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Sample records for radiative lifetime measurements

  1. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  2. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Gd I levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xue; Zhou, Chunxiao; Dai, Zhenwen

    2017-04-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes for 27 excited levels of Gd I in the energy range from 28215.140 to 43963.900 cm-1 were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique in an atom beam produced by laser-induced plasma. All the lifetimes obtained in this paper range from 8.4 to 833 ns with the uncertainties within ten percent. A comparison with a few previously reported values was performed and good agreement between them was achieved. To our best knowledge, 18 lifetimes of Gd I are reported for the first time.

  3. The Measurement of Radiative Lifetimes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence: Experimental Review and Astrophysical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Sneden, C.

    2005-01-01

    One of the standard methods for determining atomic transition probabilities is to combine branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry with radiative lifetimes measurements using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). This combination of techniques provides an efficient method for measuring large sets of accurate, absolute transition probabilities. The radiative lifetimes, which provide the overall scaling for the transition probabilities, can be measured routinely to ± 5% accuracy using time-resolved LIF. Although the time-resolved LIF technique we use does not achieve the accuracy of fast-beam LIF, the time-resolved technique does enable us to make measurements at a far greater rate (hundreds of level lifetimes per year). Care must be taken, however, to understand and control the systematic effects in time-resolved LIF measurements to maintain ± 5% accuracy over a wide dynamic range and hundreds of lifetime measurements. Over the last 25 years, we have measured lifetimes for 47 spectra using time-resolved LIF. Our atomic beam source can produce a slow beam of neutral and singly ionized atoms of nearly any element. Lifetimes from 2 ns to ~2 µs can be measured for energy levels ranging from 15,000 to ~60,000 cm-1. In this review we will describe our method of measuring radiative lifetimes with an emphasis on possible errors and techniques used for controlling them. The electronic bandwidth, linearity, and overall fidelity of the fast photomultiplier, cable connections, and transient waveform digitizer are concerns. Possible errors from atomic collisions, radiation trapping, Zeeman quantum beats, hyperfine quantum beats, atoms/ions escaping from the observation region before radiating, and from radiative cascade through lower levels must be understood and controlled. We will then present a recent example of the application of our transition probability data to abundance determinations in the sun and in metal-poor halo stars (Den Hartog E A et al

  4. Effect on radiation trapping on measured excited-state lifetimes in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, M.P.

    1996-04-01

    A refractive index matched experimental setup that largely eliminates the effects of radiation trapping on measured excited-state lifetimes in high refractive index solids is presented. An index-matched glass sphere was used to measure the room-temperature lifetimes of {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} in YAG:l%Yb{sup 3+} and {sup 4}I{sub 1/2} in YLF:5%Er{sup 3+}, yielding the record low values of 948.9{plus_minus}0.6 {mu}s and 3.85{plus_minus}0.01 ms, respectively. It is concluded that lifetimes from non index-matched experiments are most likely to be significantly over estimated in high refractive-index solids for excited states with a large radiative component to the ground-state multiplet and a high reabsorption cross section. The presented technique is easily applicable to room-temperature excited-state lifetime measurements of many luminescent solids.

  5. Direct Measurement of the Radiative Lifetime of Vibrationally Excited OH Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard; Loo, Mark P.J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2005-07-01

    Neutral molecules, isolated in the gas phase, can be prepared in a long-lived excited state and stored in a trap. The long observation time afforded by the trap can then be exploited to measure the radiative lifetime of this state by monitoring the temporal decay of the population in the trap. This method is demonstrated here and used to benchmark the Einstein A coefficients in the Meinel system of OH. A pulsed beam of vibrationally excited OH radicals is Stark decelerated and loaded into an electrostatic quadrupole trap. The radiative lifetime of the upper {lambda}-doublet component of the X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2}, v=1, J=3/2 level is determined as 59.0{+-}2.0 ms, in good agreement with the calculated value of 58.0{+-}1.0 ms.

  6. The Radiative Lifetime of O2(1Delta) From Sunset SABER Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, H.

    2008-12-01

    Electronically excited O2(1Δ) is produced during the day from photolysis of ozone. Its emission at 1.27 μm has long been used to infer ozone abundances during the day. The 1.27 μm emission is also seen at night. A better understanding of the chemistry of O2(1Δ) at night will be valuable in inferring the abundance of atomic oxygen, as O is thought to play a key role. The only significant loss processes of O2(1Δ) in the mesosphere are collisional quenching with O2 and O, and radiative decay. Quenching by O2 dominates at 70 km, radiative decay dominates at 80 km, and quenching by O dominates at 90 km. An accurate estimate of the radiative decay rate is important for the retrievals of O and O3. However, currently reported Einstein A coefficients for radiative decay at 1.27 μm from laboratory and atmospheric emission studies have ranged from 1.47×10-4s-1 (corresponding to a lifetime of 6800 s) to 2.58×10-4 s-1 (3900 s). Using SABER observations of the decay of the 1.27 micron O2(1Δ) airglow after sunset in the 70 to 90 km altitude region, we can derive a radiative lifetime that best fits the data. Initial estimates of the decay lifetime are consistent with the most recent laboratory value of 4500 s measured by Lafferty et al. (1998) and Spalek et al. (1999). REFERENCES: Lafferty, W.J., A.M. Solodov, C.L. Lugez, and G.T. Fraser, Applied Optics, 37(12), 2264-2270 (1998) Špalek, O., J. Kodymová, P. Stopka, and I. Miček, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys., 32, 1885-1892 (1999)

  7. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  8. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-17

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  9. TR-LIF LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS AND HFR+CPOL CALCULATIONS OF RADIATIVE PARAMETERS IN VANADIUM ATOM (V I)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L. Y.; Shang, X.; Tian, Y. S.; Dai, Z. W.; Quinet, P.; Palmeri, P.; Zhang, W. E-mail: Pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 79 levels belonging to the 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s5p, 3d {sup 4}5p, and 3d {sup 3}4s4d configurations of V I with energy from 26,604.807 to 46,862.786 cm{sup –1} have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values reported in this paper are in the range of 3.3-494 ns, and the uncertainties of these measurements are within ±10%. A good agreement was obtained with previous data. HFR+CPOL calculations have been performed and used to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical transition probabilities for 784 V I transitions.

  10. Measurement of Rydberg positronium fluorescence lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the fluorescence lifetimes of positronium (Ps) atoms with principal quantum numbers n =10 -19 . Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states were produced via a two-color two-step 1 3S→2 3P→n 3S/n measured time-of-flight distributions were used to determine the mean lifetimes of the Rydberg levels, yielding values ranging from 3 μ s to 26 μ s . Our data are in accord with the expected radiative lifetimes of Rydberg-Stark states of Ps.

  11. Lifetime Measurements in ^124Xe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, I. M.; Patnaik, D.; Kumar, A.; Garg, U.; Ghugre, S. S.; Johnson, T.; Kharraja, B.; Naguleswaran, S.; Walpe, J. C.; Kaczarowski, R.

    1996-10-01

    Lifetimes of lower excited states in ^124Xe have been measured using the Recoil-Distance Doppler-shift technique. The nucleus ^124Xe was produced by the ^18O + ^110Pd reaction at a beam energy of 66 MeV. The Recoil-Distance measurements were performed using the Notre Dame plunger. The lifetimes of the 2^+, 4^+, 6^+ and 8^+ states of the ground-state band were extracted, using the computer code "LIFETIME"^a, including the corrections due to the side-feeding and the nuclear deorientation effects. The lifetime of the 2^+1 state agrees well with the Coloumb-excitation data ^b. The measured B(E2) values are compared with the existing Algebraic and Multishell models. ^a Computer code LIFETIME, J.C. Wells, ORNL, Oak-Ridge, TN. ^b D.M Gordon et al, PRC 12, 628 (1975).

  12. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  13. Lifetime Measurements in 162Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarella, Clark; Aprahamian, A.; Lesher, S.; Crider, B.; Lowe, M.; Peters, E.; Prados-Estevez, F.; Ross, T.; Tully, Z.; Yates, S.

    2015-10-01

    Historically, the rare-earth region of nuclei has been a fountainhead for nuclear structure phenomena. One of the more debated structure effects is the nature of excited 0+ bands in nuclei, and continues to be an outstanding challenge in nuclear structure physics; several interpretations exist, and we hope that lifetime measurements can help distinguish between them. 162Dy has an abundance of 0+ states with limited lifetime data; we have measured excitation functions, mean lifetimes, and angular distributions of gamma rays for excited states in 162Dy at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Low lying excited states were populated up to an excitation energy of E < 3.2 MeV, where we will discuss the implications of the lifetimes under this energy threshold. This work was supported by the NSF under contract numbers PHY-1068192, PHY-1205412, and PHY-0956310.

  14. Lifetime measurements in 100Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinopoulos, T.; Petkov, P.; Goasduff, A.; Arici, T.; Astier, A.; Atanasova, L.; Axiotis, M.; Bonatsos, D.; Detistov, P.; Dewald, A.; Eller, M. J.; Foteinou, V.; Gargano, A.; Georgiev, G.; Gladnishki, K.; Gottardo, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Hess, H.; Kaim, S.; Kocheva, D.; Kusoglu, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Matea, I.; Melon, B.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Nannini, A.; Petrache, C. M.; Petrovici, A.; Provatas, G.; Reiter, P.; Rocchini, M.; Roccia, S.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Suzuki, D.; Warr, N.; De Witte, H.; Zerrouki, T.

    2017-01-01

    The nucleus 100Ru appears to be a good candidate for the E(5) critical point symmetry which describes the U(5)-SO(6) shape phase transition. To investigate this point with respect to the electromagnetic transition strengths, lifetime measurements of its yrast states have been performed using the recoil distance Doppler shift technique as well as the Doppler shift attenuation method. As a result, the lifetimes of the yrast 2+, 4+, and 8+ states were determined. The deduced transition strengths are compared to the E(5) predictions as well as to the results of excited Vampir and shell-model calculations.

  15. Photoluminescence lifetime measurements in InP wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    A simple apparatus to measure the minority carrier lifetime in InP has been developed. The technique stimulates the sample with a short pulse of light from a diode laser and measures the photoluminescence decay to extract the minority carrier lifetime. The photoluminescence lifetime in InP as a function of doping on both n- and p-type material is examined. The results also show a marked difference in the lifetime of n-type InP and p-type InP of similar doping levels. N-type InP shows a lifetime considerably longer than the expected radiative limited lifetime.

