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Sample records for radiative decay

  1. Radiative decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubega, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B 0 → K *0 γ and B s → ϕ γ, the direct CP asymmetry in B 0 → K *0 γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B ± → K ±π∓π± γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb-1 of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb-1 of data, respectively.

  2. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  3. Radiative decays at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Giubega, L. E.; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  4. RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS FROM BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2003-08-28

    Electroweak penguin decays provide a promising hunting ground for Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The decay B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, which proceeds through an electromagnetic penguin loop, already provides stringent constraints on the supersymmetric (SUSY) parameter space. The present data samples of {approx}1 x 10{sup 8} B{bar B} events allow to explore radiative penguin decays with branching fractions of the order of 10{sup -6} or less. In this brief report they discuss a study of B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decay modes and a search for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma} decays.

  5. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edward Tann

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  6. Rare and radiative kaon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Ambrosio, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss theoretical issues in radiative rare kaon decays. The interest is twofold: to extract useful short-distance information and understand the underlying dynamics. We emphasize channels where either we can understand non-perturbative aspects of QCD or there is a chance to test the Standard Model. An interesting channel, K + → π + π 0 e + e ‑, is studied also in connection with the recent experimental NA48 results. Motivated by LHCB results on KS → μ + μ ‑ we discuss other channels like KS,L → l + l ‑ l + l ‑. Motivated by recent theoretical work by Buras and collaborators we study also the K ± → π±l + l ‑ form factor.

  7. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  8. Radiative Penguin Decays at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Koneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS

    2007-11-16

    In this article, I review the most recent results in radiative penguin decays from the B factories Belle and BABAR. Most notably, I will talk about the recent new observations in the decays B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}) {gamma}, a new analysis technique in b {yields} s{gamma}, and first measurements of radiative penguin decays in the B{sup 0}{sub s} meson system. Finally, I will summarize the current status and future prospects of radiative penguin B physics at the B factories.

  9. Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes simple electrical circuits, showing that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decay of atoms. Compares a two-circuit electrical system with a two-level atom. (MLH)

  10. Competition between radiative and strong force decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    For nuclear states unbound to neutron decay, radiative emission is often assumed to not dominate over neutron decay mediated by the far stronger strong interaction, except for very low neutron energies and high angular momentum barriers. Recent experimental investigations of 19O and 27 Mg populated in heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions have revealed predominantly gamma decays from a number of states unbound to neutron decay by up to 2 MeV. In most cases the angular momentum barrier is not sufficient to inhibit neutron decay enough to allow E-M decay with widths of up to an eV or so to win. Other inhibitions to particle decay, including low spectroscopic factors, will be discussed. Supported in part by NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  11. Radiative β decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. L.; Chupp, T. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gentile, T. R.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Fisher, B. M.; Kremsky, I.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Beise, E. J.; Kiriluk, K. G.; Byrne, J.; Coakley, K. J.; Fu, C.

    2010-03-01

    The theory of quantum electrodynamics predicts that the β decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is accompanied by a continuous spectrum of emitted photons described as inner bremsstrahlung. While this phenomenon has been observed in nuclear β decay and electron-capture decay for many years, it has only been recently observed in free-neutron decay. We present a detailed discussion of an experiment in which the radiative decay mode of the free neutron was observed. In this experiment, the branching ratio for this rare decay was determined by recording photons that were correlated with both the electron and proton emitted in neutron decay. We determined the branching ratio for photons with energy between 15 and 340 keV to be (3.09±0.32)×10-3 (68% level of confidence), where the uncertainty is dominated by systematic effects. This value for the branching ratio is consistent with theoretical predictions. The characteristic energy spectrum of the radiated photons, which differs from the uncorrelated background spectrum, is also consistent with the theoretical spectrum.

  12. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Decays of B

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Jeffrey D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-11-09

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are flavor-changing-neutral-current processes that provide powerful ways to test the Standard Model at the one-loop level, to search for the effects of new physics, and to extract Standard Model parameters such as CKM matrix elements and quark masses. The large data samples obtained by the B-factory experiments BaBar and Belle, together with an intensive theoretical effort, have led to significant progress towards understanding these rare decays. Recent experimental results include the measurements of the b {yields} d{gamma} decays B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, the observation of B {yields} K(*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays (together with studies of the associated kinematic distributions), and improved measurements of the inclusive B {yields} Xs{gamma} rate and photon energy spectrum.

  13. STUDIES OF RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS AT BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, C

    2003-10-27

    The electromagnetic radiative ''penguin'' decays b {yields} s{gamma}, b {yields} d{gamma} are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors present recent studies made with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  14. Radiative neutrino decay in hot media

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, J.F.; Pal, P.B.

    1997-07-01

    We calculate the rate for the radiative neutrino decay in a thermal background of electrons and photons, taking into account the effect of the stimulated emission of photons in the thermal bath. We show that the rate is enhanced by a large factor relative to the rate for the corresponding process in the vacuum. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  16. Biomedical applications of radiative decay engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Shen, Yibing; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2002-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a widely used research tool in biochemistry and has also become the dominant method enabling the revolution in medical diagnostics, DNA sequencing and genomics. In this forward-looking article we describe a new opportunity in fluorescence, radiative decay engineering (RDE). By RDE we mean modifying the emission of fluorophores or chromophores by a nearby metallic surface, the most important effect being an increase in the radiative decay rate. We describe the usual effects expected form increase in the radiative rates with reference to the biomedical applications of immunoassay and DNA hybridization. We also present experiments which show that metallic particles can increase the quantum yield of low quantum yield fluorophores, increase fluorophore photostability and increase the distance for resonance energy transfer. And finally we show that proximity to silver particles can increase the intensity of the intrinsic fluorescence from DNA.

  17. Study of the radiative pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung

    2011-04-01

    We study the radiative pion decay of {pi}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma} in the light-front quark model. We also summarize the result in the chiral perturbation theory. The vector and axial-vector hadronic form factors (F{sub V,A}) for the {pi}{yields}{gamma} transition are evaluated in the whole allowed momentum transfer. In terms of these momentum dependent form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratio and compare our results with the experimental data and other theoretical predictions in the literature. We also constrain the possible size of the tensor interaction in the light-front quark model.

  18. Form factors in the radiative pion decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, V.; Portolés, J.

    2007-10-01

    We perform an analysis of the form factors that rule the structure-dependent amplitude in radiative pion decay. The resonance contributions to π→eνeγ decays are computed through the proper construction of the vector and axial-vector form factors by setting the QCD driven asymptotic properties of the three-point Green functions and , and by demanding the smoothening of the form factors at high transfer of momentum. A comparison between theoretical and experimental determination of the form factors is also carried out. We also consider and evaluate the role played by a non-standard tensor form factor. We conclude that, at present and due to the hadronic uncertainties, the search for new physics in this process is not feasible.

  19. QCD challenges in radiative B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Misiak, M.

    2010-12-22

    Radiative decays of the B meson are known to provide important constraints on the MSSM and many other realistic new physics models in the sub-TeV range. The inclusive branching ratio B(B-bar{yields}X{sub s{gamma}}) being the key observable is currently measured to about {+-}7% accuracy. Reaching a better precision on the theory side is a challenge both for the perturbative QCD calculations and for analyses of non-perturbative hadronic effects. The current situation is briefly summarized here.

  20. Studies of radiative charm decays at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanut, T.; Belle Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fractions of the radiative decays {D{^0}to V γ} , where V=φ, overline{K{}^{*0}} or ρ{0} . This is the first observation of the decay {D{^0}to ρ{0}γ} . We measure preliminary branching fractions {{B}(D{^0}to φ γ)}=(2.76 ± 0.20 ± 0.08) × 10^{-5} , {{B}(D{^0}to overline{K{}^{*0}}γ)}=(4.66 ± 0.21 ± 0.18) × 10^{-4} and {{B}(D{^0}to ρ{0}γ)}=(1.77 ± 0.30 ± 0.08) × 10^{-5} , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. We also present the first measurement of CP asymmetry in these decays. The preliminary values are {{A_{CP}}(D{^0}to φ γ)}=-0.094 ± 0.066 ± 0.001 , {{A_{CP}}(D{^0}to overline{K{}^{*0}}γ)}=-0.003 ± 0.020 ± 0.000 and {{A_{CP}}(D{^0}to ρ{0}γ)}=0.056 ± 0.151 ± 0.006 . We also present the results of the search for the rare charm decay D^0 to γ γ , resulting in an upper limit on the branching fraction Br(D^0 to γ γ)< 8.5 × 10^{-7} at 90% confidence level, the most restrictive limit to date.

  1. Radiative corrections to top-quark decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilam, G.; Mendel, R. R.; Migneron, R.; Soni, A.

    1991-06-01

    We calculate all radiative corrections to one-loop order for the main decay of the top quark, t-->b+W, in the standard model, retaining exact dependence on all masses. For mt=150 GeV and MH=100 GeV we find a -2.9% (-6.9%) correction with a very weak dependence on the Higgs-boson mass, in renormalization schemes that use α, GF, and MZ (GF, MW, and MZ) as input parameters. Out of the above results, -8.5% is due to QCD. The mt and MH dependence is given up to 300 and 1000 GeV, respectively. The inadequacy of a leading mt calculation is pointed out.

  2. Radiative decays of the neutral Zc(3900 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Dong, Yu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    We study the radiative decays of the Zc(3900 )0 in a hadronic molecule picture, where the Zc(3900 ) is treated as a D D¯ *+c .c hadronic molecule. The partial widths of Γ (Zc(3900 )0→γ ηc(2 S )) and Γ (Zc(3900 )0→γ χc 0) are predicted to be of order 10 keV, and the cross sections for σ (e+e-→π0Zc(3900 )→π0γ ηc(2 S )) and σ (e+e-→π0Zc(3900 )→π0γ χc 0) are of order 0.1 pb at 4.23 GeV, which may be accessible for the BESIII and forthcoming Belle II.

  3. Inclusive radiative J/{psi} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.

    2008-08-01

    Using data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct-photon momentum spectrum in the decay J/{psi}(1S){yields}{gamma}gg, via the ''tagged'' process: e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S); {psi}(2S){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}+X. Including contributions from two-body radiative decay processes, we find the ratio of the inclusive direct-photon branching fraction to that of the dominant three-gluon branching fraction [R{sub {gamma}}=B(gg{gamma})/B(ggg)] to be R{sub {gamma}}=0.137{+-}0.001{+-}0.016{+-}0.004, where the errors shown are statistical, systematic, and the model-dependent uncertainty related to the extrapolation to zero photon energy. The shape of the scaled photon energy spectrum in J/{psi}{yields}gg{gamma} is observed to be very similar to that of {upsilon}{yields}gg{gamma}. The R{sub {gamma}} value obtained is roughly consistent with that expected by a simple quark-charge scaling [R{sub {gamma}}{approx}(q{sub c}/q{sub b}){sup 2}] of the value determined at the {upsilon}(1S), but somewhat higher than the value expected from the running of the strong coupling constant.

  4. J/psi and UPSILON radiative and hadronic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1987-07-01

    The search for gluonium at the J/psi and UPSILON is discussed, as well as the search for exotics at the UPSILON. Reactions discussed include radiative and hadronic decays of the J/psi and the search for radiative decays of the UPSILON. Future perspectives are also briefly considered. 45 refs., 27 figs. (LEW)

  5. Radiative Decays of the B Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hirohisa A

    2003-09-23

    The radiative decays of the B meson to the final states K *(892){gamma} and {rho}(770){gamma} proceed through virtual effective flavor-changing neutral current processes which are sensitive to contributions from high mass scales from within the Standard Model of particle interactions and from possible new physics. In the context of the Standard Model, these transitions are of interest in probing the weak interaction behavior of the top quark. In particular, the ratio of branching fractions for the two processes can be used to extract the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}|. Potential new physics contributions in these virtual transitions may induce new sources of direct CP violation and enhancement or suppression of the rate of these processes. The B {yields} K*{gamma} is a manifestation of the b {yields} s{gamma} radiative transition. This process has been previously observed by the CLEO collaboration and its branching fraction measured. While the theoretical prediction for the inclusive rate of b {yields} s{gamma} transitions is more robust than that of the exclusive B {yields} K*{gamma}, the prospects for precise measurements of {Beta}[B {yields} K*{gamma}] and direct CP violation in this channel has attracted considerable attention. The analysis described here represents an improved measurement of the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching factions and a more sensitive search for direct CP violation. In 22.7 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector in 1999-2000, we measure: {Beta}[B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}] = 4.23 {+-} 0.40(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}[B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}] = 3.83 {+-} 0.62(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.) x 10{sup -5}. We find no evidence for direct CP violation in the decays and constrain -0.170 < A{sub CP} < 0.082 at 90% Confidence Level. The B {yields} {rho}{gamma} proceeds through the analogous b {yields} d{gamma} radiative transition. As such, its rate is

  6. Radiative decay of massious neutrinos: Implications for physics and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative lifetime tau for the decay of massious neutrinos is calculated using various physical models for neutrino decay. The results are related to the astrophysical problem of the detectability of the decay photons from cosmic neutrinos. Conversely, the astrophysical data are used to place lower limits on tau. However, an observed feature at approximately 1700 A in the ultraviolet background radiation at high galactic latitudes may be from the decay of neutrinos with mass approximately 14 eV. This would require a decay rate much larger than the predictions of standard models but could be indicative of a decay rate possible in composite models. It is considered that this may be an important test for substructure in leptons and quarks.

  7. Squark cascade decays to charginos/neutralinos: Gluon radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Horsky, R.; Kraemer, M.; Mueck, A.; Zerwas, P. M.

    2008-08-01

    The momentum spectrum and the polarization of charginos and neutralinos in squark decays are affected by gluon radiation in the decay process q-tilde{yields}q{chi}-tilde(g). We determine these corrections and study their impact on the [ql] invariant mass distributions for leptonic {chi}-tilde decays. The higher-order corrections, though small in general, can be sizeable near pronounced edges of the final-state distribution000.

  8. Studies of Radiative Penguin B Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier

    2003-05-14

    We summarize results on a number of observations of penguin dominated radiative decays of the B meson. Such decays are forbidden at tree level and proceed via electroweak loops. As such they may be sensitive to physics beyond the standard model. The observations have been made at the BaBar experiment at PEPII, the asymmetric B factory at SLAC.

  9. An electroweak enigma: Hyperon radiative decays

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, A.,; Jastrzembski, E.; Lach, J.; Marriner, J.; Golovtsov, V.; Krivshich, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; McCliment, E.; Newsom, C.; Norbeck, E.; Cooper, P.S.; /Yale U.

    1985-04-03

    The main thrust of this experiment will be to measure the asymmetry parameter for the electroweak decay {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{gamma} and verify its branching ratio. As a secondary goal they will measure, or set new upper limits for, the branching ratio of the electroweak decay {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{gamma}. Since the {Xi}{sup -} are expected to be polarized, information on the asymmetry parameter may also be available.

  10. Dark radiation from particle decay: cosmological constraints and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenkamp, Jasper; Kersten, Jörn E-mail: Joern.Kersten@desy.de

    2013-08-01

    We study particle decay as the origin of dark radiation. After elaborating general properties and useful parametrisations we provide model-independent and easy-to-use constraints from nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background and structure formation. Bounds on branching ratios and mass hierarchies depend in a unique way on the time of decay. We demonstrate their power to exclude well-motivated scenarios taking the example of the lightest ordinary sparticle decaying into the gravitino. We point out signatures and opportunities in cosmological observations and structure formation. For example, if there are two dark decay modes, dark radiation and the observed dark matter with adjustable free-streaming can originate from the same decaying particle, solving small-scale problems of structure formation. Hot dark matter mimicking a neutrino mass scale as deduced from cosmological observations can arise and possibly be distinguished after a discovery. Our results can be used as a guideline for model building.

  11. Dark radiation from particle decays during big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menestrina, Justin L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2012-02-01

    CMB observations suggest the possibility of an extra dark radiation component, while the current evidence from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is more ambiguous. Dark radiation from a decaying particle can affect these two processes differently. Early decays add an additional radiation component to both the CMB and BBN, while late decays can alter the radiation content seen in the CMB while having a negligible effect on BBN. Here, we quantify this difference and explore the intermediate regime by examining particles decaying during BBN, i.e., particle lifetimes τX satisfying 0.1sec<τX<1000sec. We calculate the change in the effective number of neutrino species, Neff, as measured by the CMB, ΔNCMB, and the change in the effective number of neutrino species as measured by BBN, ΔNBBN, as a function of the decaying particle initial energy density and lifetime, where ΔNBBN is defined in terms of the number of additional two-component neutrinos needed to produce the same change in the primordial He4 abundance as our decaying particle. As expected, for short lifetimes (τX≲0.1sec), the particles decay before the onset of BBN, and ΔNCMB=ΔNBBN, while for long lifetimes (τX≳1000sec), ΔNBBN is dominated by the energy density of the nonrelativistic particles before they decay, so that ΔNBBN remains nonzero and becomes independent of the particle lifetime. By varying both the particle energy density and lifetime, one can obtain any desired combination of ΔNBBN and ΔNCMB, subject to the constraint that ΔNCMB≥ΔNBBN. We present limits on the decaying particle parameters derived from observational constraints on ΔNCMB and ΔNBBN.

  12. Radiative Corrections to One-Photon Decays of Hydrogenic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Pachucki, K; Cheng, K T

    2003-11-11

    Radiative corrections to the decay rate of n = 2 states of hydrogenic ions are calculated. The transitions considered are the M1 decay of the 2s state to the ground state and the E1(M2) decays of the 2p{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 3/2} states to the ground state. The radiative corrections start in order {alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 2}, but the method used sums all orders of Z{alpha}. The leading {alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 2} correction for the E1 decays is calculated and compared with the exact result. The extension of the calculational method to parity nonconserving transitions in neutral atoms is discussed.

  13. Radiative decays of resonances on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Agadjanov, Andria; Bernard, Véronique; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-22

    We discuss a generalization of the Lüscher approach to the calculation of the matrix elements of the unstable states. A theoretical framework for the lattice extraction of the ΔNγ* transition form factors is formulated. The procedure to measure the form factors at the resonance pole is given. The current theoretical progress on the B → K*γ* decays is briefly summarized.

  14. Time reversal violation in radiative beta decay: experimental plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; McNeil, J.; Anholm, M.; Gorelov, A.; Melconian, D.; Ashery, D.

    2017-01-01

    Some explanations for the excess of matter over antimatter in the universe involve sources of time reversal violation (TRV) in addition to the one known in the standard model of particle physics. We plan to search for TRV in a correlation between the momenta of the beta, neutrino, and the radiative gamma sometimes emitted in nuclear beta decay. Correlations involving three (out of four) momenta are sensitive at lowest order to different TRV physics than observables involving spin, such as electric dipole moments and spin-polarized beta decay correlations. Such experiments have been done in radiative kaon decay, but not in systems involving the lightest generation of quarks. An explicit low-energy physics model being tested produces TRV effects in the Fermi beta decay of the neutron, tritium, or some positron-decaying isotopes. We will present plans to measure the TRV asymmetry in radiative beta decay of laser-trapped 38mK at better than 0.01 sensitivity, including suppression of background from positron annihilation. Supported by NSERC, D.O.E., Israel Science Foundation. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  15. Radiative corrections to false vacuum decay in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglov, M. A.; Onishchenko, A. I.

    2017-08-01

    We consider radiative corrections to false vacuum decay within the framework of quantum mechanics for the general potential of the form 1/2 M ϕ2(ϕ -A )(ϕ -B ), where M , A and B are arbitrary parameters. For this type of potential we provide analytical results for Green function in the background of a corresponding bounce solution together with a one loop expression for false vacuum decay rate. Next, we discuss the computations of higher order corrections for false vacuum decay rates and provide numerical expressions for two and three loop contributions.

  16. Ultraviolet background radiation and the search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the observed far-ultraviolet background at high galactic latitudes is studied in order to find evidence of radiation from neutrino decay. It is concluded that at latitudes above about 20 degrees, the limit on any light scattered from interstellar dust or the limit on light from any source other than stars is of order 300 photons/sq cm sec ster A. Superficial evidence for radiation from decaying neutrinos is provided by an examination of the spectrum of the observed background at the highest galactic latitudes, although the spectrum is so uncertain that conclusions are not possible.

  17. Ultraviolet background radiation and the search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the observed far-ultraviolet background at high galactic latitudes is studied in order to find evidence of radiation from neutrino decay. It is concluded that at latitudes above about 20 degrees, the limit on any light scattered from interstellar dust or the limit on light from any source other than stars is of order 300 photons/sq cm sec ster A. Superficial evidence for radiation from decaying neutrinos is provided by an examination of the spectrum of the observed background at the highest galactic latitudes, although the spectrum is so uncertain that conclusions are not possible.

  18. Decay processes and radiative cooling of small anionic copper clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenfeldt, Christian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael W.; George, Sebastian; Guzmán-Ramírez, Gregorio; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Schweikhard, Lutz; Wolf, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The decay of copper clusters Cun- with size n =4 -7 , produced in a metal ion sputter source, was studied in an electrostatic ion-beam trap. The neutral products after electron emission and fragmentation were monitored for ion storage times of up to a second. The observations indicated the presence of radiative cooling. The energy distributions of the remaining clusters were probed by laser irradiation up to several further seconds of storage time. This defined excitation lead to photoinduced decay signals which, again, showed signs of radiative cooling for Cu6,7 -, not, however, for Cu4,5 -.

  19. Radiative Decays, Nonet Symmetry and SU(3) Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B

    1999-06-30

    We re-examine the problem of simultaneously describing in a consistent way all radiative and leptonic decays of light mesons (V {yields} P{gamma}, P {yields} V{gamma}, P {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, V {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}). For this purpose, we rely on the Hidden Local Symmetry model in both its anomalous and non-anomalous sectors. We show that the SU(3) symmetry breaking scheme proposed by Bando, Kugo and Yamawaki, supplemented with nonet symmetry breaking in the pseudoscalar sector, allows one to reach a nice agreement with all data, except for the K*{sup {+-}} radiative decay. An extension of this breaking pattern allows one to account for this particular decay mode too. Considered together, the whole set of radiative decays provides a pseudoscalar mixing angle {theta}{sub P} {approx_equal} and a value for {theta}{sub V} which is {approx_equal} 3{sup o} from that of ideal mixing. We also show that it is impossible, in a practical sense, to disentangle the effects of nonet symmetry breaking and those of glue inside the {eta}{prime}, using only light meson decays.

  20. Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Khafizov, R. U.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Solovei, V. A.; Kolhidashvili, M. R.

    2009-12-15

    Over 10 years ago we proposed an experiment on measuring the characteristics of radiative neutron decay in papers [1, 2]. At the same time we had published the theoretical spectrum of radiative gamma quanta, calculated within the framework of the electroweak interactions, on the basis of which we proposed the methodology for the future experiment [3, 4]. However, because we were denied beam time on the intensive cold neutron beam at ILL (Grenoble, France) for a number of years, we could only conduct the experiment in 2005 on the newly opened FRMII reactor of Technical University of Muenchen. The main result of this experiment was the discovery of radiative neutron decay and the measurement of its relative intensity B.R. = (3.2 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -3} with C.L. = 99.7% for radiative gamma quanta with energy over 35 kev [5, 6]. Over a year after our first announcement about the results of the conducted experiment, 'Nature' [7] published a letter asserting that its authors have also measured the branching ratio of radiative neutron decay B.R. = (3.13 {+-} 0.34) x 10{sup -3} with c.l. = 68% and gamma quanta energy from 15 to 340 kev. This article aims to compare these two experiments. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the NIST (Washington, USA) experiment methodology not only prevents any exact measurement of the branching ratio and identification of radiative neutron decay events, but also makes registration of ordinary neutron decay events impossible.

  1. Precision theoretical analysis of neutron radiative beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Höllwieser, R.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.; Berdnikov, Ya. A.

    2017-02-01

    In the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and in the tree approximation we calculate the rate and branching ratio of the neutron radiative β- decay with one real photon emission by taking into account the contributions of the weak magnetism and proton recoil to order 1 /mp of the large proton mass mp expansion. We find that the obtained contributions of the weak magnetism and proton recoil increase the rate and branching ratio of the neutron radiative β- decay by about 0.70%. This is large compared with the contribution of the weak magnetism and proton recoil of about 0.16% to the rate of the neutron β- decay, calculated in Phys. Rev. D 88, 073002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.073002.

  2. Color magnetism in pion photoproduction and radiative delta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.; Davidson, R.

    1987-01-01

    We use the extant multipole data base to extract the ..gamma..N-..delta.. transition amplitudes, using the phenomenology of the effective Lagrangian approach. We find evidence for hadronic color magnetism in the radiative delta decay amplitudes. 24 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  4. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  5. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  6. The possible Bπ molecular state and its radiative decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Gao, Lei; Li, Xue-Qian

    2017-05-01

    Recently, several exotic bosons have been confirmed as multi-quark states. However, there are violent disputes about their inner structures, namely if they are molecular states or tetraquarks, or even mixtures of the two structures. It would be interesting to search experimentally for non-strange four-quark states with open charm or bottom which are lighter than Λ _c or Λ _b. Reasonable arguments indicate that they are good candidates of pure molecular states Dπ or Bπ because pions are the lightest boson. Both Bπ and Dπ bound states do not decay via the strong interaction. The Bπ molecule may decay into B^* by radiating a photon, whereas the Dπ molecule can only decay via weak interaction. In this paper we explore the mass spectra of the Bπ molecular states by solving the corresponding instantaneous B-S equation. Then the rate of radiative decay |3/2,1/2\\rangle → B^*γ is calculated and our numerical results indicate that the processes can be measured by the future experiment. We also briefly discuss the Dπ case. Due to the constraint of the final state phase space it can only decay via weak interaction.

  7. Observation of the Radiative Decay Mode of the Free Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, T. R.

    2006-10-01

    Despite decades of detailed study, the radiative decay mode of the neutron has never been definitively observed. We report observation of this process, in which a photon is emitted along with the proton, electron and antineutrino. Photons with energies between 15 keV and 340 keV were detected by a scintillating crystal coupled to an avalanche photodiode and were distinguished from uncorrelated background photons by coincidence with both the decay electron and proton. Correlated background from external bremsstrahlung generated in the electron detector has been estimated to be minor, due to the physical separation and limited line-of-sight between the particle and photon detectors. Measurement of the dependence of the radiative decay rate on the available phase space of the decay is consistent with the expected behavior for radiative decay. The energy spectrum of the radiated photons, which differs from the uncorrelated background spectrum, is also consistent with the calculated spectrum. The measured branching ratio is consistent with theoretical predictions. We discuss the results of this first experiment, and the design of an improved apparatus to perform a precision measurement of the branching ratio and spectrum. In collaboration with M.S. Dewey, H.P. Mumm, J.S. Nico, A.K. Thompson, NIST-Gaithersburg; B.M. Fisher, I. Kremsky, F.E. Wietfeldt, Tulane University; T.E. Chupp, R.L. Cooper, University of Michigan; E.J. Beise, K.G. Kiriluk, University of Maryland; J. Byrne, University of Sussex; and K.J. Coakley, NIST-Boulder.

  8. {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} Radiative-Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Victorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kubarovsky, V.P.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Leontiev, V.M.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Petrenko, S.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Kolganov, V.Z.

    2005-03-01

    The radiative decay {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} was recorded in the exclusive reaction p + N {yields} {lambda}(1520)K{sup +} + N at the SPHINX facility. The branching ratio for this decay and the corresponding partial width were found to be, respectively, Br[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = (1.02 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} and {gamma}[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = 159 {+-} 35 keV (the quoted errors are purely statistical, the systematic errors being within 15%)

  9. Study of rare radiative Phi decays at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Emil Frlez

    1999-07-01

    The RadPhi Collaboration has proposed using the intense tagged photon beam in Hall B at TJNAF to produce {phi} mesons and measure the branching ratios of {phi}'s decaying into the a0(980)g and f0(980){gamma} all-neutral final states. The comparison of branching ratios for these two decay modes should provide crucial information on the quark substructure of a0(980) and f0(980) scalar mesons. Three engineering runs conducted so far measured the photon beam profile, instantaneous rates, pileups and dead times in the detector components, as well as energy and timing resolutions of RadPhi detectors. The measurements demonstrated that the proposed experiment is capable of detecting rare radiative {phi} decays with branching ratios greater than 10{sup -5}.

  10. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  11. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  12. Quasiclassical description of bremsstrahlung accompanying {alpha} decay including quadrupole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.; Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.

    2008-01-15

    We present a quasiclassical theory of {alpha} decay accompanied by bremsstrahlung with a special emphasis on the case of {sup 210}Po, with the aim of finding a unified description that incorporates both the radiation during the tunneling through the Coulomb wall and the finite energy E{sub {gamma}} of the radiated photon up to E{sub {gamma}}{approx}Q{sub {alpha}}/{radical}({eta}), where Q{sub {alpha}} is the {alpha}-decay Q-value and {eta} is the Sommerfeld parameter. The corrections with respect to previous quasiclassical investigations are found to be substantial, and excellent agreement with a full quantum mechanical treatment is achieved. Furthermore, we find that a dipole-quadrupole interference significantly changes the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation. We obtain good agreement between our theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  13. Limits to the radiative decay of the axion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressell, M. Ted

    1991-01-01

    An axion with a mass greater than 1 eV should be detectable through its decay into two photons. The astrophysical and cosmological limits which define a small window of allowed axion mass above 3 eV are discussed. A firm upper bound to the axion's mass of M(sub a) less than or equal to 8 eV is derived by considering the effect of decaying axions upon the diffuse extragalactic background radiation and the brightness of the night sky due to axions in the halo of the Milky Way galaxy. The intergalactic light of clusters of galaxies is shown to be an ideal place to search for an emission line arising from the radiative decay of axions. An unsuccessful search for this emission line in three clusters of galaxies is then detailed. Limits to the presence of any intracluster line emission are derived with the result that axions with masses between 3 and 8 eV are excluded by the data, effectively closing this window of axion mass, unless a severe cancellation of axionic decay amplitudes occurs. The intracluster flux limits are then used to constrain the amplitude of any such model dependence.

  14. A search for radiative neutrino decay from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard S.; Svoboda, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    This document presents the data analysis procedures proposed for use with the COMPTEL instrument aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) in the search for radiative neutrino decay from supernovae. The proposed analysis methodology is an extension of a standard procedure used by the COMPTEL team in searching for a variety of source types. We have applied the procedures to a set of simulated data to demonstrate the feasibility of the method to this project.

  15. Limits on neutrino radiative decay from SN1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Andrew H.; Fenimore, ED; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate limits on the properties of neutrinos using data from gamma ray detectors on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Solar Max Mission satellites. A massive neutrino decaying in flight from the supernova would produce gamma rays detectable by these instruments. The lack of such a signal allows us to constrain the mass, radiative lifetime, and branching ratio to photons of a massive neutrino species produced in the supernova.

  16. Radiative hc /b decays to η or η '

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin; Dai, Jian-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recent measurements of the radiative decay rates of the P -wave spin singlet charmonium hc to the light meson η or η' by the BESIII Collaboration, we investigate the decay rates of these channels at order α αs4. The photon is radiated mainly from charm quark pairs in the lowest-order Feynman diagrams, because the diagrams where a photon radiated from light quarks are suppressed by αs or the relative charm quark velocity v , due to charge-parity conservation. The form factors of two gluons to η or η', which are the major mechanism for η and η' production, are employed. η (η') is treated as a light-cone object when we consider that the parent charmonium mass is much heavier than that of the final light meson. We obtain the branching ratio B (hc→γ η')=(1.9 4-0.51+0.70)×10-3 in the nonrelativistic QCD approach, which is in agreement with the BESIII measurement. The prediction of the branching ratio of hc→γ η is also within the range of experimental error after including the larger uncertainty of the total decay width Γh c. The applications of these formulas to the radiative decays to η (η') of the P -wave spin singlet bottomonium hb(n P ) are presented. These studies will shed some light on the η -η' mixing effects, the flavor SU(3) symmetry breaking, and the nonperturbative dynamics of charmonium and bottomonium.

  17. Radiative Decays of Low-Lying Excited-State Hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Simon

    2000-05-01

    The quark wave-functions of the lower-lying excited-state hyperons Lambda(1405), Sigma(1385), and Lambda(1520) are not well understood. For example, the Lambda(1405) may not be a regular three-quark state but a $\\bar{K}$N molecule. Several competing models have been proposed, but none have been convincingly eliminated. Measuring radiative decays provides a means of discriminating between the models. The radiative branching of ratios are predicted to be small (~1%), but the radiative widths vary by factors of 2-10 from model to model. The existing experimental data is sparse and inconsistent; moreover, the radiative decay of the Sigma(1385) has never been observed before (except for one event). These lower-lying excited state hypersons were produced in a tagged photon-beam experiment in the CLAS detector at TJNAF in the reaction gamma p → K+ Y* for photon energies from threshold to 2.4 GeV. The radiative branching ration for the Sigma0(1385) relative to the Sigma0(1385) → Lambda pi0 channel was measured to be 0.021 ± 0.008$+0.004\\atop{-0.007}$, corresponding to a partial width of 640 ± 270$+130\\atop{-220}$ keV.

  18. Formation and decay of the inner electron radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y. J.; Selesnick, R.

    2016-12-01

    The inner electron radiation belt was found, early in the space age, to be highly variable with rapid injections followed by slower decay. Highly structured energy spectra were also observed (now known in energy-time spectrograms as "zebra stripes"). Inner belt formation was explained by inward diffusion. However, even the fastest diffusion is expected to require a period of many days, while observations show frequent rapid injections across the entire inner belt (as low as L=1.2) during periods of <1 day. Atmospheric Coulomb scattering is the primary loss mechanism at low altitudes, which produces rapid decay of electron intensity at L≤1.3 and slow decay at higher L shells (up to L=2.5); however, recent measurements show slow decay across the entire inner belt. In this presentation, we will explain the rapid injections, slow decay, and structured energy spectra, as observed from Van Allen Probes for electrons with energies of 100-400 keV, by the action of large-scale electric fields. In addition, a case study of a non-diffusive fast injection event that occurred on March 17, 2013, is simulated by a test particle code which demonstrates the sensitivity of electron intensity to the selected electric field model.

  19. Decay constants and radiative decays of heavy mesons in light-front quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the magnetic dipole decays V{yields}P{gamma} of various heavy-flavored mesons such as (D,D*,D{sub s},D{sub s}*,{eta}{sub c},J/{psi}) and (B,B*,B{sub s},B{sub s}*,{eta}{sub b},{upsilon}) using the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD-motivated effective Hamiltonian. The momentum dependent form factors F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}) for V{yields}P{gamma}* decays are obtained in the q{sup +}=0 frame and then analytically continued to the timelike region by changing q{sub perpendicular} to iq{sub perpendicular} in the form factors. The coupling constant g{sub VP{gamma}} for real photon case is then obtained in the limit as q{sup 2}{yields}0, i.e. g{sub VP{gamma}}=F{sub VP}(q{sup 2}=0). The weak decay constants of heavy pseudoscalar and vector mesons are also calculated. Our numerical results for the decay constants and radiative decay widths for the heavy-flavored mesons are overall in good agreement with the available experimental data as well as other theoretical model calculations.

  20. QED corrections to radiative recombination and radiative decay of heavy hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, J.; Artemyev, A. N.; Surzhykov, A.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2015-10-01

    One-loop quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections are studied for two basic atomic processes, radiative recombination of an electron with a bare nucleus and radiative decay of a hydrogenlike ion. The perturbations of the bound-state wave function and the binding energy due to the electron self-energy and the vacuum polarization are computed in the Feynman and Coulomb gauges. QED corrections induced by these perturbations are calculated for the differential cross section and the polarization of the emitted radiation in the radiative recombination of an electron and a bare uranium nuclei, as well as the corresponding corrections to the ratio of the E 1 (electric dipole) and M 2 (magnetic quadrupole) transition amplitudes in the 2 p3 /2→1 s radiative decay of hydrogenlike uranium. The results obtained indicate the expected magnitude of the QED effects in these processes on a subpercent level.

  1. Factorization for radiative heavy quarkonium decays into scalar Glueball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin

    2015-09-01

    We establish the factorization formula for scalar Glueball production through radiative decays of vector states of heavy quarkonia, e.g. J/ ψ, ψ(2 S) and Υ( nS), where the Glueball mass is much less than the parent heavy quarkonium mass. The factorization is demonstrated explicitly at one-loop level through the next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the hard kernel, the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) long-distance matrix elements (LDMEs) of the heavy quarkonium, and the light-cone distribution amplitude (LCDA) of scalar Glueball. The factorization provides a comprehensive theoretical approach to investigate Glueball production in the radiative decays of vector states of heavy quarkonia and determine the physic nature of Glueball. We discuss the scale evolution equation of LCDA for scalar Glueball. In the end, we extract the value of the decay constant of Scalar Glueball from Lattice QCD calculation and analyze the mixing effect among f 0(1370), f 0(1500) and f 0(1710).

  2. The Radiative Decay of Plasma Oscillations on Nonplanar Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John William, Jr.

    We have studied the radiation resulting from electron bombardment of extremely small silver particles and of silver films containing closely-spaced, periodic surface structure. Thin silver films which were heated to a temperature slightly below the bulk-silver melting point were found to break into collections of particles with approximately ellipsoidal cross sections. Electron microscopy and shadow -casting techniques were used to characterize the samples as to the distributions of particle sizes and particle shapes. The wavelength, polarization, and angular intensity characteristics of the radiation emitted by these samples were compared with the predictions of a theoretical model for the radiative decay of surface plasmons on nonspherical particles. The results indicated that two distinct modes of charge density oscillation contributed to the radiation. Very closely-spaced periodic surface modulations were produced in silver films by using the technique of electron beam lithography. Radiation resulting from the electron bombardment of these films showed evidence of structure that has been predicted theoretically. However, this structure was not well resolved. We have made suggestions which should be useful in future studies of the origin of this radiation.

  3. Radiative Leptonic Decay of Ds and D Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.

    The radiative leptonic decays Ds → μνμγ and D → μνμγ are investigated at the tree level within the relativistic independent quark model based on the confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratios for these decays in the vanishing lepton mass limit are obtained as ℬr(Ds → μνμγ) = 4.94×10-4 and ℬr(D → μνμγ) = 3.34×10-5, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. Finally, the photon energy spectra as predicted here is found to be symmetric about the peak value of the photon energy at Eγ = MD_(s)/4.

  4. Radiative leptonic Bc decay in the relativistic independent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2008-12-01

    The radiative leptonic decay Bc-→μ-ν¯μγ is analyzed in its leading order in a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratio for this decay in the vanishing lepton mass limit is obtained as Br(Bc→μνμγ)=6.83×10-5, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure-dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. The contributions of the bremsstrahlung and the structure-dependent diagrams, as well as their additive interference parts, are compared and found to be of the same order of magnitude. Finally, the predicted photon energy spectrum is observed here to be almost symmetrical about the peak value of the photon energy at Ẽγ≃(MBc)/(4), which may be quite accessible experimentally at LHC in near future.

  5. Hybrid structure of X(3872) and its radiative decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Makoto; Shimizu, Kiyotaka; Takeuchi, Sachiko

    2014-09-01

    We study the radiative decays of the X (3872) using a charmonium-two-meson hybrid model with the two-meson states consisting of the D0 D *0 , D+D*- , J / Φρ , and J / Φω . We can reproduce the observed mass of the X(3872) in this framework. The obtained structure of the X (3872) explains many of the observed properties, such as the isospin symmetry breaking, the production rate in the p p collision, a lack of the existence of the χc 1 (2 P) peak predicted by the quark model and the absence of the charged partner of the X (3872) . We shall report the results of the X (3872) --> J / Φ γ and X (3872) -->Φ' γ decay rates in our approach.

  6. Self-consistent radiative corrections to false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, B.; Millington, P.

    2017-07-01

    With the Higgs mass now measured at the sub-percent level, the potential metastability of the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model (SM) motivates renewed study of false vacuum decay in quantum field theory. In this note, we describe an approach to calculating quantum corrections to the decay rate of false vacua that is able to account fully and self-consistently for the underlying inhomogeneity of the solitonic tunneling configuration. We show that this method can be applied both to theories in which the instability arises already at the level of the classical potential and those in which the instability arises entirely through radiative effects, as is the case for the SM Higgs vacuum. We analyse two simple models in the thin-wall regime, and we show that the modifications of the one-loop corrections from accounting fully for the inhomogeneity can compete at the same level as the two-loop homogeneous corrections.

  7. A search for radiative neutrino decay from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svoboda, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Two supernovae have been identified in the COMPTEL data base as being the best sources to investigate for evidence of gamma-ray emission caused by radiative neutrino decay. These are SN1987a and SN1993J. A detailed simulation has shown us that we can expect a gain in sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude (depending on neutrino mass) over previous results. Instrument response is now being modeled using a SPARC10 computer acquired for this study. A library of simulated gamma-ray lines is being produced for COMPTEL as a by-product of this effort.

  8. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the Earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10 power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the Earth's shadow.

  9. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10th power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the earth's shadow.

  10. Interpretation of black body radiation as a decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Clarence A.

    2007-06-01

    The treatment of black body radiation as a decay process with the wavelength ( λ) as the time marker, leads to an apportioning function ( Dλ) that distributes the total thermodynamic Stefan-Boltzmann emitted intensity ( I) over the entire wavelength range (Clarence A Gall, BAPS, March Meeting 2007, Denver, CO). The resulting distribution function ( Iλ=IDλ=σT^6b^2λe^-Tbλ) gives the Stefan-Boltzmann law on integration over the same interval. Differentiation of Iλ produces Wien's displacement law as the condition for the wavelength at maximum emitted intensity ( λm) . Substitution of λm in Iλ yields the maximum emitted intensity ( Iλm) as being proportional to T,5. Hence Iλ satisfies exactly the three known empirical laws of black body radiation and fulfils Einstein's hope for a solution of the radiation problem without the use of light quanta. Finally the replacement of Tb with a single constant G simplifies the distribution function so that Iλ=σGG^6λe^-Gλ where σG=b^4σ. Consequently G defines a new temperature scale with units of reciprocal wavelength that unifies the thermodynamic and colour scales.

