were measured on 74 additional mice in order to estimate the relationship between locomotor activity and heat loss or feed intake. Selection lines were different (P < 0.01) for both locomotor activity and core body temperature. Differences were due to selection (MH-ML, P < 0.01), and there was no evidence of asymmetry of response (P > 0.38). Retransformed from log base 2 to the scale of measurement, mean activity counts were 308, 210, and 150 for MH, MC, and ML, respectively. Mean core temperatures were 37.2, 36.9, and 36.7 degrees C for MH, MC, and ML (P < 0.01), respectively. Females had greater physical activity (P < 0.01) and body temperature (P < 0.01) than males. There was no evidence of a sex x selection criterion interaction for either activity or temperature (P > 0.20). Overall phenotypic correlation between body temperature and log base 2 activity was 0.43 (P < 0.01). Periods during the day were different for both 12- and 6-h analyses (P < 0.01), but there were no period x selection criterion interactions (P > 0.1) for physical activity or body

  3. Double wall versus single wall incubator for reducing heat loss in very low birth weight infants in incubators.

    PubMed

    Laroia, N; Phelps, D L; Roy, J

    2007-04-18

    Studies have shown improved survival of newborn infants maintained in the thermoneutral range. The concept of an incubator with additional insulation, a double plexiglass wall, is appealing for very low birth weight infants as it may help to provide a thermoneutral environment. To assess the effects of double walled incubator versus a single wall incubator on insensible water loss, rate of oxygen consumption, episodes of hypothermia, time to regain birth weight, duration of hospitalization and infant mortality in premature infants. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases: Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966 - 2006), EMBASE, previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conference and symposia proceedings, expert informants in all published languages, and CINAHL (1982 - 2006). Only studies using random or quasi-random methods of allocation were considered for this review. Eligible studies assessed at least one of the outcome variables identified as important to this topic. Independent data extraction and quality assessment of included trials was conducted by the review authors. Data were analyzed using generic inverse variance methodology and weighted mean difference (WMD). Results are presented with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed effect model. Three studies met the criteria. Four other studies were excluded, as they did not compare double versus single wall incubators (details of the studies are given in the included and excluded studies section). Double wall incubators have the advantage of decreasing heat loss, decreasing heat production and decreasing radiant heat loss when compared to single wall incubators. There is also the advantage of reduced oxygen consumption. A minimal increase in conductive heat loss was noted when

  4. Radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres. 2: Asymmetric phase functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Adams, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effects are investigated of sphericity on the radiation reflected from a planet with a homogeneous, conservative scattering atmosphere of optical thicknesses of 0.25 and 1.0. A Henyey-Greenstein phase function with asymmetry factors of 0.5 and 0.7 is considered. Significant differences were found when these results were compared with the plane-parallel calculations. Also large violations of the reciprocity theorem, which is only true for plane-parallel calculations, were noted. Results are presented for the radiance versus height distributions as a function of planetary phase angle.

  5. Parasitic heat loss reduction in AMTEC cells by heat shield optimization

    SciT

    Borkowski, C.A.; Svedberg, R.C.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    Alkali metal thermal to electric conversion (AMTEC) cell performance can be increased by the proper design of thermal radiative shielding internal to the AMTEC cell. These heat shields essentially lower the radiative heat transfer between the heat input zone of the cell and the heat rejection zone of the cell. In addition to lowering the radiative heat transfer between the heat input and heat rejection surfaces of the cell, the shields raise the AMTEC cell performance by increasing the temperature of the beta alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). This increase in temperature of the BASE tube allows the evaporator temperature tomore » be increased without sodium condensing within the BASE tubes. Experimental testing and theoretical analysis have been performed to compare the relative merits of two candidate heat shield packages: (1) chevron, and (2) cylindrical heat shields. These two heat shield packages were compared to each other and a baseline cell which had no heat shields installed. For the two heat shield packages, the reduction in total heat transfer is between 17--27% for the heat input surface temperature varying from 700 C, 750 C, and 800 C with the heat rejection surface temperature kept at 300 C.« less

  6. An Analytical Investigation of the Heat Losses from a U.S. Navy K-Type Airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillendahl, Wesley H.; George, Ralph E.

    1946-01-01

    The heat losses from the envelope surface of a U.S. Navy K-type airship are evaluated to determine if the use of heat is a feasible means of preventing ice and snow accumulations on lighter-than-air craft during flight and when moored uncovered. Consideration is given to heat losses in clear air (no liquid water present in the atmosphere) and in probable conditions of icing and snow. The results of the analysis indicate that the amount of heat required in flight to raise the surface temperature of the entire envelope to the extent considered adequate for ice protection, based on experience with tests of heavier-than-air craft, is very large. Existing types of heating equipment which could be used to supply this quantity of heat would probably be too bulky and heavy to provide a practical flight installation. The heat requirements to provide protection for the nose and stern regions in assumed mild to moderate icing conditions appear to be within the range of the capacity of current types of heating equipment suitable for flight use. The amount of heat necessary to prevent snow accumulations on the upper surface of the airship envelope when moored uncovered under all conditions appear to be excessive for the heating equipment presently available for flight use, but could possibly be achieved with auxiliary ground heating equipment.

  7. Ongoing hydrothermal heat loss from the 1912 ash-flow sheet, Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska

    Hogeweg, N.; Keith, T.E.C.; Colvard, E.M.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    The June 1912 eruption of Novarupta filled nearby glacial valleys on the Alaska Peninsula with ash-flow tuff (ignimbrite), and post-eruption observations of thousands of steaming fumaroles led to the name 'Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes' (VTTS). By the late 1980s most fumarolic activity had ceased, but the discovery of thermal springs in mid-valley in 1987 suggested continued cooling of the ash-flow sheet. Data collected at the mid-valley springs between 1987 and 2001 show a statistically significant correlation between maximum observed chloride (Cl) concentration and temperature. These data also show a statistically significant decline in the maximum Cl concentration. The observed variation in stream chemistry across the sheet strongly implies that most solutes, including Cl, originate within the area of the VTTS occupied by the 1912 deposits. Numerous measurements of Cl flux in the Ukak River just below the ash-flow sheet suggest an ongoing heat loss of ???250 MW. This represents one of the largest hydrothermal heat discharges in North America. Other hydrothermal discharges of comparable magnitude are related to heat obtained from silicic magma bodies at depth, and are quasi-steady on a multidecadal time scale. However, the VTTS hydrothermal flux is not obviously related to a magma body and is clearly declining. Available data provide reasonable boundary and initial conditions for simple transient modeling. Both an analytical, conduction-only model and a numerical model predict large rates of heat loss from the sheet 90 years after deposition.

  8. Radiation Effects on the Thermodiffusive Instability of Premixed Flames on a Cylindrical Porous Flame Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Minglong; Yang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    A linear analysis method was used to investigate the mechanics of radiation heat loss and mass transfer in the porous wall of premixed annular flames and their effect on thermodiffusive instability. The dispersion relation between the disturbance wave growth rate and wavenumber was calculated numerically. Results showed that radiation heat loss elevated the annular flame slightly away from the porous wall. In the annular flame with small Lewis numbers, radiation heat loss changed the thermodiffusive instability from a pulsating to a cellular state, while for the large Lewis numbers, only the pulsating instability was represented. Increasing radiation heat loss and the radius of the porous wall enhanced the instability of the annular flames. Heat losses decreased with the continued increase in thickness of the porous wall and the decrease in porosity. Annular flames with long-wave mode along the angular direction were more unstable than the shortwave mode.

  9. Useful integral function and its application in thermal radiation calculations

    SciT

    Chang, S.L.; Rhee, K.T.

    1983-07-01

    In applying the Planck formula for computing the energy radiated from an isothermal source, the emissivity of the source must be found. This emissivity is expressed in terms of its spectral emissivity. This spectral emissivity of an isothermal volume with a given optical length containing radiating gases and/or soot, is computed through a relation (Sparrow and Cess, 1978) that contains the optical length and the spectral volume absorption coefficient. An exact solution is then offered to the equation that results from introducing the equation for the spectral emissivity into the equation for the emissivity. The function obtained is shown tomore » be useful in computing the spectral emissivity of an isothermal volume containing either soot or gaseous species, or both. Examples are presented.« less

  10. Influence of low-level laser radiation on kidney functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.

    1998-12-01

    Most of all renal diseases are accompanied by lowering of kidney functions. That makes the quality of the treatment worse. On an example 69 patients receiving Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT), the influence of the laser radiation on a contracting system of blood, on current of an active and inactive tubercular inflammation and on partial functions of kidneys were investigated. Is established, that LLLT does not render influence to a contracting system; promotes stopping of unspecific and moderate peaking of a specific inflammation of kidneys. Is proved, that after a rate of laserotherapy the improving of a blood micricirculation in kidney occurs in 57.9% of patients; a secretion - in 63.1% of the patients; a stimulation of urodynamic is fixed in 79% of cases. Magnification of diuresis, improving filtration and concentration functions of kidneys also is marked.

  11. Sexual function after surgical and radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    SciT

    Seibel, M.; Freeman, M.G.; Graves, W.L.

    One hundred women treated for carcinoma of the cervix were interviewed more than one year later to establish the effects of radiation or surgical therapy on sexual function. Forty-three had received irradiation, 44 nonradical surgery, six combined surgery and irradiation, and seven radical surgery. The irradiation and nonradical surgery groups were each further subdivided into subgroups of patients aged 30 to 49 for age-controlled comparison. Patients in the irradiation group had statistically significant decreases in sexual enjoyment, ability to attain orgasm, coital opportunity, frequency of intercourse, and coital desire. The group who had nonradical surgical procedures had no significant changemore » in sexual function after treatment. Similar results were found in both age-controlled subgroups, eliminating age as a major etiologic factor. Marked vaginal alterations were recorded in the majority of irradiated patients, but were not present among the groups treated with nonradical surgery. The vaginal changes alone could not be held accountable for the significant decrease in sexual function among women who received pelvic irradiation. The origin of decreased sexual desire after radiation therapy is complex, and not yet completely understood. We propose therapeutic programs to help women deal with the emotional and physical consequences of pelvic irradiation.« less

  12. Whole-body heat loss during exercise in the heat is not impaired in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Jill M; Yardley, Jane E; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether individuals with type 1 diabetes exhibit impairments in local and whole-body heat loss responses that could affect core temperature regulation during exercise in the heat compared with matched, nondiabetic individuals. Twelve otherwise healthy individuals with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c = 7.7% ± 0.3%) and 12 controls matched for age, sex, body surface area, and physical fitness cycled continuously for 60 min at a set rate of metabolic heat production (approximately 400 W) in a whole-body direct calorimeter (35°C and 20% relative humidity). Local sweat rate (ventilated capsule) was measured on the back and skin blood flow (laser Doppler velocimetry) on the forearm. Core (rectal and esophageal) and mean skin temperatures and heart rate were measured continuously. Whole-body heat exchange and change in body heat content were measured using simultaneous direct whole-body and indirect calorimetry. The change (mean ± SE) in body heat content was similar between groups during exercise (diabetes, 409 ± 27 kJ; control, 386 ± 33 kJ; P = 0.584) and recovery (diabetes, -115 ± 16 kJ; control, -93 ± 24 kJ; P = 0.457). Local heat loss responses of sweating (P = 0.783) and skin blood flow (P = 0.078) as well as rectal temperature (diabetes, 37.87°C ± 0.10°C; control, 37.85°C; ± 0.13°C; P = 0.977) and heart rate (diabetes, 130 ± 9 beats·min, vs control, 126 ± 8 beats·min, P = 0.326) were comparable at the end of the exercise period. During light-to-moderate-intensity exercise performed under conditions permitting full sweat evaporation, otherwise healthy type 1 diabetic individuals did not show impaired heat loss responses during heat exposure when compared with matched individuals without diabetes.

  13. Comparison of three different methods to prevent heat loss in healthy dogs undergoing 90 minutes of general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, Stuart C; Dossin, Olivier; Jones, Katherine R; Otto, Angela N; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-05-01

    To compare a towel under, a warm water pad under or a forced warm air blanket over dogs as techniques to reduce heat loss during a standardized anesthetic. Prospective, randomized, crossover study. Eight, healthy, mixed breed dogs weighing 16.3-19.6 kg. Dogs were anesthetized four times for 90 minutes. Dogs were placed on a steel table (treatment TA), with a cotton towel (treatment TO) or a circulating warm water pad (treatment WP) between the dog and the table, or with, a towel under the dog and covered with a forced warm air blanket (treatment WAB). Rectal temperature (RT) was recorded at 5 minute intervals. Changes in temperature (ΔRT) were calculated as the RT at a given point subtracted from the RT before anesthesia (baseline) and compared over time. After 90 minutes of anesthesia, the ΔRT was 3.42 °C ± 0.29 for TA, 2.78 °C ± 0.43 for TO, 1.98 °C ± 0.29 for WP, and 0.91 °C ± 0.27 for WAB. Significant differences in ΔRT occurred between TA and WAB at 20 minutes (0.94 °C ± 0.42, p = 0.0206), between TO and WAB at 30 minutes (1.16 °C ± 0.62, p = 0.0063), between WP and WAB at 50 minutes (0.96 °C ± 0.98, p = 0.0249), between TA and WP at 35 minutes (1.19 °C ± 0.54, p = 0.0091), between TO and WP at 70 minutes (1.12 °C ± 0.56, p = 0.0248), and between TA and TO at 75 minutes (0.96 °C ± 0.62, p = 0.0313). These differences in ΔRT between each treatment persisted from the times indicated until the end of the anesthesia. During anesthesia, forced warm air blankets were superior to other methods tested for limiting heat loss. An efficient heat loss technique should be used for anesthesia longer than 20 minutes duration in medium sized dogs. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  14. Bidirectional Reflectance Functions for Application to Earth Radiation Budget Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manalo-Smith, N.; Tiwari, S. N.; Smith, G. L.

    1997-01-01

    Reflected solar radiative fluxes emerging for the Earth's top of the atmosphere are inferred from satellite broadband radiance measurements by applying bidirectional reflectance functions (BDRFs) to account for the anisotropy of the radiation field. BDRF's are dependent upon the viewing geometry (i.e. solar zenith angle, view zenith angle, and relative azimuth angle), the amount and type of cloud cover, the condition of the intervening atmosphere, and the reflectance characteristics of the underlying surface. A set of operational Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) BDRFs is available which was developed from the Nimbus 7 ERB (Earth Radiation Budget) scanner data for a three-angle grid system, An improved set of bidirectional reflectance is required for mission planning and data analysis of future earth radiation budget instruments, such as the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and for the enhancement of existing radiation budget data products. This study presents an analytic expression for BDRFs formulated by applying a fit to the ERBE operational model tabulations. A set of model coefficients applicable to any viewing condition is computed for an overcast and a clear sky scene over four geographical surface types: ocean, land, snow, and desert, and partly cloudy scenes over ocean and land. The models are smooth in terms of the directional angles and adhere to the principle of reciprocity, i.e., they are invariant with respect to the interchange of the incoming and outgoing directional angles. The analytic BDRFs and the radiance standard deviations are compared with the operational ERBE models and validated with ERBE data. The clear ocean model is validated with Dlhopolsky's clear ocean model. Dlhopolsky developed a BDRF of higher angular resolution for clear sky ocean from ERBE radiances. Additionally, the effectiveness of the models accounting for anisotropy for various viewing directions is tested with the ERBE along tract data. An area

  15. Radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres. II - Asymmetric phase functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Adams, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sphericity on the radiation reflected from a planet with a homogeneous conservative-scattering atmosphere of optical thicknesses of 0.25 and 1.0. A Henyey-Greenstein phase function with asymmetry factors of 0.5 and 0.7 was considered. Significant differences were found when these results were compared with the plane-parallel calculations. Also, large violations of the reciprocity theorem, which is only true for plane-parallel calculations, were noted. Results are presented for the radiance versus height distributions as a function of planetary phase angle. These results will be useful to researchers in the field of remote sensing and planetary spectroscopy.

  16. Quantitative trait loci for energy balance traits in an advanced intercross line derived from mice divergently selected for heat loss

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Merlyn K.; Thorn, Stephanie R.; Valdar, William; Pomp, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in human populations, currently a serious health concern, is considered to be the consequence of an energy imbalance in which more energy in calories is consumed than is expended. We used interval mapping techniques to investigate the genetic basis of a number of energy balance traits in an F11 advanced intercross population of mice created from an original intercross of lines selected for increased and decreased heat loss. We uncovered a total of 137 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these traits at 41 unique sites on 18 of the 20 chromosomes in the mouse genome, with X-linked QTLs being most prevalent. Two QTLs were found for the selection target of heat loss, one on distal chromosome 1 and another on proximal chromosome 2. The number of QTLs affecting the various traits generally was consistent with previous estimates of heritabilities in the same population, with the most found for two bone mineral traits and the least for feed intake and several body composition traits. QTLs were generally additive in their effects, and some, especially those affecting the body weight traits, were sex-specific. Pleiotropy was extensive within trait groups (body weights, adiposity and organ weight traits, bone traits) and especially between body composition traits adjusted and not adjusted for body weight at sacrifice. Nine QTLs were found for one or more of the adiposity traits, five of which appeared to be unique. The confidence intervals among all QTLs averaged 13.3 Mb, much smaller than usually observed in an F2 cross, and in some cases this allowed us to make reasonable inferences about candidate genes underlying these QTLs. This study combined QTL mapping with genetic parameter analysis in a large segregating population, and has advanced our understanding of the genetic architecture of complex traits related to obesity. PMID:24918027

  17. Simulation of heat losses and ground temperatures for district-heating culverts. Comparison with field experiments for well-insulated, damaged, and extra-insulated culverts

    SciT

    Hagentoft, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Many old district-heating culverts are in bad condition due to the entry of water into the thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity, and thereby the heat loss from the culvert, is much larger for a wet than a dry thermal insulation. The high energy prices make it interesting and necessary to find the water-damaged parts of the district-heating culvert and improve the thermal insulation so that a reduction in the heat losses is obtained. The aim of the project is to develop a simple field method to determine the heat loss and the condition of the culvert. The method is basedmore » on the measurement of the temperature on the top of the culvert and a classification of the soil. The classification of the soil gives an estimation of its thermal conductivity. The heat loss and the reduction in heat loss due to an extra insulation is estimated from these data. Five different types of culverts were tested: two types of asbestos cement culverts, one concrete culvert, and two aerated concrete culverts. The comparison of the measured temperatures and the temperatures obtained from the simulations is reported in the study.« less

  18. Optimizing global liver function in radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Victor W.; Epelman, Marina A.; Wang, Hesheng; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Matuszak, Martha M.

    2016-09-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients differ in both pre-treatment liver function (e.g. due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatment) and radiosensitivity, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work investigates three treatment planning optimization models that minimize risk of toxicity: two consider both voxel-based pre-treatment liver function and local-function-based radiosensitivity with dose; one considers only dose. Each model optimizes different objective functions (varying in complexity of capturing the influence of dose on liver function) subject to the same dose constraints and are tested on 2D synthesized and 3D clinical cases. The normal-liver-based objective functions are the linearized equivalent uniform dose (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) (conventional ‘\\ell \\text{EUD} model’), the so-called perfusion-weighted \\ell \\text{EUD} (\\text{fEUD} ) (proposed ‘fEUD model’), and post-treatment global liver function (GLF) (proposed ‘GLF model’), predicted by a new liver-perfusion-based dose-response model. The resulting \\ell \\text{EUD} , fEUD, and GLF plans delivering the same target \\ell \\text{EUD} are compared with respect to their post-treatment function and various dose-based metrics. Voxel-based portal venous liver perfusion, used as a measure of local function, is computed using DCE-MRI. In cases used in our experiments, the GLF plan preserves up to 4.6 % ≤ft(7.5 % \\right) more liver function than the fEUD (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) plan does in 2D cases, and up to 4.5 % ≤ft(5.6 % \\right) in 3D cases. The GLF and fEUD plans worsen in \\ell \\text{EUD} of functional liver on average by 1.0 Gy and 0.5 Gy in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. Liver perfusion information can be used during treatment planning to minimize the risk of toxicity by improving expected GLF; the degree of benefit varies with perfusion pattern. Although fEUD model optimization is computationally inexpensive and

  19. Determination of clothing evaporative resistance on a sweating thermal manikin in an isothermal condition: heat loss method or mass loss method?

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    2011-08-01

    This paper addresses selection between two calculation options, i.e heat loss option and mass loss option, for thermal manikin measurements on clothing evaporative resistance conducted in an isothermal condition (T(manikin) = T(a) = T(r)). Five vocational clothing ensembles with a thermal insulation range of 1.05-2.58 clo were selected and measured on a sweating thermal manikin 'Tore'. The reasons why the isothermal heat loss method generates a higher evaporative resistance than that of the mass loss method were thoroughly investigated. In addition, an indirect approach was applied to determine the amount of evaporative heat energy taken from the environment. It was found that clothing evaporative resistance values by the heat loss option were 11.2-37.1% greater than those based on the mass loss option. The percentage of evaporative heat loss taken from the environment (H(e,env)) for all test scenarios ranged from 10.9 to 23.8%. The real evaporative cooling efficiency ranged from 0.762 to 0.891, respectively. Furthermore, it is evident that the evaporative heat loss difference introduced by those two options was equal to the heat energy taken from the environment. In order to eliminate the combined effects of dry heat transfer, condensation, and heat pipe on clothing evaporative resistance, it is suggested that manikin measurements on the determination of clothing evaporative resistance should be performed in an isothermal condition. Moreover, the mass loss method should be applied to calculate clothing evaporative resistance. The isothermal heat loss method would appear to overestimate heat stress and thus should be corrected before use.

  20. Protection against cold in prehospital care: evaporative heat loss reduction by wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapor barrier--a thermal manikin study.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Otto; Lundgren, Peter; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar; Naredi, Peter; Bjornstig, Ulf

    2012-02-01

    In the prehospital care of a cold and wet person, early application of adequate insulation is of utmost importance to reduce cold stress, limit body core cooling, and prevent deterioration of the patient's condition. Most prehospital guidelines on protection against cold recommend the removal of wet clothing prior to insulation, and some also recommend the use of a waterproof vapor barrier to reduce evaporative heat loss. However, there is little scientific evidence of the effectiveness of these measures. Using a thermal manikin with wet clothing, this study was conducted to determine the effect of wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapor barrier on thermal insulation and evaporative heat loss using different amounts of insulation in both warm and cold ambient conditions. A thermal manikin dressed in wet clothing was set up in accordance with the European Standard for assessing requirements of sleeping bags, modified for wet heat loss determination, and the climatic chamber was set to -15 degrees Celsius (°C) for cold conditions and +10°C for warm conditions. Three different insulation ensembles, one, two or seven woollen blankets, were chosen to provide different levels of insulation. Five different test conditions were evaluated for all three levels of insulation ensembles: (1) dry underwear; (2) dry underwear with a vapor barrier; (3) wet underwear; (4) wet underwear with a vapor barrier; and (5) no underwear. Dry and wet heat loss and thermal resistance were determined from continuous monitoring of ambient air temperature, manikin surface temperature, heat flux and evaporative mass loss rate. Independent of insulation thickness or ambient temperature, the removal of wet clothing or the addition of a vapor barrier resulted in a reduction in total heat loss of 19-42%. The absolute heat loss reduction was greater, however, and thus clinically more important in cold environments when little insulation is available. A similar reduction in total heat loss

  1. Should regional ventilation function be considered during radiation treatment planning to prevent radiation-induced complications?

    SciT

    Lan, Fujun; Jeudy, Jean; D’Souza, Warren

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of pretherapy regional ventilation function in predicting radiation fibrosis (RF) in stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent thoracic chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with stage III NSCLC were retrospectively studied. Patients received one cycle of cisplatin–gemcitabine, followed by two to three cycles of cisplatin–etoposide concurrently with involved-field thoracic radiotherapy (46–66 Gy; 2 Gy/fraction). Pretherapy regional ventilation images of the lung were derived from 4D computed tomography via a density change–based algorithm with mass correction. In addition to the conventional dose–volume metrics (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 40}, and mean lung dose),more » dose–function metrics (fV{sub 20}, fV{sub 30}, fV{sub 40}, and functional mean lung dose) were generated by combining regional ventilation and radiation dose. A new class of metrics was derived and referred to as dose–subvolume metrics (sV{sub 20}, sV{sub 30}, sV{sub 40}, and subvolume mean lung dose); these were defined as the conventional dose–volume metrics computed on the functional lung. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate these metrics in predicting hallmark characteristics of RF (lung consolidation, volume loss, and airway dilation). Results: AUC values for the dose–volume metrics in predicting lung consolidation, volume loss, and airway dilation were 0.65–0.69, 0.57–0.70, and 0.69–0.76, respectively. The respective ranges for dose–function metrics were 0.63–0.66, 0.61–0.71, and 0.72–0.80 and for dose–subvolume metrics were 0.50–0.65, 0.65–0.75, and 0.73–0.85. Using an AUC value = 0.70 as cutoff value suggested that at least one of each type of metrics (dose–volume, dose–function, dose–subvolume) was predictive for volume loss and airway dilation, whereas lung

  2. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (p<0.05) and reproducible quantitative differences in ground-base ion radiation and spaceflight experiments respectively. The functions of ground-base radiation and spaceflight proteins were both involved in a wide range of biological processes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis further revealed that ground-base radiation responsive proteins were mainly involved in removal of superoxide radicals, defense response to stimulus and photosynthesis, while spaceflight responsive proteins mainly participate in nucleoside metabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing

  3. Determination of heat losses and their influence on the performance characteristics of high-enthalpy hot-shot tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganimedov, V. L.; Shumsky, V. V.; Yaroslavtsev, M. I.

    2009-06-01

    An analysis of the losses of heat into the walls of settling chamber in a hypersonic hot-shot tube has been performed. Tests without diaphragm rupture showed that the fall of settling-chamber pressure during the operating flow regime in the tube was the consequence of the transfer of heat from working body to wall; this has allowed us to evaluate the heat-transfer coefficient α and the inner-surface temperature of the wall T w. An empirical formula relating the coefficient α with the pressure and working-body temperature in the settling chamber in the range of pressures and temperatures 160 to 540 bar and 700 to 3400 K was obtained. Using the gained dependences of α and T w on pressure and temperature, we have developed a physical model for calculating the working-body characteristics in the tube with allowance for enthalpy losses. We found that by the hundredth millisecond of the operating regime the disregard, in such calculations, of the wall heat flux in the first settling chamber resulted in overestimation of the stagnation temperature in the test section in comparison with similar calculations made without allowance for the heat losses by 6-18 % in terms of the full-scale temperature for aircraft flight in Mach number range 5 to 8. The developed calculation procedure has been tested in experiments without diaphragm rupture.

  4. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    SciT

    Velikovich, A. L., E-mail: sasha.velikovich@nrl.navy.mil; Giuliani, J. L., E-mail: sasha.velikovich@nrl.navy.mil; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, andmore » the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.« less

  5. Heat loss distribution: Impedance and thermal loss analyses in LiFePO4/graphite 18650 electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasundaram, Manikandan; Ramar, Vishwanathan; Yap, Christopher; Lu, Li; Tay, Andrew A. O.; Palani, Balaya

    2016-10-01

    We report here thermal behaviour and various components of heat loss of 18650-type LiFePO4/graphite cell at different testing conditions. In this regard, the total heat generated during charging and discharging processes at various current rates (C) has been quantified in an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter experiment. Irreversible heat generation, which depends on applied current and internal cell resistance, is measured under corresponding charge/discharge conditions using intermittent pulse techniques. On the other hand, reversible heat generation which depends on entropy changes of the electrode materials during the cell reaction is measured from the determination of entropic coefficient at various states of charge/discharge. The contributions of irreversible and reversible heat generation to the total heat generation at both high and low current rates are evaluated. At every state of charge/discharge, the nature of the cell reaction is found to be either exothermic or endothermic which is especially evident at low C rates. In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements are performed on above 18650 cells at various states of charge to determine the components of internal resistance. The findings from the impedance and thermal loss analysis are helpful for understanding the favourable states of charge/discharge for battery operation, and designing better thermal management systems.

  6. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciT

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstratesmore » that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.« less

  7. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08.

  8. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    PubMed

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915measuredsamples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rateand heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  10. Extreme learning machine: a new alternative for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijian; Li, Hao; Tang, Xindong; Zhang, Xinyu; Lin, Fan; Cheng, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    Heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial indicators for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, wasting too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we previously used artificial neural networks and support vector machine to develop precise knowledge-based models for predicting the heat collection rates and heat loss coefficients of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters, setting the properties measured by "portable test instruments" as the independent variables. A robust software for determination was also developed. However, in previous results, the prediction accuracy of heat loss coefficients can still be improved compared to those of heat collection rates. Also, in practical applications, even a small reduction in root mean square errors (RMSEs) can sometimes significantly improve the evaluation and business processes. As a further study, in this short report, we show that using a novel and fast machine learning algorithm-extreme learning machine can generate better predicted results for heat loss coefficient, which reduces the average RMSEs to 0.67 in testing.

  11. Fitness-related differences in the rate of whole-body evaporative heat loss in exercising men are heat-load dependent.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Notley, Sean R; Louie, Jeffrey C; Poirier, Martin P; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Aerobic fitness modulates heat loss, but the heat-load threshold at which fitness-related differences in heat loss occur in young healthy men remains unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate using direct calorimetry that aerobic fitness modulates heat loss in a heat-load-dependent manner, with fitness-related differences occurring between young men who have low and high fitness when the heat load is ∼≥500 W. Although aerobic fitness has been known for some time to modulate heat loss, our findings define the precise heat-load threshold at which fitness-related differences occur. The effect of aerobic fitness (defined as rate of peak oxygen consumption) on heat loss during exercise is thought to be related to the level of heat stress. However, it remains unclear at what combined exercise and environmental (net) heat-load threshold these fitness-related differences occur. To identify this, we assessed whole-body heat exchange (dry and evaporative) by direct calorimetry in young (22 ± 3 years) men matched for physical characteristics with low (Low-fit; 39.8 ± 2.5 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ), moderate (Mod-fit; 50.9 ± 1.2 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ) and high aerobic fitness (High-fit; 62.0 ± 4.4 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ; each n = 8), during three 30 min bouts of cycling in dry heat (40°C, 12% relative humidity) at increasing rates of metabolic heat production of 300 (Ex1), 400 (Ex2) and 500 W (Ex3), each followed by a 15 min recovery period. Each group was exposed to a similar net heat load (metabolic plus ∼100 W dry heat gain; P = 0.83) during each exercise bout [∼400 (Ex1), ∼500 (Ex2) and ∼600 W (Ex3); P < 0.01]. Although evaporative heat loss was similar between groups during Ex1 (P = 0.33), evaporative heat loss was greater in the High-fit (Ex2, 466 ± 21 W; Ex3, 557 ± 26 W) compared with the Low-fit group (Ex2, 439 ± 22 W; Ex3, 511 ± 20

  12. In-Space Radiator Shape Optimization using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Kittredge, Ken; Tinker, Michael; SanSoucie, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require the development of more advanced in-space radiators. These radiators should be highly efficient and lightweight, deployable heat rejection systems. Typical radiators for in-space heat mitigation commonly comprise a substantial portion of the total vehicle mass. A small mass savings of even 5-10% can greatly improve vehicle performance. The objective of this paper is to present the development of detailed tools for the analysis and design of in-space radiators using evolutionary computation techniques. The optimality criterion is defined as a two-dimensional radiator with a shape demonstrating the smallest mass for the greatest overall heat transfer, thus the end result is a set of highly functional radiator designs. This cross-disciplinary work combines topology optimization and thermal analysis design by means of a genetic algorithm The proposed design tool consists of the following steps; design parameterization based on the exterior boundary of the radiator, objective function definition (mass minimization and heat loss maximization), objective function evaluation via finite element analysis (thermal radiation analysis) and optimization based on evolutionary algorithms. The radiator design problem is defined as follows: the input force is a driving temperature and the output reaction is heat loss. Appropriate modeling of the space environment is added to capture its effect on the radiator. The design parameters chosen for this radiator shape optimization problem fall into two classes, variable height along the width of the radiator and a spline curve defining the -material boundary of the radiator. The implementation of multiple design parameter schemes allows the user to have more confidence in the radiator optimization tool upon demonstration of convergence between the two design parameter schemes. This tool easily allows the user to manipulate the driving temperature regions thus permitting detailed design of in

  13. Ionizing radiation and taxonomic, functional and evolutionary diversity of bird communities.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Federico; Benedetti, Yanina; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders Pape

    2018-08-15

    Ionizing radiation from nuclear accidents at Chernobyl, Fukushima and elsewhere has reduced the abundance, species richness and diversity of ecosystems. Here we analyzed the taxonomic, functional and evolutionary diversity of bird communities in forested areas around Chernobyl. Species richness decreased with increasing radiation, mainly in 2007. Functional richness, but not functional evenness and divergence, decreased with increasing level of ionizing radiation. Evolutionary distinctiveness of bird communities was higher in areas with higher levels of ionizing radiation. Regression tree models revealed that species richness was higher in bird communities in areas with radiation levels lower than 0.7 μSv/h. In contrast, when radiation levels were higher than 16.67 μSv/h, bird species richness reached a minimum. Functional richness was affected by two variables: Forest cover and radiation level. Higher functional richness was found in bird communities in areas with forest cover lower than 50%. In the areas with forest cover higher than 50%, the functional richness was lower when radiation level was higher than 0.91 μSv/h. Finally, the average evolutionary distinctiveness of bird communities was higher in areas with forest cover exceeding 50%. These findings imply that level of ionizing radiation interacted with forest cover to affect species richness and its component parts, i.e. taxonomic, functional, and evolutionary diversity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fitness-related differences in the rate of whole-body total heat loss in exercising young healthy women are heat-load dependent.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Notley, Sean R; Poirier, Martin P; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Aerobic fitness modulates heat loss, albeit the heat load at which fitness-related differences occur in young healthy women remains unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate using direct calorimetry that fitness modulates heat loss in a heat-load dependent manner, with differences occurring between young women of low and high fitness and matched physical characteristics when the metabolic heat load is at least 400 W in hot, dry conditions. Although fitness has been known for some time to modulate heat loss, our findings define the metabolic heat load at which fitness-related differences occur. Aerobic fitness has recently been shown to alter heat loss capacity in a heat-load dependent manner in young men. However, given that sex-related differences in heat loss capacity exist, it is unclear whether this response is consistent in women. We therefore assessed whole-body total heat loss in young (21 ± 3 years old) healthy women matched for physical characteristics, but with low (low-fit; 35.8 ± 4.5 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ) or high aerobic fitness (high-fit; 53.1 ± 5.1 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ; both n = 8; indexed by peak oxygen consumption), during three 30 min bouts of cycling performed at increasing rates of metabolic heat production of 250 (Ex1), 325 (Ex2) and 400 W (Ex3), each separated by a 15 min recovery, in hot, dry conditions (40°C, 11% relative humidity). Whole-body total heat loss (evaporative ± dry heat exchange) and metabolic heat production were measured using direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat content was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and loss. Total heat loss did not differ during Ex1 (low-fit, 215 ± 16 W; high-fit, 231 ± 20 W; P > 0.05) and Ex2 (low-fit, 278 ± 15 W; high-fit, 301 ± 20 W; P > 0.05), but was lower in the low-fit (316 ± 21 W) compared with the high-fit women (359 ± 32

  15. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  16. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  17. Effects of encapsulated niacin on evaporative heat loss and body temperature in moderately heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Zimbelman, R B; Baumgard, L H; Collier, R J

    2010-06-01

    Twelve multiparous Holstein cows (145+/-9 d in milk) were randomly assigned to receive either 0 g/d of encapsulated niacin (control diet; C) or 12 g/d of encapsulated niacin (NI) and were exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 7 d) or heat stress (HS; 7 d) conditions in climate-controlled chambers. The temperature-humidity index during TN conditions never exceeded 72, whereas HS conditions consisted of a circadian temperature range in which the temperature-humidity index exceeded 72 for 12 h/d. Measures of thermal status obtained 4 times/d included respiration rate (RR); rectal temperature; surface temperature of both shaved and unshaved areas at the rump, shoulder, and tail head; vaginal temperature; and evaporative heat loss (EVHL) of the shoulder shaved and unshaved areas. Cows fed NI had increased free plasma niacin concentrations in both the TN and HS periods (1.70 vs. 1.47+/-0.17 microg/mL). Milk yield did not differ between dietary groups or periods. Dry matter intake was not affected by NI, but decreased (3%) for both C and NI treatments during HS. Water intake was increased during HS in both treatments (C: 40.4 vs. 57.7+/-0.8L/d for TN and HS, respectively; NI: 52.7 vs. 57.7+/-0.8 L/d for TN and HS, respectively). Average EVHL for shaved and unshaved skin for C and NI treatments was higher during HS (90.1 vs. 108.1 g/m(2) per hour) than TN (20.7 vs. 15.7+/-4.9 g/m(2) per hour). Between 1000 and 1600 h, mean EVHL for shaved and unshaved areas for NI fed cows was higher than for C fed cows (106.9 vs. 94.4+/-4.9 g/m(2) per hour). The NI fed cows had decreased rectal temperatures during HS compared with the C fed cows (38.17 vs. 38.34+/-0.07 degrees C) and had lower vaginal temperatures (38.0 vs. 38.4+/-0.02 degrees C). Calculated metabolic rate decreased during HS regardless of diet (50.25 and 49.70+/-0.48 kcal/kg of body weight per day for TN and HS, respectively). Feeding NI increased free plasma NI levels, increased EVHL during peak thermal load, and was associated

  18. Yeast culture increased plasma niacin concentration, evaporative heat loss, and feed efficiency of dairy cows in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Julia D L; Silva, Rayana B; Fernandes, Tatiane; Barbosa, Eugenio F; Graças, Larissa E C; Araujo, Rafael C; Pereira, Renata A N; Pereira, Marcos N

    2018-04-04

    concentrations, linear somatic cell count, and milk urea N were also similar. The supplementation of YC increased plasma niacin concentration, body heat loss, and feed efficiency of late lactation dairy cows by reducing intake at similar milk yield. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of a pre-moistened multilayered breathable fabric in promoting heat loss during recovery after exercise under hot conditions.

    PubMed

    Foreman, J H; Benson, G J; Foreman, M H

    2006-08-01

    Horses generate considerable internal heat burdens when exercising. Although common practice for a trainer or groom to place a wet blanket or towel on the dorsum of a hot horse post exercise, there are no data supporting the efficacy of this cooling method. To test the hypothesis that a pre-moistened blanket designed with a multilayered breathable fabric would enhance heat loss in horses post exercise. Eight treadmill-trained horses performed a standardised exercise test (SET) weekly for 3 weeks, with 3 different recovery treatments administered randomly. Pulmonary artery temperature (PAT) was measured via Swan-Ganz catheter. The SET consisted of 10 min at 3.7 m/sec, 3 min at 11.0 m/sec, 25 min at 3.7 m/sec and 20 min of recovery walking at 2.0 m/sec (58 min exercise and recovery under laboratory conditions of 35.0-40.6 degrees C and 27-49% RH). From 3-7 min during recovery, the treadmill was stopped and horses randomly received either: (a) no bath (negative control); (b) a bath consisting of 32 l of 1-4 degrees C water split into 3-4 cycles of bilateral water application (positive control) followed by water removal ('scraping'); or (c) application of a multilayered fabric blanket soaked in 16-19 degrees C water, wrung out, and placed over the dorsum and sides of the horse. PAT was compared using RM ANOVA with the Student Neuman-Keul's test used post hoc to discriminate between treatments at specific points in time. Mean PAT rose with each phase of exercise (P<0.001) and peaked at a mean of 40.2 +/- 0.2 degrees C. During recovery, the cold bath decreased HR and PAT for 9 min after walking resumed (P<0.001-P<0.05). The blanket did not decrease HR or PAT compared to negative control (P>0.05), and both were hotter than the cold bath treatment through 16 min of recovery (P<0.05). A specially-designed cooling blanket failed to reduce PAT when compared to negative control. Cold water bathing decreased HR and PAT but was not effective throughout all of recovery. A

  20. Radiation-induced cardiomyopathy as a function of radiation beam gating to the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, David J.; Flanagan, Michael F.; Southworth, Jean B.; Hadley, Vaughn; Thibualt, Melissa Wei; Hug, Eugen B.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2004-04-01

    Portions of the heart are often unavoidably included in the primary treatment volume during thoracic radiotherapy, and radiation-induced heart disease has been observed as a treatment-related complication. Such complications have been observed in humans following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease and treatment of the left breast for carcinoma. Recent attempts have been made to prevent re-stenosis following angioplasty procedures using external beam irradiation. These attempts were not successful, however, due to the large volume of heart included in the treatment field and subsequent cardiac morbidity. We suggest a mechanism for sparing the heart from radiation damage by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle and delivering radiation only when the heart is in a relatively hypoxic state. We present data from a rat model testing this hypothesis and show that radiation damage to the heart can be altered by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle. This technique may be useful in reducing radiation damage to the heart secondary to treatment for diseases such as Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer.