  16. Lifetime measurements in 180Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Li, C. B.; Gao, Z. C.; Li, G. S.; Chen, F. Q.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Hu, S. P.; Zhong, J.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Lifetimes of the yrast states in 180Pt have been measured from 4+ to 8+ using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. These states were populated by the reaction 156Gd(28Si,4 n )180Pt at a beam energy of 144 MeV. The differential decay curve method was applied to determine the lifetimes from experimental coincidence data. The B (E 2 ) values extracted from lifetimes increase with increasing spin, implying rotor behavior, but do not show the typical shape coexistence where the B (E 2 ) values present a rapid increase at very low spins. Calculations based on the triaxial projected shell model were performed for the yrast states in 180Pt and the results of both energies and E 2 transition probabilities reproduce the experimental data very well. The result also shows that a better description of the yrast band in 180Pt requires consideration of the γ degree of freedom.

  17. Lifetime measurements in 162Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprahamian, A.; Lesher, S. R.; Casarella, C.; Börner, H. G.; Jentschel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Background: The nature of oscillations or excitations around the equilibrium deformed nuclear shape remains an open question in nuclear structure. The 162Dy nucleus is one of the most extensively studied nuclei with the (n ,γ ), (n ,e- ), (α ,2 n ) reactions and most recently the (p ,t ) pickup reaction adding 11 0+ states to an excitation energy of 2.8 MeV to an already-well-developed level scheme. However, a major shortfall for a better understanding of the nature of the plethora of bands and levels in this nucleus has been the lack of lifetime measurements. Purpose: To determine the character of the low-lying excited bands in this 162Dy nucleus, we set out to measure the level lifetimes. Method: Lifetimes were measured in the 162Dy nucleus following neutron capture using the Gamma-Ray-Induced Doppler (GRID) broadening technique at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. Results: In total, we have measured the lifetimes of 12 levels belonging to a number of excited positive- and negative-parity bands in the low-lying spectrum of the 162Dy nucleus. The lifetime of the Kπ=2+ bandhead at 888.16 keV was previously measured. We confirm this value and measure lifetimes of the 3+ and 4+ members of this band yielding B (E 2 ) values that are consistent with a single γ -vibrational phonon of several Weisskopf units. The first excited Kπ=4+ band, with a bandhead at 1535.66 keV, is strongly connected to the Kπ=2+ band with enhanced collective B (E 2 ) values and it is consistent with a double phonon vibrational (γ γ ) excitation. Lifetime of Kπ=0+ band members have also been measured, including the 4Kπ=02+ state at 1574.29 keV and the 2Kπ= 03+ state at 1728.31 keV. This latter state also displays the characteristics of a double phonon excitation built on the Kπ=2+ band. Conclusions: We discuss our findings in terms of the presence or absence of collective quadrupole and octupole vibrational excitations. We find two positive-parity excited bands at 1535

  18. Radiative lifetime of excitons in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Perebeinos, Vasili; Tersoff, J; Avouris, Phaedon

    2005-12-01

    We calculate the radiative lifetime and energy bandstructure of excitons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes within a tight-binding approach including the electron-hole correlations via the Bethe-Salpeter equation. In the limit of rapid interband thermalization, the radiative decay rate is maximized at intermediate temperatures and decreases at low temperature because the lowest-energy excitons are optically forbidden. The intrinsic phonons cannot scatter excitons between optically active and forbidden bands, so sample-dependent extrinsic effects that break the symmetries can play a central role. We calculate the diameter-dependent energy splittings between singlet and triplet excitons of different symmetries and the resulting dependence of radiative lifetime on temperature and tube diameter.

  19. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  20. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  1. Lifetime Measurement of 26O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redpath, Thomas; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An interesting property of some neutron-unbound systems is true two-neutron emission where the neutrons are emitted simultaneously as opposed to a sequential decay through an intermediate state. Since neutrons are only affected by the angular momentum barrier, the timescale for this process is much shorter than for two proton emission which is dominated by the Coulomb barrier. One such case is 26O where a very low decay energy was measured and the two valence neutrons are expected to occupy d-wave orbitals. Also, the ground state of 25O is located 700 keV higher. In a first experiment, the MoNA collaboration extracted a lifetime of 4 .5-1 . 5 + 1 . 1 (stat) +/- 3(syst) ps with a confidence level of 82%. Recently, an experiment dedicated to measuring the 26O lifetime in order to improve the confidence level of the measurement was performed at NSCL. The experiment utilized a newly developed segmented target which increased the statistics without degrading the resolution. Preliminary results will be presented. NSF PHY-1002511, DOE-NNSA DE-NA0000979.

  2. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  3. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  4. Exciton Radiative Lifetimes and Their Temperature Dependence in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Hirori, Hideki; Matsuda, Kazunari; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the radiative lifetimes of excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from simultaneous measurements of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes [1] and the PL quantum yields. A high-quality sample of PFO dispersed-SWNTs was used for the PL measurements. The evaluated radiative lifetimes were ˜5-15 ns for SWNTs with diameters ˜0.8-1.1 nm at room temperature. The radiative lifetimes increased with the tube diameter. The exciton spatial coherence volume (length) was of the order 10 ^2 nm along the tube axis, as deduced from the radiative lifetimes. Furthermore, we discuss the dynamics of bright and dark excitons [2] from the temperature dependence of the radiative lifetime (10 to 300 K).[3pt] [1] H. Hirori, K. Matsuda, Y. Miyauchi, S. Maruyama, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 257401 (2006). [0pt] [2] R. Matsunaga, K. Matsuda, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 147404 (2008).

  5. Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

  6. Measurement of the (27)P lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Charles George

    The lifetime of 27P has been measured using the Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) at the Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory (NSRL) at the University of Rochester. 27P was produced by bombarding a BeO target with a 24Mg beam at a lab energy of 118 MeV. A focal-plane detector system, consisting of a parallel-grid avalanche counter (PGAC) backed by an ionization counter (IC) and a silicon detector, was used to provide particle identification. A sodium iodide detector array was used to detect the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation produced by the decay of 27P. The result obtained for the half-life of 27P is 0.32 -0.15+0.22 s.

  7. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  8. Radiative Lifetimes for High Levels of Neutral Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, E.; Guzman, A.

    2013-01-01

    New radiative lifetime measurements for ~ 50 high lying levels of Fe I are reported. Laboratory astrophysics faces a challenge to provide basic spectroscopic data, especially reliable atomic transition probabilities, in the IR region for abundance studies. The availability of HgCdTe (HAWAII) detector arrays has opened IR spectral regions for extensive new spectroscopic studies. The SDSS III APOGEE project in the H-Band is an important example which will penetrate the dust obscuring the Galactic bulge. APOGEE will survey elemental abundances of 100,000 red giant stars in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. Many stellar spectra in the H-Band are, as expected, dominated by transitions of Fe I. Most of these IR transitions connect high levels of Fe. Our program has started an effort to meet this challenge with new radiative lifetime measurements on high lying levels of Fe I using time resolved laser induced fluorescence (TRLIF). The TRLIF method is typically accurate to 5% and is efficient. Our goal is to combine these accurate, absolute radiative lifetimes with emission branching fractions [1] to determine log(gf) values of the highest quality for Fe I lines in the UV, visible, and IR. This method was used very successfully by O’Brian et al. [2] on lower levels of Fe I. This method is still the best available for all but very simple spectra for which ab-initio theory is more accurate. Supported by NSF grant AST-0907732. [1] Branching fractions are being measured by M. Ruffoni and J. C. Pickering at Imperial College London. [2] O'Brian, T. R., Wickliffe, M. E., Lawler, J. E., Whaling, W., & Brault, J. W. 1991, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 1185

  9. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  10. Measurement of the radiative lifetime of the 2s(2)2p(4) (1)S(0) metastable level of neon; a study of forbidden transitions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Adrian Nigel

    The radiative lifetime of the 2s22 p4 1S0 metastable level of Ne2+ (Ne III) has been measured to be 223 +/- 11 ms at the 90% confidence level by observing the photons emitted at 1815 Å (181.5 nm) by a decaying population of 1 S0 Ne2+ ions stored in a radio frequency ion trap. This thesis describes the first use of a method to account for any ions lost from the trap and determine the radiative lifetime. Metastable ions were produced by electron bombardment of Ne gas, and rate coefficients for Ne2+ + Ne collisions were also determined. The lifetime measurement is in good agreement with recent calculated values, and has a lower uncertainty than the calculated values. This is the first lifetime measurement for an excited term of a ground configuration ion in the second row of the periodic table. The transition probabilities (A-values) for the forbidden transitions in the ground configurations of these ions are required for astrophysical spectral line intensity ratio diagnostics. Using calculated branching ratios, we estimate that, at the 90% confidence level, A(3P1 - 1S0) = 1.94 +/- 0.17 s-1 for the forbidden line of Ne III at 1815 Å, and A(1D2 - 1S0) = 2.55 +/- 0.19 s-1 for the forbidden line of Ne III at 3344 Å.

  11. DSAM Lifetime Measurements in {sup 119}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Scraggs; E.S. Paul; A.J. Boston; C.J. Chiara; D.B. Fossan; C. Fox; D.R. LaFosse; P.J. Nolan; T. Koike; K. Starosta; A. Walker; A.V. Afanasjev; I. Ragnarsson

    1999-12-31

    Lifetime measurements of states in the yrast band of {sup 119}Xe have been performed using a Doppler broadened lineshape analysis. Preliminary results, in the range 27/2{sup -}{<=}I{pi}{<=}43/2{sup -}, indicate a transition quadrupole moment of approximately 2.9 eb, which corresponds to a prolate rotor with deformation {epsilon}{sub 2}{approx}0.17.

  12. B-lifetime measurements at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, H. |; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    During the run period from May 1992 to begin of June 1993 the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has recorded {approx} 21.4 pb{sup {minus}1} of p{anti p} collider data at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. For this run the detector had been upgraded which significantly enhanced its b-physics capabilities. The upgrades include a high precision Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) which enables CDF to reconstruct the decay vertex and decay length of b-hadrons. In this article the author reports on several measurements of the lifetime of b-flavored hadrons. The determination of the average b-lifetime using inclusive J/{psi}`s, the measurement of the B{sup {+-}} and B{sup 0} lifetimes by reconstructing exclusive final states including a J/{psi} or {psi}(2S) and a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson lifetime exploiting the decay: B{sub s} {yields} l{nu}D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} l{nu}{phi}{pi}{sup +} {yields} l{nu}K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}.

  13. On estimating mean lifetimes by a weighted sum of lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosper, Harrison Bertrand

    1987-10-01

    Given N lifetime measurements an estimate of the mean lifetime can be obtained from a weighted sum of these measurements. We derive exact expressions for the probability density function, the moment-generating function, and the cumulative distribution function for the weighted sum. We indicate how these results might be used in the estimation of particle lifetimes. The probability distribution function of Yost for the distribution of lifetime measurements with finite measurement error is our starting point.