  11. Limits to radiative neutrino decay from SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, A.H.; Turner, M.S. |

    1997-06-01

    We calculate limits to the properties of massive, unstable neutrinos using data from {gamma}-ray detectors on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Spacecraft. The absence of a {gamma}-ray signal in the PVO detector constrains the branching ratio to photons (B{sub {gamma}}), mass (m{sub {nu}}), and radiative lifetime ({tau}{sub {gamma}}={tau}/B{sub {gamma}}). For low-mass (m{approx_lt}T{approximately}8MeV) neutrinos decaying {nu}{r_arrow}{nu}{sup {prime}}{gamma}, B{sub {gamma}}{lt}3{times}10{sup {minus}7} for m{sub {nu}}{tau}{approx_lt}10{sup 6}keVsec, and B{sub {gamma}}{lt}2{times}10{sup {minus}13}m{sub {nu}}{tau}/keVsec for m{sub {nu}}{tau}{approx_gt}10{sup 6}keVsec; limits for high-mass neutrinos are somewhat weaker due to Boltzmann suppression. We also calculate limits for decays that produce {gamma} rays through the bremsstrahlung channel, {nu}{r_arrow}{nu}{sup {prime}}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{gamma}. With one exception, the PVO limits are roughly comparable to those from an analysis of data from the Solar Max Mission (SMM) Satellite (which observed at higher {gamma}-ray energies but for a much shorter time). For neutrino mass states that are nearly degenerate, {delta}m{sup 2}/m{sup 2}{approximately}0.1{lt}1, our limits for the mode {nu}{r_arrow}{nu}{sup {prime}}{gamma} become more stringent by a factor as large as m{sup 2}/{delta}m{sup 2}, because more decay photons are shifted into the PVO energy window. For this same reason, SMM cannot constrain this case. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Reexamination of evidence for a radiatively decaying neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    Large-aperture low-dispersion exposures obtained with the IUE short-wavelength camera have been reanalyzed to examine the possibility of using nonstandard electroweak models to explain the steplike signal of 5-sigma significance in the cosmic background claimed by Auriemma et al. (1985). The present results show that no evidence yet exists for the postulated cosmic UV radiation from neutrino decay. Error bars of the order of 20,000 photons/sq cm per s per A per sr are found for the brightnesses of Auriemma et al., and it is suggested that their steps may be due to fixed pattern noise in the detector rather than to a cosmic signal.

  13. Pion radiative weak decay from the instanton vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Sang-In; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the vector and axial-vector form factors for the pion radiative weak decays π+ →e+νe γ and π+ →e+νee+e-, based on the gauged effective chiral action from the instanton vacuum in the large Nc limit. The nonlocal contributions, which arise from the gauging of the action, enhance the vector form factor by about 20%, whereas the axial-vector form factor is reduced by almost 30%. Both the results for the vector and axial-vector form factors at the zero momentum transfer are in good agreement with the experimental data. The dependence of the form factors on the momentum transfer is also studied. The slope parameters are computed and compared with other works.

  14. Search for Radiative β-Decay of the Free Neutron

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J.; Khafizov, R. U.; Mostovoi, Yu A.; Rozhnov, O.; Solovei, V. A.; Beck, M.; Kozlov, V. U.; Severijns, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results of the first experiment to search for the radiative decay mode of the free neutron are reported. The γ-spectrum was studied in the energy region from 35 keV to 100 keV in six Cs(Tl) scintillators, each set at an angle of 35° to, and shielded from, a central plastic scintillator electron detector. Triple coincidences were recorded with recoil protons detected in a micro-channel plate. A limit for the branching ratio BR < 6.9 × 10−3 (90 % confidence level) was obtained, which is greater that the theoretical prediction by not more than a few tenths of a percent. PMID:27308160

  15. Radiative decay modes of the D{sup 0} meson

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D.M.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T.S.; Lange, D.J.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Balest, R.; Behrens, B.H.; Ford, W.T.; Gritsan, A.; Park, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Baker, R.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D.G.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; von Dombrowski, S.; Drell, P.S.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Foland, A.D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hopman, P.I.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Ward, C.; Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C.D.; Lohner, M.; Patton, S.; Prescott, C.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R.A.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Browder, T.E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Hans, R.M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M.A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; Bellerive, A.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; and others

    1998-11-01

    In this paper we describe a search for four radiative decay modes of the D{sup 0} meson: D{sup 0}{r_arrow}{phi}{gamma}, D{sup 0}{r_arrow}{omega}{gamma}, D{sup 0}{r_arrow}{bar K}{sup {asterisk}}{gamma}, and D{sup 0}{r_arrow}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma}. We obtain 90{percent} C.L. upper limits on the branching ratios of these modes of 1.9{times}10{sup {minus}4}, 2.4{times}10{sup {minus}4}, 7.6{times}10{sup {minus}4}, and 2.4{times}10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Search for fj(2220) in radiative J/psi decays

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-07-30

    We present a search for f{sub J}(2220) production in radiative J/{psi} {yields} {gamma}f{sub J}(2220) decays using 460 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The f{sub J}(2220) is searched for in the decays to K{sup +}K{sup -} and K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}. No evidence of this resonance is observed, and 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the branching fractions for J/{psi} {yields} {gamma}f{sub J}(2220) and f{sub J}(2220) {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}(K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) as a function of spin and helicity are set at the level of 10{sup -5}, below the central values reported by the Mark III experiment.

  17. Radiative Beta Decay for Studies of CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Susan; He, Daheng

    2013-10-01

    A triple-product correlation in the radiative β decay rate of neutrons or of nuclei, characterized by the kinematical variable, where, e.g., n (p) --> p (p') +e- (le) + νe (lν) + γ (k) , can be generated by the pseudo-Chern-Simons term found by Harvey, Hill, and Hill as a consequence of the baryon vector current anomaly and SU(2)L ×U(1)Y gauge invariance at low energies. The correlation probes the imaginary part of its coupling constant, so that its observation at anticipated levels of sensitivity would reflect the presence of sources of CP violation beyond the standard model. We compute the size of the asymmetry in n --> pe-νe γ decay in chiral effective theory, compare it with the computed background from standard-model final-state interactions, and consider the new physics scenarios which would be limited by its experimental study. Work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics under contract no. DE-FG02-96ER40989.

  18. Search for Hadronic Decays of a Light Higgs Boson in the Radiative Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.

    2012-02-16

    The authors search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) produced in radiative decays of an {Upsilon}(2S) or {Upsilon}(3S) meson, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}. The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) center of mass energies, and include (121.3 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and (98.3 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions {beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) {center_dot} {beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) (n = 2 or 3) that range from 1 x 10{sup -6} for an A{sup 0} mass of 0.3 GeV/c{sup 2} to 8 x 10{sup -5} at 7 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Radiative B decays in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Otto C.W.; Vaidya, Rishikesh D.

    2005-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of all the contributions at the leading log order to the branching ratio of the inclusive radiative decay B{yields}X{sub s}+{gamma} in the framework of supersymmetry without R parity. The relevant set of four-quark operators involved in QCD running are extended from six (within the standard model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model) to 24, with also many new contributions to the Wilson coefficients of (chromo)magnetic penguins for either chiral structure. We present complete analytical results here without any a priori assumptions on the form of R-parity violation. Mass-eigenstate expressions are given; hence the results are free from the commonly adopted mass-insertion approximation. In the numerical analysis, we focus here only on the influence of the trilinear {lambda}{sub ijk}{sup '} couplings and report on the possibility of a few orders of magnitude improvement for the bounds on a few combinations of the {lambda}{sup '} couplings. Our study shows that the Wilson coefficients of the current-current operators due to R-parity violation dominate over the direct contributions to the penguins. However, the interplay of various contributions is complicated due to the QCD corrections which we elaborate here.

  20. Recent MARK III results in radiative J/psi decays

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.

    1985-11-01

    New results on the zeta(2.2) are reported. Mark III has analyzed new J/psi data and reconfirmed the zeta(2.2) in radiative J/psi decays to K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub S//sup 0/ and K/sup +/K/sup -/. The significances of the signals are 3.6 and 4.5 standard deviations, the masses, 2.232 +- .007 +- .007 and 2.230 +- .006 +- .014 GeV/c/sup 2/, and the widths, 0.018/sub -.015//sup +.023/ +- .010 and 0.026/sub -.016//sup +.020/ +- .017 GeV/c/sup 2/, for the K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub S//sup 0/ and K/sup +/K/sup -/ modes, respectively. The branching ratios are BR(J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..zeta, zeta ..-->.. K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub S//sup 0/) = (3.2/sub -1.3//sub +1.6/ +- 0.7) x 10/sup -5/ and BR(J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..zeta, zeta ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (4.2/sub -1.4//sup +1.7/ +- 0.8) x 10/sup -5/. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Astrophysical tests for radiative decay of neutrinos and fundamental physics implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Brown, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative lifetime tau for the decay of massious neutrinos was calculated using various physical models for neutrino decay. The results were then related to the astrophysical problem of the detectability of the decay photons from cosmic neutrinos. Conversely, the astrophysical data were used to place lower limits on tau. These limits are all well below predicted values. However, an observed feature at approximately 1700 A in the ultraviolet background radiation at high galactic latitudes may be from the decay of neutrinos with mass approximately 14 eV. This would require a decay rate much larger than the predictions of standard models but could be indicative of a decay rate possible in composite models or other new physics. Thus an important test for substructure in leptons and quarks or other physics beyond the standard electroweak model may have been found.

  2. Nuclear Decay Data in the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) Format

    DOE Data Explorer

    MIRD is a database of evaluated nuclear decay data for over 2,100 radioactive nuclei. Data are extracted from ENSDF, processed by the program RadList, and used for medical internal radiation dose calculations. When using the MIRD interface, tables of nuclear and atomic radiations from nuclear decay and decay scheme drawings will be produced in the MIRD format from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) for the specified nuclide. Output may be either HTML-formatted tables and JPEG drawings, PostScript tables and drawings, or PDF tables and drawings.

  3. Radiation issues in a radioactive ion decay ring.

    PubMed

    Magistris, M; Silari, M

    2005-01-01

    In a beta-beam facility, a pure beam of electron neutrinos, or their antiparticles, are produced by the decay of fully stripped radioactive ions (6He and 18Ne) circulating in a storage ring. Since the beam is not extracted from the ring, all the particles will eventually be lost somewhere in the machine and thus activate the accelerator components and the surrounding concrete and rock. In particular, as nuclei change their charge in beta-decay, a large part of the particles will be lost in the arcs of the decay ring and mainly irradiate the magnets. The density of inelastic interactions of hadrons in the magnets, concrete and rock and the track-length distribution of secondary hadrons were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. These values were used to estimate the induced radioactivity in the facility, the dose rates expected in the decay ring and the consequences for the environment.

  4. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Marsh, Richard J.; Duchen, Michael R.; Bain, Angus J.

    2013-08-01

    In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water-glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers-Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  5. Radiative Corrections to Asymmetry Parameter in the {Omega}{sup -{yields}{Lambda}}+K{sup -} Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Queijeiro, A.

    2010-07-29

    We compute the radiative corrections, to first order in the fine structure constant {alpha}, to the asymmetry parameter {alpha}{sub {Omega}}of the {Omega}{sup -{yields}{Lambda}}+K{sup -} decay. We use previous results where Sirlin's procedure is used to separate the radiative corrections into two parts, one independent model contribution and a model dependent one.

  6. First Results in Inclusive Radiative Penguin Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Colin P

    2000-11-17

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the exclusive penguin decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub {gamma}}{sup 0} using (8.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays B(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub {gamma}}{sup 0}) = (5.42 {+-} 0.82(stat.) {+-} 0.47(sys.)) x 10{sup -5}. In addition they search for the related penguin decays with a lepton pair in the final state, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  7. Estimate of Radiative decay of the heavy-light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, T.; Morii, T.; Seo, K.

    We propose a method how to calculate decay amplitudes of the heavy-light mesons associated with one photon or one chiral light hadron, using our semi-relativistic model, which succeeds in predicting and/or reproducing recently discovered all the heavy-light mesons, i.e., D/Ds /B/Bs including the so-called DsJ . We also obtain the relativistic expression for the decay amplitudes by Lorentz-boosting the the rest-frame wave functions.

  8. Radiative decays of heavy and light mesons in a quark triangle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N. R.; Liu, Dongsheng

    1996-06-01

    The radiative meson decays V-->Pγ and P-->γγ are analyzed using the quark triangle diagram. Experimental data yield well determined estimates of the universal quark-antiquark-meson couplings g'Vqq¯ and g'Pqq¯ for the light meson sector. Also predictions for the ratios of neutral to charged heavy meson decay coupling constants are given and await experimental confirmation.

  9. Radiative decay of neutron-unbound intruder states in 19O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, R.; Tabor, S. L.; Tripathi, Vandana; Volya, A.; Kravvaris, K.; Abromeit, B.; Caussyn, D. D.; Morrow, S.; Parker, J. J.; Tai, P.-L.; VonMoss, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The 9Be(14C, α γ ) reaction at EL a b=30 and 35 MeV was used to study excited states of 19O. The Florida State University (FSU) γ detector array was used to detect γ radiation in coincidence with charged particles detected and identified with a silicon Δ E -E particle telescope. γ decays have been observed for the first time from six states ranging from 368 to 2147 keV above the neutron separation energy (Sn=3962 keV) in 19O. The γ -decaying states are interspersed among states previously observed to decay by neutron emission. The ability of electromagnetic decay to compete successfully with neutron decay is explained in terms of neutron angular momentum barriers and small spectroscopic factors implying higher spin and complex structure for these intruder states. These results illustrate the need for complementary experimental approaches to best illuminate the complete nuclear structure.

  10. Radiative Penguin and Leptonic Rare Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Paoloni, E

    2004-07-06

    Recent BABAR results on rare B decays involving flavour-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. New measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma}, B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported, as well as a new measurement of the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching fraction. Also reported are updated limits on B {yields} {mu}{nu} and recent measurements of B {yields} K(*){ell}{ell} and b {yields} s{ell}{ell}. The data sample comprises 123 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  11. Search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson in the radiative decay Υ→γA0.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2011-11-25

    We search for hadronic decays of a light Higgs boson (A(0)) produced in radiative decays of an Υ(2S) or Υ(3S) meson, Υ→γA(0). The data have been recorded by the BABAR experiment at the Υ(3S) and Υ(2S) center-of-mass energies and include (121.3±1.2)×10(6) Υ(3S) and (98.3±0.9)×10(6) Υ(2S) mesons. No significant signal is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fractions B(Υ(nS)→γA(0))B(A(0)→hadrons) (n=2 or 3) that range from 1×10(-6) for an A(0) mass of 0.3 GeV/c(2) to 8×10(-5) at 7 GeV/c(2).

  12. A New Measurement of the Pi0 Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M

    2011-04-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall~B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8\\% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  13. Radiative and Leptonic B-meson Decays from the B-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, John; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-11-14

    Radiative and leptonic decays of B-mesons represent an excellent laboratory for the search for New Physics. I present here recent results on radiative and leptonic decays from the Belle and BABAR collaborations. Radiative penguin and leptonic B-meson decays are excellent probes for investigating the effects of New Physics. Although current measurements are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations, they are still quite useful for setting bounds on possible NP models. The B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} and B {yields} {tau}{nu} measurements, for example, put strong constraints on the mass of charged Higgs bosons in Type II two-Higgs double models. The B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} branching fraction measurements also constrain models with universal extra dimensions.

  14. Search for very light CP-odd Higgs Boson in radiative decays of Upsilon(1S).

    PubMed

    Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M

    2008-10-10

    We search for a non-SM-like CP-odd Higgs boson (a(1)(0)) decaying to tau(+)tau(-) or mu(+)mu(-) in radiative decays of the Upsilon(1S). No significant signal is found, and upper limits on the product branching ratios are set. Our tau(+)tau(-) results are almost 2 orders of magnitude more stringent than previous upper limits. Our data provide no evidence for a Higgs state with a mass of 214 MeV decaying to mu(+)mu(-), previously proposed as an explanation for 3 Sigma(+)-->pmu(+)mu(-) events observed by the HyperCP experiment. Our results constrain NMSSM models.

  15. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Processes in Exclusive B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskyi, Dmytro; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2011-06-14

    A review of recent BABAR results on exclusive B {yields} ({rho}/{Omega}){gamma}, B {yields} {pi}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B {yields} K(*) l{sup +}l{sup -} decays is presented. It was found that {bar {Beta}}[B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}] = (1.01 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -6}, {bar {Beta}}[B{sup +} {yields} {pi}l{sup +}l{sup -}] < 7.9 x 10{sup -8} at 90% C.L., {bar {Beta}}[B {yields} Kl{sup +}l{sup -}] = (0.84 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -6} and {bar {Beta}}[B {yields} K*l{sup +}l{sup -}] = (0.78{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19} {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -6}. it was also found that different asymmetry measurements are consistent with Standard Model expectations. Based on these results an independent estimate of the |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| matrix element of the CKM matrix is derived to be |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.171{sub -0.021-0.014}{sup +0.018+0.017}. A first evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma} decays was found and last year's observation of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma} was confirmed.

  16. A VMD Based, Nonet and SU(3) Symmetry Broken Model for Radiative Decays of Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.

    2005-04-06

    We present a VMD based model aiming to describe all radiative decays of light mesons. We show that the SU(3) breaking mechanism proposed by Bando, Kugo and Yamawaki (BKY), supplemented by nonet symmetry breaking in the pseudoscalar sector are sufficient to provide a nice description of all data, except the K*{sup {+-}} radiative width. It is also shown that nonet symmetry breaking has effects which cannot be disentangled from those produced by coupling of glue to the {eta}{prime} meson. Coupling of glue to {eta} is not found to be required by the data. Assuming the K*{sup {+-}} radiative width is indeed at its presently accepted value necessitates to supplement the BKY breaking in a way which finally preserves an equivalence statement between the VMD approach to radiative decays and the Wess-Zumino-Witten Lagrangian.

  17. Coherent Radiative Decay of Molecular Rotations: A Comparative Study of Terahertz-Oriented versus Optically Aligned Molecular Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damari, Ran; Rosenberg, Dina; Fleischer, Sharly

    2017-07-01

    The decay of field-free rotational dynamics is experimentally studied by two complementary methods: laser-induced molecular alignment and terahertz-field-induced molecular orientation. A comparison between the decay rates of different molecular species at various gas pressures reveals that oriented molecular ensembles decay faster than aligned ensembles. The discrepancy in decay rates is attributed to the coherent radiation emitted by the transiently oriented ensembles and is absent from aligned molecules. The experimental results reveal the dramatic contribution of coherent radiative emission to the observed decay of rotational dynamics and underline a general phenomenon expected whenever field-free coherent dipole oscillations are induced.

  18. Coherent Radiative Decay of Molecular Rotations: A Comparative Study of Terahertz-Oriented versus Optically Aligned Molecular Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Damari, Ran; Rosenberg, Dina; Fleischer, Sharly

    2017-07-21

    The decay of field-free rotational dynamics is experimentally studied by two complementary methods: laser-induced molecular alignment and terahertz-field-induced molecular orientation. A comparison between the decay rates of different molecular species at various gas pressures reveals that oriented molecular ensembles decay faster than aligned ensembles. The discrepancy in decay rates is attributed to the coherent radiation emitted by the transiently oriented ensembles and is absent from aligned molecules. The experimental results reveal the dramatic contribution of coherent radiative emission to the observed decay of rotational dynamics and underline a general phenomenon expected whenever field-free coherent dipole oscillations are induced.

  19. Spin-flip processes and radiative decay of dark intravalley excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodeniuk, A. O.; Basko, D. M.

    2016-09-01

    We perform a theoretical study of radiative decay of dark intravalley excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers. This decay necessarily involves an electronic spin flip. The intrinsic decay mechanism due to interband spin-flip dipole moment perpendicular to the monolayer plane, gives a rate about 100-1000 times smaller than that of bright excitons. However, we find that this mechanism also introduces an energy splitting due to a local field effect, and the whole oscillator strength is contained in the higher-energy component, while the lowest-energy state remains dark and needs an extrinsic spin-flip mechanism for the decay. Rashba effect due to a perpendicular electric field or a dielectric substrate, gives a negligible radiative decay rate (about 107 times slower than that of bright excitons). Spin flip due to Zeeman effect in a sufficiently strong in-plane magnetic field can give a decay rate comparable to that due to the intrinsic interband spin-flip dipole.

  20. Radiative decays χc J→V γ within the QCD factorization framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, N.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present a discussion of radiative decays χc J→γ ρ (ω ,ϕ ) . The decay amplitudes are computed within the QCD factorization framework. NRQCD has been used in the heavy meson sector as well as a collinear expansion in order to describe the overlap with light mesons in the final state. The color-singlet contributions to all helicity amplitudes have been computed using the light-cone distribution amplitudes of twist-2 and twist-3. All obtained expressions are well defined at least in the leading-order approximation. The color-octet contributions have also been studied in the Coulomb limit in order to exhibit their scaling behavior. In order to understand the relevance of the different contributions we perform numerical estimates using the color-singlet contributions. For the χc 1→γ V⊥ decays, to vector mesons with transverse polarization, we find that the color-singlet contribution potentially allows for a reliable description. On the other hand, for the χc 1→γ V∥ decays, to vector mesons with longitudinal polarization, our findings indicate that the color-octet mechanism may be important for a good description. We expect that more accurate measurements of the decay χc 2→γ V⊥,∥ can help to better understand the mechanism of radiative decays.

  1. Rare radiative charm decays within the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Stefan; Hiller, Gudrun

    2017-08-01

    We present standard model (SM) estimates for exclusive c → uγ processes in heavy quark and hybrid frameworks. Measured branching ratios \\mathrmB({D}^0\\to (φ, {\\overline{K}}^{\\ast 0})γ ) are at or somewhat exceeding the upper range of the SM and suggest slow convergence of the 1 /m D , α s -expansion. Model-independent constraints on |Δ C| = | Δ U | = 1 dipole operators from ℬ( D 0 → ρ 0 γ) data are obtained. Predictions and implications for leptoquark models are worked out. While branching ratios are SM-like CP asymmetries ≲ 10% can be induced. In SUSY deviations from the SM can be even larger with CP asymmetries of O(0 .1). If Λ c -baryons are produced polarized, such as at the Z-pole, an angular asymmetry in Λ c → pγ decays can be studied that is sensitive to chirality-flipped contributions.

  2. Factorization and Sudakov Resummation in Leptonic Radiative B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Richard J

    2003-03-25

    Soft-collinear effective theory is used to prove factorization of the B {yields} {gamma}l{nu} decay amplitude at leading power in {Lambda}/m{sub b}, including a demonstration of the absence of non-valence Fock states and of the finiteness of the convolution integral in the factorization formula. Large logarithms entering the hard-scattering kernel are resummed by performing a two-step perturbative matching onto the low-energy effective theory, and by solving evolution equations derived from the renormalization properties of the leading-order B-meson light-cone distribution amplitude. As a byproduct, the evolution equation for heavy-collinear current operators in soft-collinear effective theory is derived.

  3. Precision measurement of the radiative beta decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Thomas; RDK Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    A continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the decay of the free neutron. We present the results of the RDK II experiment, in which radiative photons were detected in coincidence with the electrons and protons from neutron decay. The experiment was performed on the NG-6 fundamental physics neutron beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research using two different photon detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons with energies between 14 keV and 782 keV and an array of large area avalanche photodiodes directly detected photons with energies between 0.4 keV and 14 keV . This experiment represents the first precision test of the shape of the photon energy spectrum from neutron radiative decay and a substantially improved determination of the branching ratio over a broad range of photon energies.

  4. Precision measurement of the radiative β decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Matthew; RDK Collaboration, II

    2016-09-01

    A continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the decay of the free neutron. We present the results of the RDK II experiment, in which radiative photons were detected in coincidence with the electrons and protons from neutron decay. The experiment was performed on the NG-6 fundamental physics neutron beam line at the NIST Center for Neutron Research using two different photon detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons with energies between 14 keV and 782 keV and an array of large area avalanche photodiodes directly detected photons with energies between 0.4 keV and 14 keV . This experiment represents the first precision test of the shape of the photon energy spectrum from neutron radiative decay and a substantially improved determination of the branching ratio over a broad range of photon energies.

  5. Radiative decays of the Sigma0(1385) and Lambda(1520) hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Taylor; Gordon Mutchler; CLAS Collaboration

    2005-03-01

    The electromagnetic decays of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and {Lambda}(1520) hyperons were studied in photon-induced reactions {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} in the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. We report the first observation of the radiative decay of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and a measurement of the {Lambda}(1520) radiative decay width. For the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we measured a partial width of 479 {+-} 120(stat){sub -100}{sup +81}(sys) keV, larger than all of the existing model predictions. For the {Lambda}(1520) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we obtained a partial width of 167 {+-} 43(stat){sub -12}{sup +26}(sys) keV.

  6. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Baldini, A. M.; Bao, Y.; Baracchini, E.; ...

    2016-02-29

    Here, we studied the radiative muon decay μ+ → e+νν¯γ by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (~13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8×1014 positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009–2010 and measured the branching ratio B(μ → eνν¯γ)=(6.03 ± 0.14(stat.) ± 0.53(sys.))×10–8 for Ee > 45 MeV and Eγ > 40 MeV, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality checkmore » of the complete MEG experiment in the search for μ+→e+γ process.« less

  7. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Bao, Y.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Berg, F.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; de Bari, A.; De Gerone, M.; D'Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, L.; Gatti, F.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Graziosi, A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hodge, Z.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Kang, Tae Im; Kettle, P.-R.; Khazin, B. I.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Lim, G. M. A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, Toshinori; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Nakaura, S.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pepino, A.; Piredda, G.; Pizzigoni, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Rutar, G.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tassielli, G. F.; Tenchini, F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, K.; You, Z.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-03-01

    We studied the radiative muon decay {\\upmu }+ → {e}+ {\\upnu }bar{{\\upnu }}{\\upgamma } by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (˜ 13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8× 10^{14} positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009-2010 and measured the branching ratio {B}({\\upmu } → {e} {\\upnu }bar{{\\upnu }}{\\upgamma }) = (6.03± 0.14{(stat.)}± 0.53{(sys.)})× 10^{-8} for E_{e}>45 {MeV} and E_{{\\upgamma }}>40 {MeV}, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality check of the complete MEG experiment in the search for {\\upmu }+ → {e}+ {\\upgamma } process.

  8. Radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays with the emission of a polarized baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, R.

    2010-07-29

    We present an overview of the calculation of radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. We discuss both charged and neutral decaying baryons, restricted to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Our analysis is specialized to cover two possible scenarios: The center-of-mass frames of the emitted and the decaying baryons. We have accounted for terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum-transfer and M{sup 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  9. Connecting radiative neutrino mass, neutron-antineutron oscillation, proton decay, and leptogenesis through dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Pei-Hong; Ma, Ernest; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-12-01

    The scotogenic mechanism for radiative neutrino mass is generalized to include neutron-antineutron oscillation as well as proton decay. Dark matter is stabilized by extending the notion of lepton parity to matter parity. Leptogenesis is also a possible byproduct. This framework unifies the description of all these important topics in physics beyond the standard model of particle interactions.

  10. Rare Hadronic and Radiative Penguin B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, Stephane

    2002-02-07

    We report recent results in the study of rare hadronic and radiative penguin decays of B mesons. These results are based on a sample of 23 million BB pairs collected by the BaBar Collaboration at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- B Factory.

  11. Photoproduction and radiative decay of spin 1/2 and 3/2 pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang; Li Tong; Li Xueqian; Lih, C.-C.

    2005-01-01

    We study photoproduction and radiative decays of pentaquarks paying particular attention to the differences between spin-1/2 and spin-3/2, positive and negative parities of pentaquarks. Detailed study of these processes can not only give crucial information about the spin, but also the parity of pentaquarks.

  12. Precision theoretical analysis of neutron radiative beta decay to order O (α2/π2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Höllwieser, R.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.; Berdnikov, Ya. A.

    2017-06-01

    In the Standard Model (SM) we calculate the decay rate of the neutron radiative β- decay to order O (α2/π2˜10-5), where α is the fine-structure constant, and radiative corrections to order O (α /π ˜10-3). The obtained results together with the recent analysis of the neutron radiative β- decay to next-to-leading order in the large proton-mass expansion, performed by Ivanov et al. [Phys. Rev. D 95, 033007 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.033007], describe recent experimental data by the RDK II Collaboration [Bales et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 242501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.242501] within 1.5 standard deviations. We argue a substantial influence of strong low-energy interactions of hadrons coupled to photons on the properties of the amplitude of the neutron radiative β- decay under gauge transformations of real and virtual photons.

  13. Radiative τ leptonic decays and the possibility to determine the τ dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fael, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Precise data on radiative leptonic τ decays offer the opportunity to probe the electromagnetic properties of the τ and may allow to determine its anomalous magnetic moment which, in spite of its precise Standard Model prediction, has never been measured. Recently, the branching fractions of the radiative leptonic τ decays (τ to lν bar ν γ, with l = e, μ) were measured by the Babar collaboration. These precise measurements, with a relative error of about 3%, must be compared with the branching ratios at the next-to-leading order in QED. Indeed the radiative corrections are expected to be of order 10%, for l = e, and 3%, for l = μ. Here, we present the prediction of the differential decay rates and branching ratios of the radiative leptonic τ decays in the Standard Model at the next-to-leading order and we compare them with the recent Babar measurements. Moreover, we report on a dedicated feasibility study for the measurements of the τ anomalous magnetic moment at Belle and Belle II.

  14. Radiative decays of negative parity heavy baryons in the framework of the light cone QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agamaliev, A. K.; Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2017-02-01

    The transition form factors responsible for the radiative ΣQ →ΛQ γ and ΞQ‧ →ΞQ γ decays of the negative parity baryons are examined within light cone QCD sum rules. The decay widths of the radiative transitions are calculated using the obtained results of the form factors. A comparison of our predictions on decay widths with the corresponding widths of positive parity baryons is given.

  15. Coincident excitation and radiative decay in electron-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    The distorted-wave Born approximation formalism for the description of the (e ,e'γ ) reaction, in which emitted photons and scattered electrons are simultaneously detected, is outlined. Both the Coulomb and the magnetic scattering are fully taken into account. The influence of electron bremsstrahlung is estimated within the plane-wave Born approximation. Recoil effects are also discussed. The formalism is applied for the low-energy (e ,e'γ )92Zr reaction with excitation of the first collective (21+) and mixed-symmetry (22+) states. The corresponding transition charge and current densities are taken from a random-phase approximation (RPA) calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. It is shown, by this example, in which way the magnetic subshell population of the excited state influences the angular distribution of the decay photon. For these quadrupole excitations the influence of magnetic scattering is only prominent at the backmost scattering angles, where a clear distinction of the photon pattern pertaining to the two states is predicted.

  16. Improved Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B-meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, J.; Limosani, A.

    2008-11-01

    We report a fully inclusive measurement of the flavor changing neutral current decay B→Xsγ in the energy range 1.7 GeV⩽Eγc.m.s⩽2.8 GeV, covering 97% of the total spectrum, where c.m.s is the center of mass system. Using 605 fb-1 of data, we obtain in the rest frame of the B-meson B(B→Xsγ:EγB>1.7 GeV) = (3.31±0.19±0.37±0.01)×10-4, where the errors are statistical, systematic and from the boost correction needed to transform from the rest frame of the Υ(4S) (c.m.s) to that of the B-meson, respectively. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum as functions of various energy thresholds, which extend down to 1.7 GeV. The results are preliminary.

  17. Rare radiative decays of the B c meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wan-Li; Wang, Tianhong; Jiang, Yue; Yuan, Han; Wang, Guo-Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the rare radiative processes {B}c\\to {D}{sJ}(*)γ within the Standard Model, where {D}{sJ}(*) stands for the meson {D}s*, {D}s1(2460,2536) or {D}s2*(2573). During the investigations, we consider the contributions from the penguin, annihilation, color-suppressed and color-favored cascade diagrams. Our results show that: (1) the penguin and annihilation contributions are dominant in the branching fractions; (2) for the processes {B}c\\to {D}s*γ and {B}c\\to {D}s1(2460,2536)γ , the effects from the color-suppressed and color-favored cascade diagrams are un-negligible.

  18. Exclusive radiative decays of W and Z bosons in QCD factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Yuval; König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of very rare, exclusive hadronic decays of the electroweak gauge bosons V = W, Z from first principles of QCD. Our main focus is on the radiative decays V → Mγ, in which M is a pseudoscalar or vector meson. At leading order in an expansion in powers of ΛQCD /m V the decay amplitudes can be factorized into convolutions of calculable hard-scattering coefficients with the leading-twist light-cone distribution amplitude of the meson M. Power corrections to the decay rates arise first at order (ΛQCD /m V ) 2 . They can be estimated in terms of higher-twist distribution amplitudes and are predicted to be tiny. We include one-loop radiative corrections to the hard-scattering coefficients and perform the resummation of large logarithms ( α s ln( m {/v 2}/ μ {0/2})) n (with μ 0 ˜ 1 GeV a typical hadronic scale) to all orders in perturbation theory. Evolution effects have an important impact both numerically and conceptually, since they reduce the sensitivity to poorly determined hadronic parameters. We present detailed numerical predictions and error estimates, which can serve as benchmarks for future precision measurements. We also present an exploratory study of the weak radiative decays Z → MW. Some of the decay modes studied here have branching ratios large enough to be accessible in the high-luminosity run of the LHC. Many of them can be measured with high accuracy at a future lepton collider. This will provide stringent tests of the QCD factorization formalism and enable novel searches for new physics.

  19. Electromagnetic transition form factor and radiative corrections in decays of neutral pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husek, Tomáš

    2016-11-01

    We briefly summarize experimental and theoretical results on the rare decay π0 → e+e-. The notorious 3.3σ discrepancy between the SM prediction and the experimental value provided by KTeV collaboration is discussed in the view of a complete set of NLO QED radiative corrections. We also present the Two-Hadron Saturation (THS) scenario for the PVV correlator and apply it to the decay under discussion. The discrepancy then reduces down to 1.8σ.

  20. Observation of tree-level B decays with ss production from gluon radiation.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-05-02

    We report on our search for decays proceeding via a tree-level b-->c quark transition in which a gluon radiates into an ss[over ] pair. We present observations of the decays B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}pi;{-} and B[over ];{0}-->D_{s};{+}K_{S};{0}pi;{-} and evidence for B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}K;{-} and set upper limits on the branching fractions for B[over ];{0}-->D_{s};{+}K_{S};{0}pi;{-} and B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}K;{-} using 383x10;{6} Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] events collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC. We present evidence that the invariant mass distributions of D_{s};{+}K;{-} pairs from B;{-}-->D_{s};{+}K;{-}pi;{-} decays are inconsistent with the phase-space model, suggesting the presence of charm resonances lying below the D_{s};{+}K;{-} threshold.

  1. Evaluation of spent fuel isotopics, radiation spectra and decay heat using the scale computational system

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Hermann, O.W.; Ryman, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    In order to be a self-sufficient system for transport/storage cask shielding and heat transfer analysis, the SCALE system developers included modules to evaluate spent fuel radiation spectra and decay heat. The primary module developed for these analyses is ORIGEN-S which is an updated verision of the original ORIGEN code. The COUPLE module was also developed to enable ORIGEN-S to easily utilize multigroup cross sections and neutron flux data during a depletion analysis. Finally, the SAS2 control module was developed for automating the depletion and decay via ORIGEN-S while using burnup-dependent neutronic data based on a user-specified fuel assembly and reactor history. The ORIGEN-S data libraries available for depletion and decay have also been significantly updated from that developed with the original ORIGEN code.

  2. Experimental limits for heavy neutrino admixture deduced from 177Lu β decay and constraints on the life time of a radiative neutrino decay mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönert, S.; Oberauer, L.; Hagner, C.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Schreckenbach, K.; Declais, Y.; Mayerhofer, U.

    1996-05-01

    From cosmological constraints, the requirement for stable neutrinos is to have masses less than 30 eV. In the case that neutrino masses exceed this bound, neutrinos must decay sufficiently fast in order to satisfy the presently observed energy density of the universe. The experiments presented in this contribution consist of the complementary search for heavy neutrino admixture in nuclear beta decay of 177Lu and of the search for a radiative neutrino decay mode at the nuclear power station in Bugey, France. The data obtained from the 177Lu beta decay restrict the mixing probability of a heavy neutrino to the electron | U eh| 2 < 0.2 - 0.3% (90% Cl) for neutrino masses between 10 and 95 keV. The radiative lifetime is constrained to exceed t/ m > 180 × | U eh| 2 sec/eV which is one order of magnitude more restrictive than previous laboratory limits.

  3. Nonperturbative charming penguin contributions to isospin asymmetries in radiative B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chul; Mehen, Thomas; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2008-09-01

    Recent experimental data on the radiative decays B{yields}V{gamma}, where V is a light vector meson, find small isospin violation in B{yields}K*{gamma} while isospin asymmetries in B{yields}{rho}{gamma} are of order 20%, with large uncertainties. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate isospin asymmetries in these radiative B decays up to O(1/m{sub b}), also including O(v{alpha}{sub s}) contributions from nonperturbative charming penguins (NPCP). In the absence of NPCP contributions, the theoretical predictions for the asymmetries are a few percent or less. Including the NPCP can significantly increase the isospin asymmetries for both B{yields}V{gamma} modes. We also consider the effect of the NPCP on the branching ratio and CP asymmetries in B{sup {+-}}{yields}V{sup {+-}}{gamma}.

  4. Search for the radiative leptonic decay D+→γ e+νe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Morello, G.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Using an electron-positron collision data sample of 2.93 fb-1 collected at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector, we present the first search for the radiative leptonic decay D+→γ e+νe . The analysis is performed with a double-tag method. We do not observe a significant D+→γ e+νe signal, and obtain an upper limit on the branching fraction of D+→γ e+νe decay with the energy of radiative photon larger than 10 MeV of 3.0 ×10-5 at the 90% confidence level.

  5. Fully differential NLO predictions for the radiative decay of muons and taus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruna, G. M.; Signer, A.; Ulrich, Y.

    2017-09-01

    We present a general purpose Monte Carlo program for the calculation of the radiative muon decay μ → e ν ν bar γ and the radiative decays τ → e ν ν bar γ and τ → μ ν ν bar γ at next-to-leading order in the Fermi theory. The full dependence on the lepton masses and polarization of the initial-sate lepton are kept. We study the branching ratios for these processes and show that fully-differential next-to-leading order corrections are important for addressing a tension between BABAR's recent measurement of the branching ratio B (τ → e ν ν bar γ) and the Standard Model prediction. In addition, we study various distributions of the process μ → e ν ν bar γ and obtain precise predictions for the irreducible background to μ → eγ searches, tailored to the geometry of the MEG detector.

  6. Precision Measurement of the Radiative Decay Mode of the Free Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Benjamin

    The theory of quantum electrodynamics predicts that beta decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and anti-neutrino should be accompanied by a continuous spectrum of photons. A recent experiment, RDK I, reported the first detection of radiative decay photons from neutron beta decay with a branching ratio of (3.09 ± 0.32) × 10-3 in the energy range of 15 keV to 340 keV. This was achieved by prompt coincident detection of an electron and photon, in delayed coincidence with a proton. The photons were detected by using a single bar of bismuth germanate scintillating crystal coupled to an avalanche photodiode. This thesis deals with the follow-up experiment, RDK II, to measure the branching ratio at the level of approximately 1% and the energy spectrum at the level of a few percent. The most significant improvement of RDK II is the use of a photon detector with about an order of magnitude greater solid angle coverage than RDK I. In addition, the detectable energy range has been extended down to approximately 250 eV and up to the endpoint energy of 782 keV. This dissertation presents an overview of the apparatus, development of a new data analysis technique for radiative decay, and results for the ratio of electron-proton-photon coincident Repg to electron-proton coincident Rep events.

  7. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  8. Green's function method for handling radiative effects on false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Millington, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a Green's function method for handling radiative effects on false vacuum decay. In addition to the usual thin-wall approximation, we achieve further simplification by treating the bubble wall in the planar limit. As an application, we take the λ Φ4 theory, extended with N additional heavier scalars, wherein we calculate analytically both the functional determinant of the quadratic fluctuations about the classical soliton configuration and the first correction to the soliton configuration itself.

  9. Radiative decay rate of excitons in square quantum wells: Microscopic modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Khramtsov, E. S.; Grigoryev, P. S.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Verbin, S. Yu.; Belov, P. A. Efimov, Yu. P.; Eliseev, S. A.; Lovtcius, V. A.; Petrov, V. V.; Yakovlev, S. L.

    2016-05-14

    The binding energy and the corresponding wave function of excitons in GaAs-based finite square quantum wells (QWs) are calculated by the direct numerical solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The precise results for the lowest exciton state are obtained by the Hamiltonian discretization using the high-order finite-difference scheme. The microscopic calculations are compared with the results obtained by the standard variational approach. The exciton binding energies found by two methods coincide within 0.1 meV for the wide range of QW widths. The radiative decay rate is calculated for QWs of various widths using the exciton wave functions obtained by direct and variational methods. The radiative decay rates are confronted with the experimental data measured for high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs QW heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The calculated and measured values are in good agreement, though slight differences with earlier calculations of the radiative decay rate are observed.