  1. Investigation of Salivary Function and Oral Microbiota of Radiation Caries-Free People with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyang; Liu, Hongling; Liang, Xue; Zhang, Min; Wang, Renke; Peng, Guang; Li, Jiyao

    2015-01-01

    Radiation caries have been reported to be correlated with radiotherapy-induced destruction of salivary function and changes in oral microbiota. There have been no published reports detailing patients who have remained radiation caries-free following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between salivary function, oral microbiota and the absence of radiation caries. Twelve radiation caries-free patients and nine patients exhibiting radiation caries following irradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected. V40, the dose at which the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receives more than 40 Gy, was recorded. Stimulated saliva flow rate, pH values and buffering capacity were examined to assess salivary function. Stimulated saliva was used for molecular profiling by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. Mutans streptococci and Lactobacilli in saliva were also cultivated. There were no significant differences in V40 between radiation caries-free individuals and those with radiation caries. Compared with normal values, the radiation caries-free group had significantly decreased simulated saliva flow rate, while there were no significant differences in the saliva pH value and buffering capacity. Similar results were observed in the radiation caries group. There was no statistical difference in microbial diversity, composition and log CFU counts in cultivation from the radiation caries-free group and the radiation caries group. Eleven genera were detected in these two groups, among which Streptococcus spp. and Neisseria spp. had the highest distribution. Our results suggest that changes in salivary function and in salivary microbiota do not explain the absence of radiation caries in radiation caries-free individuals. PMID:25860481

  2. Investigation of salivary function and oral microbiota of radiation caries-free people with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyang; Liu, Hongling; Liang, Xue; Zhang, Min; Wang, Renke; Peng, Guang; Li, Jiyao

    2015-01-01

    Radiation caries have been reported to be correlated with radiotherapy-induced destruction of salivary function and changes in oral microbiota. There have been no published reports detailing patients who have remained radiation caries-free following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between salivary function, oral microbiota and the absence of radiation caries. Twelve radiation caries-free patients and nine patients exhibiting radiation caries following irradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected. V40, the dose at which the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receives more than 40 Gy, was recorded. Stimulated saliva flow rate, pH values and buffering capacity were examined to assess salivary function. Stimulated saliva was used for molecular profiling by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. Mutans streptococci and Lactobacilli in saliva were also cultivated. There were no significant differences in V40 between radiation caries-free individuals and those with radiation caries. Compared with normal values, the radiation caries-free group had significantly decreased simulated saliva flow rate, while there were no significant differences in the saliva pH value and buffering capacity. Similar results were observed in the radiation caries group. There was no statistical difference in microbial diversity, composition and log CFU counts in cultivation from the radiation caries-free group and the radiation caries group. Eleven genera were detected in these two groups, among which Streptococcus spp. and Neisseria spp. had the highest distribution. Our results suggest that changes in salivary function and in salivary microbiota do not explain the absence of radiation caries in radiation caries-free individuals.

  3. Effects of High Dietary HEME Iron and Radiation on Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Brown, A. K.; Platts, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The radiation related health risks to astronauts is of particular concern to NASA. Data support that exposure to radiation is associated with a number of disorders including a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases. Independent of radiation, altered nutrient status (e.g. high dietary iron) also increases ones risk for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether exposure to radiation in combination with high dietary iron further increases ones cardiovascular risk. The intent of our proposal is to generate compulsory data examining the combined effect of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury to address HRP risks: 1) Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition; 2) Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems; and 3) Risk of Degenerative Tissue or other Health Effects from Space Radiation. Towards our goal we propose two distinct pilot studies using the following specific aims: Vascular Aim 1: To determine the short-term consequences of the independent and combined effects of exposure to gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on measures of endothelial function and cell viability and integrity. We hypothesize that animals that have high body iron stores and are exposed to gamma radiation will show a greater reduction in endothelial dependent nitric oxid production and larger pathological changes in endothelial integrity than animals that have only 1 of those treatments (either high iron stores or exposure to gamma radiation). Vascular Aim 2: Identify and compare the effects of gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on the genetic and epigenetic regulation of proteins associated with endothelial cell function. We hypothesize that modifications of epigenetic control and posttranslational expression of proteins associated with endothelial cell function will be differentially altered in rats with high body iron stores and exposed to gamma radiation compared to rats with only 1 type of treatment. Cardiac Aim 1: To determine the

  4. Corporate Functional Management Evaluation of the LLNL Radiation Safety Organization

    SciT

    Sygitowicz, L S

    2008-03-20

    A Corporate Assess, Improve, and Modernize review was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to evaluate the LLNL Radiation Safety Program and recommend actions to address the conditions identified in the Internal Assessment conducted July 23-25, 2007. This review confirms the findings of the Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program (RSP) including the noted deficiencies and vulnerabilities to be valid. The actions recommended are a result of interviews with about 35 individuals representing senior management through the technician level. The deficiencies identified in the LLNL Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program were discussed with Radiationmore » Safety personnel team leads, customers of Radiation Safety Program, DOE Livermore site office, and senior ES&H management. There are significant issues with the RSP. LLNL RSP is not an integrated, cohesive, consistently implemented program with a single authority that has the clear roll and responsibility and authority to assure radiological operations at LLNL are conducted in a safe and compliant manner. There is no institutional commitment to address the deficiencies that are identified in the internal assessment. Some of these deficiencies have been previously identified and corrective actions have not been taken or are ineffective in addressing the issues. Serious funding and staffing issues have prevented addressing previously identified issues in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Internal Dosimetry, Bioassay Laboratory, and the Whole Body Counter. There is a lack of technical basis documentation for the Radiation Calibration Laboratory and an inadequate QA plan that does not specify standards of work. The Radiation Safety Program lack rigor and consistency across all supported programs. The implementation of DOE Standard 1098-99 Radiological Control can be used as a tool to establish this consistency across LLNL. The establishment of a

  5. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Preserves Salivary Gland Function After Fractionated Radiation

    SciT

    Limesand, Kirsten H., E-mail: limesank@u.arizona.ed; Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Avila, Jennifer L.

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer consists of fractionated radiation treatments that cause significant damage to salivary glands leading to chronic salivary gland dysfunction with only limited prevention and treatment options currently available. This study examines the feasibility of IGF-1 in preserving salivary gland function following a fractionated radiation treatment regimen in a pre-clinical model. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to fractionated radiation, and salivary gland function and histological analyses of structure, apoptosis, and proliferation were evaluated. Results: In this study, we report that treatment with fractionated doses of radiation results in a significant level of apoptotic cells in FVBmore » mice after each fraction, which is significantly decreased in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Salivary gland function is significantly reduced in FVB mice exposed to fractionated radiation; however, myr-Akt1 transgenic mice maintain salivary function under the same treatment conditions. Injection into FVB mice of recombinant insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which activates endogenous Akt, suppressed acute apoptosis and preserved salivary gland function after fractionated doses of radiation 30 to 90 days after treatment. FVB mice exposed to fractionated radiation had significantly lower levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive salivary acinar cells 90 days after treatment, which correlated with a chronic loss of function. In contrast, FVB mice injected with IGF-1 before each radiation treatment exhibited acinar cell proliferation rates similar to those of untreated controls. Conclusion: These studies suggest that activation of IGF-1-mediated pathways before head-and-neck radiation could modulate radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction and maintain glandular homeostasis.« less

  6. FURTHER EVIDENCE OF AN INVERSE RELATION BETWEEN MAMMALIAN BODY MASS AND SENSITIVITY TO RADIO-FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objectives of the paper under criticism were to interrelate the effects of ambient temperature and intensity of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) on the activity of a single thermoregulatory effector, evaporative heat loss (EHL) and (ii) to ...

  7. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Figure 3. 10% SDS-PAGE of immunoprecipitated 26S proteasome from PC3 cells extracted with ATP!S instead of ATP. From the left: not irradiated...block the transcription (DBR). Cells were treated with DBR 10 minutes after being exposed to a dose of radiation of 10Gy. The extracts were made at...inhibition. Figure 5. PC3 cells treated with DBR, an inhibitor of polymerase II. Proteins were extracted at different time points and the

  8. Gamma Radiation (5-10 Gy) Impairs Neuronal Function in the Guinea Pig Hippocampus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Radiation (5-10 Gy) Impairs Neuronal Function in the Guinea Pig Hippocampus TERRY C. PELLMAR AND DENNIS L. LEPINSKI Ph.vsiology Department..Irmned Forces...L. Gamma Radiation ioral effects. Within hours of irradiation with 10 Gy and (5- 10 Gy) Impairs Neuronal Function in the Guinea Pig Hippo- less...acti v- Guinea pigs were exposed to 5 and 10 Gy ’y radiation. Hippo- ity (9) are evident. campal brain slices were isolated 30 min, I day, 3 days and 5

  9. Regeneration efficiency, shuttle heat loss and thermal conductivity in epoxy-composite annualr gap regenerators from 4K to 80K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrtle, K.; Cygax, S.; Plateel, C.; Winter, C.

    1983-01-01

    A test apparatus designed to simulate a section of a Stirling cycle cryocooler was built. Measurements of regeneration efficiency, shuttle heat loss and thermal conductivity reported for several regenerator test sections. The test composites were epoxy glass, epoxy glass with lead particles, epoxy glass with activated charcoal and epoxy graphite. Losses measured for these materials were approximately the same. Losses are in good agreement with those calculated theoretically for an epoxy glass (C-10) composite. The implications of these results on cryocooler design are discussed.

  10. The study of the mobile compressor unit heat losses recovery system waste heat exchanger thermal insulation types influence on the operational efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusha, V. L.; Chernov, G. I.; Kalashnikov, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The paper examines the mobile compressor unit (MCU) heat losses recovery system waste heat exchanger prototype external thermal insulation types influence on the operational efficiency. The study is conducted by means of the numerical method through the modellingof the heat exchange processes carried out in the waste heat exchanger in ANSUS. Thermaflex, mineral wool, penofol, water and air were applied as the heat exchanger external insulation. The study results showed the waste heat exchanger external thermal insulationexistence or absence to have a significant impact on the heat exchanger operational efficiency.

  11. The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Houston, B J; Nixon, B; King, B V; De Iuliis, G N; Aitken, R J

    2016-12-01

    Mobile phone usage has become an integral part of our lives. However, the effects of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted by these devices on biological systems and specifically the reproductive systems are currently under active debate. A fundamental hindrance to the current debate is that there is no clear mechanism of how such non-ionising radiation influences biological systems. Therefore, we explored the documented impacts of RF-EMR on the male reproductive system and considered any common observations that could provide insights on a potential mechanism. Among a total of 27 studies investigating the effects of RF-EMR on the male reproductive system, negative consequences of exposure were reported in 21. Within these 21 studies, 11 of the 15 that investigated sperm motility reported significant declines, 7 of 7 that measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) documented elevated levels and 4 of 5 studies that probed for DNA damage highlighted increased damage due to RF-EMR exposure. Associated with this, RF-EMR treatment reduced the antioxidant levels in 6 of 6 studies that discussed this phenomenon, whereas consequences of RF-EMR were successfully ameliorated with the supplementation of antioxidants in all 3 studies that carried out these experiments. In light of this, we envisage a two-step mechanism whereby RF-EMR is able to induce mitochondrial dysfunction leading to elevated ROS production. A continued focus on research, which aims to shed light on the biological effects of RF-EMR will allow us to test and assess this proposed mechanism in a variety of cell types. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  12. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    SciT

    Hakim, Samer George, E-mail: samer.hakim@mkg-chir.mu-luebeck.de; Benedek, Geza Attila; Su Yuxiong

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary glandmore » function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.« less

  13. Role of functional imaging in treatment plan optimization of stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Jumeau, Raphael; Deantonio, Letizia; Adib, Salim; Godin, Sarah; Zeverino, Michele; Moeckli, Raphael; Bourhis, Jean; Prior, John O; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2016-10-13

    We report the first known instance of the clinical use of 99mTc-mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for the optimization of radiotherapy treatment planning and for the follow-up of acute toxicity in a patient undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. In our experience, HBS allowed the identification and the sparing of more functioning liver areas, thus potentially reducing the risk of radiation-induced liver toxicity.

  14. Two-Flux Green's Function Analysis for Transient Spectral Radiation in a Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is developed for obtaining transient temperatures in a two-layer semitransparent composite with spectrally dependent properties. Each external boundary of the composite is subjected to radiation and convection. The two-flux radiative transfer equations are solved by deriving a Green's function. This yields the local radiative heat source needed to numerically solve the transient energy equation. An advantage of the two-flux method is that isotropic scattering is included without added complexity. The layer refractive indices are larger than one. This produces internal reflections at the boundaries and the internal interface; the reflections are assumed diffuse. Spectral results using the Green's function method are verified by comparing with numerical solutions using the exact radiative transfer equations. Transient temperature distributions are given to illustrate the effect of radiative heating on one side of a composite with external convective cooling. The protection of a material from incident radiation is illustrated by adding scattering to the layer adjacent to the radiative source.

  15. Recent Developments in Three Dimensional Radiation Transport Using the Green's Function Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockell, Candice; Tweed, John; Blattnig, Steve R.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, astronauts will be sent into space for longer durations of time compared to previous missions. The increased risk of exposure to dangerous radiation, such as Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events, is of great concern. Consequently, steps must be taken to ensure astronaut safety by providing adequate shielding. In order to better determine and verify shielding requirements, an accurate and efficient radiation transport code based on a fully three dimensional radiation transport model using the Green's function technique is being developed

  16. Radiative lifetimes and cooling functions for astrophysically important molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Hulme, Kelsey; Naim, Omree K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2016-02-01

    Extensive line lists generated as part of the ExoMol project are used to compute lifetimes for individual rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic excited states, and temperature-dependent cooling functions by summing over all dipole-allowed transitions for the states concerned. Results are presented for SiO, CaH, AlO, ScH, H2O and methane. The results for CH4 are particularly unusual with four excited states with no dipole-allowed decay route and several others, where these decays lead to exceptionally long lifetimes. These lifetime data should be useful in models of masers and estimates of critical densities, and can provide a link with laboratory measurements. Cooling functions are important in stellar and planet formation.

  17. Minimalism in radiation synthesis of biomedical functional nanogels.

    PubMed

    Dispenza, Clelia; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Grimaldi, Natascia; Bulone, Donatella; Bondì, Maria Luisa; Casaletto, Maria Pia; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Adamo, Giorgia; Ghersi, Giulio

    2012-06-11

    A scalable, single-step, synthetic approach for the manufacture of biocompatible, functionalized micro- and nanogels is presented. In particular, poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone)-grafted-(aminopropyl)methacrylamide microgels and nanogels were generated through e-beam irradiation of PVP aqueous solutions in the presence of a primary amino-group-carrying monomer. Particles with different hydrodynamic diameters and surface charge densities were obtained at the variance of the irradiation conditions. Chemical structure was investigated by different spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescent variants were generated through fluorescein isothiocyanate attachment to the primary amino groups grafted to PVP, to both quantify the available functional groups for bioconjugation and follow nanogels localization in cell cultures. Finally, a model protein, bovine serum albumin, was conjugated to the nanogels to demonstrate the attachment of biologically relevant molecules for targeting purposes in drug delivery. The described approach provides a novel strategy to fabricate biohybrid nanogels with a very promising potential in nanomedicine.

  18. Effect of solar radiation on the functional components of mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mari; Katsube, Takuya; Koyama, Akio; Itamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The functional components of mulberry leaves have attracted the attention of the health food industry, and increasing their concentrations is an industry goal. This study investigated the effects of solar radiation, which may influence the production of flavonol and 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) functional components in mulberry leaves, by comparing a greenhouse (poor solar radiation) and outdoor (rich solar radiation) setting. The level of flavonol in leaves cultivated in the greenhouse was markedly decreased when compared with those cultivated outdoors. In contrast, the DNJ content in greenhouse-cultivated plants was increased only slightly when compared with those cultivated outdoors. Interestingly, the flavonol content was markedly increased in the upper leaves of mulberry trees that were transferred from a greenhouse to the outdoors compared with those cultivated only in the outdoors. Solar radiation conditions influence the synthesis of flavonol and DNJ, the functional components of mulberry leaves. Under high solar radiation, the flavonol level becomes very high but the DNJ level becomes slightly lower, suggesting that the impact of solar radiation is great on flavonol but small on DNJ synthesis. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Gravitational radiation during plunge - a Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Price, Richard; Khanna, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    During the merger of binary compact objects, an important stage is the plunge. A short part of the Gravitational waveform, it marks the end of early inspiral and determines the quasinormal ringing (QNR) of the final product of the merger. In this talk, we describe the approach of using the Fourier domain Green's function in the particle perturbation approximation to understand the excitation of QNR. We show that the resulting understanding is successful in explaining QNR in toy models and in the Schwarzschild background.

  20. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  1. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  2. Comparison of feed energy costs of maintenance, lean deposition, and fat deposition in three lines of mice selected for heat loss.

    PubMed

    Eggert, D L; Nielsen, M K

    2006-02-01

    Three replications of mouse selection populations for high heat loss (MH), low heat loss (ML), and a nonselected control (MC) were used to estimate the feed energy costs of maintenance and gain and to test whether selection had changed these costs. At 21 and 49 d of age, mice were weighed and subjected to dual x-ray densitometry measurement for prediction of body composition. At 21 d, mice were randomly assigned to an ad libitum, an 80% of ad libitum, or a 60% of ad libitum feeding group for 28-d collection of individual feed intake. Data were analyzed using 3 approaches. The first approach was an attempt to partition energy intake between costs for maintenance, fat deposition, and lean deposition for each replicate, sex, and line by multiple regression of feed intake on the sum of daily metabolic weight (kg(0.75)), fat gain, and lean gain. Approach II was a less restrictive attempt to partition energy intake between costs for maintenance and total gain for each replicate, sex, and line by multiple regression of feed intake on the sum of daily metabolic weight and total gain. Approach III used multiple regression on the entire data set with pooled regressions on fat and lean gains, and subclass regressions for maintenance. Contrasts were conducted to test the effect of selection (MH - ML) and asymmetry of selection [(MH + ML)/2 - MC] for the various energy costs. In approach I, there were no differences between lines for costs of maintenance, fat deposition, or protein deposition, but we question our ability to estimate these accurately. In approach II, selection changed both cost of maintenance (P = 0.03) and gain (P = 0.05); MH mice had greater per unit costs than ML mice for both. Asymmetry of the selection response was found in approach II for the cost of maintenance (P = 0.06). In approach III, the effect of selection (P < 0.01) contributed to differences in the maintenance cost, but asymmetry of selection (P > 0.17) was not evident. Sex effects were found for

  3. Radiation Effects on Cognitive Function Among Atomic Bomb Survivors Exposed at or After Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Landes, Reid D; Mimori, Yasuyo; Nagano, Yoshito; Sasaki, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate radiation effects on longitudinal pre-dementia cognitive decline among participants who developed dementia as well as on those who did not develop dementia during follow-up. Measuring cognitive function with the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument approximately every 2 years, we followed 1844 atomic bomb survivors participating in the Adult Health Study of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1992 to 2011. Participants were adolescents or older when exposed to between 0 and 4 Gy. Approximately 15% and 40% of participants were exposed to ≥1 Gy and <5 mGy, respectively. At study start, participants were dementia-free and between 60 and 80 years old. Three-quarters of the participants returned after baseline, averaging 8.4 years of follow-up. During follow-up, 313 developed dementia. We used cognitive scores before dementia onset for analysis and a mixed-effects model to estimate radiation effects on longitudinal change of cognition, adjusting for dementia occurrence, age, sex, and education. Cognition level was significantly associated with age, education, and dementia occurrence but not with radiation dose or sex. Cognitive decline accelerated with increasing age, especially among participants who developed dementia. Neither radiation nor education was significantly associated with the degree of deterioration with age. Radiation did not modify the different cognitive decline by dementia occurrence. Radiation did not significantly affect cognition among atomic bomb survivors exposed at or after adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Morphological dependency of cutaneous blood flow and sweating during compensable heat stress when heat-loss requirements are matched across participants.

    PubMed

    Notley, Sean R; Park, Joonhee; Tagami, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2016-07-01

    Human heat loss is thought, in part, to be morphologically related. It was therefore hypothesized that when heat-loss requirements and body temperatures were matched, that the mass-specific surface area alone could significantly explain both cutaneous vascular and sudomotor responses during compensable exercise. These thermoeffector responses were examined in 36 men with widely varying mass-specific surface areas (range, 232.3-292.7 cm(2)/kg), but of similar age, aerobic fitness, and adiposity. Subjects completed two trials under compensable conditions (28.1°C, 36.8% relative humidity), each involving rest (20 min) and steady-state cycling (45 min) at two matched metabolic heat-production rates (light, ∼135 W/m(2); moderate, ∼200 W/m(2)). Following equivalent mean body temperature changes, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance (r = 0.63 and r = 0.65) shared significant, positive associations with the mass-specific surface area during light work (P < 0.05), explaining ∼45% of the vasomotor variation. Conversely, during light and moderate work, whole body sweat rate, as well as local sweat rate and sudomotor sensitivity at three of four measured sites, revealed moderate, negative relationships with the mass-specific surface area (correlation coefficient range -0.37 to -0.73, P < 0.05). Moreover, those relationships could uniquely account for between 10 and 53% of those sweating responses (P < 0.05). Therefore, both thermoeffector responses displayed a significant morphological dependency in the presence of equivalent thermoafferent drive. Indeed, up to half of the interindividual variation in these effector responses could now be explained through morphological differences and the first principles governing heat transfer. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Body temperature depression and peripheral heat loss accompany the metabolic and ventilatory responses to hypoxia in low and high altitude birds.

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham R; Cadena, Viviana; Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the thermoregulatory, metabolic and ventilatory responses to hypoxia of the high altitude bar-headed goose with low altitude waterfowl. All birds were found to reduce body temperature (T(b)) during hypoxia, by up to 1-1.5 degrees C in severe hypoxia. During prolonged hypoxia, T(b) stabilized at a new lower temperature. A regulated increase in heat loss contributed to T(b) depression as reflected by increases in bill surface temperatures (up to 5 degrees C) during hypoxia. Bill warming required peripheral chemoreceptor inputs, since vagotomy abolished this response to hypoxia. T(b) depression could still occur without bill warming, however, because vagotomized birds reduced T(b) as much as intact birds. Compared to both greylag geese and pekin ducks, bar-headed geese required more severe hypoxia to initiate T(b) depression and heat loss from the bill. However, when T(b) depression or bill warming were expressed relative to arterial O(2) concentration (rather than inspired O(2)) all species were similar; this suggests that enhanced O(2) loading, rather than differences in thermoregulatory control centres, reduces T(b) depression during hypoxia in bar-headed geese. Correspondingly, bar-headed geese maintained higher rates of metabolism during severe hypoxia (7% inspired O(2)), but this was only partly due to differences in T(b). Time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response also appeared to differ between bar-headed geese and low altitude species. Overall, our results suggest that birds can adjust peripheral heat dissipation to facilitate T(b) depression during hypoxia, and that bar-headed geese minimize T(b) and metabolic depression as a result of evolutionary adaptations that enhance O(2) transport.

  6. Morphological dependency of cutaneous blood flow and sweating during compensable heat stress when heat-loss requirements are matched across participants

    PubMed Central

    Notley, Sean R.; Park, Joonhee; Tagami, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Norikazu

    2016-01-01

    Human heat loss is thought, in part, to be morphologically related. It was therefore hypothesized that when heat-loss requirements and body temperatures were matched, that the mass-specific surface area alone could significantly explain both cutaneous vascular and sudomotor responses during compensable exercise. These thermoeffector responses were examined in 36 men with widely varying mass-specific surface areas (range, 232.3-292.7 cm2/kg), but of similar age, aerobic fitness, and adiposity. Subjects completed two trials under compensable conditions (28.1°C, 36.8% relative humidity), each involving rest (20 min) and steady-state cycling (45 min) at two matched metabolic heat-production rates (light, ∼135 W/m2; moderate, ∼200 W/m2). Following equivalent mean body temperature changes, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance (r = 0.63 and r = 0.65) shared significant, positive associations with the mass-specific surface area during light work (P < 0.05), explaining ∼45% of the vasomotor variation. Conversely, during light and moderate work, whole body sweat rate, as well as local sweat rate and sudomotor sensitivity at three of four measured sites, revealed moderate, negative relationships with the mass-specific surface area (correlation coefficient range −0.37 to −0.73, P < 0.05). Moreover, those relationships could uniquely account for between 10 and 53% of those sweating responses (P < 0.05). Therefore, both thermoeffector responses displayed a significant morphological dependency in the presence of equivalent thermoafferent drive. Indeed, up to half of the interindividual variation in these effector responses could now be explained through morphological differences and the first principles governing heat transfer. PMID:27125845

  7. A Multidimensional Study of Vocal Function Following Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Vrushali; Dressler, Emily; Stemple, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Radiation therapy (XRT) has proven to be an effective curative modality in the treatment of laryngeal cancers. However, XRT also has deleterious effects on vocal function. To demonstrate the multidimensional nature of deficits in vocal function as a result of radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer. Cohort study. Vocal function parameters were chosen from the 5 domains of voice assessment to complete a multidimensional assessment battery. Adults irradiated (XRT group) for laryngeal cancers were compared to a control group of individuals with no history of head and neck cancers or radiation therapy. The control group was matched in age, sex, and pack years of smoking. Eighteen participants were recruited for the study. The XRT group demonstrated significantly worse clinical values as compared to the control group across select parameters in the each of the 5 domains of voice assessment. Radiation therapy for laryngeal cancers results in multidimensional deficits in vocal function. Notably, these deficits persist long term. In the present study sample, multidimensional deficits were persistent 2 to 7 years following completion of XRT. The observed multidimensional persistent vocal difficulties highlight the importance of vocal rehabilitation in the irradiated larynx cancer population.

  8. Solution of the radiative transfer equation for Rayleigh scattering using the infinite medium Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biçer, M.; Kaşkaş, A.

    2018-03-01

    The infinite medium Green's function is used to solve the half-space albedo, slab albedo and Milne problems for the unpolarized Rayleigh scattering case; these problems are the most classical problems of radiative transfer theory. The numerical results are obtained and are compared with previous ones.

  9. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  10. Evaluation of Multi-Functional Materials for Deep Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William; Wilkins, Richard; Gersey, Brad; Badavi, Francis F.

    2009-01-01

    Small scale trade study of materials for radiation shielding: a) High-hydrogen polymers; b) Z-graded materials; c) Fiber-reinforced polymer composites. Discussed multi-functionality of fiber-reinforced polymer composites. Preliminary results of ground testing data.

  11. Green's function solution to radiative heat transfer between longitudinal gray fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J. I.; Silvestri, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A demonstration is presented of the applicability and versatility of a pure integral formulation for radiative-conductive heat-transfer problems. Preliminary results have been obtained which indicate that this formulation allows an accurate, fast, and stable computation procedure to be implemented. Attention is given to the accessory problem defining Green's function.

  12. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  13. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Verreet, Tine; Quintens, Roel; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic) and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered. PMID:27382490

  14. Impacts of exposure to 900 MHz mobile phone radiation on liver function in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-rong; Ma, Zhi-hong; Wang, Gui-ying; Song, Cui-miao; Ma, Xue-lian; Cao, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Guo-hong

    2015-11-01

    To study the impacts of exposure to electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on liver function in rats. Twenty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group and radiated group. The rats in normal group were not radiated, those in radiated group were exposed to EMR 4 h/ d for 18 consecutive days. Rats were sacrificed immediately after the end of the experiment. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and those of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) in liver tissue were evaluated by colorimetric method. The liver histopathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and the protein expression of bax and bcl- 2 in liver tissue were detected by immunohistochemical method. Terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick and labelling (TUNEL) method was used for analysis of apoptosis in liver. Compared with the normal rats, the serum levels of ALT and AST in the radiated group had no obvious changes (P>0.05), while the contents of MDA increased (P < 0.01) and those of GSH decreased (P < 0.01) in liver tissues. The histopathology examination showed diffuse hepatocyte swelling and vacuolation, small pieces and focal necrosis. The immunohistochemical results displayed that the expression of the bax protein was higher and that of bcl-2 protein was lower in radiated group. The hepatocyte apoptosis rates in radiated group was higher than that in normal group (all P < 0.01). The exposure to 900 MHz mobile phone 4 h/d for 18 days could induce the liver histological changes, which may be partly due to the apoptosis and oxidative stress induced in liver tissue by electromagnetic radiation.

  15. Change in the thermionic work function of semiconductor powders exposed to electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourasseau, S.; Martin, J. R.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The variations of the thermoelectronic work function of titanium dioxide, submitted to an ultraviolet or visible and infrared radiation, in the presence of oxygen, are studied by the vibrating condenser method. It is shown that during the ultraviolet irradiation, a desorption of a first species of oxygen simultaneously occurs with the adsorption of a second species of oxygen and that this phenomenon is found for any structure of TiO2 (anatase or rutile) any texture, oxygen pressure, radiation intensity, and nature of introduced dopes.

  16. Assessment of the effects of environmental radiation on wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2008-09-01

    Combinations of wind-driven convection and environmental radiation in cold weather, make the environment "feel" colder. The relative contributions of these mechanisms, which form the basis for estimating wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs), are studied over a wide range of environmental conditions. Distinction is made between direct solar radiation and environmental radiation. Solar radiation, which is not included in the analysis, has beneficial effects, as it counters and offsets some of the effects due to wind and low air temperatures. Environmental radiation effects, which are included, have detrimental effects in enhancing heat loss from the human body, thus affecting the overall thermal sensation due to the environment. The analysis is performed by a simple, steady-state analytical model of human-environment thermal interaction using upper and lower bounds of environmental radiation heat exchange. It is shown that, over a wide range of relevant air temperatures and reported wind speeds, convection heat losses dominate over environmental radiation. At low wind speeds radiation contributes up to about 23% of the overall heat loss from exposed skin areas. Its relative contributions reduce considerably as the time of the exposure prolongs and exposed skin temperatures drop. At still higher wind speeds, environmental radiation effects become much smaller contributing about 5% of the total heat loss. These values fall well within the uncertainties associated with the parameter values assumed in the computation of WCETs. It is also shown that environmental radiation effects may be accommodated by adjusting reported wind speeds slightly above their reported values.

  17. Regional Lung Function Profiles of Stage I and III Lung Cancer Patients: An Evaluation for Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of clinical trials is underway to use 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging to preferentially spare functional lung in patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to generate data to aide with clinical trial design by retrospectively characterizing dosimetric and functional profiles for patients with different stages of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 118 lung cancer patients (36% stage I and 64% stage III) from 2 institutions were used for the study. A 4DCT-ventilation map was calculated using the patient's 4DCT imaging, deformable image registration, and a density-change–based algorithm. To assessmore » each patient's spatial ventilation profile both quantitative and qualitative metrics were developed, including an observer-based defect observation and metrics based on the ventilation in each lung third. For each patient we used the clinical doses to calculate functionally weighted mean lung doses and metrics that assessed the interplay between the spatial location of the dose and high-functioning lung. Results: Both qualitative and quantitative metrics revealed a significant difference in functional profiles between the 2 stage groups (P<.01). We determined that 65% of stage III and 28% of stage I patients had ventilation defects. Average functionally weighted mean lung dose was 19.6 Gy and 5.4 Gy for stage III and I patients, respectively, with both groups containing patients with large spatial overlap between dose and high-function regions. Conclusion: Our 118-patient retrospective study found that 65% of stage III patients have regionally variant ventilation profiles that are suitable for functional avoidance. Our results suggest that regardless of disease stage, it is possible to have unique spatial interplay between dose and high-functional lung, highlighting the importance of evaluating the function of each patient and developing a personalized functional avoidance

  18. Changes in body temperature in king penguins at sea: the result of fine adjustments in peripheral heat loss?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alexander; Alard, Frank; Handrich, Yves

    2006-09-01

    To investigate thermoregulatory adjustments at sea, body temperatures (the pectoral muscle and the brood patch) and diving behavior were monitored during a foraging trip of several days at sea in six breeding king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus. During inactive phases at sea (water temperature: 4-7 degrees C), all tissues measured were maintained at normothermic temperatures. The brood patch temperature was maintained at the same values as those measured when brooding on shore (38 degrees C). This high temperature difference causes a significant loss of heat. We hypothesize that high-energy expenditure associated with elevated peripheral temperature when resting at sea is the thermoregulatory cost that a postabsorptive penguin has to face for the restoration of its subcutaneous body fat. During diving, mean pectoral temperature was 37.6 +/- 1.6 degrees C. While being almost normothermic on average, the temperature of the pectoral muscle was still significantly lower than during inactivity in five out of the six birds and underwent temperature drops of up to 5.5 degrees C. Mean brood patch temperature was 29.6 +/- 2.5 degrees C during diving, and temperature decreases of up to 21.6 degrees C were recorded. Interestingly, we observed episodes of brood patch warming during the descent to depth, suggesting that, in some cases, king penguins may perform active thermolysis using the brood patch. It is hypothesized that functional pectoral temperature may be regulated through peripheral adjustments in blood perfusion. These two paradoxical features, i.e., lower temperature of deep tissues during activity and normothermic peripheral tissues while inactive, may highlight the key to the energetics of this diving endotherm while foraging at sea.

  19. Comparison of functional and morphological deficits in the rat after gestational exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciT

    Norton, S.; Kimler, B.F.

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is a precise tool for altering formation of the developing cerebral cortex of the fetal rat. Whole body exposure of the pregnant rat on gestational day 13, 15 or 17 to 1.0 Gy of gamma radiation resulted in maximum thinning of the cortex on days 15 and 17. In the preweaning period, functional tests (negative geotaxis, reflex suspension, continuous corridor and gait) were most affected by irradiation gestational day 15, as was body weight. When a lower dose of radiation (0.75 Gy) was used on gestational day 15, the damage to the cortex was much less but behavioralmore » changes were still present. Frontal, parietal and occipital areas of the cortex were approximately equally affected. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, the linkage of functional tests and cortical thickness was examined. Functional variables which were most commonly included as predictors of frontal and parietal cortex were negative geotaxis and continuous corridor. Occipital cortical layers were not predicted by behavioral variables. In predicting function using cortical variables, frontal cortex was better than parietal and occipital cortex was the poorest predictor.« less

  20. Ultraviolet germicidal efficacy as a function of pulsed radiation parameters studied by spore film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Stefan; Holtschmidt, Hans; Ott, Günter

    2018-01-01

    Disinfection by pulsed ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a commonly used method, e.g. in industry or medicine and can be carried out either with lasers or broadband UV radiation sources. Detrimental effects to biological materials depending on parameters such as pulse duration τ or pulse repetition frequency f p are well-understood for pulsed coherent UV radiation, however, relatively little is known for its incoherent variant. Therefore, within this work, it is the first time that disinfection rates of pulsed and continuous (cw) incoherent UV radiation studied by means of spore film dosimetry are presented, compared with each other, and in a second step further investigated regarding two pulse parameters. After analyzing the dynamic range of the Bacillus subtilis spore films with variable cw radiant exposures H=5-100Jm -2 a validation of the Bunsen-Roscoe law revealed its restricted applicability and a 28% enhanced detrimental effect of pulsed compared to cw incoherent UV radiation. A radiant exposure H=50Jm -2 and an irradiance E=0.5Wm -2 were found to be suitable parameters for an analysis of the disinfection rate as a function of τ=0.5-10ms and f p =25-500Hz unveiling that shorter pulses and lower frequencies inactivate more spores. Finally, the number of applied pulses as well as the experiment time were considered with regard to spore film disinfection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Main functions, recent updates, and applications of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Rakitin, Maksim; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Chu, Yong S.; Fluerasu, Andrei; Hidas, Dean; Wiegart, Lutz

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents an overview of the main functions and new application examples of the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) code. SRW supports high-accuracy calculations of different types of synchrotron radiation, and simulations of propagation of fully-coherent radiation wavefronts, partially-coherent radiation from a finite-emittance electron beam of a storage ring source, and time-/frequency-dependent radiation pulses of a free-electron laser, through X-ray optical elements of a beamline. An extended library of physical-optics "propagators" for different types of reflective, refractive and diffractive X-ray optics with its typical imperfections, implemented in SRW, enable simulation of practically any X-ray beamline in a modern light source facility. The high accuracy of calculation methods used in SRW allows for multiple applications of this code, not only in the area of development of instruments and beamlines for new light source facilities, but also in areas such as electron beam diagnostics, commissioning and performance benchmarking of insertion devices and individual X-ray optical elements of beamlines. Applications of SRW in these areas, facilitating development and advanced commissioning of beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), are described.

  2. Radiation-induced functional connectivity alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiongmin; Wu, Donglin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aims to investigate the radiation-induced brain functional alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy (RT) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and statistic scale. The fMRI data of 35 NPC patients with RT and 24 demographically matched untreated NPC patients were acquired. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was also measured to evaluate their global cognition performance. Multivariate pattern analysis was performed to find the significantly altered functional connections between these 2 groups, while the linear correlation level was detected between the altered functional connections and the MoCA scores. Forty-five notably altered functional connections were found, which were mainly located between 3 brain networks, the cerebellum, sensorimotor, and cingulo-opercular. With strictly false discovery rate correction, 5 altered functional connections were shown to have significant linear correlations with the MoCA scores, that is, the connections between the vermis and hippocampus, cerebellum lobule VI and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and dorsal frontal cortex, cuneus and middle occipital lobe, and insula and cuneus. Besides, the connectivity between the vermis and hippocampus was also significantly correlated with the attention score, 1 of the 7 subscores of the MoCA. The present study provides new insights into the radiation-induced functional connectivity impairments in NPC patients. The results showed that the RT may induce the cognitive impairments, especially the attention alterations. The 45 altered functional connections, especially the 5 altered functional connections that were significantly correlated to the MoCA scores, may serve as the potential biomarkers of the RT-induced brain functional impairments and provide valuable targets for further functional recovery treatment. PMID:27442663

  3. Radiation-induced functional connectivity alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiongmin; Wu, Donglin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-07-01

    The study aims to investigate the radiation-induced brain functional alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy (RT) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and statistic scale.The fMRI data of 35 NPC patients with RT and 24 demographically matched untreated NPC patients were acquired. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was also measured to evaluate their global cognition performance. Multivariate pattern analysis was performed to find the significantly altered functional connections between these 2 groups, while the linear correlation level was detected between the altered functional connections and the MoCA scores.Forty-five notably altered functional connections were found, which were mainly located between 3 brain networks, the cerebellum, sensorimotor, and cingulo-opercular. With strictly false discovery rate correction, 5 altered functional connections were shown to have significant linear correlations with the MoCA scores, that is, the connections between the vermis and hippocampus, cerebellum lobule VI and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and dorsal frontal cortex, cuneus and middle occipital lobe, and insula and cuneus. Besides, the connectivity between the vermis and hippocampus was also significantly correlated with the attention score, 1 of the 7 subscores of the MoCA.The present study provides new insights into the radiation-induced functional connectivity impairments in NPC patients. The results showed that the RT may induce the cognitive impairments, especially the attention alterations. The 45 altered functional connections, especially the 5 altered functional connections that were significantly correlated to the MoCA scores, may serve as the potential biomarkers of the RT-induced brain functional impairments and provide valuable targets for further functional recovery treatment.

  4. Mannan oligosaccharide requires functional ETC and TLR for biological radiation protection to normal cells.

    PubMed

    Sanguri, Sweta; Gupta, Damodar

    2018-06-27

    Low LET Ionizing radiation is known to alter intracellular redox balance by inducing free radical generation, which may cause oxidative modification of various cellular biomolecules. The extent of biomolecule-modifications/ damages and changes in vital processes (viz. cellular homeostasis, inter-/intra-cellular signaling, mitochondrial physiology/dynamics antioxidant defence systems) are crucial which in turn determine fate of cells. In the present study, we expended TLR expressing (normal/ transformed) and TLR null cells; and we have shown that mannan pretreatment in TLR expressing normal cells offers survival advantage against lethal doses of ionizing radiation. On the contrary, mannan pretreatment does not offer any protection against radiation to TLR null cells, NKE ρ° cells and transformed cells. In normal cells, abrupt decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and endogenous ROS levels occurs following treatment with mannan. We intend to irradiate mannan-pretreated cells at a specific stage of perturbed mitochondrial functioning and ROS levels to comprehend if mannan pretreatment offers any survival advantage against radiation exposure to cells. Interestingly, pre-irradiation treatment of cells with mannan activates NFκB, p38 and JNK, alters mitochondrial physiology, increases expression of Cu/ZnSOD and MnSOD, minimizes oxidation of mitochondrial phospholipids and offers survival advantage in comparison to irradiated group, in TLR expressing normal cells. The study demonstrates that TLR and mitochondrial ETC functions are inevitable in radio-protective efficacy exhibited by mannan.

  5. Assessment of hepatic function decline after stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Toesca, Diego A S; Osmundson, Evan C; von Eyben, Rie; Shaffer, Jenny L; Koong, Albert C; Chang, Daniel T

    This study aims to determine how the albumin-bilirubin (ALBI) score compares with the Child-Pugh (CP) score for assessing liver function following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In total, 60 patients, 40 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 20 with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), were treated with SBRT. Liver function panels were obtained before and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after SBRT. Laboratory values were censored after locoregional recurrence, further liver-directed therapies, or liver transplant. A significant decline in hepatic function occurred after SBRT for HCC patients only (P = .001 by ALBI score; P < .0001 by CP score). By converting radiation doses to biologically equivalent doses by using a standard linear quadratic model using α/β of 10, the strongest dosimetric predictor of liver function decline for HCC was the volume of normal liver irradiated by a dose of 40 Gy when assessing liver function by the ALBI score (P = .07), and the volume of normal liver irradiated by a dose of 20 Gy by using the CP score (P= .0009). For CCA patients, the volume of normal liver irradiated by a dose of 40 Gy remained the strongest dosimetric predictor when using the ALBI score (P = .002), but no dosimetric predictor was significant using the CP score. Hepatic function decline correlated with worse overall survival for HCC (by ALBI, P = .0005; by CP, P < .0001) and for CCA (by ALBI, P = NS; by CP, P = .008). ALBI score was similarly able to predict hepatic function decline compared with CP score, and both systems correlated with survival. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Benchmark Linelists and Radiative Cooling Functions for LiH Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Leonardo G.; Alijah, Alexander; Mohallem, José R.

    2018-04-01

    Linelists and radiative cooling functions in the local thermodynamic equilibrium limit have been computed for the six most important isotopologues of lithium hydride, 7LiH, 6LiH, 7LiD, 6LiD, 7LiT, and 6LiT. The data are based on the most accurate dipole moment and potential energy curves presently available, the latter including adiabatic and leading relativistic corrections. Distance-dependent reduced vibrational masses are used to account for non-adiabatic corrections of the rovibrational energy levels. Even for 7LiH, for which linelists have been reported previously, the present linelist is more accurate. Among all isotopologues, 7LiH and 6LiH are the best coolants, as shown by the radiative cooling functions.

  7. Variation in the thermionic work function of semiconductor powders exposed to electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourasseau, S.; Martin, J. R.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the variation of thermoelectronic work function potential of TiO2 in the presence of isobutane shows that this gas is not adsorbed on this solid, in either the presence or the absence of ultraviolet radiation. These results, as well as those obtained in a previous work, lead to the mechanism of the photo-oxidation of isobutane at room temperature, in which excited atomic oxygen is the active species.