  14. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  15. Phase fluorometry for semiconductor lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Alexander R.; Laghumavarapu, Ramesh B.; Imangholi, Babak; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2007-02-01

    Understanding and quantifying nonradiative recombination is a critical factor for the successful laser cooling of semiconductors. The usual approach to measuring the nonradiative lifetime employs pulsed photoexcitation and monitors the luminescence decay via time-resolved photon counting. We present an alternative approach that employs phase fluorometry with a lock-in amplifier. A sinusoidally modulated diode laser is used for excitation. Lifetime data are extracted from the frequency dependent phase shift and amplitude response of the photolumi-nescence signal, detected by a photomultiplier tube. Samples studied include high quality AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs and GaInP/GaAs/GaInP double heterostructures, grown by MBE and MOCVD. Data over a temperature range from 10 to 300 K is compared with results obtained in time-domain measurements.

  16. Measurement of the τ lifetime from Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The lifetime of the τ-lepton is measured using the process e+e- →τ+τ-, where both τ-leptons decay to 3 πν. The preliminary result based on 711 fb-1 of data collected on the ϒ (4 S) resonance and in the nearby continuum is ττ = (290.18 ± 0.54 (stat.) ± 0.33 (syst.)) ×10-15 s.

  17. DSAM lifetime measurements in {sup 119}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Scraggs, H. C.; Paul, E. S.; Boston, A. J.; Fox, C.; Nolan, P. J.; Walker, A.; Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; LaFosse, D. R.; Koike, T.; Starosta, K.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1999-11-16

    Lifetime measurements of states in the yrast band of {sup 119}Xe have been performed using a Doppler broadened lineshape analysis. Preliminary results, in the range 27/2{sup -}{<=}I{sup {pi}}{<=}43/2{sup -}, indicate a transition quadrupole moment of approximately 2.9 eb, which corresponds to a prolate rotor with deformation {epsilon}{sub 2}{approx_equal}0.17.

  18. Radiative lifetimes, branching rations, and absolute transition probabilities in Cr II and Zn II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeson, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    New absolute atomic transition probability measurements are reported for 12 transitions in Cr II and two transitions in Zn II. These transition probabilities are determined by combining branching ratios measured by classical techniques and radiative lifetimes measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence. The measurements are compared with branching fractions, radiative lifetimes, and transition probabilities in the literature. The 206 nm resonance multiplets in Cr II and Zn II are included in this work. These multiplets are very useful in determining the distribution of the elements in the gas versus grain phases in the interstellar medium.

  19. A measurement of the tau lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Agasi, E.; Aleksan, R.; Alekseev, G. D.; Algeri, A.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andreazza, A.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Apsimon, R. J.; Arnoud, Y.; Å, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barate, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Barrio, J. A.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M. J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Beeston, C. J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bocci, V.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Bosworth, S.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenner, R. A.; Briand, H.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Campion, R.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chabaud, V.; Chan, A.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chaussard, L.; Chauveau, J.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Clara, M. P.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Daum, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; Davies, J.; da Silva, W.; Defoix, C.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; de Angelis, A.; de Boeck, H.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Fez Laso, M. D. M.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; Dijkstra, H.; di Ciaccio, L.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Dupont, F.; Eek, L.-O.; Eerola, P. A.-M.; Ehret, R.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.-P.; Ershaidat, N.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K. A. J.; Fousset, J.-L.; Francon, S.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J.-P.; Giacomelli, P.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorski, M.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Grossetete, B.; Gumenyuk, S.; Guy, J.; Haedinger, U.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, M.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakansson, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hao, W.; Harris, F. J.; Hedberg, V.; Henkes, T.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T. L.; Hietanen, I.; Higgins, C. O.; Higon, E.; Hilke, H. J.; Hodgson, S. D.; Hofmokl, T.; Holmes, R.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holthuizen, D.; Honore, P. F.; Hooper, J. E.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huet, K.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Ioannou, P.; Iversen, P.-S.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, E. K.; Johnson, D.; Jonker, M.; Jonsson, L.; Juillot, P.; Kalkanis, G.; Kalmus, G.; Kapusta, F.; Karlsson, M.; Karvelas, E.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kesteman, J.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klein, H.; Klovning, A.; Kluit, P.; Koch-Mehrin, A.; Koehne, J. H.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korytov, A. V.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, P. H.; Krolikowski, J.; Kronkvist, I.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulka, K.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, J. M.; Lieb, E.; Liko, D.; Lindgren, J.; Lindner, R.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Los, M.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, J. J.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Maillard, J.; Maio, A.; Maltezos, A.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Markou, A.; Maron, T.; Marti, S.; Mathis, L.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Nay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meola, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Mikulec, I.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Murray, W. J.; Myatt, G.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nijjhar, B.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nilsen, P. E. S.; Niss, P.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Ostankov, A.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Pain, R.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parodi, F.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Pennanen, J.; Peralta, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Pettersen, T. E.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Pingot, O.; Plaszczynski, S.; Podobrin, O.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, M.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roditi, I.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Ronnqvist, C.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, S.; Rossi, U.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybin, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, J.; Sannino, M.; Schael, S.; Schneider, H.; Schulze, B.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Segar, A. M.; Seitz, A.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siccama, I.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smith, G. R.; Sosnowski, R.; Souza-Santos, D.; Spassoff, T. S.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Straver, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tabarelli, T.; Tchikilev, O.; Theodosiou, G. E.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Toet, D. Z.; Toker, O.; Tome, B.; Torassa, E.; Tortora, L.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Trischuk, W.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Vander Velde, C.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van der Heijden, M.; van Doninck, W. K.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vilanova, D.; Vincent, P.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Wehr, A.; Weierstall, M.; Weilhammer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yepes, P.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zuberi, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.; Zuniga, J.

    1993-03-01

    The tau lepton lifetime is measured using four different methods with the DELPHI detector. Three measurements using one prong decays are combined, accounting for correlations, resulting in ττ=298 +/-7 (stat.)+/-4 (syst.) fs while the decay length distribution of three prong decays gives ππ=298+/-13 (stat)+/-(syst.) fs. The combined result is ττ=298+/-7 fs. The ratio of the Fermi coupling constant from tau decay relative to that from muon decay is found to be 0.985+/-0.013, compatible with lepton universality.

  20. Ultracold neutron detector for neutron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Vassiljev, A.; Ivanov, E.; Ilyin, D.; Krivshich, A.; Serebrov, A.

    2017-02-01

    The gas-filled detector of ultracold neutrons has been designed and constructed for the spectrometer of the neutron lifetime measurements at the ILL, Grenoble, France. The detector has been successfully tested and is currently being used at this spectrometer. We could show that minimization of the ;wall; effect is a key factor to ensure efficient background suppression and to maximize the detection efficiency. This effect is primarily related to the composition of the gas mixture, which crucially depends on the neutron velocity spectrum.

  1. Lifetime Radiation Exposure in Patients with Recurrent Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Elkoushy, Mohamed A; Andonian, Sero

    2017-09-12

    Patients presenting with nephrolithiasis often undergo repeated imaging studies before, during, and after management. Considering the significant risk of stone recurrence in primary stone-formers, repeated imaging studies are not uncommon. Cumulative effects of ionizing radiation exposure from various imaging studies could potentially increase the risk for developing cataracts and solid malignancies in urolithiasis patients. Therefore, practitioners planning or performing imaging studies with ionizing radiation are compelled to keep radiation exposure to humans and the environment as low as possible, thus strictly adhering to the ALARA (As Low as Reasonably Achievable) principles. This chapter will review the latest literature on lifetime radiation exposure of nephrolithiasis patients and present the latest recommendations in minimizing radiation exposure to them pre-, intra-, and postoperatively. For patients presenting with acute renal colic, especially those with body mass index of < 30, low-dose noncontrast computed tomography is the current gold standard of imaging. Patients with opaque stones are followed with ultrasonography (US) and plain radiography (kidney, ureter, and bladder or KUB). Intraoperatively, pulsed fluoroscopy could be used to significantly reduce radiation during ureteroscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Immediately postoperatively and in the long term, US and KUB could be used to follow up patients with nephrolithiasis. Only symptomatic patients suspected of ureteral stricture should obtain tri-phasic CT urography. Following these latest imaging guidelines from the American Urological Association will dramatically reduce lifetime radiation exposure to patients with nephrolithiasis.

  2. Lifetime measurements in {sup 133}Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Emediato, L.G.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Seale, W.A.; Botelho, S.; Ribas, R.V.; Oliveira, J.R.; Cybulska, E.W.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Guimaraes, V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    Lifetimes of low-lying levels in the one- and three-quasiparticle bands in {sup 133}Ce have been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique. The E2 transition strengths extracted for the negative parity yrast states are well described by the triaxial-rotor-plus-quasiparticle and the geometrical models, but the interacting-boson-plus-fermion predictions are too small by about a factor of 3. The B(M1) values extracted for the levels in the positive parity three-quasiparticle band are consistent with the previous {nu}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}h{sub 11/2}{circle_times}{pi}g{sub 7/2} configuration assignment to this band. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Lifetime Measurement of HgCdTe Semiconductor Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    measurement of minority carrier lifetime using the photoconductive decay method. This experiment was conducted to analyze the minority carrier lifetime of...lifetime, photoconductive decay. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 19a. NAME OF...the photoconductive decay method was used. To measure the lifetime of the HgCdTe samples using the photoconductive decay method, samples of HgCdTe

  4. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  5. Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in ^79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Kaye, R. A.; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baldwin, T.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Wiedeking, M.; D"Oring, J.; Sun, Y.; Gerbick, S. M.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU Ge array of 10 Compton-suppressed detectors. The ^54Fe target was thick enough so that all of the synthesized nuclei could stop completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. The band based on a d5/2 single-particle orbit, verified in this study through γ- γ coincidences, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave= 0.41) among the three bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM predictions. Supported in part by the NSF and the OWU SSRP.

  6. Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in ^79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Y. K.; Kaye, R. A.; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baldwin, T.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Wiedeking, M.; D"Oring, J.; Sun, Y.; Gerbick, S. M.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU Ge array of 10 Compton-suppressed detectors. The ^54Fe target was thick enough so that all of the synthesized nuclei could stop completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. The band based on a d5/2 single-particle orbit, verified in this study through γ- γ coincidences, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave = 0.41) among the three bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM predictions.

  7. Radiative lifetimes and cooling functions for astrophysically important molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Hulme, Kelsey; Naim, Omree K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2016-02-01

    Extensive line lists generated as part of the ExoMol project are used to compute lifetimes for individual rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic excited states, and temperature-dependent cooling functions by summing over all dipole-allowed transitions for the states concerned. Results are presented for SiO, CaH, AlO, ScH, H2O and methane. The results for CH4 are particularly unusual with four excited states with no dipole-allowed decay route and several others, where these decays lead to exceptionally long lifetimes. These lifetime data should be useful in models of masers and estimates of critical densities, and can provide a link with laboratory measurements. Cooling functions are important in stellar and planet formation.