  10. Decays of neutral pions: Electromagnetic transition form factor and radiative corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husek, Tomáš

    2017-03-01

    We briefly summarize experimental and theoretical results on the rare decay π0 → e+e-. The notorious 3.3σ discrepancy between the Standard Model prediction and the experimental value provided by KTeV collaboration is discussed in the view of a complete set of next-to-leading-order QED radiative corrections. We also present the Two-Hadron Saturation (THS) scenario for the PVV correlator and apply it to the decay under discussion. The discrepancy under discussion then reduces down to 1.8σ. Finally, we turn our attention the the Dalitz decay π0 → e+e-γ. We have recalculated the Mikaelian and Smith radiative corrections beyond the soft-photon approximation, i.e. over the whole range of the Dalitz plot and with no restrictions on the radiative photon. In contrast to the previous calculations, we also included the one-photon irreducible contribution at one-loop level. Our results can be also used for a further treatment of the processes with heavier particles in the final state.

  11. Radiative decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model including hyperfine mixing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Oexl, Bettina; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-06-01

    We study flavor-conserving radiative decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit. We discuss in some detail hyperfine mixing effects.

  12. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of Kl3 0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, M.; Martínez, A.; Juárez-León, C.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Rubén

    2015-10-01

    A model-independent expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of neutral kaons, Kl3 0, including radiative corrections to order (α /π )(q /M1), where q is the momentum transfer and M1 is the mass of the kaon, is presented. The model dependence of radiative corrections is kept in a general form within this approximation, which is suitable for model-independent experimental analyses. Expressions for bremsstrahlung radiative corrections are presented in two forms: one with the triple integral over the kinematical variables of the photon ready to be performed numerically and the other one in a fully analytical form. The final result is restricted to the so-called three-body region of the Dalitz plot and it is not compromised to fixing the values of the form factors at predetermined values.

  13. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, A. M.; Bao, Y.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Berg, F.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; de Bari, A.; De Gerone, M.; D’Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, L.; Gatti, F.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Graziosi, A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hodge, Z.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Kang, Tae Im; Kettle, P. -R.; Khazin, B. I.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Lim, G. M. A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, Toshinori; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Nakaura, S.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pepino, A.; Piredda, G.; Pizzigoni, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Rutar, G.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tassielli, G. F.; Tenchini, F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, K.; You, Z.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-02-29

    Here, we studied the radiative muon decay μ+ → e+νν¯γ by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (~13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8×1014 positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009–2010 and measured the branching ratio B(μ → eνν¯γ)=(6.03 ± 0.14(stat.) ± 0.53(sys.))×10–8 for Ee > 45 MeV and Eγ > 40 MeV, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality check of the complete MEG experiment in the search for μ+→e+γ process.

  14. Radiative decays of the {upsilon}(1S) to a pair of charged hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, S.B.; Avery, P.; Breva-Newell, L.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.D.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E.J.; Williams, J.; Wiss, J.

    2006-02-01

    Using data obtained with the CLEO III detector, running at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), we report on a new study of exclusive radiative {upsilon}(1S) decays into the final states {gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}, and {gamma}pp. We present branching ratio measurements for the decay modes {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}(1270), {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525), and {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}; helicity production ratios for f{sub 2}(1270) and f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525); upper limits for the decay {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub J}(2200), with f{sub J}(2220){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, pp; and an upper limit for the decay {upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}X(1860), with X(1860){yields}{gamma}pp.

  15. Observation of the doubly radiative decay η'→γ γ π0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Huihui; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Zongyuan; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Based on a sample of 1.31 billion J /ψ events collected with the BESIII detector, we report the study of the doubly radiative decay η'→γ γ π0 for the first time, where the η' meson is produced via the J /ψ →γ η' decay. The branching fraction of η'→γ γ π0 inclusive decay is measured to be B (η'→γ γ π0)Incl=(3.20 ±0.07 (stat ) ±0.23 (sys ) )×10-3 , while the branching fractions of the dominant process η'→γ ω and the nonresonant component are determined to be B (η'→γ ω )×B (ω →γ π0)=(23.7 ±1.4 (stat ) ±1.8 (sys ) )×10-4 and B (η'→γ γ π0)NR=(6.16 ±0.64 (stat ) ±0.67 (sys ) )×10-4 , respectively. In addition, the Mγγ 2-dependent partial widths of the inclusive decay are also presented.

  16. Limits to the radiative decays of neutrinos and axions from gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations obtained by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer in the energy range 4.1-6.4 MeV are used to provide limits on the possible radiative decay of neutrinos and axions emitted by SN 1987A. For branching ratio values for the radiative decay modes of less than about 0.0001, the present limits are more stringent than those based upon the photon flux from decaying relic neutrinos. The data are also used to set an axion mass limit.

  17. Limits to the radiative decays of neutrinos and axions from gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations obtained by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer in the energy range 4.1-6.4 MeV are used to provide limits on the possible radiative decay of neutrinos and axions emitted by SN 1987A. For branching ratio values for the radiative decay modes of less than about 0.0001, the present limits are more stringent than those based upon the photon flux from decaying relic neutrinos. The data are also used to set an axion mass limit.

  18. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    In 1962, several satellites were lost following high altitude nuclear tests by the United States and the Soviet Union. These satellite failures were caused by energetic electrons injected into the earth's radiation belts from the beta decay of bomb produced fission fragments and neutrons. It has been 40 years since the last high altitude nuclear test; there are now many more satellites in orbit, and it is important to understand their vulnerability to radiation belt pumping from nuclear explosions at high altitude or in space. This report presents the results of a calculation of the contribution of neutron beta decay to artificial belt pumping. For most high altitude nuclear explosions, neutrons are expected to make a smaller contribution than fission products to the total trapped electron inventory, and their contribution is usually neglected. However, the neutron contribution may dominate in cases where the fission product contribution is suppressed due to the altitude or geomagnetic latitude of the nuclear explosion, and for regions of the radiation belts with field lines far from the detonation point. In any case, an accurate model of belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions, and a self-consistent explanation of the 1962 data, require inclusion of the neutron contribution. One recent analysis of satellite measurements of electron flux from the 1962 tests found that a better fit to the data is obtained if the neutron contribution to the trapped electron inventory was larger than that of the fission products [l]. Belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions is a complicated process. Fission fragments are dispersed as part of the ionized bomb debris, which is constrained and guided by the earth's magnetic field. Those fission products that beta decay before being lost to the earth's atmosphere can contribute trapped energetic electrons to the earth's radiation belts. There has been a large effort to develop computer models for the contribution of

  19. Radiative decay of excitons in model aggregates of {pi}-conjugated oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, E.S.; Spano, F.C.

    1998-07-01

    Spontaneous emission from exciton states in an aggregate of {pi}-conjugated oligomers is studied theoretically. Each oligomer is taken as a ring of N carbon atoms and is treated using a PPP Hamiltonian. Coulombic interactions between rings are treated to first order. The radiative decay rate {gamma} from an exciton state in an aggregate of M aligned oligomers is superradiant, being M times faster than the decay rate of an isolated oligomer exciton. Inter-oligomer interactions have little effect on the exciton size and energy when the oligomer size N is large compared to the interoligomer spacing. However, when N is small, both the exciton size and energy are strongly affected by these interactions, leading to a markedly different N dependence for {gamma}.

  20. Limits on Higgs bosons, scalar-quarkonia, and ηb's from radiative upsilon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzini, P.; Son, D.; Tuts, P. M.; Youssef, S.; Zhao, T.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Horstkotte, J.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kaarsberg, T.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Schamberger, R. D.; Sontz, S. B.; Yanagisawa, C.

    1987-05-01

    We have searched for monochromatic photon signals in the reaction Υ(9460)-->X+γ in a sample of 420 000 Υ decays observed in the CUSB detector. From the absence of signal we obtain upper limits for Higgs-boson production in Υ decay which approach the minimal-standard-model expectations, including QCD radiative corrections, for low Higgs-boson masses. For two Higgs-boson models we obtain bounds on the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two neutral Higgs fields as a function of the Higgs-boson mass. We do not confirm the ζ(8.3) and find no evidence for a nearby bound scalar-quark-anti-scalar-quark state. We obtain a lower bound for the ηb mass using potential-model predictions.

  1. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative Bs0 Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, I.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative Bs0 decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in p p collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the Bs0→ϕ γ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter AΔ, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in b →s γ transitions. A value of AΔ=-0.98-0.52-0.20+0.46+0.23

  2. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative B_{s}^{0} Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Batsukh, B; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, I; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, H; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-01-13

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative B_{s}^{0} decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1} at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the B_{s}^{0}→ϕγ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter A^{Δ}, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in b→sγ transitions. A value of A^{Δ}=-0.98_{-0.52}^{+0.46}_{-0.20}^{+0.23} is measured. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction within 2 standard deviations.

  3. Radiative decays of the psi prime to all-photon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Results of studies of selected radiative decays of the psi' to charmonium and non-charmonium states which decay into photons are presented. These studies were performed using a sample of 1.8 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi''s collected by the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR electron-positron storage ring. The branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/, chi/sub 2/, and eta'/sub c/ to two photons have been measured to be (4.5 +- 2.2 +- 2.0) x 10/sup -4/, (9.5 +- 2.9 +- 4.5) x 10/sup -4/ (first errors statistical, second systematic), and <1 x 10/sup -2/ (90% C.L.). The signal from the decay chain psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi/sub 0/, chi/sub 0/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ has been observed with essentially no background. Using the observed line shape of the radiative photon in this reaction, the full width of the psi/sub 0/ has been found to be 8.8 +- 1.3 +- 1.5 MeV/c/sup 2/. In addition, the branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/ and chi/sub 2/ to ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ have been measured to be (3.5 +- 0.3 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -3/ and (1.2 +- 0.2 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -3/; the branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/ and chi/sub 2/ to eta eta have been measured to be (2.8 +- 0.9 +- 1.3) x 10/sup -3/ and (8.4 +- 4.2 +- 4.0) x 10/sup -4/. The decays of the psi' to four non-charmonium states have been investigated. The branching ratios and upper limits of these decays have been normalized to the branching ratios of the corresponding decays from the J/psi which have been measured using a sample of 2.2 x 10/sup 6/ produced J/psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector. The ratios of the psi' branching ratios to the J/psi branching ratios for the final states ..gamma..eta, ..gamma..eta', ..gamma..theta, and ..gamma..f have been measured to be <1.8%, <2.6%, <10 to 15%, and 9 +- 3%. These results are compared with the theoretical expectations of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics potential models. Substantial disagreement is found between theory and experiment.

  4. Established theory of radiation-induced decay is not generalizable to Bolton-Hunter labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Doran, Amanda C; Wan, Yieh-Ping; Kopin, Alan S; Beinborn, Martin

    2003-05-01

    Peptide hormones radiolabeled with 125I are widely used for the pharmacological characterization of cognate receptors. As a prerequisite for calculating ligand affinities from competition binding assays, and for estimating receptor densities from such studies, it is necessary to know the concentration of bioactive radioligand that is used in respective experiments. It has been demonstrated previously that radioiodinated peptides undergo decay catastrophe, i.e. disintegration of the radioactive label leads to the concomitant destruction of the carrier peptide. Here, we demonstrate that decay catastrophe does not apply to two peptide hormones that are iodinated by Bolton-Hunter conjugation: cholecystokinin octapeptide and glucagon-like peptide 2. The function of aged samples of these radioligands at corresponding recombinantly expressed receptors was assessed by measuring ligand-induced inositol phosphate production or generation of cyclic AMP, respectively. Both of the tested compounds, although predicted by decay catastrophe to contain little or subthreshold remaining bioactivity, stimulated an unexpectedly high level of receptor-mediated second messenger signaling. Quantitative comparison of observed functions with those of corresponding unlabeled peptides suggested that the bioactivity of each radioligand had been largely conserved despite the radioactive decay of the iodine label. Consistent with an apparent absence of decay catastrophe, we noted that the specific radioactivity, when determined immediately following peptide iodination, was close to the theoretical maximum but exponentially decreased over time. These findings raise the possibility that attachment of a Bolton-Hunter conjugate may shield labeled peptides from radiation-induced damage, a scenario that should be considered when performing radioligand binding experiments.

  5. Exclusive radiative B-meson decays within minimal flavor-violating two-Higgs-doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qiang; Yang, Ya-Dong; Yuan, Xing-Bo

    2014-03-01

    In the "Higgs basis" for a generic two-Higgs-doublet model, only one doublet gets a nonzero vacuum expectation value and, under the criterion of minimal flavor violation, the other one is fixed to be either color-singlet or color-octet, referred to, respectively, as the type-III and type-C models. Both of them can naturally avoid large FCNC transitions and provide very interesting phenomena in some low-energy processes. In this paper, we study their effects on exclusive radiative B-meson decays due to the exchange of colorless or colored charged Higgs. It is found that while constraints from the branching ratios are slightly weaker than the ones from the inclusive B→Xsγ decay, the isospin asymmetries in exclusive decays provide very complementary bounds on the model parameters. As the two models predict similar corrections to the dipole coefficient C7eff, but similar magnitudes with opposite signs to C8eff, the branching ratios cannot discriminate the two models, and we have to resort to the direct CP and isospin asymmetries of b→s processes, which are more sensitive to C8eff. Due to the CKM factors |λu(d)|˜|λt(d)|, the terms proportional to λu(d) make the observables of b→d processes exhibit a different dependence on the possible new physics phase. In addition, correlations between the various observables in the exclusive B→Vγ and the inclusive B→Xs ,dγ decays are investigated, which could provide further insights into the models with more precise experimental measurements and theoretical predictions for these decays.

  6. Radiative decay of the Hg(6{sup 3}P{sub 2}) metastable state in rare gases

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebin, A.L.; Lednev, M.G.

    1995-12-01

    Based on the semiempirical potentials of interatomic interaction and the probabilities of quasi-molecular radiative transitions recently obtained, the processes of radiative decay of the Hg(6{sup 3}P{sub 2}) metastable state in collisions with rare gas atoms were considered. Temperature dependences of the rate constants for these processes were calculated. 27 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Search for radiative $B$-hadron decays with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masashi

    2001-01-01

    Radiative decays of B hadrons, $\\bar{B}$d → $\\bar{K}$*0 γ(pγ), $\\bar{B}$s → Φγ ($\\bar{K}$*0), and Λb → Λγ (nγ), occur via the quark transition b → s(d) that involves a loop ("penguin") diagram. In addition, the existence of non-SM heavy charged particles such as a supersymmetric charged Higgs can affect the amplitude of the penguin loop.

  8. Experimental limits on the radiative decay of SN 1987A neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Reppin, Claus

    1989-01-01

    SMM gamma-ray spectrometer data are examined to look for gamma-ray emission coincident with the about-10-s neutrino burst from SN 1987A. The absence of a detectable signal suggests that the energy radiated into MeV gamma rays by neutrino decay (or any other process) is less than 10 to the -10th of that in supernova neutrinos above 9 MeV. The results are used to set a direct limit on the lifetime of any massive neutrino type generated in the core collapse leading to SN 1987A.

  9. Experimental limits on the radiative decay of SN 1987A neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Reppin, Claus

    1989-01-01

    SMM gamma-ray spectrometer data are examined to look for gamma-ray emission coincident with the about-10-s neutrino burst from SN 1987A. The absence of a detectable signal suggests that the energy radiated into MeV gamma rays by neutrino decay (or any other process) is less than 10 to the -10th of that in supernova neutrinos above 9 MeV. The results are used to set a direct limit on the lifetime of any massive neutrino type generated in the core collapse leading to SN 1987A.

  10. Evidence against the Sciama Model of Radiative Decay of Massive Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Korpela, Eric J.; Edelstein, Jerry; Lampton, Michael; Morales, Carmen; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; Gómez, José F.; Trapero, Joaquín

    1999-11-01

    We report on spectral observations of the night sky in the band around 900 Å where the emission line in the Sciama model of radiatively decaying massive neutrinos would be present. The data were obtained with a high-resolution, high-sensitivity spectrometer flown on the Spanish satellite MINISAT. The observed emission is far less intense than that expected in the Sciama model. Based on the development and utilization of the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta de Radiación Difusa, a collaboration of the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial and the Center for EUV Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley.

  11. Radioactive Decay

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  12. A New Decay Path in the {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O Radiative Capture Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Haas, F.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Salsac, M.-D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marley, P.; Lister, C. J.

    2009-03-04

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture reaction has been studied at energies close to the Coulomb barrier at Triumf (Vancouver) using the Dragon spectrometer and its associated BGO array. It has been observed that the {gamma} decay flux proceeds mainly via states around 10-11 MeV and via the direct feeding of the {sup 28}Si 3{sub 1}{sup -}(6879 keV) and 4{sub 2}{sup +}(6888 keV) deformed states. A discussion is presented about this selective feeding as well as perspectives for the use of novel detection systems for the study of light heavy-ion radiative capture reactions.

  13. BaBar: sin(2beta) with Charmless and Radiative Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dujmic, Denis; /SLAC

    2006-02-27

    We present new measurements of time-dependent CP-violation parameters in hadronic penguin decays: B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub L}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {omega}K{sub L}{sup 0}, and a radiative penguin decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} in a dataset of around 230 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. These CP asymmetry measurements probe for amplitudes beyond the Standard Model in loop-dominated decays of neutral B mesons. While we find a puzzling deviation of CP-asymmetry parameters from predicted values, a full confirmation still awaits more data.

  14. Fully radiative relaxation of silicon nanocrystals in colloidal ensemble revealed by advanced treatment of decay kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greben, Michael; Khoroshyy, Petro; Liu, Xiangkai; Pi, Xiaodong; Valenta, Jan

    2017-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the spectrally resolved photoluminescence (PL) decay kinetics of dodecyl-passivated colloidal silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) is presented. The correct treatment of average decay lifetime is demonstrated. We report on importance to distinguish the external quantum efficiency (QE) from the internal QE. The external QE of the ensemble of Si NCs is measured to be ˜60%, while the internal QE of Si NCs emitting around ˜1.5 eV is evaluated to be near unity. This difference between internal and external QE is attributed to a fraction of "dark" (absorbing but non-emitting) Si NCs in the ensemble. This conclusion is based on the analysis of deconvoluted size-selected decay curves retrieved by the presented mathematical procedure. The homogeneous line-broadening is estimated to be around 180 meV by experimentally challenging single-NC PL measurements. In addition, radiative lifetimes are calculated by the envelope function approximation and confirm the observed exponential increase of lifetime with decreasing emission photon energy.

  15. Decay strength distributions in {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}) radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D. G.; Fulton, B. R.; Marley, P.; Fox, S. P.; Glover, R.; Wadsworth, R.; Watson, D. L.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Rousseau, M.; Sanchez i Zafra, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Ottewell, D.; Pavan, M. M.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2007-10-15

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}), has been investigated at energies both on- and off-resonance, with a particular focus on known resonances at E{sub c.m.}=6.0, 6.8, 7.5, and 8.0 MeV. Gamma rays detected in a BGO scintillator array were recorded in coincidence with {sup 24}Mg residues at the focal plane of the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. In this manner, the relative strength of all decay pathways through excited states up to the particle threshold could be examined for the first time. Isovector M1 transitions are found to be a important component of the radiative capture from the E{sub c.m.}=6.0 and 6.8 MeV resonances. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests that these resonances may have either J=0 or 2, with a preference for J=2. The higher energy resonances at E{sub c.m.}=7.5 and 8.0 MeV have a rather different decay pattern. The former is a clear candidate for a J=4 resonance, whereas the latter has a dominant J=4 character superposed on a J=2 resonant component underneath. The relationship between these resonances and the well-known quasimolecular resonances as well as resonances in breakup and electrofission of {sup 24}Mg into two {sup 12}C nuclei are discussed.

  16. Steep Decay of GRB X-Ray Flares: The Results of Anisotropic Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jin-Jun; Huang, Yong-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2017-05-01

    When an emitting spherical shell with a constant Lorentz factor turns off emission abruptly at some radii, its high-latitude emission would obey the relation of \\hat{α } (the temporal index) = 2+\\hat{β } (the spectral index). However, this relation is violated by the X-ray fares in some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), whose \\hat{α } is much more steeper. We show that the synchrotron radiation should be anisotropic when the angular distribution of accelerated electrons has a preferable orientation, and this anisotropy would naturally lead to a steeper decay for the high-latitude emission if the intrinsic emission is limb-brightened. We use this simple toy model to reproduce the temporal and spectral evolution of X-ray flares. We show that our model can well interpret the steep decay of the X-ray flares in the three GRBs selected as an example. Recent simulations on particle acceleration may support the specific anisotropic distribution of the electrons adopted in our work. Reversely, confirmation of the anisotropy in the radiation would provide meaningful clues to the details of electron acceleration in the emitting region.

  17. Radiation decay of thaumatin crystals at three X-ray energies

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage is an unavoidable obstacle in X-ray crystallographic data collection for macromolecular structure determination, so it is important to know how much radiation a sample can endure before being degraded beyond an acceptable limit. In the literature, the threshold at which the average intensity of all recorded reflections decreases to a certain fraction of the initial value is called the ‘dose limit’. The first estimated D 50 dose-limit value, at which the average diffracted intensity was reduced to 50%, was 20 MGy and was derived from observing sample decay in electron-diffraction experiments. A later X-ray study carried out at 100 K on ferritin protein crystals arrived at a D 50 of 43 MGy, and recommended an intensity reduction of protein reflections to 70%, D 70, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 30 MGy, as a more appropriate limit for macromolecular crystallography. In the macromolecular crystallography community, the rate of intensity decay with dose was then assumed to be similar for all protein crystals. A series of diffraction images of cryocooled (100 K) thaumatin crystals at identical small, 2° rotation intervals were recorded at X-ray energies of 6.33 , 12.66 and 19.00 keV. Five crystals were used for each wavelength. The decay in the average diffraction intensity to 70% of the initial value, for data extending to 2.45 Å resolution, was determined to be about 7.5 MGy at 6.33 keV and about 11 MGy at the two higher energies. PMID:25849388

  18. Radiation decay of thaumatin crystals at three X-ray energies.

    PubMed

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    Radiation damage is an unavoidable obstacle in X-ray crystallographic data collection for macromolecular structure determination, so it is important to know how much radiation a sample can endure before being degraded beyond an acceptable limit. In the literature, the threshold at which the average intensity of all recorded reflections decreases to a certain fraction of the initial value is called the `dose limit'. The first estimated D50 dose-limit value, at which the average diffracted intensity was reduced to 50%, was 20 MGy and was derived from observing sample decay in electron-diffraction experiments. A later X-ray study carried out at 100 K on ferritin protein crystals arrived at a D50 of 43 MGy, and recommended an intensity reduction of protein reflections to 70%, D70, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 30 MGy, as a more appropriate limit for macromolecular crystallography. In the macromolecular crystallography community, the rate of intensity decay with dose was then assumed to be similar for all protein crystals. A series of diffraction images of cryocooled (100 K) thaumatin crystals at identical small, 2° rotation intervals were recorded at X-ray energies of 6.33 , 12.66 and 19.00 keV. Five crystals were used for each wavelength. The decay in the average diffraction intensity to 70% of the initial value, for data extending to 2.45 Å resolution, was determined to be about 7.5 MGy at 6.33 keV and about 11 MGy at the two higher energies.

  19. Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B -Meson Decay B -> X_s gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, V.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2006-01-06

    Radiative decays of the B meson, B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, proceed via virtual flavor changing neutral current processes that are sensitive to contributions from high mass scales, either within the Standard Model of electroweak interactions or beyond. In the Standard Model, these transitions are sensitive to the weak interactions of the top quark, and relatively robust predictions of the inclusive decay rate exist. Significant deviation from these predictions could be interpreted as indications for processes not included in the minimal Standard Model, like interactions of charged Higgs or SUSY particles. The analysis of the inclusive photon spectrum from B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays is rather challenging due to high backgrounds from photons emitted in the decay of mesons in B decays as well as e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation to low mass quark and lepton pairs. Based on 88.5 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector, the photon spectrum above 1.9 GeV is presented. By comparison of the first and second moments of the photon spectrum with QCD predictions (calculated in the kinetic scheme), QCD parameters describing the bound state of the b quark in the B meson are extracted: m{sub b} = (4.45 {+-} 0.16) GeV/c{sup 2}; {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2} = (0.65 {+-} 0.29) GeV{sup 2}. These parameters are useful input to non-perturbative QCD corrections to the semileptonic B decay rate and the determination of the CKM parameter |V{sub ub}|. Based on these parameters and heavy quark expansion, the full branching fraction is obtained as: {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}){sup E{sub {gamma}}>1.6 GeV} = (4.05 {+-} 0.32(stat) {+-} 0.38(syst) {+-} 0.29(model)) x 10{sup -4}. This result is in good agreement with previous measurements, the statistical and systematic errors are comparable. It is also in good agreement with the theoretical Standard Model predictions, and thus within the present errors there is no indication of any interactions not accounted for in the

  20. Study of χcJ radiative decays into a vector meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-06-01

    The decays χcJ→γV (V=ϕ, ρ0, ω) are studied with a sample of radiative ψ'→γχcJ events in a sample of (1.06±0.04)×108ψ' events collected with the BESIII detector. The branching fractions are determined to be: B(χc1→γϕ)=(25.8±5.2±2.3)×10-6, B(χc1→γρ0)=(228±13±22)×10-6, and B(χc1→γω)=(69.7±7.2±6.6)×10-6. The decay χc1→γϕ is observed for the first time. Upper limits at the 90% confidence level on the branching fractions for χc0 and χc2 decays into these final states are determined. In addition, the fractions of the transverse polarization component of the vector meson in χc1→γV decays are measured to be 0.29-0.12-0.09+0.13+0.10 for χc1→γϕ, 0.158±0.034-0.014+0.015 for χc1→γρ0, and 0.247-0.087-0.026+0.090+0.044 for χc1→γω, respectively. The first errors are statistical and the second ones are systematic.

  1. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of neutral baryons with light or charm quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Garcia, A. ); Tun, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    In this paper we obtain an expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of neutral baryons including radiative corrections up to order [alpha][ital q]/[pi][ital M][sub 1] ([ital q] is the four-momentum transfer and [ital M][sub 1] is the mass of the decaying baryon). The model dependence of the radiative corrections is kept in a general form which is suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis. The bremsstrahlung contribution is given in two ways. The first one leaves the triple integration over the photon variables to be performed numerically and the second one is completely analytic. Our result is suitable for high-statistics decays of ordinary baryons as well as for medium-statistics decays of charm baryons.

  2. Addendum to Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of neutral baryons with light or charm quarks''

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Tun, D.M.; Garcia, A.; Sanchez-Colon, G. Coordinacion de Dinamica Orbital, Telecomunicaciones de Mexico, Av. de las Telecomunicaciones s/n, C.P. 09300, Mexico, Distrito Federal Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Apartado Postal 14-740, C.P. 07000, Mexico, Distrito Federal )

    1994-08-01

    We show that the radiative corrections containing terms up to order [alpha][ital q]/[pi][ital M][sub 1] for unpolarized semileptonic decays of baryons with positron emission can be obtained by simply reversing the sign of the axial-vector form factors in the corresponding final expressions of such decays with electron emission. This rule is valid regardless of the final kinematical variables chosen and of the particular Lorentz frame in which the final results are required.

  3. Radiative and nonradiative spontaneous decay rates for an electric quadrupole source in the vicinity of a spherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D. V.

    2016-04-15

    Analytic expressions for the radiative and nonradiative decay rates for an electric quadrupole source (atom, molecule) in the vicinity of a spherical particle (dielectric, metal) have been derived and analyzed within the classical electrodynamics. It has been shown that the highest increase in the decay rates appears in the quasi-static case, when the wavelength of the transition in question is much larger than the characteristic size of the system formed by the particle and the quadrupole. Asymptotic expressions for the decay rates have been derived for this case.

  4. Fluorescence quenching and photobleaching in Au/Rh6G nanoassemblies: impact of competition between radiative and non-radiative decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, L.; Ye, F.; Hu, J.; Popov, S.; Friberg, A. T.; Muhammed, M.

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching from nanoassemblies formed by Rhodamine 6G and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of 2.6 nm radius has been investigated. The presence of Au NPs also induces long-term degradation of the photostability (photobleaching) of Rhodamine 6G used as gain medium in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. We found that the degradation gets profound when the Au NPs concentration is significantly increased. Calculation of the radiative rate and direct time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence decay indicates that both the decrease of radiative decay rate and increase of non-radiative decay rate are responsible for the fluorescence quenching and photostability degradation. An energy transfer from the dye molecules to gold nanoparticles is dominating within the small distance between them and suppresses the quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G drastically. In long time scale, the photobleaching rate was slowing down, and laser output intensity reached a stabilized level which depends on the gold nanoparticles concentration.

  5. Spectral and Non Radiative Decay Studies of Lead Di Bromide Single Crystals by Mode Matched Thermal Lens Technique.

    PubMed

    Rejeena, I; Lillibai, B; Thomas, V; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, the investigations on the non radiative decay mechanism, optical band gap determination from absorption spectroscopic studies and fluorescence emission by photo luminescence techniques using different excitation wavelengths on gel derived lead di bromide single crystals are reported. Non radiative decay of the sample is studied using high sensitive dual beam mode matched thermal lens technique. For the thermal lensing experiment the crystal in solution phase is incorporated with rhodamine 6G dye for enhancing the absorption of the crystal sample. The thermal diffusivity of lead di bromide is determined using the probe beam intensity v/s time measurements.

  6. Search for radiative decays of {upsilon}(1S) into {eta} and {eta}'

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.

    2007-10-01

    We report on a search for the radiative decay of {upsilon}(1S) to the pseudoscalar mesons {eta} and {eta}{sup '} in (21.2{+-}0.2)x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(1S) decays collected with the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The {eta} meson was reconstructed in the three modes {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, or {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The {eta}{sup '} meson was reconstructed in the mode {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta} decaying through any of the above three modes, and also {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{sup 0}, where {rho}{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Five out of the seven submodes are found to have very low backgrounds. In four of them we find no signal candidates and in one [{upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}] there are two good signal candidates, which is insufficient evidence to claim a signal. The other two submodes ({eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}) are background limited, and show no excess of events in their signal regions. We combine the results from different channels and obtain upper limits at the 90% C.L. which are B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta})<1.0x10{sup -6} and B({upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})<1.9x10{sup -6}. Our limits are an order of magnitude tighter than the previous ones and below the predictions made by some theoretical models.

  7. Observation of hc Radiative Decay hc→γ η' and Evidence for hc→γ η

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fedorov, O.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    A search for radiative decays of the P -wave spin singlet charmonium resonance hc is performed based on 4.48 ×108 ψ' events collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring. Events of the reaction channels hc→γ η' and γ η are observed with a statistical significance of 8.4 σ and 4.0 σ , respectively, for the first time. The branching fractions of hc→γ η' and hc→γ η are measured to be B (hc→γ η')=(1.52 ±0.27 ±0.29 )×10-3 and B (hc→γ η )=(4.7 ±1.5 ±1.4 )×10-4, respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic uncertainties.

  8. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of K{sub l3}{sup {+-}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the model-independent radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of K{sub l3}{sup {+-}} decays to the order of ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}), where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the kaon. The final results are presented, first, with the triple integration over the variables of the bremsstrahlung photon ready to be performed numerically and, second, in an analytical form. These two forms are useful to cross-check on one another and with other calculations. This paper is organized to make it accessible and reliable in the analysis of the Dalitz plot of precision experiments and is not compromised to fixing the form factors at predetermined values. It is assumed that the real photons are kinematically discriminated. Otherwise, our results have a general model-independent applicability.

  9. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar Boson in Radiative Transitions Y -> gamma A^0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-06-02

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the {Upsilon}(2S) and {Upsilon}(3S) resonances: {Upsilon}(2S, 3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such a particle appears in extensions of the Standaard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 {<=} m{sub A{sup 0}} {<=} 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) and 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A{sup 0}. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the {eta}{sub b} meson: {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.9% at 90% confidence level.

  10. Precision Measurement of the Radiative β Decay of the Free Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, M. J.; Alarcon, R.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Byrne, J.; Chupp, T. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Cooper, R. L.; Dewey, M. S.; Gardner, S.; Gentile, T. R.; He, D.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; O'Neill, B.; Thompson, A. K.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; RDK Collaboration, II

    2016-06-01

    The standard model predicts that, in addition to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, a continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the β decay of the free neutron. We report on the RDK II experiment which measured the photon spectrum using two different detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons from 14 to 782 keV. The spectral shape was consistent with theory, and we determined a branching ratio of 0.00335 ±0.00005 [stat ]±0.00015 [syst ] . A second detector array of large area avalanche photodiodes directly detected photons from 0.4 to 14 keV. For this array, the spectral shape was consistent with theory, and the branching ratio was determined to be 0.00582 ±0.00023 [stat ]±0.00062 [syst ] . We report the first precision test of the shape of the photon energy spectrum from neutron radiative decay and a substantially improved determination of the branching ratio over a broad range of photon energies.

  11. An experiment for the precision measurement of the radiative decay mode of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. L.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Byrne, J.; Chupp, T. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Dewey, M. S.; Fisher, B. M.; Fu, C.; Gentile, T. R.; McGonagle, M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2009-12-01

    The familiar neutron decay into a proton, electron, and antineutrino can be accompanied by photons with sufficient energy to be detected. We recently reported the first observation of the radiative beta decay branch for the free neutron with photons of energy 15-340 keV. We performed the experiment in the bore of a superconducting magnet where electron, proton, and photon signals were measured. A bar of bismuth germanate scintillating crystal coupled to an avalanche photodiode served as the photon detector that operated in the cryogenic, high magnetic field environment. The branching ratio for this energy region was measured and is consistent with the theoretical calculation. An experiment is under way to measure the branching ratio with an improved precision of 1% relative standard uncertainty and to measure the photon energy spectrum. In this paper, the apparatus modifications to reduce the systematic uncertainties will be described. Central to these improvements is the development of a 12-element detector based on the original photon detector design that will improve the statistical sensitivity. During data acquisition, a detailed calibration program will be performed to improve the systematic uncertainties. The development of these modifications is currently under way, and the second run of the experiment commenced in July 2008.

  12. Radiative Decay Engineering 7: Tamm State-Coupled Emission Using a Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Descrovi, Emiliano; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a continuing need to increase the brightness and photostability of fluorophores for use in biotechnology, medical diagnostics and cell imaging. One approach developed during the past decade is to use metallic surfaces and nanostructures. It is now known that excited state fluorophores display interactions with surface plasmons, which can increase the radiative decay rates, modify the spatial distribution of emission and result in directional emission. One important example is Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission (SPCE). In this phenomenon the fluorophores at close distances from a thin metal film, typically silver, display emission over a small range of angles into the substrate. A disadvantage of SPCE is that the emission occur at large angles relative to the surface normal, and at angles which are larger than the critical angle for the glass substrate. The large angles make it difficult to collect all the coupled emission and have prevented use of SPCE with high-throughput and/or array applications. In the present report we describe a simple multi-layer metal-dielectric structure which allows excitation with light that is perpendicular (normal) to the plane and provides emission within a narrow angular distribution that is normal to the plane. This structure consist of a thin silver film on top of a multi-layer dielectric Bragg grating, with no nanoscale features except for the metal or dielectric layer thicknesses. Our structure is designed to support optical Tamm states, which are trapped electromagnetic modes between the metal film and the underlying Bragg grating. We used simulations with the transfer matrix method to understand the optical properties of Tamm states and localization of the modes or electric fields in the structure. Tamm states can exist with zero in-plane wavevector components and can be created without the use of a coupling prism. We show that fluorophores on top of the metal film can interact with the Tamm state under the metal film

  13. Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states

    SciTech Connect

    Einsweiler, K.F.

    1984-05-01

    The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ..pi pi.. channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma..K/sup +/K/sup -/ is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi ..-->.. ..gamma..xi(2220))BR(xi(2220) ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -5/.

  14. Effect of Proton Radiation on the Kinetics of Phosphorescence Decay in the Ceramic Material ZnS-Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchakova, T.A.; Vesna, G.V.; Makara, V.A.

    2004-11-01

    The results of studying the dose dependences of the decay kinetics of phosphorescence excited by X-ray radiation in luminescent ZnS-Cu ceramic material before and after irradiation with 50-MeV protons are considered. An anomalous variation in the exponent of the hyperbolic phosphorescence curves was observed experimentally as the accumulated light sum increased. It is found from an analysis of the data obtained that two processes are involved in the decay: one of these is monomolecular and corresponds to the first-order kinetics; the other is bimolecular and corresponds to the second-order kinetics. Transitions of charge carriers delocalized from traps occur at the nonradiative-recombination centers induced by proton radiation. Recombination of these charge carriers at the emission centers in the course of decay is described by the second-order kinetics.

  15. Understanding and eliminating non-radiative decay in organic-inorganic perovskites (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; de Quilettes, Dane

    2016-09-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are highly promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21% and promising applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors also emerging. A key enabling property of the perovskites is their high photoluminescence quantum efficiency, suggesting that these materials could in principle approach the thermodynamic device efficiency limits in which all recombination is radiative. However, non-radiative recombination sites are present which vary heterogeneously from grain to grain and limit device performance. Here, I will present results where we probe the local photophysics of neat CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films using confocal photoluminescence (PL) measurements and correlate the observations with the local chemistry of the grains using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). We investigate the connection between grains that are bright or dark in emission and the local Pb:I ratios at the surface and through the grains. We also examine how the photophysics, local chemistry and non-radiative decay pathways change slowly over time under illumination. Our results reveal a "photo-induced cleaning" arising from a redistribution of iodide content in the films, giving strong evidence for photo-induced ion migration. These slow transient effects appear to be related to anomalous hysteresis phenomena observed in full solar cells. I will discuss how immobilizing ions, reducing trap densities and achieving homogenous stoichiometries could suppress hysteresis effects and lead to devices approaching the efficiency limits.

  16. Radiative decay of self-trapped excitons in CaMoO4 and MgMoO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailik, V. B.; Kraus, H.; Itoh, M.; Iri, D.; Uchida, M.

    2005-11-01

    Spectroscopic properties of CaMoO4 and MgMoO4 crystals were studied in view of their application to cryogenic scintillation detectors. Luminescence spectra and the luminescence decay kinetics were measured over a wide range of temperatures (8-300 K). For the first time we measured time-resolved luminescence spectra of CaMoO4. In addition to the green emission arising from the triplet state of self-trapped excitons (STEs), a new band at around 430 nm with a decay time constant 10 ± 3 ns was observed at T = 8 K. This emission is assigned to the radiative decay of a singlet STE. The relaxation of electronic excitations in the crystals under study is discussed on the basis of our current understanding of their electronic structures and a configuration coordinate model for the radiative decay of STEs. The model includes adiabatic potential energy surfaces (APESs) associated with singlet and triplet states and explains the variation of the luminescence kinetics with temperature as a result of a re-distribution in the population of these states. Thus, judging from the change of the singlet STE emission due to temperature variation, we infer the existence of an energy barrier between the singlet and triplet APESs. The multi-exponential character of the decay of the triplet emission can be understood assuming that the relevant radiative transitions originate from different minima of the triplet APES. Non-radiative energy transfer processes control the population of these states, resulting in thermal variation of the intensities of the different emission components.

  17. Asymmetries in rare radiative leptonic and semileptonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Balakireva, I. A. Nikitin, N. V. Tlisov, D. A.

    2010-10-15

    The time-dependent and time-independent CP asymmetries A({sub CP})/{sup B}{sub q}{sup 0{yields}f} ({tau}) and A({sub CP})/{sup B}{sub q}{sup 0{yields}f}) (s-circumflex) for rare semileptonic and radiative leptonic decays of B mesons are calculated by the method of helicity amplitudes. The sensitivity of CP asymmetries to various extensions of the Standard Model that have an operator basis that is identical to the operator basis of the Standard Model is investigated. It is shown that, by combining information about the form of the charge lepton asymmetry A{sub FB} at small values of the square of the invariant dilepton mass and information about the average value of the time-dependent CP asymmetry, one can in principle determine the relative phases of the Wilson coefficients C7{sub {gamma}}, C-{sub 9}V, and C10A in the effective Hamiltonian for b {sup {yields} {l_brace}}d, s{r_brace}l{sup +}l{sup -} transitions.

  18. SEARCH FOR THE EXCLUSIVE RADIATIVE DECAYS B ---> RHO GAMMA AND B0 ---> OMEGA GAMMA

    SciTech Connect

    Convery, Mark R

    2002-07-26

    A search for the exclusive radiative decays B {yields} {rho}(770){gamma} and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}(782){gamma} is performed on a sample of 84 million B{bar B} events collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. No significant signal is seen in any of the channels. They set preliminary upper limits of {Beta}[B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}] < 1.4 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}[B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{gamma}] < 2.3 x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}[B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}] < 1.2 x 10{sup -6} at 90% Confidence Level. Combining these into a single limit on the generic process B {yields} {rho}{gamma}, they find the preliminary limit {Beta}[B {yields} {rho}{gamma}] < 1.9 x 10{sup -6} corresponding, to a limit of {Beta}[B {yields} {rho}{gamma}]/{Beta}[B {yields} K*{gamma}] < 0.047 at 90% Confidence Level.