  8. [Effects of electromagnetic radiation on health and immune function of operators].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-zhong; Chen, Shao-hua; Zhao, Ke-fu; Gui, Yun; Fang, Si-xin; Xu, Ying; Ma, Zi-jian

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the physiological indices and immune function of operators. The general conditions and electromagnetic radiation awareness rate of 205 operators under electromagnetic radiation were evaluated using a self-designed questionnaire. Physical examination, electrocardiography, and routine urine test were performed in these operators. Peripheral blood was collected from the operators under electromagnetic radiation for blood cell counting and biochemical testing, and their peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for determination of chromosomal aberrant frequency and micronucleus frequency. The data from these operators (exposure group) were compared with those of 95 ordinary individuals (control group). The chief complaint of giddiness, tiredness, dizziness, and amnesia showed significant differences between the exposure group and control group (P < 0.01), and the difference in headache became larger with an increase in working years. The awareness rate of electromagnetic radiation damage was significantly higher in the exposure group than in the control group. The difference in bradycardia was significant between the two groups (P <0.01), and the incidence was higher with longer working years. Significant differences between the two groups were also found in the numbers of individuals with elevated alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and direct bilirubin (P < 0.01), populations with increased lymphocyte ratio and decreased neutrophil ratio (P < 0.01), populations with positive occult blood, urobilinogen, and bilirubin tests, and the number of individuals with increased micronucleus frequency of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes (P < 0.01). In addition, the exposure group had significantly increased complement C3 and C4 (P < 0.01), significantly increased IgG (P < 0.05), and significantly decreased IgM (P < 0.01), as compared with the control group. Electromagnetic radiation may lead to the changes

  9. Continental cichlid radiations: functional diversity reveals the role of changing ecological opportunity in the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Jessica Hilary; López-Fernández, Hernán

    2016-08-17

    Adaptive radiations have been hypothesized to contribute broadly to the diversity of organisms. Models of adaptive radiation predict that ecological opportunity and ecological release, the availability of empty ecological niches and the response by adapting lineages to occupy them, respectively, drive patterns of phenotypic and lineage diversification. Adaptive radiations driven by 'ecological opportunity' are well established in island systems; it is less clear if ecological opportunity influences continent-wide diversification. We use Neotropical cichlid fishes to test if variation in rates of functional evolution is consistent with changing ecological opportunity. Across a functional morphological axis associated with ram-suction feeding traits, evolutionary rates declined through time as lineages diversified in South America. Evolutionary rates of ram-suction functional morphology also appear to have accelerated as cichlids colonized Central America and encountered renewed opportunity. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity may play an important role in shaping patterns of morphological diversity of even broadly distributed lineages like Neotropical cichlids. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Continental cichlid radiations: functional diversity reveals the role of changing ecological opportunity in the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    López-Fernández, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive radiations have been hypothesized to contribute broadly to the diversity of organisms. Models of adaptive radiation predict that ecological opportunity and ecological release, the availability of empty ecological niches and the response by adapting lineages to occupy them, respectively, drive patterns of phenotypic and lineage diversification. Adaptive radiations driven by ‘ecological opportunity’ are well established in island systems; it is less clear if ecological opportunity influences continent-wide diversification. We use Neotropical cichlid fishes to test if variation in rates of functional evolution is consistent with changing ecological opportunity. Across a functional morphological axis associated with ram–suction feeding traits, evolutionary rates declined through time as lineages diversified in South America. Evolutionary rates of ram–suction functional morphology also appear to have accelerated as cichlids colonized Central America and encountered renewed opportunity. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity may play an important role in shaping patterns of morphological diversity of even broadly distributed lineages like Neotropical cichlids. PMID:27512144

  11. Influence of gamma-radiation on the nutritional and functional qualities of lotus seed flour.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajeev; Sridhar, Kandikere Ramaiah; Karim, Alias A; Young, Chiu C; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha B

    2009-10-28

    In the present study, we investigated the physicochemical and functional properties of lotus seed flour exposed to low and high doses of gamma-radiation (0-30 kGy; the dose recommended for quarantine and hygienic purposes). The results indicated raw seed flour to be rich in nutrients with minimal quantities of antinutritional factors. Irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent increase in some of the proximal constituents. The raw and gamma-irradiated seeds meet the Food and Agricultural Organization-World Health Organization recommended pattern of essential amino acids. Some of the antinutritional factors (phytic acid, total phenolics, and tannins) were lowered with gamma-irradiation, while the seed flours were devoid of lectins, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and polonium-210. The functional properties of the seed flour were significantly improved with gamma-radiation. gamma-radiation selectively preserved or improved the desired nutritional and functional traits of lotus seeds, thus ensuring a safe production of appropriate nutraceutically valued products.

  12. High LET radiation shows no major cellular and functional effects on primary cardiomyocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heselich, Anja; Frieß, Johannes L.; Ritter, Sylvia; Benz, Naja P.; Layer, Paul G.; Thielemann, Christiane

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation causes adverse effects on various mammalian tissues. However, there is little information on the biological effects of heavy ion radiation on the heart. In order to fill this gap, we systematically examined DNA-damage induction and repair, as well as proliferation and apoptosis in avian cardiomyocyte cultures irradiated with heavy ions such as titanium and iron, relevant for manned space-flight, and carbon ions, as used for radiotherapy. Further, and to our knowledge for the first time, we analyzed the effect of heavy ion radiation on the electrophysiology of primary cardiomyocytes derived from chicken embryos using the non-invasive microelectrode array (MEA) technology. As electrophysiological endpoints beat rate and field action potential duration were analyzed. The cultures clearly exhibited the capacity to repair induced DNA damage almost completely within 24 h, even at doses of 7 Gy, and almost completely recovered from radiation-induced changes in proliferative behavior. Interestingly, no significant effects on apoptosis could be detected. Especially the functionality of primary cardiac cells exhibited a surprisingly high robustness against heavy ion radiation, even at doses of up to 7 Gy. In contrast to our previous study with X-rays the beat rate remained more or less unaffected after heavy ion radiation, independently of beam quality. The only change we could observe was an increase of the field action potential duration of up to 30% after titanium irradiation, diminishing within the following three days. This potentially pathological observation may be an indication that heavy ion irradiation at high doses could bear a long-term risk for cardiovascular disease induction.

  13. Radiation-induced brain structural and functional abnormalities in presymptomatic phase and outcome prediction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Han; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Xie, Fei; Liu, Lizhi; Qiu, Shijun; Li, Li; Shen, Dinggang

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy, a major method of treatment for brain cancer, may cause severe brain injuries after many years. We used a rare and unique cohort of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with normal-appearing brains to study possible early irradiation injury in its presymptomatic phase before severe, irreversible necrosis happens. The aim is to detect any structural or functional imaging biomarker that is sensitive to early irradiation injury, and to understand the recovery and progression of irradiation injury that can shed light on outcome prediction for early clinical intervention. We found an acute increase in local brain activity that is followed by extensive reductions in such activity in the temporal lobe and significant loss of functional connectivity in a distributed, large-scale, high-level cognitive function-related brain network. Intriguingly, these radiosensitive functional alterations were found to be fully or partially recoverable. In contrast, progressive late disruptions to the integrity of the related far-end white matter structure began to be significant after one year. Importantly, early increased local brain functional activity was predictive of severe later temporal lobe necrosis. Based on these findings, we proposed a dynamic, multifactorial model for radiation injury and another preventive model for timely clinical intervention. Hum Brain Mapp 39:407-427, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Performance of the dot product function in radiative transfer code SORD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-10-01

    The successive orders of scattering radiative transfer (RT) codes frequently call the scalar (dot) product function. In this paper, we study performance of some implementations of the dot product in the RT code SORD using 50 scenarios for light scattering in the atmosphere-surface system. In the dot product function, we use the unrolled loops technique with different unrolling factor. We also considered the intrinsic Fortran functions. We show results for two machines: ifort compiler under Windows, and pgf90 under Linux. Intrinsic DOT_PRODUCT function showed best performance for the ifort. For the pgf90, the dot product implemented with unrolling factor 4 was the fastest. The RT code SORD together with the interface that runs all the mentioned tests are publicly available from ftp://maiac.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/skorkin/SORD_IP_16B (current release) or by email request from the corresponding (first) author.

  15. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  16. Geodesic synchrotron radiation in the Kerr geometry by the method of asymptotically factorized Green's functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrzanowski, P. L.; Misner, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    The scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational geodesic-synchrotron-radiation (GSR) spectra are determined for the case of a test particle moving on a highly relativistic circular orbit about a rotating (Kerr) black hole. It is found that the spectral shape depends only weakly on the value of the angular-momentum parameter (a/M) of the black hole, but the total radiated power drops unexpectedly for a value of at least 0.95 and vanishes as the value approaches unity. A spin-dependent factor (involving the inner product of the polarization of a radiated quantum with the source) is isolated to explain the dependence of the spectral shape on the spin of the radiated field. Although the scalar wave equation is solved by separation of variables, this procedure is avoided for the vector and tensor cases by postulating a sum-over-states expansion for the Green's function similar to that found to hold in the scalar case. The terms in this sum, significant for GSR, can then be evaluated in the geometric-optics approximation without requiring the use of vector or tensor spherical harmonics.

  17. A Discrete Probability Function Method for the Equation of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Y. R.; Gore, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    A discrete probability function (DPF) method for the equation of radiative transfer is derived. The DPF is defined as the integral of the probability density function (PDF) over a discrete interval. The derivation allows the evaluation of the PDF of intensities leaving desired radiation paths including turbulence-radiation interactions without the use of computer intensive stochastic methods. The DPF method has a distinct advantage over conventional PDF methods since the creation of a partial differential equation from the equation of transfer is avoided. Further, convergence of all moments of intensity is guaranteed at the basic level of simulation unlike the stochastic method where the number of realizations for convergence of higher order moments increases rapidly. The DPF method is described for a representative path with approximately integral-length scale-sized spatial discretization. The results show good agreement with measurements in a propylene/air flame except for the effects of intermittency resulting from highly correlated realizations. The method can be extended to the treatment of spatial correlations as described in the Appendix. However, information regarding spatial correlations in turbulent flames is needed prior to the execution of this extension.

  18. Fractionated radiation facilitates repair and functional motor recovery after spinal cord transection in rat.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, N; Xu, S; Koutcher, J A; Fuks, Z

    2001-06-22

    Previous studies suggest that motor recovery does not occur after spinal cord injury because reactive glia abort the natural repair processes. A permanent wound gap is left in the cord and the brain-cord circuitry consequently remains broken. Single-dose x-irradiation destroys reactive glia at the damage site in transected adult rat spinal cord. The wound then heals naturally, and a partially functional brain-cord circuitry is reconstructed. Timing is crucial; cell ablation is beneficial only within the third week after injury. Data presented here point to the possibility of translating these observations into a clinical therapy for preventing the paralysis following spinal cord injury in the human. The lesion site (at low thoracic level) in severed adult rat spinal cord was treated daily, over the third week postinjury, with protocols of fractionated radiation similar to those for treating human spinal cord tumors. This resulted, as with the single-dose protocol, in wound healing and restoration of some hindquarter motor function; in addition, the beneficial outcome was augmented. Of the restored hindlimb motor functions, weight-support and posture in stance was the only obvious one. Recovery of this motor function was partial to substantial and its incidence was 100% instead of about 50% obtained with the single-dose treatment. None of the hindlimbs, however, regained frequent stepping or any weight-bearing locomotion. These data indicate that the therapeutic outcome may be further augmented by tuning the radiation parameters within the critical time-window after injury. These data also indicate that dose-fractionation is an effective strategy and better than the single-dose treatment for targeting of reactive cells that abort the natural repair, suggesting that radiation therapy could be developed into a therapeutic procedure for repairing injured spinal cord.

  19. Radiative Forcing of the Pinatubo Aerosol as a Function of Latitude and Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Russell, P. B.; Bauman, J. J.; Minnis, P.

    1996-01-01

    We present calculations of the radiative forcing of the Mt. Pinatubo aerosols as a function of latitude and time after the eruption and compare the results with GOES satellite data. The results from the model indicate that the net effect of the aerosol was to cool the earth-atmosphere system with the most significant radiative effect in the tropics (corresponding to the location of the tropical stratospheric reservoir) and at latitudes greater than 60 deg. The high-latitude maximum is a combined effect of the high-latitude peak in optical depth (Trepte et al 1994) and the large solar zenith angles. The comparison of the predicted and measured net flux shows relatively good agreement, with the model consistently under predicting the cooling effect of the aerosol.

  20. Radiative Forcing of the Pinatubo Aerosol as a Function of Latitude and Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Kinne, S.; Russell, P. B.; Bauman, J. J.; Minnis, P.

    2000-01-01

    We present calculations of the radiative forcing of the Mt. Pinatubo aerosols as a function of latitude and time after the eruption and compare the results with GOES satellite data. The results from the model indicate that the net effect of the aerosol was to cool the earth-atmosphere system with the most significant radiative effect in the tropics (corresponding to the location of the tropical stratospheric reservoir) and at latitudes greater than 60 degrees. The high-latitude maximum is a combined effect of the high-latitude peak in optical depth (Trepte et al 1994) and the large solar zenith angles. The comparison of the predicted and measured net flux shows relatively good agreement, with the model consistently under predicting the cooling effect of the aerosol.

  1. [Use of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies for the correction of thyroid functional state during stress].

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Tsymbal, A A

    2010-01-01

    The influence of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies (150.176-150.664 Ghz) on the functional activity of rat thyroid gland subjected to acute immobilization stress has been studied. It is shown that terahertz radiation totally normalizes thyroid activity in stressed animals within 30 min after application.

  2. EFFECT OF A RADIATION COOLING AND HEATING FUNCTION ON STANDING LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS IN CORONAL LOOPS

    SciT

    Kumar, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Moon, Y.-J., E-mail: sanjaykumar@khu.ac.kr

    2016-06-10

    Standing long-period (with periods longer than several minutes) oscillations in large, hot (with a temperature higher than 3 MK) coronal loops have been observed as the quasi-periodic modulation of the EUV and microwave intensity emission and the Doppler shift of coronal emission lines, and they have been interpreted as standing slow magnetoacoustic (longitudinal) oscillations. Quasi-periodic pulsations of shorter periods, detected in thermal and non-thermal emissions in solar flares could be produced by a similar mechanism. We present theoretical modeling of the standing slow magnetoacoustic mode, showing that this mode of oscillation is highly sensitive to peculiarities of the radiative coolingmore » and heating function. We generalized the theoretical model of standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in a hot plasma, including the effects of the radiative losses and accounting for plasma heating. The heating mechanism is not specified and taken empirically to compensate the cooling by radiation and thermal conduction. It is shown that the evolution of the oscillations is described by a generalized Burgers equation. The numerical solution of an initial value problem for the evolutionary equation demonstrates that different dependences of the radiative cooling and plasma heating on the temperature lead to different regimes of the oscillations, including growing, quasi-stationary, and rapidly decaying. Our findings provide a theoretical foundation for probing the coronal heating function and may explain the observations of decayless long-period, quasi-periodic pulsations in flares. The hydrodynamic approach employed in this study should be considered with caution in the modeling of non-thermal emission associated with flares, because it misses potentially important non-hydrodynamic effects.« less

  3. Algorithm applying a modified BRDF function in Λ-ridge concentrator of solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, Kamil

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that uses the modified BRDF function. It allows the calculation of the parameters of Λ-ridge concentrator system. The concentrator directs reflected solar radiation on photovoltaic surface, increasing its efficiency. The efficiency of the concentrator depends on the surface characteristics of the material which it is made of, the angle of the photovoltaic panel and the resolution of the tracking system. It shows a method of modeling the surface by using the BRDF function and describes its basic parameters, e.g. roughness and the components of the reflected stream. A cost calculation of chosen models with presented in this article BRDF function modification has been made. The author's own simulation program allows to choose the appropriate material for construction of a Λ-ridge concentrator, generate micro surface of the material, and simulate the shape and components of the reflected stream.

  4. Members of the Candidate Phyla Radiation are functionally differentiated by carbon and nitrogen cycling capabilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danczak, R.; Johnston, M.; Kenah, C.; Slattery, M.; Wrighton, K. C.; Wilkins, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Candidate Phyla Radiation (CPR) is a recently described expansion of the tree of life that represents more than 15% of all bacterial diversity and putatively contains over 70 different phyla. Despite this broad phylogenetic variation, these microorganisms often feature limited functional diversity, with members generally characterized as obligate fermenters. Additionally, much of the data describing CPR phyla has been generated from a limited number of environments, constraining our knowledge of their functional roles and biogeographical distribution. To better understand subsurface CPR microorganisms, we sampled four groundwater wells over two years across three Ohio counties. Samples were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene amplicon and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Amplicon results indicated that CPR members comprised 2-20% of the microbial communities, with relative abundances stable through time in Athens and Greene county samples but dynamic in Licking county groundwater. Shotgun metagenomic analyses generated 71 putative CPR genomes, representing roughly 32 known phyla and potentially two new phyla, Candidatus Brownbacteria and Candidatus Hugbacteria. While these genomes largely mirrored typical CPR metabolism, some features were previously uncharacterized. For instance, a nirK-encoded nitrite reductase was found in four of our Parcubacteria genomes and multiple CPR genomes from other studies, indicating a possibly undescribed role for these microorganisms in denitrification. Additionally, glycoside hydrolase (GH) family profiles for our genomes and over 2000 other CPR genomes were analyzed to characterize their carbon processing potential. Although common trends were present throughout the radiation, differences highlighted mechanisms that may allow microorganisms across the CPR to occupy various subsurface niches. For example, members of the Microgenomates superphylum appear to potentially degrade a wider range of carbon substrates than other CPR phyla. The

  5. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciT

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUDmore » (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same

  6. Radiation-induced changes in gustatory function comparison of effects of neutron and photon irradiation

    SciT

    Mossman, K.L.; Chencharick, J.D.; Scheer, A.C.

    1979-04-01

    Changes in gustatory function were measured in 51 patients with various forms of cancer who received radiation to the head and neck region. Forty patients (group I) were treated with conventional photon radiation (e.g. 66 Gy/7 weeks), and 11 patients (group II) were treated with cyclotron produced fast neutrons (e.g. 22 Gy/7 weeks). Taste acuity was measured for four taste qualities (salt, sweet, sour, and bitter) by a forced choice-three stimulus drop technique which measured detection and recognition thresholds and by a forced scaling technique which measured taste intensity responsiveness. Subjective complaints of anorexia, dysgeusia, taste loss, and xerostomia weremore » also recorded. Patients were studied before, during and up to two months after therapy. Prior to therapy, detection and recognition thresholds, intensity responsiveness, and the frequency of subjective complaints in patients from groups I and II were statistically equivalent. During and up to 2 months after therapy, taste impairment and frequency of subjective complaints increased significantly in neutron and photon treated patients, but were statistically equivalent. Results of this study indicate that gustatory tissue response as measured by taste detection and recognition and intensity responsiveness, and the frequency of subjective complaints related to taste are statistically equivalent in patients before, during, or up 2 months after they were given either neutron or photon radiation for tumors of the head and neck.« less

  7. Design of Organic Solar Cells as a Function of Radiative Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroid, Blaise; Kozyreff, Gregory

    2017-09-01

    We study the radiative decay, or fluorescence, of excitons in organic solar cells as a function of its geometrical parameters. Contrary to their nonradiative counterpart, fluorescence losses strongly depend on the environment. By properly tuning the thicknesses of the buffer layers between the active regions of the cell and the electrodes, the exciton lifetime and, hence, the exciton diffusion length can be increased. The importance of this phenomenon depends on the radiative quantum efficiency, which is the fraction of the exciton decay that is intrinsically due to fluorescence. Besides this effect, interferences within the cell control the efficiency of sunlight injection into the active layers. The optimal cell design must rely on a consideration of these two aspects. By properly managing fluorescence losses, one can significantly improve the cell performance. To demonstrate this fact, we use realistic material parameters inspired from literature data and obtain an increase of power-conversion efficiency from 11.3% to 12.7%. Conversely, not to take into account the strong dependence of fluorescence on the environment may lead to a suboptimal cell design and a degradation of cell performance. The presence of radiative losses, however small, significantly changes the optimal set of thicknesses. We illustrate the latter situation with experimental material data.

  8. Large Diameter, Radiative Extinction Experiments with Decane Droplets in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John; Tien, James; Dietrich, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The extinction of a diffusion flame is of fundamental interest in combustion science. Linan, Law, and Chung and Law analytically and experimentally determined an extinction boundary in terms of droplet diameter and pressure for a single droplet due to Damkohler, or blowoff, extinction. More recently, other researchers demonstrated extinction due to finite rate kinetics in reduced gravity for free droplets of heptane. Chao modeled the effect of radiative heat loss on a quasi-steady spherically symmetric single droplet burning in the absence of buoyancy. They determined that for increasing droplet diameter, a second limit can be reached such that combustion is no longer possible. This second, larger droplet diameter limit arises due to radiative heat loss, which increases with increasing droplet and flame diameter. This increase in radiative heat loss arises due to an increase in the surface area of the flame. Recently, Marchese modeled fuel droplets with detailed chemistry and radiative effects, and compared the results to other work. The modeling also showed the importance of radiative loss and radiative extinction Experiments examined the behavior of a large droplet of decane burning in reduced gravity onboard the NASA Lewis DC-9 aircraft, but did not show a radiative extinction boundary due to g-jitter (Variations in gravitational level and direction) effects. Dietrich conducted experiments in the reduced gravity environment of the Space Shuttle. This work showed that the extinction diameter of methanol droplets increased when the initial diameter of the droplets was large (in this case, approximately 5 mm). Theoretical results agreed with these experimental results only when the theory included radiative effects . Radiative extinction was experimentally verified by Nayagam in a later Shuttle mission. The following work focuses on the combustion and extinction of a single fuel droplet. The goal is to experimentally determine a large droplet diameter limit that

  9. Functional image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciT

    Tsegmed, Uranchimeg; Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Nakashima, Takeo

    The aim of the current planning study is to evaluate the ability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI)–guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in sparing the functional liver tissues during SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. Functional liver tissues were defined according to quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratios ≥ 1.5 on a hepatobiliary phase scan. Functional images were fused with the planning computed tomography (CT) images; the following 2 SBRT plans were designed using a “step-and-shoot” static IMRT technique for each patient: (1) an anatomicalmore » SBRT plan optimization based on the total liver; and (2) a functional SBRT plan based on the functional liver. The total prescribed dose was 48 gray (Gy) in 4 fractions. Dosimetric parameters, including dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D{sub 95%}), percentages of total and functional liver volumes, which received doses from 5 to 30 Gy (V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30), and mean doses to total and functional liver (MLD and fMLD, respectively) of the 2 plans were compared. Compared with anatomical plans, functional image-guided SBRT plans reduced MLD (mean: plan A, 5.5 Gy; and plan F, 5.1 Gy; p < 0.0001) and fMLD (mean: plan A, 5.4 Gy; and plan F, 4.9 Gy; p < 0.0001), as well as V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30. No differences were noted in PTV coverage and nonhepatic organs at risk (OARs) doses. In conclusion, EOB-MRI–guided SBRT planning using the IMRT technique may preserve functional liver tissues in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).« less

  10. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciT

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findingsmore » remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide

  11. Radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from cell phone causes defective testicular function in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Oyewopo, A O; Olaniyi, S K; Oyewopo, C I; Jimoh, A T

    2017-12-01

    Cell phones have become an integral part of everyday life. As cell phone usage has become more widespread, concerns have increased regarding the harmful effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from these devices. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the emitted radiation by cell phones on testicular histomorphometry and biochemical analyses. Adult male Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g were randomly allotted to control, group A (switched off mode exposure), group B (1-hr exposure), group C (2-hr exposure) and group D (3-hr exposure). The animals were exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation of cell phone for a period of 28 days. Histomorphometry, biochemical and histological investigations were carried out. The histomorphometric parameters showed no significant change (p < .05) in the levels of germinal epithelial diameter in all the experimental groups compared with the control group. There was no significant change (p < .05) in cross-sectional diameter of all the experimental groups compared with the control group. Group D rats showed a significant decrease (p ˂ .05) in lumen diameter compared with group B rats. There was an uneven distribution of germinal epithelial cells in groups B, C and D. However, there was degeneration of the epithelia cells in group D when compared to the control and group B rats. Sera levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), which are markers of reactive oxygen species, significantly increased (MDA) and decreased (SOD), respectively, in all the experimental groups compared with the control group. Also sera levels of gonadotropic hormones (FSH, LH and testosterone) significantly decreased (p < .05) in groups C and D compared with the control group. The study demonstrates that chronic exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation of cell phone leads to defective testicular function that is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased

  12. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    The NSCOR program project is transitioning from establishing the existence of CNS responses to low doses of charged particles, to an investigation of mechanisms underlying these changes and extending the irradiation paradigm to more space-like exposures. In earlier experiments we examined radiation responses of the mouse brain (hippocampus) following exposure to 250 MeV protons and 600 MeV/n iron ions. Our key findings on structural changes were: 1) Significant dose and time dependent loss of en-dothelial cells and microvessel network remodeling occurs suggesting that vascular insufficiency is produced. 2) Significant dose dependent losses of neural precursor cells were observed in a lineage specific pattern which may be associated with cognitive impairment. 3) Evaluation of DNA damage showed dose and time dependent accumulation of mutations with region-specific mutation structures and gene expression profiling demonstrated activation of neurotrophic and adhesion factors as well as chemokine receptors associated with inflammation. Our key find-ings on functional changes were: 1) Time and dose dependent modifications to neural output expressed as enhanced excitability but reduced synaptic efficacy and plasticity (including long term potentiation). 2) Intrinsic membrane properties of neurons were not significantly modi-fied by radiation exposure but pharmacological treatments demonstrated changes in inhibitory synapses. 3) MRI imaging visualized brain structural changes based on altered water diffu-sion properties and patterns were consistent with demyelination or gliosis. Our key findings on neurodegeneration and fidelity of homeostasis were: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibited accelerated APP-type electrophysiological pathology over several months. 2) Microvessel net-work changes following irradiation were suggestive of poor tissue oxygenation. 3) The ability of the brain to respond a controlled septic shock was altered by irradiation; the septic shock reactions

  13. Early exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation decreases immune function later in life

    PubMed Central

    Ceccato, Emma; Cramp, Rebecca L.; Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have declined dramatically worldwide. Many of these declines are occurring in areas where no obvious anthropogenic stressors are present. It is proposed that in these areas, environmental factors such as elevated solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation could be responsible. Ultraviolet-B levels have increased in many parts of the world as a consequence of the anthropogenic destruction of the ozone layer. Amphibian tadpoles are particularly sensitive to the damaging effects of UV-B radiation, with exposure disrupting growth and fitness in many species. Given that UV-B can disrupt immune function in other animals, we tested the hypothesis that early UV-B exposure suppresses the immune responses of amphibian tadpoles and subsequent juvenile frogs. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to sublethal levels of UV-B radiation for 6 weeks after hatching, then examined indices of immune function in both the tadpoles and the subsequent metamorphs. There was no significant effect of UV-B on tadpole leucocyte counts or on their response to an acute antigen (phytohaemagglutinin) challenge. However, early UV-B exposure resulted in a significant reduction in both metamorph leucocyte abundance and their response to an acute phytohaemagglutinin challenge. These data demonstrate that early UV-B exposure can have carry-over effects on later life-history traits even if the applied stressor has no immediately discernible effect. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the effects of UV-B exposure on amphibian health and susceptibility to diseases such as chytridiomycosis. PMID:27668081

  14. The ALTEA/ALTEINO projects: studying functional effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narici, L.; Belli, F.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P.; Di Fino, L.; Furano, G.; Modena, I.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; hide

    2004-01-01

    The ALTEA project investigates the risks of functional brain damage induced by particle radiation in space. A modular facility (the ALTEA facility) is being implemented and will be operated in the International Space Station (ISS) to record electrophysiological and behavioral descriptors of brain function and to monitor their time dynamics and correlation with particles and space environment. The focus of the program will be on abnormal visual perceptions (often reported as "light flashes" by astronauts) and the impact on retinal and brain visual structures of particle in microgravity conditions. The facility will be made available to the international scientific community for human neurophysiological, electrophysiological and psychophysics experiments, studies on particle fluxes, and dosimetry. A precursor of ALTEA (the 'Alteino' project) helps set the experimental baseline for the ALTEA experiments, while providing novel information on the radiation environment onboard the ISS and on the brain electrophysiology of the astronauts during orbital flights. Alteino was flown to the ISS on the Soyuz TM34 as part of mission Marco Polo. Controlled ground experiments using mice and accelerator beams complete the experimental strategy of ALTEA. We present here the status of progress of the ALTEA project and preliminary results of the Alteino study on brain dynamics, particle fluxes and abnormal visual perceptions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The ALTEA/ALTEINO projects: studying functional effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Narici, L; Belli, F; Bidoli, V; Casolino, M; De Pascale, M P; Di Fino, L; Furano, G; Modena, I; Morselli, A; Picozza, P; Reali, E; Rinaldi, A; Ruggieri, D; Sparvoli, R; Zaconte, V; Sannita, W G; Carozzo, S; Licoccia, S; Romagnoli, P; Traversa, E; Cotronei, V; Vazquez, M; Miller, J; Salnitskii, V P; Shevchenko, O I; Petrov, V P; Trukhanov, K A; Galper, A; Khodarovich, A; Korotkov, M G; Popov, A; Vavilov, N; Avdeev, S; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, W; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Mazzenga, G; Ricci, M; Spillantini, P; Castellini, G; Vittori, R; Carlson, P; Fuglesang, C; Schardt, D

    2004-01-01

    The ALTEA project investigates the risks of functional brain damage induced by particle radiation in space. A modular facility (the ALTEA facility) is being implemented and will be operated in the International Space Station (ISS) to record electrophysiological and behavioral descriptors of brain function and to monitor their time dynamics and correlation with particles and space environment. The focus of the program will be on abnormal visual perceptions (often reported as "light flashes" by astronauts) and the impact on retinal and brain visual structures of particle in microgravity conditions. The facility will be made available to the international scientific community for human neurophysiological, electrophysiological and psychophysics experiments, studies on particle fluxes, and dosimetry. A precursor of ALTEA (the 'Alteino' project) helps set the experimental baseline for the ALTEA experiments, while providing novel information on the radiation environment onboard the ISS and on the brain electrophysiology of the astronauts during orbital flights. Alteino was flown to the ISS on the Soyuz TM34 as part of mission Marco Polo. Controlled ground experiments using mice and accelerator beams complete the experimental strategy of ALTEA. We present here the status of progress of the ALTEA project and preliminary results of the Alteino study on brain dynamics, particle fluxes and abnormal visual perceptions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel radiation protection device based on tungsten functional paper for application in interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Monzen, Hajime; Tamura, Mikoto; Shimomura, Kohei; Onishi, Yuichi; Nakayama, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kenji; Hanaoka, Kohei; Kamomae, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    Tungsten functional paper (TFP), which contains 80% tungsten by weight, has radiation-shielding properties. We investigated the use of TFP for the protection of operators during interventional or therapeutic angiography. The air kerma rate of scattered radiation from a simulated patient was measured, with and without TFP, using a water-equivalent phantom and fixed C-arm fluoroscopy. Measurements were taken at the level of the operator's eye, chest, waist, and knee, with a variable number of TFP sheets used for shielding. A Monte Carlo simulation was also utilized to analyze the dose rate delivered with and without the TFP shielding. In cine mode, when the number of TFP sheets was varied through 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10, the respective reduction in the air kerma rate relative to no TFP shielding was as follows: at eye level, 24.9%, 29.9%, 41.6%, 50.4%, and 56.2%; at chest level, 25.3%, 33.1%, 34.9%, 46.1%, and 44.3%; at waist level, 45.1%, 57.0%, 64.4%, 70.7%, and 75.2%; and at knee level, 2.1%, 2.2%, 2.1%, 2.1%, and 2.1%. In fluoroscopy mode, the respective reduction in the air kerma rate relative to no TFP shielding was as follows: at eye level, 24.8%, 30.3%, 34.8%, 51.1%, and 58.5%; at chest level, 25.8%, 33.4%, 35.5%, 45.2%, and 44.4%; at waist level, 44.6%, 56.8%, 64.7%, 71.7%, and 77.2%; and at knee level, 2.2%, 0.0%, 2.2%, 2.8%, and 2.5%. The TFP paper exhibited good radiation-shielding properties against the scattered radiation encountered in clinical settings, and was shown to have potential application in decreasing the radiation exposure to the operator during interventional radiology. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma

    SciT

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu Shengjie

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. Amore » total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (-.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (-.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.« less

  18. Tumor suppressor function of Betaig-H3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we showed previously that expression of a list of genes including Betaig-h3 (induced by transforming growth factor-β) DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), p21 cip1, c-fos , Heat shock protein (HSP27) and cytokeratin 14 were differentially expressed in several independently generated, radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Our previous data further demonstrated that loss of tumor suppressor gene(s) as a likely mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. In the present study, we chose Betaig-h3 and DCC that were downregulated in tumorigenic cells for further study. Restored expression of Betaig-h3 gene, not DCC gene, by transfecting cDNA into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth. While integrin receptor α5β1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level found in control BEP2D cells after Betaig-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Betaig-h3 gene is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin α5β1 receptor. Furthermore, exogenous TGF-β1 induced expression of Betaig-h3 gene and inhibited the growth of both control and tumorigenic BEP2D cells. Therefore, downregulation of Betaig-h3 gene may results from the decreased expression of upstream mediators such as TGF-β. The findings provide strong evidence that the Betaig-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation-induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  19. Effects of 12C6+ Heavy Ion Radiation on Dendritic Cells Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Hu, Xuguang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Zhe; Liu, Cong; Cai, Jianming; Gao, Fu; Li, Bailong

    2018-01-01

    Background Carbon ion radiotherapy has been shown to be more effective in cancer radiotherapy than photon irradiation. Influence of carbon ion radiation on cancer microenvironment is very important for the outcomes of radiotherapy. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) play critical roles in cancer antigen processing and antitumor immunity. However, there is scant literature covering the effects of carbon ion radiation on DCs. In this study, we aimed to uncover the impact of carbon ion irradiation on bone marrow derived DCs. Material/Methods Bone marrow cells were co-cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4 for seven days, and the population of DCs was confirmed with flow cytometry. We used an Annexin V and PI staining method to detect cell apoptosis. Endocytosis assay of DCs was determined by using a flow cytometry method. DCs migration capacity was tested by a Transwell method. We also used ELISA assay and western blotting assay to examine the cytokines and protein expression, respectively. Results Our data showed that carbon ion radiation induced apoptosis in both immature and mature DCs. After irradiation, the endocytosis and migration capacity of DCs was also impaired. Interestingly, carbon irradiation triggered a burst of IFN-γ and IL-12 in LPS or CpG treated DCs, which provide novel insights into the combination of immunotherapy and carbon ion radiotherapy. Finally, we found that carbon ion irradiation induced apoptosis and migration suppression was p38 dependent. Conclusions Our present study demonstrated that carbon ion irradiation induced apoptosis in DCs, and impaired DCs function mainly through the p38 signaling pathway. Carbon ion irradiation also triggered anti-tumor cytokines secretion. This work provides novel information of carbon ion radiotherapy in DCs, and also provides new insights on the combination of immune adjuvant and carbon ion radiotherapy. PMID:29525808

  20. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function

    SciT

    Gridley, Daila S.

    Exposure to radiation above levels normally encountered on Earth can occur during wartime, accidents such as those at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and detonation of “dirty bombs” by terrorists. Relatively high levels of radiation exposure can also occur in certain occupations (low-level waste sites, nuclear power plants, nuclear medicine facilities, airline industry, and space agencies). Depression or dysfunction of the highly radiosensitive cells of the immune system can lead to serious consequences, including increased risk for infections, cancer, hypersensitivity reactions, poor wound healing, and other pathologies. The focus of this research was on the T helper (Th) subset ofmore » lymphocytes that secrete cytokines (proteins), and thus control many actions and interactions of other cell types that make up what is collectively known as the immune system. The Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Program is concerned with mechanisms altered by exposure to high energy photons (x- and gamma-rays), protons and electrons. This study compared, for the first time, the low-dose effects of two of these radiation forms, photons and protons, on the response of Th cells, as well as other cell types with which they communicate. The research provided insights regarding gene expression patterns and capacity to secrete potent immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, some of which are implicated in pathophysiological processes. Furthermore, the photon versus proton comparison was important not only to healthy individuals who may be exposed, but also to patients undergoing radiotherapy, since many medical centers in the United States, as well as worldwide, are now building proton accelerators. The overall hypothesis of this study was that whole-body exposure to low-dose photons (gamma-rays) will alter CD4+ Th cell function. We further proposed that exposure to low-dose proton radiation will induce a different pattern of gene and functional changes

  1. UVA radiation impairs phenotypic and functional maturation of human dermal dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; Berthier-Vergnes, Odile; Ducarre, Blandine; Schmitt, Daniel; Peguet-Navarro, Josette

    2005-11-01

    There is now strong evidence that the ultraviolet A (UVA) part of the solar spectrum contributes to the development of skin cancers. Its effect on the skin immune system, however, has not been fully investigated. Here, we analyzed the effects of UVA radiation on dermal dendritic cells (DDC), which, in addition, provided further characterization of these cells. Dermal sheets were obtained from normal human skin and irradiated, or not, with UVA at 2 or 12 J per cm2. After a 2 d incubation, the phenotype of emigrant cells was analyzed by double immunostaining and flow cytometry. Results showed that migratory DDC were best characterized by CD1c expression and that only few cells co-expressed the Langerhans cell marker Langerin. Whereas the DC extracted from the dermis displayed an immature phenotype, emigrant DDC showed increased expression of HLA-DR and acquired co-stimulation and maturation markers. We showed here that UVA significantly decreased the number of viable emigrant DDC, a process related to increased apoptosis. Furthermore, UVA irradiation impaired the phenotypic and functional maturation of migrating DDC into potent antigen-presenting cells, in a concentration-dependent manner. The results provide further evidence that UVA are immunosuppressive and suggest an additional mechanism by which solar radiation impairs immune response.

  2. Tumor suppression function of the Big-h3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we show here that expression of Big-h3 gene, a secreted adhesion molecule induced by transforming growth factor- beta (TGF-beta ), is markedly decreased in independently generated, high LET radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Expression of this gene was restored to control level in fusion cell lines between the tumorigenic and parental BEP2D cells that were no longer tumorigenic in nude mice. Transfection of Big-h3 gene into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth. While integrin receptor alpha 5/beta 1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level of control BEP2D cells after Big-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Big-h3 is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin receptor alpha 5/beta 1. . WWee We further show that down regulation of Big-h3 results from loss of expression of TGFbeta1 in tumor cells. The findings provide strong evidence that the Big-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  3. Technical report. The application of probability-generating functions to linear-quadratic radiation survival curves.

    PubMed

    Kendal, W S

    2000-04-01

    To illustrate how probability-generating functions (PGFs) can be employed to derive a simple probabilistic model for clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing irradiation. Both repairable and irreparable radiation damage to DNA were assumed to occur by independent (Poisson) processes, at intensities proportional to the irradiation dose. Also, repairable damage was assumed to be either repaired or further (lethally) injured according to a third (Bernoulli) process, with the probability of lethal conversion being directly proportional to dose. Using the algebra of PGFs, these three processes were combined to yield a composite PGF that described the distribution of lethal DNA lesions in irradiated cells. The composite PGF characterized a Poisson distribution with mean, chiD+betaD2, where D was dose and alpha and beta were radiobiological constants. This distribution yielded the conventional linear-quadratic survival equation. To test the composite model, the derived distribution was used to predict the frequencies of multiple chromosomal aberrations in irradiated human lymphocytes. The predictions agreed well with observation. This probabilistic model was consistent with single-hit mechanisms, but it was not consistent with binary misrepair mechanisms. A stochastic model for radiation survival has been constructed from elementary PGFs that exactly yields the linear-quadratic relationship. This approach can be used to investigate other simple probabilistic survival models.

  4. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Green's Function of the Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic radiation track structure codes are of great interest for space radiation studies and hadron therapy in medicine. These codes are used for a many purposes, notably for microdosimetry and DNA damage studies. In the last two decades, they were also used with the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method in the simulation of chemical reactions, to calculate the yield of various radiolytic species produced during the radiolysis of water and in chemical dosimeters. Recently, we have developed a Green's function based code to simulate reversible chemical reactions with an intermediate state, which yielded results in excellent agreement with those obtained by using the IRT method. This code was also used to simulate and the interaction of particles with membrane receptors. We are in the process of including this program for use with the Monte-Carlo track structure code Relativistic Ion Tracks (RITRACKS). This recent addition should greatly expand the capabilities of RITRACKS, notably to simulate DNA damage by both the direct and indirect effect.

  5. Progressive alterations of central nervous system structure and function are caused by charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Cns Nscor Team

    A new NASA-sponsored program project (NSCOR) has been organized to conduct the first comprehensive investigation of the response of a mammalian brain structure (mouse hippocampus) to charged-particle radiation. The NSCOR collaboration has three main goals. The first goal is to quantify the time- and dose-dependent changes in cellular composition and architecture. By using stereology on preserved brains, subsets of cells (neurons, glia, endothelia and stem cells) will be quantified out to 2 years after irradiation with accelerated protons and iron ions. To further characterize changes in vasculature architecture a polymer infusion technique will be used to produce a three-dimensional vasculature cast that then will be mapped by x-ray tomography to determine topological changes, and microscopic infarcts associated with amyloid protein deposits. The 2nd goal is to quantify hippocampal function(s). The primary measurement of function will be extracellular electrical recordings from hippocampal ``brain slices'' that reflect underlying functions such as connectivity, action potential generation & conduction, and neurotransmitter formation, secretion, and uptake. Individual nerve membrane properties will be assessed by ``patch clamp'' recordings. Two non-invasive methods will evaluate brain function and the evolution of changes with time. Electroencephalograms will map macroscopic spontaneous electrical activity while two state-of-the-art MRI magnetization sequences will visualize and quantify local oxygen utilization and white matter fiber tracts structural integrity. To quantify the brains' overall performance under stress, animals will receive a systemic shock mediated by the immune system in the form of a reaction to lipopolysaccharide. A second strategy will employ the APP23 transgenic mouse that develops the pathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Measurements of irradiated mice will determine whether radiation exposure affects the latency and

  6. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  7. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  8. Biological weighting function for the inhibition of phytoplankton photosynthesis by ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.; Neale, Patrick J.; Lesser, Michael P.