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Gaugliardo, P.; Farnan, I.; Zhang, M.; Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R. B.; Mudie, S.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼1019 α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter.

  9. Transition probabilities and radiative lifetimes of Mg III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Medina, A.; Colón, C.; Moreno-Díaz, C.

    2015-03-01

    There have been calculated transition probabilities for 365 lines arising from 2p5 n s(n = 3 , 4 , 5) , 2p5 n p(n = 3 , 4) , 2p5 n d(n = 3 , 4) , 2p5 n f(n = 4 , 5) and 2p5 5g configurations of Mg III and radiative lifetimes corresponding to 89 levels. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) by using ab initio relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) calculations. Later, we use the standard method of least square fitting of experimental energy levels for the IC calculations by means of Cowan's computer codes. The vast majority of the calculated transition probabilities correspond to lines lying in the ultraviolet range (UV) which are of high interest in astrophysics. Our results are compared to those previously reported in the literature. Furthermore, the values of transition probabilities of configuration levels 2p5 4d, 2p5 n f(n = 4 , 5) and 2p5 5g are presented for the first time. In light of these findings, it is possible to extend the range of wavelengths which allows us to estimate the temperature in plasma diagnostic. In addition, our results for radiative lifetimes have been compared to the available experimental values.

  10. Lifetime measurement of high spin states in (75) Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, Javid; Trivedi, T.; Maurya, K.; Mehrotra, I.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Jain, H. C.; Negi, D.; Mahanto, G.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Pancholi, S.C.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Yang, Y-C; Sun, Y.; Dahl, A.; Raju, M.K.; Appannababu, S.; Kumar, S.; Choudhury, D.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The lifetimes of high spin states of {sup 75}Kr have been determined via {sup 50}Cr ({sup 28}Si, 2pn) {sup 75}Kr reaction in positive parity band using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The transition quadrupole moments Q deduced from lifetime measurements have been compared with {sup 75}Br. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the framework of projected shell model.

  11. Lifetime Measurement of the 229Th nuclear isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferle, Benedict; von der Wense, Lars; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    The first excited isomeric state of 229Th possesses the lowest energy among all known excited nuclear states. The expected energy is accessible with today's laser technology and in principle allows for a direct optical laser excitation of the nucleus. The isomer decays via three channels to its ground state (internal conversion, γ decay, and bound internal conversion), whose strengths depend on the charge state of Thm229 . We report on the measurement of the internal-conversion decay half-life of neutral Thm229 . A half-life of 7 ±1 μ s has been measured, which is in the range of theoretical predictions and, based on the theoretically expected lifetime of ≈1 04 s of the photonic decay channel, gives further support for an internal conversion coefficient of ≈1 09, thus constraining the strength of a radiative branch in the presence of internal conversion.

  12. Photon correlation system for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. G.; Murray, J. G.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1995-07-01

    The construction and testing of a dual-channel photon correlator is reported for the frequency domain imaging of fluorescence lifetimes using photon-counting detection. A light source modulated at radio frequency excites fluorescence, which is detected using an imaging single-photon detector. After discrimination, single-photon events are processed in parallel by the correlation circuit, the purpose of which is to allow both the mean phase delay and the demodulation of fluorescence to be calculated relative to a reference signal derived from the modulated excitation source. Outputs from the correlator are integrated in a computer, resulting in accumulation of images which have been statistically filtered by sine and cosine transforms, and which can be manipulated within the computer to generate a resultant image where contrast depends on fluorescence lifetime rather than fluorescence intensity.

  13. Autofluorescence lifetime measurements in images of the human ocular fundus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Kolb, Achim; Hammer, Martin

    2001-10-01

    Measurements of the autofluorescence at the fundus prove to be an important tool in early diagnosis and in discovering the pathomechanism, e.g., in age-related macular degeneration. In addition to the action of lipofuscin in the aging process, flavines play an important role as prosthetic groups. As metabolic changes occur at cellular level, patient-specific optimized therapy should be possible according to endogenous fluorophores, before morphological alterations are manifest. As a first tool for the detection of dynamic autofluorescence, a laser scanner opthalmoscope will be presented permitting lifetime measurements at the living human eye-ground under extremely weak detectable light. Considering histograms of lifetimes after excitation at 457.8 nm and determined at the living human eye ground in parapapillary region, a lifetime (rho) approximately equal to 1.38nm was calculated most frequently in the long-wave emission range ((lambda) $GTR550 nm). This points to the main contribution of lipfuscin. If the emission range is extended down to 515 nm, components with longer lifetimes are additionally detectable. Lifetime measurements at a human fundus specimen confirmed the lifetime of 1.38nm in lipfuscin-rich pigment epithelium, whereas the mean lifetime of an intact fundus was 2.04ns. A comparison of lifetimes before, during, and after breathing 100% oxygen results in a quenching of the mean lifetime of 0.15ns by oxygen.

  14. Radiative lifetimes of excitons and trions in monolayers of the metal dichalcogenide MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haining; Zhang, Changjian; Chan, Weimin; Manolatou, Christina; Tiwari, Sandip; Rana, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    We present results on the radiative lifetimes of excitons and trions in a monolayer of metal dichalcogenide MoS2. The small exciton radius and the large exciton optical oscillator strength result in radiative lifetimes in the 0.18-0.30 ps range for excitons that have small in-plane momenta and couple to radiation. Average lifetimes of thermally distributed excitons depend linearly on the exciton temperature and can be in the few picoseconds range at small temperatures and more than a nanosecond near room temperature. Localized excitons exhibit lifetimes in the same range and the lifetime increases as the localization length decreases. The radiative lifetimes of trions are in the hundreds of picosecond range and increase with the increase in the trion momentum. Average lifetimes of thermally distributed trions increase with the trion temperature as the trions acquire thermal energy and larger momenta. We expect our theoretical results to be applicable to most other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides.

  15. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  16. Radiative lifetimes of zincblende CdSe/CdS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Ke; Martin, James E.; Shea-Rohwer, Lauren E.; Lu, Ping; Kelley, David F.

    2015-01-02

    Recent synthetic advances have made available very monodisperse zincblende CdSe/CdS quantum dots having near-unity photoluminescence quantum yields. Because of the absence of nonradiative decay pathways, accurate values of the radiative lifetimes can be obtained from time-resolved PL measurements. Radiative lifetimes can also be obtained from the Einstein relations, using the static absorption spectra and the relative thermal populations in the angular momentum sublevels. We found that one of the inputs into these calculations is the shell thickness, and it is useful to be able to determine shell thickness from spectroscopic measurements. We use an empirically corrected effective mass model to produce a “map” of exciton wavelength as a function of core size and shell thickness. These calculations use an elastic continuum model and the known lattice and elastic constants to include the effect of lattice strain on the band gap energy. The map is in agreement with the known CdSe sizing curve and with the shell thicknesses of zincblende core/shell particles obtained from TEM images. Furthermore, if selenium–sulfur diffusion is included and lattice strain is omitted from the calculation then the resulting map is appropriate for wurtzite CdSe/CdS quantum dots synthesized at high temperatures, and this map is very similar to one previously reported (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14299). Radiative lifetimes determined from time-resolved measurements are compared to values obtained from the Einstein relations, and found to be in excellent agreement. For a specific core size (2.64 nm diameter, in the present case), radiative lifetimes are found to decrease with increasing shell thickness. Thus, this is similar to the size dependence of one-component CdSe quantum dots and in contrast to the size dependence in type-II quantum dots.

  17. Radiative lifetimes of zincblende CdSe/CdS quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    Gong, Ke; Martin, James E.; Shea-Rohwer, Lauren E.; ...

    2015-01-02

    Recent synthetic advances have made available very monodisperse zincblende CdSe/CdS quantum dots having near-unity photoluminescence quantum yields. Because of the absence of nonradiative decay pathways, accurate values of the radiative lifetimes can be obtained from time-resolved PL measurements. Radiative lifetimes can also be obtained from the Einstein relations, using the static absorption spectra and the relative thermal populations in the angular momentum sublevels. We found that one of the inputs into these calculations is the shell thickness, and it is useful to be able to determine shell thickness from spectroscopic measurements. We use an empirically corrected effective mass model tomore » produce a “map” of exciton wavelength as a function of core size and shell thickness. These calculations use an elastic continuum model and the known lattice and elastic constants to include the effect of lattice strain on the band gap energy. The map is in agreement with the known CdSe sizing curve and with the shell thicknesses of zincblende core/shell particles obtained from TEM images. Furthermore, if selenium–sulfur diffusion is included and lattice strain is omitted from the calculation then the resulting map is appropriate for wurtzite CdSe/CdS quantum dots synthesized at high temperatures, and this map is very similar to one previously reported (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14299). Radiative lifetimes determined from time-resolved measurements are compared to values obtained from the Einstein relations, and found to be in excellent agreement. For a specific core size (2.64 nm diameter, in the present case), radiative lifetimes are found to decrease with increasing shell thickness. Thus, this is similar to the size dependence of one-component CdSe quantum dots and in contrast to the size dependence in type-II quantum dots.« less

  18. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  19. Influence of proton radiation on the minority carrier lifetime in midwave infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Höglund, L.; Ting, D. Z.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Soibel, A.; Fisher, A.; Hill, C. J.; Keo, S.; Rafol, S.; Gunapala, S. D.

    2016-06-27

    Influence of proton radiation on the minority carrier lifetime and on carrier concentrations in InAs/InAsSb superlattices has been studied for radiation doses up to 300 krad. The lifetime decreased from 1.8 μs down to 430 ns as the dose was increased. A variation of the carrier concentration in the range 1–2 × 10{sup 15} with increasing radiation dose was observed. The lifetime drop was however mainly caused by added Shockley-Read-Hall defects in the material. The position of these Shockley-Read-Hall centers was estimated to ∼60 meV below the conduction band edge from comparison between calculated and measured temperature dependencies of the minority carrier lifetime.

  20. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  1. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  2. Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P.; Varlamov, V. E.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Fomin, A. K.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Taldaev, R. R.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Pokotilovski, Yu. N.; Geltenbort, P.