  19. Search for the Radiative Decays B→ργ and B0→ωγ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Ernst, J. A.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-03-01

    A search of the exclusive radiative decays B→ρ(770)γ and B0→ω(782)γ is performed on a sample of about 84×106 BB¯ events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring. No significant signal is seen in any of the channels. We set upper limits on the branching fractions B of B(B0→ρ0γ)<1.2×10-6, B(B+→ρ+γ)<2.1×10-6, and B(B0→ωγ)<1.0×10-6 at 90% confidence level (C.L.). Using the assumption that Γ(B→ργ)=Γ(B+→ρ+γ)=2×Γ(B0→ρ0γ), we find the combined limit B(B→ργ)<1.9×10-6, corresponding to B(B→ργ)/B(B→K*γ)<0.047 at 90% C.L.

  20. Relativistic electron acceleration and decay time scales in the inner and outer radiation belts: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Hovestadt, D.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy electrons have been measured systematically in a low-altitude (520 x 675 km), nearly polar (inclination = 82 deg) orbit by sensitive instruments onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). Count rate channels with electron energy thresholds ranging from 0.4 MeV to 3.5 MeV in three different instruments have been used to examine relativistic electron variations as a function of L-shell parameter and time. A long run of essentially continuous data (July 1992 - July 1993) shows substantial acceleration of energetic electrons throughout much of the magnetosphere on rapid time scales. This acceleration appears to be due to solar wind velocity enhancements and is surprisingly large in that the radiation belt 'slot' region often is filled temporarily and electron fluxes are strongly enhanced even at very low L-values (L aprroximately 2). A superposed epoch analysis shows that electron fluxes rise rapidly for 2.5 is approximately less than L is approximately less than 5. These increases occur on a time scale of order 1-2 days and are most abrupt for L-values near 3. The temporal decay rate of the fluxes is dependent on energy and L-value and may be described by J = Ke-t/to with t(sub o) approximately equals 5-10 days. Thus, these results suggest that the Earth's magnetosphere is a cosmic electron accelerator of substantial strength and efficiency.

  1. Temperature and magnetic-field dependence of radiative decay in colloidal germanium quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Robel, István; Shabaev, Andrew; Lee, Doh C; Schaller, Richard D; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Crooker, Scott A; L Efros, Alexander; Klimov, Victor I

    2015-04-08

    We conduct spectroscopic and theoretical studies of photoluminescence (PL) from Ge quantum dots (QDs) fabricated via colloidal synthesis. The dynamics of late-time PL exhibit a pronounced dependence on temperature and applied magnetic field, which can be explained by radiative decay involving two closely spaced, slowly emitting exciton states. In 3.5 nm QDs, these states are separated by ∼1 meV and are characterized by ∼82 μs and ∼18 μs lifetimes. By using a four-band formalism, we calculate the fine structure of the indirect band-edge exciton arising from the electron-hole exchange interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the Γ-point hole with the anisotropic charge density of the L-point electron. The calculations suggest that the observed PL dynamics can be explained by phonon-assisted recombination of excitons thermally distributed between the lower-energy "dark" state with the momentum projection J = ± 2 and a higher energy "bright" state with J = ± 1. A fairly small difference between lifetimes of these states is due to their mixing induced by the exchange term unique to crystals with a highly symmetric cubic lattice such as Ge.

  2. Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in Radiative B Decays to eta K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-05-14

    The authors present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}; for B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} they also measure the branching fractions and for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} the time-integrated charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 465 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The results are S = -0.18{sub -0.46}{sup +0.49} {+-} 0.12, C = -0.32{sub -0.39}{sup +0.40} {+-} 0.07, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = (7.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = (7.7 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Alpha}{sub ch} = (-9.0{sub -9.8}{sup +10.4} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -2}. The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  3. Determination of the b-quark Mass and Nonperturbative parameters in Semileptonic and Radiative Penguin Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Tackmann, Kerstin; collaboration, for the BABAR

    2008-01-23

    Knowing the mass of the b-quark is essential to the study of the structure and decays of B mesons as well as to future tests of the Higgs mechanism of mass generation. We present recent preliminary measurements of the b-quark mass and related nonperturbative parameters from moments of kinematic distributions in charmed and charmless semileptonic and radiative penguin B decays. Their determination from charmless semileptonic B decays is the first measurement in this mode. The data were collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center at a center-of-momentum energy of 10:58 GeV.

  4. Flavor Changing Neutral Coupling Mediated Radiative Top Quark Decays at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Drobnak, Jure; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2010-06-25

    We compute the branching ratios for the rare top quark decays t{yields}c{gamma} and t{yields}cZ mediated by effective flavor changing neutral couplings at next-to-leading order in QCD, including the effects due to operator mixing. After resumming contributions of the order of [{alpha}{sub s}log({Lambda}/m{sub t})]{sup n}, where {Lambda} is the scale at which the effective operators are generated, using renormalization group methods, we compute finite matrix element corrections and study the effects of experimental kinematic cuts on the extracted branching ratios. We find that the t{yields}c{gamma} decay can also be used to probe the effective operators mediating t{yields}cg processes, since the latter can naturally contribute 10% or more to the radiative decay. Conversely, any experimental signal of t{yields}cg would indicate a natural lower bound on t{yields}cZ, {gamma}.

  5. Calculation of the decay rate of tachyonic neutrinos against charged-lepton-pair and neutrino-pair Cerenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Nándori, István; Ehrlich, Robert

    2017-10-01

    We consider in detail the calculation of the decay rate of high-energy superluminal neutrinos against (charged) lepton pair Cerenkov radiation, and neutrino pair Cerenkov radiation, i.e., against the decay channels ν \\to ν {e}+ {e}- and ν \\to ν \\overline{ν } ν . Under the hypothesis of a tachyonic nature of neutrinos, these decay channels put constraints on the lifetime of high-energy neutrinos for terrestrial experiments as well as on cosmic scales. For the oncoming neutrino, we use the Lorentz-covariant tachyonic relation {E}ν =\\sqrt{{p}2-{m}ν 2}, where m ν is the tachyonic mass parameter. We derive both threshold conditions as well as on decay and energy loss rates, using the plane-wave fundamental bispinor solutions of the tachyonic Dirac equation. Various intricacies of rest frame versus lab frame calculations are highlighted. The results are compared to the observations of high-energy IceCube neutrinos of cosmological origin.

  6. Spectral and polarization characteristics of the nonspherically decaying radiation generated by polarization currents with superluminally rotating distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John

    2004-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the emission from a superluminal polarization current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency omega) and oscillates (with a frequency Omega) at the same time and that comprises both poloidal and toroidal components. This type of polarization current is found in recent practical machines designed to investigate superluminal emission. We find that the superluminal motion of the distribution pattern of the emitting current generates localized electromagnetic waves that do not decay spherically, i.e., that do not have an intensity diminishing as RP(-2) with the distance RP from their source. The nonspherical decay of the focused wave packets that are emitted by the polarization currents does not contravene conservation of energy: The constructive interference of the constituent waves of such propagating caustics takes place within different solid angles on spheres of different radii (RP) centered on the source. For a polarization current whose longitudinal distribution (over an azimuthal interval of length 2pi) consists of m cycles of a sinusoidal wave train, the nonspherically decaying part of the emitted radiation contains the frequencies Omega +/- momega; i.e., it contains only the frequencies involved in the creation and implementation of the source. This is in contrast to recent studies of the spherically decaying emission, which was shown to contain much higher frequencies. The polarization of the emitted radiation is found to be linear for most configurations of the source.

  7. Search for Di-Muon Decays of a Light Scalar Higgs Boson in Radiative Upsilon(1S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vindhyawasini

    2013-08-01

    We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A0) in the fully reconstructed decay chain of Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ), Υ(1S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ+. The A0 is predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model (SM), including the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). NMSSM introduces a CP-odd light Higgs boson whose mass could be less than 10 GeV/c2. The data samples used in this analysis contain 92.8 × 106 Υ(2S ) and 116.8 × 106 Υ(3S ) events collected by the BABAR detector. The Υ(1S ) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ) transitions. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S ) → γA0) × B(A0 → μ+μ-) in the range of (0.28 - 9.7) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.20 GeV/c2. We also combine our results with previous BABAR results of Υ(2S, 3S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ- to set limits on the effective coupling ( fΥ) of the b-quark to the A0, f 2 Υ × B(A0 → μ+μ-), at the level of (0.29- 40) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.2 GeV/c2.

  8. New decay branches of the radiative capture reaction {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Rousseau, M.; Marley, P. L.; Glover, R. G.; Kent, P. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.

    2009-01-28

    Resonances in the {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture process at energies around the Coulomb barrier have been probed using the very selective 0 deg. Dragon spectrometer at Triumf and its associated BGO {gamma}-array. For the first time the full level scheme involved in this process has been measured and shows previously unobserved {gamma}-decay to doorway states around 11 MeV in {sup 28}Si.

  9. Testing the Standard Model with Radiative Penguin Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, J; /Maryland U.

    2008-04-22

    The author discusses two recent results in b {yields} s{gamma} decays from BABAR. The first is a measurement of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum in the B meson frame of the decay B {yields} X{sub s{gamma}}. The second result probes the photon polarization via time-dependent CP violation in neutral B decays to K*{sup 0}{gamma}.

  10. Experimental search for radiative decays of the pentaquark baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540)

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the reactions K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0{gamma}}X and K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup +{gamma}}X, obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, have been analyzed for possible radiative decays of the {Theta}{sup +}(1540) baryon: {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma} and {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}. No signals have been observed, and we derive the upper limits {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p) < 0.032 and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 0.041 which, using our previous measurement of {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}KN) = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV, translate to {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma}) < 8 keV and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 11 keV at 90% confidence level. We have also measured the cross sections of K{sup +}-induced reactions involving emission of a neutral pion: {sigma}(K{sup +}n {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{pi}{sup 0}) = 68 {+-} 18 {mu}b and {sigma}(K{sup +}N {sup {yields}}K{sup +}N{pi}{sup 0}) = 30 {+-} 8 {mu}b for incident K{sup +} momentum of 640 MeV.

  11. Search for charmonium and charmoniumlike states in {Upsilon}(2S) radiative decays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Wang, P.; Shen, C. P.; Hayasaka, K.; Iijima, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Ohshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Adachi, I.; Haba, J.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Sakai, Y.; Trabelsi, K.

    2011-10-01

    Using a sample of 158x10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) events collected with the Belle detector, charmonium and charmoniumlike states with even charge parity are searched for in {Upsilon}(2S) radiative decays. No significant {chi}{sub cJ} or {eta}{sub c} signal is observed, and the following upper limits at 90% confidence level (C. L.) are obtained: B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub c0})<1.0x10{sup -4}, B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub c1})<3.6x10{sup -6}, B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub c2})<1.5x10{sup -5}, and B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c})<2.7x10{sup -5}. No significant signal of any charmoniumlike state is observed, and we obtain the limits B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}X(3872))xB(X(3872){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi})<0.8x10{sup -6}, B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}X(3872))x B(X(3872){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}J/{psi})<2.4x10{sup -6}, B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}X(3915))xB(X(3915){yields}{omega}J/{psi})<2.8x10{sup -6}, B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}Y(4140))xB(Y(4140){yields}{phi}J/{psi}))<1.2x10{sup -6}, and B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{gamma}X(4350))xB(X(4350){yields}{phi}J/{psi}))<1.3x10{sup -6} at 90% C. L.

  12. Radiative Penguin Decays of B Mesons: Measurements of B to K* gamma, B to K2* gamma, and Search for B0 to phi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, J.

    2005-01-03

    Electromagnetic radiative penguin decays of the B meson were studied with the BaBar detector at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. Branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of the decay B {yields} K*{gamma}, branching fractions of B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and a search for B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{gamma} are presented. The decay rates may be enhanced by contributions from non-standard model processes.

  13. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  14. Search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson in radiative decays of the Υ(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-02-01

    We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A0) produced in radiative Υ(1S) decays. The Υ(1S) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the Υ(2S,3S)→π+π-Υ(1S) transitions, using a data sample of 92.8×106 Υ(2S) and 116.8×106 Υ(3S) events collected by the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→γA0)×B(A0→μ+μ-) in the range of (0.28-9.7)×10-6 for 0.212≤mA0≤9.20GeV/c2. The results are combined with our previous measurements of Υ(2S,3S)→γA0, A0→μ+μ- to set limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0.

  15. Investigation of photoneutron and capture gamma-ray production in Pb and W under irradiation from 16N decay radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2015-09-01

    Lead and tungsten are potential alternative materials for shielding reactor ex-core components with high 16N activity when available space limits application of concrete. Since the two materials are vulnerable to photonuclear reactions, the nature and intensity of the secondary radiation resulting from (γ,n) and (n,γ) reactions when 16N decay radiation interact with these materials need to be well known for effective shielding design. In this study the MCNP code was used to calculate the photoneutron and capture gamma-ray spectra in the two materials when irradiated by 16N decay radiation. It was observed that some of the photoneutrons generated in the two materials lie in the low-energy range which is considered optimum for (n,γ) reactions. Lead is more transparent to the photoneutrons when compared to tungsten. The calculations also revealed that the bremsstrahlung generated by the beta spectrum was not sufficient to trigger any additional photoneutrons. Both energetic and less energetic capture gamma-rays are observed when photoneutrons interact with nuclei of the two materials. Depending on the strength of the 16N source term, the secondary radiation could affect the effectiveness of the shield and need to be considered during design.

  16. 12C(16O,γ)28Si radiative capture: Structural and statistical aspects of the γ decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Jenkins, D. G.; Simenel, C.; Salsac, M.-D.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Beck, C.; Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Davis, C.; Glover, R. G.; Goasduff, A.; Kent, P. E.; Levai, G.; Marley, P. L.; Michalon, A.; Pearson, J. E.; Rousseau, M.; Rowley, N.; Ruiz, C.

    2012-03-01

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction 12C(16O,γ)28Si has been studied at three energies Ec.m.=8.5, 8.8, and 9 MeV which are close to the Coulomb barrier. The weak radiative capture process has been identified by measuring the 28Si recoils in the highly selective 0∘ spectrometer DRAGON at TRIUMF (Vancouver). The coincident γ rays have been recorded in the associated BGO array. This has allowed a complete measurement of the γ spectrum and the relative strength of all decay pathways. An important part of the decay through quasibound states close to the particle threshold and the feeding of bound states with particular deformation have been identified for the first time. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations allowed the extraction of the full experimental radiative capture cross section. Our results suggest an important contribution of spins Jπ=5- and 6+ in the entrance channel. The surprisingly large cross sections from 12 μb at Ec.m.=8.5 MeV to 25 μb at Ec.m.=9.0 MeV for the heavy-ion radiative capture process are discussed in terms of the interplay between statistical and structural aspects of the process.

  17. Temperature dependence of excitonic radiative decay in CdSe quantum dots: the role of surface hole traps.

    PubMed

    Califano, Marco; Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    2005-12-01

    Using atomistic, semiempirical pseudopotential calculations, we show that if one assumes the simplest form of a surface state in a CdSe nanocrystal--an unpassivated surface anion site--one can explain theoretically several puzzling aspects regarding the observed temperature dependence of the radiative decay of excitons. In particular, our calculations show that the presence of surface states leads to a mixing of the dark and bright exciton states, resulting in a decrease of 3 orders of magnitude of the dark-exciton radiative lifetime. This result explains the persistence of the zero-phonon emission line at low temperature, for which thermal population of higher-energy bright-exciton states is negligible. Thus, we suggest that surface states are the controlling factor of dark-exciton radiative recombination in currently synthesized colloidal CdSe nanocrystals.

  18. An amplitude analysis of the pi0pi0 system produced in radiative J/psi decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Jake Vernon

    Despite many years of study, a complete understanding of the interactions of quarks and gluons within hadronic states remains elusive. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) has long predicted the possibility of states in which gluonic excitations can contribute to the characteristics of the state (a hybrid) or even take the place of constituent quarks altogether (a glueball), yet no incontrovertible evidence yet exists. This is partially due to the nature of the low mass spectrum, in which broad, overlapping states make experimental methods challenging. Recent technological improvements and high statistics data sets now enable a rigorous study of regions in which experimentalists may perform fundamental tests of QCD. This dissertation presents one such study, focusing on the pi 0pi0 spectrum. Particular emphasis is placed on the scalar meson spectrum (JPC = 0++), wherein the lightest glueball state is expected. An amplitude analysis of the pi0pi0 system produced in radiative J/psi decays is presented. A mass independent analysis of the (1.3106 +/- 0.0072) x 10 9 J/psi decays collected by the BESIII detector at BEPCII in Beijing, China is repeated under different model assumptions and experimental conditions. Additionally, the branching ratio of radiative J/psi decays to pi0pi0 is measured to be (1.147+/-0.002+/-0.042) x 10-3, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the first measurement of this reaction.

  19. Momentum-transfer contributions to the radiative corrections of the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of charged baryons with light or charm quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Tun, D.M.; Juarez W., S.R. ); Garcia, A. )

    1991-12-01

    We obtain an expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of charged baryons, including radiative corrections with all the terms of the order {alpha} times the momentum transfer. The model dependence of the radiative corrections is kept in a general form which is suitable for model-independent experimental analysis. The bremsstrahlung contribution is given in two ways. The first one leaves the triple integration over the photon variables to be performed numerically and the second one is completely analytic. Our result is suitable for high-statistics decays of ordinary baryons as well as for medium-statistics decays of charm baryons.

  20. Exclusive weak radiative Higgs decays in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alte, Stefan; König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    We perform a detailed study of the exclusive Higgs decays h → MZ and h → MW, where M is a pseudoscalar or vector meson, using the QCD factorization approach. We allow for the presence of new-physics effects in the form of modified Higgs couplings to gauge bosons and fermions, including the possibility of flavor-changing Higgs couplings. We show that the decays h → VZ exhibit a strong sensitivity to the effective CP-even and CP-odd hγZ couplings. When combined with a measurement of the h → γZ decay rate, this can be used to extract these couplings up to a sign ambiguity in the CP-odd coefficient. Some of the h → MW decay modes can be used to probe for flavor-violating Higgs couplings involving the top quark.

  1. Rare And Radiative B Meson Decays From the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, J.; /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Since its start in 1999 the BABAR experiment has collected a vast amount of data. Electron-positron collisions at the energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance have produced about 240 million coherent B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup +}B{sup -} pairs, opening the doors for exploration of rare B meson decays. An overview of the electroweak penguin physics program of BABAR is given, the analysis of two specific decays is presented in detail.

  2. Volume effects in the decay of free radicals in organic crystals. [cobalt 60 gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Markaryan, R.E.; Kovarskii, A.L.; Tshetinin, V.G. )

    1991-09-01

    The decay kinetics of the free radicals produced by {gamma}-irradiation of single crystals of organic dicarboxylic acids is studied at hydrostatic pressures up to 200 MPa. Correlation is established between the reaction's activation parameters (V{sup *} and E{sup *}) and the crystals macrocharacteristics - the compressibility and thermal expansion coefficients. A common equation is proposed to describe the variation of the radical decay rate constant with temperature and pressure in malonic, succinic, adipic, glutaric, suberic, and sebacic acids.

  3. Radiative corrections of O(α ) to B- → V0 ℓ - bar{ν }_{ℓ } decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tostado, S. L.; Castro, G. López

    2016-09-01

    The O(α ) electromagnetic radiative corrections to the B^- → V^0 ℓ ^- bar{ν }_{ℓ } ( V is a vector meson and ℓ a charged lepton) decay rates are evaluated using the cutoff method to regularize virtual corrections and incorporating intermediate resonance states in the real-photon amplitude to extend the region of validity of the soft-photon approximation. The electromagnetic and weak form factors of hadrons are assumed to vary smoothly over the energies of virtual and real photons under consideration. The cutoff dependence of radiative corrections upon the scale Λ that separates the long- and short-distance regimes is found to be mild and is considered as an uncertainty of the calculation. Owing to partial cancellations of electromagnetic corrections evaluated over the three- and four-body regions of phase space, the photon-inclusive corrected rates are found to be dominated by the short-distance contribution. These corrections will be relevant for a precise determination of the b quark mixing angles by testing isospin symmetry when measurements of semileptonic rates of charged and neutral B mesons at the few percent level become available. For completeness, we also provide numerical values of radiative corrections in the three-body region of the Dalitz plot distributions of these decays.

  4. Constraining |V(td)|/|V(ts)| Using Radiative Penguin B -> V(K*/rho/omega)gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ping; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-08

    Exclusive radiative penguin B decays, B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}) and B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}, are flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) processes. Studies of these decays are of special interest in testing Standard Model (SM) predictions and searching for other beyond-the-SM FCNC interactions. Using 89 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR, we measure the branching fraction ({Beta}), CP-asymmetry ({Alpha}), and isospin asymmetry ({Delta}{sub 0-}) of B {yields} (K*{sup 0}/K*{sup +}){gamma} as follows: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma}) = 3.92 {+-} 0.20(stat.) {+-} 0.24(syst.); {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +}{gamma}) = 3.87 {+-} 0.28(stat.) {+-} 0.26(syst.); {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = -0.013 {+-} 0.36(stat.) {+-} 0.10(syst.); {Delta}{sub 0-}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) = 0.050 {+-} 0.045(stat.) {+-} 0.028(syst.) {+-} 0.024(R{sup +/0}). The 90% confidence intervals for the CP-asymmetry and the isospin-asymmetry in the B {yields} K*{gamma} decay are given as: -0.074 < {Alpha}(B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.049, -0.046 < {Delta}{sub 0-} (B {yields} K*{gamma}) < 0.146. We also search for B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma} decays using 211 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs from BABAR. No evidence for these decays is found. We set the upper limits at 90% confidence level for these decays: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{gamma}) < 0.4 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup +}{yields} {rho}{sup =}{gamma}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6}; {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{gamma}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -6}; {bar {Beta}}(B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}){gamma}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -6}. These results are in good agreement with the SM predictions. The branching fractions of these decays are then used to constrain the ratio |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}|.

  5. Radiative capture studies of the electromagnetic decays of highly excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    Selected examples of interesting E1, M1, and E2 resonance studies in (p,..gamma..) and (..cap alpha..,..gamma..) reactions are discussed. These include a unique determination of E1 amplitudes in the /sup 12/C(P,..gamma../sub 0/)/sup 13/N reaction, E2 strength in light nuclei, M1 decays to the ground states and to the excited O/sup +/ states of the doubly magic /sup 16/O and /sup 40/Ca nuclei, second harmonic E1 resonances in (p,..gamma..), and M1 ..gamma..-decay of stretched particle-hole states in /sup 16/O and /sup 28/Si.

  6. Atomic Radiations in the Decay of Medical Radioisotopes: A Physics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B. Q.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Robertson, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    Auger electrons emitted in nuclear decay offer a unique tool to treat cancer cells at the scale of a DNA molecule. Over the last forty years many aspects of this promising research goal have been explored, however it is still not in the phase of serious clinical trials. In this paper, we review the physical processes of Auger emission in nuclear decay and present a new model being developed to evaluate the energy spectrum of Auger electrons, and hence overcome the limitations of existing computations. PMID:22924061

  7. Atomic radiations in the decay of medical radioisotopes: a physics perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, B Q; Kibédi, T; Stuchbery, A E; Robertson, K A

    2012-01-01

    Auger electrons emitted in nuclear decay offer a unique tool to treat cancer cells at the scale of a DNA molecule. Over the last forty years many aspects of this promising research goal have been explored, however it is still not in the phase of serious clinical trials. In this paper, we review the physical processes of Auger emission in nuclear decay and present a new model being developed to evaluate the energy spectrum of Auger electrons, and hence overcome the limitations of existing computations.

  8. Charge-exchange x-ray spectra: Evidence for significant contributions from radiative decays of doubly excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Harris, C. L.; Neill, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Charge-exchange collisions of slow Ne+10 ions with He, Ne, and Ar targets were studied with simultaneous x-ray and cold-target recoil-ion-momentum spectroscopy proving the contribution of several mechanisms to the radiative stabilization of apparent (4,4) doubly excited states for He and Ne targets and of (5,6) states for Ar. In particular, the stabilization efficiency of the mechanism of dynamic auto-transfer to Rydberg states is confirmed. Moreover, we present evidence for direct radiative decays of (4,4) states populated in collisions with He, which is an experimental indication of the population of so-called unnatural-parity states in such collisions. These mechanisms lead to the emission of x-rays that have considerably higher energies than those predicted by current spectral models and may explain recent observations of anomalously large x-ray emission from Rydberg levels.

  9. Theoretical Studies of Photodeactivation Pathways of NHC-Chelate Pt(II) Compounds with Different Numbers of Triarylboron Units: Radiative and Nonradiative Decay Processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengying; Xu, Yanyan; Zhang, Wenting; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2017-01-26

    The radiative and nonradiative decay processes of four platinum(II) complexes chelated with triarylboron (TAB)-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) are investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculation, for probing into the influence of different numbers of TAB on the phosphorescent emission properties. For the radiative decay processes, zero-field splitting energies, radiative rates, and lifetimes are explored, and corresponding factors including transition dipole moments, singlet-triplet splitting energies as well as spin-orbit coupling matrix elements are also analyzed in detail. Additionally, energy-gap law is considered in the temperature-independent nonradiative decay processes; meanwhile, potential energy profiles are obtained to elaborate the temperature-dependent nonradiative decay processes. As a result, radiative rates declined slightly with the increased numbers of TAB. The minimum temperature-independent nonradiative decay may occur in BC-3 due to its smallest structural distortion between S0 and T1 states. According to the potential energy profiles of the deactivation pathways, four investigated phosphors have the similar temperature-dependent nonradiative decay processes because of the incredibly analogous energy barriers. We speculate that it does not mean greater phosphorescent emission and higher phosphorescent quantum yield with more TAB units, which would provide extraordinary assistance for further research in potential phosphors of organic light-emitting diodes.

  10. Novel nonperturbative approach for radiative B¯0(B¯s0)→J /ψ γ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li-Sheng; Oset, Eulogio

    2016-07-01

    Radiative B¯ 0(B¯s 0)→J /ψ γ decays provide an interesting case to test our understanding of (non)perturbative QCD and eventually to probe physics beyond the standard model. Recently, the LHCb Collaboration reported an upper bound, updating the results of the BABAR Collaboration. Previous theoretical predictions based on QCD factorization or perturbative QCD have shown large variations due to different treatment of nonfactorizable contributions and meson-photon transitions. In this paper, we report on a novel approach to estimate the decay rates, which is based on a recently proposed model for B decays and the vector meson dominance hypothesis, widely tested in the relevant energy regions. The predicted branching ratios are Br [B¯ 0→J /ψ γ ]=(3.50 ±0.34-0.63+1.12)×10-8 and Br [B¯s 0→J /ψ γ ]=(7.20 ±0.68-1.30+2.31)×10-7 . The first uncertainty is systematic and the second is statistical, originating from the experimental B¯s 0→J /ψ ϕ branching ratio.

  11. Phenomenological study on the wino radiative decay in anomalous U(1){sup '} models

    SciTech Connect

    Fucito, Francesco; Lionetto, Andrea; Pacifici, Daniel Ricci; Racioppi, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    An extension of the standard model by at least one extra U(1) gauge symmetry has been investigated by many authors. In this paper we explore the possibility that this extra U(1) is anomalous. One possible signature of this model could be given by the photons produced in the decays of the next to lightest supersymmetric particle into the lightest supersymmetric particle.

  12. {eta}{sub b} and {eta}{sub c} radiative decays in the Salpeter model with the AdS/QCD inspired potential

    SciTech Connect

    Giannuzzi, Floriana

    2008-12-01

    The decay constants and the radiative decay widths of {eta}{sub b}(nS) and {eta}{sub c}(nS) are computed within a semirelativistic quark model, using a potential found through the AdS/QCD correspondence. For {eta}{sub c}, the results are in agreement with experimental data, while in the case of {eta}{sub c}{sup '} a discrepancy is found and the possible reasons are discussed.

  13. Radiatively corrected lepton energy distributions in top quark decays t→ bW +→ b( ℓ + ν ℓ ) and t→ bH +→ b( τ + ν τ ) and single-charged prong energy distributions from subsequent τ + decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Kuraev, Eduard A.; Bystritskiy, Yury M.

    2010-06-01

    We calculate the QED and QCD radiative corrections to the charged lepton energy distributions in the dominant semileptonic decays of the top quark t→ bW +→ b( ℓ + ν ℓ ) ( ℓ= e, μ, τ) in the standard model (SM), and for the decay t→ bH +→ b( τ + ν τ ) in an extension of the SM having a charged Higgs boson H ± with m_{H^{±}}decays. As the τ + leptons arising from the decays W +→ τ + ν τ and H +→ τ + ν τ are predominantly left- and right-polarised, respectively, influencing the energy distributions of the decay products in the subsequent decays of the τ +, we work out the effect of the radiative corrections on such distributions in the dominant (one-charged prong) decay channels tau+toπ+bar{ν}_{tau},ρ+bar{ν}_{tau},a1+bar{ν}_{tau} and ell+ν_{ell}bar{ν}_{tau}. The inclusive π + energy spectra in the decay chains tto b(W+,H+)to b(tau+ν_{tau})to b(π+bar{ν}_{tau}ν_{tau}+X) are calculated, which can help in searching for the induced H ± effects at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  14. Radiations emitted in the decay of 165Er: a promising medical radionuclide.

    PubMed

    Rao, D V; Hallee, G J; Ottlinger, M E; Sastry, K S

    1977-01-01

    The 10.3-h 165Er, decaying by electron capture to stable 165Ho, offers an excellent promise for use in diagnostic nuclear medicine, especially in conjunction with multiwire proportional-counter cameras. Using an ultra-high-resolution Si(Li) photon spectrometer, L and K x-ray photon yields in 165Er decay have been measured. The ratio PL/PK of electron-capture probalities in L and K shells is determined to be 0.196+/-0.030, in good agreement with theory. Estimates of Auger electron yields and yields of very-low-energy electrons from Coster-Kronig transitions are presented. Levels of 169Er and 171Er radioactive impurities in the reactor-produced 165Er sample are experimentally determined. Whole-body dose estimates for 165Er are given. These compare favorably with 99mTc dose.

  15. High-energy electrons from the muon decay in orbit: Radiative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Szafron, Robert; Czarnecki, Andrzej

    2015-12-07

    We determine the Ο(α) correction to the energy spectrum of electrons produced in the decay of muons bound in atoms. We focus on the high-energy end of the spectrum that constitutes a background for the muon-electron conversion and will be precisely measured by the upcoming experiments Mu2e and COMET. As a result, the correction suppresses the background by about 20%.

  16. New Measurement of the {pi}{sup 0} Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I.; McNulty, D.; Prok, Y.; Bernstein, A. M.; Kowalski, S.; Clinton, E.; Martel, P.; Miskimen, R.; Wood, M.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Benton, L.; Danagoulian, S.; Demirchyan, R.; Gasparian, A.; Hardy, K.; Mtingwa, S.; Overby, S.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.

    2011-04-22

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9-5.5 GeV to extract the {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The {pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is {Gamma}({pi}{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})=7.82{+-}0.14(stat){+-}0.17(syst) eV. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current Particle Data Group average of this fundamental quantity, and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  17. Corrected Article: "Experimental observation of nonspherically-decaying radiation from a rotating superluminal source" [J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4614 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, A.; Hayes, W.; Singleton, J.; Ardavan, H.; Fopma, J.; Halliday, D.

    2004-12-01

    We describe the experimental implementation of a superluminal (i.e., faster than light in vacuo) polarization current distribution that both oscillates and undergoes centripetal acceleration. Theoretical treatments predict that the radiation emitted by each volume element of the superluminally moving distribution pattern will comprise a Čerenkov-like envelope with two sheets that meet along a cusp. Correspondingly, the emission from the experimental machine is found to be tightly beamed in both the azimuthal and polar directions. The beaming is frequency independent and has a sharply defined and unchanging geometry determined only by the speed and path of the moving distribution pattern, i.e., by the parameters governing the structure of the Čerenkov-like envelopes. In addition, over a restricted range of angles, we detect the presence of cusps in the emitted radiation. These, which are due to the focusing of wave fronts on a propagating space curve, result in the reception, during a short time period, of radiation emitted over a considerably longer period of (retarded) source time. The intensity of the radiation at these angles was observed to decline more slowly with increasing distance from the source than would the emission from a conventional antenna. The angular distribution of the emitted radiation and the properties associated with the cusps are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical models of superluminal sources once the effect of reflections from the earth's surface are taken into account. In particular, the prediction that the beaming and the slow decay should extend into the far zone has been tested to several hundred Fresnel distances (Rayleigh ranges). The excellent agreement between the theoretical calculations and the data suggests that the apparatus achieves precise and reproducible control of the polarization current and that similar machines could be of general interest for studying and utilizing the novel effects associated with

  18. Radiative transfer theory for the fractal structure and power-law decay characteristics of short-period seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Haruo; Fukushima, Rintaro

    2013-12-01

    For short period S-wave seismograms of an earthquake, the maximum amplitude decreases according to a power of traveltime, and the coda amplitude also decreases according to a power of lapse time measured from the earthquake origin time. The radiative transfer theory has been often used for the envelope synthesis of complex seismograms composed of scattered waves due to random heterogeneities in the Earth medium; however, the conventional theory, which supposes uniform distributions of scatterers (heterogeneities) and intrinsic absorbers, predicts that both the ballistic term amplitude and the coda wave amplitude exponentially decrease with time increasing in addition to the geometrical decay. In order to explain their power-law characteristics, this paper proposes the radiative transfer theory for a fractally random and homogeneous distribution of isotropic scatterers and intrinsic absorbers with fractal dimension D ≤ 3 in the 3-D space: the number density of scatterers/absorbers in a sphere of radius r is proportional to rD - 3 for distance r ≫ rc but constant for r ≪ rc, where the corner distance rc is introduced to avoid divergence at a small r. The case of D = 3 corresponds to the conventional uniform distribution. For the case of D = 2, the theory well predicts that the mean square (MS) amplitude of the ballistic-wave decreases according to a power of traveltime and the MS amplitude of coda waves decreases according to a power of lapse time measured from the origin time, where each power is controlled by the scattering coefficient, intrinsic absorption coefficient and corner distance. For the case of D = 1, the ballistic-wave MS amplitude decay is the inverse square of time and the coda decay is much faster. As a preliminary work, fixing D = 2 as a priori choice, we analyse S-seismogram envelopes of a local earthquake in Japan. The case study shows that the radiative transfer theory for a fractal scattering medium is useful for the study of the

  19. On the origin of the pion-decay radiation in the 1982 June 3 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Dermer, C. D.

    1987-01-01

    The June 3, 1982 flare produced a wealth of observed gamma-ray, energetic particle, and neutron emissions. It is shown that the predictions of an interaction model developed for the June 3 flare by Murphy, Dermer, and Ramaty (1987) compare favorably with new data on the time-dependent flux on pion-decay emission from this flare. It is concluded that the particles which produced the bulk of the pions could have the same origin as the particle observed in interplanetary space from the June 3 flare.

  20. Vector-meson-dominance model for radiative decays involving light scalar mesons.

    PubMed

    Black, Deirdre; Harada, Masayasu; Schechter, Joseph

    2002-05-06

    We study a vector-dominance model which predicts quite a large number of currently interesting decay amplitudes of the types S-->gammagamma, V-->Sgamma, and S-->Vgamma, where S and V denote scalar and vector mesons, in terms of three parameters. As an application, the model makes it easy to study in detail a recent proposal to boost the ratio Gamma(phi-->f(0)gamma)/Gamma(phi-->a(0)(0)gamma) by including the isospin violating a(0)(0)-f(0) mixing. However, we find that this effect is actually small in our model.

  1. Solving the Crisis in Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis by the Radiative Decay of an Exotic Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtmann, Erich; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Moroi, Takeo

    1996-10-01

    We discuss a new mechanism which can solve the crisis in standard big-bang nucleosynthesis. A long-lived particle X \\(104 sec<~τX<~106 sec\\) which decays into photon(s) will induce cascade photons, and destroy significant amounts of D and 3He without destroying 4He or too much 7Li. We numerically investigate this process and derive a constraint on the properties of X such that the theoretical values of the primordial light-element abundances agree with observation. We also present some candidates for the unstable particle X.

  2. Recent Results of Bottomonium Spectroscopy in Radiative ϒ(2 S) Decays at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottler, Zachary; Belle Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report on the recent results of a search for ϒ(2 S) ->(b b) γ decays. We characterize the properties of χbJ(1 P) (J = 0 , 1 , 2) mesons, which are reconstructed from 74 hadronic final states containing charged and neutral pions, kaons, protons. In total, we observe 41 modes with a significance at or above 5 σ , many of which are first observations. Our results are based on an integrated luminosity of 24 . 7 fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the Belle detector at the ϒ(2 S) resonance, corresponding to (157 . 8 +/- 3 . 6) ×106 ϒ(2 S) events.

  3. Radiative and semileptonic B decays involving the tensor meson K2*(1430) in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Hisaki; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2009-06-01

    We study semileptonic and radiative B decays involving the strange tensor meson K2*(1430) in the final state. Using the large energy effective theory (LEET) techniques, we formulate the B→K2* transition form factors in large recoil region. All the form factors can be parametrized in terms of two independent LEET functions ζ⊥ and ζ∥. The magnitude of ζ⊥ is estimated from the data for B(B→K2*(1430)γ). Assuming a dipole q2 dependence for the LEET functions and ζ∥/ζ⊥=1.0±0.2, for which the former consists with the QCD counting rules, and the latter is favored by the B→ϕK2* data, we investigate the decays B→K2*ℓ+ℓ- and B→K2*νν¯, where the contributions due to ζ∥ are suppressed by mK2*/mB. For the B→K2*ℓ+ℓ- decay, in the large recoil region where the hadronic uncertainties are considerably reduced, the longitudinal distribution dFL/ds is reduced by 20-30% due to the flipped sign of c7eff compared with the standard model result. Moreover, the forward-backward asymmetry zero is about 3.4GeV2 in the standard model, but changing the sign of c7eff yields a positive asymmetry for all values of the invariant mass of the lepton pair. We calculate the branching fraction for B→K2*νν¯ in the standard model. Our result exhibits the impressed resemblance between B→K2*(1430)ℓ+ℓ-, νν¯, and B→K*(892)ℓ+ℓ-, νν¯.

  4. A New Measurement of {eta}{sub b}(1S) From {Upsilon}(3S) Radiative Decay at CLEO

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Sean

    2010-08-05

    Using CLEO data, we report on the confirmation of the {eta}{sub b}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) ground state of bottomonium in the radiative decay {Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub b} We determine its mass to be M({eta}{sub b}) = 9391.8{+-}6.6{+-}2.1 MeV, which corresponds to the hyperfine splitting {Delta}M{sub hf}(1S) = 68.5{+-}6.6{+-}2.0 MeV, and the branching fraction B({Upsilon}(3S){gamma}{eta}{sub b}) = (7.1{+-}1.8{+-}1.1)x10{sup -4}. These results agree with those previously reported by BaBar.

  5. Measurement of inclusive radiative B-meson decays with a photon energy threshold of 1.7 GeV.

    PubMed

    Limosani, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Belous, K; Bischofberger, M; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Drutskoy, A; Dungel, W; Eidelman, S; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Ha, H; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Julius, T; Kah, D H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y I; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Korpar, S; Kreps, M; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kwon, Y-J; Kyeong, S-H; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Liu, C; Liventsev, D; Louvot, R; Matyja, A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Piilonen, L E; Rozanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shiu, J-G; Singh, J B; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamamoto, H; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A

    2009-12-11

    Using 605 fb(-1) of data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance we present a measurement of the inclusive radiative B-meson decay channel, B-->X(s)gamma. For the lower photon energy thresholds of 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, and 2.0 GeV, as defined in the rest frame of the B meson, we measure the partial branching fraction and the mean and variance of the photon energy spectrum. At the 1.7 GeV threshold we obtain the partial branching fraction BF(B-->X(s)}gamma)=(3.45+/-0.15+/-0.40)x10(-4), where the errors are statistical and systematic.

  6. Measurements of the production of P-wave charmonium states through radiative decays at the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcisovsky, Michal

    2014-04-01

    The production cross sections of the χc1 and χc2 charmonium states are measured in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV using 4.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The χc states are reconstructed via the radiative decay χc → J/ψ(μ+μ-)γ, where the photons are reconstructed using γ → e+ e- conversion in the detector material. Differential production cross sections for prompt and non-prompt χc1,2 are presented, as well as the fraction of inclusive J/ψ produced by feed-down from the χc states. The results are compared with a range of theoretical predictions. The branching fraction of ℬ (B+ → χc1K+) is measured using the same dataset and χc event selection.

  7. Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B-Meson Decays with a Photon Energy Threshold of 1.7 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limosani, A.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Dungel, W.; Eidelman, S.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Kreps, M.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matyja, A.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mori, T.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rozanska, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Ushiroda, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.

    2009-12-01

    Using 605fb-1 of data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance we present a measurement of the inclusive radiative B-meson decay channel, B→Xsγ. For the lower photon energy thresholds of 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, and 2.0 GeV, as defined in the rest frame of the B meson, we measure the partial branching fraction and the mean and variance of the photon energy spectrum. At the 1.7 GeV threshold we obtain the partial branching fraction BF(B→Xsγ)=(3.45±0.15±0.40)×10-4, where the errors are statistical and systematic.

  8. Roles of Interfering Radiation Emitted from Decaying Pulses Obeying Soliton Equations Belonging to the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Hironobu; Yajima, Tetsu

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation under the box-type initial condition, which models general multiple pulses deviating from pure solitons, is analyzed. Following the approximation by splitting the initial pulse into many small bins [G. Boffetta and A. R. Osborne, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0021-9991(92)90370-E, J. Comp. Phys. 102, 252 (1992)], we can analyze the Zakharov-Shabat eigenvalue problem to construct transfer matrices connecting the Jost functions in each interval without direct numerical computation. We can obtain analytical expressions for the scattering data that describe interfering radiation emitted from initial pulses. The number of solitons that appear in the final stage is predicted theoretically, and the condition generating an unusual wave such as a double-pole soliton is derived. Numerical analyses under box-type initial conditions are also performed to show that the interplay between the tails from decaying pulses can affect the asymptotic profile.