    1992-01-01

    Severe reduction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica has focused increasing concern on the biological effects of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation (280 to 320 nanometers). Measurements of photosynthesis from an experimental system, in which phytoplankton are exposed to a broad range of irradiance treatments, are fit to an analytical model to provide the spectral biological weighting function that can be used to predict the short-term effects of ozone depletion on aquatic photosynthesis. Results show that UVA (320 to 400 nanometers) significantly inhibits the photosynthesis of a marine diatom and a dinoflagellate, and that the effects of UVB are even more severe. Application of the model suggests that the Antarctic ozone hole might reduce near-surface photosynthesis by 12 to 15 percent, but less so at depth. The experimental system makes possible routine estimation of spectral weightings for natural phytoplankton.

  9. MMR Deficiency Does Not Sensitize or Compromise the Function of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Low and High LET Radiation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rutulkumar; Qing, Yulan; Kennedy, Lucy; Yan, Yan; Pink, John; Aguila, Brittany; Desai, Amar; Gerson, Stanton L; Welford, Scott M

    2018-04-14

    One of the major health concerns on long-duration space missions will be radiation exposure to the astronauts. Outside the earth's magnetosphere, astronauts will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events that are principally composed of protons and He, Ca, O, Ne, Si, Ca, and Fe nuclei. Protons are by far the most common species, but the higher atomic number particles are thought to be more damaging to biological systems. Evaluation and amelioration of risks from GCR exposure will be important for deep space travel. The hematopoietic system is one of the most radiation-sensitive organ systems, and is highly dependent on functional DNA repair pathways for survival. Recent results from our group have demonstrated an acquired deficiency in mismatch repair (MMR) in human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with age due to functional loss of the MLH1 protein, suggesting an additional risk to astronauts who may have significant numbers of MMR deficient HSCs at the time of space travel. In the present study, we investigated the effects gamma radiation, proton radiation, and 56 Fe radiation on HSC function in Mlh1 +/+ and Mlh1 -/- marrow from mice in a variety of assays and have determined that while cosmic radiation is a major risk to the hematopoietic system, there is no dependence on MMR capacity. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018. © 2018 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  10. In vitro bio-functionality of gallium nitride sensors for radiation biophysics.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Schmid, Martin; Schoell, Sebastian; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Adigüzel, Denis; Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2012-07-27

    There is an increasing interest in the integration of hybrid bio-semiconductor systems for the non-invasive evaluation of physiological parameters. High quality gallium nitride and its alloys show promising characteristics to monitor cellular parameters. Nevertheless, such applications not only request appropriate sensing capabilities but also the biocompatibility and especially the biofunctionality of materials. Here we show extensive biocompatibility studies of gallium nitride and, for the first time, a biofunctionality assay using ionizing radiation. Analytical sensor devices are used in medical settings, as well as for cell- and tissue engineering. Within these fields, semiconductor devices have increasingly been applied for online biosensing on a cellular and tissue level. Integration of advanced materials such as gallium nitride into these systems has the potential to increase the range of applicability for a multitude of test devices and greatly enhance sensitivity and functionality. However, for such applications it is necessary to optimize cell-surface interactions and to verify the biocompatibility of the semiconductor. In this work, we present studies of mouse fibroblast cell activity grown on gallium nitride surfaces after applying external noxa. Cell-semiconductor hybrids were irradiated with X-rays at air kerma doses up to 250 mGy and the DNA repair dynamics, cell proliferation, and cell growth dynamics of adherent cells were compared to control samples. The impact of ionizing radiation on DNA, along with the associated cellular repair mechanisms, is well characterized and serves as a reference tool for evaluation of substrate effects. The results indicate that gallium nitride does not require specific surface treatments to ensure biocompatibility and suggest that cell signaling is not affected by micro-environmental alterations arising from gallium nitride-cell interactions. The observation that gallium nitride provides no bio-functional influence on

  11. Biofabricated Structures Reconstruct Functional Urinary Bladders in Radiation-injured Rat Bladders.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Shimamura, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nagai, Takashi; Silwal Gautam, Sudha; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2018-05-08

    The ability to repair damaged urinary bladders through the application of bone marrow-derived cells is in the earliest stages of development. We investigated the application of bone marrow-derived cells to repair radiation-injured bladders. We used a three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting robot system to biofabricate bone marrow-derived cell structures. We then determined if the biofabricated structures could restore the tissues and functions of radiation-injured bladders. The bladders of female 10-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were irradiated with 2-Gy once a week for 5 weeks. Adherent and proliferating bone marrow-derived cells harvested from the femurs of male 17-week-old green fluorescence protein-transfected Tg-SD rats were cultured in collagen-coated flasks. Bone marrow-derived cell spheroids were formed in 96-well plates. Three layers of spheroids were assembled by the bioprinter onto a 9x9 microneedle array. The assembled spheroids were perfusion cultured for 7 days, and then the microneedle array was removed. Two weeks after the last radiation treatment, the biofabricated structures were transplanted into an incision on the anterior wall of the bladders (n=10). Control rats received the same surgery but without the biofabricated structures (sham-structure, n=12). At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the sham-structure control bladder tissues exhibited disorganized smooth muscle layers, decreased nerve cells, and significant fibrosis with increased presence of fibrosis-marker P4HB-positive cells and hypoxia-marker HIF1α-positive cells. The transplanted structures survived within the recipient tissues, and blood vessels extended within them from the recipient tissues. The bone marrow-derived cells in the structures differentiated into smooth muscle cells and formed smooth muscle clusters. The recipient tissues near the transplanted structures had distinct smooth muscle layers and reconstructed nerve cells, and only minimal fibrosis with decreased presence of P4

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor-Peptide Improves Barrier Function and Proliferation in Human Keratinocytes After Radiation

    SciT

    Zhang Kunzhong; Tian Yeping; Yin Liangjie

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Epidermal keratinocytes, which can be severely damaged after ionizing radiation (IR), are rapid turnover cells that function as a barrier, protecting the host from pathogenic invasion and fluid loss. We tested fibroblast growth factor-peptide (FGF-P), a small peptide derived from the receptor-binding domain of FGF-2, as a potential mitigator of radiation effects via proliferation and the barrier function of keratinocytes. Methods and Materials: Keratinocytes isolated from neonatal foreskin were grown on transwells. After being exposed to 0, 5, or 10 Gy IR, the cells were treated with a vehicle or FGF-P. The permeability of IR cells was assessed bymore » using transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and a paracellular tracer flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) with Ussing chambers. The cell proliferation was measured with yellow tetrazolium salt (MTT) and tritiated thymidine ([{sup 3}H]-TdR) assays. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) was measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA)-like assay, and the proteins related to tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) were examined with Western blotting. We used a mouse model to assess the ability of FGF-P to promote the healing of skin {beta} burns created with a strontium applicator. Results: We found (1) FGF-P reduced the permeability of irradiated keratinocytes, as evidenced by increased TEER and decreased diffusion of FITC-BSA, both associated with the regulation of different proteins and levels of TJ and AJ; and (2) FGF-P enhanced the proliferation of irradiated keratinocytes, as evidenced by increased MTT activity and [{sup 3}H]-TdR incorporation, which was associated with activation of the ERK pathway; and (3) FGF-P promoted the healing of skin {beta} burns. Conclusions: FGF-P enhances the barrier function, including up-regulation of TJ proteins, increases proliferation of human keratinocytes, and accelerates

  13. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    SciT

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previouslymore » with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.« less

  14. Effects of radiofrequency radiation emitted by cellular telephones on the cognitive functions of humans.

    PubMed

    Eliyahu, Ilan; Luria, Roy; Hareuveny, Ronen; Margaliot, Menachem; Meiran, Nachshon; Shani, Gad

    2006-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of exposure to Electromagnetic Radiation emitted by a standard GSM phone at 890 MHz on human cognitive functions. This study attempted to establish a connection between the exposure of a specific area of the brain and the cognitive functions associated with that area. A total of 36 healthy right-handed male subjects performed four distinct cognitive tasks: spatial item recognition, verbal item recognition, and two spatial compatibility tasks. Tasks were chosen according to the brain side they are assumed to activate. All subjects performed the tasks under three exposure conditions: right side, left side, and sham exposure. The phones were controlled by a base station simulator and operated at their full power. We have recorded the reaction times (RTs) and accuracy of the responses. The experiments consisted of two sections, of 1 h each, with a 5 min break in between. The tasks and the exposure regimes were counterbalanced. The results indicated that the exposure of the left side of the brain slows down the left-hand response time, in the second-later-part of the experiment. This effect was apparent in three of the four tasks, and was highly significant in only one of the tests. The exposure intensity and its duration exceeded the common exposure of cellular phone users.

  15. Heuristic Green's function of the time dependent radiative transfer equation for a semi-infinite medium.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    2007-12-24

    The Green's function of the time dependent radiative transfer equation for the semi-infinite medium is derived for the first time by a heuristic approach based on the extrapolated boundary condition and on an almost exact solution for the infinite medium. Monte Carlo simulations performed both in the simple case of isotropic scattering and of an isotropic point-like source, and in the more realistic case of anisotropic scattering and pencil beam source, are used to validate the heuristic Green's function. Except for the very early times, the proposed solution has an excellent accuracy (> 98 % for the isotropic case, and > 97 % for the anisotropic case) significantly better than the diffusion equation. The use of this solution could be extremely useful in the biomedical optics field where it can be directly employed in conditions where the use of the diffusion equation is limited, e.g. small volume samples, high absorption and/or low scattering media, short source-receiver distances and early times. Also it represents a first step to derive tools for other geometries (e.g. slab and slab with inhomogeneities inside) of practical interest for noninvasive spectroscopy and diffuse optical imaging. Moreover the proposed solution can be useful to several research fields where the study of a transport process is fundamental.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  17. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciT

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy.more » During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.« less

  18. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-08-18

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation.

  19. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    SciT

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.

    Outside the protection of earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events atmore » the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin’s barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.« less

  20. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K.; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H.C.

    2015-01-01

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation. PMID:26282711

  1. A prospective study on radiation-induced changes in hearing function

    SciT

    Herrmann, Franziska; Doerr, Wolfgang; Experimental Center, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, University of Technology-Dresden, Dresden

    Purpose: To quantitate changes in hearing function after radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, 32 patients were irradiated for head-and-neck tumors. Three-dimensional treatment planning was applied. Total tumor doses were 30.0-77.6 Gy, local doses to the inner ear (n = 64) ranged from 1.7 to 64.3 Gy. Audiometry was performed before the onset of radiotherapy (RT), at a tumor dose of 40 Gy or at the end of palliative treatment, at the end of curative RT, and 2-6 months post-RT. Assays applied were frequency-specific threshold measurements for air and bone conduction,more » measurements according to Weber and Rinne, tympanometry and assessment of the stapedius reflex. Results: Age and prior disease significantly decreased, whereas previous or concurrent alcohol consumption significantly increased hearing ability. A significant reduction in hearing ability during RT was found for high frequencies (at 40 Gy) and low frequencies (at end of RT), which persisted after RT. No differences were observed for air or bone conduction. None of the other assays displayed time- or dose-dependent changes. Dose-effect analyses revealed an ED50 (dose at which a 50% incidence is expected) for significant changes in hearing thresholds (15 dB) in the range of 20-25 Gy, with large confidence limits. Conclusions: Radiation effects on hearing ability were confined to threshold audiogram values, which started during the treatment without reversibility during 6 months postradiotherapy.« less

  2. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT PhantomTM), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  3. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    SciT

    Yan, Susu, E-mail: susu.yan@duke.edu; Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator ormore » a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in

  4. Effects of thinning on transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection and solar radiation

    Advective energy occurring in edge environments may increase tree water use (e.g., latent heat loss, LE > net radiation, Rn). In humid agricultural landscapes, advection-enhanced transpiration in riparian buffers may provide hydrologic regulation and flood control benefits; however, research in humi...

  5. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 2: Combined effect of radiation and some drugs

    SciT

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.

    1995-09-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 Mhz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6--3.0) 10{sup {minus}5} M of propranolol or (0.5--1.5) 10{sup {minus}7} M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation.more » Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate ad amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P<0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8--10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.« less

  6. Effect of Prostate Cancer Severity on Functional Outcomes After Localized Treatment: Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation Study Results.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Mark Douglas; Koyama, Tatsuki; Lee, Dan; Hoffman, Karen E; Resnick, Matthew J; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Goodman, Michael; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hamilton, Ann S; Hashibe, Mia; Paddock, Lisa E; Stroup, Antoinette; Chen, Vivien; Conwill, Ralph; McCollum, Dan; Penson, David F; Barocas, Daniel A

    2018-07-01

    Whether prostate cancer severity modifies patient-reported functional outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized cancer is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in predicted function over time between RP and EBRT varied by risk group. The Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation (CEASAR) study is a prospective, population-based, observational study that enrolled men with localized prostate cancer in 2011-2012. Among 2117 CEASAR participants who underwent RP or EBRT, 817 had low-risk, 902 intermediate-risk, and 398 high-risk disease. Patient-reported, disease-specific function was measured using the 26-item Expanded Prostate Index Composite (at baseline and 6, 12, and 36 mo). Predicted function was estimated using regression models and compared by disease risk. Low-risk EBRT patients reported 3-yr sexual function scores 12 points higher than those of low-risk RP patients (RP, 39 points [95% confidence interval {CI}, 37-42] vs EBRT, 52 points [95% CI, 47-56]; p<0.001). The difference in 3-yr scores for high-risk patients was not clinically significant (RP, 32 points [95% CI, 28-35] vs EBRT, 38 points [95% CI, 33-42]; p=0.03). However, when using a commonly used binary definition of sexual function (erections firm enough for intercourse), no major differences were noted between RP and EBRT at 3 yr across low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease strata. No clinically significant interactive effects between treatment and cancer severity were observed for incontinence, bowel, irritative voiding, and hormone domains. The primary limitation is the lack of firmly established thresholds for clinically significant differences in Expanded Prostate Index Composite domain scores. For men with low-risk prostate cancer, EBRT was associated with higher sexual function scores at 3 yr than RP; however, for men with high-risk prostate cancer, no clinically significant difference

  7. Two-Flux and Green's Function Method for Transient Radiative Transfer in a Semi-Transparent Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1995-01-01

    A method using a Green's function is developed for computing transient temperatures in a semitransparent layer by using the two-flux method coupled with the transient energy equation. Each boundary of the layer is exposed to a hot or cold radiative environment, and is heated or cooled by convection. The layer refractive index is larger than one, and the effect of internal reflections is included with the boundaries assumed diffuse. The analysis accounts for internal emission, absorption, heat conduction, and isotropic scattering. Spectrally dependent radiative properties are included, and transient results are given to illustrate two-band spectral behavior with optically thin and thick bands. Transient results using the present Green's function method are verified for a gray layer by comparison with a finite difference solution of the exact radiative transfer equations; excellent agreement is obtained. The present method requires only moderate computing times and incorporates isotropic scattering without additional complexity. Typical temperature distributions are given to illustrate application of the method by examining the effect of strong radiative heating on one side of a layer with convective cooling on the other side, and the interaction of strong convective heating with radiative cooling from the layer interior.

  8. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Underwood, Tracy S A; Kung, Jong; Wang, Meng; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Held, Kathryn D; Hong, Theodore S; Efstathiou, Jason A; Willers, Henning

    2016-05-01

    Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ∼1.1. However, emerging data have suggested that Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects can lead to a variable RBE, at least in vitro. We investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer 2.5 keV/μm) or with 250 kVp x-rays, and the clonogenic survival fractions were determined. To estimate the RBE of the protons relative to cobalt-60 photons (Co60Eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to x-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor the damage responses, and the cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared with 1.11 for wild-type cells (at a survival fraction of 0.1; P<.05), which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the S/G2 phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is, at least in part, due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damage. In vivo and clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings in human cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  9. Abdominal {gamma}-Radiation Induces an Accumulation of Function-Impaired Regulatory T Cells in the Small Intestine

    SciT

    Billiard, Fabienne; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and the functional characteristics of one major component of immune tolerance, the CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to a single abdominal dose of {gamma}-radiation (10 Gy). We evaluated small intestine Treg infiltration by Foxp3 immunostaining and the functional suppressive activity of Tregs isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. Results: Foxp3 immunostaining showed that radiation induced a long-term infiltration of the intestine by Tregs (levels 5.5 times greater than in controls). Co-culture of Tregs from mesenteric lymph nodes with CD4{sup +} effectormore » cells showed that the Tregs had lost their suppressive function. This loss was associated with a significant decrease in the levels of Foxp3, TGF-{beta}, and CTLA-4 mRNA, all required for optimal Treg function. At Day 90 after irradiation, Tregs regained their suppressive activity as forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression returned to normal. Analysis of the secretory function of mesenteric lymph node Tregs, activated in vitro with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Abs, showed that this dysfunction was independent of a defect in interleukin-10 secretion. Conclusion: Radiation caused a long-term accumulation of function-impaired Foxp3{sup +}CD4{sup +} Tregs in the intestine. Our study provides new insights into how radiation affects the immune tolerance in peripheral tissues.« less

  10. Measures of GCM Performance as Functions of Model Parameters Affecting Clouds and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Mu, Q.; Sen, M.; Stoffa, P.

    2002-05-01

    This abstract is one of three related presentations at this meeting dealing with several issues surrounding optimal parameter and uncertainty estimation of model predictions of climate. Uncertainty in model predictions of climate depends in part on the uncertainty produced by model approximations or parameterizations of unresolved physics. Evaluating these uncertainties is computationally expensive because one needs to evaluate how arbitrary choices for any given combination of model parameters affects model performance. Because the computational effort grows exponentially with the number of parameters being investigated, it is important to choose parameters carefully. Evaluating whether a parameter is worth investigating depends on two considerations: 1) does reasonable choices of parameter values produce a large range in model response relative to observational uncertainty? and 2) does the model response depend non-linearly on various combinations of model parameters? We have decided to narrow our attention to selecting parameters that affect clouds and radiation, as it is likely that these parameters will dominate uncertainties in model predictions of future climate. We present preliminary results of ~20 to 30 AMIPII style climate model integrations using NCAR's CCM3.10 that show model performance as functions of individual parameters controlling 1) critical relative humidity for cloud formation (RHMIN), and 2) boundary layer critical Richardson number (RICR). We also explore various definitions of model performance that include some or all observational data sources (surface air temperature and pressure, meridional and zonal winds, clouds, long and short-wave cloud forcings, etc...) and evaluate in a few select cases whether the model's response depends non-linearly on the parameter values we have selected.

  11. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  12. Role of the Functional State of the Hypothalamus in Bioelectric Reactions of the Cerebral Cortex to Radiation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The effect of subjection of the hypothalamus to electrocoagulation in the area of the mamillary bodies on the bioelectric activity and reactivity of...the cerebral cortex exposed to radiation was studied. Rabbits were irradiated on the 10th day after electrocoagulation . Immediately after... electrocoagulation , a decline in the excitability and functional activity of cortical neurons in the posterior section of the cortex and a decrease in the

  13. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiologic Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Wang, Hesheng, E-mail: hesheng@umich.edu; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF)more » images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose–response functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. Results: The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=−0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). Conclusions: 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment

  14. Predictive models for regional hepatic function based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and local radiation dose for physiologic adaptive radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A; Ten Haken, Randall K; Lawrence, Theodore S; Cao, Yue

    2013-08-01

    High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose-response functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=-0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies to maximize tumor control and minimize the risk of liver

  15. WE-AB-202-01: Evaluating the Toxicity Reduction with CT-Ventilation Functional Avoidance Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Vinogradskiy, Y; Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N

    Purpose: CT-ventilation is an exciting new imaging modality that uses 4DCTs to calculate lung ventilation. Studies have proposed to use 4DCT-ventilation imaging for functional avoidance radiotherapy which implies designing treatment plans to spare functional portions of the lung. Although retrospective studies have been performed to evaluate the dosimetric gains to functional lung; no work has been done to translate the dosimetric gains to an improvement in pulmonary toxicity. The purpose of our work was to evaluate the potential reduction in toxicity for 4DCT-ventilation based functional avoidance. Methods: 70 lung cancer patients with 4DCT imaging were used for the study. CT-ventilationmore » maps were calculated using the patient’s 4DCT, deformable image registrations, and a density-change-based algorithm. Radiation pneumonitis was graded using imaging and clinical information. Log-likelihood methods were used to fit a normal-tissue-complication-probability (NTCP) model predicting grade 2+ radiation pneumonitis as a function of doses (mean and V20) to functional lung (>15% ventilation). For 20 patients a functional plan was generated that reduced dose to functional lung while meeting RTOG 0617-based constraints. The NTCP model was applied to the functional plan to determine the reduction in toxicity with functional planning Results: The mean dose to functional lung was 16.8 and 17.7 Gy with the functional and clinical plans respectively. The corresponding grade 2+ pneumonitis probability was 26.9% with the clinically-used plan and 24.6% with the functional plan (8.5% reduction). The V20-based grade 2+ pneumonitis probability was 23.7% with the clinically-used plan and reduced to 19.6% with the functional plan (20.9% reduction). Conclusion: Our results revealed a reduction of 9–20% in complication probability with functional planning. To our knowledge this is the first study to apply complication probability to convert dosimetric results to toxicity

  16. Radiation dose calculations for CT scans with tube current modulation using the approach to equilibrium function

    SciT

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The approach to equilibrium function has been used previously to calculate the radiation dose to a shift-invariant medium undergoing CT scans with constant tube current [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. The authors have adapted this method to CT scans with tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: For a scan with variable tube current, the scan range was divided into multiple subscan ranges, each with a nearly constant tube current. Then the dose calculation algorithm presented previously was applied. For a clinical CT scan series that presented tube current per slice, the authors adopted an efficient approachmore » that computed the longitudinal dose distribution for one scan length equal to the slice thickness, which center was at z = 0. The cumulative dose at a specific point was a summation of the contributions from all slices and the overscan. Results: The dose calculations performed for a total of four constant and variable tube current distributions agreed with the published results of Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 40, 111920 (14pp.) (2013)]. For an abdomen/pelvis scan of an anthropomorphic phantom (model ATOM 701-B, CIRS, Inc., VA) on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 scanner with 120 kV, N × T = 20 mm, pitch = 1.375, z axis current modulation (auto mA), and angular current modulation (smart mA), dose measurements were performed using two lines of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters, one of which was placed near the phantom center and the other on the surface. Dose calculations were performed on the central and peripheral axes of a cylinder containing water, whose cross-sectional mass was about equal to that of the ATOM phantom in its abdominal region, and the results agreed with the measurements within 28.4%. Conclusions: The described method provides an effective approach that takes into account subject size, scan length, and constant or variable tube current to evaluate CT dose to a shift-invariant medium. For a clinical CT

  17. Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciT

    Zhang Fan; Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Hu Jing

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using cine megavoltage (MV) images. Methods and Materials: Cine MV images of 20 patients acquired during three-dimensional conformal (6-11 beams) SBRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed to extract tumor motion trajectories. For each patient, tumor motion PDFs were generated per fraction (PDF{sub n}) using three selected 'usable' beams. Patients without at least three usable beams were excluded from the study. Fractional PDF reproducibility (R{sub n}) was calculated as the Dice similarity coefficient between PDF{sub n} to a 'ground-truth' PDF (PDF{submore » g}), which was generated using the selected beams of all fractions. The mean of R{sub n}, labeled as R{sub m}, was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient's mean tumor motion rang (A{sub m}). Change of R{sub m} during the course of SBRT treatments was also evaluated. Intra- and intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of R{sub m} and A{sub m} were determined. Results: Thirteen patients had at least three usable beams and were analyzed. The mean of R{sub m} was 0.87 (range, 0.84-0.95). The mean of A{sub m} was 3.18 mm (range, 0.46-7.80 mm). R{sub m} was found to decrease as A{sub m} increases following an equation of R{sub m} = 0.17e{sup -0.9Am} + 0.84. R{sub m} also decreased slightly throughout the course of treatments. Intersubject CV of R{sub m} (0.05) was comparable to intrasubject CV of R{sub m} (range, 0.02-0.09); intersubject CV of A{sub m} (0.73) was significantly greater than intrasubject CV of A{sub m} (range, 0.09-0.24). Conclusions: Tumor motion PDF can be determined using cine MV images acquired during the treatments. The reproducibility of lung tumor motion PDF decreased exponentially as the tumor motion range increased and decreased slightly throughout the course of the treatments.« less

  18. Attention, processing speed, and executive functioning in pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with proton beam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Tanya N; Ris, M Douglas; Grosshans, David R; Mahajan, Anita; Okcu, M Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Paulino, Arnold; Child, Amanda E; Orobio, Jessica; Stancel, Heather H; Kahalley, Lisa S

    2017-07-01

    This study examines attention, processing speed, and executive functioning in pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). We examined 39 survivors (age 6-19years) who were 3.61years post-PBRT on average. Craniospinal (CSI; n=21) and focal (n=18) subgroups were analyzed. Attention, processing speed, and executive functioning scores were compared to population norms, and clinical/demographic risk factors were examined. As a group, survivors treated with focal PBRT exhibited attention, processing speed, and executive functioning that did not differ from population norms (all p>0.05). Performance in the CSI group across attention scales was normative (all p>0.05), but areas of relative weakness were identified on one executive functioning subtest and several processing speed subtests (all p<0.01). Survivors treated with PBRT may exhibit relative resilience in cognitive domains traditionally associated with radiation late effects. Attention, processing speed, and executive functioning remained intact and within normal limits for survivors treated with focal PBRT. Among survivors treated with CSI, a score pattern emerged that was suggestive of difficulties in underlying component skills (i.e., processing speed) rather than true executive dysfunction. No evidence of profound cognitive impairment was found in either group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation-Induced Loss of Salivary Gland Function Is Driven by Cellular Senescence and Prevented by IL6 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Marmary, Yitzhak; Adar, Revital; Gaska, Svetlana; Wygoda, Annette; Maly, Alexander; Cohen, Jonathan; Eliashar, Ron; Mizrachi, Lina; Orfaig-Geva, Carmit; Baum, Bruce J; Rose-John, Stefan; Galun, Eithan; Axelrod, Jonathan H

    2016-03-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated by radiation commonly suffer from a devastating side effect known as dry-mouth syndrome, which results from the irreversible loss of salivary gland function via mechanisms that are not completely understood. In this study, we used a mouse model of radiation-induced salivary hypofunction to investigate the outcomes of DNA damage in the head and neck region. We demonstrate that the loss of salivary function was closely accompanied by cellular senescence, as evidenced by a persistent DNA damage response (γH2AX and 53BP1) and the expression of senescence-associated markers (SA-βgal, p19ARF, and DcR2) and secretory phenotype (SASP) factors (PAI-1 and IL6). Notably, profound apoptosis or necrosis was not observed in irradiated regions. Signs of cellular senescence were also apparent in irradiated salivary glands surgically resected from human patients who underwent radiotherapy. Importantly, using IL6 knockout mice, we found that sustained expression of IL6 in the salivary gland long after initiation of radiation-induced DNA damage was required for both senescence and hypofunction. Additionally, we demonstrate that IL6 pretreatment prevented both senescence and salivary gland hypofunction via a mechanism involving enhanced DNA damage repair. Collectively, these results indicate that cellular senescence is a fundamental mechanism driving radiation-induced damage in the salivary gland and suggest that IL6 pretreatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to preserve salivary gland function in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Bladder Function Preservation With Brachytherapy, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limited Surger in Bladder Cancer Patients: Long-Term Results

    SciT

    Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl; Rooij, Peter H.E. van; Kirkels, Wim J.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of a bladder preservation strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) using external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy/interstitial radiation therapy (IRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and October 2011, 192 selected patients with MIBC were treated with a combined regimen of preoperative external beam radiation therapy and subsequent surgical exploration with or without partial cystectomy and insertion of source carrier tubes for afterloading IRT using low dose rate and pulsed dose rate. Data for oncologic and functional outcomes were prospectively collected. The primary endpoints were local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), bladder function preservation survival, and salvage cystectomy-freemore » survival. The endpoints were constructed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up period was 105.5 months. The LRFS rate was 80% and 73% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Salvage cystectomy-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 93% and 85%. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 65% and 46%, whereas cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10 years was 75% and 67%. The distant metastases-free survival rate was 76% and 69% at 5 and 10 years. Multivariate analysis revealed no independent predictors of LRFS. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥3 late bladder and rectum toxicity were recorded in 11 patients (5.7%) and 2 patients (1%), respectively. Conclusions: A multimodality bladder-sparing regimen using IRT offers excellent long-term oncologic outcome in selected patients with MIBC. The late toxicity rate is low, and the majority of patients preserve their functional bladder.« less

  1. Adenocarcinoma of vagina: combined surgery and radiation with preservation of genital function

    SciT

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.; Lewis, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    A report is given of a patient treated at Memorial Hospital, New York City, by external and fractionated intravaginal radiation given after a surgical procedure that consisted of local excision of tumor, pretreatment laparotomy, and lateral ovarian transposition. The treatment plan was based on the observations that there was no evidence of local or distant spread and that the ovaries could be moved to positions where radiation exposure would not terminate their activity. The patient has survived over six years and is without evidence of recurrence.

  2. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  3. Functional Data Analysis in NTCP Modeling: A New Method to Explore the Radiation Dose-Volume Effects

    SciT

    Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine, E-mail: mohamedamine.benadjaoud@gustaveroussy.fr; Université Paris sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To describe a novel method to explore radiation dose-volume effects. Functional data analysis is used to investigate the information contained in differential dose-volume histograms. The method is applied to the normal tissue complication probability modeling of rectal bleeding (RB) for patients irradiated in the prostatic bed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Kernel density estimation was used to estimate the individual probability density functions from each of the 141 rectum differential dose-volume histograms. Functional principal component analysis was performed on the estimated probability density functions to explore the variation modes in the dose distribution. The functional principalmore » components were then tested for association with RB using logistic regression adapted to functional covariates (FLR). For comparison, 3 other normal tissue complication probability models were considered: the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, logistic model based on standard dosimetric parameters (LM), and logistic model based on multivariate principal component analysis (PCA). Results: The incidence rate of grade ≥2 RB was 14%. V{sub 65Gy} was the most predictive factor for the LM (P=.058). The best fit for the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was obtained with n=0.12, m = 0.17, and TD50 = 72.6 Gy. In PCA and FLR, the components that describe the interdependence between the relative volumes exposed at intermediate and high doses were the most correlated to the complication. The FLR parameter function leads to a better understanding of the volume effect by including the treatment specificity in the delivered mechanistic information. For RB grade ≥2, patients with advanced age are significantly at risk (odds ratio, 1.123; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.22), and the fits of the LM, PCA, and functional principal component analysis models are significantly improved by including this clinical factor. Conclusion

  4. Confluent Heun functions and the physics of black holes: Resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering of scalar waves

    SciT

    Vieira, H.S., E-mail: horacio.santana.vieira@hotmail.com; Centro de Ciências, Tecnologia e Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, CEP 58233-000, Araruna, PB; Bezerra, V.B., E-mail: valdir@fisica.ufpb.br

    We apply the confluent Heun functions to study the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum), the Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves, in a class of spacetimes, namely, the ones generated by a Kerr–Newman–Kasuya spacetime (dyon black hole) and a Reissner–Nordström black hole surrounded by a magnetic field (Ernst spacetime). In both spacetimes, the solutions for the angular and radial parts of the corresponding Klein–Gordon equations are obtained exactly, for massive and massless fields, respectively. The special cases of Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes are analyzed and the solutions obtained, as well as in the case of a Schwarzschild blackmore » hole surrounded by a magnetic field. In all these special situations, the resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering are studied. - Highlights: • Charged massive scalar field in the dyon black hole and massless scalar field in the Ernst spacetime are analyzed. • The confluent Heun functions are applied to obtain the solution of the Klein–Gordon equation. • The resonant frequencies are obtained. • The Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves are examined.« less

  5. 2-D Ultrasound Sparse Arrays Multidepth Radiation Optimization Using Simulated Annealing and Spiral-Array Inspired Energy Functions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Emmanuel; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Robini, Marc C; Liebgott, Herve

    2016-12-01

    Full matrix arrays are excellent tools for 3-D ultrasound imaging, but the required number of active elements is too high to be individually controlled by an equal number of scanner channels. The number of active elements is significantly reduced by the sparse array techniques, but the position of the remaining elements must be carefully optimized. This issue is faced here by introducing novel energy functions in the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. At each iteration step of the optimization process, one element is freely translated and the associated radiated pattern is simulated. To control the pressure field behavior at multiple depths, three energy functions inspired by the pressure field radiated by a Blackman-tapered spiral array are introduced. Such energy functions aim at limiting the main lobe width while lowering the side lobe and grating lobe levels at multiple depths. Numerical optimization results illustrate the influence of the number of iterations, pressure measurement points, and depths, as well as the influence of the energy function definition on the optimized layout. It is also shown that performance close to or even better than the one provided by a spiral array, here assumed as reference, may be obtained. The finite-time convergence properties of SA allow the duration of the optimization process to be set in advance.

  6. Cytoskeletal and functional changes in bioreactor assembled thyroid tissue organoids exposed to gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lora M.; Patel, Zarana; Murray, Deborah K.; Rightnar, Steven; Burell, Cheryl G.; Gridley, Daila S.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Fischer rat thyroid cells were grown under low-shear stress in a bioreactor to a stage of organization composed of integrated follicles resembling small thyroid glands prior to exposure to 3 Gray-gamma radiation. Bioreactor tissues and controls (both irradiated and non-irradiated) were harvested at 24, 48, 96 and 144 hours post-exposure. Tissue samples were fixed and fluorescently labeled for actin and microtubules. Tissues were assessed for changes in cytoskeletal components induced by radiation and quantified by laser scanning cytometry. ELISA's were used to quantify transforming growth factor-beta and thyroxin released from cells to the culture supernatant. Tissue architecture was disrupted by exposure to radiation with the structural organization of actin and loss of follicular content the most obviously affected. With time post-irradiation the actin appeared disordered and the levels of fluorescence associated with filamentous-actin and microtubules cycled in the tissue analogs, but not in the flask-grown cultures. Active transforming growth factor-beta was higher in supernatants from the irradiated bioreactor tissue. Thyroxin release paralleled cell survival in the bioreactors and control cultures. Thus, the engineered tissue responses to radiation differed from those of conventional tissue culture making it a potentially better mimic of the in vivo situation.

  7. Acute effects of exposure to space radiation on CNS function and cognitive performance

    On exploratory class missions, such as a mission to Mars, astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (cosmic rays) that are not experienced in low earth orbit where the Space Shuttle and International Space Station operate. Exposure to cosmic rays produces changes in neuronal functi...

  8. Prospective study of functional bone marrow-sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for pelvic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M; Rose, Brent S; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K; Lawson, Joshua D; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J; Bydder, Graeme M; Mell, Loren K

    2013-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V(10) (volume receiving ≥10 Gy) and V(20) (volume receiving ≥20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prospective Study of Functional Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Pelvic Malignancies

    SciT

    Liang Yun; Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California; Bydder, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). Methods and Materials: We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computedmore » tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. Results: In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V{sub 10} (volume receiving {>=}10 Gy) and V{sub 20} (volume receiving {>=}20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. Conclusions: IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial.« less

  10. Cognitive Function Before and After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Study

    SciT

    Hsiao, Kuan-Yin; Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Yeh, Shyh-An, E-mail: yehsa@hotmail.co

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy (RT) on neurocognitive function in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with NPC treated with intensity-modulated RT were included. Dose-volume histograms of the temporal lobes were obtained in every patient. Neurocognitive tests were administered individually to each patient 1 day before initiation of RT and at least 12 months after completion of RT. Cognitive functioning status was evaluated as change in scores over time. Results: Among the total of 30 patients, 23 patients (76.7%) had significantly lower post-RT cognitive functioning scores compared with their pre-RT scores (p =more » 0.033). The cognitive functioning scores had significantly declined in the domains of short-term memory, language abilities, and list-generating fluency (p = 0.020, 0.023, and 0.001, respectively). Compared with patients with a mean dose to the temporal lobes of 36 Gy or less, patients with a mean dose of greater than 36 Gy had a significantly greater reduction in cognitive functioning scores (p = 0.017). Patients in whom V60 of the temporal lobes (i.e., the percentage of the temporal lobe volume that had received >60 Gy) was greater than 10% also had a greater reduction in cognitive functioning scores than those in whom V60 was 10% or less (p = 0.039). Conclusions: The results of our study indicated that RT could have deleterious effects on cognitive function in patients with NPC. Efforts should be made to reduce the radiation dose and irradiated volume of temporal lobes without compromising the coverage of target volume.« less

  11. Stereotactic radiation therapy for the treatment of functional pituitary adenomas associated with feline acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Wormhoudt, Tiffany L; Boss, Mary-Keara; Lunn, Katharine; Griffin, Lynn; Leary, Del; Dowers, Kristy; Rao, Sangeeta; LaRue, Susan M

    2018-05-21

    Conventional fractionated radiotherapy has been shown to be partially effective for management of pituitary tumors in cats that cause acromegaly and diabetes mellitus (DM), but, the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) as a treatment for acromegalic cats has not been described. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment for controlling acromegaly associated with pituitary adenomas in cats. Additionally, SRT-treated acromegalic cats with DM will experience a decrease in insulin requirements after radiation therapy. Fifty-three client-owned cats referred to Colorado State University for SRT to treat pituitary tumors causing poorly controlled DM secondary to acromegaly. Retrospective study of cats treated for acromegaly with SRT between 2008 and 2016 at Colorado State University. Diagnosis of acromegaly was based on history, physical examination, laboratory results, and cross-sectional imaging of the pituitary. Signalment, radiation protocol, insulin requirements over time, adverse effects, and survival were recorded. Median survival time was 1072 days. Of the 41 cats for which insulin dosage information was available, 95% (39/41) experienced a decrease in required insulin dose, with 32% (13/41) achieving diabetic remission. Remission was permanent in 62% (8/13) and temporary in 38% (5/13) cats. Median duration to lowest insulin dose was 9.5 months. Of the treated cats, 14% developed hypothyroidism and required supplementation after SRT. Stereotactic radiation therapy is safe and effective for treating cats with acromegaly. Cats treated with SRT have improved survival time and control of their DM when compared to previously reported patients treated with non-SRT. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. A novel methodology for radiative transfer in a planetary atmosphere. I - The functions a exponent m and b exponent m of anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.; Kalaba, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The original problem of anisotropic scattering in an atmosphere illuminated by a unidirectional source is replaced by an analogous formulation where the incident light is omnidirectional. A radiative-transfer equation for the omnidirectional case is obtained in which the direction of illumination plays no role and the source-function analog, Sobolev's (1972) source function Phi exponent m, contains only a single integral term. For radiation incident on the top or the bottom of the atmosphere, this equation involves the functions b exponent m and h exponent m, respectively, with m corresponding to the order of the harmonic component of the scattered radiation field; these two functions are shown to be only one through some simple reciprocity relations. The transfer problem is then reformulated for the function a exponent m, in which case the source-function analog (Sobolev's function D exponent m) involves incident direction.

  13. Radiative Extinction of Gaseous Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative extinction of spherical diffusion flames was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved microgravity spherical diffusion flames burning ethylene and propane at 0.98 bar. Both normal (fuel flowing into oxidizer) and inverse (oxidizer flowing into fuel) flames were studied, with nitrogen supplied to either the fuel or the oxygen. Flame conditions were chosen to ensure that the flames extinguished within the 2.2 s of available test time; thus extinction occurred during unsteady flame conditions. Diagnostics included color video and thin-filament pyrometry. The computations, which simulated flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, included detailed chemistry, transport and radiation, and yielded transient results. Radiative extinction was observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Extinction time, peak temperature, and radiative loss fraction were found to be independent of flow rate except at very low flow rates. Radiative heat loss was dominated by the combustion products downstream of the flame and was found to scale with flame surface area, not volume. For large transient flames the heat release rate also scaled with surface area and thus the radiative loss fraction was largely independent of flow rate. Peak temperatures at extinction onset were about 1100 K, which is significantly lower than for kinetic extinction. One observation of this work is that while radiative heat losses can drive transient extinction, this is not because radiative losses are increasing with time (flame size) but rather because the heat release rate is falling off as the temperature drops.

  14. Damage pattern as a function of radiation quality and other factors.

    PubMed

    Burkart, W; Jung, T; Frasch, G

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of damage pattern in critical cellular structures such as DNA is an important prerequisite for a mechanistic assessment of primary radiation damage, its possible repair, and the propagation of residual changes in somatic and germ cells as potential contributors to disease or ageing. Important quantitative insights have been made recently on the distribution in time and space of critical lesions from direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation on mammalian cells. When compared to damage from chemicals or from spontaneous degradation, e.g. depurination or base deamination in DNA, the potential of even low-LET radiation to create local hot spots of damage from single particle tracks is of utmost importance. This has important repercussions on inferences from critical biological effects at high dose and dose rate exposure situations to health risks at chronic, low-level exposures as experienced in environmental and controlled occupational settings. About 10,000 DNA lesions per human cell nucleus and day from spontaneous degradation and chemical attack cause no apparent effect, but a dose of 4 Gy translating into a similar number of direct and indirect DNA breaks induces acute lethality. Therefore, single lesions cannot explain the high efficiency of ionizing radiation in the induction of mutation, transformation and loss of proliferative capacity. Clustered damage leading to poorly repairable double-strand breaks or even more complex local DNA degradation, correlates better with fixed damage and critical biological endpoints. A comparison with other physical, chemical and biological agents indicates that ionizing radiation is indeed set apart from these by its unique micro- and nano-dosimetric traits. Only a few other agents such as bleomycin have a similar potential to cause complex damage from single events. However, in view of the multi-stage mechanism of carcinogenesis, it is still an open question whether dose-effect linearity for complex

  15. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  16. Atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation - Time dependence and the asymptotic wave function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, wave-packet description of atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation is extracted from the more conventional time-independent, stationary-state description. This approach resolves certain difficulties of interpretation in the time-independent approach which arise in the case of asymptotic near resonance. In the two-state model investigated, the approach predicts the existence of three spherically scattered waves in this asymptotically near-resonant case.