    2008-09-15

    Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before: the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron {beta} decay. The neutron lifetime obtained, 878.5{+-}0.7{sub stat}{+-}0.3{sub sys} s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

  3. Quantitative carrier lifetime images optically measured on rough silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Martin C.; Pingel, Sebastian; The, Manuel; Warta, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    Results of optical carrier lifetime measurements like carrier density imaging significantly depend on surface conditions of the sample under test. Rough or textured surfaces have a severe impact on the measurement quality since they cause blurring and overestimation of the lifetime measurement. We propose a correction method for both, the adjustment of the absolute value and the restoration of the spatial distribution of the recombination lifetime. The absolute value is corrected by taking the emissivity of the sample into account. The unblurred signal distribution is obtained by mathematical deconvolution via Wiener filtering. For this purpose an appropriate point spread function is experimentally determined.

  4. Measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-12-15

    We report a measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel Bs(0) --> Ds- mu+ nuX (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. Using 5176 reconstructed Ds- mu+ signal events, we have measured the Bs(0) lifetime to be tau(Bs(0))=1.398+/-0.044(stat)(-0.025)(+0.028)(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the Bs(0) lifetime to date.

  5. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  6. A Precision Measurement Of The Neutral Pion Lifetime: The PRIMEX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, Rory

    2008-10-13

    The PRIMEX collaboration at Jefferson Lab is completing an experimental analysis to obtain a precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Results from the experiment will be presented and comparisons made with the chiral anomaly prediction and NLO calculations. An extension of the experiment to 12 GeV for measurements of the {eta} and {eta}' radiative widths is discussed.

  7. Radiative lifetimes of nitrogen dioxide for excitation wavelengths from 400 to 750 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Burley, J.D.; Johnston, H.S. )

    1990-10-04

    At room temperature, the radiative lifetimes of nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable, dye laser radiation are measured in a 50-L flask, for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm, at total pressures between 0.25 and 2.0 mTorr, and for times between 0.7 and 60 {mu}s. The data are analyzed in terms of the Stern-Volmer mechanism to give zero-pressure radiative constants (k{sub 0} = 1/{tau}{sub 0}) and empirical collisional quenching rate constants k{sub q} by ground-state nitrogen dioxide. (a) The observed radiative coefficients generally increase linearly with increasing excitation energy (cm{sup {minus}1}): k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1} = 0.504(E-E{sub 0}) + 7.96 {times} 10{sup 3}, where E is the excitation energy and E{sub 0} is the energy of the origin of the {sup 2}B{sub 2} excited state. At wavelengths above about 540 nm there are strong state-to-state variations of radiative lifetime, producing large apparent scatter in the data. The zero-pressure radiative lifetimes {tau}{sub 0} are compared to previous measurements and are in rough agreement with a number of earlier studies. (b) On the other hand, different investigators typically obtain different numerical values for the Stern-Volmer collisional quenching rate constants. As observed here, the quenching rate constants k{sub q} are found to vary by almost a factor of 6 as filters are changed in front of the photomultiplier tube with all other experimental conditions held constant. Some of the difficulties of observing meaningful quenching rate constants for nitrogen dioxide are discussed.

  8. Radiation Measurements on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-09

    Micrograys are unit of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. The vertical axis is in micrograys per day. The RAD instrument on NASA Curiosity Mars rover monitors the natural radiation environment at the surface of Mars.

  9. Lifetime measurement of the 9s level of atomic francium.

    PubMed

    Aubin, S; Gomez, E; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D

    2003-11-01

    We use two-photon resonant excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting techniques on a sample of 210Fr atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optical trap to measure the lifetime of the 9s excited level. Direct measurement of the decay through the 7P(3/2) level at 851 nm yields a lifetime of 107.53 +/- 0.80 ns.

  10. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    Apparatus and method is described for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochromes in the sample.

  11. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  12. The lifetime risk of maternal mortality: concept and measurement.

    PubMed

    Wilmoth, John

    2009-04-01

    The lifetime risk of maternal mortality, which describes the cumulative loss of life due to maternal deaths over the female life course, is an important summary measure of population health. However, despite its interpretive appeal, the lifetime risk of dying from maternal causes can be defined and calculated in various ways. A clear and concise discussion of both its underlying concept and methods of measurement is badly needed. I define and compare a variety of procedures for calculating the lifetime risk of maternal mortality. I use detailed survey data from Bangladesh in 2001 to illustrate these calculations and compare the properties of the various risk measures. Using official UN estimates of maternal mortality for 2005, I document the differences in lifetime risk derived with the various measures. Taking sub-Saharan Africa as an example, the range of estimates for the 2005 lifetime risk extends from 3.41% to 5.76%, or from 1 in 29 to 1 in 17. The highest value resulted from the method used for producing official UN estimates for the year 2000. The measure recommended here has an intermediate value of 4.47%, or 1 in 22. There are strong reasons to consider the calculation method proposed here more accurate and appropriate than earlier procedures. Accordingly, it was adopted for use in producing the 2005 UN estimates of the lifetime risk of maternal mortality. By comparison, the method used for the 2000 UN estimates appears to overestimate this important measure of population health by around 20%.

  13. A preliminary measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Manly, S.L.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577{plus_minus}0.032(stat.){plus_minus}0.046(syst.) ps.

  14. A preliminary, precise measurement of the average B hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    SLD Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    The average B hadron lifetime was measured using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLC in 1993. From a sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} events, a sample enriched in Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} was selected by applying an impact parameter tag. The lifetime was extracted from the decay length distribution of inclusive vertices reconstructed in three dimensions. A binned maximum likelihood method yielded an average B hadron lifetime of {tau}{sub B} = 1.577 {plus_minus} 0.032(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.046(syst.) ps.

  15. Measurement of the τ-lepton lifetime at Belle.

    PubMed

    Belous, K; Shapkin, M; Sokolov, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, S-H; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Ng, C; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2014-01-24

    The lifetime of the τ lepton is measured using the process e+ e- → τ+ τ- , where both τ leptons decay to 3πν(τ). The result for the mean lifetime, based on 711  fb(-1) of data collected with the Belle detector at the ϒ(4S) resonance and 60  MeV below, is τ=(290.17±0.53(stat)±0.33(syst))×10(-15)  s. The first measurement of the lifetime difference between τ+ and τ- is performed. The upper limit on the relative lifetime difference between positive and negative τ leptons is |Δτ|/τ<7.0×10(-3) at 90% C.L.

  16. Measurement of the τ-lepton Lifetime at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belous, K.; Shapkin, M.; Sokolov, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Bhuyan, B.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The lifetime of the τ lepton is measured using the process e+e-→τ+τ-, where both τ leptons decay to 3πντ. The result for the mean lifetime, based on 711 fb-1 of data collected with the Belle detector at the ϒ(4S) resonance and 60 MeV below, is τ =290.17±0.53(stat)±0.33(syst) ×10-15 s. The first measurement of the lifetime difference between τ+ and τ- is performed. The upper limit on the relative lifetime difference between positive and negative τ leptons is |Δτ|/τ<7.0×10-3 at 90% C.L.

  17. Improved measurements of the B0 and B+ meson lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Bürgin, R.; Burgard, C.; Capdevielle, N.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fischer, P.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hagemann, J.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Jui, C.; Karlen, D.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Leroy, C.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Robinson, D.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schütz, P.; Schulz, M.; Schwick, C.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; Tousignant, O.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yeaman, A.; Yekutieli, G.; Yurko, M.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-09-01

    Updated measurements of the B0 and B+ meson lifetimes are presented. From a data sample of 1.72 million hadronic Z0 decays recorded during the period 1991 to 1993, a sample of approximately 1000 semileptonic B meson decays containing a D0, D+ or D*+ has been isolated. From the distribution of decay times in the different samples the lifetimes of the B0 and B+ mesons are determined to be 1.53±0.12±0.08 ps and 1.52±0.14±0.09 ps, respectively, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The ratio of the B+ to B0 lifetimes is measured to be 0.99±0.14{-0.04/+0.05}, confirming expectations that the lifetimes are similar.

  18. Positronium lifetime measurements in micro- and mesoporous ferrisilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dũng, Trần Quốc; Lázár, Károly

    2017-10-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime, Doppler broadening measurements have been used to study microporous FER and MFI structures containing framework subtituted iron in different amounts. Mesoporous SBA-15 samples without and with iron introduced to the pore walls were also investigated by these methods. Mössbauer measurements have been accompanied to prove the extent of isomorphous incorporation of iron into the different structures. The results reveal a certain dependence of lifetimes on the various pore and channel sizes. Addition of iron does not influence significantly the observed lifetimes in FER microporous systems. However a slight decrease of lifetimes can be observed in the MFI samples. The effect of addition of iron in mesoporous SBA-15 system is more expressed. Supplement of iron also has an influence on the S parameter of Doppler broadening spectra.

  19. The radiative lifetime of the 5S(0)2 metastable level of O(2+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Smith, P. L.; Knight, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 5S(0)2 metastable level of O(2+) was measured as 1.22 + or - 0.08 ms at the 90 percent confidence level by observing the time dependence of the spontaneous emission from metastable ions created and stored in a cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap. The intersystem line emission 2s(2)2p(2) 3P - 2s2p(3) 5S(0) was observed at 1660.8 and 1666.2 A. Discrepancies between measured and calculated values indicate that certain calculated transition probabilities for intersystem lines may be less reliable than previously believed.

  20. Analysis of carrier recombination dynamics in InGaN-based light-emitting diodes by differential carrier lifetime measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dong-Pyo; Shim, Jong-In; Shin, Dong-Soo

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the carrier recombination dynamics in InGaN-based blue LED devices by analyzing the radiative and nonradiative carrier lifetimes as functions of driving current. To separate the radiative and nonradiative carrier lifetimes, we utilize the information on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and differential carrier lifetime. For comparative analysis, the characteristics of the IQE and electroluminescence spectrum are also used. Through measurements and analyses, we demonstrate that the saturation of the radiative recombination rate induced by the phase-space filling in the active volume triggers the increase in nonradiative recombination rate, thus leading to the efficiency droop.

  1. Solar radiation measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Xavier solar radiation measurement project and station are described. Measurements of the total solar radiation on a horizontal surface from an Eppley pyranometer were collected into computer data files. Total radiation in watt hours was converted from ten minute intervals to hourly intervals. Graphs of this total radiation data are included. A computer program in Fortran was written to calculate the total extraterrestrial radiation on a horizontal surface for each day of the month. Educational and social benefits of the project are cited.

  2. Design of a compact, low-price, lifetime measuring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.; Moeller, Reinhard; Tafeit, Erwin

    1994-08-01

    The technical requirements for a small, rugged, and moderately- priced device for measuring fluorescence lifetimes have been investigated. The suitability and performance of various lifetime measuring schemes were compared. Based on these investigations a compact time-domain instrument was developed allowing measurement of fluorescence decays with a time resolution well below 1 ns. A semiconductor laser (frequency-doubled, if necessary) is used as a light source. Detection is done with a miniaturized photomultiplier. In favorable cases measurement of a fluorescent decay curve is accomplished within less than one minute.