  9. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S) -> gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2009-06-02

    The fundamental nature of mass is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. The Higgs mechanism is a theoretically appealing way to account for the different masses of elementary particles and implies the existence of a new, yet unseen particle, the Higgs boson. We search for evidence of a light scalar (e.g. a Higgs boson) in the radiative decays of the narrow {Upsilon}(3S) resonance: {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such an object appears in extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction product {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) at (0.25 - 5.2) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range 0.212 {<=} m{sub A{sup 0}} {<=} 9.3 GeV. We also set a limit on the dimuon branching fraction of the {eta}{sub b} meson {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.8% at 90% C.L. The results are preliminary.

  10. Observation of D0→ρ0γ and Search for C P Violation in Radiative Charm Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanut, T.; Zupanc, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Biswal, J.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kaliyar, A. B.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kulasiri, R.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moon, H. K.; Nakao, M.; Nath, K. J.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prasanth, K.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Stypula, J.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uno, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Widmann, E.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yelton, J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Belle Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We report the first observation of the radiative charm decay D0→ρ0γ and the first search for C P violation in decays D0→ρ0γ , ϕ γ , and K¯ *0 (892 )γ , using a data sample of 943 fb-1 collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The branching fraction is measured to be B (D0→ρ0γ ) =(1.77 ±0.30 ±0.07 )×10-5 , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The obtained C P asymmetries AC P(D0→ρ0γ ) =+0.056 ±0.152 ±0.006 , AC P(D0→ϕ γ ) =-0.094 ±0.066 ±0.001 , and AC P(D0→K¯ *0γ ) =-0.003 ±0.020 ±0.000 are consistent with no C P violation. We also present an improved measurement of the branching fractions B (D0→ϕ γ ) =(2.76 ±0.19 ±0.10 )×10-5 and B (D0→K¯ *0γ ) =(4.66 ±0.21 ±0.21 )×10-4 .

  11. Observation of D^{0}→ρ^{0}γ and Search for CP Violation in Radiative Charm Decays.

    PubMed

    Nanut, T; Zupanc, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Al Said, S; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Behera, P; Bhardwaj, V; Biswal, J; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dash, N; Di Carlo, S; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Iwasaki, Y; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kaliyar, A B; Kang, K H; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kulasiri, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Li, C H; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lubej, M; Masuda, M; Matsuda, T; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moon, H K; Nakao, M; Nath, K J; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C-S; Park, C W; Park, H; Paul, S; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Prasanth, K; Pulvermacher, C; Rauch, J; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seino, Y; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Strube, J F; Stypula, J; Sumiyoshi, T; Takizawa, M; Tamponi, U; Tenchini, F; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uno, S; Ushiroda, Y; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Widmann, E; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yelton, J; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhukova, V; Zhulanov, V

    2017-02-03

    We report the first observation of the radiative charm decay D^{0}→ρ^{0}γ and the first search for CP violation in decays D^{0}→ρ^{0}γ, ϕγ, and K[over ¯]^{*0}(892)γ, using a data sample of 943  fb^{-1} collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^{+}e^{-} collider. The branching fraction is measured to be B(D^{0}→ρ^{0}γ)=(1.77±0.30±0.07)×10^{-5}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The obtained CP asymmetries A_{CP}(D^{0}→ρ^{0}γ)=+0.056±0.152±0.006, A_{CP}(D^{0}→ϕγ)=-0.094±0.066±0.001, and A_{CP}(D^{0}→K[over ¯]^{*0}γ)=-0.003±0.020±0.000 are consistent with no CP violation. We also present an improved measurement of the branching fractions B(D^{0}→ϕγ)=(2.76±0.19±0.10)×10^{-5} and B(D^{0}→K[over ¯]^{*0}γ)=(4.66±0.21±0.21)×10^{-4}.

  12. Measurement of the rate of charm quark pairs produced by radiated gluons in hadronic Z decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyangkyu

    1998-11-01

    We have measured the probability of gluon splitting to charm quark pairs using 1.7 million hadronic Z decays collected in 1994 and 1995 at the L3 detector. Although this process, gluon splitting to charm quark pairs, is one of the basic processes in QCD, it has not been well understood both theoretically and experimentally. Furthermore, the limited knowledge of this process is one of the biggest sources of error in the measurement of the fraction of Z decays to bottom quark pairs (Rb). For this measurement, we have applied two methods to events with a three-jet event topology. One method. relies on tagging charm hadrons by identifying a lepton in the lowest energy jet. Another method uses a neural network technique for identifying events containing gluon splitting into charm quark pairs. Though the first method provides a simple way to tag a charm quark, it is limited by statistics. The second method improves the statistical accuracy by utilizing the entire hadronic event sample. Combining both methods, we measure the average number of gluons splitting into charm quark pairs per hadronic event to be overlinenoverlineg-->coverlinecoverline =(2.22+/-0.18+/-0.44) %. We performed a combined fit with this result and other existing measurements of overlinenoverlineg-->coverlinecoverline at LEP experiments. The result allows a stringent test of various QCD models and reduces the single biggest source of systematic error in the measurement of Rb.

  13. Investigation of internal bremsstrahlung radiation accompanying forbidden β-decay of 169Er and 170Tm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, E. I.

    2011-06-01

    The internal bremsstrahlung (IB) spectrum accompanying the β-decay of the first forbidden β-transitions of 169Er and 170Tm is studied. The IB was measured using a scintillation γ-spectrometer. It was analyzed by the variable width peeling-off-method, and then corrected by applying the proper corrections. The analyzed and corrected IB spectrum was compared with those calculated according to the original theories of Knipp and Uhlenbeck (1936) as well as of Bloch (1936) (KUB), the coulomb corrected theory of Nilsson (1956), Lewis and Ford (1957), and detour transitions of Ford and Martin (1969). Also, a new trial was carried out by applying the shape correction factor C1 of the first forbidden β-transition suggested by Konopinski and Uhlenbeck (1935, 1941) on the Fermi β-decay theory to the calculated IB based on Nilsson's theory. It is called modified KUB (M.KUB). The experimental results are in a good agreement with the theoretical calculations of forbidden β-transition of Ford and Martin (1969), and M.KUB. It is observed that the Coloumb contribution into IB spectrum is larger for lower β-endpoint energies in case of the sources of same Coulomb charge ( Z) and different β-endpoint energies.

  14. Weak radiative pion vertex in τ-→π-ντℓ+ℓ- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, P.; Guevara, A.; López Castro, G.

    2013-08-01

    We carry out a detailed study of the branching fractions and lepton-pair invariant-mass spectrum of τ-→π-ντℓ+ℓ- decays (ℓ=e, μ). In addition to the model-independent (QED) contributions, we include the structure-dependent (SD) terms, which encode information on the hadronization of QCD currents. The form factors describing the SD contributions are evaluated by supplementing Chiral Perturbation Theory with the inclusion of the lightest multiplet of spin-1 resonances as active degrees of freedom. The Lagrangian couplings have been determined by demanding the known QCD short-distance behavior to the relevant Green functions and associated form factors in the limit where the number of colors goes to infinity. As a result, we predict BR(τ-→π-ντe+e-)=(1.7-0.3+1.1)×10-5 and BR(τ-→π-ντμ+μ-)∈[0.03,1.0]×10-5. According to this, the first decay could be measured in the near future, which is not granted for the second one.

  15. Astrophysical data on 5 eV to 1 keV radiation from the radiative decay of fundamental particles - Current limits and prospects for improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Malina, Roger F.

    1986-01-01

    Line emission from the decay of fundamental particles, integrated over cosmological distances, can give rise to detectable spectral features in the diffuse astronomical background between 5 eV and 1 keV. Spectroscopic observations may allow these features to be separated from line emission from the numerous local sources of radiation. The current observational status and existing evidence for such features are reviewed. No definitive detections of nongalactic line features have been made. Several local sources of background mask the features at many wavelengths and confuse the interpretation of the data. No systematic spectral observations have been carried out to date. Upcoming experiments which can be expected to provide significantly better constraints on the presence of spectral features in the diffuse background from 5 eV to 1 keV are reviewed.

  16. The Radiative Decay of Green and Red Photoluminescent Phosphors: An Undergraduate Kinetics Experiment for Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory experiment that allows the students to investigate the radiative properties of the green and red emitting phosphors that are employed in commercial fluorescent lamps. Making use of a spectrofluorometer, students first record the emission spectrum of a fluorescent lamp under normal operating conditions, and then…

  17. The Radiative Decay of Green and Red Photoluminescent Phosphors: An Undergraduate Kinetics Experiment for Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory experiment that allows the students to investigate the radiative properties of the green and red emitting phosphors that are employed in commercial fluorescent lamps. Making use of a spectrofluorometer, students first record the emission spectrum of a fluorescent lamp under normal operating conditions, and then…

  18. Photogenerated excitons in plain core CdSe nanocrystals with unity radiative decay in single channel: the effects of surface and ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Peng, Xiaogang

    2015-04-01

    A systematic and reproducible method was developed to study the decay dynamics of an exciton, a photogenerated electron-hole pair, in semiconductor nanocrystals in solution. Results revealed that the excitons in plain core CdSe nanocrystals in either zinc-blende or wurtzite or mixed lattice structures could be reproducibly prepared to decay radiatively in unity quantum yield and in single channel. The single-channel lifetime was found to increase monotonically by increasing size of the CdSe nanocrystals, with zinc-blende ones increasing in a relatively slow pace. Surface inorganic stoichiometry was found to be a sensitive parameter to affect the exciton decay dynamics for all crystal structures with different sizes. Excess Se (Cd) sites on the surface were found to induce short (long) lifetime channels for the excitons. Both types of traps reduced the quantum yield of the radiative decay of the excitons, and the hole traps associated with Se sites were nearly not emissive. With optimal surface inorganic stoichiometry, primary amines were identified as "ideal" organic ligands for CdSe core nanocrystals to achieve unity radiative decay of excitons in single channel in comparison to other types of neutral ligands commonly applied in the field.

  19. Comprehensive Bayesian analysis of rare (semi)leptonic and radiative [Formula: see text] decays.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, Frederik; Bobeth, Christoph; van Dyk, Danny

    The available data on [Formula: see text] decays are in good agreement with the Standard Model when permitting subleading power corrections of about [Formula: see text] at large hadronic recoil. Constraining new-physics effects in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], the data still demand the same size of power corrections as in the Standard Model. In the presence of chirality-flipped operators, all but one of the power corrections reduce substantially. The Bayes factors are in favor of the Standard Model. Using new lattice inputs for [Formula: see text] form factors and under our minimal prior assumption for the power corrections, the favor shifts toward models with chirality-flipped operators. We use the data to further constrain the hadronic form factors in [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] transitions.

  20. Observation of chicJ radiative decays to light vector mesons.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J V; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tan, B J Y; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Martin, L; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Mendez, H; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J

    2008-10-10

    Using a total of 2.74 x 10(7) decays of the psi(2S) collected with the CLEO-c detector, we present a study of chi(cJ)-->gammaV, where V=rho(0), omega, phi. The transitions chi(c1)-->gammarho(0 and chi(c1)-->gammaomega are observed with B(chi(c1)-->gammarho(0))=(2.43+/-0.19+/-0.22) x 10(-4) and B(chi(c1)-->gammaomega)=(8.3+/-1.5+/-1.2) x 10(-5). In the chi(c1)-->gammarho(0) transition, the final state meson is dominantly longitudinally polarized. Upper limits on the branching fractions of other chi(cJ) states to light vector mesons are presented.

  1. Exclusive radiative Higgs decays as probes of light-quark Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Matthias; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the rare exclusive Higgs boson decays into a single vector meson and a photon and investigate the possibility of using these processes to probe the light-quark Yukawa couplings. We work with an effective Lagrangian with modified Higgs couplings to account for possible new-physics effects in a model-independent way. The h → Vγ decay rate is governed by the destructive interference of two amplitudes, one of which involves the Higgs coupling to the quark anti-quark pair inside the vector meson. We derive this amplitude at next-to-leading order in α s using QCD factorization, including the resummation of large logarithmic corrections and accounting for the effects of flavor mixing. The high factorization scale μ ˜ m h ensures that our results are rather insensitive to the hadronic parameters characterizing the light-cone distribution amplitude of the vector meson. The second amplitude arises from the loop-induced effective hγγ * and hγZ * couplings, where the off-shell gauge boson converts into the vector meson. We devise a strategy to eliminate theoretical uncertainties related to this amplitude to almost arbitrary precision. This opens up the possibility to probe for modifications of the c- and b-quark Yukawa couplings and modifications of the s-quark Yukawa coupling in the high-luminosity LHC run. In particular, we show that measurements of the ratios Br( h → Υ( nS) γ)/Br( h → γγ) and can provide complementary information on the real and imaginary parts of the b-quark Yukawa coupling. More accurate measurements would be possible at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider.

  2. Analysis of the vertices {Omega}{sub Q}*{Omega}{sub Q{phi}} and radiative decays {Omega}{sub Q}*{yields}{Omega}{sub Q{gamma}}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhigang

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we study the vertices {Omega}{sub Q}*{Omega}{sub Q{phi}} with the light-cone QCD sum rules, then assume the vector meson dominance of the intermediate {phi}(1020), and calculate the radiative decays {Omega}{sub Q}*{yields}{Omega}{sub Q{gamma}}.

  3. Self-consistent solitons for vacuum decay in radiatively generated potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Millington, Peter

    2015-12-01

    We use a Green's function approach in order to develop a method for calculating the tunneling rate between radiatively generated nondegenerate vacua. We apply this to a model that exhibits spontaneous symmetry breaking via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, where we determine the self-consistent tunneling configuration and illustrate the impact of gradient effects that arise from accounting for the underlying space-time inhomogeneity.

  4. Reply to Comments on ``Generation of focused, nonspherically decaying pulses of electromagnetic radiation''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, H.

    2000-08-01

    The criticism made by Hannay [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. E 62, 3008 (2000)] is unfounded since the steps, familiar from the subluminal regime, that are taken in his argument are not mathematically permissible when the distribution pattern of the source is moving and has volume elements that approach the observer with the speed of light and zero acceleration along the radiation direction. In the superluminal regime, the retarded time is a multivalued function of the observation time and so the retarded potential for the radiation from a localized source cannot be represented, as Hannay assumes, by an integral over all space whose integrand entails a differentiable retarded distribution of the source density. Contrary to what is claimed by Hewish [Comment in this issue, Phys. Rev. E 62, 3007 (2000)], moreover, there is no discrepancy between conventional antenna theory and the analysis that appears in Phys. Rev. E 58, 6659 (1998). The characteristics of the new type of emission predicted by this analysis, and received from pulsars, differ from those of the radiation that is produced by known leaky waveguides because there are at present no antennas in which the emitting electric current is both volume-distributed and has the time dependence of a traveling wave with an accelerated superluminal motion.

  5. Reply to comments on "Generation of focused, nonspherically decaying pulses of electromagnetic radiation"

    PubMed

    Ardavan

    2000-08-01

    The criticism made by Hannay [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. E 62, 3008 (2000)] is unfounded since the steps, familiar from the subluminal regime, that are taken in his argument are not mathematically permissible when the distribution pattern of the source is moving and has volume elements that approach the observer with the speed of light and zero acceleration along the radiation direction. In the superluminal regime, the retarded time is a multivalued function of the observation time and so the retarded potential for the radiation from a localized source cannot be represented, as Hannay assumes, by an integral over all space whose integrand entails a differentiable retarded distribution of the source density. Contrary to what is claimed by Hewish [Comment in this issue, Phys. Rev. E 62, 3007 (2000)], moreover, there is no discrepancy between conventional antenna theory and the analysis that appears in Phys. Rev. E 58, 6659 (1998). The characteristics of the new type of emission predicted by this analysis, and received from pulsars, differ from those of the radiation that is produced by known leaky waveguides because there are at present no antennas in which the emitting electric current is both volume-distributed and has the time dependence of a traveling wave with an accelerated superluminal motion.

  6. Search for a light C P -odd Higgs boson in radiative decays of J /ψ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. Y.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the fully reconstructed decay chain of J /ψ →γ A0 , A0→μ+μ- using (225.0 ±2.8 )×106 J /ψ events collected by the BESIII experiment. The A0 is a hypothetical C P -odd light Higgs boson predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model including two spin-0 doublets plus an extra singlet. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B (J /ψ →γ A0)×B (A0→μ+μ-) in the range of (2.8 - 495.3 )×10-8 for 0.212 ≤mA0≤3.0 GeV /c2 . The new limits are five times below our previous results, and the nature of the A0 is constrained to be mostly singlet.

  7. Test of the linear-NO threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis for inhaled radon decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1995-02-01

    Data on lung cancer mortality rates vs. average radon concentration in homes for 1,601 U.S. counties are used to test the linear-no threshold theory. The widely recognized problems with ecological studies, as applied to this work, are addressed extensively. With or without corrections for variations in smoking prevalence, there is a strong tendency for lung cancer rates to decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase expected from the theory. The discrepancy in slope is about 20 standard deviations. It is shown that uncertainties in lung cancer rates, radon exposures, and smoking prevalence are not important and that confounding by 54 socioeconomic factors, by geography, and by altitude and climate can explain only a small fraction of the discrepancy. Effects of known radon-smoking prevalence correlations-rural people have higher radon levels and smoke less than urban people, and smokers are exposed to less radon than non-smokers-are calculated and found to be trivial. In spite of extensive efforts, no potential explanation for the discrepancy other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory for carcinogenesis from inhaled radon decay products could be found. 46 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Radiative decay engineering 5: metal-enhanced fluorescence and plasmon emission

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic particles and surfaces display diverse and complex optical properties. Examples include the intense colors of noble metal colloids, surface plasmon resonance absorption by thin metal films, and quenching of excited fluorophores near the metal surfaces. Recently, the interactions of fluorophores with metallic particles and surfaces (metals) have been used to obtain increased fluorescence intensities, to develop assays based on fluorescence quenching by gold colloids, and to obtain directional radiation from fluorophores near thin metal films. For metal-enhanced fluorescence it is difficult to predict whether a particular metal structure, such as a colloid, fractal, or continuous surface, will quench or enhance fluorescence. In the present report we suggest how the effects of metals on fluorescence can be explained using a simple concept, based on radiating plasmons (RPs). The underlying physics may be complex but the concept is simple to understand. According to the RP model, the emission or quenching of a fluorophore near the metal can be predicted from the optical properties of the metal structures as calculated from electrodynamics, Mie theory, and/or Maxwell’s equations. For example, according to Mie theory and the size and shape of the particle, the extinction of metal colloids can be due to either absorption or scattering. Incident energy is dissipated by absorption. Far-field radiation is created by scattering. Based on our model small colloids are expected to quench fluorescence because absorption is dominant over scattering. Larger colloids are expected to enhance fluorescence because the scattering component is dominant over absorption. The ability of a metal’s surface to absorb or reflect light is due to wavenumber matching requirements at the metal–sample interface. Wavenumber matching considerations can also be used to predict whether fluorophores at a given distance from a continuous planar surface will be emitted or quenched. These

  9. Angular distributions in the radiative decays of the state of charmonium originating from polarized collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Ping; Mok, Alex W. K.; Sit, Wai-Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using the helicity formalism, we calculate the combined angular distribution function of the two gamma photons ( and ) and the electron () in the triple cascade process , when and are arbitrarily polarized. We also derive six different partially integrated angular distribution functions which give the angular distributions of one or two particles in the final state. Our results show that by measuring the two-particle angular distribution of and and that of and , one can determine the relative magnitudes as well as the relative phases of all the helicity amplitudes in the two charmonium radiative transitions and.

  10. Measurement of the Radiative Decay Width of the Positive Rho Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, Joey Walter

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the coherent reaction $\\pi^+ + (A,Z) \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^0 + (A,Z)$ on three nuclear targets (carbon, copper and lead) at an incident momentum of 200 GeV. The mass spectrum was found to be dominated by $p^+$ production. A fit was performed on the line shape of the $p^+$ and the values of 770 MeV for the mass and 150 MeV for the total width were found. The t distributions were analyzed allowing a small amount of hadronic production to interfere with the dominant electromagnetic production of the $p^+$. A new value for the radiative width , $\\Gamma(p^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\gamma$), of 60 ± 4 KeV was extracted. This value is in reasonable agreement with that expected from VDM, SU(3) and non-relativistic quark model arguments. -

  11. Modeling of Iron K Lines: Radiative and Auger Decay Data for Fe II-Fe IX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeri, P.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the radiative and Auger de-excitation channels of K-shell vacancy states in Fe II-Fe IX has been carried out. Level energies, wavelengths, A-values, Auger rates and fluorescence yields have been calculated for the lowest fine-structure levels populated by photoionization of the ground state of the parent ion. Different branching ratios, namely K alpha 2/K alpha 1, K beta/K alpha, KLM/KLL, KMM/KLL, and the total K-shell fluorescence yields, omega(sub k), obtained in the present work have been compared with other theoretical data and solid-state measurements, finding good general agreement with the latter. The Kalpha 2/K alpha l ratio is found to be sensitive to the excitation mechanism. From these comparisons it has been possible to estimate an accuracy of approx.10% for the present transition probabilities.

  12. Modeling of iron K lines: Radiative and Auger decay data for Fe II-Fe IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, P.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.; Meléndez, M.

    2003-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the radiative and Auger de-excitation channels of K-shell vacancy states in Fe II-Fe IX has been carried out. Level energies, wavelengths, A-values, Auger rates and fluorescence yields have been calculated for the lowest fine-structure levels populated by photoionization of the ground state of the parent ion. Different branching ratios, namely Kalpha2 /Kalpha1, Kbeta/Kalpha, KLM/KLL, KMM/KLL, and the total K-shell fluorescence yields, omegaK, obtained in the present work have been compared with other theoretical data and solid-state measurements, finding good general agreement with the latter. The Kalpha2/Kalpha1 ratio is found to be sensitive to the excitation mechanism. From these comparisons it has been possible to estimate an accuracy of ~ 10% for the present transition probabilities. Tables 3 and 4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/410/359

  13. Updated Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Predictions for the Weak Radiative B-Meson Decays.

    PubMed

    Misiak, M; Asatrian, H M; Boughezal, R; Czakon, M; Ewerth, T; Ferroglia, A; Fiedler, P; Gambino, P; Greub, C; Haisch, U; Huber, T; Kamiński, M; Ossola, G; Poradziński, M; Rehman, A; Schutzmeier, T; Steinhauser, M; Virto, J

    2015-06-05

    Weak radiative decays of the B mesons belong to the most important flavor changing processes that provide constraints on physics at the TeV scale. In the derivation of such constraints, accurate standard model predictions for the inclusive branching ratios play a crucial role. In the current Letter we present an update of these predictions, incorporating all our results for the O(α_{s}^{2}) and lower-order perturbative corrections that have been calculated after 2006. New estimates of nonperturbative effects are taken into account, too. For the CP- and isospin-averaged branching ratios, we find B_{sγ}=(3.36±0.23)×10^{-4} and B_{dγ}=(1.73_{-0.22}^{+0.12})×10^{-5}, for E_{γ}>1.6 GeV. Both results remain in agreement with the current experimental averages. Normalizing their sum to the inclusive semileptonic branching ratio, we obtain R_{γ}≡(B_{sγ}+B_{dγ})/B_{cℓν}=(3.31±0.22)×10^{-3}. A new bound from B_{sγ} on the charged Higgs boson mass in the two-Higgs-doublet-model II reads M_{H^{±}}>480 GeV at 95% C.L.

  14. High-energy positrons and gamma radiation from decaying constituents of a two-component dark atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, K.; Khlopov, M.; Kouvaris, C.; Laletin, M.

    2015-09-01

    We study a two-component dark matter candidate inspired by the minimal walking technicolor (WTC) model. Dark matter consists of a dominant strongly interactive massive particle (SIMP)-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context, a metastable technibaryon that decays to e+e+, μ+μ+ and τ+τ+ can, in principle, explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that there is a small range of parameter space that this scenario can be realized under certain conditions regarding the cosmic ray propagation and the final state radiation (FSR). This range of parameters fall inside the region where the current run of large hadron collider (LHC) can probe, and therefore it will soon be possible to either verify or exclude conclusively this model of dark matter.

  15. Radiative decays of radially excited mesons {pi}{sup 0'}, {rho}{sup 0'}, and {omega}{sup '} in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuraev, E. A.; Volkov, M. K.; Arbuzov, A. B.

    2010-12-15

    Radiative decays {pi}{sup 0}({pi}{sup 0'}){yields}{gamma}+{gamma}, {pi}{sup 0'{yields}{rho}0}({omega})+{gamma}, {rho}{sup 0'}({omega}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sup 0}+{gamma}, and {rho}{sup 0'}({omega}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sup 0'}+{gamma} are considered in the framework of the SU(2)xSU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. Radially excited mesons are described with the help of a simple polynomial form factor. In spite of mixing of the ground and excited meson states in this model, the decay widths of {pi}{sup 0{yields}{gamma}}+{gamma} and {rho}{sup 0}({omega}){yields}{pi}{sup 0}+{gamma} are found to be in good agreement with experimental data, as in the standard NJL model. Our predictions for decay widths of radially excited mesons can be verified in future experiments.

  16. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of charged and neutral baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Manriquez, J. J. Torres; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Garcia, A.

    2008-07-02

    Because of the near future work of the NA48 experimental group, we have calculated the radiative corrections (RC) to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers the two cases, charged and neutral decaying baryons, and it is restricted to the so called three body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the c.m. frame of the emitted baryon. We consider terms up to ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglect terms of the order ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup n}, n = 1,2,.... The analytical expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis.

  17. Measurements of radiative-decay rates of the 2s22p(2P°)-2s2p2(4P) intersystem transitions of C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Wang, Jiebing; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-08-01

    The radiative-decay rates of the 2s22p(2P0)-2s2p2(4P) intersystem transitions of C+ ions have been measured by recording the time dependence of the ~233-nm emission. A cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap was used to store electron-impact-produced C+ ions. The time-dependent signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative-decay rates to the ground term are 146.4(+8.3,-9.2) s-1 for 4P1/2, 11.6(+0.8,-1.7) s-1 for 4P3/2, and 51.2(+2.6,-3.5) s-1 for 4P5/2. Comparison of the measured values with theoretical values is presented.

  18. Measurement of the radiative and nonradiative decay rates of single CdSe nanocrystals through a controlled modification of their spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Brokmann, X; Coolen, L; Dahan, M; Hermier, J P

    2004-09-03

    We present a simple method to measure the radiative and nonradiative recombination rates of individual fluorescent emitters at room temperature. By placing a single molecule successively close and far from a dielectric interface and simultaneously measuring its photoluminescence decay and its orientation, both the radiative and nonradiative recombination rates can be determined. For CdSe nanocrystals, our results demonstrate that the fluorescence quantum efficiency, determined at the single-molecule level, is 98% in average, far above the value expected from conventional ensemble experiments. The bidimensional nature of the transition dipole is also directly evidenced from a single-particle measurement.

  19. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  20. Decay of S‐wave amplitudes with distance for earthquakes in the Charlevoix, Quebec, area: Effects of radiation pattern and directivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The decay of the Fourier spectral amplitudes of S waves over distances of 10–80 km near Charlevoix, Quebec, was determined using waveforms from seven earthquakes with MN 3.3–5.4. The S‐wave spectral amplitudes were corrected for site response and source amplitude by normalizing the coda‐wave spectrum at a fixed time after the origin time. The amplitude decay with distance was found to be less steep as the frequency increases from 1 to 14, contrary to what would be expected from anelastic and scattering attenuation for a point source with an isotropic radiation pattern. The decay at 14 Hz indicates that the geometrical spreading at distances less than 80 km is less steep than R−1.05. The steeper distance decay of the low‐frequency spectrum appears to be an artifact of the radiation pattern and rupture directivity, which affect the low‐frequency amplitude more than the high frequency. Synthetic seismograms were made for a horizontally layered crust for the Mw 4.6 Rivière du Loup earthquake and an Mw 3.3 event. The decay with distance of the 1 Hz spectral amplitudes of the synthetics is similar to that observed for the Rivière du Loup earthquake, indicating that radiation pattern and rupture directivity are important factors in determining the attenuation with distance at 1 Hz. For the Mw 3.3 earthquake, the distance decay of the 1 Hz spectral amplitudes was found to be sensitive to the focal mechanism. This study demonstrates that estimates of geometrical spreading made using 1 Hz amplitudes can be contaminated by radiation pattern and directivity effects and may not be applicable for constructing ground‐motion prediction equations for sources with other focal mechanisms and rupture behavior.

  1. Massive Neutrino Decay Driven Radiative Instabilities, Sub-Structure Survival in Galaxy Clusters and a Nested - Particle-Mesh Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, Randall John

    1995-01-01

    I have performed a series of studies concerning the clustering of mass on large scales in the universe, with the goal being an increased understanding of the role of various processes in the formation of structure in the universe. One of the first dark matter candidates was the massive neutrino. In this section I investigate the role of a radiative decay mode for a massive neutrino species, and its impact on structure formation. By reviving a concept known as "mock gravity" I attempt to provide seed masses for eventual galaxy formation in a Hot Dark Matter universe. I show that mock gravity is ineffective at generating seed masses for galaxy formation; the ionization rate is too large and the universe becomes fully ionized well before the radiation pressure can have any effect on the clumping of matter. The final section of this thesis presents a series of N-body experiments which are aimed at understanding the theoretical sources of substructure in galaxy clusters. I perform a series of simulations using a variety of power law initial conditions to generate our cluster data sets. From there I use the statistical methods developed by Bird to analyze the subsequent survival of the sub-structures. I find that for a high omega universe that a significant number of clusters should exhibit sub-structure for very long periods of time after their formation. To test whether the sub-structure results are dependent upon the resolution of the N-body code I develop a nested-grid code for use in performing high resolution studies of gravitational instability. In the next section I present an N-body code which features a nested-grid technology. This nested-grid method allows me to extend both the force and mass resolution of a traditional particle-mesh type code. This code will prove extremely useful for studying problems in large-scale structure formation where one is focusing on highly non -linear objects, and hence force and mass resolution are at a premium. In this chapter I

  2. A comparison of radiative capture with decay gamma-ray method in bore hole logging for economic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.

    1972-01-01

    The recent availability of borehole logging sondes employing a source of neutrons and a Ge(Li) detector opens up the possibility of analyzing either decay or capture gamma rays. The most efficient method for a given element can be predicted by calculating the decay-to-capture count ratio for the most prominent peaks in the respective spectra. From a practical point of view such a calculation must be slanted toward short irradiation and count times at each station in a borehole. A simplified method of computation is shown, and the decay-to-capture count ratio has been calculated and tabulated for the optimum value in the decay mode irrespective of the irradiation time, and also for a ten minute irradiation time. Based on analysis of a single peak in each spectrum, the results indicate the preferred technique and the best decay or capture peak to observe for those elements of economic interest. ?? 1972.

  3. Radiative decay rate of a quantum well exciton in a semiconductor microcavity: Cross-over behavior of exciton- and cavity-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odani, Kensuke; Ohfuti, Yasushi; Cho, Kikuo

    1993-08-01

    A cross-over behavior was found between microcavity (MC) mode and quantum well (QW)-exciton mode as a function of parallel wave vector k for a QW in a MC, i.e., a 2D structure consisting of two sets of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) with a QW at the center of them. The radiative widths of the two modes were calculated as functions of k, the layer number of DBR, and the non-radiative width of the QW-exciton. The radiative decay rate of the QW-exciton mode shows a remarkable enhancement at a critical value of k, which is determined by the relative frequencies of the "empty" MC and "bare" QW-exciton modes. The cross-over behavior is the result of the excessive mixing of the two modes.

  4. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss̄ in the radiative decays of Υ(1S)

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2013-08-06

    We search for the decay Υ(1S)→γA⁰, A⁰→gg or ss̄, where A⁰ is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10⁶ Υ(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e⁺e⁻→Υ(2S)→π⁺π⁻Υ(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→γA⁰)·B(A⁰→gg or ss̄) ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10⁻² for A⁰ masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  5. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss¯ in the radiative decays of Υ(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-08-01

    We search for the decay Υ(1S)→γA0, A0→gg or ss¯, where A0 is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×106 Υ(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e+e-→Υ(2S)→π+π-Υ(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S)→γA0)·B(A0→ggorss¯) ranging from 10-6 to 10-2 for A0 masses in the range 0.5-9.0GeV/c2.

  6. The Observation of the Weak Radiative Hyperon Decay Ξ°→Λ°π°γ at KTeV/E799, Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Huican

    2005-01-01

    The large sample of Ξ° hyperons available at KTeV 799 provides an opportunity to search for the Weak Radiative Hyperon Decay Ξ° → Λ°π°γ. We present a branching fraction measurement of Ξ° → Λ°π°γ based on the E799-II experiment data-taking in 1999 at KTeV, Fermilab. We used the principal decay of Ξ° → Λ°π where Λ decays to a proton and a π- as the flux normalization mode. This is the first observation of this interesting decay mode. Four candidate events are found in the data. The branching ratio at 90% confidence level has been measured to be (1.67-0.80+1.45(stat.) ± 0.50(syst.)) x 10-5 or (1.67-0.69+1.16(stat.) ± 0.50(syst.)) x 10-5 at 68.27% confidence level.

  7. Search for x-ray induced decay of the 31-yr isomer of {sup 178}Hf using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Gemmell, D.S.; Moore, E.F.; Schiffer, J.P.; Banar, J.C.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Miller, G.G.; Palmer, P.; Pangault, L.N.; Rundberg, R.S.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Becker, J.A.; Cooper, J.R.; Kraemer, A.; McNabb, D.P.; Wang, T.-F.; Mashayekhi, A.; Shastri, S.D.

    2005-02-01

    Isomeric {sup 178}Hf (t{sub 1/2}=31 yr, E{sub x}=2.446 MeV, J{sup {pi}}=16{sup +}) was bombarded by a white beam of x rays from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. A search was made for x-ray induced decay of the isomer by detecting prompt and delayed {gamma} rays associated with the decay. No induced decay was observed. Upper limits for such a process for x-ray energies between 7 and 100 keV were set. The limits between 7 and 30 keV are below {approx_equal}3x10{sup -27} cm{sup 2} keV for induced decay that bypasses the 4-s isomer and {approx_equal}5x10{sup -27} cm{sup 2} keV for induced decay that is delayed through this isomer, which are orders of magnitude below values at which induced decay was reported previously. These limits are consistent with what is known about the properties of atomic nuclei.

  8. Search for x-ray induced decay of the 31-yr isomer of 178Hf using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Banar, J. C.; Becker, J. A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Cooper, J. R.; Gemmell, D. S.; Kraemer, A.; Mashayekhi, A.; McNabb, D. P.; Miller, G. G.; Moore, E. F.; Palmer, P.; Pangault, L. N.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schiffer, J. P.; Shastri, S. D.; Wang, T.-F.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2005-02-01

    Isomeric 178Hf (t1/2=31 yr, Ex=2.446MeV, Jπ=16+) was bombarded by a white beam of x rays from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. A search was made for x-ray induced decay of the isomer by detecting prompt and delayed γ rays associated with the decay. No induced decay was observed. Upper limits for such a process for x-ray energies between 7 and 100 keV were set. The limits between 7 and 30 keV are below ≈3×10-27 cm2keV for induced decay that bypasses the 4-s isomer and ≈5×10-27 cm2keV for induced decay that is delayed through this isomer, which are orders of magnitude below values at which induced decay was reported previously. These limits are consistent with what is known about the properties of atomic nuclei.

  9. Search for X-ray induced decay of the 31-yr isomer of 178Hf using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I; Banar, J C; Becker, J A; Bredeweg, T A; Cooper, J R; Gemmell, D S; Kraemer, A; Mashayekhi, A; McNabb, D P; Miller, G G; Moore, E F; Palmer, P; Pangault, L N; Rundberg, R S; Schiffer, J P; Shastri, S D; Wang, T F; Wilhelmy, J B

    2004-09-13

    Isomeric {sup 178}Hf (t{sub 1/2} = 31 yr, E{sub x} = 2.446 MeV, J{sup {pi}} = 16{sup +}) was bombarded by a white beam of x-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. A search was made for x-ray induced decay of the isomer by detecting prompt and delayed {gamma} rays associated with the decay. No induced decay was observed. Upper limits for such a process for x-ray energies between 7-100 keV were set. The limits between 7 and 30 keV are below {approx} 3 x 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}-keV for induced decay that bypasses the 4-s isomer and {approx} 5 x 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}-keV for induced decay that is delayed through this isomer, orders of magnitude below values at which induced decay was reported previously. These limits are consistent with what is known about the properties of atomic nuclei.

  10. Measurement of branching fractions in radiative B decays to {eta}K{gamma} and search for B decays to {eta}{sup '}K{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.

    2006-08-01

    We present measurements of the B{yields}{eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B{yields}{eta}{sup '}K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +}{yields}{eta}K{sup +}{gamma} we also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232x10{sup 6} produced BB pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% confidence level in units of 10{sup -6} are: B(B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}K{sup 0}{gamma})=11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8}{+-}0.6, B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}K{sup +}{gamma})=10.0{+-}1.3{+-}0.5, B(B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{sup '}K{sup 0}{gamma})<6.6, B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +}{gamma})<4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +}{yields}{eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is A{sub ch}=-0.09{+-}0.12{+-}0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  11. Low-LET and high-LET radiation action of {sup 125}I decays in DNA: Effect of cysteamine on micronucleus formation and cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, K.G.; Bao, S.P.

    1995-02-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were pulse-labeled with {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine during early S phase, and cell samples were harvested 30 min or 5 h after labeling. The samples were frozen (with or without 25 mM cysteamine) and stored at -196{degrees}C for accumulation of {sup 125}I decays. X-ray control experiments were performed at 37{degrees}C and -196{degrees}C. Aliquots of cells were plated for evaluating micronucleus formation and cell survival. The results demonstrated a striking shift in micronucleus formation and cell death with time after labeling. Cells frozen 30 min after labeling exhibited effects typical of low-LET radiation, but cells frozen 5 h after labeling showed a response characteristic of high-LET radiation. Cysteamine provided protection against the effects of {sup 125}I during the initial phase of effects characteristic of low-LET radiation, but no protection was seen during the phase characteristic of high-LET radiation. When cell survival was evaluated as a function of micronucleus frequency rather than dose in decays/cell, the survival curves for all treatment groups became superimposed. Previous work using the same experimental system had failed to show a direct link between {sup 125}I-induced DNA double-strand breaks and cell death. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that DNA damage may not be the sole mechanism for cell killing and that damage to higher-order structures in the cell nucleus may contribute to (or modify) radiation-induced cell death. 50 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Search for a light Higgs resonance in radiative decays of the ϒ (1 S ) with a charm tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A search is presented for the decay ϒ (1 S )→γ A0 , A0→c c ¯, where A0 is a candidate for the C P -odd Higgs boson of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The search is based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the ϒ (2 S ) resonance. A sample of ϒ (1 S ) mesons is selected via the decay ϒ (2 S )→π+π-ϒ (1 S ) . The A0→c c ¯ decay is identified through the reconstruction of hadronic D0, D+, and D*(2010 )+ meson decays. No significant signal is observed. The measured 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B (ϒ (1 S )→γ A0)×B (A0→c c ¯ ) range from 7.4 ×10-5 to 2.4 ×10-3 for A0 masses from 4.00 to 8.95 GeV /c2 and 9.10 to 9.25 GeV /c2 , where the region between 8.95 and 9.10 GeV /c2 is excluded because of background from ϒ (2 S )→γ χb J(1 P ) , χb J(1 P )→γ ϒ (1 S ) decays.

  13. Search for Invisible Decays of a Light Scalar in Radiative Transitions Y(3S)->gamma A0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2008-11-05

    We search for a light scalar particle produced in single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) resonance through the process {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} + A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} invisible. Such an object appears in Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. If, in addition, there exists a light, stable neutralino, decays of A{sup 0} could be preferentially to an invisible final state. We search for events with a single high-energy photon and a large missing mass, consistent with a 2-body decay of {Upsilon}(3S). We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} invisible) at (0.7-31) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range m{sub A{sup 0}} {le} 7.8 GeV. The results are preliminary.

  14. Search for a light Higgs resonance in radiative decays of the Y(1S) with a charm tag

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, a search is presented for the decay Υ(1S)→γA0, A0 → cc¯, where A0 is a candidate for the CP-odd Higgs boson of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The search is based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the Υ(2S) resonance. A sample of Υ(1S) mesons is selected via the decay Υ(2S) → π+π Υ(1S). The A0 → cc¯ decay is identified through the reconstruction of hadronic D0, D+, and D*(2010)+ meson decays. No significant signal is observed. The measured 90% confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S) → γA0)×B(A0 → cc¯) range from 7.4×10–5 to 2.4×10–3 for A0 masses from 4.00 to 8.95 GeV/c2 and 9.10 to 9.25 GeV/c2, where the region between 8.95 and 9.10 GeV/c2 is excluded because of background from Υ(2S) → γχbJ(1P), χbJ(1P) → γΥ(1S) decays.

  15. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons: The initial-baryon rest frame case

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2009-03-01

    We complement the results for the radiative corrections to the s-circumflex{sub 2}{center_dot}l-circumflex angular correlation of baryon semileptonic decays of Neri et al.[Phys. Rev. D 78, 054018 (2008)] with the final results in the rest frame of the decaying baryon. In addition, we present an analytical result which was not possible to obtain in Neri et al.'s work.