  17. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  18. Nanoparticle induced piezoelectric, super toughened, radiation resistant, multi-functional nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vimal K; Shripathi, T; Lalla, N P; Maiti, Pralay

    2012-01-07

    We have developed multifunctional nanohybrids of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (CTFE) with a small percentage of surface modified inorganic layered silicate showing dramatic improvement in toughness, radiation resistant and piezoelectric properties vis-à-vis pristine polymer. Massive intercalation (d(001) 1.8 → 3.9 nm) of polymer inside the nanoclay galleries and unique crystallization behavior of the fluoropolymer on the surface of individual silicate layer has been reported. Toughness in the nanohybrid increases more than three orders of magnitude as compared to pure CTFE. High energy radiation (80 MeV Si(+7)) causes chain session, amorphization and creates olefinic bonds in the pure polymer while the nanohybrids are radiation resistant at a similar dose. Nanoclay induces the metastable piezoelectric β-phase in CTFE, suitable for sensor and actuator application. Molecular level changes after irradiation and controlled morphology for smart membrane have been confirmed by using spectroscopy, sol-gel technique, surface morphology studies and in situ residual gas analysis.

  19. Radiation-induced hemopoietic death in mice as a function of photon energy and dose rate

    SciT

    Gengozian, N.; Taylor, T.; Jameson, H.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation-induced hemopoietic death was measured in mice exposed to photons of four different energies: 250-kVp X rays, /sup 60/Co gamma rays (1.25 MeV), and 6- and 25-MV photons from a linear accelerator. For each radiation source, the lethal dose which killed 50% of the population in 30 days (LD50/30) associated with the hemopoietic syndrome was determined in groups of mice exposed to graded doses from 600 to 1150 cGy at dose rates of 20, 40, and 80 cGy/min. The calculated LD50/30 values for 25 and 6 MV were significantly different from each other at all exposure rates while no differencemore » was observed between 6 MV and /sup 60/Co. Using /sup 60/Co gamma rays as the standard, the relative biologic effectiveness was as follows: 250 kVp greater than 25 MV greater than 6 MV = /sup 60/Co. The data suggest that there may be a greater damage to tissue within the marrow cavities following exposure to very high megavoltage radiation, a factor which must be considered with the increasing utilization of linear accelerators in the clinic and laboratory.« less

  20. Pharmacological Activation of the EDA/EDAR Signaling Pathway Restores Salivary Gland Function following Radiation-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Grace; Headon, Denis; Harris, Zoey I.; Huttner, Kenneth; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers often results in collateral damage to adjacent salivary glands associated with clinically significant hyposalivation and xerostomia. Due to the reduced capacity of salivary glands to regenerate, hyposalivation is treated by substitution with artificial saliva, rather than through functional restoration of the glands. During embryogenesis, the ectodysplasin/ectodysplasin receptor (EDA/EDAR) signaling pathway is a critical element in the development and growth of salivary glands. We have assessed the effects of pharmacological activation of this pathway in a mouse model of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. We report that post-irradiation administration of an EDAR-agonist monoclonal antibody (mAbEDAR1) normalizes function of radiation damaged adult salivary glands as determined by stimulated salivary flow rates. In addition, salivary gland structure and homeostasis is restored to pre-irradiation levels. These results suggest that transient activation of pathways involved in salivary gland development could facilitate regeneration and restoration of function following damage. PMID:25409170

  1. Radiation-damage-induced transitions in zircon: Percolation theory applied to hardness and elastic moduli as a function of density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Pöllmann, Herbert; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2018-05-01

    Two in literature predicted percolation transitions in radiation-damaged zircon (ZrSiO4) were observed experimentally by measurement of the indentation hardness as a function of density and their correlation with the elastic moduli. Percolations occur near 30% and 70% amorphous fractions, where hardness deviates from its linear correlation with the elastic modulus (E), the shear modulus (G) and the bulk modulus (K). The first percolation point pc1 generates a cusp in the hardness versus density evolution, while the second percolation point is seen as a change of slope.

  2. Collisional redistribution of radiation. III - The equation of motion for the correlation function and the scattered spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1980-01-01

    Computations were made of the scattering of monochromatic radiation by a degenerate atom in the binary-collision approximation for field strengths whose products of the Rabi frequency for atomic transition and the duration of a strong collision are much less than 1. An expression of motion for the correlation function is derived which does not exclude the region where thermal correlations may be neglected; the equation is valid outside the quantum-regression regime, and has a straightforward solution for practical cases. Solutions for the weak-field linear response regime are presented in terms of generalized absorption and emission profiles which depend on the indices of the atomic multipoles.

  3. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-09-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  4. Effect of radiation therapy on permanent pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator function.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Akash; Prisciandaro, Joann; Agarwal, Sunil; Lusk, Morgan; Horwood, Laura; Moran, Jean; Fox, Colleen; Hayman, James A; Ghanbari, Hamid; Roberts, Brett; Belardi, Diego; Latchamsetty, Rakesh; Crawford, Thomas; Good, Eric; Jongnarangsin, Krit; Bogun, Frank; Chugh, Aman; Oral, Hakan; Morady, Fred; Pelosi, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Radiation therapy's (RT's) effects on cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers (PMs) are not well established, leading to device removal or relocation in preparation for RT. To determine the effect of scattered RT on CIED performance. We analyzed 69 patients--50 (72%) with PMs and 19 (28%) with ICDs--receiving RT at the University of Michigan. Collected data included device model, anatomic location, and treatment beam energies, treatment type, and estimated dose to the device. Patients were treated with either high-energy (16-MV) and/or low-energy (6 MV) photon beams with or without electron beams (6-16 MeV). The devices were interrogated with pre- and post-RT and/or weekly with either in-treatment or home interrogation, depending on the patient's dependence on the device and the estimated or measured delivered dose. Outcomes analyzed were inappropriate ICD therapies, device malfunctions, or device-related clinical events. The PMs were exposed to 84.4 ± 99.7 cGy of radiation, and the ICDs were exposed to 92.1 ± 72.6 cGy of radiation. Two patients with ICDs experienced a partial reset of the ICD with the loss of historic diagnostic data after receiving 123 and 4 cGy, respectively. No device malfunction or premature battery depletion was observed at 6-month follow-up from RT completion. CIED malfunction due to indirect RT exposure is uncommon. Regular in-treatment or home interrogation should be done to detect and treat these events and to ensure that diagnostic data are preserved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-functional layered structure having structural and radiation shielding attributes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K. (Inventor); Barghouty, Abdulnasser Fakhri (Inventor); Penn, Benjamin G. (Inventor); Hulcher, Anthony Bruce (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cosmic and solar radiation shielding structure that also has structural attributes is comprised of three layers. The first layer is 30-42 percent by volume of ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene fibers, 18-30 percent by volume of graphite fibers, and a remaining percent by volume of an epoxy resin matrix. The second layer is approximately 68 percent by volume of UHMW polyethylene fibers and a remaining percent by volume of a polyethylene matrix. The third layer is a ceramic material.

  6. Disorder of Endothelia Vessels' Functional State with Malignant Tumors in Patients Exposed Anthropogenic Radiation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Laura; Noso, Yoshihiro; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Anambaeva, Zukhra; Adylkhanov, Tasbolat; Takeichi, Nobuo; Lzhaev, Sayakhat; Aldyngurov, Daniyar; Tuleutayeva, Raikhan; Argynbekova, Ainur; Tanysheva, Gulyash; Zhazykbayeva, Lashyn; Baissalbayeva, Ainur; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the characteristics of endothelial factors and the hemostatic system conditions with malignant neoplasms patients, which were exposed to ionizing radiation. Total number of examined people is 223, 153 of them are patients with gastrointestinal tract oncopathology. The article presents the results of the analysis of numerical indicators of endothelial condition and platelet hemostasis of patients, who had cancer. They lived in the regions of Kazakhstan, subjected to contamination of radionuclides as a result of nuclear weapons tests, which took place in this region from 1949 to 1989. These results then were compared to cancer patients and healthy individuals with no radiation risk. The study revealed the presence of higher levels of endothelial dysfunction and following trigger of the hemostatic system in patients with malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. In particular, the defined high degree of endothelial dysfunction include endothelium- dependent vasodilation, content desquamated endothelial cells in peripheral blood and von Willebrand factor. These indicators have a clear correlation with the degree of disorder of studied parameters of the hemostasis, which can cause the development of thrombotic complications.

  7. Effect of electromagnetic radiations from mobile phone base stations on general health and salivary function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kushpal; Nagaraj, Anup; Yousuf, Asif; Ganta, Shravani; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Cell phones use electromagnetic, nonionizing radiations in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. The present study aimed to determine the effect of electromagnetic radiations (EMRs) on unstimulated/stimulated salivary flow rate and other health-related problems between the general populations residing in proximity to and far away from mobile phone base stations. A total of four mobile base stations were randomly selected from four zones of Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Twenty individuals who were residing in proximity to the selected mobile phone towers were taken as the case group and the other 20 individuals (control group) who were living nearly 1 km away in the periphery were selected for salivary analysis. Questions related to sleep disturbances were measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and other health problems were included in the questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. It was unveiled that a majority of the subjects who were residing near the mobile base station complained of sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, irritability, concentration difficulties, and hypertension. A majority of the study subjects had significantly lesser stimulated salivary secretion (P < 0.01) as compared to the control subjects. The effects of prolonged exposure to EMRs from mobile phone base stations on the health and well-being of the general population cannot be ruled out. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on general health and more specifically on oral health.

  8. Pregnancies and menstrual function before and after combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy (TVPP) for Hodgkin's disease

    SciT

    Lacher, M.J.; Toner, K.

    The menstrual cycle, pregnancies, and offspring were evaluated before and after initial combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy with thiotepa, vinblastine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (TVPP), in 34 women between the ages of 18 and 44 (median 26.5 years) treated for Stage II and Stage III Hodgkin's disease. The median range of follow-up is 83.1 months (range 40.5-140). After therapy 94.1% (32/34) continued to menstruate. Two of the four patients over the age of 35 ceased to menstruate. All patients under the age of 35 continued to menstruate (30/30). Age at the time of diagnosis was the only factor affecting changemore » in menses with a significant probability (p = .001) that women greater than 30 years of age will experience some change in menstrual pattern. Seventeen pregnancies occurred in 12 women after therapy; 2 had 4 elective abortions; 10 delivered 12 children with normal physical development; 1 will deliver six months from now. Twelve of thirteen patients who wanted to become pregnant have conceived. The ability to become pregnant and deliver normal children after intensive treatment with combined radiation and chemotherapy (RT/TVPP) was comparable to the patients' pretreatment record.« less

  9. Prediction of radiation-induced normal tissue complications in radiotherapy using functional image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nioutsikou, Elena; Partridge, Mike; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study has been to explicitly include the functional heterogeneity of an organ as a factor that contributes to the probability of complication of normal tissues following radiotherapy. Situations for which the inclusion of this information can be advantageous to the design of treatment plans are then investigated. A Java program has been implemented for this purpose. This makes use of a voxelated model of a patient, which is based on registered anatomical and functional data in order to enable functional voxel weighting. Using this model, the functional dose-volume histogram (fDVH) and the functional normal tissue complication probability (fNTCP) are then introduced as extensions to the conventional dose-volume histogram (DVH) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). In the presence of functional heterogeneity, these tools are physically more meaningful for plan evaluation than the traditional indices, as they incorporate additional information and are anticipated to show a better correlation with outcome. New parameters mf, nf and TD50f are required to replace the m, n and TD50 parameters. A range of plausible values was investigated, awaiting fitting of these new parameters to patient outcomes where functional data have been measured. As an example, the model is applied to two lung datasets utilizing accurately registered computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion scans. Assuming a linear perfusion-function relationship, the biological index mean perfusion weighted lung dose (MPWLD) has been extracted from integration over outlined regions of interest. In agreement with the MPWLD ranking, the fNTCP predictions reveal that incorporation of functional imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning is most beneficial for organs with a large volume effect and large focal areas of dysfunction. There is, however, no additional advantage in cases presenting with homogeneous function. Although presented

  10. Inhibiting the NF-kappaB pathway to assess its function in the cellular response to space radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Kristina; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    2012-07-01

    Radiation is regarded as one of the limiting factors for space missions. Therefore the cellular radiation response needs to be studied in order to estimate risks and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Exposure of human cells to ionizing radiation can provoke cell cycle arrest, leading to cellular senescence or premature differentiation, and different types of cell death. Previous heavy ion experiments have shown that the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway is activated by fluences that can be reached during long-term missions and thereby NF-κB was identified as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response. It could improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses and influence the cancer risk of astronauts. The classical and the genotoxic stress induced NF-κB pathway result in nuclear translocation of the p65/p50 dimer. Both pathways might contribute to the cellular radiation response. Chemical inhibitors were tested to suppress the NF-κB pathway in recombinant HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. The efficacy and cytotoxicity of the inhibitors targeting different elements of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed and found mostly inappropriate as inhibitors were partly cytotoxic or unspecific. Alternatively a functional knock-out of RelA (p65) was used to identify the contribution of the NF-κB pathway to different cellular outcomes. Small hairpin RNA constructs (shRNA) were transfected into the HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cell line. Their functionality was assessed by quantitative Reverse Transcriptase real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to verify that the RelA mRNA amount was reduced by more than 80% in the knock-down cells The original cell line had been stably transfected with a reporter system to monitor NF-κB activation by measuring destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP)-expression. It was shown that after 18 hours d2EGFP reaches its highest expression level after activation of NF-κB and can be measured by FACS analysis

  11. Cycles in metabolism and heat loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.; Troutman, S. J.; Webb, P.

    1974-01-01

    Using calorimetric techniques, subjects' metabolism, thermoregulation, and body temperatures were monitored continuously for 24-hour days, using three types of experimental routines. A water cooling garment (WCG) was used for direct calorimetry, while partitional calorimetry was used to establish a non-suited comparison for one of the routines. In this replicated routine, called the quiet day, the subjects were sedentary throughout the daytime hours and slept normally at night. Results indicate that the WCG may act to reduce 24-hour total oxygen consumption (VO2) or heat production, possibly due to the lowered energy cost of thermoregulation.

  12. Benefits of adaptive radiation therapy in lung cancer as a function of replanning frequency

    SciT

    Dial, Christian; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D., E-mail: gdhugo@vcu.edu

    Purpose: To quantify the potential benefit associated with daily replanning in lung cancer in terms of normal tissue dose sparing and to characterize the tradeoff between adaptive benefit and replanning frequency. Methods: A set of synthetic images and contours, derived from weekly active breathing control images of 12 patients who underwent radiation therapy treatment for nonsmall cell lung cancer, is generated for each fraction of treatment using principal component analysis in a way that preserves temporal anatomical trends (e.g., tumor regression). Daily synthetic images and contours are used to simulate four different treatment scenarios: (1) a “no-adapt” scenario that simulatesmore » delivery of an initial plan throughout treatment, (2) a “midadapt” scenario that implements a single replan for fraction 18, (3) a “weekly adapt” scenario that simulates weekly adaptations, and (4) a “full-adapt” scenario that simulates daily replanning. An initial intensity modulated radiation therapy plan is created for each patient and replanning is carried out in an automated fashion by reoptimizing beam apertures and weights. Dose is calculated on each image and accumulated to the first in the series using deformable mappings utilized in synthetic image creation for comparison between simulated treatments. Results: Target coverage was maintained and cord tolerance was not exceeded for any of the adaptive simulations. Average reductions in mean lung dose (MLD) and volume of lung receiving 20 Gy or more (V20{sub lung}) were 65 ± 49 cGy (p = 0.000 01) and 1.1% ± 1.2% (p = 0.0006), respectively, for all patients. The largest reduction in MLD for a single patient was 162 cGy, which allowed an isotoxic escalation of the target dose of 1668 cGy. Average reductions in cord max dose, mean esophageal dose (MED), dose received by 66% of the heart (D66{sub heart}), and dose received by 33% of the heart (D33{sub heart}), were 158 ± 280, 117 ± 121, 37 ± 77, and 99

  13. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Wichman, Indrek; Guenther, Mark; Ray, Anjan; Agrawal, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    In a recent paper on 'Observations of candle flames under various atmospheres in microgravity' by Ross et al., it was found that for the same atmosphere, the burning rate per unit wick surface area and the flame temperature were considerably reduced in microgravity as compared with normal gravity. Also, the flame (spherical in microgravity) was much thicker and further removed from the wick. It thus appears that the flame becomes 'weaker' in microgravity due to the absence of buoyancy generated flow which serves to transport the oxidizer to the combustion zone and remove the hot combustion products from it. The buoyant flow, which may be characterized by the strain rate, assists the diffusion process to execute these essential functions for the survival of the flame. Thus, the diffusion flame is 'weak' at very low strain rates and as the strain rate increases the flame is initially 'strengthened' and eventually it may be 'blown out'. The computed flammability boundaries of T'ien show that such a reversal in material flammability occurs at strain rates around 5 sec. At very low or zero strain rates, flame radiation is expected to considerably affect this 'weak' diffusion flame because: (1) the concentration of combustion products which participate in gas radiation is high in the flame zone; and (2) low strain rates provide sufficient residence time for substantial amounts of soot to form which is usually responsible for a major portion of the radiative heat loss. We anticipate that flame radiation will eventually extinguish this flame. Thus, the objective of this project is to perform an experimental and theoretical investigation of radiation-induced extinction of diffusion flames under microgravity conditions. This is important for spacecraft fire safety.

  14. A tocotrienol-enriched formulation protects against radiation-induced changes in cardiac mitochondria without modifying late cardiac function or structure.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly J; Sharma, Sunil K; Moros, Eduardo G; Melnyk, Stepan B; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-03-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a common and sometimes severe late side effect of radiation therapy for intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. We have previously shown that local heart irradiation in a rat model caused prolonged changes in mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Because tocotrienols are known to protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, in this study, we examined the effects of tocotrienols on radiation-induced alterations in mitochondria, and structural and functional manifestations of RIHD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received image-guided localized X irradiation to the heart to a total dose of 21 Gy. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, rats received a tocotrienol-enriched formulation or vehicle by oral gavage. Mitochondrial function and mitochondrial membrane parameters were studied at 2 weeks and 28 weeks after irradiation. In addition, cardiac function and histology were examined at 28 weeks. A single oral dose of the tocotrienol-enriched formulation preserved Bax/Bcl2 ratios and prevented mPTP opening and radiation-induced alterations in succinate-driven mitochondrial respiration. Nevertheless, the late effects of local heart irradiation pertaining to myocardial function and structure were not modified. Our studies suggest that a single dose of tocotrienols protects against radiation-induced mitochondrial changes, but these effects are not sufficient against long-term alterations in cardiac function or remodeling.

  15. A Tocotrienol-Enriched Formulation Protects against Radiation-Induced Changes in Cardiac Mitochondria without Modifying Late Cardiac Function or Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly J; Sharma, Sunil K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a common and sometimes severe late side effect of radiation therapy for intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. We have previously shown that local heart irradiation in a rat model caused prolonged changes in mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Because tocotrienols are known to protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, in this study, we examined the effects of tocotrienols on radiation-induced alterations in mitochondria, and structural and functional manifestations of RIHD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received image-guided localized X irradiation to the heart to a total dose of 21 Gy. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, rats received a tocotrienol-enriched formulation or vehicle by oral gavage. Mitochondrial function and mitochondrial membrane parameters were studied at 2 weeks and 28 weeks after irradiation. In addition, cardiac function and histology were examined at 28 weeks. A single oral dose of the tocotrienol-enriched formulation preserved Bax/Bcl2 ratios and prevented mPTP opening and radiation-induced alterations in succinate-driven mitochondrial respiration. Nevertheless, the late effects of local heart irradiation pertaining to myocardial function and structure were not modified. Our studies suggest that a single dose of tocotrienols protects against radiation-induced mitochondrial changes, but these effects are not sufficient against long-term alterations in cardiac function or remodeling. PMID:25710576

  16. Changes in mitochondrial functioning with electromagnetic radiation of ultra high frequency as revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Burlaka, Anatoly; Selyuk, Marina; Gafurov, Marat; Lukin, Sergei; Potaskalova, Viktoria; Sidorik, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    To study the effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of ultra high frequency (UHF) in the doses equivalent to the maximal permitted energy load for the staffs of the radar stations on the biochemical processes that occur in the cell organelles. Liver, cardiac and aorta tissues from the male rats exposed to non-thermal UHF EMR in pulsed and continuous modes were studied during 28 days after the irradiation by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods including a spin trapping of superoxide radicals. The qualitative and quantitative disturbances in electron transport chain (ETC) of mitochondria are registered. A formation of the iron-nitrosyl complexes of nitric oxide (NO) radicals with the iron-sulphide (FeS) proteins, the decreased activity of FeS-protein N2 of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and flavo-ubisemiquinone growth combined with the increased rates of superoxide production are obtained. (i) Abnormalities in the mitochondrial ETC of liver and aorta cells are more pronounced for animals radiated in a pulsed mode; (ii) the alterations in the functioning of the mitochondrial ETC cause increase of superoxide radicals generation rate in all samples, formation of cellular hypoxia, and intensification of the oxide-initiated metabolic changes; and (iii) electron paramagnetic resonance methods could be used to track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the mitochondrial ETC caused by the UHF EMR.

  17. WE-AB-202-02: Incorporating Regional Ventilation Function in Predicting Radiation Fibrosis After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciT

    Lan, F; Jeudy, J; Tseng, H

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of pre-therapy regional ventilation function in predicting radiation fibrosis (RF) in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent thoracic chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 37 stage III NSCLC patients were retrospectively studied. Patients received one cycle of cisplatin-gemcitabine, followed by two to three cycles of cisplatin-etoposide concurrently with involved-field thoracic radiotherapy between 46 and 66 Gy (2 Gy per fraction). Pre-therapy regional ventilation images of the lung were derived from 4DCT via a density-change-based image registration algorithm with mass correction. RF was evaluated at 6-months post-treatment using radiographic scoring based on airway dilation and volumemore » loss. Three types of ipsilateral lung metrics were studied: (1) conventional dose-volume metrics (V20, V30, V40, and mean-lung-dose (MLD)), (2) dose-function metrics (fV20, fV30, fV40, and functional mean-lung-dose (fMLD) generated by combining regional ventilation and dose), and (3) dose-subvolume metrics (sV20, sV30, sV40, and subvolume mean-lung-dose (sMLD) defined as the dose-volume metrics computed on the sub-volume of the lung with at least 60% of the quantified maximum ventilation status). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate the predictability of these metrics for RF. Results: In predicting airway dilation, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) values for (V20, MLD), (fV20, fMLD), and (sV20, and sMLD) were (0.76, 0.70), (0.80, 0.74) and (0.82, 0.80), respectively. The logistic regression p-values were (0.09, 0.18), (0.02, 0.05) and (0.004, 0.006), respectively. With regard to volume loss, the corresponding AUC values for these metrics were (0.66, 0.57), (0.67, 0.61) and (0.71, 0.69), and p-values were (0.95, 0.90), (0.43, 0.64) and (0.08, 0.12), respectively. Conclusion: The inclusion of regional ventilation function improved

  18. TH-CD-202-09: Free-Breathing Proton MRI Functional Lung Avoidance Maps to Guide Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Capaldi, D; Sheikh, K; Parraga, G

    Purpose: Pulmonary functional MRI using inhaled gas contrast agents was previously investigated as a way to identify well-functioning lung in patients with NSCLC who are clinical candidates for radiotherapy. Hyperpolarized noble-gas ({sup 3}He and {sup 129}Xe) MRI has also been optimized to measure functional lung information, but for a number of reasons, the clinical translation of this approach to guide radiotherapy planning has been limited. As an alternative, free-breathing pulmonary 1H MRI using clinically available MRI systems and pulse sequences provides a non-contrast-enhanced method to generate both ventilation and perfusion maps. Free-breathing {sup 1}H MRI exploits non-rigid registration and Fouriermore » decomposition of MRI signal intensity differences (Bauman et al., MRM, 2009) that may be generated during normal tidal breathing. Here, our objective was to generate free-breathing {sup 1}H MRI ventilation and lung function avoidance maps in patients with NSCLC as a way to guide radiation therapy planning. Methods: Stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC patients (n=8, 68±9yr) provided written informed consent to a randomized controlled clinical trial ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02002052 ) that aimed to compare outcomes related to image-guided versus conventional radiation therapy planning. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}He/{sup 129}Xe and dynamic free tidal-breathing {sup 1}H MRI were acquired as previously described (Capaldi et al., Acad Radiol, 2015). Non-rigid registration was performed using the modality-independent-neighbourhood-descriptor (MIND) deformable approach (Heinrich et al., Med Image Anal, 2012). Ventilation-defect-percent ({sup 3}He:VDP{sub He}, {sup 129}Xe:VDP{sub Xe}, Free-breathing-{sup 1}H:VDP{sub FB}) and the corresponding ventilation maps were compared using Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Results: VDP{sub FB} was significantly related to VDP{sub He} (r=.71; p=.04) and VDP{sub Xe} (r=.80; p=.01

  19. Use of PET and Other Functional Imaging to Guide Target Delineation in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Choi, J Isabelle; Sawant, Amit; Gullapalli, Rao P; Chen, Wengen; Alavi, Abass; Simone, Charles B

    2018-06-01

    Molecular and functional imaging is increasingly being used to guide radiotherapy (RT) management and target delineation. This review summarizes existing data in several disease sites of various functional imaging modalities, chiefly positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), with respect to RT target definition and management. For gliomas, differentiation between postoperative changes and viable tumor is discussed, as well as focal dose escalation and reirradiation. Head and neck neoplasms may also benefit from precise PET/CT-based target delineation, especially for cancers of unknown primary; focal dose escalation is also described. In lung cancer, PET/CT can influence coverage of tumor volumes, dose escalation, and adaptive management. For cervical cancer, PET/CT as an adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging planning is discussed, as are dose escalation and delineation of avoidance targets such as the bone marrow. The emerging role of choline-based PET for prostate cancer and its impact on dose escalation is also described. Lastly, given the essential role of PET/CT for target definition in lymphoma, phase III trials of PET-directed management are reviewed, along with novel imaging modalities. Taken together, molecular and functional imaging approaches offer a major step to individualize radiotherapeutic care going forward. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Macrophage function in murine allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras in the early phase after transplantation

    SciT

    Roesler, J.; Baccarini, M.; Vogt, B.

    1989-08-01

    We tested several of the functions of macrophages (M phi) in the early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer to get information about this important aspect of the nonspecific immune system in the T-cell-deficient recipient. On days 3-5 after transfer, the number of M phi was reduced in the spleen, liver, lungs, and peritoneal cavity (Pe). The phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) by these M phi was normal or even enhanced, as in the case of Pe-M phi. Already on days 8-12 after transfer, the number of M phi in spleen and liver exceeded that of controls, whereasmore » the number was still reduced in lungs and Pe. We examined their ability to kill P815 tumor cells, to produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), to phagocytose SRBC, to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in vitro and to kill Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. Most functions were normal and often even enhanced, depending on the organ origin, but the ability of Pe-M phi to produce ROI was reduced. Proliferative response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and killing of YAC-1 tumor cells revealed a high frequency of macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and liver and a high natural killer (NK) activity in the liver. Altogether, enhanced nonspecific immune function, especially preactivated M phi, may enable chimeras to survive attacks by opportunistic pathogens.« less

  1. Depression of T lymphocyte function in chimpanzees receiving thymectomy and irradiation. [X Radiation

    SciT

    Gilbertsen, R.B.; Metzgar, R.S.

    1978-03-01

    In studies analogous to those in which the thymus dependency of immune functions in murine systems was determined, three chimpanzees were thymectomized, splenectomized, exposed to lethal doses of whole body x-irradiation with limited bone marrow shielding, and subsequently evaluated for lymphocyte markers and functions over a period of years. In the oldest animal studied (Irena, 7.2 years at surgery), the percentage of peripheral blood T cells decreased to about 60% of control values and remained at that level for approximately 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years before returning to normal. In the two youngest chimpanzees T cell rosette values dropped to 15more » to 40% of control values after irradiation. T cell percentages in one of these young chimpanzees returned to about 75% of the controls 2/sup 1///sub 2/ years after x-irradiation. Phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A mitogen responses were less affected in the oldest chimpanzee. However, even in the oldest animal, the responses to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A began to show a gradual and consistent decline 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years after irradiation. Mixed leukocyte culture responsiveness was most affected by the experimental procedures, being greatly reduced in all three chimpanzees during varying time intervals. In general, the effects of the experimental procedures used to produce T cell deficiencies varied with the age of the chimpanzee at surgery, the time after irradiation when the animal was tested, and the lymphocyte marker or function studied.« less

  2. Polarization-dependent bi-functional metasurface for directive radiation and diffusion-like scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Wang, Wenjun; Ding, Guowen; Chen, Ke; Zhao, Junming; Jiang, Tian; Zhu, Bo; Feng, Yijun

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we design a bi-functional metasurface with different spatial distribution of reflection phase responses depending on the incident polarization. The metasurface with a thickness of only 0.067 λ0 (λ0 is the working wavelength) is constructed by unit cells composing two orthogonal I-shaped metallic structures, and the reflection phase for x- and y-linearly polarized incidence can be independently controlled by the geometric parameters. The metasurface can work as a flat parabolic reflector antenna with a maximum gain reaching about 22 dBi around 9.5 GHz, when it is illuminated by the x-polarized feed source of an offset open-ended waveguide antenna. Meanwhile, designed with randomly distributed reflection phases, the proposed metasurface can behave as an electromagnetic (EM) diffusion-like surface, which is capable of suppressing the backward scattering in a broadband from 8.5 GHz to 14 GHz for y-polarized incidence. By this strategy of EM functionality integration, a metasurface reflector antenna equipped with stealth technique to achieve simultaneously high gain and low backward scattering is obtained. Finally, experiments have been carried out to demonstrate this design principle, which agree with the simulation results. The proposed metasurface could offer a promising route for designing EM devices with polarization-dependent multi-functionalities.

  3. Trajectories of cognitive function in dementia-free subjects: Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Landes, Reid D; Mimori, Yasuyo; Nagano, Yoshito; Sasaki, Hideo

    2015-04-15

    To investigate associations between age, sex, education, and birth cohort and global cognitive decline among a population that would most likely not progress to dementia. A total of 1538 dementia-free subjects aged 60 to 80years in 1992 were followed up through 2011 without dementia occurrence. We assessed cognitive function using the Cognitive Ability Screening Instrument (CASI). Using stepwise-like model selection procedure, we built mixed-effects models for initial cognition and longitudinal cognition. Initial CASI scores for younger age and more years of formal education were higher than those for older and less education. Sex did not show a significant effect. In the longitudinal analysis, cognitive decline became more rapid with increasing age. Sex and education did not modify the degree of deterioration with age. CASI scores were higher for younger cohorts and men due to differences in education levels. Among dementia-free subjects, age is an important predictor of cognitive function level and cognitive decline. Education level affects cognitive function level, but did not affect cognitive decline. The results have implications not only for elucidation of the aging process, but also for reference in dementia screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Total heart volume as a function of clinical and anthropometric parameters in a population of external beam radiation therapy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadège Ilembe Badouna, Audrey; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Bidault, François; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Bridier, André; de Vathaire, Florent; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine anthropometric parameters leading to the least uncertain estimate of heart size when connecting a computational phantom to an external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) patient. From computed tomography images, we segmented the heart and calculated its total volume (THV) in a population of 270 EBRT patients of both sexes, aged 0.7-83 years. Our data were fitted using logistic growth functions. The patient age, height, weight, body mass index and body surface area (BSA) were used as explanatory variables. For both genders, good fits were obtained with both weight (R2 = 0.89 for males and 0.83 for females) and BSA (R2 = 0.90 for males and 0.84 for females). These results demonstrate that, among anthropometric parameters, weight plays an important role in predicting THV. These findings should be taken into account when assigning a computational phantom to a patient.

  5. A transported probability density function/photon Monte Carlo method for high-temperature oxy-natural gas combustion with spectral gas and wall radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. Y.; Haworth, D. C.; Ren, T.; Modest, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model for high-temperature oxy-natural gas combustion is developed and exercised. The model features detailed gas-phase chemistry and radiation treatments (a photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution for gas and wall radiation - PMC/LBL) and a transported probability density function (PDF) method to account for turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. The model is first validated for a 0.8 MW oxy-natural gas furnace, and the level of agreement between model and experiment is found to be at least as good as any that has been published earlier. Next, simulations are performed with systematic model variations to provide insight into the roles of individual physical processes and their interplay in high-temperature oxy-fuel combustion. This includes variations in the chemical mechanism and the radiation model, and comparisons of results obtained with versus without the PDF method to isolate and quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions and turbulence-radiation interactions. In this combustion environment, it is found to be important to account for the interconversion of CO and CO2, and radiation plays a dominant role. The PMC/LBL model allows the effects of molecular gas radiation and wall radiation to be clearly separated and quantified. Radiation and chemistry are tightly coupled through the temperature, and correct temperature prediction is required for correct prediction of the CO/CO2 ratio. Turbulence-chemistry interactions influence the computed flame structure and mean CO levels. Strong local effects of turbulence-radiation interactions are found in the flame, but the net influence of TRI on computed mean temperature and species profiles is small. The ultimate goal of this research is to simulate high-temperature oxy-coal combustion, where accurate treatments of chemistry, radiation and turbulence-chemistry-particle-radiation interactions will be even more important.

  6. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com; Jalali, Rakesh; Goswami, Savita

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and atmore » specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.« less

  7. Effects of low-dose cranial radiation on growth hormone secretory dynamics and hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciT

    Costin, G.

    1988-08-01

    Spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretory dynamics and hypothalamic-pituitary function were studied in 16 long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were aged 9 to 15 1/2 years and had been treated with prophylactic central nervous system radiation and combined chemotherapy. At the time of study, the mean height was -1.5 SD score below the mean, less than genetic potential, and significantly less than the mean pretreatment height of -0.25 SD score. Height velocity was subnormal for age and sexual stage in all patients. Two patients had compensated hypothyroidism, and four had evidence of gonadal failure. In 11 patients, the peakmore » GH level after two provocative tests was below 10 micrograms/L, which was consistent with GH deficiency. In ten of 13 patients tested, spontaneous GH secretion determined by a 24-hour GH concentration (GHC), GH pulse amplitude, frequency of GH pulses greater than or equal to 5 micrograms/L, and GH peak during wake and sleep hours was significantly less than in normal height controls. Although in three pubertal patients the 24-hour GHC was within normal limits, the GHC during sleep hours, GH pulse amplitude during 24 hours and sleep hours, and peak GH during wake hours were significantly less than in normal height controls. In all pubertal and in two of the prepubertal patients, the somatomedin C (SmC) level was significantly less than in controls. The 24-hour GHC correlated well with the GHC during sleep, peak-stimulated GH level, gonadal steroid level, and the SmC level, but not with height velocity, dose of radiation, or age at radiation. A significant increase in height velocity and the SmC level was noted in all patients treated with GH. These results indicate that GH deficiency occurs after 18 to 24 Gy of cranial radiation and that the puberty-associated growth spurt may mask the decline in height velocity owing to GH deficiency.« less

  8. Genetic differences in transcript responses to low-dose ionizing radiation identify tissue functions associated with breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Antoine M; Marchetti, Francesco; Bhatnagar, Sandhya; Duru, Nadire; Han, Ju; Hu, Zhi; Mao, Jian-Hua; Gray, Joe W; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    High dose ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer but the health effects after low-dose (LD, <10 cGy) exposures remain highly uncertain. We explored a systems approach that compared LD-induced chromosome damage and transcriptional responses in strains of mice with genetic differences in their sensitivity to radiation-induced mammary cancer (BALB/c and C57BL/6) for the purpose of identifying mechanisms of mammary cancer susceptibility. Unirradiated mammary and blood tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of DNA repair, tumor suppressor, and stress response genes. LD exposures of 7.5 cGy (weekly for 4 weeks) did not induce detectable genomic instability in either strain. However, the mammary glands of the sensitive strain but not the resistant strain showed early transcriptional responses involving: (a) diminished immune response, (b) increased cellular stress, (c) altered TGFβ-signaling, and (d) inappropriate expression of developmental genes. One month after LD exposure, the two strains showed opposing responses in transcriptional signatures linked to proliferation, senescence, and microenvironment functions. We also discovered a pre-exposure expression signature in both blood and mammary tissues that is predictive for poor survival among human cancer patients (p = 0.0001), and a post-LD-exposure signature also predictive for poor patient survival (p<0.0001). There is concordant direction of expression in the LD-exposed sensitive mouse strain, in biomarkers of human DCIS and in biomarkers of human breast tumors. Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic mechanisms that determine susceptibility to LD radiation induced mammary cancer in mice are similar to the tissue mechanisms that determine poor-survival in breast cancer patients. We observed non-linearity of the LD responses providing molecular evidence against the LNT risk model and obtained new evidence that LD responses are strongly

  9. Thermoregulation of water foraging honeybees--balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and functional requirements.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Schmaranzer, Sigurd

    2010-12-01

    Foraging honeybees are subjected to considerable variations of microclimatic conditions challenging their thermoregulatory ability. Solar heat is a gain in the cold but may be a burden in the heat. We investigated the balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and physiological functions of water foraging Apis mellifera carnica honeybees in the whole range of ambient temperatures (T(a)) and solar radiation they are likely to be exposed in their natural environment in Middle Europe. The mean thorax temperature (T(th)) during foraging stays was regulated at a constantly high level (37.0-38.5 °C) in a broad range of T(a) (3-30 °C). At warmer conditions (T(a)=30-39 °C) T(th) increased to a maximal level of 45.3 °C. The endothermic temperature excess (difference of T(body)-T(a) of living and dead bees) was used to assess the endogenously generated temperature elevation as a correlate of energy turnover. Up to a T(a) of ∼30 °C bees used solar heat gain for a double purpose: to reduce energetic expenditure and to increase T(th) by about 1-3 °C to improve force production of flight muscles. At higher T(a) they exhibited cooling efforts to get rid of excess heat. A high T(th) also allowed regulation of the head temperature high enough to guarantee proper function of the bees' suction pump even at low T(a). This shortened the foraging stays and this way reduced energetic costs. With decreasing T(a) bees also reduced arrival body weight and crop loading to do both minimize costs and optimize flight performance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiative transfer in multilayered random medium with laminar structure - Green's function approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    For a multilayered random medium with a laminar structure a Green's function approach is introduced to obtain the emitted intensity due to an arbitrary point source. It is then shown that the approach is applicable to both active and passive remote sensing. In active remote sensing, the computed radar backscattering cross section for the multilayered medium includes the effects of both volume multiple scattering and surface multiple scattering at the layer boundaries. In passive remote sensing, the brightness temperature is obtained for arbitrary temperature profiles in the layers. As an illustration the brightness temperature and reflectivity are calculated for a bounded layer and compared with results in the literature.

  11. Palladium-103 plaque radiation therapy for ciliary body melanoma through a functioning glaucoma filtering bleb.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Arif H K; Barash, Alexander; Tena, Lawrence B; Finger, Paul T

    2018-01-01

    To provide a clinical description of the long-term outcome of a 103 Pd plaque-irradiated ciliary body melanoma with extrascleral extension while attempting to preserve a subadjacent glaucoma filtering bleb. A 75-year-old woman with pseudoexfoliative glaucoma for 17 years, 16 years status post argon laser trabeculoplasty, and 15 years status post trabeculectomy in the left eye, was diagnosed with an ipsilateral ciliary body melanoma with visible extrascleral extension. Treatment involved insertion of a 103 Pd radioactive plaque over the functioning trabeculectomy, with removal 7 days later. At plaque insertion, amniotic membrane grafts were used to cover the plaque and protect the filtering site. The tumor was successfully treated without clinical evidence of harm to the filtering bleb, with resultant stable intraocular pressure. However, the patient developed blebitis 1.5 years later. Though it resolved with topical antibiotic therapy, the bleb became less succulent. Two years postoperatively, she developed a spontaneous hyphema that resolved after one injection of transscleral bevacizumab 1.25 mg. Her tumor continually regressed in thickness. Without additional glaucoma surgery, her intraocular pressure remained well-controlled on topical medications for 6 years. Ciliary body melanoma with minimal extrascleral extension beneath a functioning filtering bleb can be treated using radioactive plaque therapy. In this case, we were able to achieve both tumor regression and glaucoma control by covering the plaque with an amniotic membrane graft.