  3. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  4. New Millisecond Isomer Lifetime Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, M. Nelson, R.O.; Fotiades, N.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    2014-06-15

    New half-life measurements have been made of the millisecond isomers {sup 71m}Ge, {sup 114m2}I, {sup 208m}Bi, {sup 88m1}Y, {sup 88m2}Y, and {sup 75m}As populated in neutron-induced reactions. These measurements were made using the unique time structure of the LANSCE/WNR neutron source, by observing the γ-ray decays of the isomers during the time between the LANSCE proton macropulses. Two different LANSCE proton beam time structures were used. The GEANIE array of HPGe detectors was used to detect the γ-ray decays.

  5. Measurement and Perturbation of Morphogen Lifetime: Effects on Gradient Shape

    PubMed Central

    Drocco, Jeffrey A.; Grimm, Oliver; Tank, David W.; Wieschaus, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Protein lifetime is of critical importance for most biological processes and plays a central role in cell signaling and embryonic development, where it impacts the absolute concentration of signaling molecules and, potentially, the shape of morphogen gradients. Early conceptual and mathematical models of gradient formation proposed that steady-state gradients are established by an equilibration between the lifetime of a morphogen and its rates of synthesis and diffusion, though whether gradients in fact reach steady state before being read out is a matter of controversy. In any case, this class of models predicts that protein lifetime is a key determinant of both the time to steady state and the spatial extent of a gradient. Using a method that employs repeated photoswitching of a fusion of the morphogen Bicoid (Bcd) and the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Dronpa, we measure and modify the lifetime of Dronpa-Bcd in living Drosophila embryos. We find that the lifetime of Bcd is dynamic, changing from 50 min before mitotic cycle 14 to 15 min during cellularization. Moreover, by measuring total quantities of Bcd over time, we find that the gradient does not reach steady state. Finally, using a nearly continuous low-level conversion to the dark state of Dronpa-Bcd to mimic the effect of increased degradation, we demonstrate that perturbation of protein lifetime changes the characteristic length of the gradient, providing direct support for a mechanism based on synthesis, diffusion, and degradation. PMID:22004733

  6. Earth Radiation Measurement Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis

    2000-01-01

    This document is the final report for NASA Grant NAG1-1959, 'Earth Radiation Measurement Science'. The purpose of this grant was to perform research in this area for the needs of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project and for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which are bing conducted by the Radiation and Aerosols Branch of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of Langley Research Center. Earth Radiation Measurement Science investigates the processes by which measurements are converted into data products. Under this grant, research was to be conducted for five tasks: (1) Point Response Function Measurements; (2) Temporal Sampling of Outgoing Longwave Radiation; (3) Spatial Averaging of Radiation Budget Data; (4) CERES Data Validation and Applications; and (5) ScaRaB Data Validation and Application.

  7. Exciton radiative lifetime in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, C.; Lagarde, D.; Cadiz, F.; Wang, G.; Lassagne, B.; Amand, T.; Balocchi, A.; Renucci, P.; Tongay, S.; Urbaszek, B.; Marie, X.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the exciton dynamics in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using time-resolved photoluminescence experiments performed with optimized time resolution. For MoS e2 monolayer, we measure τrad0=1.8 ±0.2 ps at T =7 K that we interpret as the intrinsic radiative recombination time. Similar values are found for WS e2 monolayers. Our detailed analysis suggests the following scenario: at low temperature (T ≲50 K ), the exciton oscillator strength is so large that the entire light can be emitted before the time required for the establishment of a thermalized exciton distribution. For higher lattice temperatures, the photoluminescence dynamics is characterized by two regimes with very different characteristic times. First the photoluminescence intensity drops drastically with a decay time in the range of the picosecond driven by the escape of excitons from the radiative window due to exciton-phonon interactions. Following this first nonthermal regime, a thermalized exciton population is established gradually yielding longer photoluminescence decay times in the nanosecond range. Both the exciton effective radiative recombination and nonradiative recombination channels including exciton-exciton annihilation control the latter. Finally the temperature dependence of the measured exciton and trion dynamics indicates that the two populations are not in thermodynamical equilibrium.

  8. Precision lifetime measurements by single-proton counting

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.; Hill, W.T. III; Leone, S.R.

    1995-08-01

    There is renewed interest in the accurate measurement of lifetimes of excited states in alkalis in order to test ab initio theories which are needed for the interpretation of atomic parity nonconservation measurements. While it is often assumed that the fast-beam laser method yields the most accurate lifetimes, we demonstrated that an alternative technique, time-correlated single-photon counting, is capable of achieving comparable accuracy. Using this method at JILA, we measured the lifetimes of the 6p {sup 2}p{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels in atomic Cs with accuracies {approx}0.2-0.3%. A high-repetition rate, femtosecond, self-modelocked Ti:sapphire laser is used to excite Cs produced in a well-collimated atomic beam. The time interval between the excitation pulse and the arrival of a fluorescence photon is measured repetitively until the desired statistics are obtained. The lifetime results are 34.75(7) ns and 30.41(10) ns for the 6p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels, respectively. These lifetimes are in agreement with those extracted from ab initio many-ody perturbation theory calculations at the sub 1% level. The measurement errors are dominated by systematic effects, and methods to alleviate these and approach an accuracy of 0.1% were determined.

  9. Developing and Testing a Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    FRET measurements can provide dynamic spatial information on length scales smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Several methods exist to measure FRET between fluorophores, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), which relies on the reduction of fluorescence lifetime when a fluorophore is undergoing FRET. FLIM measurements take the form of histograms of photon arrival times, containing contributions from a mixed population of fluorophores both undergoing and not undergoing FRET, with the measured distribution being a mixture of exponentials of different lifetimes. Here, we present an analysis method based on Bayesian inference that rigorously takes into account several experimental complications. We test the precision and accuracy of our analysis on controlled experimental data and verify that we can faithfully extract model parameters, both in the low-photon and low-fraction regimes. PMID:28060890

  10. Measurement of Metastable Lifetimes of Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is part of a series of measurements of metastable lifetimes of highly-charged ions (HCIs) which contribute to optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), stellar atmospheres, etc. Measurements were carried out using the 14-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at the JPL HCI facility. The ECR provides useful currents of charge states such as C(sup(1-6)+), Mg(sup(1-6)+) and Fe(sup(1-17)+). In this work the HCI beam is focused into a Kingdon electrostatic ion trap for measuring lifetimes via optical decays.

  11. Quantification of the SF6 lifetime based on mesospheric loss measured in the stratospheric polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Eric A.; Moore, Fred L.; Elkins, James W.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Laube, Johannes C.; Röckmann, Thomas; Marsh, Daniel R.; Andrews, Arlyn E.

    2017-04-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is a greenhouse gas with one of the highest radiative efficiencies in the atmosphere as well as an important indicator of transport time scales in the stratosphere. The current widely used estimate of the atmospheric lifetime of SF6 is 3200 years. In this study we use in situ measurements in the 2000 Arctic polar vortex that sampled air with up to 50% SF6 loss to calculate an SF6 lifetime. Comparison of these measurements with output from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) shows that WACCM transport into the vortex is accurate and that an important SF6 loss mechanism, believed to be electron attachment, is missing in the model. Based on the measurements and estimates of the size of the vortex, we calculate an SF6 lifetime of 850 years with an uncertainty range of 580-1400 years. The amount of SF6 loss is shown to be consistent with that of HFC-227ea, which has a lifetime of 670-780 years, adding independent support to our new SF6 lifetime estimate. Based on the revised lifetime the global warming potential of SF6 will decrease only slightly for short time horizons (<100 years) but will decrease substantially for time horizons longer than 2000 years. Also, the use of SF6 measurements as an indicator of transport time scales in the stratosphere clearly must account for potential influence from polar vortex air.

  12. Progress toward a new beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell

    2016-09-01

    Neutron beta decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. A precise value of the neutron lifetime is important for consistency tests of the Standard Model and Big Bang Nucleosysnthesis models. The beam neutron lifetime method requires the absolute counting of the decay protons in a neutron beam of precisely known flux. Recent work has resulted in improvements in both the neutron and proton detection systems that should permit a significant reduction in systematic uncertainties. A new measurement of the neutron lifetime using the beam method will be performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The projected uncertainty of this new measurement is 1 s. An overview of the measurement and the technical improvements will be discussed.

  13. A New Precision Measurement of the Lifetime of ^19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Pattie, Robert; Back, Henning; Young, Albert; Dammalapati, Umakanth; de, Subhadeep; Dendooven, Peter; Dermois, Otto; Huisman, Leo; Jungmann, Klaus; Mol, Aran; Gerco Onderwater, C.; Rogachevskiy, Andrey; Sohani, Moslem; Traykov, Emil; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans

    2008-04-01

    The mixed 12^+->12^+ decay of ^19Ne is an important system for studies of the weak interaction. A measurement of the lifetime of this decay at the 10-4 level combined with the measured value of the β-asymmetry enables a determination of Vud that rivals the precision obtained from 0^+->0^+ superallowed Fermi beta decays. The lifetime is currently known to a precision of about 0.08%, and by utilizing the unique capabilities of the Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: μicro-laboratories for fundamental Physics (TRIμP) facility at the Kernfysich Versneller Instituut (KVI), we can improve this precision by up to a factor of three. We describe recent progress towards a high-precision lifetime measurement and present preliminary results.

  14. Progress toward a new beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell; BL2 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Neutron beta decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. A precise value of the neutron lifetime is important for consistency tests of the Standard Model and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis models. The beam neutron lifetime method requires the absolute counting of the decay protons in a neutron beam of precisely known flux. Recent work has resulted in improvements in both the neutron and proton detection systems that should permit a significant reduction in systematic uncertainties. A new measurement of the neutron lifetime using the beam method is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. The projected uncertainty of this new measurement is 1 s. An overview of the measurement, its current status, and the technical improvements will be discussed.

  15. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  16. Measuring and modeling the lifetime of nitrous oxide including its variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Hsu, Juno; DeLuca, Nicole M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Strahan, Susan E.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Søvde, O. Amund; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Funke, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    The lifetime of nitrous oxide, the third-most-important human-emitted greenhouse gas, is based to date primarily on model studies or scaling to other gases. This work calculates a semiempirical lifetime based on Microwave Limb Sounder satellite measurements of stratospheric profiles of nitrous oxide, ozone, and temperature; laboratory cross-section data for ozone and molecular oxygen plus kinetics for O(1D); the observed solar spectrum; and a simple radiative transfer model. The result is 116 ± 9 years. The observed monthly-to-biennial variations in lifetime and tropical abundance are well matched by four independent chemistry-transport models driven by reanalysis meteorological fields for the period of observation (2005-2010), but all these models overestimate the lifetime due to lower abundances in the critical loss region near 32 km in the tropics. These models plus a chemistry-climate model agree on the nitrous oxide feedback factor on its own lifetime of 0.94 ± 0.01, giving N2O perturbations an effective residence time of 109 years. Combining this new empirical lifetime with model estimates of residence time and preindustrial lifetime (123 years) adjusts our best estimates of the human-natural balance of emissions today and improves the accuracy of projected nitrous oxide increases over this century.