  16. Search for radiative penguin decays B(+)-->rho(+)gamma, B(0)-->rho(0)gamma, and B(0)-->omegagamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Lodovico, F Di; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Buono, L Del; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Groot, N De; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Nardo, G De; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-14

    A search for the decays B-->rho(770)gamma and B0-->omega(782)gamma is performed on a sample of 211 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) storage ring. No evidence for the decays is seen. We set the following limits on the individual branching fractions: B(B+-->rho(+)gamma)<1.8 x 10(-6), B(B0-->rho(0)gamma)<0.4 x 10(-6), and B(B0-->omegagamma)<1.0 x 10(-6) at the 90% confidence level. We use the quark model to limit the combined branching fraction B [B-->(rho/omega)gamma]<1.2 x 10(-6), from which we determine a constraint on the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V(td)|/|V(ts)|.

  17. Impact of radiation processing on quality during storage and post-refrigeration decay of plum (Prunus domestica L.) cv. Santaroza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Peerzada R.; Dar, Mohd A.; Wani, Ali M.

    2013-04-01

    Gamma irradiation treatment was tested for maintaining storage quality and extending the shelf life of plum fruit. Matured green plums were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-1.5 kGy and stored under ambient (temperature 25±2 °C, RH 70%) and refrigerated (temperature 3±1 °C, RH 80%) conditions. Studies revealed that irradiation treatment significantly (p≤0.05) maintained the storage quality of plum fruit under ambient as well as refrigerated conditions. Positive correlations (r=0.88) existed between the irradiation doses and firmness retention under both the storage conditions. In samples irradiated at 1.0 kGy, 1.2 kGy and 1.5 kGy, no microbial load was detected up to 8 and 12 days of ambient storage. Dose range of 1.2-1.5 kGy significantly inhibited the decaying of plums up to 16 days of ambient storage. Irradiation in combination with refrigeration prevented the decaying of plums up to 35 days as against the 12.5% decay in un-irradiated control samples. Irradiation dose of 1.2-1.5 kGy also gave an extension of 8 days during additional ambient storage of the plums at 25±2 °C, RH 70% following 35 days of refrigeration.

  18. Search for X-Ray Induced Acceleration of the Decay of the 31-yr Isomer 178Hf Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I; Banar, J C; Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Kraemer, A; Mashayekhi, A; McNabb, D P; Miller, G G; Moore, E F; Pangault, L N; Rundberg, R S; Schiffer, J P; Shastri, S D; Wang, T F; Wilhelmy, J B

    2002-05-09

    Releasing the energy stored in an isomeric nuclear state in a controlled way with an atomic or electromagnetic trigger is an attractive speculation: the energy gain may be on the order of the ratio of nuclear/atomic energies - MeV/keV. (Nuclear isomers are loosely defined as excited nuclear states with lifetimes longer than 10{sup -9} s.) Nuclear isomers, therefore, represent an opportunity for a stand-alone energy source if suitable schemes for trigger and control of the energy release can be found. Potential applications include space drive, as well as very bright {gamma}-ray sources. The nucleus {sup 178}Hf has a nuclear isomer with excitation energy E{sub x} = 2.447 MeV. The 2.447-MeV isomeric state decays slowly (t{sub 1/2} = 31 y) to the nearby state at 2.433 MeV. The J{sup {pi}} = 13{sup -} state loses energy in a rapid (t {approx} 10{sup -12} s) {gamma}-ray cascade ending at the 8{sup -} rotational band head which in turn decays via the ground-state rotational band cascade. The {gamma}-ray cascade is delayed at the 8{sup -} state at 1.147 MeV, since the 8{sup -} state is also isomeric, with t{sub 1/2} = 4 s. Very scarce quantities of the 16{sup +}, 31-yr isomer are available for research ({approx} 10{sup 15} atoms). Reports of triggered decay of the {sup 178}Hf isomer induced by x-rays delivered by a dental x-ray machine have been made [2,3]. Enhancements of {approx} 1 - 2% in the isomer decay rate (dN/dt = - (1 + {var_epsilon})N/{tau}) had been reported for various {gamma}-rays in the cascade (distinguished by red and vertical lines in Figure 1). The reported integrated cross section for triggering the decay is cm{sup 2} keV, so large as to demand new physics. We have sought to verify these reports taking advantage of the intense photon flux available at the Advanced Photon Source.

  19. Radiative corrections to the decays K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Repko, W.W.

    1998-12-31

    The authors calculate the rates and lepton ({ell}) invariant mass distributions for decays of the form 0{sup {minus}+} {r_arrow} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}{gamma}, which are important radiative corrections to the purely leptonic decays 0{sup {minus}+} {r_arrow} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}. The approach uses the loop diagrams which arise by including the two photon intermediate state and they retain the imaginary parts of the loops--a radiative extension of the unitarity bound for the process. These results are compared with those obtained using a model in which the meson couples directly to the leptons.

  20. A source for measurement of the absolute intensities of 226Ra gamma-radiation in equilibrium with decay products.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, I A; Rasko, M A; Sepman, S V; Terechtchenko, E E; Hejdelman, A M

    2002-01-01

    The design and production techniques of a gamma-ray spectrometric source of 226Ra in equilibrium with its daughter decay products have been developed. The radon emanation coefficient of the source did not exceed 0.1%. The 226Ra activity in the gamma-ray spectrometric source was measured relative to that in an alpha-particle spectrometric source by comparison of the intensities of the main gamma rays using a semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometer. The total uncertainty of the activity measurement results was 0.5% for a coverage factor of k = 2.

  1. The radiative leptonic decays D0 -> e+ e-γ ,μ ^+μ ^-γ in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, S.; Singer, P.; Zupan, J.

    2003-03-01

    We present a calculation of the rare decay modes D^0 to e^+ e^- γ and D^0 to μ^+μ^- γ in the framework of the standard model. For the short distance part we have derived QCD corrections to the Wilson coefficients involved, including C9. The latter is found to be strongly suppressed by the corrections, leading to diminished values for the cto u l^+l^- branching ratios in the 10-10 range. Within SM the exclusive decays are dominated by long distance effects. Non-resonant contributions are estimated using heavy quark and chiral symmetries to be at the level of 10%, compared to the contributions arising from D^0to V γto l^+l^- γ, with V = ρ, ω, φ. The total SM branching ratio is predicted to be in the range (1-3)× 10^{-9}. We also consider contributions coming from MSSM with and without R parity conservation. The effects from MSSM are significant only for the R parity violating case. Such contributions enhance the branching ratio D^0 to μ^+μ^- γ to lesssim 0.5 × 10^{-7}, based on appropriately allowed values for C9 and C10. This selects D^0 to μ^+μ^- γ as a possible probe of new physics.

  2. Spin-Parity Analysis of pp¯ Mass Threshold Structure in J/ψ and ψ(3686) Radiative Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R. B. F.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M. B.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A. C.; Cao, G. F.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding Ding, W. L.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S. P.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A. Z.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2012-03-01

    A partial wave analysis of the pp¯ mass-threshold enhancement in the reaction J/ψ→γpp¯ is used to determine its JPC quantum numbers to be 0-+, its peak mass to be below threshold at M=1832-5+19(stat)-17+18(syst)±19(model)MeV/c2, and its total width to be Γ<76MeV/c2 at the 90% C.L. The product of branching ratios is measured to be BR[J/ψ→γX(pp¯)]BR[X(pp¯)→pp¯]=[9.0-1.1+0.4(stat)-5.0+1.5(syst)±2.3(model)]×10-5. A similar analysis performed on ψ(3686)→γpp¯ decays shows, for the first time, the presence of a corresponding enhancement with a production rate relative to that for J/ψ decays of R=[5.08-0.45+0.71(stat)-3.58+0.67(syst)±0.12(model)]%.

  3. Preparation of the 178m2Hf isomer used in the induced gamma decay experiment by X-ray from synchrotron radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianli; TaoJiang; Ze, Rende; Wu, Huailong; He, Yuhui; Yang, Jun; Yang, Chaowen

    2012-10-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the 178m2Hf nuclide is the most suitable substance to study the decay characteristic of the isomer induced by low-energy X-ray. In order to conduct the experiment on the induced gamma emission, the research group has started producing the 178m2Hf nuclide based on the 176Yb( α, 2 n)178 m2Hf reaction. After the chemical purification is conducted, the sample is prepared and used in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. During the production of isomer, the natural metal Yb target is got through magnetron sputtering. Bombarded by α particles about 27 MeV, the 178m2Hf nuclide reaches about 1012. Yb target prepared in this way is most suitable for the production of 178m2Hf nuclide in the CS30 cyclotron. There are various nuclides in the irradiated target and the main long-lived nuclides are 173Lu, 172Lu, 175Hf, 172Hf and 65Zn. The chemical separation of 178m2Hf is studied and its process is monitored by radioactive tracer. The above result shows that decontamination factors of Zn and Lu are 105 and 103, respectively, and the yield of hafnium is 69%. Under the protection of vacuum filtration technology, the purified 178m2Hf isomers are entirely transferred to the surface of filter paper, in order to form the sample which satisfies requirements of X-ray triggering the 178m2Hf isomer decay experiment in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility in the future.

  4. sigma. /sup +/ and. xi. /sup -/ radiative decay studies: Progress report for the period 1 August 1986-30 September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    McCliment, E.R.; Newsom, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The period covered by this progress report coincides with the hardware development phase of Fermilab experiment E761, which will run in the fall of 1988 and winter of 1989. Our contribution to the hardware is a silicon strip detector system for precision measurement of the hyperon beam momentum. We started this project by building a prototype station, MARK II, and testing it extensively, first at Iowa using a radioactive source, and then at LAMPF using a test beam. The results obtained were used to design the final version of the detector station, MARK III. Three MARK-III stations, the number required for the experiment, have been built and transported to Fermilab. Two have been installed in a test beam in P-Center, and the third is awaiting installation. Data taking has just gotten underway to study noise, efficiency, alignment procedures, and tracking. We have also been engaged in analyzing three-track triggers from Fermilab experiment E715 with the aim of measuring the cascade minus magnetic moment and production polarization. To date, we have analyzed 60% of the data and obtained therefrom 100,000 fully reconstructed nonleptonic cascade decays. Of these 40,000 have the right polarization to use for a magnetic moment determination. The rest are useful for studying production polarization and systematics.

  5. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  6. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    You call it a cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole in your tooth. The cause of tooth decay is plaque, a sticky substance in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without ...

  7. Trunk decays

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1989-01-01

    Trunk decays are major causes of low quality wood-wood with little or no economic value. As a forest practitioner you should be able to recognize trees at high risk for decay and remove them if timber production is your primary objective. Remember, however, that decayed trees often develop into den trees or nesting sites and provide essential habitat for wildlife....

  8. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  9. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  10. Symmetry control of radiative decay in linear polyenes: low barriers for isomerization in the S1 state of hexadecaheptaene.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ronald L; Galinato, Mary Grace I; Chu, Emily F; Fujii, Ritsuko; Hashimoto, Hideki; Frank, Harry A

    2007-02-14

    The room temperature absorption and emission spectra of the 4-cis and all-trans isomers of 2,4,6,8,10,12,14-hexadecaheptaene are almost identical, exhibiting the characteristic dual emissions S1-->S0 (21Ag- --> 11Ag-) and S2-->S0 (11Bu+ --> 11Ag-) noted in previous studies of intermediate length polyenes and carotenoids. The ratio of the S1-->S0 and S2-->S0 emission yields for the cis isomer increases by a factor of approximately 15 upon cooling to 77 K in n-pentadecane. In contrast, for the trans isomer this ratio shows a 2-fold decrease with decreasing temperature. These results suggest a low barrier for conversion between the 4-cis and all-trans isomers in the S1 state. At 77 K, the cis isomer cannot convert to the more stable all-trans isomer in the 21Ag- state, resulting in the striking increase in its S1-->S0 fluorescence. These experiments imply that the S1 states of longer polyenes have local energy minima, corresponding to a range of conformations and isomers, separated by relatively low (2-4 kcal) barriers. Steady state and time-resolved optical measurements on the S1 states in solution thus may sample a distribution of conformers and geometric isomers, even for samples represented by a single, dominant ground state structure. Complex S1 potential energy surfaces may help explain the complicated S2-->S1 relaxation kinetics of many carotenoids. The finding that fluorescence from linear polyenes is so strongly dependent on molecular symmetry requires a reevaluation of the literature on the radiative properties of all-trans polyenes and carotenoids.

  11. Radiative Penguin Decays at the BaBar Experiment B to K*gamma, B to rho gamma, B to omega gamma and B to X_s gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Grauges, E.

    2004-12-08

    A review of the results obtained from the analysis of the B meson decays that involve Radiative Penguin processes, recorded at the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II B-Factory, is presented. The physics interest of these processes and their SM prediction are discussed briefly. The most relevant selection techniques used in the analysis are described before quoting the latest results made public by the BaBar collaboration as of July 2003.

  12. Penguin and rare decays in BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar, Simon; Babar Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present recent results from the BABAR Collaboration on radiative decays. These include searches for new physics via measurements of several observables such as the time- dependent CP asymmetry in B0 → K0Sπ-π+γ exclusive decays, as well as direct CP asymmetries and branching fractions in B → Xsγ and B → Xsl+l- inclusive decays.

  13. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  14. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  15. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... temporary, it can be permanent. Sore Mouth and Tooth Decay The tissues of the mouth may be sore ... and there may be an increased risk of tooth decay if a child received radiation therapy to the ...

  16. Radiative decay probabilities of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level in neonlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Obst, M.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-15

    The radiative decay rates of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level in neonlike ions have been calculated for nuclear charges ranging from Z=10 to Z=110. The calculations include the magnetic dipole decay to the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} level, which is shown to be the dominant decay branch in low-Z and very-high-Z ions, as well as the two-electron, one-photon decays to the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3p{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} and (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3p{sub 3/2}){sub J=1} levels, which dominate near Z=50. We also take into account a small magnetic quadrupole decay branch to the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=2} level and calculate the total radiative lifetime of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level. The resulting values span over 15 orders of magnitude, and much of this range is accessible with modern atomic lifetime measurement techniques. In particular, we calculate a value of 1.6x10{sup 4} s{sup -1} for the radiative decay rate of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level in Fe XVII and show that the corresponding magnetic dipole transition has a measurable spectral intensity for electron densities below about 1x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}.

  17. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  18. Yukawa radiative corrections to the triple self-couplings of neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and to the H {sup {yields}} hh decay rate within the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Yu. P.

    2007-07-15

    Within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, four self-couplings, {lambda}{sub hhh}, {lambda}{sub hhH}, {lambda}{sub hHH}, and {lambda}{sub HHH}, and the decay rate {gamma}(H {sup {yields}} hh) are calculated with allowance for one-loop corrections induced by the contribution of the t, b, and c quarks, the {tau} lepton, and the corresponding superpartners and with the aid of the on-shell renormalization scheme. An analysis of the dependences of these features on tan{beta} and the mass of the A Higgs boson, M{sub A}, shows that, in a specific region of the model-parameter space, the calculated corrections can make a significant contribution to the couplings and decay rate in the one-loop approximation. The inclusion of the radiative corrections in question is mandatory in reconstructing the Higgs potential.

  19. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  20. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  1. Experimental Status of b -> s(d) gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lodovico, F

    2004-02-05

    Radiative penguin decays provide an indirect probe for physics beyond the Standard Model and contribute to the determination of the CKM matrix elements. Copious quantities of B mesons produced at the B-Factories permit precision measurements of radiative penguin decays. We review the experimental status of the radiative penguin processes b {yields} s(d){gamma}.

  2. PHYSICAL FACTORS AND DOSIMETRY IN THE MARSHALL ISLAND RADIATION EXPOSURES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FALLOUT, *RADIATION HAZARDS, *RADIOCHEMISTRY, DOSE RATE, PERSONNEL, RADIATION, RADIATION MONITORS, DOSAGE , EXPOSURE (PHYSIOLOGY), EXPOSURE METERS, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, ENERGY, TIME, GAMMA RAY SPECTROSCOPY, BETA DECAY, PHOTONS.

  3. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2013-05-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling \\Gamma \\sim \\Gamma _{CDL}^{2}, where ΓCDL is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable initial state an efficient quantum Zeno effect occurs due to thermal radiation of temperatures as low as the de Sitter temperature. This strong decoherence effect is a consequence of gravitational interactions with light external mode. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincaré recurrence in de Sitter space.

  4. Threshold enhancement phenomena in Y(4260) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Hai

    2014-04-01

    We investigate several strong and radiative decay modes of Y(4260), by assuming that Y(4260) either is a D1\\bar {D} molecular state, or has sizeable couplings with D0 \\bar {D}* and D1' \\bar {D}. In such ansatzes, obvious threshold enhancements or narrow cusp structures appear quite naturally without introducing a genuine resonance. And we emphasize that the radiative decay modes may be useful for studying D(*)\\bar {D}S-wave scattering.

  5. Observation of large-scale density cavities and parametric-decay instabilities in the high-altitude discrete auroral ionosphere under pulsed electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Wong, A Y; Chen, J; Lee, L C; Liu, L Y

    2009-03-13

    A large density cavity that measured 2000 km across and 500 km in height was observed by DEMETER and Formosat/COSMIC satellites in temporal and spatial relation to a new mode of propagation of electromagnetic (em) pulses between discrete magnetic field-aligned auroral plasmas to high altitudes. Recorded positive plasma potential from satellite probes is consistent with the expulsion of electrons in the creation of density cavities. High-frequency decay spectra support the concept of parametric instabilities fed by free energy sources.

  6. Observation of Large-Scale Density Cavities and Parametric-Decay Instabilities in the High-Altitude Discrete Auroral Ionosphere under Pulsed Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A. Y.; Chen, J.; Lee, L. C.; Liu, L. Y.

    2009-03-13

    A large density cavity that measured 2000 km across and 500 km in height was observed by DEMETER and Formosat/COSMIC satellites in temporal and spatial relation to a new mode of propagation of electromagnetic (em) pulses between discrete magnetic field-aligned auroral plasmas to high altitudes. Recorded positive plasma potential from satellite probes is consistent with the expulsion of electrons in the creation of density cavities. High-frequency decay spectra support the concept of parametric instabilities fed by free energy sources.

  7. Study of final-state radiation in decays of Z bosons produced in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    The differential cross sections for the production of photons in Z→μ+μ-γ decays are presented as a function of the transverse energy of the photon and its separation from the nearest muon. The data for these measurements are collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV delivered by the CERN LHC. The cross sections are compared to simulations with powheg and pythia, where pythia is used to simulate parton showers and final-state photons. These simulations match the data to better than 5%.

  8. Baryon semileptonic decays: the Mexican contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Martinez, Alfonso

    2006-09-25

    We give a detailed account of the techniques to compute radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays developed over the years by Mexican collaborations. We explain how the method works by obtaining an expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of polarized baryons including radiative corrections to order O({alpha}q/{pi}M1), where q is the four-momentum transfer and M1 is the mass of the decaying baryon. From here we compute the totally integrated spin angular asymmetry coefficient of the emitted baryon and compare its value with other results.

  9. Neutron-Induced Partial Cross Section Measurements on Cu, Ge and Pb at En = 8 and 12 MeV for Background Radiation in 0νββ Decay Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kidd, M. F.; Tonchev, A.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C.; Karwowski, H.; Kelley, J.; Mei, D.; Hilderbrand, S.; Masters, D. B.; Pedroni, R. S.; Weisel, G. J.

    2008-04-01

    The search for the existence of 0νββ decay plays an important role in the uncovering of physics beyond the standard model. The detection of such decay would confirm that neutrinos are Majorana particles. The large lifetimes (i.e.,T1/2(^76Ge) > 10^25 y) and the corresponding long measuring times require extensive understanding of background radiation induced by neutron interactions with shielding and detector materials. For example, neutron induced γ-ray transitions in Pb and Cu and their escape peaks could interfere with the identification of the 2039 keV signature of 0νββ in the case of ^ 76Ge. Thus, it is necessary to determine the yields from possible background sources. The neutron-induced partial cross sections for γ-ray transitions in Cu, enriched ^76 Ge, and Pb were measured at TUNL using an array of HPGe detectors at En=8 and 12 MeV. The experimental setup and preliminary results will be presented.Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41033 & DE- FG02-97ER41042.

  10. Rare B Decays in BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hicheur, A

    2004-08-25

    Measurements and searches for rare B decays have been performed with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factory, operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. The authors report some recent branching fraction measurements on hadronic and radiative B decays, occurring from b --> s/d and b --> u transitions. Most of the results presented here are based on a data sample corresponding to a luminosity of 81.9 fb{sup -1}.

  11. New experimental results on neutrino mixing and decay.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberauer, L.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Hagner, C.; Kempf, G.; Mößbauer, R. L.; Declais, Y.; Kajfasz, E.

    The search for neutrino decay is a sensitive method to look for very small neutrino mixing parameter. The authors report about the status of an decay experiment performed at a reactor in Bugey and present preliminary new experimental limits on the coupling of a heavy neutrino to the electron state. Additionally new experimental lifetime bounds on the radiative decay mode are given. Rigid laboratory limits on this decay mode for the hypothetical 17 keV neutrino are presented. Limits on the radiative decay of a 17 keV neutrino obtained from the supernova SN 1987A are discussed.

  12. An amplitude analyses of the K K-bar system (M < 2 GeV/C{sup 2}) produced in J/{Psi} radiative decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liang-Ping

    1991-11-01

    Using the 5.8 {times} 10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected by the MARK 3 experiment on the SPEAR e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring at SLAC, a mass independent amplitude analysis of the J/{psi} {yields} {gamma} K{sub s}K{sub s} and J/{psi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays is presented. For K{bar K} systems having mass less than 2 GeV/c{sup 2}, the efficiency-corrected spherical harmonic moments of the J/{psi} joint decay angular distribution are measured. Fits are then performed in each independent mass interval in order to extract the underlying helicity amplitude structure; amplitudes describing K{bar K} systems of spin zero and spin two are included simultaneously. For the first time, a large spin zero component in the {theta}(1720) mass region is observed; consistent results are obtained for the data samples corresponding to the individual decay modes. This structure is attributed to the production of an S wave resonance, the f{sub 0}(1710), of mass and width M = 1710 {plus_minus} 10 MeV/c{sup 2}, {Gamma} = 186 {plus_minus} 30 MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively, with branching fraction Bf(J/{psi} {yields} {gamma}f{sub 0}, f{sub 0} {yields} K{bar K}) = (6.47 {plus_minus} 1.14 {plus_minus} 0.84) {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. A small amount ({approximately}24%) of spin two component in this mass region cannot be ruled out with the present statistics. These results revise the previous conclusion that the {theta}(1720) is a spin two resonance, a result obtained on the basis of spin hypothesis tests, which assumed that either pure spin zero or pure spin two states contribute in this mass region, but not both. The previous measurements of the f{sub 2}{prime} (1525) have been refined in the present analysis because of the simultaneous inclusion of spin zero and spin two amplitudes in the fit.

  13. An amplitude analyses of the K K-bar system (M < 2 GeV/C sup 2 ) produced in J/. Psi. radiative decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liang-Ping.

    1991-11-01

    Using the 5.8 {times} 10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected by the MARK 3 experiment on the SPEAR e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring at SLAC, a mass independent amplitude analysis of the J/{psi} {yields} {gamma} K{sub s}K{sub s} and J/{psi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays is presented. For K{bar K} systems having mass less than 2 GeV/c{sup 2}, the efficiency-corrected spherical harmonic moments of the J/{psi} joint decay angular distribution are measured. Fits are then performed in each independent mass interval in order to extract the underlying helicity amplitude structure; amplitudes describing K{bar K} systems of spin zero and spin two are included simultaneously. For the first time, a large spin zero component in the {theta}(1720) mass region is observed; consistent results are obtained for the data samples corresponding to the individual decay modes. This structure is attributed to the production of an S wave resonance, the f{sub 0}(1710), of mass and width M = 1710 {plus minus} 10 MeV/c{sup 2}, {Gamma} = 186 {plus minus} 30 MeV/c{sup 2}, respectively, with branching fraction Bf(J/{psi} {yields} {gamma}f{sub 0}, f{sub 0} {yields} K{bar K}) = (6.47 {plus minus} 1.14 {plus minus} 0.84) {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. A small amount ({approximately}24%) of spin two component in this mass region cannot be ruled out with the present statistics. These results revise the previous conclusion that the {theta}(1720) is a spin two resonance, a result obtained on the basis of spin hypothesis tests, which assumed that either pure spin zero or pure spin two states contribute in this mass region, but not both. The previous measurements of the f{sub 2}{prime} (1525) have been refined in the present analysis because of the simultaneous inclusion of spin zero and spin two amplitudes in the fit.

  14. Measurement of the branching fractions of radiative leptonic τ decays τ → ℓγν anti-ν (ℓ=e,μ) at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhof, Benjamin

    2015-04-29

    We perform a measurement of the branching fractions for τ → ℓγν anti ν, (ℓ = e, μ) decays for a minimum photon energy of 10 MeV in the τ rest frame using 430 fb-1 of e+e- collisions collected at the center-of-mass energy of the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. We find B(τ → μγνν) = (3.69±0.03±0.10)×103 and B(τ → eγνν) = (1.847 ± 0.015 ± 0.052) × 10-2 where the first quoted error is statistical and the second is systematic. These results represent a substantial improvement with respect to existing measurements for both channels.

  15. Spin-forbidden radiative decay rates from the 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1,2} and 3 {sup 1}P{sub 1} states of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Donald C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2011-04-15

    We have calculated atomic helium spontaneous decay rates and absorption oscillator strengths for the spin-forbidden transitions from 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1,2} and 3 {sup 1}P{sub 1} to all lower {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} states. In particular we found A{sub 10}=44.33(4) s{sup -1} for the E1 transition 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1}-1 {sup 1}S{sub 0} and 0.1147(1) s{sup -1} for the M2 transition 3 {sup 3}P{sub 2}-1 {sup 1}S{sub 0}.

  16. Resonant Auger decay driving intermolecular Coulombic decay in molecular dimers.

    PubMed

    Trinter, F; Schöffler, M S; Kim, H-K; Sturm, F P; Cole, K; Neumann, N; Vredenborg, A; Williams, J; Bocharova, I; Guillemin, R; Simon, M; Belkacem, A; Landers, A L; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Dörner, R; Jahnke, T

    2014-01-30

    In 1997, it was predicted that an electronically excited atom or molecule placed in a loosely bound chemical system (such as a hydrogen-bonded or van-der-Waals-bonded cluster) could efficiently decay by transferring its excess energy to a neighbouring species that would then emit a low-energy electron. This intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) process has since been shown to be a common phenomenon, raising questions about its role in DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, in which low-energy electrons are known to play an important part. It was recently suggested that ICD can be triggered efficiently and site-selectively by resonantly core-exciting a target atom, which then transforms through Auger decay into an ionic species with sufficiently high excitation energy to permit ICD to occur. Here we show experimentally that resonant Auger decay can indeed trigger ICD in dimers of both molecular nitrogen and carbon monoxide. By using ion and electron momentum spectroscopy to measure simultaneously the charged species created in the resonant-Auger-driven ICD cascade, we find that ICD occurs in less time than the 20 femtoseconds it would take for individual molecules to undergo dissociation. Our experimental confirmation of this process and its efficiency may trigger renewed efforts to develop resonant X-ray excitation schemes for more localized and targeted cancer radiation therapy.

  17. Homodyne monitoring of postselected decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.; Foroozani, N.; Naghiloo, M.; Kiilerich, A. H.; Mølmer, K.; Murch, K. W.

    2017-08-01

    We use homodyne detection to monitor the radiative decay of a superconducting qubit. According to the classical theory of conditional probabilities, the excited-state population differs from an exponential decay law if it is conditioned upon a later projective qubit measurement. Quantum trajectory theory accounts for the expectation values of general observables, and we use experimental data to show how a homodyne detection signal is conditioned upon both the initial state and the finally projected state of a decaying qubit. We observe, in particular, how anomalous weak values occur in continuous weak measurement for certain pre- and postselected states. Subject to homodyne detection, the density matrix evolves in a stochastic manner, but it is restricted to a specific surface in the Bloch sphere. We show that a similar restriction applies to the information associated with the postselection, and thus bounds the predictions of the theory.

  18. Lepton flavor violating quarkonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazard, Derek E.; Petrov, Alexey A.

    2016-10-01

    We argue that lepton flavor violating (LFV) decays M →ℓ1ℓ¯ 2 of quarkonium states M with different quantum numbers could be used to put constraints on the Wilson coefficients of effective operators describing LFV interactions at low energy scales. We note that restricted kinematics of the two-body quarkonium decays allows us to select operators with particular quantum numbers, significantly reducing the reliance on the single operator dominance assumption that is prevalent in constraining parameters of the effective LFV Lagrangian. We shall also argue that studies of radiative lepton flavor violating M →γ ℓ1ℓ¯ 2 decays could provide important complementary access to those effective operators.

  19. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  20. Evidence for Orbital Decay of RX J1914.4+2456: Gravitational Radiation and the Nature of the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RX J1914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary (AM CVn) with a putative 569 s orbital period. If this identification is correct, then it has one of the shortest binary orbital periods known, and gravitational radiation should drive the orbital evolution and mass transfer if the binary is semi-detached. Here we report the results of a coherent timing study of the archival ROSAT data for RX J1914.4+2456. We performed a phase coherent timing analysis using all five ROSAT observations spanning a four-year period. We demonstrate that all the data can be phase connected, and we show that the 1.756 mHz orbital frequency is increasing at a rate of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -17) Hz/s consistent with the expected loss of angular momentum from the binary system via gravitational radiation. In addition to providing evidence for the emission of gravitational waves, our measurement of the orbital v(dot) constrains models for the X-ray emission and the nature of the secondary. If stable mass accretion drives the X-ray flux, then a positive v(dot) is inconsistent with a degenerate donor. A helium burning dwarf is compatible if indeed such systems can have periods as short as that of RX J1914.4+2456, an open theoretical question. Our measurement of a positive v(dot) is consistent with the unipolar induction model of Wu et al. which does not require accretion to drive the X-ray flux. We discuss how future timing measurements of RX J1914.4+2456 (and systems like it) with for example, Chandra and XMM-Newton, can provide a unique probe of the interaction between mass loss and gravitational radiation. We also discuss the importance of such measurements in the context of gravitational wave detection from space, such as is expected in the future with the LISA mission.

  1. Intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the non-radiative excited state decay of uracil in the gas phase: an ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Carbonniere, Philippe; Pouchan, Claude; Improta, Roberto

    2015-05-07

    We report a study of intramolecular vibrational distribution (IVR) occurring in the electronic ground state of uracil (S0) in the gas phase, following photoexcitation in the lowest energy bright excited state (Sπ) and decay through the ethylene-like Sπ/S0 Conical Intersection (CI-0π). To this aim we have performed 20 independent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations starting from CI-0π (ten of them with 1 eV kinetic energy randomly distributed over the different molecular degrees of freedom) and 10 starting from the ground state minimum (Franck-Condon, FC, point), with the excess kinetic energy equal to the energy gap between CI-0π and the FC point. The simulations, exploiting PBE0/6-31G(d) calculations, were performed over an overall period of 10 ps. A thorough statistical analysis of the variation of the geometrical parameters of uracil during the simulation time and of the distribution of the kinetic energy among the different vibrational degrees of freedom provides a consistent picture of the IVR process. In the first 0-200 fs the structural dynamics involve mainly the recovery of the average planarity. In the 200-600 fs time range, a substantial activation of CO and NH degrees of freedom is observed. After 500-600 fs most of the geometrical parameters reach average values similar to those found after 10 ps, though the system cannot be considered to be in equilibrium yet.

  2. A study of the excitation and radiative decay of the 3s-prime 3D-0 and 3d 3D-0 levels of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Mclaughlin, R. W.; Gorman, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The absolute cross-sections for the excitation of the 989 A, 1027 A, 7990 A, 8446 A, 1.1287 micron and 1.3164 micron multiplets of atomic oxygen by electron impact dissociation of O2 are reported. The radiative branching ratios for these transitions are calculated from these results and compared with the NBS compilation of Wiese et al. (1966) and the recent theoretical calculations of Pradhan and Saraph (1977). The cascade models of O(+) radiative recombination and of electron-impact excitation of the O I(3S) state in the terrestrial airglow are discussed in the light of the laboratory measurements, and the effects of the resonant absorption of components of the lambda 989 A and lambda 1027 A multiplets by the Birge-Hopfield band system of N2 are investigated. This process is shown to depend sensitively on the N2 vibrational temperature and to cause characteristic changes in the OI EUV emission spectrum in auroras and in the sunlit F-region at high exospheric temperatures.

  3. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  4. Semi-empirical calculations of radiative decay rates in Mo II. A comparison between oscillator strength parametrization and core-polarization-corrected relativistic Hartree-Fock approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, Safa; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    We present a semi-empirical determination of Mo II radiative parameters in a wide wavelength range 1716-8789 Å. Our fitting procedure to experimental oscillator strengths available in the literature permits us to provide reliable values for a large number of Mo II lines, predicting previously unmeasured oscillator strengths of lines involving 4d45p and 4d35s5p odd-parity configurations. The extracted transition radial integral values are compared with ab-initio calculations: on average they are 0.88 times the values obtained with the basic pseudo-relativistic Hartree Fock method and they agree well when core polarization effects are included. When making a survey of our present and previous studies and including also those given in the literature we observe as general trends a decreasing of transition radial integral values with filling nd shells of the same principal quantum numbers for ndk(n + 1)s → ndk(n + 1)p transitions.

  5. Searching the inclusive ℓγE̸T+b-quark signature for radiative top quark decay and non-standard-model processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H. J.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-07-01

    We compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton (ℓ), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E̸T), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV corresponding to 1.9fb-1 of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector. We find 28 ℓγbE̸T events versus an expectation of 31.0-3.5+4.1 events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, the largest SM source is radiative top-quark pair production, t tmacr +γ. In the data we observe 16 t tmacr γ candidate events versus an expectation from SM sources of 11.2-2.1+2.3. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total of 6.8-2.0+2.2 is due to SM top-quark production, we estimate the t tmacr γ cross section to be 0.15±0.08pb.

  6. Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

  7. The program RADLST (Radiation Listing)

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, T.W.

    1988-02-29

    The program RADLST (Radiation Listing) is designed to calculate the nuclear and atomic radiations associated with the radioactive decay of nuclei. It uses as its primary input nuclear decay data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) format. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and, with a few exceptions, is consistent with the ANSI standard. 65 refs.

  8. RADinfo Glossary of Radiation Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a basic unit of absorbed radiation dose. radioactive decay: The process in which a radioactive nucleus emits (gives off) radiation and changes to a different isotope or element. A number of different particles can be emitted by decay. The most typical are alpha, beta particles, and ...

  9. Messenger RNA Decay.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Sidney R

    2007-04-01

    This chapter discusses several topics relating to the mechanisms of mRNA decay. These topics include the following: important physical properties of mRNA molecules that can alter their stability; methods for determining mRNA half-lives; the genetics and biochemistry of proteins and enzymes involved in mRNA decay; posttranscriptional modification of mRNAs; the cellular location of the mRNA decay apparatus; regulation of mRNA decay; the relationships among mRNA decay, tRNA maturation, and ribosomal RNA processing; and biochemical models for mRNA decay. Escherichia coli has multiple pathways for ensuring the effective decay of mRNAs and mRNA decay is closely linked to the cell's overall RNA metabolism. Finally, the chapter highlights important unanswered questions regarding both the mechanism and importance of mRNA decay.

  10. Analytical properties of the plasmon decay profile in a periodic metal-nanoparticle chain.

    PubMed

    Fung, Kin Hung; Tang, Ross Chin Hang; Chan, C T

    2011-06-15

    We show that the spatial decay of plasmons in a periodic metal-nanoparticle chain is composed of exponential and power-law decays. Our results show a high level of similarity between the absorptive and radiative decay channels. By analyzing the poles (and the corresponding residues) of the generating function for the lattice Green's function, we explain the details of the spatial decay profile. We also present an analytical formula for the decay profile.

  11. International decay data evaluation project

    SciTech Connect

    Helmer, R.G.

    1996-10-01

    Basic concepts of, and information from, radionuclide decay are used in many applications. The author limits this discussion to the data needed for applied {gamma}-ray spectrometry; this includes applications such as nuclide identification and quantitative assay. Many of these applications require a knowledge of half-lives and radiation energies and emission probabilities. For over 50 years, people have compiled and evaluated measured data with the goal of obtaining the best values of these quantities. This has resulted in numerous sets of recommended values, many of which still have scientific, historical, or national reasons for existing. These sets show varying degrees of agreement and disagreement in the quoted values and varying time lags in incorporating new and improved experimental results. A new informational international group has been formed to carry out evaluations for radionuclides of importance in applications; it is expected that the results will become an authoritative and widely accepted set of decay data.

  12. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Measurement of Inner Bremsstrahlung in Polarized Muon Decay with MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Bai, X.; Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Cerri, C.; de Bari, A.; De Gerone, M.; Doke, T.; Dussoni, S.; Egger, J.; Fratini, K.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, G.; Gallucci, L.; Gatti, F.; Golden, B.; Grassi, M.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hisamatsu, Y.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kettle, P.-R.; Khazin, B. I.; Kiselev, O.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Maki, A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, T.; Mzavia, D.; Natori, H.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pazzi, R.; Piredda, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Suzuki, S.; Tenchini, F.; Topchyan, C.; Uchiyama, Y.; Valle, R.; Voena, C.; Xiao, F.; Yamada, S.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamashita, S.; Yudin, Yu. V.; Zanello, D.

    2014-03-01

    A muon decay accompanied by a photon through the inner Bremmstrahlung process (μ→eννbarγ, radiative muon decay) produces a time-correlated pair of positron and photon which becomes one of the main backgrounds in the search for μ→eγ decay. This channel is also an important probe of timing calibration and cross-check of whole the experiment. We identified a large sample (∼ 13000) of radiative muon decays in MEG data sample. The measured branching ratio in a region of interest in the μ→eγ search is consistent with the standard model prediction. It is also the first measurement of the decay from polarized muons. The precision measurement of this mode enables us to use it as one of the normalization channels of μ→eγ decay successfully reducing its uncertainty to less than 5%.

  14. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  15. Determination of the scintillator decay time by the autocorrelation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, V. A.; Morozova, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    An autocorrelation method is developed for determining the composition and decay time of scintillators. This method also allows studying the spatial distribution of nuclear radiation and controlling the amount of the dopants introduced in the scintillator. The decay time is measured from a few nanoseconds to microseconds. It is found out that the decay time increases in plastic scintillators with a wavelength shifter and a Gd doped.

  16. The large scale microwave background anisotropy in decaying particle cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, M.

    1987-06-01

    We investigate the large-scale anisotropy of the microwave background radiation in cosmological models with decaying particles. The observed value of the quadrupole moment combined with other constraints gives an upper limit on the redshift of the decay z/sub d/ < 3-5. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Detection of radon decay products in rainwater

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.I.

    1999-11-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) Environmental Radiation Monitoring System measures and records ambient radiation levels and provides detection capability for radon decay products in rain clouds. These decay products in rainwater tracked into a facility on the shoes of workers can cause false alarms from hand and shoe monitors. The monitors at ANL-E can easily detect the radon decay products, and the 19.6 and 26.8 min half-lives of the beta-particle emitters are long enough in many cases for sufficient activity to still be present to initiate a contamination alarm when the shoes are checked for radioactivity. The Environmental Radiation Monitoring System provides a warning when precipitation contains elevated levels of radon decay products. It is based on a prototype developed at the Super Collider Laboratory, During its first year of operation there were nine alarms from radon decay products with an alarm trigger point set at 30% greater than background. The alarms occurred at both monitoring stations, which are approximately 1,000 m apart, indicating large diameter radon clouds. The increases in background were associated with low atmospheric pressure. There was no correlation with radon released from the coal-burning steam plant on the site. Alarms also occurred when short-lived accelerator-produced radioactivity in the exhaust stack plume passed over the NaI(TI) detector in one of the stations. The 450 MeV proton accelerator near the station produced {sup 12}C, {sup 13}N, and {sup 15}O by spallation of air nuclei. The gamma-ray spectrum from the plume from the accelerator exhaust stack was dominated by the 511 keV annihilation gamma rays from decay of these radionuclides. These gamma rays were easily distinguished from the 609 keV, 1,120 keV, and 1,764 keV gamma rays emitted by the radon decay products.

  18. Bremsstrahlung in {alpha} Decay Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Jentschura, U. D.; Koeck, F.; Lauer, M.; Schwalm, D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of {approx}500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the {alpha} particle and the emitted photon.

  19. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  20. Is decay constant?

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Stroh, H; Altzitzoglou, T; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Kossert, K; Nähle, O; Keightley, J D; Ferreira, K M; Verheyen, L; Bruggeman, M

    2017-09-07

    Some authors have raised doubt about the invariability of decay constants, which would invalidate the exponential-decay law and the foundation on which the common measurement system for radioactivity is based. Claims were made about a new interaction - the fifth force - by which neutrinos could affect decay constants, thus predicting changes in decay rates in correlation with the variations of the solar neutrino flux. Their argument is based on the observation of permille-sized annual modulations in particular decay rate measurements, as well as transient oscillations at frequencies near 11 year(-1) and 12.7 year(-1) which they speculatively associate with dynamics of the solar interior. In this work, 12 data sets of precise long-term decay rate measurements have been investigated for the presence of systematic modulations at frequencies between 0.08 and 20 year(-1). Besides small annual effects, no common oscillations could be observed among α, β(-), β(+) or EC decaying nuclides. The amplitudes of fitted oscillations to residuals from exponential decay do not exceed 3 times their standard uncertainty, which varies from 0.00023 % to 0.023 %. This contradicts the assertion that 'neutrino-induced' beta decay provides information about the deep solar interior. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. On stimulated radiation of black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Ridky, Jan

    2009-10-27

    The Unruh's thermal state in the vicinity of the event horizon of the black hole provides conditions where impinging particles can radiate other particles. The subsequent decays eventually lead to observable radiation of photons and neutrinos. Such radiation can be induced even by massive particles with gravitational interaction only. The hadronic particles would induce {approx}30 MeV gamma radiation from {pi}{sup 0} decays.