  12. [Theoretical grounds of a structural and functional model for quality assurance of radiation diagnostics under conditions of development of the modern health care system in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Korop, Oleg A; Lenskykh, Sergiy V

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Modern changes in the health care system of Ukraine are focused on financial support in providing medical and diagnostic care to the population and are based on deep and consistent structural and functional transformations. They are aimed at providing adequate quality care, which is the main target function and a principal criterion for operation of health care system. The urgency of this problem is increasing in the context of reforming the health care system and global changes in the governmental financial guarantees for the provision of medical services to the population. The aim of the work is to provide theoretical grounds for a structural and functional model of quality assurance of radiation diagnostics at all levels of medical care given to the population under the current health care reform in Ukraine. Materials and methods: The object of the study is organizing the operation of the radiation diagnostic service; the information is based on the actual data on the characteristics of radiation diagnosis at different levels of medical care provision. Methods of systematic approach, system analysis and structural and functional analysis of the operating system of radiation diagnostics are used. Review: The basis of the quality assurance model is the cyclical process, which includes the stages of the problem identifition, planning of its solution, organization of the system for implementation of decisions, monitoring the quality management process of the radiation diagnostics, and factors influencing the quality of the radiation diagnostics service. These factors include the quality of the structure, process, results, organization of management and control of current processes and the results of radiation diagnostics management. Conclusions: The advantages of the proposed model for ensuring the quality of the radiation diagnostics service are its systemacy and complexity, elimination of identified defects and deficiencies, and achievement of

  13. Functional Data Analysis Applied to Modeling of Severe Acute Mucositis and Dysphagia Resulting From Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Dean, Jamie A., E-mail: jamie.dean@icr.ac.uk; Wong, Kee H.; Gay, Hiram

    Purpose: Current normal tissue complication probability modeling using logistic regression suffers from bias and high uncertainty in the presence of highly correlated radiation therapy (RT) dose data. This hinders robust estimates of dose-response associations and, hence, optimal normal tissue–sparing strategies from being elucidated. Using functional data analysis (FDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the dose data could overcome this limitation. Methods and Materials: FDA was applied to modeling of severe acute mucositis and dysphagia resulting from head and neck RT. Functional partial least squares regression (FPLS) and functional principal component analysis were used for dimensionality reduction of the dose-volume histogrammore » data. The reduced dose data were input into functional logistic regression models (functional partial least squares–logistic regression [FPLS-LR] and functional principal component–logistic regression [FPC-LR]) along with clinical data. This approach was compared with penalized logistic regression (PLR) in terms of predictive performance and the significance of treatment covariate–response associations, assessed using bootstrapping. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models was 0.65, 0.69, and 0.67, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 0.81, 0.83, and 0.83, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The calibration slopes/intercepts for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models were 1.6/−0.67, 0.45/0.47, and 0.40/0.49, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 2.5/−0.96, 0.79/−0.04, and 0.79/0.00, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The bootstrapped odds ratios indicated significant associations between RT dose and severe toxicity in the mucositis and dysphagia FDA models. Cisplatin was significantly associated with severe dysphagia in the FDA models. None of the covariates was significantly associated with

  14. Functional Data Analysis Applied to Modeling of Severe Acute Mucositis and Dysphagia Resulting From Head and Neck Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Gay, Hiram; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Deasy, Joseph O; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-11-15

    Current normal tissue complication probability modeling using logistic regression suffers from bias and high uncertainty in the presence of highly correlated radiation therapy (RT) dose data. This hinders robust estimates of dose-response associations and, hence, optimal normal tissue-sparing strategies from being elucidated. Using functional data analysis (FDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the dose data could overcome this limitation. FDA was applied to modeling of severe acute mucositis and dysphagia resulting from head and neck RT. Functional partial least squares regression (FPLS) and functional principal component analysis were used for dimensionality reduction of the dose-volume histogram data. The reduced dose data were input into functional logistic regression models (functional partial least squares-logistic regression [FPLS-LR] and functional principal component-logistic regression [FPC-LR]) along with clinical data. This approach was compared with penalized logistic regression (PLR) in terms of predictive performance and the significance of treatment covariate-response associations, assessed using bootstrapping. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models was 0.65, 0.69, and 0.67, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 0.81, 0.83, and 0.83, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The calibration slopes/intercepts for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models were 1.6/-0.67, 0.45/0.47, and 0.40/0.49, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 2.5/-0.96, 0.79/-0.04, and 0.79/0.00, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The bootstrapped odds ratios indicated significant associations between RT dose and severe toxicity in the mucositis and dysphagia FDA models. Cisplatin was significantly associated with severe dysphagia in the FDA models. None of the covariates was significantly associated with severe toxicity in the PLR models. Dose levels greater than

  15. Comparison of Calculations and Measurements of the Off-Axis Radiation Dose (SI) in Liquid Nitrogen as a Function of Radiation Length.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    radiation lengths. The off-axis dose in Silicon was calculated using the electron/photon transport code CYLTRAN and measured using thermal luminescent...various path lengths out to 2 radiation lengths. The cff-axis dose in Silicon was calculated using the electron/photon transport code CYLTRAN and measured... using thermal luminescent dosimeters (TLD’s). Calculations were performed on a CDC-7600 computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory and measurements

  16. Structure and Function of Skin: The Application of THz Radiation in Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Seong Jin; Kwon, Oh Sang

    Skin, the largest organ of human being, is a soft membrane covering the exterior of the body. It protects the host from mechanical injuries, toxic materials, pathogenic organisms, and so on. Although its basic function is protection from the environment like this, it is not a simple and static shield but a complex and dynamic organ which performs important roles in maintaining the homeostasis of the body. Skin controls evaporation to prevent massive water loss, and regulates body temperature by controlling the blood flow of skin and perspiration [1]. It is responsible for the synthesis of vitamin D and a storage center for lipid and water. In addition, skin contains nerve endings and provides sensation for temperature, touch, pressure, and vibration.

  17. A Study of Green's Function Methods Applied to Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the propagation of galactic ions through various materials. Galactic light ions result from the break up of heavy ion particles and their propagation through materials is modeled using the one-dimensional Boltzmann equation. When ions enter materials there can occur (i) the interaction of ions with orbital electrons which causes ionization within the material and (ii) ions collide with atoms causing production of secondary particles which penetrate deeper within the material. These processes are modeled by a continuum model. The basic idea is to place a control volume within the material and examine the change in ion flux across this control volume. In this way on can derive the basic equations for the transport of light and heavy ions in matter. Green's function perturbation methods can then be employed to solve the resulting equations using energy dependent nuclear cross sections.

  18. Turbulence radiation coupling in boundary layers of heavy-duty diesel engines

    SciT

    Sircar, Arpan; Paul, Chandan; Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder radiation and heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive, physics-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Recent measurements of wall layers in engines show discrepancies of up to 100% with respect to standard CFD boundary-layer models. And recent analysis of in-cylinder radiation based on the most recent spectral property databases and high-fidelity radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers has shown that at operating pressures and exhaust-gas recirculation levels typical of modern heavy-duty compression-ignition engines, radiative emissionmore » can be as high as 40% of the wall heat losses, that molecular gas radiation (mainly CO2 and H2O) can be more important than soot radiation, and that a significant fraction of the emitted radiation can be reabsorbed before reaching the walls. That is, radiation not only contributes to heat losses, but also changes the in-cylinder temperature distribution, which in turn affects combustion and emissions. The goal of this research is to develop models that explicitly account for the potentially strong coupling between radiative and turbulent boundary layer heat transfer. For example, for optically thick conditions, a simple diffusion model might be formulated in terms of an absorption-coefficient-dependent turbulent Prandtl number.« less

  19. Solar radiation and functional traits explain the decline of forest primary productivity along a tropical elevation gradient.

    PubMed

    Fyllas, Nikolaos M; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Shenkin, Alexander; Asner, Gregory P; Atkin, Owen K; Díaz, Sandra; Enquist, Brian J; Farfan-Rios, William; Gloor, Emanuel; Guerrieri, Rossella; Huasco, Walter Huaraca; Ishida, Yoko; Martin, Roberta E; Meir, Patrick; Phillips, Oliver; Salinas, Norma; Silman, Miles; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2017-06-01

    One of the major challenges in ecology is to understand how ecosystems respond to changes in environmental conditions, and how taxonomic and functional diversity mediate these changes. In this study, we use a trait-spectra and individual-based model, to analyse variation in forest primary productivity along a 3.3 km elevation gradient in the Amazon-Andes. The model accurately predicted the magnitude and trends in forest productivity with elevation, with solar radiation and plant functional traits (leaf dry mass per area, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, and wood density) collectively accounting for productivity variation. Remarkably, explicit representation of temperature variation with elevation was not required to achieve accurate predictions of forest productivity, as trait variation driven by species turnover appears to capture the effect of temperature. Our semi-mechanistic model suggests that spatial variation in traits can potentially be used to estimate spatial variation in productivity at the landscape scale. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciT

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 msmore » using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for

  1. Altered Physiological Function, Not Structure, Drives Increased Radiation-Use Efficiency of Soybean Grown at Elevated CO2

    Previous studies of elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on crop canopies have found that radiation-use efficiency is increased more than radiation-interception efficiency. It is assumed that increased radiation-use efficiency is due to changes in leaf-level physiology; however, canopy stru...

  2. Selective inhibition of influenza virus protein synthesis by inhibitors of DNA function. [UV radiation

    SciT

    Minor, P.D.; Dimmock, N.J.

    1977-05-15

    Various known inhibitors of cellular DNA function were shown to inhibit cellular RNA synthesis and influenza (fowl plague) virus multiplication. The drugs were investigated for their effect upon the synthesis of influenza virus proteins. According to this effect they could be classified with previously studied compounds as follows: Group I (ethidium bromide, proflavine, and N-nitroquinoline-N-oxide) inhibited both viral and cellular protein synthesis; Group II (nogalomycin, daunomycin and ..cap alpha..-amanitin) inhibited viral but not cellular protein synthesis, and all viral proteins were inhibited coordinately; Group III (mithramycin, echinomycin, and actinomycin D) inhibited all viral but not cellular protein synthesis at highmore » concentrations, but at a lower critical concentration inhibited the synthesis of viral haemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and M protein preferentially; Group IV(uv irradiation and camptothecin) inhibited the synthesis of viral haemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and M protein, but not other viral proteins, even at high doses. The mode of action of these inhibitors is discussed in relation to the mechanism of the nuclear events upon which influenza virus multiplication is dependent.« less

  3. Sanitation of chicken eggs by ionizing radiation: functional and nutritional assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, P.; Ribeiro, R.; Sousa, L.; Verde, S. Cabo; Lima, M. G.; Dinis, M.; Santana, A.; Botelho, M. L.

    2004-09-01

    Alternative technologies must be developed and implemented considering sanitation and preservation of eggs mainly for risk population. Food irradiation is an alternative to free Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. eggs, as a low dose point to a safety assurance. This study presents the correlation between irradiation doses (0.5 kGy up to 5 kGy at dose rate of 1.0 kGy/h) and some of functional and nutritional egg properties. Viscosimetry of non-irradiated and irradiated eggs was evaluated by means of VT550 Haake with an NV sensor and co-axes cylinders. After irradiation at 5 kGy, the yolk colour die (pale yellow) and the white egg was modified to a turbid yellow. The Cross equation was utilized to viscosimetry curves. Based on the assymptotics viscosimetry data indicated that increase of doses corresponds to an increase of the yolk and a decrease of white egg viscosimetry as such a Newton behaviour. Irradiation effects on nutritional properties were evaluated by means of egg protein patterns that were assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Lipids were identified by TLC. Based on results the sanitation dose is lower than the limit dose for the decrease of the main eggs properties.

  4. Functional and morphological evaluation of radiation nephropathy and ureteral injury in the dog

    SciT

    Cloran, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) may provide a therapeutic advantage in the treatment of certain intraabdominal malignancies. However, before the therapeutic potential of innovative modalities can be assessed adequately, the in vivo radiobiological effects and responses of normal tissues to clinical doses of irradiation must be determined. In this study, the reactions of normal canine kidneys, ureters, and major vessels wee assessed following IORT, fractionated x-irradiation, or a combination of these modalities. Radiographically derived morphological endpoints, including kidney size and cortical width, were monitored for one year following irradiation. The renal parenchymal atrophy, vascular alterations and functional impairment that developed was directlymore » related to the IORT dose, whether delivered alone or in combination with fractionated x-irradiation. The incidence of ureteral injury and secondary hydronephrosis increased with both the IORT dose and post-irradiation time. No ureteral changes were detected in dogs that received only fractionated x-irradiation (60-80 Gy). No significant arteriographic abnormalities could be detected in the caudal aorta during the one year follow-up period.« less

  5. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    SciT

    Kipritidis, John, E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), amore » novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r

  6. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging.

    PubMed

    Kipritidis, John; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey; Keall, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4-6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r̄(Inter)=0.52±0.25, which was significantly

  7. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  8. Effects of Radiative Emission and Absorption on the Propagation and Extinction of Premixed Gas Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Yiguang; Masuya, Goro; Ronney, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    Premixed gas flames in mixtures of CH4, O2, N2, and CO2 were studied numerically using detailed chemical and radiative emission-absorption models to establish the conditions for which radiatively induced extinction limits may exist independent of the system dimensions. It was found that reabsorption of emitted radiation led to substantially higher burning velocities and wider extinction limits than calculations using optically thin radiation models, particularly when CO2, a strong absorber, is present in the unburned gas, Two heat loss mechanisms that lead to flammability limits even with reabsorption were identified. One is that for dry hydrocarbon-air mixtures, because of the differences in the absorption spectra of H2O and CO2, most of the radiation from product H2O that is emitted in the upstream direction cannot be absorbed by the reactants. The second is that the emission spectrum Of CO2 is broader at flame temperatures than ambient temperature: thus, some radiation emitted near the flame front cannot be absorbed by the reactants even when they are seeded with CO2 Via both mechanisms, some net upstream heat loss due to radiation will always occur, leading to extinction of sufficiently weak mixtures. Downstream loss has practically no influence. Comparison with experiment demonstrates the importance of reabsorption in CO2 diluted mixtures. It is concluded that fundamental flammability limits can exist due to radiative heat loss, but these limits are strongly dependent on the emission-absorption spectra of the reactant and product -gases and their temperature dependence and cannot be predicted using gray-gas or optically thin model parameters. Applications to practical flames at high pressure, in large combustion chambers, and with exhaust-gas or flue-gas recirculation are discussed.

  9. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Goldfarb, Shari

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, basedmore » on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.« less

  10. Mechanism of action of ionizing radiation on hexokinase and cholinesterase activity in the rat brain, in the presence of altered function of M-cholinergic structures. [X radiation

    SciT

    Khripchenko, I.P.; Kukulyanskaya, M.F.; Markina, V.L.

    1977-01-01

    Data are submitted on activity of hexokinase and isozymes thereof, and cholinesterase in subcellular fractions of the brain in the case of inhibition and stimulation of M-cholinoreactive structures under the influence of a relatively small dose, 40 R, of ionizing radiation.

  11. Epidermal 'alarm substance' cells of fishes maintained by non-alarm functions: possible defence against pathogens, parasites and UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Douglas P; Wisenden, Brian D; Hindman, Carrie J; Michalak, Tracy A; Kusch, Robin C; Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Jack, Kristin L; Ferrari, Maud C O; Pollock, Robyn J; Halbgewachs, Colin F; Pollock, Michael S; Alemadi, Shireen; James, Clayton T; Savaloja, Rachel K; Goater, Cameron P; Corwin, Amber; Mirza, Reehan S; Kiesecker, Joseph M; Brown, Grant E; Adrian, James C; Krone, Patrick H; Blaustein, Andrew R; Mathis, Alicia

    2007-10-22

    Many fishes possess specialized epidermal cells that are ruptured by the teeth of predators, thus reliably indicating the presence of an actively foraging predator. Understanding the evolution of these cells has intrigued evolutionary ecologists because the release of these alarm chemicals is not voluntary. Here, we show that predation pressure does not influence alarm cell production in fishes. Alarm cell production is stimulated by exposure to skin-penetrating pathogens (water moulds: Saprolegnia ferax and Saprolegnia parasitica), skin-penetrating parasites (larval trematodes: Teleorchis sp. and Uvulifer sp.) and correlated with exposure to UV radiation. Suppression of the immune system with environmentally relevant levels of Cd inhibits alarm cell production of fishes challenged with Saprolegnia. These data are the first evidence that alarm substance cells have an immune function against ubiquitous environmental challenges to epidermal integrity. Our results indicate that these specialized cells arose and are maintained by natural selection owing to selfish benefits unrelated to predator-prey interactions. Cell contents released when these cells are damaged in predator attacks have secondarily acquired an ecological role as alarm cues because selection favours receivers to detect and respond adaptively to public information about predation.

  12. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  13. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  14. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    SciT

    Liu, Qi; Underwood, Tracy S.A.; Kung, Jong

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ∼1.1. However, emerging data have suggested that Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects can lead to a variable RBE, at least in vitro. We investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Methods and Materials: Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer 2.5 keV/μm)more » or with 250 kVp x-rays, and the clonogenic survival fractions were determined. To estimate the RBE of the protons relative to cobalt-60 photons (Co60Eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to x-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor the damage responses, and the cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Results: Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared with 1.11 for wild-type cells (at a survival fraction of 0.1; P<.05), which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the S/G{sub 2} phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. Conclusions: A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is, at least in part, due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damage. In vivo and clinical studies are needed

  15. Far infrared radiation promotes rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and functional characteristics, and protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Ni; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Young, Tai-Horng

    2017-01-01

    Far infrared radiation, a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum, is beneficial for long-term tissue healing, anti-inflammatory effects, growth promotion, sleep modulation, acceleration of microcirculation, and pain relief. We investigated if far infrared radiation is beneficial for renal proximal tubule cell cultivation and renal tissue engineering. We observed the effects of far infrared radiation on renal proximal tubules cells, including its effects on cell proliferation, gene and protein expression, and viability. We also examined the protective effects of far infrared radiation against cisplatin, a nephrotoxic agent, using the human proximal tubule cell line HK-2. We found that daily exposure to far infrared radiation for 30 min significantly increased rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation in vitro, as assessed by MTT assay. Far infrared radiation was not only beneficial to renal proximal tubule cell proliferation, it also increased the expression of ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1, as determined by western blotting. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that far infrared radiation enhanced CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK expression. In the proximal tubule cell line HK-2, far infrared radiation protected against cisplatin-mediated nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis. Renal proximal tubule cell cultivation with far infrared radiation exposure resulted in better cell proliferation, significantly higher ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1 expression, and significantly enhanced expression of CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK. These results suggest that far infrared radiation improves cell proliferation and differentiation. In HK-2 cells, far infrared radiation mediated protective effects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis, as indicated by flow cytometry and caspase-3 assay.

  16. Effects of soot absorption coefficient-Planck function correlation on radiative heat transfer in oxygen-enriched propane turbulent diffusion flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvi, J. L.; Nmira, F.

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this article is to quantify the influence of the soot absorption coefficient-Planck function correlation on radiative loss and flame structure in an oxygen-enhanced propane turbulent diffusion flame. Calculations were run with and without accounting for this correlation by using a standard k-ε model and the steady laminar flamelet model (SLF) coupled to a joint Probability Density Function (PDF) of mixture fraction, enthalpy defect, scalar dissipation rate, and soot quantities. The PDF transport equation is solved by using a Stochastic Eulerian Field (SEF) method. The modeling of soot production is carried out by using a flamelet-based semi-empirical acetylene/benzene soot model. Radiative heat transfer is modeled by using a wide band correlated-k model and turbulent radiation interactions (TRI) are accounted for by using the Optically-Thin Fluctuation Approximation (OTFA). Predicted soot volume fraction, radiant wall heat flux distribution and radiant fraction are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Model results show that soot absorption coefficient and Planck function are negatively correlated in the region of intense soot emission. Neglecting this correlation is found to increase significantly the radiative loss leading to a substantial impact on flame structure in terms of mean and rms values of temperature. In addition mean and rms values of soot volume fraction are found to be less sensitive to the correlation than temperature since soot formation occurs mainly in a region where its influence is low.

  17. Comparison of calculations and measurements of the off-axis radiation dose (SI) in liquid nitrogen as a function of radiation length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromar, P. F.

    1984-12-01

    In this thesis results are presented from a study of the off-axis X and Gamma radiation field caused by a highly relativistic electron beam in liquid Nitrogen at various path lengths out to 2 radiation lengths. The off-axis dose in Silicon was calculated using electron/photon transport code CYLTRAN and measured using thermal luminescent dosimeters (TLD's). Calculations were performed on a CDC-7600 computer ar Los Alamos National Laboratory and measurements were made using the Naval Postgraduate School 100 Mev Linac. Comparison of the results is made and CYLTRAN is found to be in agreement with experimentally measured values. The CYLTRAN results are extended to the off-axis dose caused by a 100 Mev electron beam in air at Standard Temperature and Pressure (STP).

  18. Effects of ultraviolet radiation and nutrients on the structure-function of phytoplankton in a high mountain lake.

    PubMed

    Korbee, Nathalie; Carrillo, Presentación; Mata, M Teresa; Rosillo, Silvia; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Figueroa, Félix L

    2012-06-01

    The combined effect of high solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and nutrient supply in a phytoplankton community of a high mountain lake is analyzed in a in situ experiment for 6 days with 2 × 2 factorial design. Interactive UVR × nutrient effects on structural and functional variables (algal biomass, chlorophyll a (chl a), primary production (PP), maximal electron transport rate (ETR(max)), and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA)), as well as stoichiometric ones (sestonic N per cell and N:P ratio) were found. Under non-nutrient enriched conditions, no deleterious effects of UVR on structural variables, PP, photosynthetic efficiency and ETR(max) were observed, whereas only particulate and total APA were affected by UVR. However, percentage excreted organic carbon (%EOC), dissolved APA and sestonic C and P per cell increased under UVR, leading to a decrease in algal C:P and N:P ratios. After nutrient enrichment, chl a, total algal biomass and PP were negatively affected by UVR whereas %EOC, ETR(max) and internal C, P and N content increased. We suggest that the mechanism of algal acclimation to UVR in this high UVR flux ecosystem seems to be related to the increase of internal algal P-content mediated by physiological mechanisms to save P and by a stimulatory UVR effect on dissolved extracellular APA. The mechanism involved in the unmasking effect of UVR after nutrient-enrichment may be the result of a greater sensitivity to UVR-induced cell damage, making the negative UVR effects more evident.

  19. Use of an improved radiation amplification factor to estimate the effect of total ozone changes on action spectrum weighted irradiances and an instrument response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone Ω, U(Ω/200)-RAF, where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 nm) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  20. Use of an Improved Radiation Amplification Factor to Estimate the Effect of Total Ozone Changes on Action Spectrum Weighted Irradiances and an Instrument Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple scattering radiative transfer results are used to calculate action spectrum weighted irradiances and fractional irradiance changes in terms of a power law in ozone OMEGA, U(OMEGA/200)(sup -RAF), where the new radiation amplification factor (RAF) is just a function of solar zenith angle. Including Rayleigh scattering caused small differences in the estimated 30 year changes in action spectrum-weighted irradiances compared to estimates that neglect multiple scattering. The radiative transfer results are applied to several action spectra and to an instrument response function corresponding to the Solar Light 501 meter. The effect of changing ozone on two plant damage action spectra are shown for plants with high sensitivity to UVB (280-315 run) and those with lower sensitivity, showing that the probability for plant damage for the latter has increased since 1979, especially at middle to high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Similarly, there has been an increase in rates of erythemal skin damage and pre-vitamin D3 production corresponding to measured ozone decreases. An example conversion function is derived to obtain erythemal irradiances and the UV index from measurements with the Solar Light 501 instrument response function. An analytic expressions is given to convert changes in erythemal irradiances to changes in CIE vitamin-D action spectrum weighted irradiances.

  1. Analysis of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Responses Induced by Simulated Space Radiation Qualities by Use of Recombinant Bacteria Carrying a Dual-Function Dual-Reporter Construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Zahoor, Ahmed; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    Along with the long-term space exploration come various potential health risks due to unique physical factors of the space environment. Space radiation is one of the primary environmental hazards associated with space flight. In order to deal with space-related risk radiation exposure must be properly characterised and quantified, and biological effects of charged particles have to be analysed in ground based research, especially as astronauts are subjected to a differing radiation quality in space than they receive on Earth. For risk assessment, the mutagenic potential of the heavy ion component of the galactic cosmic radiation is of major concern for tumour induction as radiation late effects. The recombinant SWITCH test is based on TA1535 Salmonella typhimurium cells transformed with a dual-function dual-reporter vector harbouring (a) the genes for bioluminescence production from Photobacterium leiognathi under the control of a DNA-damage inducible promoter and (b) the gene for green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria under the control of a constitutive promoter. Suchlike genetically modified organism report on the presence of genotoxic conditions by dose dependent increase of bioluminescence induction and on the presence of cytotoxic conditions by dose dependent decrease in GFP fluorescence. By this, it is possible to analyse bacterial inactivation and mutation induction by ionizing radiation in parallel in the same cell within short time. Experiments with heavy ions have been performed with the SWITCH test at GANIL with the following accelerated heavy ions: 35 MeV/u (72 keV/µm) and 75 MeV/u (37 keV/µm) carbon, 95 MeV/u argon (377 keV/µm), 95 MeV/u neon (98 keV/µm), 75 MeV/u nickel (967 keV/µm) and 29 MeV/u lead (10238 keV/µm). The results obtained clearly show that the numbers of hits (particles per cm2 ) necessary to inactivate the bacteria (cytotoxicity) depend on LET. The higher the ionisation capacity of the accelerated ion, the

  2. Safety of coronary CT angiography and functional testing for stable chest pain in the PROMISE trial: A randomized comparison of test complications, incidental findings, and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Lu, Michael T; Douglas, Pamela S; Udelson, James E; Adami, Elizabeth; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Picard, Michael H; Roberts, Rhonda; Lee, Kerry L; Einstein, Andrew J; Mark, Daniel B; Velazquez, Eric J; Carter, William; Ridner, Michael; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Hoffmann, Udo

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and functional testing strategies for stable chest pain yield similar outcomes; one aspect that may guide test choice is safety. We compared test safety (test complications, incidental findings, and effective radiation dose) between CTA and functional testing as-tested in PROMISE (PROspective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain). In the subgroup whose physicians intended nuclear stress over other functional tests if randomized to the functional arm, we compared radiation dose of CTA versus nuclear stress and identified characteristics associated with dose. Of 9470 patients, none had major and <1% had minor complications (CTA: 0.8% [37/4633] vs. functional: 0.6% [27/4837]). CTA identified more incidental findings (11.6% [539/4633] vs. 0.7% [34/4837], p < 0.001), most commonly pulmonary nodules (9.4%, 437/4633). CTA had similar 90-day cumulative radiation dose to functional testing. However, in the subgroup whose physicians intended nuclear stress (CTA 3147; nuclear 3203), CTA had lower median index test (8.8 vs. 12.6 mSv, p < 0.001) and 90-day cumulative (11.6 vs. 13.1 mSv, p < 0.001) dose, independent of patient characteristics. The lowest nuclear doses employed 1-day Tc-99m protocols (12.2 mSv). The lowest CTA doses were at sites performing ≥500 CTAs/year (6.9 mSv) and with advanced (latest available) CT scanners (5.5 mSv). Complications were negligibly rare for both CTA and functional testing. CTA detects more incidental findings. Compared to nuclear stress testing, CTA's lower radiation dose, independent of patient characteristics, makes it an attractive test choice. Radiation dose varies with imaging protocol, indicating opportunities to further reduce dose. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01174550). Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is concerned with the health risks to astronauts, particularly those risks related to radiation exposure. Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of (A) peripheral leukocyte distribution; (B) plasma cytokine levels; (C) cytokine production profiles following whole blood stimulation of either T cells or monocytes.

  4. The Response of the Ocean Thermal Skin Layer to Variations in Incident Infrared Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elizabeth W.; Minnett, Peter J.

    2018-04-01

    Ocean warming trends are observed and coincide with the increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere resulting from human activities. At the ocean surface, most of the incoming infrared (IR) radiation is absorbed within the top micrometers of the ocean's surface where the thermal skin layer (TSL) exists. Thus, the incident IR radiation does not directly heat the upper few meters of the ocean. This paper investigates the physical mechanism between the absorption of IR radiation and its effect on heat transfer at the air-sea boundary. The hypothesis is that given the heat lost through the air-sea interface is controlled by the TSL, the TSL adjusts in response to variations in incident IR radiation to maintain the surface heat loss. This modulates the flow of heat from below and hence controls upper ocean heat content. This hypothesis is tested using the increase in incoming longwave radiation from clouds and analyzing vertical temperature profiles in the TSL retrieved from sea-surface emission spectra. The additional energy from the absorption of increasing IR radiation adjusts the curvature of the TSL such that the upward conduction of heat from the bulk of the ocean into the TSL is reduced. The additional energy absorbed within the TSL supports more of the surface heat loss. Thus, more heat beneath the TSL is retained leading to the observed increase in upper ocean heat content.

  5. Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

  6. Reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function in stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jing; Kelsey, Chris R; Yoo, David; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using cine megavoltage (MV) images. Cine MV images of 20 patients acquired during three-dimensional conformal (6-11 beams) SBRT treatments were retrospectively analyzed to extract tumor motion trajectories. For each patient, tumor motion PDFs were generated per fraction (PDF(n)) using three selected "usable" beams. Patients without at least three usable beams were excluded from the study. Fractional PDF reproducibility (R(n)) was calculated as the Dice similarity coefficient between PDF(n) to a "ground-truth" PDF (PDF(g)), which was generated using the selected beams of all fractions. The mean of R(n), labeled as R(m), was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient's mean tumor motion rang (A(m)). Change of R(m) during the course of SBRT treatments was also evaluated. Intra- and intersubject coefficient of variation (CV) of R(m) and A(m) were determined. Thirteen patients had at least three usable beams and were analyzed. The mean of R(m) was 0.87 (range, 0.84-0.95). The mean of A(m) was 3.18 mm (range, 0.46-7.80 mm). R(m) was found to decrease as A(m) increases following an equation of R(m) = 0.17e(-0.9Am) + 0.84. R(m) also decreased slightly throughout the course of treatments. Intersubject CV of R(m) (0.05) was comparable to intrasubject CV of R(m) (range, 0.02-0.09); intersubject CV of A(m) (0.73) was significantly greater than intrasubject CV of A(m) (range, 0.09-0.24). Tumor motion PDF can be determined using cine MV images acquired during the treatments. The reproducibility of lung tumor motion PDF decreased exponentially as the tumor motion range increased and decreased slightly throughout the course of the treatments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy on oral mucosa and immune function in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Lusi; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Zhenhe; Luo, Weijun; Xu, Tao; Lü, Zhiqian; Li, Shao'en

    2018-05-28

    To study the potential effects of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on clinical efficacy, oral mucosa reaction and immunological foundation; and to explore the effect of immunological changes on clinical efficacy and oral mucosa reaction in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
 Methods: A total of 200 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, who came from First Department of Nasopharyngeal Radiotherapy, the First People's Hospital of Foshan from October 2008 to November 2011, were selected. The patients were treated with nasopharyngeal radiotherapy, and divided into an observation group and a control group (n=100 in each group). The control group underwent common conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy treatment, while the observation group underwent IMRT. The 5-year survival rates and recurrence rates were recorded at follow-up. After the radiotherapy, the oral mucosa in the patients were evaluated by the classification standard of acute radioactive mucositis by American Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG), and the number of T lymphocyte subsets before and after treatment was detected.
 Results: There were significant difference in non-regional-recurrence survival rate, disease-free survival rate, local recurrence rate between the above 2 groups (all P<0.05), but no significant difference in the distant metastasis-free survival rate (P>0.05). The acute oral mucosa reactions of grade 1, 2, 3, 4 in the control group were 8.00%, 20.00%, 12.00%, 7.00%, respectively, and those were 7.00%, 22.00%, 15.00%, 1.00% respectively. There was no significant difference in the acute response of oral mucosa in grade 1, 2 and 3 in the 2 groups (all P>0.05), but there was significant difference in the grade 4 (P<0.05). There were significantly difference in CD8+, CD4+/ CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets before and after treatment in the above 2 groups (all P<0.01); there were also significantly difference after treatment between the observation group and the

  8. Effect of γ-radiation on free radicals formation, structural changes and functional properties of wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Atrous, Hager; Benbettaieb, Nasreddine; Hosni, Faouzi; Danthine, Sabine; Blecker, Christophe; Attia, Hamadi; Ghorbel, Dorra

    2015-09-01

    Wheat starch was treated by different γ-radiation doses (3, 5, 10, 20, 35 and 50 kGy). The effects of γ-radiation on structural, thermal, physicochemical, morphological and rheological properties of wheat starch were studied. The presence of free radicals after γ-radiation treatment, which number decreased with time was confirmed. Structural analysis revealed decreases in the intensities of the O-H and C-H stretches and glycosidic linkages indicating the depolymerization of amylose and probably amylopectin into shorter chain molecules, but showed that γ-radiation treatment did not affect the crystalline structure. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) thermograms showed the absence of significant differences in the gelatinization temperatures, as well as the corresponding transition enthalpies since the DSC parameters are related to the crystalline ordering within the granules. Apparent amylose content decreased linearly with increasing irradiation dose leading to an increase in water solubility index. An increase in the swelling power was observed after irradiation treatment until 20 kGy, followed by a rapid decrease at higher doses. Microscopic observations showed that the effect of γ-radiation was more visible on starch pastes than on starch granules. Rheological properties of the starch pastes decreased with increasing irradiation dose as a result of glycosidic bond cleavage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Early brain response to low-dose radiation exposure involves molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy and environmental nuclear contamination as well as for Earth-orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of mouse brain tissue after whole-body irradiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high-dose radiation (2 Gy) and that low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues and pathways that were specific for brain tissue. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (P < 10(-53)) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified nine neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose irradiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down-regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  10. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Maximum depth of keyhole melting of metals by a laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, V. A.; Cherepanov, G. P.

    1990-11-01

    A calculation is reported of the maximum depth and diameter of a narrow crater formed in a stationary metal target exposed to high-power cw CO2 laser radiation. The energy needed for erosion of a unit volume is assumed to be constant and the energy losses experienced by the beam in the vapor-gas channel are ignored. The heat losses in the metal are allowed for by an analytic solution of the three-dimensional boundary-value heat-conduction problem of the temperature field in the vicinity of a thin but long crater with a constant temperature on its surface. An approximate solution of this problem by a method proposed earlier by one of the present authors was tested on a computer. The dimensions of the thin crater were found to be very different from those obtained earlier subject to a less rigorous allowance for the heat losses.

  11. Concept for Classifying Facade Elements Based on Material, Geometry and Thermal Radiation Using Multimodal Uav Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilehag, R.; Schenk, A.; Hinz, S.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a concept for classification of facade elements, based on the material and the geometry of the elements in addition to the thermal radiation of the facade with the usage of a multimodal Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) system. Once the concept is finalized and functional, the workflow can be used for energy demand estimations for buildings by exploiting existing methods for estimation of heat transfer coefficient and the transmitted heat loss. The multimodal system consists of a thermal, a hyperspectral and an optical sensor, which can be operational with a UAV. While dealing with sensors that operate in different spectra and have different technical specifications, such as the radiometric and the geometric resolution, the challenges that are faced are presented. Addressed are the different approaches of data fusion, such as image registration, generation of 3D models by performing image matching and the means for classification based on either the geometry of the object or the pixel values. As a first step towards realizing the concept, the result from a geometric calibration with a designed multimodal calibration pattern is presented.

  12. A web-based remote radiation treatment planning system using the remote desktop function of a computer operating system: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keishiro; Hirasawa, Yukinori; Yaegashi, Yuji; Miyamoto, Hideki; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    We developed a web-based, remote radiation treatment planning system which allowed staff at an affiliated hospital to obtain support from a fully staffed central institution. Network security was based on a firewall and a virtual private network (VPN). Client computers were installed at a cancer centre, at a university hospital and at a staff home. We remotely operated the treatment planning computer using the Remote Desktop function built in to the Windows operating system. Except for the initial setup of the VPN router, no special knowledge was needed to operate the remote radiation treatment planning system. There was a time lag that seemed to depend on the volume of data traffic on the Internet, but it did not affect smooth operation. The initial cost and running cost of the system were reasonable.

  13. [Physiological and hygienic assessment of the impact of mobile phones with various radiation intensity on the functional state of brain of children and adolescents according to electroencephalographic data].

    PubMed

    Vyatleva, O A; Teksheva, L M; Kurgansky, A M

    To test the effect of mobile phones (MP) of various radiation intensities on the functional state of the brain in children and adolescents, a sham-controlled EEG-study was conducted in a group of thirteen 6-13 years old children, including eight 6-10 years old children. The study showed that a 3-minute exposure to the MP causes the significant decline in alpha-band absolute power, which depends on the radiation intensity and the user’s age. Different from sham, an EEG-effect of MP with the energy flux density (EFD) about 100 mW/cm2 was registered both in total, and in a younger (6-10 yr) group. Its bilateral character, more prominent in the hemisphere that is ipsilateral to MP, indicates that this intensity of the radiation influences not only the superficial cortical areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere, but also the deep structures of the brain. MP with the EFD less than 1 mW/cm2 differed from sham by EEG-effect only in the group of children who are 6-10 years old. Its local, ipsilateral character indicates to the superficial influence of such intensity of the radiation on the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The results show that for the regulation of MP-radiation it’s necessary to consider age features of the brain’s response. The high significance of the EFD, as an index in the assessment of the impact of MP on the EEG of children, is shown. Since almost all schoolchildren are the users of mobile phones, the situation with the valuation of MP-effects on children of various ages, requires hygienic solution.

  14. Radiation Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Dose Calculator Use the Radiation ... the Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Radiation Protection Radiation Sources and Doses Calculate Your Radiation Dose ...

  15. [The effect of electromagnetic waves of very high frequency of molecular spectra of radiation and absorption of nitric oxide on the functional activity of platelets].

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Maĭborodin, A V; Volin, M V; Krenitskiĭ, A P; Tupikin, V D

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of electromagnetic EMI MMD-fluctuation on the frequencies of molecular spectra of radiation, and nitric oxide absorption under in vitro conditions on the functional activity of platelets in patients with unstable angina pectoris, with the help of a specially created generator. At amplitude-modulated and continuous modes of EMI MMD-irradiation of platelet-rich plasma for 5, 15 and 30 min the platelet functional activity decreases, which was shown up in reduction of their activation and fall of aggregative ability. The degree, to which platelet functional activity was inhibited, depended on the mode of irradiation and on duration of EMI MMD effect. The most obvious changes in platelet activation and in their readiness to aggregative response were observed at a continuous mode of irradiation within a 15 min interval.

  16. Radiation enhanced efficiency of combined electromagnetic hyperthermia and chemotherapy of lung carcinoma using cisplatin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Babincová, M; Kontrisova, K; Durdík, S; Bergemann, C; Sourivong, P

    2014-02-01

    The effect of trimodality treatment consisting of hyperthermia, cisplatin and radiation was investigated in two non-small lung carcinoma cell lines with different sensitivities to cisplatin. Hyperthermia treatment was performed using heat released via Neél and Brown relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field. Radiation with dose 1.5 Gy was performed after 15 min electromagnetic hyperthermia and cisplatin treatment. Electromagnetic hyperthermia enhanced cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in both the cisplatin-sensitive H460 (viability 11.2 +/- 1.8 %) and cisplatin-resistant A549 (viability 14.5 +/- 2.3 %) lung carcinoma cell line. Proposed nanotechnology based trimodality cancer treatment may have therefore important clinical applications.

  17. Cavity evolution at grain boundaries as a function of radiation damage and thermal conditions in nanocrystalline nickel

    DOE PAGES

    Muntifering, Brittany; Blair, Sarah Jane; Gong, Cajer; ...

    2015-12-30

    Enhanced radiation tolerance of nanostructured metals is attributed to the high density of interfaces that can absorb radiation-induced defects. Here, cavity evolution mechanisms during cascade damage, helium implantation, and annealing of nanocrystalline nickel are characterized via in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Films subjected to self-ion irradiation followed by helium implantation developed evenly distributed cavity structures, whereas films exposed in the reversed order developed cavities preferentially distributed along grain boundaries. Post-irradiation annealing and orientation mapping demonstrated uniform cavity growth in the nanocrystalline structure, and cavities spanning multiple grains. Furthermore, these mechanisms suggest limited ability to reduce swelling, despite the stabilitymore » of the nanostructure.« less

  18. Attenuation of radiation from distributed gamma sources as a function of wall thickness of a concrete blockhouse

    SciT

    Schmoke, M. A.; Rexroad, R. E.; Tiller, H. J.