  17. The lifetime risk of maternal mortality: concept and measurement

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective The lifetime risk of maternal mortality, which describes the cumulative loss of life due to maternal deaths over the female life course, is an important summary measure of population health. However, despite its interpretive appeal, the lifetime risk of dying from maternal causes can be defined and calculated in various ways. A clear and concise discussion of both its underlying concept and methods of measurement is badly needed. Methods I define and compare a variety of procedures for calculating the lifetime risk of maternal mortality. I use detailed survey data from Bangladesh in 2001 to illustrate these calculations and compare the properties of the various risk measures. Using official UN estimates of maternal mortality for 2005, I document the differences in lifetime risk derived with the various measures. Findings Taking sub-Saharan Africa as an example, the range of estimates for the 2005 lifetime risk extends from 3.41% to 5.76%, or from 1 in 29 to 1 in 17. The highest value resulted from the method used for producing official UN estimates for the year 2000. The measure recommended here has an intermediate value of 4.47%, or 1 in 22. Conclusion There are strong reasons to consider the calculation method proposed here more accurate and appropriate than earlier procedures. Accordingly, it was adopted for use in producing the 2005 UN estimates of the lifetime risk of maternal mortality. By comparison, the method used for the 2000 UN estimates appears to overestimate this important measure of population health by around 20%. PMID:19551233

  18. Measurement of the K meson lifetime with the KLOE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KLOE Collaboration; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bacci, C.; Beltrame, P.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Bowring, D.; Branchini, P.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ceradini, F.; Chi, S.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; de Lucia, E.; de Santis, A.; de Simone, P.; de Zorzi, G.; dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Falco, S.; di Micco, B.; Doria, A.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franzini, P.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Gorini, E.; Graziani, E.; Incagli, M.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leone, D.; Martini, M.; Massarotti, P.; Mei, W.; Meola, S.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Müller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nguyen, F.; Palutan, M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perfetto, F.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Spadaro, T.; Testa, M.; Tortora, L.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Xu, G.

    2005-10-01

    We present a measurement of the K lifetime using the KLOE detector. From a sample of ˜4×10KK pairs following the reaction ee→ϕ→KK we select ˜15×10K→πππ decays tagged by K→ππ events. From a fit of the proper time distribution we find τ=(50.92±0.17±0.25) ns. This is the most precise measurement of the K lifetime performed to date.

  19. Measurement of femtosecond atomic lifetimes using ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Two types of experiment are described that both employ an electron beam ion trap for the production of highly charged ion species with the aim of then measuring atomic level lifetimes in the femtosecond range. In one experiment (done by Beiersdorfer et al. some time ago), the lifetime measurement depends on the associated line broadening. In a recent string of experiments at Linac Coherent Light Source Stanford, the HI-LIGHT collaboration employed pump-probe excitation using the FEL as a short-pulse X-ray laser.

  20. Development of a commercial positron annihilation lifetime measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, M.; Ito, K.; Hattori, K.; Uesugi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In order to realize a commercial system with a user-friendly interface for positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements, we have applied our previously developed anti-coincidence method to a compact system, controlled by dedicated software with a data analysis module. The functionality of the data-analysis code was confirmed by examining the reproducibility of input average lifetimes for calculated PAL histograms. A prototype for the commercial system was constructed and the validity of the analysis using the system was ensured by measuring a reference material.

  1. Finding of Optimal Calcium Ion Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, Keisuke; Azuma, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Araki, Tsutomu

    We have investigated the fluorescence lifetime properties of 8 calcium ion probes, calcium-green-1, calcium green-2, calcium green-5N, calcium orange, oregon green 488 BAPTA-6F, fluo-3, fluo-4, and fluo-5N. We found that the decay time of calcium green-5N varied more sensitively with calcium concentration than calcium green-1 which was known to be a highly sensitive probe. We have also found that the center of observable range of calcium concentration by fluorescence lifetime measurement is lower than that by fluorescence intensity measurement.

  2. Infrared Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Species Based on Observations from UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minschwaner, K.; Carver, R. W.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1997-01-01

    Observations from instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) have been used to constrain calculations of infrared radiative forcing by CH4, CCl2F2 and N2O, and to determine lifetimes Of CCl2F2 and N2O- Radiative forcing is calculated as a change in net infrared flux at the tropopause that results from an increase in trace gas amount from pre-industrial (1750) to contemporary (1992) times. Latitudinal and seasonal variations are considered explicitly, using distributions of trace gases and temperature in the stratosphere from UARS measurements and seasonally averaged cloud statistics from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes calculated for the contemporary period are in good agreement with satellite measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Globally averaged values of the radiative forcing are 0.536, 0.125, and 0.108 W m-2 for CH4, CCl2F2, and N2O, respectively. The largest forcing occurs near subtropical latitudes during summer, predominantly as a result of the combination of cloud-free skies and a high, cold tropopause. Clouds are found to play a significant role in regulating infrared forcing, reducing the magnitude of the forcing by 30-40% compared to the case of clear skies. The vertical profile of CCl2F2 is important in determining its radiative forcing; use of a height-independent mixing ratio in the stratosphere leads to an over prediction of the forcing by 10%. The impact of stratospheric profiles on radiative forcing by CH4 and N2O is less than 2%. UARS-based distributions of CCl2F2 and N2O are used also to determine global destruction rates and instantaneous lifetimes of these gases. Rates of photolytic destruction in the stratosphere are calculated using solar ultraviolet irradiances measured on UARS and a line-by-line model of absorption in the oxygen Schumann-Runge bands. Lifetimes are 114 +/- 22 and 118 +/- 25 years for CCl2F2 and N2O, respectively.

  3. Radiative lifetime and energy of the low-energy isomeric level in 229Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, E. V.; Schneider, Christian; Jeet, Justin; Hudson, Eric R.

    2015-11-01

    We estimate the range of the radiative lifetime and energy of the anomalous, low-energy 3 /2+(7.8 ±0.5 eV) state in the 229Th nucleus. Our phenomenological calculations are based on the available experimental data for the intensities of M 1 and E 2 transitions between excited levels of the 229Th nucleus in the Kπ[N nZΛ ] =5 /2+[633 ] and 3 /2+[631 ] rotational bands. We also discuss the influence of certain branching coefficients, which affect the currently accepted measured energy of the isomeric state. From this work, we establish a favored region, 0.66 ×106seV3/ω3≤τ ≤2.2 ×106seV3/ω3 , where the transition lifetime τ as a function of transition energy ω should lie at roughly the 95% confidence level. Together with the result of Beck et al. [LLNL-PROC-415170 (2009)], we establish a favored area where transition lifetime and energy should lie at roughly the 90% confidence level. We also suggest new nuclear physics measurements, which would significantly reduce the ambiguity in the present data.

  4. Intrinsic radiative lifetime derived via absorption cross section of one-dimensional excitons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Yoshita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Akira; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Maruyama, Shun; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic radiative lifetime is an essential physical property of low-dimensional excitons that represents their optical transition rate and wavefunction, which directly measures the probability of finding an electron and a hole at the same position in an exciton. However, the conventional method that is used to determine this property via measuring the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) decay time involves uncertainty due to various extrinsic contributions at high temperatures. Here, we propose an alternative method to derive the intrinsic radiative lifetime via temperature-independent measurement of the absorption cross section and transformation using Einstein's A-B-coefficient equations derived for low-dimensional excitons. We experimentally verified our approach for one-dimensional (1D) excitons in high-quality 14 × 6 nm2 quantum wires by comparing it to the conventional approach. Both independent evaluations showed good agreement with each other and with theoretical predictions. This approach opens a promising path to studying low-dimensional exciton physics. PMID:23736905

  5. Extension of the radiative lifetime of Wannier-Mott excitons in semiconductor nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, V. A.

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of the study is to calculate the radiative lifetime of Wannier-Mott excitons in three-dimensional potential wells formed of direct-gap narrow-gap semiconductor nanoclusters in wide-gap semiconductors and assumed to be large compared to the exciton radius. Calculations are carried out for the InAs/GaAs heterosystem. It is shown that, as the nanocluster dimensions are reduced to values on the order of the exciton radius, the exciton radiative lifetime becomes several times longer compared to that in a homogeneous semiconductor. The increase in the radiative lifetime is more pronounced at low temperatures. Thus, it is established that the placement of Wannier-Mott excitons into direct-gap semiconductor nanoclusters, whose dimensions are of the order of the exciton radius, can be used for considerable extension of the exciton radiative lifetime.

  6. METHOD FOR MEASURING RADIATION

    DOEpatents

    Roesch, W.C.; McCall, R.C.

    1961-11-21

    A method for measuring an unknown integrated quantity of radiation with a condenser ionization chamber is described. The chamber is initially charged to a predetermined voltage by a voltage source. The chamber is then removed from the source and exposed to an unknown quantity of radiation for a period of time. The quantity of radiation to which the chamber was exposed is then measured by detecting the magnitude of the pulse of current necessary to recharge the chamber of its initial value through a suitable impedance. The current pulse is amplified and measured directly by a suitable pulse height analyzing system. (AEC)

  7. Thermal radiation measuring arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, H.L.; Sprout, J.C.

    1983-02-08

    In a thermal radiation measuring arrangement, a thermal radiation detector is located at the focal point of a collecting mirror, upon which incident thermal radiation from a surface, such as a building wall, is directed. The thermal radiation detector may be, for example, a thermopile, and provides an output signal having a magnitude proportional to the amount of thermal radiation which it receives. The temperature detection means detects the temperature of the thermal radiation detector and, for example, may detect the cold junction of the thermopile. In a first operating condition, a signal summing means receives the output signal from the thermal radiation detector and the temperature detection means and provides a third output signal proportional to the sum of these first and second output signals. In a second operating condition, a signal biasing means is connected into the signal summing means. The signal biasing means provides a signal to the signal summing means to cause the third output signal to become zero when radiation is received from a reference surface. When the arrangement is in the second operating condition and directed to receive thermal radiation from a second surface different from the reference surface, the signal biasing means maintains the same level of bias to the signal summing means as it did when detecting the radiation from the reference surface.