  2. A comprehensive study of Interatomic Coulombic Decay in argon dimers: Extracting R-dependent absolute decay rates from the experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, J.; Miteva, T.; Gaire, B.; Sann, H.; Trinter, F.; Keiling, M.; Gehrken, N.; Moradmand, A.; Berry, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Kunitski, M.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, T.; Landers, A. L.; Schöffler, M.; Williams, J. B.; Kolorenč, P.; Gokhberg, K.; Jahnke, T.; Dörner, R.

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present a comprehensive and detailed study of Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) occurring after irradiating argon dimers with XUV-synchrotron radiation. A manifold of different decay channels is observed and the corresponding initial and final states are assigned. Additionally, the effect of nuclear dynamics on the ICD electron spectrum is examined for one specific decay channel. The internuclear distance-dependent width Γ(R) of the decay is obtained from the measured kinetic energy release distribution of the ions employing a classical nuclear dynamics model.

  3. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  4. Trapping of radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Alford, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors analyze the problem of radiation trapping (imprisonment) by the method of Holstein. The process is described by an integrodifferential equation which shows that the effective radiative decay rate of the system depends on the size and the shape of the active medium. Holstein obtains a global decay rate for a particular geometry by assuming that the radiating excited species evolves into a steady state spatial mode. The authors derive a new approximation for the trapped decay which has a space dependent decay rate and is easy to implement in a detailed computer simulation of a plasma confined within an arbitrary geometry. They analyze the line shapes that are relevant to a near-atmospheric-pressure mixture of He and Xe. This line-shape analysis can be utilized in either the Holstein formulae or the space-dependent decay approximation.

  5. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  6. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  7. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  8. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  9. Dissemination and visualisation of reference decay data from Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Christophe; Kellett, Mark A.; Mougeot, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    As a primary laboratory in the field of ionising radiation metrology, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), CEA Saclay, is involved in measurements, evaluations and dissemination of radioactive decay data. Data measurements undertaken by various laboratories are evaluated by an international commission of experts (Decay Data Evaluation Project) coordinated by LNHB staff in order to establish a set of recommended decay scheme data. New nuclide evaluations are regularly added to our website, the Nucléide database, published in the BIPM-5 Monographie series and uploaded to our web application Laraweb, a dedicated tool for alpha and gamma spectrometry. The Mini Table of Radionuclides is produced from time-to-time with data extracted from our database. Various publications are described, along with new search criteria and decay scheme visualisation in Laraweb. Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  10. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  11. Searches for Exotic Decays of the Upsilon(3S) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hooberman, Benjamin; /LBL, Berkeley /Heidelberg U.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present two searches for new physics in {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector. We search for charged lepton-flavour violating decays of the {Upsilon}(3S), which are unobservable in the Standard Model but are predicted to occur in several beyond-the-Standard Model scenarios. We also search for production of a light Higgs or Higgs-like state produced in radiative decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) and decaying to muon pairs.

  12. Inflaton dark matter from incomplete decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Cerezo, Rafael; Rosa, João G.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the decay of the inflaton field may be incomplete, while nevertheless successfully reheating the Universe and leaving a stable remnant that accounts for the present dark matter abundance. We note, in particular, that since the mass of the inflaton decay products is field dependent, one can construct models, endowed with an appropriate discrete symmetry, where inflaton decay is kinematically forbidden at late times and only occurs during the initial stages of field oscillations after inflation. We show that this is sufficient to ensure the transition to a radiation-dominated era and that inflaton particles typically thermalize in the process. They eventually decouple and freeze out, yielding a thermal dark matter relic. We discuss possible implementations of this generic mechanism within consistent cosmological and particle physics scenarios, for both single-field and hybrid inflation.

  13. Factorization in B to V gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, T

    2005-03-28

    The factorization properties of the radiative decays B {yields} V{gamma} are analyzed at leading order in 1/mb using the soft-collinear effective theory. It is shown that the decay amplitudes can be expressed in terms of a B {yields} V form factor evaluated at q{sup 2} = 0, light-cone distribution amplitudes of the B and V mesons, and calculable hard-scattering kernels. The renormalization-group equations in the effective theory are solved to resume perturbative logarithms of the different scales in the decay process. Phenomenological implications for the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching ratio, isospin asymmetry, and CP asymmetries are discussed, with particular emphasis on possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model.

  14. Combinedatomic–nuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyublik, A. Ya.

    2016-05-15

    We analyzed in details the combined decay of the atomic-nuclear state, which consists of the excited 3/2{sup +} level of {sub 63}{sup 153}Eu and K hole, formed in the K capture by {sup 153}Gd. This decay proceeds in two stages. First, the nucleus transfers its energy to 2p electron, which flies into the continuum spectrum, and then returns into 1s hole, emitting γ quantum with the energy equal to the sum of energies of the nuclear and atomic transitions. We estimated the decay probability to be 2.2 × 10{sup −13}, that is much less than the recent experimental findings.

  15. Experimental review of J/psi decays

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.H.

    1987-09-01

    This is a review of J/psi physics from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders presented at the Charm Workshop in Beijing, China. The review includes a brief historical summary of J/psi physics, a general discussion of theoretical models and detailed results on radiative and hadronic J/psi decays from the Mark III, DM2, Crystal Ball and MARK II groups. 119 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Thermal balance in decaying Λ cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puy, D.

    2004-07-01

    We consider cosmological models in which the vacuum decay energy is channeled exclusively into radiation. We investigate the thermal evolution of the Universe with a variable cosmological term which varies as a function of the scale factor a as ΩΛ=ΩΛ,1+ ΩΛ,2 a-m. Using constraints given by the temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background, at redshifts between z=0 and z=4, we find that \\forall m ≠q 0 ΩΛ = ΩΛ,0 a-m models are clearly ruled out. The influence on the thermal decoupling between matter and radiation is also discussed.

  17. Trion decay in colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Jha, Praket P; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2009-04-28

    Using charged films of colloidal CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots of approximately 3.5 to 4.5 nm core diameters and 0.6 to 1.2 nm thick CdS shells, the radiative and nonradiative decay of the negatively charged exciton, the trion T-, are measured. The T- radiative rate is faster than the exciton by a factor of 2.2 +/- 0.4 and estimated at approximately 10 ns. The T- lifetime is approximately 0.7-1.5 ns for the samples measured and is longer than the biexciton lifetime by a factor or 7.5 +/- 1.7.

  18. Charmless B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gradl, Wolfgang; /Edinburgh U.

    2007-03-06

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are a good testing ground for the standard model. The dominant amplitudes contributing to this class of B decays are CKM suppressed tree diagrams and b {yields} s or b {yields} d loop diagrams (''penguins''). These decays can be used to study interfering standard model (SM) amplitudes and CP violation. They are sensitive to the presence of new particles in the loops, and they provide valuable information to constrain theoretical models of B decays. The B factories BABAR at SLAC and Belle at KEK produce B mesons in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B}. So far they have collected integrated luminosities of about 406 fb{sup -1} and 600 fb{sup -1}, respectively. The results presented here are based on subsets of about 200-500 fb{sup -1} and are preliminary unless a journal reference is given.

  19. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  20. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  1. The fitting of radioactive decay data by covariance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Osadebe, F.A.N.

    1994-04-01

    The fitting of radioactive decay data is examined when radiations from two or more processes are indistinguishable. The model is a nonlinear sum of exponentials which cannot be linearized by transformations. Simple and generalized least-squares procedures utilizing covariance matrices are applied. The validity of the midpoint approximation is demonstrated. Guidelines for acquiring adequate radioactive decay data are suggested. The relevance to activation cross section determination is discussed.

  2. Cosmological constraints on R-parity violation from neutrino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Rakshit, Subhendu; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2000-11-01

    If the neutrino mass is nonzero, as hinted by several experiments, then R-parity-violating supersymmetric Yukawa couplings can drive a heavy neutrino decay into lighter states. The heavy neutrino may either decay radiatively into a lighter neutrino, or it may decay into three light neutrinos through a Z-mediated penguin diagram. For a given mass of the decaying neutrino, we calculate its lifetime for the various modes, each mode requiring certain pairs of R-parity-violating couplings to be nonzero. We then check whether the calculated lifetimes fall in zones allowed or excluded by cosmological requirements. For the latter case, we derive stringent new constraints on the corresponding products of R-parity-violating couplings for given values of the decaying neutrino mass.

  3. Decay of long-lived particles in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Stebbins, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that radiative decay of massive fermions can distort the cosmic background radiation. The present investigation is concerned with a study of decay lifetimes in the range from 10 to 100,000 years. Attention is given to the physics involved in determining the effect of radiative decay of massive fermions on observed photon backgrounds. The case of particles which decoupled when the effective number of species in equilibrium was in the range from 50 to 100 is considered, and constraints on particle masses and lifetimes are placed on the basis of observed photon fluxes. This approach provides results with special applications to particles predicted by supersymmetry theories and to right-handed neutrinos. Implications for galaxy formation are also discussed.

  4. Diffuse gamma rays from WIMP decay and annihilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamionkowski, M.

    The author discusses contributions to the diffuse gamma-ray background from decay and annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). He first reviews the calculation of the cosmological abundance of a WIMP and shows that it is simply related to the cross section for annihilation of the WIMP into lighter particles. The diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) from WIMP decay is then discussed. It is shown how observational upper limits to the DEBRA can be used to constrain properties of WIMPs that decay to photons, and the author presents additional new constraints that unitarity of the annihilation cross section imposes on such particles.

  5. Penguin and rare decays in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Akar, Simon

    2015-04-29

    We present recent results from the BABAR Collaboration on radiative decays. These include searches for new physics via measurements of several observables such as the time- dependent CP asymmetry in B0 → K0Sπ π+γ exclusive decays, as well as direct CP asymmetries and branching fractions in B → Xsγ and B → Xs+ inclusive decays.

  6. Prospects for studying penguin decays in LHCb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barsuk, S. Ya. Pakhlova, G. V. Belyaev, I. M.

    2006-04-15

    Investigation of loop penguin decays of beauty hadrons seems promising in testing the predictions of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions and in seeking new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The possibility of studying the radiative penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} K*{sup 0}{gamma}, B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{gamma}, and B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {omega}{gamma} and the gluonic penguin decays B{sup 0} {sup {yields}} {phi}K{sup 0}{sub S} and B{sup 0}{sub s} {sup {yields}} {phi}{phi} in LHCb experiments is discussed.

  7. Enhanced Electroweak Penguin Amplitude in B{yields}VV Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Rohrer, J.; Yang, D.

    2006-04-14

    We discuss a novel electromagnetic penguin contribution to the transverse helicity amplitudes in B decays to two vector mesons, which is enhanced by two powers of m{sub B}/{lambda} relative to the standard penguin amplitudes. This leads to unique polarization signatures in penguin-dominated decay modes such as B{yields}{rho}K* similar to polarization effects in the radiative decay B{yields}K*{gamma} and offers new opportunities to probe the magnitude and chirality of flavor-changing neutral current couplings to photons.

  8. Radiation Education Activities | RadTown USA | | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-06-09

    EPA's Radiation Education Activities are designed to help increase awareness and understanding of radiation concepts among middle and high school students. The activities introduce basic concepts of radiation, non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, radiation protection, radioactive atoms and radioactive decay.

  9. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  11. Exotic Higgs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Felix

    Many models of physics beyond the Standard Model include an extended Higgs sector, responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, and predict the existence of additional Higgs bosons. The Type II Two-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) is a particularly well motivated scenario and a suitable framework for phenomenological studies of extended Higgs sectors. Its low energy spectrum includes two CP-even Higgses h and H, one CP-odd Higgs A, and a pair of charged Higgses H +/-. We study the implication of the LHC Higgs search re- sults on the Type II 2HDM and identify regions of parameter space which are consistent with all experimental and theoretical constraints and can accommo- date the observed 125 GeV Higgs signal. This includes parameter space with a distinctive mass hierarchy which permit a sizable mass splitting between the undiscovered non-Standard Model Higgs states. If this mass splitting is large enough, exotic Higgs decay channels into either a Higgs plus a Standard Model gauge boson or two lighter Higgses open up. This can significantly weaken the reach of the conventional Higgs decay channels into Standard Model particles but also provide the additional opportunity to search for exotic Higgs decay channels. We provide benchmark planes to explore exotic Higgs decay scenar- ios and perform detailed collider analyses to study the exotic decay channels H/A → AZ/HZ and H+/- → AW/HW. We find that these exotic decays offer complementary discovery channels to the conventional modes for both neutral and charged Higgs searches and permit exclusion and discovery in large regions of parameter space.

  12. Flavor changing nucleon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Muramatsu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Recent discovery of neutrino large mixings implies the large mixings in the diagonalizing matrices of 5 bar fields in SU (5) grand unified theory (GUT), while the diagonalizing matrices of 10 fields of SU (5) are expected to have small mixings like Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. We calculate the predictions of flavor changing nucleon decays (FCND) in SU (5), SO (10), and E6 GUT models which have the above features for mixings. We found that FCND can be the main decay mode and play an important role to test GUT models.

  13. Search for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for decays is performed using 3 .0 fb1- of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The f 0(980) meson is reconstructed through its decay to the π + π - final state in the mass window 900 MeV /c 2 < m( π + π -) < 1080 MeV /c 2. No significant signal is observed. The first upper limits on the branching fraction of are set at 90 % (95 %) confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C.; Sikivie, P.

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulations have been carried out of the motion and decay of global strings, including spectrum analysis of the energy stored in the scalar field which describes the global string and the radiated Nambu-Goldstone bosons. We simulated relaxing pieces of bent string and collapsing loops. We find, for the string sizes investigated, that the spectrum of field energy hardens rather than softens while the string decays into Nambu-Goldstone radiation. We argue on theoretical grounds that is indeed the most plausible general behaviour. 19 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Sound decay of notes from acoustic guitars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazen, Erika; Nordberg, Joni; Huber, Thomas M.

    2005-09-01

    The acoustic guitar produces tones by transferring energy from the strings, through the bridge to the top plate, back, and air cavity of the guitar. The vibrations are ultimately radiated into the air as sound. The air-cavity and body resonances of the guitar play an important role in both the tone and the sustain (the time it takes notes to decay) produced by the guitar. To study the relationship between resonances of the guitar and the sustain of notes, the resonance frequencies were measured using a mechanical shaker attached to the body of the guitar and laser Doppler vibrometer to measure its vibration. A string was tuned to different frequencies and plucked. The decay of the note was measured with an electromagnetic pickup that measured the vibration of the string, a vibrometer to measure vibration of the top plate, and microphones located inside and outside the guitar. As expected, when the fundamental frequency of the string was near one of the resonances of the guitar, the decay rate was faster (shorter sustain) than when the string was between resonances. The relationship between the decay rates of the different parts of the system will also be discussed.

  16. Observation of the competitive double-gamma nuclear decay.

    PubMed

    Walz, C; Scheit, H; Pietralla, N; Aumann, T; Lefol, R; Ponomarev, V Yu

    2015-10-15

    The double-gamma (γγ)-decay of a quantum system in an excited state is a fundamental second-order process of quantum electrodynamics. In contrast to the well-known single-gamma (γ)-decay, the γγ-decay is characterized by the simultaneous emission of two γ quanta, each with a continuous energy spectrum. In nuclear physics, this exotic decay mode has only been observed for transitions between states with spin-parity quantum numbers J(π) = 0(+) (refs 1-3). Single-gamma decays-the main experimental obstacle to observing the γγ-decay-are strictly forbidden for these 0(+) → 0(+) transitions. Here we report the observation of the γγ-decay of an excited nuclear state (J(π) = 11/2(-)) that is directly competing with an allowed γ-decay (to ground state J(π) = 3/2(+)). The branching ratio of the competitive γγ-decay of the 11/2(-) isomer of (137)Ba to the ground state relative to its single γ-decay was determined to be (2.05 ± 0.37) × 10(-6). From the measured angular correlation and the shape of the energy spectra of the individual γ-rays, the contributing combinations of multipolarities of the γ radiation were determined. Transition matrix elements calculated using the quasiparticle-phonon model reproduce our measurements well. The γγ-decay rate gives access to so far unexplored important nuclear structure information, such as the generalized (off-diagonal) nuclear electric polarizabilities and magnetic susceptibilities.

  17. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino

    0ν2β decay is a very powerful tool for probing the physics beyond the particle Standard Model. After the recent discovery of neutrino flavor oscillation, we know that neutrinos must have a mass (at least two of them). The 0ν2β decay discovery could fix the neutrino mass scale and its nature (Majorana particle). The unique characteristics of the Borexino detector and its Counting Test Facility (CTF) can be employed for high sensitivity studies of 116Cd 0ν2β decay: the CAMEO project. A first step foresees 24 enriched 116CdWO4 crystals for a total mass of 65 kg in the Counting Test Facility; then, 370 enriched 116CdWO4 crystals, for a total mass of 1 ton in the Borexino detector. Measurements of 116CdWO4 crystals and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the CAMEO experiment sensitivity will be T1/20ν > 1026 y, for the 65 kg phase, and T1/20ν > 1027 y for the 1 ton phase; consequently the limit on the effective neutrino mass will be ≤ 60 meV, and ≤ 20 meV, respectively. This work is based upon the experiments performed by the INR (Kiev) (and from 1998 also by the University of Florence) at the Solotvina Underground Laboratory (Ukraine). The current status of 0ν2β, and future projects of 0ν2β decay research are also briefly reviewed.

  18. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  19. Discoloration & decay in oak

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1971-01-01

    Diseases that result in discoloration and decay of wood are major problems affecting all species of oak. Wounds often start the processes that can lead to these diseases. The type and severity of the wound, the vigor of the tree, the environment, and the aggressiveness of microorganisms that infect are some of the most important factors that determine the nature of the...

  20. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  1. Decaying Neutrinos and Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Philip; Giroux, Mark

    1993-05-01

    We examine the Hogan-Rees photoionization instability (Hogan 1992, Nature 359, 40) in the context of an Omega =1 universe dominated by massive (m_nu ~ 30 eV) decaying neutrinos. In a medium with a smoothly distributed source of ionizing radiation, the photoionization and heating rates on scales larger than the photon mean free path are independent of the local gas density. Thus, underdense regions receive more energy per particle and heat up faster; this nonadiabatic temperature change produces a pressure term which drives the growth of fluctuations. Hogan (1992) showed that in a static medium this instability produces exponential growth, with growth rates which can be much larger than the expansion rate in the expanding universe. We have found that on small scales (comoving wavenumber k > k_m, where k_m corresponds to lambda ~ 10(-2) Mpc present-day), the growth remains exponential in an expanding universe. The instability growth rate is independent of scale for k > k_m, and declines rapidly with increasing scale, so the characteristic mass produced by the instability will correspond to k ~ k_m. For a neutrino energy above the Lyman limit Delta E (~ m_nu /2-13.6 eV) of a few eV and a decay lifetime T ~ 10(24) seconds, fluctuations at the Poisson level on the scale k_m can grow to non-linearity between z ~ 70 (when Compton cooling inhibits the instability) and z ~ 20 (when the intergalactic medium becomes ionized).

  2. Anatomy of decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Lennaert; De Bruyn, Kristof; Fleischer, Robert; Mulder, Mick; Tuning, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The decays B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} probe the CP-violating mixing phases ϕ d and ϕ s , respectively. The theoretical uncertainty of the corresponding determinations is limited by contributions from penguin topologies, which can be included with the help of the U-spin symmetry of the strong interaction. We analyse the currently available data for B {/d, s 0} → D {/d, s -} D {/d, s +} decays and those with similar dynamics to constrain the involved non-perturbative parameters. Using further information from semileptonic B {/d 0} → D {/d -} ℓ + ν ℓ decays, we perform a test of the factorisation approximation and take non-factorisable SU(3)-breaking corrections into account. The branching ratios of the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +}, B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +}, B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/s +} decays show an interesting pattern which can be accommodated through significantly enhanced exchange and penguin annihilation topologies. This feature is also supported by data for the B {/s 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} channel. Moreover, there are indications of potentially enhanced penguin contributions in the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} decays, which would make it mandatory to control these effects in the future measurements of ϕ d and ϕ s . We discuss scenarios for high-precision measurements in the era of Belle II and the LHCb upgrade.

  3. Interatomic Coulombic decay in a He dimer: Ab initio potential-energy curves and decay widths

    SciTech Connect

    Kolorenc, Premysl; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V.; Sisourat, Nicolas; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2010-07-15

    The energy gained by either of the two helium atoms in a helium dimer through simultaneous ionization and excitation can be efficiently transferred to the other helium atom, which then ionizes. The respective relaxation process called interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is the subject of the present paper. Specifically, we are interested in ICD of the lowest of the ionized excited states, namely, the He{sup +}(n=2)He states, for which we calculated the relevant potential-energy curves and the interatomic decay widths. The full-configuration interaction method was used to obtain the potential-energy curves. The decay widths were computed by utilizing the Fano ansatz, Green's-function methods, and the Stieltjes imaging technique. The behavior of the decay widths with the interatomic distance is examined and is elucidated, whereby special emphasis is given to the asymptotically large interatomic separations. Our calculations show that the electronic ICD processes dominate over the radiative decay mechanisms over a wide range of interatomic distances. The ICD in the helium dimer has recently been measured by Havermeier et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 133401 (2010)]. The impact of nuclear dynamics on the ICD process is extremely important and is discussed by Sisourat et al. [Nat. Phys. 6, 508 (2010)] based on the ab initio data computed in the present paper.

  4. Observational consequences of dark energy decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie

    2014-03-01

    We consider the generic scenario of dark energy that arises through the latent heat of a hidden sector first-order cosmological phase transition. This field could account for the extra radiation degree of freedom suggested by the CMB. We present the bubble nucleation solution for the viscous limit. The decay rate of the field is constrained by published kSZ data. This model may provide an explanation of current excess ISW correlations. Cross correlation of current and future surveys can further constrain or test the parameter space. The decay model is plausibly in the observable range and avoids anthropic problems. This class of models is not well constrained by the popular dark energy figure of merit.

  5. Search for the Decay B0 --> ppbar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2004-03-02

    We present the result of a search for the charmless two-body baryonic decay B{sup 0} {yields} p{bar p} in a sample of 88 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. We use Cherenkov radiation to identify protons cleanly, and determine the signal yield with a maximum-likelihood fit technique using kinematic and topological information. We find no evidence for a signal and place a 90% confidence-level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} p{bar p}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7}.

  6. Symmetry relations in nucleon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbert, Anya; Wilczek, Frank

    1980-05-01

    Some experimental consequences of the structure of the effective hamiltonian for nucleon decay are presented. New results concern relations among inclusive decay rates, a striking test of the kinship hypothesis involving μ+ polarization, and soft π theorems.

  7. Renormalization-scale uncertainty in the decay rate of false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Moroi, Takeo; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Shoji, Yutaro

    2016-01-01

    We study radiative corrections to the decay rate of false vacua, paying particular attention to the renormalization-scale dependence of the decay rate. The decay rate exponentially depends on the bounce action. The bounce action itself is renormalization-scale dependent. To make the decay rate scale-independent, radiative corrections, which are due to the field fluctuations around the bounce, have to be included. We show quantitatively that the inclusion of the fluctuations suppresses the scale dependence, and hence is important for the precise calculation of the decay rate. We also apply our analysis to a supersymmetric model and show that the radiative corrections are important for the Higgs-stau system with charge breaking minima.

  8. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    SciTech Connect

    OSORIO, V. B.

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity and equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.

  9. Theory of weak hypernuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dubach, J.F.; Feldman, G.B.; Holstein, B.R. |; de la Torre, L.

    1996-07-01

    The weak nomesonic decay of {Lambda}-hypernuclei is studied in the context of a one-meson-exchange model. Predictions are made for the decay rate, the {ital p}/{ital n} stimulation ratio and the asymmetry in polarized hypernuclear decay. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  10. Protecting log cabins from decay

    Treesearch

    R. M. Rowell; J. M. Black; L. R. Gjovik; W. C. Feist

    1977-01-01

    This report answers the questions most often asked of the Forest Service on the protection of log cabins from decay, and on practices for the exterior finishing and maintenance of existing cabins. Causes of stain and decay are discussed, as are some basic techniques for building a cabin that will minimize decay. Selection and handling of logs, their preservative...

  11. B Decays Involving Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough; /UC, Irvine

    2007-01-09

    Recent BABAR results for decays of B-mesons to combinations of non-charm mesons are presented. This includes B decays to two vector mesons, B {yields} {eta}{prime}({pi}, K, {rho}) modes, and a comprehensive Dalitz Plot analysis of B {yields} KKK decays.

  12. Measurement of upper limits for {upsilon}{yields}{gamma}+R decays

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.

    2007-12-01

    We report on a study of exclusive radiative decays {upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}+R (n=1, 2, 3), with R a narrow resonant hadronic state decaying into four or more charged particles (plus possible neutrals). Using data collected from the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we present upper limits of order 10{sup -4} for such bottomonium two-body decays as a function of the mass M{sub R} recoiling opposite the photon.

  13. Rare top quark decays in Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2007-06-19

    We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t {yields} H0 + c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t {yields} c + {gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  14. Interatomic Coulombic Decay of HeNe dimers after ionization and excitation of He and Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sann, H.; Havermeier, T.; Kim, H.-K.; Sturm, F.; Trinter, F.; Waitz, M.; Zeller, S.; Ulrich, B.; Meckel, M.; Voss, S.; Bauer, T.; Schneider, D.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Wallauer, R.; Schöffler, M.; Williams, J. B.; Dörner, R.; Jahnke, T.

    2017-01-01

    We study the decay of a helium/neon dimer after ionization and simultaneous excitation of either the neon or the helium atom using Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). We find that, depending on the decaying state, either direct Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) (i.e. mediated by a virtual photon exchange), exchange ICD (mediated by electron exchange) or radiative charge transfer occurs. The corresponding channels are identified.

  15. Superallowed Fermi beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    1998-12-21

    Superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} nuclear beta decay provides a direct measure of the weak vector coupling constant, G{sub V}. We survey current world data on the nine accurately determined transitions of this type, which range from the decay of {sup 10}C to that of {sup 54}Co, and demonstrate that the results confirm conservation of the weak vector current (CVC) but differ at the 98% confidence level from the unitarity condition for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. We examine the reliability of the small calculated corrections that have been applied to the data, and assess the likelihood of even higher quality nuclear data becoming available to confirm or deny the discrepancy. Some of the required experiments depend upon the availability of intense radioactive beams. Others are possible today.

  16. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  17. Preliminary Therapy Evaluation of 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) Demonstrates that Cerenkov Radiation Derived from 225Ac Daughter Decay Can Be Detected by Optical Imaging for In Vivo Tumor Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Darpan N.; Hantgan, Roy; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Kock, Nancy D.; Morse, David L.; Batista, Izadora; Mintz, Akiva; Li, King C.; Wadas, Thaddeus J.

    2016-01-01

    The theranostic potential of 225Ac-based radiopharmaceuticals continues to increase as researchers seek innovative ways to harness the nuclear decay of this radioisotope for therapeutic and imaging applications. This communication describes the evaluation of 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) in both biodistribution and Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) studies. Initially, La-DOTA-c(RGDyK) was prepared as a non-radioactive surrogate to evaluate methodologies that would contribute to an optimized radiochemical synthetic strategy and estimate the radioactive conjugate's affinity for αvβ3, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy studies revealed the IC50 and Ki of La-DOTA-c(RGDyK) to be 33 ± 13 nM and 26 ± 11 nM, respectively, and suggest that the complexation of the La3+ ion to the conjugate did not significantly alter integrin binding. Furthermore, use of this surrogate allowed optimization of radiochemical synthesis strategies to prepare 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) with high radiochemical purity and specific activity similar to other 225Ac-based radiopharmaceuticals. This radiopharmaceutical was highly stable in vitro. In vivo biodistribution studies confirmed the radiotracer's ability to target αvβ3 integrin with specificity; specificity was detected in tumor-bearing animals using Cerenkov luminescence imaging. Furthermore, tumor growth control was achieved using non-toxic doses of the radiopharmaceutical in U87mg tumor-bearing nude mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the CLI of αvβ3+ tumors in live animals using the daughter products derived from 225Ac decay in situ. This concept holds promise to further enhance development of targeted alpha particle therapy. PMID:27022417

  18. Project 8 Phase II: Improved beta decay electrons reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guigue, Mathieu; Project 8 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Project 8 collaboration aims to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale using a cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy technique on the beta decays of tritium. The second phase of the project will measure a differential spectrum of tritium beta decays and extract the tritium endpoint value with an eV or sub-eV scale precision. Monoenergetic electrons emitted by gaseous 83mKr atoms can be used to determine the coefficient between the cyclotron frequency and the electron energy and to optimize the instrument configuration for the tritium measurement. We present the progress on the processing of the electron cyclotron radiation signal to reconstruct the beta decay spectrum of krypton and tritium.

  19. Constraints on vacuum decay from the microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overduin, J. M.; Wesson, P. S.; Bowyer, S.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the possible decay of a vacuum with nonzero energy density into radiation. This is one way to introduce a time-varying cosmological constant, which has been suggested as a means of resolving the cosmological constant problem. We concentrate on the model of Freese et al., in which the vacuum energy density is given as a fraction x/(1 - x) of the energy density of radiation. Using equations for the visible extragalactic background light and assuming that the vacuum decay energy is converted entirely into photons with a Planckian spectrum, we show that the decay process would be capable of contributing significantly to the intensity of the cosmic microwave background. Comparison with COBE observations leads to the constraint x is equal to or less than 0.001, which is stronger than the upper limit of 0.07 obtained previously by Freese et al. from considerations of primordial nucleosynthesis.

  20. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  1. Recent results on rare B decays with BaBar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margoni, Martino; BaBar Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Flavor Changing Neutral Current transitions b → sl+l- and b → sγ provide an excellent laboratory for the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Standard Model tests are performed through measurements of the lepton forward-backward asymmetry AFB and the longitudinal K* polarization FL in the decay B →K*l+l-, and the search for the rare decay B+ →K+τ+τ-. From the study of the Kπ+π- system in B radiative-penguin decays, the time-dependent CP asymmetry in the decay B0 →KS0 π+π- γ is measured, together with the branching fractions of B+ →K+π-π+ γ and B0 →K0π-π+ γ.

  2. New studies of allowed pion and muon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Počanić, D.; Palladino, A.; Alonzi, L. P.; Baranov, V. A.; Bertl, W.; Bychkov, M.; Bystritsky, Yu. M.; Frlež, E.; Kalinnikov, V. A.; Khomutov, N. V.; Korenchenko, A. S.; Korenchenko, S. M.; Korolija, M.; Kozlowski, T.; Kravchuk, N. P.; Kuchinsky, N. A.; Lehman, M. C.; Mekterović, D.; Munyangabe, E.; Mzhavia, D.; Robmann, P.; Rozhdestvensky, A. M.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.; Straumann, U.; Supek, I.; Truöl, P.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; van der Schaaf, A.; Velicheva, E. P.; Volnykh, V. P.

    2013-10-01

    Building on the rare pion and muon decay results of the PIBETA experiment, the PEN collaboration has undertaken a precise measurement of Bπe2≡Re/μπ, the π+ → e+ν(γ) decay branching ratio, at the Paul Scherrer Institute, to reduce the present 40× experimental precision lag behind theory to ˜6 - 7×. Because of large helicity suppression, Re/μπ is uniquely sensitive to contributions from non-(V - A) physics, making this decay a particularly suitable subject of study. Even at current precision, the experimental value of Bπe2 provides the most accurate test of lepton universality available. During runs in 2008-10, PEN has accumulated over 2 × 107 πe2 events; a comprehensive maximum-likelihood analysis is currently under way. The new data will also lead to improved precision of the earlier PIBETA results on radiative π and μ decays.

  3. Charmless b decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  4. Non-exponential and oscillatory decays in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, Murray; Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-08-07

    The quantum-mechanical theory of the decay of unstable states is revisited. We show that the decay is non-exponential both in the short-time and long-time limits using a more physical definition of the decay rate than the one usually used. We report results of numerical studies based on Winter's model that may elucidate qualitative features of exponential and non-exponential decay more generally. The main exponential stage is related to the formation of a radiating state that maintains the shape of its wave function with exponentially diminishing normalization. We discuss situations where the radioactive decay displays several exponents. The transient stages between different regimes are typically accompanied by interference of various contributions and resulting oscillations in the decay curve. The decay curve can be fully oscillatory in a two-flavor generalization of Winter's model with some values of the parameters. We consider the implications of that result for models of the oscillations reported by GSI.

  5. Non-exponential and oscillatory decays in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkin, Murray; Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    The quantum-mechanical theory of the decay of unstable states is revisited. We show that the decay is non-exponential both in the short-time and long-time limits using a more physical definition of the decay rate than the one usually used. We report results of numerical studies based on Winter's model that may elucidate qualitative features of exponential and non-exponential decay more generally. The main exponential stage is related to the formation of a radiating state that maintains the shape of its wave function with exponentially diminishing normalization. We discuss situations where the radioactive decay displays several exponents. The transient stages between different regimes are typically accompanied by interference of various contributions and resulting oscillations in the decay curve. The decay curve can be fully oscillatory in a two-flavor generalization of Winter's model with some values of the parameters. We consider the implications of that result for models of the oscillations reported by GSI.

  6. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, HyoJung

    2010-02-01

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb-1 containing 657 millions BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider.

  7. Is radioactive decay really exponential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aston, P. J.

    2012-03-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in atmospheric levels of 14C. We note that predicted atmospheric variation (assuming exponential decay) does not agree with results from modelling, and that theoretical quantum mechanics does not predict exact exponential decay. We give mathematical arguments that non-exponential decay should be expected for slowly decaying isotopes and explore the consequences of non-exponential decay. We propose an experimental test of this prediction of non-exponential decay for 14C. If confirmed, a foundation stone of current dating methods will have been removed, requiring a radical reappraisal both of radioisotope dating methods and of currently predicted dates obtained using these methods.

  8. E6 Gamma Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. Alex; Rae, W. D. M.

    2011-05-06

    Rare electric hexacontatetrapole (E6) transitions are studied in the full (f{sub 7/2},f{sub 5/2},p{sub 3/2},p{sub 1/2}) shell-model basis. Comparison of theory to the results from the gamma decay in {sup 53}Fe and from inelastic electron scattering on {sup 52}Cr provides unique and interesting tests of the valence wavefunctions, the models used for energy density functionals and into the origin of effective charge.

  9. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  10. The observation of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudbery, A.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the usual formulation of quantum mechanics does not satisfactorily describe physical change: the standard formula for a transition probability does not follow from the postulates. Instead, these yield the paradox that a watched pot never bolls (sometimes called "Zeno's paradox"). The paradox is reviewed and the possibility of avoiding it is discussed. A simple model of a decaying system is analysed; the system is then considered in continuous interaction with an apparatus designed to observe the time development of the system. In the light of this analysis, the possibility is considered of replacing the usual (diserete) projection postulate by a continuous projection postulate.

  11. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  12. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  13. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  14. Constraining decaying dark matter with Fermi LAT gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Günter; Weniger, Christoph; Maccione, Luca; Redondo, Javier E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de E-mail: redondo@mppmm.mpg.de

    2010-06-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton off low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. The aim of this paper is providing a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the Fermi LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV. We provide a set of universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model produce the desired constraints. Our response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs such as the electron propagation in the galaxy, the dark matter profile, the gamma-ray fluxes of known origin, and the Fermi LAT data. We study the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. To this end we also take into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. We find that with the available data decaying dark matter cannot be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess.

  15. Search for rare B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutyin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have searched for decays b → sgluon through full reconstruction of a whole event. Two B overlineB decays were found with one of B meson decaying into a final state without charmed particles. We also obtained an upper limit of Br(B + → τ+ντ) of 1.04% at 90% CL.

  16. Rare beauty and charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  17. Rare B Decays at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Palombo, Fernando; Collaboration, for the BABAR

    2009-01-12

    The author presents some of the most recent BABAR measurements for rare B decays. These include rate asymmetries in the B decays to K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and branching fractions in the B decays to l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}, K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The author also reports a search for the B{sup +} decay to K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}.

  18. Study of B → Kππγ decays at the BaBar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graugés, Eugeni; BaBar Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the B meson radiative decays to Kππγ, recorded at the BaBar experiment, are presented. A preliminary measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry related to the hadronic CP eigenstate ρ0 KS0 is extracted from the radiative-penguin decay B0 → KS0 π+π- γ. The decay B+ →K+π+π- γ is used to measure the intermediate resonant amplitudes of different resonances decaying to Kππ through the intermediate states ρ0K+, K*0π+ and (Kπ) S -waveπ+. Assuming (isospin symmetry) that the resonant amplitudes are the same for B0 → KS0 π+π- γ, the time-dependent CP asymmetry of the B0 → KS0 ργ decay is obtained.

  19. Dark radiation from modulated reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2012-03-01

    We show that the modulated reheating mechanism can naturally account for dark radiation, whose existence is hinted by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and the primordial Helium abundance. In this mechanism, the inflaton decay rate depends on a light modulus which acquires almost scale-invariant quantum fluctuations during inflation. We find that the light modulus is generically produced by the inflaton decay and therefore a prime candidate for the dark radiation. Interestingly, an almost scale-invariant power spectrum predicted in the modulated reheating mechanism gives a better fit to the observation in the presence of the extra radiation. We discuss the production mechanism of the light modulus in detail taking account of its associated isocurvature fluctuations. We also consider a case where the modulus becomes the dominant component of dark matter.

  20. Adriatic seiche decay and energy loss to the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerovečki, Ivana; Orlić, Mirko; Hendershott, Myrl C.

    1997-12-01

    A salient feature of sea level records from the Adriatic Sea is the frequent occurrence of energetic seiches of period about 21 h. Once excited by a sudden wind event, such seiches often persist for days. They lose energy either to friction within the Adriatic, or by radiation through Otranto Strait into the Mediterranean. The free decay time of the dominant (lowest mode) seiche was determined from envelopes of handpassed sea level residuals from three locations (Bakar, Split and Dubrovnik) along the Croatian coast during twelve seiche episodes between 1963 and 1986 by taking into consideration only time intervals when the envelopes decreased exponentially in time, when the modelled effects of along-basin winds were smaller than the error of estimation of decay time from the envelopes and when across-basin winds were small. The free decay time thus obtained was 3.2±0.5 d. This value is consonant with the observed width of the spectral peak. The decay caused by both bottom friction and radiation was included in a one dimensional variable cross section shallow water model of the Adriatic. Bottom friction is parameterized by the coefficient k appearing in the linearized bottom stress term ρ0u (where u is the along-basin velocity and ρ0 the fluid density). The coefficient k is constrained by values obtained from linearization of the quadratic bottom stress law using estimates of near bottom currents associated with the seiche, with wind driven currents, with tides and with wind waves. Radiation is parameterized by the coefficient f appearing in the open strait boundary condition ζ = auh/ c (where ζ is sea level, h is depth and c is phase speed). This parameterization of radiation provides results comparable to allowing the Adriatic to radiate into an unbounded half plane ocean. Repeated runs of the model delineate the dependence of model free seiche decay time on k and a, and these plus the estimates of k allow estimation of a. The principle conclusions of this

  1. Cluster decay in the superallowed α decay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, A.; Liotta, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    The emissions of α particles and protons are the dominant decay channels in the neutron-deficient nuclei corresponding to the s d g major shell. The possibility of cluster emission is explored here. It is shown that the cluster decay mode has a small yet sizable branching ratio.

  2. CP violation in K decays and rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1996-12-01

    The present status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is reviewed. In addition selected rare decays of both K and B mesons are discussed. The emphasis is in particular on observables that can be reliably calculated and thus offer the possibility of clean tests of standard model flavor physics. 105 refs.

  3. The decay of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, David

    2017-10-01

    It is understood that the Skyrme model has a topologically interesting baryonic excitation which can model nuclei. So far no stable knotted solutions, of the Skyrme model, have been found. Here we investigate the dynamics of Hopf solitons decaying to the vacuum solution in the Skyrme model. In doing this we develop a matrix-free numerical method to identify the minimum eigenvalue of the Hessian of the corresponding energy functional. We also show that as isospinning Hopf solitons decay, they emit a cloud of isospinning radiation.

  4. Gravitino decay and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) spectrum does not exhibit evidence for the decay of light gravitinos, in contradiction to the suggestion by Olive and Silk (1985), who observed a bump near 1 MeV in the CGB radiation spectrum. It is suggested that better fits to the CGB spectrum would be provided by mechanisms generating a power-law spectrum which is flattened below about 2 MeV. Olive and Silk maintain that the decays of a long-lived particle such as the gravitino may be responsible for features in the gamma-ray spectrum near 1 MeV.

  5. Photon emission and decay from generic Lorentz invariance violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Huerta, H.; Pérez-Lorenzana, A.

    2017-06-01

    One of the most studied approaches in phenomenology to introduce the breaking of Lorentz symmetry is the generic approach. This consist on the modification of the free particle dispersion relation by the addition of an extra power law term of order n on energy or momentum. Using this approach in the photon sector, we have calculated the generic rates for vacuum Cherenkov radiation and photon decay, for any order n, at leading order. Explicit results for the decay and emission rates for the lowest values of n are also presented.