    1963-06-15

    The experiment described constitutes part of the shielding program conducted by Army Nuclear Defense Laboratory and was designed to experimentally verify theoretical calculations used to predict the amount of radiation protection afforded by above-ground structures in a fallout radiation field. This method requires the knowledge of some physical parameters of a structure such as mass thickness of the walls and the geometric orientation of the detectors within the structure. From this information, a reduction factor for any given structure may be calculated. This Laboratory's experimental program was initially begun by measuring the attenuation of a simple structure with no complicatingmore » internal or external geometries and will proceed to more complex structures with basements, interior partitions, and upper floors. (auth)« less

  19. Functional specialization in nucleotide sugar transporters occurred through differentiation of the gene cluster EamA (DUF6) before the radiation of Viridiplantae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The drug/metabolite transporter superfamily comprises a diversity of protein domain families with multiple functions including transport of nucleotide sugars. Drug/metabolite transporter domains are contained in both solute carrier families 30, 35 and 39 proteins as well as in acyl-malonyl condensing enzyme proteins. In this paper, we present an evolutionary analysis of nucleotide sugar transporters in relation to the entire superfamily of drug/metabolite transporters that considers crucial intra-protein duplication events that have shaped the transporters. We use a method that combines the strengths of hidden Markov models and maximum likelihood to find relationships between drug/metabolite transporter families, and branches within families. Results We present evidence that the triose-phosphate transporters, domain unknown function 914, uracil-diphosphate glucose-N-acetylglucosamine, and nucleotide sugar transporter families have evolved from a domain duplication event before the radiation of Viridiplantae in the EamA family (previously called domain unknown function 6). We identify previously unknown branches in the solute carrier 30, 35 and 39 protein families that emerged simultaneously as key physiological developments after the radiation of Viridiplantae, including the "35C/E" branch of EamA, which formed in the lineage of T. adhaerens (Animalia). We identify a second cluster of DMTs, called the domain unknown function 1632 cluster, which has non-cytosolic N- and C-termini, and thus appears to have been formed from a different domain duplication event. We identify a previously uncharacterized motif, G-X(6)-G, which is overrepresented in the fifth transmembrane helix of C-terminal domains. We present evidence that the family called fatty acid elongases are homologous to transporters, not enzymes as had previously been thought. Conclusions The nucleotide sugar transporters families were formed through differentiation of the gene cluster EamA (domain

  20. Radiation exposure prior to traumatic brain injury induces responses that differ as a function of animal age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Uncontrolled radiation exposure due to radiological terrorism, industrial accidents or military circumstances is a continuing threat for the civilian population. Age plays a major role in the susceptibility to radiation; younger children are at higher risk of developing cognitive deterioration when compared to adults. Our objective was to determine if an exposure to radiation affected the vulnerability of the juvenile hippocampus to a subsequent moderate traumatic injury. Materials and methods: Three-week-old (juvenile) and eight-week-old young adult C57BL/J6 male mice received whole body cesium-137 (137Cs) irradiation with 4 gray (Gy). One month later, unilateral traumatic brain injury was induced using a controlled cortical impact system. Two months post-irradiation, animals were tested for hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance in the Morris water-maze. After cognitive testing, animals were euthanized and their brains frozen for immunohistochemical assessment of activated microglia and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results: All animals were able to learn the water maze task; however, treatment effects were seen when spatial memory retention was assessed. Animals that received irradiation as juveniles followed by a moderate traumatic brain injury one month later did not show spatial memory retention, i.e., were cognitively impaired. In contrast, all groups of animals that were treated as adults showed spatial memory retention in the probe trials. Conclusion: Although the mechanisms involved are not clear, our results suggest that irradiation enhanced a young animal's vulnerability to develop cognitive injury following a subsequent traumatic injury. PMID:24164494

  1. Effects of prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal testicular development and function in the Wistar rat: development/teratology/behavior/radiation

    SciT

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    It is evident that significant permanent tissue hypoplasia can be produced following radiation exposure late in fetal development. Because two organs, brain and testes, are developmentally and functionally interrelated, it was of interest to determine whether fetal testicular hypoplasia was a primary or a secondary effect of fetal brain irradiation. Twenty-four pregnant Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups, and a laparotomy was performed on day 18 of gestation. The fetuses received sham irradiation, whole body irradiation, or only head/thorax or pelvic body irradiation at a dosage level of 1.5 Gy. Mothers were allowed to delivermore » and raise their offspring until postnatal day 30, when the offspring were weaned. At 60 days of age, 74 male offspring were allowed to mate with colony control females of similar age until successful insemination or until the males reached 90 days of age, when they were killed. Testes were weighed and processed for histologic examination. Direct radiation of testes, due to whole body or pelvic exposure, resulted in testicular growth retardation and significantly reduced spermatogenesis. Breeding activity of the males and the percent of positive inseminations were also slightly reduced. However, a significant percentage of male offspring receiving direct testicular radiation did produce offspring. Head/thorax-only irradiation did not adversely affect testicular growth or spermatogenesis. Therefore, the use of histologic analysis as the sole determinant of infertility may be misleading. This study indicates that testicular growth retardation and an increased infertility rate result from direct prenatal exposure of rat testes to X-radiation and are not necessarily mediated via X-irradiation effects on the central nervous system.« less

  2. Regional radiation dose-response modeling of functional liver in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with longitudinal sulfur colloid SPECT/CT: a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Price, Ryan G; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Schaub, Stephanie K; Nyflot, Matthew J; Chapman, Tobias R; Matesan, Manuela; Vesselle, Hubert J; Bowen, Stephen R

    2018-06-19

    We report on patient-specific quantitative changes in longitudinal sulfur colloid SPECT/CT as a function of regional radiation dose distributions to normal liver in a cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Dose-response thresholds and slopes varied with baseline liver function metrics, and extreme values were found in patients with fatal hepatotoxicity. Dose-response modeling of normal liver in individual HCC patients has potential to characterize in vivo radiosensitivity, identify high risk subgroups, and personalize treatment planning dose constraints. Hepatotoxicity risk in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients is modulated by radiation dose delivered to normal liver tissue, but reported dose-response data are limited. Our prior work established baseline [ 99m Tc]sulfur colloid (SC) SPECT/CT liver function imaging biomarkers that predict clinical outcomes. We conducted a proof-of-concept investigation with longitudinal SC SPECT/CT to characterize patient-specific radiation dose-response relationships as surrogates for liver radiosensitivity. SC SPECT/CT images of 15 HCC patients with variable Child-Pugh status (8 CP-A, 7 CP-B/C) were acquired in treatment position prior to and 1 month (nominal) after SBRT (n=6) or proton therapy (n=9). Localized rigid registrations between pre/post-treatment CT to planning CT scans were performed, and transformations were applied to pre/post-treatment SC SPECT images. Radiotherapy doses were converted to EQD2 α/β=3 and Gy (RBE), and binned in 5 GyEQD2 increments within tumor-subtracted livers. Mean dose and percent change (%ΔSC) between pre- and post-treatment SPECT uptake, normalized to regions receiving < 5 GyEQD2, were calculated in each binned dose region. Dose-response data were parameterized by sigmoid functions (double exponential) consisting of maximum reduction (%ΔSC max ), dose midpoint (D mid ), and dose-response slope (α mid ) parameters. Individual patient sigmoid dose-response curves had high goodness

  3. Determination of the functional size of oxytocin receptors in plasma membranes from mammary gland and uterine myometrium of the rat by radiation inactivation

    SciT

    Soloff, M.S.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

    1988-05-01

    Gel filtration of detergent-solubilized oxytocin (OT) receptors in plasma membrane fractions from both regressed mammary gland and labor myometrium of the rat, showed that specific (/sup 3/H)OT binding was associated with a heterogeneously sized population of macromolecules. As radiation inactivation is the only method available to measure the apparent molecular weights of membrane proteins in situ, we used this approach to define the functional sizes of OT receptors. The results indicate that both mammary and myometrial receptors are uniform in size and of similar molecular mass. Mammary and myometrial receptors were estimated to be 57.5 +/- 3.8 (SD) and 58.8more » +/- 1.6 kilodaltons, respectively. Knowledge of the functional size of OT receptors will be useful in studies involving the purification and characterization of the receptor and associated membrane components.« less

  4. Comparative functional analyses of ultrabithorax reveal multiple steps and paths to diversification of legs in the adaptive radiation of semi-aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Khila, Abderrahman; Abouheif, Ehab; Rowe, Locke

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of new ecological habitats is often associated with lineage diversification, yet the genetic changes underlying invasions and radiations are poorly understood. Over 200 million years ago, the semi-aquatic insects invaded water surface from a common terrestrial ancestor and diversified to exploit a wide array of niches. Here, we uncover the changes in regulation and function of the gene Ultrabithorax associated with both the invasion of water surface and the subsequent diversification of the group. In the common ancestor of the semi-aquatic insects, a novel deployment of Ubx protein in the mid-legs increased their length, thereby enhancing their role in water surface walking. In derived lineages that specialize in rowing on the open water, additional changes in the timing of Ubx expression further elongated the mid-legs thereby facilitating their function as oars. In addition, Ubx protein function was selectively reversed to shorten specific rear-leg segments, thereby enabling their function as rudders. These changes in Ubx have generated distinct niche-specialized morphologies that account for the remarkable diversification of the semi-aquatic insects. Therefore, changes in the regulation and function of a key developmental gene may facilitate both the morphological change necessary to transition to novel habitats and fuel subsequent morphological diversification. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Determination of the nuclear level densities and radiative strength function for 43 nuclei in the mass interval 28≤A≤200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic, David; Jovancevic, Nikola; Sukhovoj, Anatoly M.; Mitsyna, Ludmila V.; Krmar, Miodrag; Cong, Vu D.; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Revay, Zsolt; Stieghorst, Christian; Dragic, Aleksandar

    2018-03-01

    The determination of nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions is one of the most important tasks in low-energy nuclear physics. Accurate experimental values of these parameters are critical for the study of the fundamental properties of nuclear structure. The step-like structure in the dependence of the level densities p on the excitation energy of nuclei Eex is observed in the two-step gamma cascade measurements for nuclei in the 28 ≤ A ≤ 200 mass region. This characteristic structure can be explained only if a co-existence of quasi-particles and phonons, as well as their interaction in a nucleus, are taken into account in the process of gamma-decay. Here we present a new improvement to the Dubna practical model for the determination of nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions. The new practical model guarantees a good description of the available intensities of the two step gamma cascades, comparable to the experimental data accuracy.

  6. GPU-based Green’s function simulations of shear waves generated by an applied acoustic radiation force in elastic and viscoelastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiqun; Urban, Matthew W.; McGough, Robert J.

    2018-05-01

    Shear wave calculations induced by an acoustic radiation force are very time-consuming on desktop computers, and high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) achieve dramatic reductions in the computation time for these simulations. The acoustic radiation force is calculated using the fast near field method and the angular spectrum approach, and then the shear waves are calculated in parallel with Green’s functions on a GPU. This combination enables rapid evaluation of shear waves for push beams with different spatial samplings and for apertures with different f/#. Relative to shear wave simulations that evaluate the same algorithm on an Intel i7 desktop computer, a high performance nVidia GPU reduces the time required for these calculations by a factor of 45 and 700 when applied to elastic and viscoelastic shear wave simulation models, respectively. These GPU-accelerated simulations also compared to measurements in different viscoelastic phantoms, and the results are similar. For parametric evaluations and for comparisons with measured shear wave data, shear wave simulations with the Green’s function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs.

  7. GPU-based Green's function simulations of shear waves generated by an applied acoustic radiation force in elastic and viscoelastic models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiqun; Urban, Matthew W; McGough, Robert J

    2018-05-15

    Shear wave calculations induced by an acoustic radiation force are very time-consuming on desktop computers, and high-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) achieve dramatic reductions in the computation time for these simulations. The acoustic radiation force is calculated using the fast near field method and the angular spectrum approach, and then the shear waves are calculated in parallel with Green's functions on a GPU. This combination enables rapid evaluation of shear waves for push beams with different spatial samplings and for apertures with different f/#. Relative to shear wave simulations that evaluate the same algorithm on an Intel i7 desktop computer, a high performance nVidia GPU reduces the time required for these calculations by a factor of 45 and 700 when applied to elastic and viscoelastic shear wave simulation models, respectively. These GPU-accelerated simulations also compared to measurements in different viscoelastic phantoms, and the results are similar. For parametric evaluations and for comparisons with measured shear wave data, shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs.

  8. Calculation of the static in-flight telescope-detector response by deconvolution applied to point-spread function for the geostationary earth radiation budget experiment.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Grant

    2004-12-01

    The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment is a broadband satellite radiometer instrument program intended to resolve remaining uncertainties surrounding the effect of cloud radiative feedback on future climate change. By use of a custom-designed diffraction-aberration telescope model, the GERB detector spatial response is recovered by deconvolution applied to the ground calibration point-spread function (PSF) measurements. An ensemble of randomly generated white-noise test scenes, combined with the measured telescope transfer function results in the effect of noise on the deconvolution being significantly reduced. With the recovered detector response as a base, the same model is applied in construction of the predicted in-flight field-of-view response of each GERB pixel to both short- and long-wave Earth radiance. The results of this study can now be used to simulate and investigate the instantaneous sampling errors incurred by GERB. Also, the developed deconvolution method may be highly applicable in enhancing images or PSF data for any telescope system for which a wave-front error measurement is available.

  9. Comprehensive Expression Profiling and Functional Network Analysis of Porphyra-334, One Mycosporine-Like Amino Acid (MAA), in Human Keratinocyte Exposed with UV-radiation.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Lee, Sung Gu; Youn, Ui Joung; Han, Se Jong; Kim, Il-Chan; Kim, Sanghee

    2017-06-24

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) have been highlighted as pharmacologically active secondary compounds to protect cells from harmful UV-radiation by absorbing its energy. Previous studies have mostly focused on characterizing their physiological properties such as antioxidant activity and osmotic regulation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying their UV-protective capability have not yet been revealed. In the present study, we investigated the expression profiling of porphyra-334-modulated genes or microRNA (miRNAs) in response to UV-exposure and their functional networks, using cDNA and miRNAs microarray. Based on our data, we showed that porphyra-334-regulated genes play essential roles in UV-affected biological processes such as Wnt (Wingless/integrase-1) and Notch pathways which exhibit antagonistic relationship in various biological processes; the UV-repressed genes were in the Wnt signaling pathway, while the activated genes were in the Notch signaling. In addition, porphyra-334-regulated miRNAs can target many genes related with UV-mediated biological processes such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and translational elongation. Notably, we observed that functional roles of the target genes for up-regulated miRNAs are inversely correlated with those for down-regulated miRNAs; the former genes promote apoptosis and translational elongation, whereas the latter function as inhibitors in these processes. Taken together, these data suggest that porphyra-334 protects cells from harmful UV radiation through the comprehensive modulation of expression patterns of genes involved in UV-mediated biological processes, and that provide a new insight to understand its functional molecular networks.

  10. An improved technique for determining reflection from semi-infinite atmospheres with linearly anisotropic phase functions. [radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    A solution to the problem of reflection from a semi-infinite atmosphere is presented, based upon Chandrasekhar's H-function method for linearly anisotropic phase functions. A modification to the Gauss quadrature formula which gives about the same accuracy with 10 points as the conventional Gauss quadrature does with 100 points was developed. A computer program achieving this solution is described and results are presented for several illustrative cases.

  11. TU-F-12A-04: Differential Radiation Avoidance of Functional Liver Regions Defined by 99mTc-Sulfur Colloid SPECT/CT with Proton Therapy

    SciT

    Bowen, S; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients is conventionally planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in hepatic function, which may increase risk of radiation-induced liver disease. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton radiotherapy (pRT) plans were generated to differentially decrease dose to functional liver volumes (FLV) defined on [{sup 99m}Tc]sulfur colloid (SC) SPECT/CT images (functional avoidance plans) and compared against conventional pRT plans. Methods: Three HCC patients underwent SC SPECT/CT scans for pRT planning acquired 15 min post injection over 24 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM following scatter, collimator, and exhale CT attenuation correction. Functional liver volumes (FLV) were defined bymore » liver:spleen uptake ratio thresholds (43% to 90% maximum). Planning objectives to FLV were based on mean SC SPECT uptake ratio relative to GTV-subtracted liver and inversely scaled to mean liver dose of 20 Gy. PTV target coverage (V{sub 95}) was matched between conventional and functional avoidance plans. PBS pRT plans were optimized in RayStation for single field uniform dose (SFUD) and systematically perturbed to verify robustness to uncertainty in range, setup, and motion. Relative differences in FLV DVH and target dose heterogeneity (D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D50 were assessed. Results: For similar liver dose between functional avoidance and conventional PBS pRT plans (D{sub mean}≤5% difference, V{sub 18Gy}≤1% difference), dose to functional liver volumes were lower in avoidance plans but varied in magnitude across patients (FLV{sub 70%max} D{sub mean}≤26% difference, V{sub 18Gy}≤8% difference). Higher PTV dose heterogeneity in avoidance plans was associated with lower functional liver dose, particularly for the largest lesion [(D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D{sub 50}=13%, FLV{sub 90%max}=50% difference]. Conclusion: Differential avoidance of functional liver regions defined on sulfur colloid SPECT/CT is feasible with

  12. Tapered Optical Fiber Functionalized with Palladium Nanoparticles by Drop Casting and Laser Radiation for H2 and Volatile Organic Compounds Sensing Purposes

    PubMed Central

    González-Sierra, Nancy Elizabeth; Gómez-Pavón, Luz del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Gerardo Francisco; Luis-Ramos, Arnulfo; Zaca-Morán, Plácido; Chávez-Ramírez, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study on the sensing properties of a tapered optical fiber pristine and functionalized with the palladium nanoparticles to hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), is presented. The sensor response and, response/recovery times were extracted from the measurements of the transient response of the device. The tapered optical fiber sensor was fabricated using a single-mode optical fiber by the flame-brushing technique. Functionalization of the optical fiber was performed using an aqueous solution of palladium chloride by drop-casting technique assisted for laser radiation. The detection principle of the sensor is based on the changes in the optical properties of palladium nanoparticles when exposed to reducing gases, which causes a variation in the absorption of evanescent waves. A continuous wave laser diode operating at 1550 nm is used for the sensor characterization. The sensor functionalized with palladium nanoparticles by this technique is viable for the sensing of hydrogen and VOCs, since it shows an enhancement in sensor response and response time compared to the sensor based on the pristine optical microfiber. The results show that the fabricated sensor is competitive with other fiber optic sensors functionalized with palladium nanoparticles to the hydrogen. PMID:28878161

  13. Tapered Optical Fiber Functionalized with Palladium Nanoparticles by Drop Casting and Laser Radiation for H₂ and Volatile Organic Compounds Sensing Purposes.

    PubMed

    González-Sierra, Nancy Elizabeth; Gómez-Pavón, Luz Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Gerardo Francisco; Luis-Ramos, Arnulfo; Zaca-Morán, Plácido; Muñoz-Pacheco, Jesús Manuel; Chávez-Ramírez, Francisco

    2017-09-06

    A comparative study on the sensing properties of a tapered optical fiber pristine and functionalized with the palladium nanoparticles to hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), is presented. The sensor response and, response/recovery times were extracted from the measurements of the transient response of the device. The tapered optical fiber sensor was fabricated using a single-mode optical fiber by the flame-brushing technique. Functionalization of the optical fiber was performed using an aqueous solution of palladium chloride by drop-casting technique assisted for laser radiation. The detection principle of the sensor is based on the changes in the optical properties of palladium nanoparticles when exposed to reducing gases, which causes a variation in the absorption of evanescent waves. A continuous wave laser diode operating at 1550 nm is used for the sensor characterization. The sensor functionalized with palladium nanoparticles by this technique is viable for the sensing of hydrogen and VOCs, since it shows an enhancement in sensor response and response time compared to the sensor based on the pristine optical microfiber. The results show that the fabricated sensor is competitive with other fiber optic sensors functionalized with palladium nanoparticles to the hydrogen.

  14. NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert radiation-mediated tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Priscilla S.; Bardhan, Kankana; Chen, May R.; Paschall, Amy V.; Lu, Chunwan; Bollag, Roni J.; Kong, Feng-Chong; Jin, JianYue; Kong, Feng-Ming; Waller, Jennifer L.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation modulates both tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert its anti-tumor activity; however, the molecular connection between tumor cells and immune cells that mediates radiation-exerted tumor suppression activity in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. We report here that radiation induces rapid activation of the p65/p50 and p50/p50 NF-κB complexes in human soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Radiation-activated p65/p50 and p50/p50 bind to the TNFα promoter to activate its transcription in STS cells. Radiation-induced TNFα induces tumor cell death in an autocrine manner. A sublethal dose of Smac mimetic BV6 induces cIAP1 and cIAP2 degradation to increase tumor cell sensitivity to radiation-induced cell death in vitro and to enhance radiation-mediated suppression of STS xenografts in vivo. Inhibition of caspases, RIP1, or RIP3 blocks radiation/TNFα-induced cell death, whereas inhibition of RIP1 blocks TNFα-induced caspase activation, suggesting that caspases and RIP1 act sequentially to mediate the non-compensatory cell death pathways. Furthermore, we determined in a syngeneic sarcoma mouse model that radiation up-regulates IRF3, IFNβ, and the T cell chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in the tumor microenvironment, which are associated with activation and increased infiltration of Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, tumor-infiltrating T cells are in their active form since both the perforin and FasL pathways are activated in irradiated tumor tissues. Consequently, combined BV6 and radiation completely suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, radiation-induced NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment for radiation-mediated tumor suppression. PMID:27014915

  15. Assessment of Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (RT-TDDFT) in Radiation Chemistry: Ionized Water Dimer.

    PubMed

    Chalabala, Jan; Uhlig, Frank; Slavíček, Petr

    2018-03-29

    Ionization in the condensed phase and molecular clusters leads to a complicated chain of processes with coupled electron-nuclear dynamics. It is difficult to describe such dynamics with conventional nonadiabatic molecular dynamics schemes since the number of states swiftly increases as the molecular system grows. It is therefore attractive to use a direct electron and nuclear propagation such as the real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). Here we report a RT-TDDFT benchmark study on simulations of singly and doubly ionized states of a water monomer and dimer as a prototype for more complex processes in a condensed phase. We employed the RT-TDDFT based Ehrenfest molecular dynamics with a generalized gradient approximate (GGA) functional and compared it with wave-function-based surface hopping (SH) simulations. We found that the initial dynamics of a singly HOMO ionized water dimer is similar for both the RT-TDDFT/GGA and the SH simulations but leads to completely different reaction channels on a longer time scale. This failure is attributed to the self-interaction error in the GGA functionals and it can be avoided by using hybrid functionals with large fraction of exact exchange (represented here by the BHandHLYP functional). The simulations of doubly ionized states are reasonably described already at the GGA level. This suggests that the RT-TDDFT/GGA method could describe processes following the autoionization processes such as Auger emission, while its applicability to more complex processes such as intermolecular Coulombic decay remains limited.

  16. Optimization of two-photon wave function in parametric down conversion by adaptive optics control of the pump radiation.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, M; Bonora, S; Sergienko, A V; Vallone, G; Villoresi, P

    2013-02-15

    We present an efficient method for optimizing the spatial profile of entangled-photon wave function produced in a spontaneous parametric down conversion process. A deformable mirror that modifies a wavefront of a 404 nm CW diode laser pump interacting with a nonlinear β-barium borate type-I crystal effectively controls the profile of the joint biphoton function. The use of a feedback signal extracted from the biphoton coincidence rate is used to achieve the optimal wavefront shape. The optimization of the two-photon coupling into two, single spatial modes for correlated detection is used for a practical demonstration of this physical principle.

  17. SU-E-J-86: Functional Conformal Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with CT-Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging

    SciT

    Kurosawa, T; Moriya, S; Sato, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the functional planning using CT-pulmonary ventilation imaging for conformal SBRT. Methods: The CT-pulmonary ventilation image was generated using the Jacobian metric in the in-house program with the NiftyReg software package. Using the ventilation image, the normal lung was split into three lung regions for functionality (high, moderate and low). The anatomical plan (AP) and functional plan (FP) were made for ten lung SBRT patients. For the AP, the beam angles were optimized with the dose-volume constraints for the normal lung sparing and the PTV coverage. For the FP, the gantry angles were also optimized with the additionalmore » constraint for high functional lung. The MLC aperture shapes were adjusted to the PTV with the additional 5 mm margin. The dosimetric parameters for PTV, the functional volumes, spinal cord and so on were compared in both plans. Results: Compared to the AP, the FP showed better dose sparing for high- and moderate-functional lungs with similar PTV coverage while not taking care of the low functional lung (High:−12.9±9.26% Moderate: −2.0±7.09%, Low: +4.1±12.2%). For the other normal organs, the FP and AP showed similar dose sparing in the eight patients. However, the FP showed that the maximum doses for spinal cord were increased with the significant increment of 16.4Gy and 21.0Gy in other two patients, respectively. Because the beam direction optimizer chose the unexpected directions passing through the spinal cord. Conclusion: Even the functional conformal SBRT can selectively reduce high- and moderatefunctional lung while keeping the PTV coverage. However, it would be careful that the optimizer would choose unexpected beam angles and the dose sparing for the other normal organs can be worse. Therefore, the planner needs to control the dose-volume constraints and also limit the beam angles in order to achieve the expected dose sparing and coverage.« less

  18. Assessment of Resistance of Bacillus Horneckiae Endospores to UV Radiation and Function of Their Extraneous Layer in Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachariah, Malcolm M.; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming microbes are highly resistant to various physical and chemical conditions, which include ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress, and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary surfaces. The spore's resistance might be due to their metabolically dormant state, and/or by the presence of a series of protective structures that encase the interior-most compartment, the core, which houses the spore chromosome. These spores have multiple layers surrounding the cell that are not found in vegetative cells, and some species have an outer layer of proteins and glycoproteins termed the "exosporium" or a fibrous "extraneous layer" (EL). Bacillus horneckiae is an EL-producing novel sporeformer isolated from a Phoenix spacecraft assembly clean room, and it has previously demonstrated resistance to UV radiation up to 1000 J/m(sup 2). The EL appears to bind B. horneckiae spores into large aggregations, or biofilms, and may confer some UV resistance to the spores. Multiple culturing and purification schemes were tried to achieve high purity spores because vegetative cells would skew UV resistance results. An ethanol-based purification scheme produced high purity spores. Selective removal of the EL from spores was attempted with two schemes: a chemical extraction method and physical extraction (sonication). Results from survival rates in the presence and absence of the external layer will provide a new understanding of the role of biofilms and passive resistance that may favor survival of biological systems in aggressive extra-terrestrial environments. The chemical extraction method decreased viable counts of spores and lead to an inconclusive change UV resistance relative to non-extracted spores. The physical extraction method lead to non-aggregated spores and did not alter viability; however, it produced UV resistance profiles similar to non-extracted spores. In addition to the EL-removal study, samples of B. horneckiae spores dried on

  19. Solar Radiation and the UV Index: An Application of Numerical Integration, Trigonometric Functions, Online Education and the Modelling Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio V.; Galligan, Linda; Turner, Joanna; Amar, Abdurazaq; King, Rachel; Ultra, Filipina; Butler, Harry

    2016-01-01

    A short series of practical classroom mathematics activities employing the use of a large and publicly accessible scientific data set are presented for use by students in years 9 and 10. The activities introduce and build understanding of integral calculus and trigonometric functions through the presentation of practical problem solving that…

  20. The Effect of Electromagnetic Radiation due to Mobile Phone Use on Thyroid Function in Medical Students Studying in a Medical College in South India.

    PubMed

    Baby, Nikita Mary; Koshy, George; Mathew, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Enormous increase in mobile phone use throughout the world raises widespread concerns about its possible detrimental effect on human health. Radiofrequency waves are emitted by cell phones. They are non-ionising and the effect on the thyroid gland is part of their non thermal effects. The thyroid gland may be particularly vulnerable to this effect because of its normal anatomical position. The study was done to explore the association between radiation exposure and thyroid dysfunction among mobile phone users. It had an exploratory design and unit survey method to collect information from all medical students in a medical college in South India. Inclusion criteria included active use of mobile phone prior to and during the study period. Criteria for exclusion was presence of pre-existsting thyroid disease,thyroid nodule,thyroid goitre/nodule and altered thyroid function. The sample size was 83 undergraduate students. 71% of respondents had no family history of thyroid illness. Among the remainder,20.5% had a first degree relative with thyroid dysfunction,8.4% had a second degree relative affected. Clinical examination revealed that 79.5% of the respondents were normal,13.6% had thyroid swelling,3.6% had symptoms of thyroid dysfunction and 3.6% had both thyroid swelling and symptoms of thyroid dysfunction. 53% of the respondents spent 0.5 hrs on an average talking on the phone daily,28.9% spent 1.5 hrs daily and 10.8% of respondents spent over 3.5 hours. We found there was a significant correlation between total radiation exposure and an increase in TSH among both groups -in those with and without family history of thyroid illness. In our study there was a significant correlation between total radiation exposure and increasing TSH values among both all respondents.

  1. Radiation inhibits salivary gland function by promoting STIM1 cleavage by caspase-3 and loss of SOCE through a TRPM2-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xibao; Gong, Baijuan; de Souza, Lorena Brito; Ong, Hwei Ling; Subedi, Krishna P.; Cheng, Kwong Tai; Swaim, William; Zheng, Changyu; Mori, Yasuo; Ambudkar, Indu S.

    2017-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is critical for salivary gland fluid secretion. We report that radiation treatment caused persistent salivary gland dysfunction by activating a TRPM2-dependent mitochondrial pathway, leading to caspase-3–mediated cleavage of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) and loss of SOCE. After irradiation, acinar cells from the submandibular glands of TRPM2+/+, but not those from TRPM2−/− mice, displayed an increase in the concentrations of mitochondrial Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspase-3, which was associated with a sustained decrease in STIM1 abundance and attenuation of SOCE. In a salivary gland cell line, silencing the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter or caspase-3 or treatment with inhibitors of TRPM2 or caspase-3 prevented irradiation-induced loss of STIM1 and SOCE. Expression of exogenous STIM1 in the salivary glands of irradiated mice increased SOCE and fluid secretion. We suggest that targeting the mechanisms underlying the loss of STIM1 would be a potentially useful approach for preserving salivary gland function after radiation therapy. PMID:28588080

  2. Nonequilibrium Green's function theory of resonant steady state photoconduction in a double quantum well FET subject to THz radiation at plasmon frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J.; Popov, Vyacheslav V.

    2006-04-01

    Recent experimental observations by X.G. Peralta and S.J. Allen, et al. of dc photoconductivity resonances in steady source-drain current subject to terahertz radiation in a grid-gated double-quantum well FET suggested an association with plasmon resonances. This association was definitively confirmed for some parameter ranges in our detailed electrodynamic absorbance calculations. In this paper we propose that the reason that the dc photoconductance resonances match the plasmon resonances in semiconductors is based on a nonlinear dynamic screening mechanism. In this, we employ a shielded potential approximation that is nonlinear in the terahertz field to determine the nonequilibrium Green's function and associated density perturbation that govern the nonequilibrium dielectric polarization of the medium. This ''conditioning'' of the system by the incident THz radiation results in resonant polarization response at the plasmon frequencies which, in turn, causes a sharp drop of the resistive shielded impurity scattering potentials and attendant increase of the dc source-drain current. This amounts to disabling the impurity scattering mechanism by plasmon resonant behavior in nonlinear screening.

  3. High-temperature partition functions, specific heats and spectral radiative properties of diatomic molecules with an improved calculation of energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.

    2018-05-01

    The level energies of diatomic molecules calculated by the frequently used Dunham expansion will become less accurate for high-lying vibrational and rotational levels. In this paper, the potential curves for the lower-lying electronic states with accurate spectroscopic constants are reconstructed using the Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) method, which are extrapolated to the dissociation limits by fitting of the theoretical potentials, and the rest of the potential curves are obtained from the ab-initio results in the literature. Solving the rotational dependence of the radial Schrödinger equation over the obtained potential curves, we determine the rovibrational level energies, which are then used to calculate the equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamic properties of N2, N2+, NO, O2, CN, C2, CO and CO+. The partition functions and the specific heats are systematically validated by available data in the literature. Finally, we calculate the radiative source strengths of diatomic molecules in thermodynamic equilibrium, which agree well with the available values in the literature. The spectral radiative intensities for some diatomic molecules in thermodynamic non-equilibrium are calculated and validated by available experimental data.

  4. Differences in Radiation Dosimetry and Anorectal Function Testing Imply That Anorectal Symptoms May Arise From Different Anatomic Substrates

    SciT

    Smeenk, Robert Jan, E-mail: r.smeenk@rther.umcn.nl; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of functional changes and dosimetric parameters on specific incontinence-related anorectal complaints after prostate external beam radiotherapy and to estimate dose-effect relations for the anal wall and rectal wall. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients, irradiated for localized prostate cancer, underwent anorectal manometry and barostat measurements to evaluate anal pressures, rectal capacity, and rectal sensory functions. In addition, 30 untreated men were analyzed as a control group. In 36 irradiated patients, the anal wall and rectal wall were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans, and dosimetric parameters were retrieved from the treatment plans. Functional and dosimetricmore » parameters were compared between patients with and without complaints, focusing on urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Results: After external beam radiotherapy, reduced anal pressures and tolerated rectal volumes were observed, irrespective of complaints. Patients with urgency and/or incontinence showed significantly lower anal resting pressures (mean 38 and 39 vs. 49 and 50 mm Hg) and lower tolerated rectal pressures (mean 28 and 28 vs. 33 and 34 mm Hg), compared to patients without these complaints. In patients with frequency, almost all rectal parameters were reduced. Several dosimetric parameters to the anal wall and rectal wall were predictive for urgency (e.g., anal D{sub mean}>38Gy), whereas some anal wall parameters correlated to incontinence and no dose-effect relation for frequency was found. Conclusions: Anorectal function deteriorates after external beam radiotherapy. Different incontinence-related complaints show specific anorectal dysfunctions, suggesting different anatomic and pathophysiologic substrates: urgency and incontinence seem to originate from both anal wall and rectal wall, whereas frequency seems associated with rectal wall dysfunction. Also, dose-effect relations differed between these

  5. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciT

    Meng, Xue; Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan; Frey, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL)more » was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung.« less

  6. UVB radiation and human monocyte accessory function: Differential effects on pre-mitotic events in T-cell activation

    SciT

    Krutmann, J.K.; Kammer, G.M.; Toossi, Z.

    Purified T lymphocytes fail to proliferate in response to antigenic and mitogenic stimuli when cultured in the presence of accessory cells that have been exposed in vitro to sublethal doses of UVB radiation. Because proliferation represents a final stage in the T-cell activation process, the present study was conducted to determine whether T cells were able to progress through any of the pre-mitotic stages when UVB-irradiated monocytes were used as model accessory cells. In these experiments, monoclonal anti-CD3 antibodies were employed as the mitogenic stimulus. Culture of T cells with UVB-irradiated monocytes did allow the T cells to undergo anmore » increase in intracellular free calcium, which is one of the first steps in the activation sequence. The T cells expressed interleukin-2 receptors, although at a reduced level. However, T cells failed to produce interleukin-2 above background levels when they were placed in culture with monocytes exposed to UVB doses as low as 50 J/m2. Incubation of T cells with UVB-irradiated monocytes did not affect the subsequent capacity of T cells to proliferate, since they developed a normal proliferative response in secondary culture when restimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies and unirradiated monocytes. These studies indicate that T lymphocytes become partially activated when cultured with UVB-irradiated monocytes and mitogenic anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. In addition, they suggest that interleukin-2 production is the T-cell activation step most sensitive to inhibition when UVB-irradiated monocytes are employed as accessory cells.« less

  7. [Effect of low-intensity laser radiation on the function of vascular endothelium in patients with chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Burduli, N M; Krifaridi, A S

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure plasma levels of stable metabolites of nitric oxide, nitrates, and nitrites (NOx) in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and evaluate the possibility of their correction by low-power laser irradiation. NO metabolites (total nitrites and nitrates) were measured colorimetrically from the development of colour in the reaction of nitrite with sulfanilamide diazotization in Griess reagent. Colour intensity was determined with Victor2 enzyme immunoanalyzer, Perkin Elmaer (Finland). The patients were divided into three groups. In group 1 (control, n = 30) they received combined medicamentous therapy, in group 2 (n = 45) medicamentous therapy and a course of intravenous laser therapy, in goup 3 (n = 45) medicamentous therapy and skin laserotherapy. The results indicate that medicamentous treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis does not bring any beneficial changes in plasma NOx whose levels are significantly improved in case of simultaneous laser therapy. It is concluded that different laserotherapeutic modalities have beneficial effect on NO-producing function of endothelium and thereby improve its functional state. Compensation of NO deficit by laser therapy ensures overall protection of the organism against free radicals and decreases severity of oxidative stress.

  8. Clinical effectiveness of low-power laser radiation and functioning of hemosalivatory barrier in patients with rheumatic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia D.; Karachistov, Alexander B.; Komarova, Lia G.; Alekseeva, Olga P.; Grunina, Elena A.

    1996-11-01

    We have estimated the clinical effectiveness of several regimes and ways of low power laser therapy (LT) on the basis of a double 'blind', placebo-controlling randomizing comparative test in 454 patients with rheumatic diseases (RD). LT for RD has a well-expressed placebo effect. The level of clinical effect of LT for RD is not so high. We couldn't achieve 'a considerable improvement' in any cases, 'an improvement' was secured in only 18 percent. LT should be viewed as a symptomatic means, with a primary anesthetic and feebly expressed anti-inflammatory effect, which can not influence the course of the rheumatoid process. Only in 15 percent of patients with RD, a sufficient functioning of hemo-salivary barrier was observed, the latter providing a reserve for adaption mechanism, which leads under the influence of stressor agents of medium strength not only to anesthetic, but also to moderately expressed anti- inflammatory effect.

  9. [Liver stiffness measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in assessing hepatic functional reserve in patients with space-occupying lesions in the liver].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui-tong; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Wen-bo; Jiao, Zi-yu; Yao, Chun-xiao; Lv, Fa-qin; Tang, Jie

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the value of liver stiffness measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging(ARFI) in assessing hepatic functional reserve in patients with space-occupying lesions in the liver. Sixty-three patients with space-occupying lesions in the liver were enrolled. Liver stiffness (LS) measurements with ARFI and indocyanine green(ICG) retention test were performed in the same day, and plasma clearance rate of indocyanine green(ICG-K), ICG retention at 15 minutes(ICGR15) as well as 10 effective values of LS were recorded. The correlation between Child-Pugh score, ICGR15, ICG-K, and LS were evaluated. The LS measurements with ARFI failed in one patient. A strong correlation between LS and ICGR15(r=0.789, P<0.01) and an inverse correlation between LS and ICG-K(r=-0.738, P<0.01) were observed. Besides, there was a significant correlation between LS measurements and Child-Pugh score(r=0.929, P<0.01) . The LS significantly differed among patients with Child-Pugh class A, B, and C(P<0.01) . ARFI is a simple, feasible and non-invasive method for assessing hepatic functional reserve in patients with space-occupying lesions in the liver.

  10. Reactions of mixed silver-gold cluster cations AgmAun+ (m+n=4,5,6) with CO: Radiative association kinetics and density functional theory computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Marco; Weigend, Florian; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2006-09-01

    Near thermal energy reactive collisions of small mixed metal cluster cations AgmAun+ (m +n=4, 5, and 6) with carbon monoxide have been studied in the room temperature Penning trap of a Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectrometer as a function of cluster size and composition. The tetrameric species AgAu3+ and Ag2Au2+ are found to react dissociatively by way of Au or Ag atom loss, respectively, to form the cluster carbonyl AgAu2CO+. In contrast, measurements on a selection of pentamers and hexamers show that CO is added with absolute rate constants that decrease with increasing silver content. Experimentally determined absolute rate constants for CO adsorption were analyzed using the radiative association kinetics model to obtain cluster cation-CO binding energies ranging from 0.77to1.09eV. High-level ab initio density functional theory (DFT) computations identifying the lowest-energy cluster isomers and the respective CO adsorption energies are in good agreement with the experimental findings clearly showing that CO binds in a "head-on" fashion to a gold atom in the mixed clusters. DFT exploration of reaction pathways in the case of Ag2Au2+ suggests that exoergicities are high enough to access the minimum energy products for all reactive clusters probed.

  11. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciT

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPsmore » of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade {>=}2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.« less

  12. Convective and radiative components of wind chill in sheep: Estimation from meteorological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Mount, L. E.

    1987-06-01

    Wind chill is defined as the excess of sensible heat loss over what would occur at zero wind speed with other conditions unchanged. Wind chill can be broken down into a part that is determined by air temperature and a radiative part that comprises wind-dependent effects on additional long-wave radiative exchange and on solar radiation (by reducing solar warming). Radiative exchange and gain from solar radiation are affected by changes that are produced by wind in both surface and fleece insulations. Coefficients are derived for (a) converting the components of sensible heat exchange (air-temperature-dependent including both convective and associated long-wave radiative, additional long-wave radiative and solar) into the components of the total heat loss that are associated with wind and (b) for calculating equivalent air temperature changes. The coefficients contain terms only in wind speed, wetting of the fleece and fleece depth; these determine the external insulation. Calculation from standard meteorological records, using Plymouth and Aberdeen in 1973 as examples, indicate that in April September 1973 at Plymouth reduction in effective solar warming constituted 28% of the 24-h total wind chill, and 7% in the other months of the year combined; at Aberdeen the corresponding percentages were 25% and 6%. Mean hour-of-day estimates for the months of April and October showed that at midday reduction in solar warming due to wind rose to the order of half the air-temperature-dependent component of wind chill, with a much smaller effect in January. For about six hours at midday in July reduction in solar warming due to wind was similar in magnitude to the air-temperature-dependent component. It is concluded that realistic estimates of wind chill cannot be obtained unless the effect of solar radiation is taken into account. Failure to include solar radiation results not only in omitting solar warming but also in omitting the effects of wind in reducing that warming. The

  13. Heat gain from thermal radiation through protective clothing with different insulation, reflectivity and vapour permeability.

    PubMed

    Bröde, Peter; Kuklane, Kalev; Candas, Victor; Den Hartog, Emiel A; Griefahn, Barbara; Holmér, Ingvar; Meinander, Harriet; Nocker, Wolfgang; Richards, Mark; Havenith, George

    2010-01-01

    The heat transferred through protective clothing under long wave radiation compared to a reference condition without radiant stress was determined in thermal manikin experiments. The influence of clothing insulation and reflectivity, and the interaction with wind and wet underclothing were considered. Garments with different outer materials and colours and additionally an aluminised reflective suit were combined with different number and types of dry and pre-wetted underwear layers. Under radiant stress, whole body heat loss decreased, i.e., heat gain occurred compared to the reference. This heat gain increased with radiation intensity, and decreased with air velocity and clothing insulation. Except for the reflective outer layer that showed only minimal heat gain over the whole range of radiation intensities, the influence of the outer garments' material and colour was small with dry clothing. Wetting the underclothing for simulating sweat accumulation, however, caused differing effects with higher heat gain in less permeable garments.

  14. Beam displacement as a function of temperature and turbulence length scale at two different laser radiation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Isterling, William M; Dally, Bassam B; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dubovinsky, Miro; Wright, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow laser beams directed from aircraft may at times pass through the exhaust plume of the engines and potentially degrade some of the laser beam characteristics. This paper reports on controlled studies of laser beam deviation arising from propagation through turbulent hot gases, in a well-characterized laboratory burner, with conditions of relevance to aircraft engine exhaust plumes. The impact of the temperature, laser wavelength, and turbulence length scale on the beam deviation has been investigated. It was found that the laser beam displacement increases with the turbulent integral length scale. The effect of temperature on the laser beam angular deviation, σ, using two different laser wavelengths, namely 4.67 μm and 632.8 nm, was recorded. It was found that the beam deviation for both wavelengths may be semiempirically modeled using a single function of the form, σ=a(b+(1/T)(2))(-1), with two parameters only, a and b, where σ is in microradians and T is the temperature in °C. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  15. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Activation Energies for Non-radiative Carrier Capture by Deep Defect Levels in Semiconductors.

    SciT

    Modine, Normand Arthur; Wright, Alan F.; Lee, Stephen R.

    Carrier recombination due to defects can have a major impact on device performance. The rate of defect-induced carrier recombination is determined by both defect levels and carrier capture cross-sections. Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) has been widely and successfully used to predict defect levels in semiconductors and insulators, but only recently has work begun to focus on using DFT to determine carrier capture cross-sections. Lang and Henry worked out the fundamental theory of carrier-capture cross-sections in the 1970s and showed that, in most cases, room temperature carrier-capture cross-sections differ between defects primarily due to differences in the carrier capture activationmore » energies. Here, we present an approach to using DFT to calculate carrier capture activation energies that does not depend on perturbation theory or an assumed configuration coordinate, and we demonstrate this approach for the -3/-2 level of the Ga vacancy in wurtzite GaN.« less

  16. The Integrated Radiation Mapper Assistant

    SciT

    Carlton, R.E.; Tripp, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Integrated Radiation Mapper Assistant (IRMA) system combines state-of-the-art radiation sensors and microprocessor based analysis techniques to perform radiation surveys. Control of the survey function is from a control station located outside the radiation thus reducing time spent in radiation areas performing radiation surveys. The system consists of a directional radiation sensor, a laser range finder, two area radiation sensors, and a video camera mounted on a pan and tilt platform. THis sensor package is deployable on a remotely operated vehicle. The outputs of the system are radiation intensity maps identifying both radiation source intensities and radiation levels throughout themore » room being surveyed. After completion of the survey, the data can be removed from the control station computer for further analysis or archiving.« less

  17. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  18. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    SciT

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com; Paulus, Rebecca; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signedmore » rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.« less

  19. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  20. Human brain imaging and radiation dosimetry of 11C-N-desmethyl-loperamide, a PET radiotracer to measure the function of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Nicholas; Zoghbi, Sami S; Liow, Jeih-San; Kreisl, William; Herscovitch, Peter; Jenko, Kimberly; Gladding, Robert L; Taku, Andrew; Pike, Victor W; Innis, Robert B

    2009-05-01

    brain-penetrant radiometabolites. In addition, the low rate of K(1) is consistent with P-gp rapidly effluxing substrates while they transit through the lipid bilayer. The radiation exposure of (11)C-dLop is similar to that of many other (11)C-radiotracers. Thus, (11)C-dLop is a promising radiotracer to study the function of P-gp at the blood-brain barrier, at which impaired function would allow increased uptake into the brain.

  1. SU-D-202-01: Functional Lung Avoidance and Response-Adaptive Escalation (FLARE) RT: Feasibility of a Precision Radiation Oncology Strategy

    SciT

    Bowen, S; Lee, E; Miyaoka, R

    Purpose: NSCLC patient RT is planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in lung function or tumor response, which may have contributed to failed uniform dose escalation in a randomized trial. The feasibility of functional lung avoidance and response-adaptive escalation (FLARE) RT to reduce dose to [{sup 99m}Tc]MAA-SPECT/CT perfused lung while redistributing 74Gy within [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT biological target volumes was assessed. Methods: Eight Stage IIB–IIIB NSCLC patients underwent FDG-PET/CT and MAA-SPECT/CT treatment planning scans. Perfused lung objectives were derived from scatter/collimator/attenuation-corrected MAA-SPECT uptake relative to ITV-subtracted lung to maintain <20Gy mean lung dose (MLD). Prescriptions included 60Gy to PTV and concomitantmore » boost of 74Gy mean to biological target volumes (BTV=GTV+PET margin) scaled to each BTV voxel by relative FDG-PET SUV. Dose-painting-by-numbers prescriptions were integrated into commercial TPS via previously reported ROI discretization. Dose constraints for lung, heart, cord, and esophagus were defined. FLARE RT plans were optimized with VMAT, proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with 3%-3mm robust optimization, and combination PBS (avoidance) plus VMAT (escalation). Dosimetric differences were evaluated by Friedman non-parametric paired test with multiple sampling correction. Results: PTV and normal tissue objectives were not violated in 24 FLARE RT plans. Population median of mean BTV dose was 73.7Gy (68.5–75.5Gy), mean FDG-PET peak dose was 89.7Gy (73.5–103Gy), MLD was 12.3Gy (7.5–19.6Gy), and perfused MLD was 4.8Gy (0.9–12.1Gy). VMAT achieved higher dose to the FDG-PET peak subvolume (p=0.01), while PBS delivered lower dose to lung (p<0.001). Voxelwise linear correlation between BTV dose and FDG-PET uptake was higher for VMAT (R=0.93) and PBS+VMAT (R=0.94) compared to PBS alone (R=0.89). Conclusion: FLARE RT is feasible with VMAT and PBS. A combination of PBS for functional lung

  2. Foundations of radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalas, D.; Mihalas, B. W.

    This book is the result of an attempt, over the past few years, to gather the basic tools required to do research on radiating flows in astrophysics. The microphysics of gases is discussed, taking into account the equation of state of a perfect gas, the first and second law of thermodynamics, the thermal properties of a perfect gas, the distribution function and Boltzmann's equation, the collision integral, the Maxwellian velocity distribution, Boltzmann's H-theorem, the time of relaxation, and aspects of classical statistical mechanics. Other subjects explored are related to the dynamics of ideal fluids, the dynamics of viscous and heat-conducting fluids, relativistic fluid flow, waves, shocks, winds, radiation and radiative transfer, the equations of radiation hydrodynamics, and radiating flows. Attention is given to small-amplitude disturbances, nonlinear flows, the interaction of radiation and matter, the solution of the transfer equation, acoustic waves, acoustic-gravity waves, basic concepts of special relativity, and equations of motion and energy.

  3. Earth Radiation Measurement Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis

    2000-01-01

    This document is the final report for NASA Grant NAG1-1959, 'Earth Radiation Measurement Science'. The purpose of this grant was to perform research in this area for the needs of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project and for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which are bing conducted by the Radiation and Aerosols Branch of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of Langley Research Center. Earth Radiation Measurement Science investigates the processes by which measurements are converted into data products. Under this grant, research was to be conducted for five tasks: (1) Point Response Function Measurements; (2) Temporal Sampling of Outgoing Longwave Radiation; (3) Spatial Averaging of Radiation Budget Data; (4) CERES Data Validation and Applications; and (5) ScaRaB Data Validation and Application.

  4. Designing Shelter in New Buildings. A Manual for Architects on the Preliminary Designing of Shielding from Fallout Gamma Radiation in Normally Functioning Spaces in New Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Albert

    Analysis of radiation fallout prevention factors in new construction is presented with emphasis on architectural shielding principles. Numerous diagrams and charts illustrate--(1) radiation and fallout properties, (2) building protection principles, (3) details and planning suggestions, and (4) tabular data interpretation. A series of charts is…

  5. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciT

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  6. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  7. Space Radiation and the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampson, R. E.

    Solar and cosmic radiation pose a number of physiological challenges to human spaceflight outside the protective region of Earth's magnetosphere. Aside from well-described effects of radiation on the blood-forming tissues of the hematopoietic system, there is increasing evidence of direct effects of radiation on the brain as evidenced by studies showing longitudinal decline in memory and cognitive function following radiation specifically directed at brain tissue. These indications strengthen the need to more fully research effects of radiation - particular those components associated with solar wind and galactic cosmic radiation - on the nervous system of mammals from rodents to humans.

  8. An experimental and theoretical study of radiative extinction of diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.; Atreya, A.

    1994-01-01

    Our work was primarily theoretical and numerical. We investigated the simplified modeling of heat losses in diffusion flames, then we 'ramped up' the level of complexity in each successive study until the final chapter discussed the general problem of soot/flame interaction. With regard to the specific objective of studying radiative extinction, we conclude that in the steady case a self-extinguishing zero-g flame is unlikely to occur. The soot volume fractions are too small. On the other hand, our work does provide rational means for assessing the mixture of chemical energy release and radiative heat release. It also provides clues for suitable 'tailoring' this balance. Thus heat fluxes to surrounding surfaces can be substantially increased by exploiting and modifying its sooting capability.

  9. The effect of moisture content within multilayer protective clothing on protection from radiation and steam.

    PubMed

    Su, Yun; Li, Jun; Song, Guowen

    2018-06-01

    The moisture from skin sweat and atmospheric water affects the thermal protective performance provided by multilayer protective clothing. Four levels of moisture content were selected to evaluate the impact of moisture on thermal protection under dry (thermal radiation) and wet (thermal radiation and low-pressure steam) heat exposure. Also, the role of moisture and its relationship with exposure time were analyzed based on skin heat flux and Henriques integral value. The addition of moisture to a fabric system was found to result in differences in second-degree and third-degree skin burn times. When moisture is added to a fabric system, it both acts as a thermal conductor to present a negative effect and provides a positive effect owing to thermal storage of water and evaporative heat loss. The positive or negative effects of moisture are mainly dependent on the thermal exposure time, the moisture content and the presence of hot steam.

  10. Evaluation of radiation-induced peripheral nerve injury in rabbits with MR neurography using diffusion tensor imaging and T2 measurements: Correlation with histological and functional changes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qi; Wang, Shiyang; Zhou, Jiaxuan; Zou, Qiao; Deng, Yingshi; Wang, Shouyang; Zheng, Xiaoying; Li, Xinchun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and T2 measurements in the evaluation of radiation-induced peripheral nerve injury (RIPNI). RIPNI was produced in a randomly selected side of sciatic nerve in each of 21 rabbits while the contralateral side served as the control. The limb function and MR parameters were evaluated over a 4-month period. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (λ∥ ), radial diffusivity (λ⊥ ) and T2 values were obtained using 3T MR for quantitative analysis. Two animals were randomly killed for histological evaluation at each timepoint. The T2 value of irradiated nerve increased at 1 day (63.95 ± 15.60, P = 0.012) and was restored at 1 month (52.34 ± 5.38, P = 0.105). It increased progressively at 2 to 4 months (60.39 ± 10.60, 66.96 ± 6.08, 75.51 ± 7.39, all P < 0.01). λ⊥ significantly increased at 1 day (0.82 ± 0.44, P = 0.046) and slightly decreased at 1 month (0.61 ± 0.17, P < 0.001). It increased gradually from 2 to 3 months (0.84 ± 0.29, 1.13 ± 0.33, both P < 0.001) followed by a decline at 4 months (0.83 ± 0.17, P < 0.001). FA was statistically lower than the contralateral sides at 1 to 4 months (0.72 ± 0.08, 0.60 ± 0.12, 0.51 ± 0.11, 0.62 ± 0.06, all P < 0.01). Changes in FA and λ⊥ correlated well with the functional and pathological changes in irradiated nerve. DTI may be a more sensitive and accurate method to evaluate RIPNI compared with T2 measurements. FA and λ⊥ are promising quantitative indices in monitoring RIPNI. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:1492-1499. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production accompanied by upregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain function and mitochondrial content under control of the cell cycle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamazumi, Masayuki; Wada, Yusuke; Nakamura, Yoshinari; Nakamura, Hideo; Inanami, Osamu

    2012-07-15

    Whereas ionizing radiation (Ir) instantaneously causes the formation of water radiolysis products that contain some reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS are also suggested to be released from biological sources in irradiated cells. It is now becoming clear that these ROS generated secondarily after Ir have a variety of biological roles. Although mitochondria are assumed to be responsible for this Ir-induced ROS production, it remains to be elucidated how Ir triggers it. Therefore, we conducted this study to decipher the mechanism of Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, Ir (10 Gy of X-rays) induced a time-dependent increase in the mitochondrial ROS level. Ir also increased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial ATP production, suggesting upregulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) function after Ir. Although we found that Ir slightly enhanced mitochondrial ETC complex II activity, the complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid failed to reduce Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. Meanwhile, we observed that the mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA level were upregulated after Ir, indicating that Ir increased the mitochondrial content of the cell. Because irradiated cells are known to undergo cell cycle arrest under control of the checkpoint mechanisms, we examined the relationships between cell cycle and mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. We found that the cells in the G2/M phase had a higher mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level than cells in the G1 or S phase, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated. We also found that Ir-induced accumulation of the cells in the G2/M phase led to an increase in cells with a high mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. This suggested that Ir upregulated mitochondrial ETC function and mitochondrial content, resulting in mitochondrial ROS production, and that

  12. On approaches to the functional restoration of salivary glands damaged by radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, with a review of related aspects of salivary gland morphology and development.

    PubMed

    Redman, R S

    2008-06-01

    Radiation therapy for cancer of the head and neck can devastate the salivary glands and partially devitalize the mandible and maxilla. As a result, saliva production is drastically reduced and its quality adversely altered. Without diligent home and professional care, the teeth are subject to rapid destruction by caries, necessitating extractions with attendant high risk of necrosis of the supporting bone. Innovative techniques in delivery of radiation therapy and administration of drugs that selectively protect normal tissues can reduce significantly the radiation effects on salivary glands. Nonetheless, many patients still suffer severe oral dryness. I review here the functional morphology and development of salivary glands as these relate to approaches to preventing and restoring radiation-induced loss of salivary function. The acinar cells are responsible for most of the fluid and organic material in saliva, while the larger ducts influence the inorganic content. A central theme of this review is the extent to which the several types of epithelial cells in salivary glands may be pluripotential and the circumstances that may influence their ability to replace cells that have been lost or functionally inactivated due to the effects of radiation. The evidence suggests that the highly differentiated cells of the acini and large ducts of mature glands can replace themselves except when the respective pools of available cells are greatly diminished via apoptosis or necrosis owing to severely stressful events. Under the latter circumstances, relatively undifferentiated cells in the intercalated ducts proliferate and redifferentiate as may be required to replenish the depleted pools. It is likely that some, if not many, acinar cells may de-differentiate into intercalated duct-like cells and thus add to the pool of progenitor cells in such situations. If the stress is heavy doses of radiation, however, the result is not only the death of acinar cells, but also a marked

  13. Short communication: timeline of radiation-induced kidney function loss after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy of renal cell carcinoma as evaluated by serial (99m)Tc-DMSA SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Price; Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Hofman, Michael S; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Siva, Shankar

    2014-11-26

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been proposed as a definitive treatment for patients with inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma. However, there is little documentation detailing the radiobiological effects of hypofractionated radiation on healthy renal tissue. In this study we describe a methodology for assessment of regional change in renal function in response to single fraction SABR of 26 Gy. In a patient with a solitary kidney, detailed follow-up of kidney function post-treatment was determined through 3-dimensional SPECT/CT imaging and (51)Cr-EDTA measurements. Based on measurements of glomerular filtration rate, renal function declined rapidly by 34% at 3 months, plateaued at 43% loss at 12 months, with minimal further decrease to 49% of baseline by 18 months. The pattern of renal functional change in (99m)Tc-DMSA uptake on SPECT/CT imaging correlates with dose delivered. This study demonstrates a dose effect relationship of SABR with loss of kidney function.

  14. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  15. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research was to experimentally and theoretically investigate the radiation-induced extinction of gaseous diffusion flames in microgravity. The microgravity conditions were required because radiation-induced extinction is generally not possible in 1-g but is highly likely in microgravity. In 1-g, the flame-generated particulates (e.g. soot) and gaseous combustion products that are responsible for flame radiation, are swept away from the high temperature reaction zone by the buoyancy-induced flow and a steady state is developed. In microgravity, however, the absence of buoyancy-induced flow which transports the fuel and the oxidizer to the combustion zone and removes the hot combustion products from it enhances the flame radiation due to: (1) transient build-up of the combustion products in the flame zone which increases the gas radiation, and (2) longer residence time makes conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is usually responsible for most of the radiative heat loss. Numerical calculations conducted during the course of this work show that even non-radiative flames continue to become "weaker" (diminished burning rate per unit flame area) due to reduced rates of convective and diffusive transport. Thus, it was anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the already "weak" microgravity diffusion flame. While this hypothesis appears convincing and our numerical calculations support it, experiments for a long enough microgravity time could not be conducted during the course of this research to provide an experimental proof. Space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in microgravity will burn indefinitely. It was hoped that radiative extinction can be experimentally shown by the aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames where the fuel supply rate was externally controlled. While substantial progress toward this

  16. Prostate Gland Lengths and Iceball Dimensions Predict Micturition Functional Outcome Following Salvage Prostate Cryotherapy in Men with Radiation Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Kalna, Gabriela; Ismail, Mohamed; Birrell, Fiona; Asterling, Sue; McCartney, Elaine; Greene, Damien; Davies, John; Leung, Hing Y.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tissue cryoablation is a potential curative option for solid malignancies, including radiation recurrent prostate cancer (RRPC). Case series of salvage cryotherapy (SCT) in RRPC have reported promising disease free survival (DFS) outcomes and acceptable toxicity profile. While many men receive SCT, no predictive factors for treatment induced side effects are known. The aim of this study is to validate the oncologic outcome of SCT in a large multi-centre patient cohort and to identify potential parameters associated with an increased risk of micturition symptoms. Patients and Methods In this retrospective analysis, we studied 283 consecutive patients with RRPC treated by SCT in three independent U.K. centres (between 2001 and 2011). Two freeze-thaw cycles of transperineal cryotherapy were performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance by a single surgeon in each of the 3 sites. We analysed clinico-pathological factors against tumour response. Functional outcomes were assessed by continence status and IPSS questionnaire. Predictive factors for SCT-induced micturition symptoms were analysed in a sub-group (n = 42) of consecutive cases. Results We found that nadir post-SCT PSA levels strongly associated with DFS. The DFS rates at 12- and 36-month were 84% and 67% for the ≤1 ng/ml group and 56% and 14% for the >1 ng/ml group, respectively (p<0.001). Correlative analysis revealed highly significant association between patients' post-SCT micturition status with prostate gland and iceball lengths following SCT. Finally, in a reduction model, both gland length and maximal length of iceball were highly associated with patients' IPSS outcome (p<0.001). Conclusion We report the largest European patient cohort treated with SCT for RRPC. Oncologic outcome guided by nadir PSA of <1 ng/ml is consistent with earlier single-centre series. For the first time, we identified physical parameters to predict micturition symptoms following SCT. Our data will directly

  17. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation therapy References Geleijns J, Tack D. Medical physics: radiation risks. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ... Exposure Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health Topics A-Z Read more A.D.A. ...

  18. Radiation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA’s mission in radiation protection is to protect human health and the environment from the ionizing radiation that comes from human use of radioactive elements. Other agencies regulate the ...

  19. Late Administration of a Palladium Lipoic Acid Complex (POLY-MVA) Modifies Cardiac Mitochondria but Not Functional or Structural Manifestations of Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Seawright, John W.; Antonawich, Francis J.; Garnett, Merrill; Cao, Maohua; Singh, Preeti; Boerma, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation can cause adverse myocardial remodeling. In small animal models, local heart irradiation causes persistent alterations in cardiac mitochondrial function and swelling. POLY-MVA is a dietary supplement that contains a palladium lipoic acid complex that targets mitochondrial complex I and has been demonstrated to have greater redox potential than lipoic acid alone. POLY-MVA improves mitochondrial function and anti-oxidant enzyme activity in the aged rat heart. In this study, we tested whether POLY-MVA can mitigate cardiac effects of ionizing radiation. Adult male rats were exposed to local heart X rays with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 consecutive days. Eighteen weeks after irradiation, POLY-MVA was administered orally at 1 ml/kg bodyweight per day during weekdays, for 6 weeks. Alterations in cardiac function as measured with echocardiography coincided with enhanced mitochondrial swelling, a reduction in mitochondrial expression of complex II, manifestations of adverse remodeling such as a reduction in myocardial microvessel density and an increase in collagen deposition and mast cell numbers. POLY-MVA enhanced left ventricular expression of superoxide dismutase 2, but only in sham-irradiated animals. In irradiated animals, POLY-MVA caused a reduction in markers of inflammatory infiltration, CD2 and CD68. Moreover, POLY-MVA mitigated the effects of radiation on mitochondria. Nonetheless, POLY-MVA did not mitigate adverse cardiac remodeling, suggesting that this tissue remodeling may not be alleviated by altering cardiac mitochondria alone. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that an earlier onset of POLY-MVA administration may have more profound effects on radiation-induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:28231026

  20. Radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    Diagnostic radiology procedures, such as computed tomography (CT) and X-ray, are an increasing source of ionising radiation exposure to our community. Exposure to ionising radiation is associated with increased risk of malignancy, proportional to the level of exposure. Every diagnostic test using ionising radiation needs to be justified by clinical need. General practitioners need a working knowledge of radiation safety so they can adequately inform their patients of the risks and benefits of diagnostic imaging procedures.

  1. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a ...

  2. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... universities; (b) Hospitals, clinics, or autonomous radiation oncology centers meeting the criteria for major... structure and function; (f) Oncologic pathology; (g) Radiation oncology; (h) Radiobiology; (i) Mathematics; (j) Radiation physics; (k) Radiation protection; (l) Radiation oncology technique; (m) Radiographic...

  3. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... universities; (b) Hospitals, clinics, or autonomous radiation oncology centers meeting the criteria for major... structure and function; (f) Oncologic pathology; (g) Radiation oncology; (h) Radiobiology; (i) Mathematics; (j) Radiation physics; (k) Radiation protection; (l) Radiation oncology technique; (m) Radiographic...

  4. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... universities; (b) Hospitals, clinics, or autonomous radiation oncology centers meeting the criteria for major... structure and function; (f) Oncologic pathology; (g) Radiation oncology; (h) Radiobiology; (i) Mathematics; (j) Radiation physics; (k) Radiation protection; (l) Radiation oncology technique; (m) Radiographic...

  5. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... universities; (b) Hospitals, clinics, or autonomous radiation oncology centers meeting the criteria for major... structure and function; (f) Oncologic pathology; (g) Radiation oncology; (h) Radiobiology; (i) Mathematics; (j) Radiation physics; (k) Radiation protection; (l) Radiation oncology technique; (m) Radiographic...

  6. Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    Radiation protection is a very important aspect for the application of particle detectors in many different fields, like high energy physics, medicine, materials science, oil and mineral exploration, and arts, to name a few. The knowledge of radiation units, the experience with shielding, and information on biological effects of radiation are vital for scientists handling radioactive sources or operating accelerators or X-ray equipment. This article describes the modern radiation units and their conversions to older units which are still in use in many countries. Typical radiation sources and detectors used in the field of radiation protection are presented. The legal regulations in nearly all countries follow closely the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Tables and diagrams with relevant information on the handling of radiation sources provide useful data for the researcher working in this field.

  7. Collisional redistribution of radiation. II - The effects of degeneracy on the equations of motion for the density matrix. III - The equation of motion for the correlation function and the scattered spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of correlations between an absorber atom and perturbers in the binary-collision approximation are applied to degenerate atomic systems. A generalized absorption profile which specifies the final state of the atom after an absorption event is related to the total intensities of Rayleigh scattering and fluorescence from the atom. It is suggested that additional dynamical information to that obtainable from ordinary absorption experiments is required in order to describe redistributed atomic radiation. The scattering of monochromatic radiation by a degenerate atom is computed in a binary-collision approximation; an equation of motion is derived for the correlation function which is valid outside the quantum-regression regime. Solutions are given for the weak-field conditions in terms of generalized absorption and emission profiles that depend on the indices of the atomic multipoles.

  8. Radiation Assurance for the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Poivey, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The space radiation environment can lead to extremely harsh operating conditions for spacecraft electronic systems. A hardness assurance methodology must be followed to assure that the space radiation environment does not compromise the functionality and performance of space-based systems during the mission lifetime. The methodology includes a definition of the radiation environment, assessment of the radiation sensitivity of parts, worst-case analysis of the impact of radiation effects, and part acceptance decisions which are likely to include mitigation measures.

  9. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Distribution function of microinclusions in polymethylmethacrylate and its evolution under the influence of a series of laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauberman, G. Ya; Savanin, S. Yu; Shkunov, V. V.; Shumov, D. E.

    1990-08-01

    A new method is proposed for the derivation of the distribution function of the experimentally determined breakdown thresholds of absorbing microinclusions in a transparent insulator. Expressions are obtained for describing the evolution of this function in the course of irradiation of the insulator with laser pulses of constant energy density. The method is applied to calculate the distribution function of microinclusions in polymethylmethacrylate and the evolution of this function.

  10. Sound radiation quantities arising from a resilient circular radiator.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Ronald M; Janssen, Augustus J E M

    2009-10-01

    Power series expansions in ka are derived for the pressure at the edge of a radiator, the reaction force on the radiator, and the total radiated power arising from a harmonically excited, resilient, flat, circular radiator of radius a in an infinite baffle. The velocity profiles on the radiator are either Stenzel functions (1-(sigma/a)2)n, with sigma the radial coordinate on the radiator, or linear combinations of Zernike functions Pn(2(sigma/a)2-1), with Pn the Legendre polynomial of degree n. Both sets of functions give rise, via King's integral for the pressure, to integrals for the quantities of interest involving the product of two Bessel functions. These integrals have a power series expansion and allow an expression in terms of Bessel functions of the first kind and Struve functions. Consequently, many of the results in [M. Greenspan, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 65, 608-621 (1979)] are generalized and treated in a unified manner. A foreseen application is for loudspeakers. The relation between the radiated power in the near-field on one hand and in the far field on the other is highlighted.

  11. Bifurcation and extinction limit of stretched premixed flames with chain-branching intermediate kinetics and radiative loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huangwei; Chen, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Premixed counterflow flames with thermally sensitive intermediate kinetics and radiation heat loss are analysed within the framework of large activation energy. Unlike previous studies considering one-step global reaction, two-step chemistry consisting of a chain branching reaction and a recombination reaction is considered here. The correlation between the flame front location and stretch rate is derived. Based on this correlation, the extinction limit and bifurcation characteristics of the strained premixed flame are studied, and the effects of fuel and radical Lewis numbers as well as radiation heat loss are examined. Different flame regimes and their extinction characteristics can be predicted by the present theory. It is found that fuel Lewis number affects the flame bifurcation qualitatively and quantitatively, whereas radical Lewis number only has a quantitative influence. Stretch rates at the stretch and radiation extinction limits respectively decrease and increase with fuel Lewis number before the flammability limit is reached, while the radical Lewis number shows the opposite tendency. In addition, the relation between the standard flammability limit and the limit derived from the strained near stagnation flame is affected by the fuel Lewis number, but not by the radical Lewis number. Meanwhile, the flammability limit increases with decreased fuel Lewis number, but with increased radical Lewis number. Radical behaviours at flame front corresponding to flame bifurcation and extinction are also analysed in this work. It is shown that radical concentration at the flame front, under extinction stretch rate condition, increases with radical Lewis number but decreases with fuel Lewis number. It decreases with increased radiation loss.

  12. Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  13. Plume radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  14. Solid-state radiation-emitting compositions and devices

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation, wherein a first substance functions as a source of exciting radiation, and a second substance interacts with the exciting radiation to provide a second radiation. The compositions comprise a porous substrate which is loaded with: a source of exciting radiation, a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with the exciting radiation, or both. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with both a source of exciting radiation, such as tritium, and a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce radiation of a second energy.

  15. Solid-state radiation-emitting compositions and devices

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

    1992-08-11

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation, wherein a first substance functions as a source of exciting radiation, and a second substance interacts with the exciting radiation to provide a second radiation. The compositions comprise a porous substrate which is loaded with: a source of exciting radiation, a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with the exciting radiation, or both. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with both a source of exciting radiation, such as tritium, and a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce radiation of a second energy. 4 figs.

  16. Does an Algorithmic Approach to Using Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiation Result in Good Function, Local Control Rates, and Low Morbidity in Patients With Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

    PubMed

    Klein, Jason; Ghasem, Alex; Huntley, Samuel; Donaldson, Nathan; Keisch, Martin; Conway, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) are two modalities used in the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. Previous work at our institution showed early complications and outcomes for patients treated with HDR-BT, EBRT, or a combination of both radiation therapy modalities. As the general indications for each of these approaches to radiation therapy differ, it is important to evaluate the use of each in an algorithmic way, reflecting how they are used in contemporary practice at sites that use these treatments. QUESTION/PURPOSES: (1) To determine the proportions of intermediate- and long-term complications associated with the use of brachytherapy in the treatment of primary high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcomas; (2), to characterize the long-term morbidity of the three radiation treatment groups using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/ European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme; (3) to determine whether treatment with HDR-BT, EBRT, and HDR-BT+EBRT therapy, in combination with limb-salvage surgery, results in acceptable local control in this high-risk group of sarcomas. We retrospectively studied data from 171 patients with a diagnosis of high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcoma treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiation therapy between 1990 and 2012 at our institution, with a mean followup of 72 months. Of the 171 patients, 33 (20%) were treated with HDR-BT, 128 (75%) with EBRT, and 10 (6%) with HDR-BT+EBRT. We excluded 265 patients with soft tissue sarcomas owing to axial tumor location, previous radiation to the affected extremity, incomplete patient records, patients receiving primary amputation, recurrent tumors, pediatric patients, low- and intermediate-grade tumors, and rhabdoid histology. Fifteen patients (9%) were lost to followup for any reason including died of disease or other causes during the first 12 months postoperatively. This

  17. Solar radiation synthesis of functional carbonaceous materials using Al2O3/TiO2-Cu-HA doped catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, Elena Manuela; Pascu, Alexandru; Roată, Ionut Claudiu; Croitoru, Cătălin; Tierean, Mircea; Rosca, Julia Mirza; Hulka, Iosif

    2018-04-01

    Single carbon nanotubes were synthesized through a physical vapor deposition method, using concentrated solar radiation as means of vaporization and promoting the formation of carbonaceous plasma plume. A novel catalyst, containing multiple hybrid ceramic/metal phases has been obtained through flame spraying. In conjunction with this catalyst, good quality nanomaterials, such as long single-walled nanotubes and nanoparticles have been obtained and characterized by both morphological (SEM, TEM) as well as structural means on analysis (XRD, FTIR). A mild oxidation of the carbonaceous phase has been reported, which could prove useful in applications in conjunction with metals or hydrophilic polymers as potential matrices for nanocomposites obtaining.

  18. Ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Grigoryev, Y. G.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation encountered in space are considered. Biological experiments conducted in space and some experiences of astronauts during space flight are described. The effects of various levels of radiation exposure and the determination of permissible dosages are discussed.

  19. Understanding Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Radiation is a natural energy force that has been a part of the environment since the Earth was formed. It takes various forms, none of which can be smelled, tasted, seen, heard, or felt. Nevertheless, scientists know what it is, where it comes from, how to measure and detect it, and how it affects people. Cosmic radiation from outer space and…

  20. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The type of cancer The size of ...

  1. The Technologist Function in Fields Related to Radiology: Tasks in Radiation Therapy and Diagnostic Ultrasound. Research Report No. 9; Relating Technologist Tasks in Diagnostic Radiology, Ultrasound and Radiation Therapy. Research Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    The two research reports included in this document describe the application of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS) task analysis method to two technologist functions and examine the interrelationships of these tasks with those in diagnostic radiology. (The HSMS method includes processes for using the data for designing job ladders, for…

  2. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  3. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  4. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  5. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  6. Global radiative adjustment after a collapse of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drijfhout, Sybren S.

    2015-10-01

    The transient climate response to a collapse of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is analysed from the difference between two ensembles of climate model simulations with ECHAM5/MPI-OM, one with hosing and the other without hosing. The primary effect of the collapse is to redistribute heat over the two hemispheres. However, Northern Hemisphere sea ice increase in response to the AMOC collapse induces a hemisphere-wide cooling, amplified by atmospheric feedbacks, in particular water vapour. The Southern Hemisphere warming is governed by slower processes. After 25 years the global cooling peaks. Thereafter, the response is characterised by a gradual readjustment of global mean temperature. During the AMOC collapse a downward radiation anomaly arises at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), heating the earth's surface. The net downward radiation anomaly at TOA arises from reduced longwave emission by the atmosphere, overcompensating the increased net upward anomalies in shortwave and longwave radiation at the surface. This radiation anomaly is associated with net ocean heat uptake: cooling of the overlying atmosphere results from reduced ocean heat release through the increase of sea-ice cover in the North Atlantic. The change in energy flow arises from the reduction in latent and sensible heat flux, which dominate the surface radiation budget. Similar experiments with a climate model of intermediate complexity reveal a stronger shortwave response that acts to reduce the net downward radiation anomaly at TOA. The net shortwave and longwave radiation anomalies at TOA always decrease during the first 100 years after the AMOC collapse, but in the intermediate complexity model this is associated with a sign change after 90 years when the net radiation anomaly at TOA becomes upward, accompanied by net ocean heat loss. After several hundred years the longwave and shortwave anomalies increase again, while the net residual at TOA remains small. This radiative

  7. Impact of Dose to the Bladder Trigone on Long-Term Urinary Function After High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciT

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Spratt, Daniel E.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential association between genitourinary (GU) toxicity and planning dose–volume parameters for GU pelvic structures after high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy in localized prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 268 patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy to a prescribed dose of 86.4 Gy in 48 fractions during June 2004-December 2008 were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Dose–volume histograms of the whole bladder, bladder wall, urethra, and bladder trigone were analyzed. The primary endpoint for GU toxicity was an IPSS sum increase ≥10 points over baseline. Univariate and multivariate analysesmore » were done by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 3-7.7 years). Thirty-nine patients experienced an IPSS sum increase ≥10 during follow-up; 84% remained event free at 5 years. After univariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.006), the V90 of the trigone (P=.006), and the maximal dose to the trigone (P=.003) were significantly associated with an IPSS sum increase ≥10. After multivariate analysis, lower baseline IPSS sum (P=.009) and increased maximal dose to the trigone (P=.005) remained significantly associated. Seventy-two patients had both a lower baseline IPSS sum and a higher maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as high risk, and 68 patients had both a higher baseline IPSS sum and a lower maximal dose to the trigone and were defined as low risk for development of an IPSS sum increase ≥10. Twenty-one of 72 high-risk patients (29%) and 5 of 68 low-risk patients (7%) experienced an IPSS sum increase ≥10 (P=.001; odds ratio 5.19). Conclusions: The application of hot spots to the bladder trigone was significantly associated with relevant changes in IPSS during follow-up. Reduction of radiation dose to the lower bladder and specifically

  8. Radiation dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  9. Radiation dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  10. Using the nonlinear control of anaesthesia-induced hypersensitivity of EEG at burst suppression level to test the effects of radiofrequency radiation on brain function

    PubMed Central

    Lipping, Tarmo; Rorarius, Michael; Jäntti, Ville; Annala, Kari; Mennander, Ari; Ferenets, Rain; Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Värri, Alpo; Korpinen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, investigating the effects of mobile phone radiation on test animals, eleven pigs were anaesthetised to the level where burst-suppression pattern appears in the electroencephalogram (EEG). At this level of anaesthesia both human subjects and animals show high sensitivity to external stimuli which produce EEG bursts during suppression. The burst-suppression phenomenon represents a nonlinear control system, where low-amplitude EEG abruptly switches to very high amplitude bursts. This switching can be triggered by very minor stimuli and the phenomenon has been described as hypersensitivity. To test if also radio frequency (RF) stimulation can trigger this nonlinear control, the animals were exposed to pulse modulated signal of a GSM mobile phone at 890 MHz. In the first phase of the experiment electromagnetic field (EMF) stimulation was randomly switched on and off and the relation between EEG bursts and EMF stimulation onsets and endpoints were studied. In the second phase a continuous RF stimulation at 31 W/kg was applied for 10 minutes. The ECG, the EEG, and the subcutaneous temperature were recorded. Results No correlation between the exposure and the EEG burst occurrences was observed in phase I measurements. No significant changes were observed in the EEG activity of the pigs during phase II measurements although several EEG signal analysis methods were applied. The temperature measured subcutaneously from the pigs' head increased by 1.6°C and the heart rate by 14.2 bpm on the average during the 10 min exposure periods. Conclusion The hypothesis that RF radiation would produce sensory stimulation of somatosensory, auditory or visual system or directly affect the brain so as to produce EEG bursts during suppression was not confirmed. PMID:19615084

  11. Effect of long-term exposure of 2.4 GHz radiofrequency radiation emitted from Wi-Fi equipment on testes functions.

    PubMed

    Dasdag, Suleyman; Taş, Muzaffer; Akdag, Mehmet Zulkuf; Yegin, Korkut

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate long-term effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted from a Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) system on testes. The study was carried out on 16 Wistar Albino adult male rats by dividing them into two groups such as sham (n: 8) and exposure (n: 8). Rats in the exposure group were exposed to 2.4 GHz RFR radiation for 24 h/d during 12 months (1 year). The same procedure was applied to the rats in the sham control group except the Wi-Fi system was turned off. Immediately after the last exposure, rats were sacrificed and reproductive organs were removed. Motility (%), concentration (×10(6)/mL), tail defects (%), head defects (%) and total morphologic defects (%) of sperms and weight of testes (g), left epididymis (g), prostate (g), seminal vesicles (g) were determined. Seminiferous tubules diameter (μm) and tunica albuginea thickness (μm) were also measured. However, the results were evaluated by using Johnsen's score. Head defects increased in the exposure group (p < 0.05) while weight of the epididymis and seminal vesicles, seminiferous tubules diameter and tunica albuginea thickness were decreased in the exposure group (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.0001). However, other alterations of other parameters were not found significant (p > 0.05). In conclusion, we observed that long-term exposure of 2.4 GHz RF emitted from Wi-Fi (2420 μW/kg, 1 g average) affects some of the reproductive parameters of male rats. We suggest Wi-Fi users to avoid long-term exposure of RF emissions from Wi-Fi equipment.

  12. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  13. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciT

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correctmore » description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to

  14. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation (also called x-rays, gamma rays, or photons) either kills tumor cells directly or interferes with ... treatment per day, five days a week, for two to seven weeks. Potiential Side Effects Most people ...

  15. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and tobacco Almost all milk products Coffee, tea, chocolate, and sodas with caffeine Foods containing whole bran ... Call your provider if you are having radiation therapy or have had it in the past and ...

  16. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Doroshow JH. Approach to the patient with cancer. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 179. National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people ...

  17. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  18. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer - brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  19. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Reddell, Brandon; Rojdev, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of both satellite and surface neutron monitor data demonstrate that the widely utilized Exponential model of solar particle event (SPE) proton kinetic energy spectra can seriously underestimate SPE proton flux, especially at the highest kinetic energies. The more recently developed Band model produces better agreement with neutron monitor data ground level events (GLEs) and is believed to be considerably more accurate at high kinetic energies. Here, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event environments (SEE) behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i. e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations have fully three dimensions with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. The effects are reported for both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event

  20. Two Fixed, Evacuated, Glass, Solar Collectors Using Nonimaging Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.; Winston, Roland; O'Gallagher, Joseph; Ford, Gary

    1984-01-01

    Two fixed, evacuated, glass solar thermal collectors have been designed. The incorporation of nonimaging concentration, selective absorption and vacuum insulation into their design is essential for obtaining high efficiency through low heat loss, while operating at high temperatures. Nonimaging, approximately ideal concentration with wide acceptance angle permits solar radiation collection without tracking the sun, and insures collection of much of the diffuse radiation. It also minimizes the area of the absorbing surface, thereby reducing the radiation heat loss. Functional integration, where different parts of these two collectors serve more than one function, is also important in achieving high efficiency, and it reduces cost.

  1. RADIATION HAZARD

    SciT

    Savenko, I.A.; Pisarenko, N.F.; Shavrin, P.I.

    1961-01-01

    Analysis of data obtained by Sputnik V (August 19, 1961) at about 320 km made it possible to delineate the position of the radiation belts and to estimate the amount of radiation hazard present. Scintillation counter data show that the radiation in the belts is anisotropic and that the energy flux under a layer of matter of 2 x 10/sup -3/ g cm/sup -2/ is 10/sup 10/ ev cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. The mean energy released per quantum in the scintillation counter crystal is computed at 2.0 x 10/sup 5/ ev and the intensity of electrons in the outer beltmore » at 5 x 10/sup 4/ particles cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. The radiation dosage absorbed inside Sputnik V was determined by dividing the amount of energy liberated in the sodium iodide crystal of the scinitillation counter by the weight of the crystal (36.4 g) without the need of a detailed examination of the composition and spectrum of the radiation. A dosage value of 7 mrad/24 hr was obtained; in terms of the RBE (relative biological effect) of the cosmic charged particles this amounted to 5O mrem/24 hr. This dosage is considered relatively safe for astronauts during flights along trajectories similar to that of Sputnik V when the sun is quiet. Solar flares, however, could bring about an increase in radiation. Owing to latitude and longitude effects and the specifi distribution of radiation at this height, the dosage per orbit ranged from 0.35 to 0.70 mrad. (OTS)« less

  2. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    SciT

    Shah, M.; Eng, K.; Engler, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  3. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  4. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  5. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  6. The course and the anatomo-functional relationships of the optic radiation: a combined study with ‘post mortem’ dissections and ‘in vivo’ direct electrical mapping

    PubMed Central

    Sarubbo, Silvio; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Milani, Paola; Paradiso, Beatrice; Barbareschi, Mattia; Rozzanigo, Umbero; Colarusso, Enzo; Tugnoli, Valeria; Farneti, Marco; Granieri, Enrico; Duffau, Hugues; Chioffi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Even if different dissection, tractographic and connectivity studies provided pure anatomical evidences about the optic radiations (ORs), descriptions of both the anatomical structure and the anatomo-functional relationships of the ORs with the adjacent bundles were not reported. We propose a detailed anatomical and functional study with ‘post mortem’ dissections and ‘in vivo’ direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the OR, demonstrating also the relationships with the adjacent eloquent bundles in a neurosurgical ‘connectomic’ perspective. Six human hemispheres (three left, three right) were dissected after a modified Klingler's preparation. The anatomy of the white matter was analysed according to systematic and topographical surgical perspectives. The anatomical results were correlated to the functional responses collected during three resections of tumours guided by cortico-subcortical DES during awake procedures. We identified two groups of fibres forming the OR. The superior component runs along the lateral wall of the occipital horn, the trigone and the supero-medial wall of the temporal horn. The inferior component covers inferiorly the occipital horn and the trigone, the lateral wall of the temporal horn and arches antero-medially to form the Meyer's Loop. The inferior fronto-occipital fascicle (IFOF) covers completely the superior OR along its entire course, as confirmed by the subcortical DES. The inferior longitudinal fascicle runs in a postero-anterior and infe