  6. Gravitino decay and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) spectrum does not exhibit evidence for the decay of light gravitinos, in contradiction to the suggestion by Olive and Silk (1985), who observed a bump near 1 MeV in the CGB radiation spectrum. It is suggested that better fits to the CGB spectrum would be provided by mechanisms generating a power-law spectrum which is flattened below about 2 MeV. Olive and Silk maintain that the decays of a long-lived particle such as the gravitino may be responsible for features in the gamma-ray spectrum near 1 MeV.

  7. Effects of vacuum fluctuation suppression on atomic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Excited atoms are shot through a cavity containing an electromagnetic field. > Cavity is in the lowest mode in a non-classical state. > Such a state can suppress the decay rate of the atoms in certain situations. > We show that this effect can be correlated with periods of negative energy density. - Abstract: The use of atomic decay rates as a probe of sub-vacuum phenomena will be studied. Because electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations are essential for radiative decay of excited atomic states, decay rates can serve as a measure of the suppression of vacuum fluctuations in non-classical states, such as squeezed vacua. In such states, the renormalized expectation value of the square of the electric field or the energy density can be periodically negative, representing suppression of vacuum fluctuations. We explore the extent to which atomic decays can be used to measure the mean squared electric field or energy density. We consider a scheme in which atoms in an excited state transit a closed cavity whose lowest mode contains photons in a non-classical state. A crucial feature of our analysis is that we do not employ the rotating wave approximation. The change in the decay probability of the atom in the cavity due to the non-classical state can, under certain circumstances, serve as a measure of the mean squared electric field or energy density in the cavity. We make some estimates of the magnitude of this effect, which indicate that an experimental test might be possible, although very challenging.

  8. Radiation Effects on the Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclide during Transport through the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    L.M. Wang; R.C. Eqing; K.F. Hayes

    2004-03-14

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste inevitably involve understanding the behavior of materials in a radiation field. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance important material properties. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic-scale changes in materials (radiation damage and transmutation).

  9. Accelerated Decay of Radioisotopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    00-01 -2013 Technical June20 l l-June 2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER DTRA MIPR 11-2362M Accelerated Decay of Radioisotopes Sb...268 x E +2 4.788 026 x E -2 6.894 757 4.535 924 x E -1 4.214 011 x E -2 1.601 846 x E +1 1.000 000 x E -2 2.579 760 x E - 4 1.000 000 x E -8...c a y o f R a d i o i s o t o p e s " P r o p o s a l # B R C A L L 0 7 - N - 2 - 0 0 4 7 I l l u s t r a t i o n o f \\ P F R P a s p o

  10. Double beta decay: Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brofferio, Chiara

    2008-11-01

    Calorimeters or, with a more specific definition, low temperature detectors, have been used by now for more than 15 years in Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, with excellent results: they compete with Ge diodes for the rank of detectors with the highest sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass, which is defined as a linear combination of the neutrino mass eigenvalues. After a brief introduction to the argument, with some notes on DBD and on bolometers, an update on the now closed experiment CUORICINO and on its successor, CUORE, is given. The fundamental role of background is then revealed and commented, introducing in this way the importance of the specific experiment now under construction, CUORE-0, that will precede CUORE to help optimizing the struggle against surface background. The possible future of this technique is then commented, quoting important R&D studies that are going on, for active shielding bolometers and for scintillating bolometers coupled with light detecting bolometers.

  11. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2007-06-01

    The recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicate that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavors is different from zero, but are unable to determine the nature and the absolute value of the neutrino mass. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to ascertain if the neutrino is a Majorana particle and to determine under this condition the absolute value of its mass. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is Dirac or Majorana particle.

  12. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  13. Radiation Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  14. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2004-09-15

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form {eta}{sup {gamma}{sub 1}} with {eta} being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for {gamma}{sub 1} to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is <decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/{pi}M. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C({eta}) the scale factor and {alpha} determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  15. Tree Decay - An Expanded Concept

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to clarify further the tree decay concept that expands the classical concept to include the orderly response of the tree to wounding and infection-compartmentalization-and the orderly infection of wounds by many microorganisms-successions. The heartrot concept must be abandoned because it deals only with decay-causing fungi and it...

  16. Tree decay an expanded concept

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1979-01-01

    This publication is the final one in a series on tree decay developed in cooperation with Harold G. Marx, Research Application Staff Assistant, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C. The purpose of this publication is to clarify further the tree decay concept that expands the classical concept to include the orderly response of the tree to...

  17. Theoretical understanding of charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-08-01

    A detailed description of charm decays has emerged. The various concepts involved are sketched. Although this description is quite successful in reproducing the data the chapter on heavy flavour decays is far from closed. Relevant questions like on th real strength of weak annihilation, Penguin operators, etc. are still unanswered. Important directions in future work, both on the experimental and theoretical side are identified.

  18. Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment consists of a 1.1 Kton fine grained iron tracking calorimeter. It has a very isotropic detection structure which along with its flexible trigger will allow detection of multiparticle and neutrino proton decay modes. The detector has now entered its construction stage.

  19. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H. J.

    2004-09-01

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form ηΓ1 with η being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for Γ1 to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is ≪H then the decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/πM. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C(η) the scale factor and α determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  20. Charm and bottom semileptonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'donnell, Patrick J.; Turan, Gürsevil

    1997-07-01

    We review the present status of theoretical attempts to calculate the semileptonic charm and bottom decays and then present a calculation of these decays in the light-front frame at the kinematic point q2=0. This allows us to evaluate the form factors at the same value of q2, even though the allowed kinematic ranges for charm and bottom decays are very different. Also, at this kinematic point the decay is given in terms of only one form factor A0(0). For the ratio of the decay rates given by the E653 collaboration we show that the determination of the ratio of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements is consistent with that obtained from the unitarity constraint, though a new measurement by the E687 Collaboration is about two standard deviations too high. At present, though, the unitarity method still has greater accuracy. Since comparisons of the semileptonic decays into ρ and either electrons or muons will be available soon from the E791 Fermilab experiment, we also look at the massive muon case. We show that for a range of q2 the SU(3)F symmetry breaking is small even though the contributions of the various helicity amplitudes becomes more complicated. For B decays, the decay B-->K*ll¯ at q2=0 involves an extra form factor coming from the photon contribution and so is not amenable to the same kind of analysis, leaving only the decay B-->K*νν¯ as a possibility. As the mass of the decaying particle increases we note that the SU(3) symmetry becomes badly broken at q2=0.

  1. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... doses of radiation, such as radiation from a nuclear power plant accident Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  2. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  3. Non-exponential decay of dark localized surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Pavel; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2012-03-12

    It is shown that the decay of the weakly coupled to radiation (dark) modes of subwavelength plasmonic nanostructures is strongly nonexponential. Their lifetime is overestimated by conventional exponential relaxation time obtained in the standard Markovian approximation. These effects are manifestations of the strong dispersion and near-field feedback. The developed theoretical framework introduces an ensemble of local relaxation degrees of freedom coupled to plasmonic mode in order to describe its decay due to material losses. The macroscopic description of the decay process leads to the specific memory function of the system, evaluated from the modal and material dispersions of the plasmonic nanostructure. Proper knowledge of the relaxation behavior is vital for various applications relying on light-matter interactions of emitters with nanoscale objects, such as fluorescence manipulation, bio-imaging, sensing, spasers, sub-diffraction optics, Raman scattering, and quantum optics.

  4. Decays of heavy vector mesons in the quark confinement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Valit, Yu. M.

    1995-12-01

    We analyze the radiative and hadronic decays of vector heavy mesons within the relativistic quark model with confined light quarks. The only adjustable parameters in this approach are the values of constituent masses of heavy quarks ( M c and M b). We adjust them using the available experimental data from CLEO and ARGUS-collaborations for the D *→ Dγ and D *→ Dπ branching ratios. It is found that the value of M c varies approximately in the interval 1.3 GeV< M c<1.65 GeV. We give the predictions for the absolute values of decay widths and compare our results with those obtained in other approaches. Also we consider the heavy quark limit M Q→∞ with E=M H-MQ=const for the decay amplitudes.

  5. Decay of negative muons bound in {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Grossheim, A.; Bayes, R.; Faszer, W.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gumplinger, P.; Henderson, R. S.; Hillairet, A.; Hu, J.; Marshall, G. M.; Mischke, R. E.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Openshaw, R.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Sheffer, G.; Shin, B.; Bueno, J. F.; Hasinoff, M. D.

    2009-09-01

    We present the first measurement of the energy spectrum up to 70 MeV of electrons from the decay of negative muons after they become bound in {sup 27}Al atoms. The data were taken with the TWIST apparatus at TRIUMF. We find a muon lifetime of (864.6{+-}1.2) ns, in agreement with earlier measurements. The asymmetry of the decay spectrum is consistent with zero, indicating that the atomic capture has completely depolarized the muons. The measured momentum spectrum is in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions at the higher energies, but differences around the peak of the spectrum indicate the need for O({alpha}) radiative corrections to the calculations. The present measurement is the most precise measurement of the decay spectrum of muons bound to any nucleus.

  6. Measurements of the Decay KL→e+e-μ+μ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi-Harati, A.; Alexopoulos, T.; Arenton, M.; Arisaka, K.; Barbosa, R. F.; Barker, A. R.; Barrio, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G. J.; Bown, C.; Bright, S.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M. D.; Cox, B.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Ford, R.; Glazov, A.; Golossanov, A.; Gouffon, P.; Graham, J.; Hamm, J.; Hanagaki, K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Huang, H.; Jejer, V.; Jensen, D. A.; Kessler, R.; Kobrak, H. G.; Kotera, K.; Ladue, J.; Lai, N.; Ledovskoy, A.; McBride, P. L.; Monnier, E.; Nelson, K. S.; Nguyen, H.; Prasad, V.; Qi, X. R.; Quinn, B.; Ramberg, E. J.; Ray, R. E.; Santos, E.; Senyo, K.; Shanahan, P.; Shields, J.; Slater, W.; Solomey, N.; Swallow, E. C.; Taegar, S. A.; Tesarek, R. J.; Toale, P. A.; Tripathi, A.; Tschirhart, R.; Wah, Y. W.; Wang, J.; White, H. B.; Whitmore, J.; Wilking, M.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Worcester, E. T.; Yamanaka, T.; Zukanovich, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    The KTeV experiment at Fermilab has isolated a total of 132events from the rare decay KL→e+e-μ+μ- , with an estimated background of 0.8events. The branching ratio of this mode is determined to be [2.69±0.24(stat)±0.12(syst)]×10-9, with a radiative cutoff of M2eeμμ /M2K>0.95. The first measurement using this mode of the parameter α from the D’Ambrosio-Isidori-Portolès (DIP) model of the KLγ*γ* vertex yields a result of -1.59±0.37, consistent with values obtained from other decay modes. Because of the limited statistics, no sensitivity is found to the DIP parameter β. We use this decay mode to set limits on CP and lepton violation.

  7. Measurements of the Decay KL-->e+ e- mu+ mu-.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Harati, A; Alexopoulos, T; Arenton, M; Arisaka, K; Barbosa, R F; Barker, A R; Barrio, M; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Blucher, E; Bock, G J; Bown, C; Bright, S; Cheu, E; Coleman, R; Corcoran, M D; Cox, B; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Ford, R; Glazov, A; Golossanov, A; Gouffon, P; Graham, J; Hamm, J; Hanagaki, K; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, H; Jejer, V; Jensen, D A; Kessler, R; Kobrak, H G E; Kotera, K; LaDue, J; Lai, N; Ledovskoy, A; McBride, P L; Monnier, E; Nelson, K S; Nguyen, H; Prasad, V; Qi, X R; Quinn, B; Ramberg, E J; Ray, R E; Santos, E; Senyo, K; Shanahan, P; Shields, J; Slater, W; Solomey, N; Swallow, E C; Taegar, S A; Tesarek, R J; Toale, P A; Tripathi, A; Tschirhart, R; Wah, Y W; Wang, J; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wilking, M; Winstein, B; Winston, R; Worcester, E T; Yamanaka, T; Zukanovich, R F

    2003-04-11

    The KTeV experiment at Fermilab has isolated a total of 132 events from the rare decay K(L)-->e+ e- mu+ mu-, with an estimated background of 0.8 events. The branching ratio of this mode is determined to be [2.69+/-0.24(stat)+/-0.12(syst)]x10(-9), with a radiative cutoff of M(2)(ee mu mu)/M(2)(K)>0.95. The first measurement using this mode of the parameter alpha from the D'Ambrosio-Isidori-Portolès (DIP) model of the K(L)gamma*gamma* vertex yields a result of -1.59+/-0.37, consistent with values obtained from other decay modes. Because of the limited statistics, no sensitivity is found to the DIP parameter beta. We use this decay mode to set limits on CP and lepton violation.

  8. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  9. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  10. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  11. Semileptonic and leptonic B decays, circa 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Giulia

    2017-02-01

    We summarize the status of semileptonic and leptonic B decays, including |Vcb| and |Vub| exclusive and inclusive determinations, decays to excited states of the charm meson spectrum and decays into τ leptons.

  12. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  13. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  14. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  15. Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2010-12-01

    Almost exactly seventy years ago and only one year before his tragic disappearance the ingenious idea of Ettore Majorana is becoming one of the most important step in the development of fundamental physics. The problem of the nature of the neutrino, namely if it is a massless Dirac particle different from its antineutrino or a Majorana particle with finite mass, is discussed. In fact the recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicates that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavours is finite. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to determine the effective value of the mass of a Majorana neutrino. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already at least partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is indeed a Majorana particle.

  16. Nonleptonic Bc→VV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Susmita; Dash, P. C.; Priyadarsini, M.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Barik, N.

    2013-11-01

    We study the exclusive nonleptonic Bc→VV decays, within the factorization approximation, in the framework of the relativistic independent quark model, based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The weak form factors are extracted from the overlap integral of meson wave functions derived in the relativistic independent quark model. The predicted branching ratios for different Bc-meson decays are obtained in a wide range, from a tiny value of O(10-6) for Bc→D*D(s)* to a large value of 24.32% for Bc→Bs*ρ-, in general agreement with other dynamical-quark-model predictions. The decay modes Bc→Bs*ρ- and Bc→B*ρ- with high branching ratios of 24.32% and 1.73%, respectively, obtained in this model should be detectable at the LHC and Tevatron in the near future. The b→c, u induced decays are predicted predominantly in the longitudinal mode, whereas the c¯→s¯, d¯ induced decays are obtained in a slightly higher transverse mode. The CP-odd fractions (R⊥) for different decay modes are predicted and those for color-favored Bc→D*D*, D*Ds* decays indicate significant CP violation in this sector.

  17. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  18. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  19. Virus decay and its causes in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Noble, R T; Fuhrman, J A

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that viruses play an influential role within the marine microbial food web. To understand this role, it is important to determine rates and mechanisms of virus removal and degradation. We used plaque assays to examine the decay of infectivity in lab-grown viruses seeded into natural seawater. The rates of loss of infectivity of native viruses from Santa Monica Bay and of nonnative viruses from the North Sea in the coastal seawater of Santa Monica Bay were determined. Viruses were seeded into fresh seawater that had been pretreated in various ways: filtration with a 0.2-(mu)m-pore-size filter to remove organisms, heat to denature enzymes, and dissolved organic matter enrichment to reconstitute enzyme activity. Seawater samples were then incubated in full sunlight, in the dark, or under glass to allow partitioning of causative agents of virus decay. Solar radiation always resulted in increased rates of loss of virus infectivity. Virus isolates which are native to Santa Monica Bay consistently degraded more slowly in full sunlight in untreated seawater (decay ranged from 4.1 to 7.2% h(sup-1)) than nonnative marine bacteriophages which were isolated from the North Sea (decay ranged from 6.6 to 11.1% h(sup-1)). All phages demonstrated susceptibility to degradation by heat-labile substances, as heat treatment reduced the decay rates to about 0.5 to 2.0% h(sup-1) in the dark. Filtration reduced decay rates by various amounts, averaging 20%. Heat-labile, high-molecular-weight dissolved material (>30 kDa, probably enzymes) appeared responsible for about 1/5 of the maximal decay. Solar radiation was responsible for about 1/3 to 2/3 of the maximal decay of nonnative viruses and about 1/4 to 1/3 of that of the native viruses, suggesting evolutionary adaptation to local light levels. Our results suggest that sunlight is an important contributing factor to virus decay but also point to the significance of particles and dissolved substances in seawater.

  20. (Higgs) vacuum decay during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joti, Aris; Katsis, Aris; Loupas, Dimitris; Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Urbano, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    We develop the formalism for computing gravitational corrections to vacuum decay from de Sitter space as a sub-Planckian perturbative expansion. Non-minimal coupling to gravity can be encoded in an effective potential. The Coleman bounce continuously deforms into the Hawking-Moss bounce, until they coincide for a critical value of the Hubble constant. As an application, we reconsider the decay of the electroweak Higgs vacuum during inflation. Our vacuum decay computation reproduces and improves bounds on the maximal inflationary Hubble scale previously computed through statistical techniques.

  1. Decays of the b quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  2. Tensor interactions and τ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina Nava, J. J.; López Castro, G.

    1995-09-01

    We study the effects of charged tensor weak currents on the strangeness-changing decays of the τ lepton. First, we use the available information on the K+e3 form factors to obtain B(τ--->K-π0ντ)~10-4 when the Kπ system is produced in an antisymmetric tensor configuration. Then we propose a mechanism for the direct production of the K*2(1430) in τ decays. Using the current upper limit on this decay we set a bound on the symmetric tensor interactions.

  3. Glueball decay in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Tan, C.-I; Terashima, Seiji

    2008-04-15

    Using holographic QCD based on D4-branes and D8-anti-D8-branes, we have computed couplings of glueballs to light mesons. We describe glueball decay by explicitly calculating its decay widths and branching ratios. Interestingly, while glueballs remain less well understood both theoretically and experimentally, our results are found to be consistent with the experimental data for the scalar glueball candidate f{sub 0}(1500). More generally, holographic QCD predicts that decay of any glueball to 4{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed, and that mixing of the lightest glueball with qq mesons is small.

  4. Slow Interatomic Coulombic Decay of Multiply Excited Neon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iablonskyi, D.; Nagaya, K.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Kumagai, Y.; Mondal, S.; Tachibana, T.; Takanashi, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Matsunami, K.; Johnsson, P.; Piseri, P.; Sansone, G.; Dubrouil, A.; Reduzzi, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Vozzi, C.; Devetta, M.; Negro, M.; Calegari, F.; Trabattoni, A.; Castrovilli, M. C.; Faccialà, D.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Möller, T.; Mudrich, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Coreno, M.; Alagia, M.; Schütte, B.; Berrah, N.; Kuleff, A. I.; Jabbari, G.; Callegari, C.; Plekan, O.; Finetti, P.; Spezzani, C.; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Penco, G.; Serpico, C.; De Ninno, G.; Nikolov, I.; Diviacco, B.; Di Mitri, S.; Giannessi, L.; Prince, K. C.; Ueda, K.

    2016-12-01

    Ne clusters (˜5000 atoms ) were resonantly excited (2 p →3 s ) by intense free electron laser (FEL) radiation at FERMI. Such multiply excited clusters can decay nonradiatively via energy exchange between at least two neighboring excited atoms. Benefiting from the precise tunability and narrow bandwidth of seeded FEL radiation, specific sites of the Ne clusters were probed. We found that the relaxation of cluster surface atoms proceeds via a sequence of interatomic or intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) processes while ICD of bulk atoms is additionally affected by the surrounding excited medium via inelastic electron scattering. For both cases, cluster excitations relax to atomic states prior to ICD, showing that this kind of ICD is rather slow (picosecond range). Controlling the average number of excitations per cluster via the FEL intensity allows a coarse tuning of the ICD rate.

  5. Slow Interatomic Coulombic Decay of Multiply Excited Neon Clusters.

    PubMed

    Iablonskyi, D; Nagaya, K; Fukuzawa, H; Motomura, K; Kumagai, Y; Mondal, S; Tachibana, T; Takanashi, T; Nishiyama, T; Matsunami, K; Johnsson, P; Piseri, P; Sansone, G; Dubrouil, A; Reduzzi, M; Carpeggiani, P; Vozzi, C; Devetta, M; Negro, M; Calegari, F; Trabattoni, A; Castrovilli, M C; Faccialà, D; Ovcharenko, Y; Möller, T; Mudrich, M; Stienkemeier, F; Coreno, M; Alagia, M; Schütte, B; Berrah, N; Kuleff, A I; Jabbari, G; Callegari, C; Plekan, O; Finetti, P; Spezzani, C; Ferrari, E; Allaria, E; Penco, G; Serpico, C; De Ninno, G; Nikolov, I; Diviacco, B; Di Mitri, S; Giannessi, L; Prince, K C; Ueda, K

    2016-12-30

    Ne clusters (∼5000  atoms) were resonantly excited (2p→3s) by intense free electron laser (FEL) radiation at FERMI. Such multiply excited clusters can decay nonradiatively via energy exchange between at least two neighboring excited atoms. Benefiting from the precise tunability and narrow bandwidth of seeded FEL radiation, specific sites of the Ne clusters were probed. We found that the relaxation of cluster surface atoms proceeds via a sequence of interatomic or intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) processes while ICD of bulk atoms is additionally affected by the surrounding excited medium via inelastic electron scattering. For both cases, cluster excitations relax to atomic states prior to ICD, showing that this kind of ICD is rather slow (picosecond range). Controlling the average number of excitations per cluster via the FEL intensity allows a coarse tuning of the ICD rate.

  6. Precision Measurement of Nuclear Electron Capture Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Haoyu; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The method of accurately measuring the radioactive decay constant of a isotope by measuring the decay rate as a function of time requires that both the detector and environment be stable over time periods comparable to the life-time of the isotope. In addition statistical accuracy requires initial counting rates be high but limited by the dead time capability of the data collection system and the detectors double-event resolving time. A High Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer, sensitive to radiation from 3-KeV to over 3-MeV, has been built to measure radioactive decay constants to a level of 10-5 10-6 at a location only 6 meters from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Such accuracy requires understanding of, background, signal-processing algorithms, and both the double and triple event pile-up in the observed spectrum. The approach taken is to fit the collected energy spectrum with invariant shapes, independent of event rate. By fixing the source-detector geometry and environmental conditions, the invariant shapes are (1) ideal energy spectrum without pile-up and background, (2) the ideal double event pile-up spectrum, (3) the ideal triple event pile-up spectrum, and (4) the stable background spectrum. A method is presented that finds these ideal shapes using the collected data in situ. Taking this approach the HPGe detector photopeak shape in the absence of background and pile-up is presented showing associated structure over a range of 7 orders of magnitude.

  7. Mass spectra and decays of ground and orbitally excited cb¯ states in nonrelativistic quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Antony Prakash; Bhat, Manjunath; Vijaya Kumar, K. B.

    2017-02-01

    The complete spectrum of cb¯ states is obtained in a phenomenological nonrelativistic quark model (NRQM), which consists of a confinement potential and one gluon exchange potential (OGEP) as effective quark-antiquark potential. We make predictions for the radiative decay (E1 and M1) widths and weak decay widths of cb¯ states in the framework of NRQM formalism.

  8. Radiative B Meson Decay as a Probe of Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Time-Dependent CP Violation in B0 → K0S π0 γ and the B → Φ K γ Branching Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Marion Tuggle IV

    2009-01-01

    The author presents measurements of radiative B meson decays to the final states Ks0π0γ and KΦγ based on data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC. In a data sample of 467 million B$\\bar{B}$ pairs, the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B0 → Ks0π0γ decays is measured in two regions of Ks00 invariant mass. In the K* region, 0.8 < m(Ks0π0) < 1.0 GeV/c2, we find SK*γ = -0.03 ± 0.29 ± 0.03 and CK*γ = -0.14 ± 0.16 ± 0.03; in the range 1.1 < m(Ks0π0) < 1.8 GeV/c2, they find SKs0π0γ = -0.78 ± 0.59 ± 0.09 and C Ks0π0γ = -0.36 ± 0.33 ± 0.04. With a sample of 228 million B$\\bar{B}$ pairs they measure the branching fraction β(B+ → K+Φγ) = (3.5 ± 0.6 ± 0.4) x 10-6 and set the limit β(B0→ K0Φγ) < 2.7 x 10-6 at 90% confidence level. The direct CP asymmetry in B+ → K+Φγ is found to be A CP = (-26 ±14 ± 5)%. In each case the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  9. Search for axion production in UPSILON(1S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Fairfield, K.H.

    1988-06-01

    We present a search for axion production in radiative UPSILON(1S) decays using the Crystal Ball detector. We find no evidence for a signal and give a new upper limit, Br(UPSILON(1S)..-->..a/degree/..gamma..) < 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/, for m/sub a/ < 2m/sub e/. Results from previous axion searches in both the UPSILON and J//psi/ systems are discussed and compared to theoretical predictions.

  10. Nonsingular decaying vacuum cosmology and entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Basilakos, Spyros; Solà, Joan

    2015-04-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of a decaying vacuum cosmology describing the entire cosmological history evolving between two extreme (early and late time) de Sitter eras is investigated. The thermal evolution from the early de Sitter to the radiation phase is discussed in detail. The temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically determined. The entropy of the effectively massless particles is initially zero but evolves continuously to the present day maximum value within the current Hubble radius, in natural units. By using the Gibbons-Hawking temperature relation for the de Sitter spacetime, it is found that the ratio between the primeval and the late time vacuum energy densities is , as required by some naive estimates from quantum field theory.

  11. Decaying Higgs Fields and Cosmological Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patla, B.; Nemiroff, R. J.

    2005-05-01

    The observed dark energy in the universe might give particles inertial mass. We investigate one realization of this idea, that the dark energy field might be a decayed scalar component of a scalar field in the early universe that creates inertial mass through spontaneous symmetry breaking, e.g. a Higgs field. To investigate this possibility, the cosmological Friedmann equation of energy balance is augmented in a standard way to incorporate a minimally coupled cosmological Higgs. For epochs where the expansion of the universe is driven by matter and radiation and not the scalar field, the observed hidden nature of the Higgs field can be codified into a single differential equation that we call the ``hidden higgs" condition. The resulting differential equation is solved for the time dependant scalar field and a simple and interesting solution is found analytically. Such a Higgs field decays from Planck scale energies rapidly and approximately exponentially from onset, leaving only the initially negligible constant term of the potential as a final cosmological constant. Such evolution replaces the hierarchy problem with the problem of explaining why such evolution is physically justified, leaving the coincidence problem still unresolved.

  12. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  13. Lepton flavor violating {tau} and B decays and heavy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang

    2004-12-01

    We study lepton flavor violating (LFV) {tau} and B decays in models with heavy neutrinos to constrain the mixing matrix parameters U{sub {tau}}{sub N}. We find that the best current constraints when the heavy neutrinos are purely left handed come from LFV radiative {tau} decay modes. To obtain competitive constraints in LFV B decay, it is necessary to probe b{yields}X{sub s}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}} at the 10{sup -7} level. When the heavy neutrinos have both left- and right-handed couplings, the mixing parameters can be constrained by studying LFV B decay modes and LFV {tau} decay into three charged leptons. We find that the branching ratios B({tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}l{sub 1}{sup {+-}}l{sub 2}{sup {+-}}l{sub 3}{sup {+-}}), B(B{sub s}{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}) and B(b{yields}X{sub s}l{sub 1}{sup {+-}}l{sub 2}{sup {+-}}) need to be probed at the 10{sup -8} level in order to constrain the mixing parameters beyond what is known from unitarity.

  14. Rare B-Meson Decays at the Crossroads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed

    Experimental era of rare B-decays started with the measurement of B → K*γ by CLEO in 1993, followed by the measurement of the inclusive decay B → Xsγ in 1995, which serves as the standard candle in this field. The frontier has moved in the meanwhile to the experiments at the LHC, in particular, LHCb, with the decay B0 → μ+μ- at about 1 part in 1010 being the smallest branching fraction measured so far. Experimental precision achieved in this area has put the standard model to unprecedented stringent tests and more are in the offing in the near future. I review some key measurements in radiative, semileptonic and leptonic rare B-decays, contrast them with their estimates in the SM, and focus on several mismatches reported recently. They are too numerous to be ignored, yet, standing alone, none of them is significant enough to warrant the breakdown of the SM. Rare B-decays find themselves at the crossroads, possibly pointing to new horizons, but quite likely requiring an improved theoretical description in the context of the SM. An independent precision experiment such as Belle II may help greatly in clearing some of the current experimental issues.

  15. Rare B-meson decays at the crossroads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Experimental era of rare B-decays started with the measurement of B → K∗γ by CLEO in 1993, followed by the measurement of the inclusive decay B → Xsγ in 1995, which serves as the standard candle in this field. The frontier has moved in the meanwhile to the experiments at the LHC, in particular, LHCb, with the decay B0 → μ+μ- at about 1 part in 1010 being the smallest branching fraction measured so far. Experimental precision achieved in this area has put the standard model to unprecedented stringent tests and more are in the offing in the near future. I review some key measurements in radiative, semileptonic and leptonic rare B-decays, contrast them with their estimates in the SM, and focus on several mismatches reported recently. They are too numerous to be ignored, yet, standing alone, none of them is significant enough to warrant the breakdown of the SM. Rare B-decays find themselves at the crossroads, possibly pointing to new horizons, but quite likely requiring an improved theoretical description in the context of the SM. An independent precision experiment such as Belle II may help greatly in clearing some of the current experimental issues.

  16. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  17. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  18. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  19. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  20. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  1. CP violation in sbottom decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and top quarks. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases at the LHC.

  2. Nuclear decay data files of the Dosimetry Research Group

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Westfall, R.J.; Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.

    1993-12-01

    This report documents the nuclear decay data files used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the utility DEXRAX which provides access to the files. The files are accessed, by nuclide, to extract information on the intensities and energies of the radiations associated with spontaneous nuclear transformation of the radionuclides. In addition, beta spectral data are available for all beta-emitting nuclides. Two collections of nuclear decay data are discussed. The larger collection contains data for 838 radionuclides, which includes the 825 radionuclides assembled during the preparation of Publications 30 and 38 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and 13 additional nuclides evaluated in preparing a monograph for the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The second collection is composed of data from the MIRD monograph and contains information for 242 radionuclides. Abridged tabulations of these data have been published by the ICRP in Publication 38 and by the Society of Nuclear Medicine in a monograph entitled ``MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes.`` The beta spectral data reported here have not been published by either organization. Electronic copies of the files and the utility, along with this report, are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Äysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.

    2012-02-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A&M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23Al, 27P, 31Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22Na(p,γ)23Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22Na in novae), 26mAl(p,γ)27Si and 30P(p,γ)31S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  4. Mechanisms and Rates of Decay of Marine Viruses in Seawater †

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Curtis A.; Chen, Feng

    1992-01-01

    Loss rates and loss processes for viruses in coastal seawater from the Gulf of Mexico were estimated with three different marine bacteriophages. Decay rates in the absence of sunlight ranged from 0.009 to 0.028 h-1, with different viruses decaying at different rates. In part, decay was attributed to adsorption by heat-labile particles, since viruses did not decay or decayed very slowly in seawater filtered through a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter (0.2-μm-filtered seawater) and in autoclaved or ultracentrifuged seawater but continued to decay in cyanide-treated seawater. Cyanide did cause decay rates to decrease, however, indicating that biological processes were also involved. The observations that decay rates were often greatly reduced in 0.8- or 1.0-μm-filtered seawater, whereas bacterial numbers were not, suggested that most bacteria were not responsible for the decay. Decay rates were also reduced in 3-μm-filtered or cycloheximide-treated seawater but not in 8-μm-filtered seawater, implying that flagellates consumed viruses. Viruses added to flagellate cultures decayed at 0.15 h-1, corresponding to 3.3 viruses ingested flagellate-1 h-1. Infectivity was very sensitive to solar radiation and, in full sunlight, decay rates were 0.4 to 0.8 h-1. Even when UV-B radiation was blocked, rates were as high as 0.17 h-1. Calculations suggest that in clear oceanic waters exposed to full sunlight, most of the virus decay, averaged over a depth of 200 m, would be attributable to solar radiation. When decay rates were averaged over 24 h for a 10-m coastal water column, loss rates of infectivity attributable to sunlight were similar to those resulting from all other processes combined. Consequently, there should be a strong diel signal in the concentration of infectious viruses. In addition, since sunlight destroys infectivity more quickly than virus particles, a large proportion of the viruses in seawater is probably not infective. Images PMID:16348812

  5. Update and evaluation of decay data for spent nuclear fuel analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Teodosi; Wemple, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Studsvik's approach to spent nuclear fuel analyses combines isotopic concentrations and multi-group cross-sections, calculated by the CASMO5 or HELIOS2 lattice transport codes, with core irradiation history data from the SIMULATE5 reactor core simulator and tabulated isotopic decay data. These data sources are used and processed by the code SNF to predict spent nuclear fuel characteristics. Recent advances in the generation procedure for the SNF decay data are presented. The SNF decay data includes basic data, such as decay constants, atomic masses and nuclide transmutation chains; radiation emission spectra for photons from radioactive decay, alpha-n reactions, bremsstrahlung, and spontaneous fission, electrons and alpha particles from radioactive decay, and neutrons from radioactive decay, spontaneous fission, and alpha-n reactions; decay heat production; and electro-atomic interaction data for bremsstrahlung production. These data are compiled from fundamental (ENDF, ENSDF, TENDL) and processed (ESTAR) sources for nearly 3700 nuclides. A rigorous evaluation procedure of internal consistency checks and comparisons to measurements and benchmarks, and code-to-code verifications is performed at the individual isotope level and using integral characteristics on a fuel assembly level (e.g., decay heat, radioactivity, neutron and gamma sources). Significant challenges are presented by the scope and complexity of the data processing, a dearth of relevant detailed measurements, and reliance on theoretical models for some data.

  6. Continuum-state and bound-state β--decay rates of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, M.; Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanova, V. A.; Marton, J.; Pitschmann, M.; Serebrov, A. P.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2009-09-01

    For the β--decay of the neutron we analyze the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. We calculate the decay rates, the electron energy spectrum for the continuum-state decay mode, and angular distributions of the decay probabilities for the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. The theoretical results are obtained for the new value for the axial coupling constant gA=1.2750(9), obtained recently by H. Abele [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 60, 1 (2008)] from the fit of the experimental data on the coefficient of the correlation of the neutron spin and the electron momentum of the electron energy spectrum of the continuum-state decay mode. We take into account the contribution of radiative corrections and the scalar and tensor weak couplings. The calculated angular distributions of the probabilities of the bound-state decay modes of the polarized neutron can be used for the experimental measurements of the bound-state β--decays into the hyperfine states with total angular momentum F=1 and scalar and tensor weak coupling constants.

  7. α-decay under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, N.

    2016-12-01

    The physical phenomenon of α-decay is a key feature in several geophysical models describing the structure and formation of Earth and our galaxy. Two of the most prominent characteristics of Earth determined from the α-decay phenomenon are 1) the Earth's age, determined by the relative abundance of α-decaying elements such as Th and U in meteorites and on Earth, and 2) the Earth's source of heat, with roughly 70% of the radioactive heat production attributed to α-decay of U and Th. Textbooks on nuclear phenomenon proclaim that the α-decay lifetime of elements is a constant of nature; however, if it is affected by environmental conditions, the models mentioned above must be refined. In this work [1] we suggest that a change in the lifetime of the α-decay process in 241Am may be detected at high pressures achievable in the laboratory [2], essentially, due to the extraordinary high compression of Am at megabar pressures. The Thomas-Fermi model [3] was used to calculate the effect of pressure on the atomic electron density, and the corresponding change in the atomic potential of 241Am. It was found that at pressures of about 0.5 Mbar the relative change in the lifetime of 241Am is about -2 × 10-4. Detailed experimental procedures to measure this effect by compressing the 241Am metal in a diamond-anvil cell are presented, with diagnostics based on counting the 60-keV γ rays accompanying α decay and/or mass spectrometry on the 237Np/241Am isotope ratio of samples recovered after compression for an extended period of time. [1] N. Nissim, F. Belloni, S. Eliezer, D. Delle Side, J. M. Martinez Val, "Toward a measurement of α-decay lifetime change at high pressure: The case of 241Am", Phys. Rev. C., 94, 014601 (2016).[2] S. Eliezer, J.M. Martinez Val, M. Piera, "Alpha decay perturbations by atomic effects at extreme conditions", Phys. Lett. B, 672, 372(2009).[3] F. Belloni," Alpha decay in electron environments of increasing density: From the bare nucleus to

  8. Few body hypernuclear systems: Weak decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical situation regarding mesonic and non-mesonic decays of light hypernuclei is reviewed. Although some models give reasonable results for pionic decays as well as the total weak decay rate, no existing approach explains, even qualitatively, the observed spin-isospin dependence of ..lambda..N ..-->.. NN non-mesonic weak decays. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Dalitz plot analysis of three-body charmonium decays at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Antimo

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary results on the measurement of the I=1/2 Kπ S-wave through a model independent partial wave analysis of ηc decays to KS0 K+π- and K+ K-π0 produced in two-photon interactions. We also perform a Dalitz plot analysis of the J/ψ decays to π+π-π0 and K+ K-π0 produced in the initial state radiation process.

  10. Spontaneous decay of an atom excited in a dense and disordered atomic ensemble: Quantum microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraptsev, A. S.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2014-07-01

    On the basis of general theoretical results developed previously [I. M. Sokolov et al., J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 112, 246 (2011), 10.1134/S106377611101016X], we analyze spontaneous decay of a single atom inside cold atomic clouds under conditions when the averaged interatomic separation is less than or comparable with the wavelength of quasiresonant radiation. Beyond the decay dynamics we analyze shifts of resonance as well as distortion of the spectral shape of the atomic transition.

  11. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  12. Non-D Anti-D Decays of the psi-prime-prime (3770)

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, W.A.

    2004-06-02

    A search for inclusive non-D{bar B} decays of the {Psi}{double_prime}(3770) is performed in a sample of 9.56 {+-} 0.48 pb{sup -1} collected by the Mark III detector at the SPEAR storage ring, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. To be more specific, a search for inclusive {bar p}, {bar {Lambda}}, and {phi} decay modes of the {Psi}{double_prime}(3770) is performed in this data sample. Backgrounds due to the decays of the radiatively produced {Psi}{prime}(3686) are subtracted. Also backgrounds due to the production of the same final state by nonresonant e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation are subtracted. After further background subtractions from D meson decays and particle misidentification and efficiency corrections no events are seen and upper limits are placed for each one of these decay channels.

  13. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy Print A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  14. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  15. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  16. Gamma-ray lines from novae. [relationship to radioactive decay and positron annihilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Hoyle, F.

    1974-01-01

    An appropriate gamma-ray telescope could detect the gamma-rays associated with radioactive decays. The observable lines would be the annihilation radiation following the positron emission of N-13, O-14, O-15, and Na-22 and the 2.312-MeV line emitted following the O-14 decay and the 1.274-MeV line emitted following the Na-22 decay. The experimental possibility should be borne in mind for the occurrence of novae within a few kiloparsecs.

  17. c b \\xAF spectrum and decay properties with coupled channel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Antony Prakash; Bhat, Manjunath; Kumar, K. B. Vijaya

    2017-03-01

    The mass spectrum of c b ¯ states has been obtained using the phenomenological relativistic quark model (RQM) with coupled channel effects. The Hamiltonian used in the investigation has confinement potential and confined one gluon exchange potential (COGEP). In the frame work of the RQM, a study of magnetic dipole and electric dipole transitions and radiative decays of c b ¯ states has been made. The weak decay widths in the spectator quark approximation have been estimated. An overall agreement is obtained with the experimental masses and decay widths.

  18. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  19. Photo induced three body decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, Christof; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    The photo induced three body decay : ABC hnu A B C, where a molecule ABC decays into three fragments A, B and C upon irradiation, is reviewed. Various experimental and theoretical techniques for the investigation of this reaction and their application to a wide range of molecular species are discussed. Emphasis is laid on the distinction between concerted and stepwise processes, consisting of one single or two consecutive kinetic events, respectively. The concerted fragmentation scheme is further classified as being of either synchronous or asynchronous character, depending on whether or not the bond breaking processes take place in unison. The three body decays of acetone, azomethane and s-tetrazine are discussed in detail as prototypes for these mechanisms. A novel kinematic analysis approach, based on the evaluation of fragment kinetic energy distributions, is presented and applied to the ultraviolet photodissociation of phosgene. Competing pathways are found to be operative, dominated by the asynchronous concerted mechanism with preferential forward scattering of the carbon monoxide fragment. The synchronous concerted decay plays a minor role under significant excitation of the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes of the parent molecule. Finally the power of the newly developed method for the analysis of the three body decay of a small polyatomic molecule is highlighted.

  20. Two surface plasmon decay of plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kluge, T. Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-06-15

    The interaction of ultra-intense lasers with solid foils can be used to accelerate ions to high energies well exceeding 60 MeV [Gaillard et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056710 (2011)]. The non-linear relativistic motion of electrons in the intense laser radiation leads to their acceleration and later to the acceleration of ions. Ions can be accelerated from the front surface, the foil interior region, and the foil rear surface (target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), most widely used), or the foil may be accelerated as a whole if sufficiently thin (radiation pressure acceleration). Here, we focus on the most widely used mechanism for laser ion-acceleration of TNSA. Starting from perfectly flat foils, we show by simulations how electron filamentation at or inside the solid leads to spatial modulations in the ions. The exact dynamics depend very sensitively on the chosen initial parameters which has a tremendous effect on electron dynamics. In the case of step-like density gradients, we find evidence that suggests a two-surface-plasmon decay of plasma oscillations triggering a Raileigh-Taylor-like instability.