  8. Muon Mean Lifetime Measurement in a High School Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Rylander, Jeffrey W.

    1996-06-01

    This thesis describes a cosmic ray muon lifetime experiment that has been developed for use in a high school classroom. The detector consists of a scintillator that is coupled to a photomultiplier tube. A timing circuit discriminates against signals below a specified threshold voltage and measures the time from when a stopped muon entered the scintillator until it decays. Data acquisition is done using a Macintosh computer and Macintosh compatible software. This software is then used to generate the necessary plots and perform the mean lifetime calculation.

  9. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at JPARC: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Kenji; Ino, Takashi; Taketani, Kaoru; Yamada, Takahito; Katayama, Ryo; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yamashita, Satoru; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is an important parameter for a test of the Standard Model of elementary particles, as well for the production of light mass nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two principally different approaches to measure the neutron lifetime: In-beam methods and storage of ultracold neutron. At present, there is a discrepancy of 8.4 sec (3.8 sigma) between the two methods. We are performing a new In-beam experiment with an intense pulsed neutron source at J-PARC, which has different systematic uncertainties from the previous experiments. We introduce the overview of the experiment and report present status.

  10. Low-spin lifetime measurements in {sup 74}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Svensson, C. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.; Andreoiu, C.; Appelbe, D. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Cameron, J. A.; Waddington, J. C.; Ball, G. C.; Hodgson, D. F.; Smith, M. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Moore, F.; Mukherjee, G.; Seweryniak, D.

    2008-02-15

    The nucleus {sup 74}Kr has been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,2p{alpha}){sup 74}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The lifetimes for low-spin states in the ground-state and two signature-split negative-parity bands were determined using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. These results are discussed together with the lifetimes measured for the high-spin states of these bands and compared with theoretical calculations.

  11. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-06-15

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of {sup 210}Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P{sub 1/2} state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-{mu}m laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P{sub 3/2} level gives 53.30{+-}0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime.

  12. Low-spin lifetime measurements in Kr74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Svensson, C. E.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.; Andreoiu, C.; Appelbe, D. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Cameron, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallon, P.; Freeman, S. J.; Garrett, P. E.; Görgen, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hodgson, D. F.; Hyland, B.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston-Theasby, F.; Joshi, P.; Kelsall, N. S.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Mengoni, D.; Moore, F.; Mukherjee, G.; Phillips, A. A.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D.; Schumaker, M. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. B.; Waddington, J. C.; Wadsworth, R.; Ward, D.

    2008-02-01

    The nucleus Kr74 has been populated in the Ca40(Ca40,2pα)Kr74 fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The lifetimes for low-spin states in the ground-state and two signature-split negative-parity bands were determined using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. These results are discussed together with the lifetimes measured for the high-spin states of these bands and compared with theoretical calculations.

  13. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  14. Lifetime measurement of excited states in /sup 105/Ag

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    1986-11-01

    The levels up to about 2.1 MeV in /sup 105/Ag were excited via /sup 105/Pd(p,n..gamma..) reaction. For the first time, lifetimes of energy levels at 1023, 1042, 1097, 1166, 1243, 1295, 1328, 1386, 1442, 1543, 1558, 1587, 1719, 1923, and 2081 keV have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation technique.

  15. Measurement of masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, F.; /Nijmegen U.

    2007-05-01

    We present recent measurements by the CDF and D{O} Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider on the masses and lifetimes of B hadrons. The results are compared to predictions based on Heavy Quark Effective Theory, lattice gauge theory, and quark models.

  16. Quantifying lifetime exposure to ultraviolet radiation in the epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.S.; Selvin, S. |; Buffler, P.A.; Scotto, J.; Berwick, M.

    1992-10-01

    This pilot study uses a unique method to calculate cumulative lifetime exposure to, ultraviolet radiation-b to determine if this refined method would indicate differences in lifetime cumulative UVB exposure between age and sex matched controls. Forty-four age and sex matched cases and controls demonstrated no significant difference in mean cumulative lifetime UVB exposure based on the duration and location of residence. This pilot study suggests that further analysis of the dataset should be conducted to determine if the cumulative lifetime exposure hypothesis is of primary importance regarding the association between UVB exposure and development of cutaneous malignant melanoma.

  17. Quantifying lifetime exposure to ultraviolet radiation in the epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.S.; Selvin, S. . Dept. of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Buffler, P.A. . Dept. of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences); Scotto, J. . Biostatistics Branch); Berwick, M. (Cancer Pre

    1992-10-01

    This pilot study uses a unique method to calculate cumulative lifetime exposure to, ultraviolet radiation-b to determine if this refined method would indicate differences in lifetime cumulative UVB exposure between age and sex matched controls. Forty-four age and sex matched cases and controls demonstrated no significant difference in mean cumulative lifetime UVB exposure based on the duration and location of residence. This pilot study suggests that further analysis of the dataset should be conducted to determine if the cumulative lifetime exposure hypothesis is of primary importance regarding the association between UVB exposure and development of cutaneous malignant melanoma.

  18. Investigations on exponential lifetime measurements for fluorescence thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernicola, V. C.; Rosso, L.; Galleano, R.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2000-07-01

    Lifetime-based methods have been, on the whole, one of the most successful schemes for fiber optic temperature sensing, using fluorescent materials whose response is intensity independent. Several approaches for determining the fluorescence lifetime, and with that the measurand, have been investigated. An experimental comparison of direct and indirect measurement methods, i.e., involving actual signals from representative optical media instead of simply using Monte Carlo simulations, has been carried out. Direct fitting methods, including Marquardt, log-fit and Prony, were used to estimate the fluorescence lifetime of a Cr3+:YAG-based sensor system and the results were compared. An agreement to better than 0.5% between Marquardt and log-fit algorithms and an agreement of about 1.5% between Marquardt and Prony approaches was found. Thus, a temperature reproducibility, of 0.5 and 1.2 °C, respectively, can be obtained with the Cr3+:YAG sensor system. An indirect measurement approach based on a phase-locked (analog-to-digital signal processor) (A-DSP) was also tested. It was found that when the A-DSP output is used to estimate the lifetime, it performs only slightly better than using direct fitting methods. On the contrary, when the whole A-DSP sensor system was directly calibrated against temperature, the measurement accuracy improves by at least a factor of 10.

  19. Neutron radioactivity-Lifetime measurements of neutron-unbound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlbow, J.; Caesar, C.; Aumann, T.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.

    2017-09-01

    A new technique to measure the lifetime τ of a neutron-radioactive nucleus that decays in-flight via neutron emission is presented and demonstrated utilizing MonteCarlo simulations. The method is based on the production of the neutron-unbound nucleus in a target, which at the same time slows down the produced nucleus and the residual nucleus after (multi-) neutron emission. The spectrum of the velocity difference of neutron(s) and the residual nucleus has a characteristic shape, that allows to extract the lifetime. If the decay happens outside the target there will be a peak in the spectrum, while events where the decay is in the target show a broad flat distribution due to the continuous slowing down of the residual nucleus. The method itself and the analysis procedure are discussed in detail for the specific candidate 26O. A stack of targets with decreasing target thicknesses can expand the measurable lifetime range and improve the sensitivity by increasing the ratio between decays outside and inside the target. The simulations indicate a lower limit of measurable lifetime τ ∼ 0 . 2 ps for the given conditions.

  20. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Gray, Stephen K.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2012-04-01

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral

  1. Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2012-04-28

    An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral

  2. Measurement of Bs0 and Ds- Meson Lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Huard, Z.-C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, C.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Gonzalo, D.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevens, H.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M. A.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We report on a measurement of the flavor-specific Bs0 lifetime and of the Ds- lifetime using proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to 3.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Approximately 407 000 Bs0→Ds(*)-μ+νμ decays are partially reconstructed in the K+K-π-μ+ final state. The Bs0 and Ds- natural widths are determined using, as a reference, kinematically similar B0→D(*)-μ+νμ decays reconstructed in the same final state. The resulting differences between widths of Bs0 and B0 mesons and of Ds- and D- mesons are ΔΓ(B )=-0.0115 ±0.0053 (stat ) ±0.0041 (syst ) ps-1 and ΔΓ(D )=1.0131 ±0.0117 (stat ) ±0.0065 (syst ) ps-1, respectively. Combined with the known B0 and D- lifetimes, these yield the flavor-specific Bs0 lifetime, τBs 0 fs =1.547 ±0.013 (stat ) ±0.010 (syst ) ±0.004 (τB) ps and the Ds- lifetime, τDs-=0.5064 ±0.0030 (stat ) ±0.0017 (syst ) ±0.0017 (τD) ps . The last uncertainties originate from the limited knowledge of the B0 and D- lifetimes. The results improve upon current determinations.

  3. Excited state lifetime measurements of ytterbium in indium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrocher, David

    1989-12-01

    The AFIT Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) lab was disassembled, relocated and rebuilt with improvements to layout and performance. Excited state lifetime measurements of ytterbium implanted in indium phosphide were conducted using the new lab. Effects of sample temperature, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) time and RTA temperature on the lifetimes of the 1.002 microns Yb3+ line were examined. Lifetime measurements of Er, Pr and Tm in GaAs were also attempted. Ytterbium concentrations were 3 x 10(exp 13) ions/sq cm, implanted at an ion energy of 1 MeV in semi-insulating InP substrate. Sample temperatures ranged from 4.2 to 90K. Annealing times ranged from 1 to 25 seconds on samples annealed at 850 C. Annealing temperatures ranged from 400 to 850 C, with RTA times of 15 seconds. The excitation source was a nitrogen-pumped dye laser with primary wavelength at 580 nm. A germanium photodiode detector was selected to eliminate the long time constant associated with available S1 power supplies and to enable detection at the near infrared wavelengths of the other rare earths. Data acquisition was accomplished with a boxcar averager and a microcomputer equipped with acquisition hardware and software. Thermal quenching was clearly observed in lifetimes at increasing sample temperatures, most dramatically at above 50 C. The results would be very helpful in device fabrication/operation considerations, and some of the sample preparation parameters may be equally applicable for other RE doped III-V semiconductors.

  4. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; 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Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  5. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, Sinead

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B$0\\atop{s}$ meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ+vD$-\\atop{s}$. The D$-\\atop{s}$ meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D$-\\atop{s}$ → Φπ, with Φ → K+K-, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 ± B$0\\atop{s}$ candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb-1 using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B$0\\atop{s}$ proper lifetime: cτ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 419 ± 28$+16\\atop{-13}$ μm and τ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 1.397 ± 0.093$+0.053\\atop{-0.043}$ ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  6. A Measurement of the D+(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferi, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-04-01

    A high statistics measurement of the D{sub s}{sup +} lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. They describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0}K{sup +}, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 5.1(syst.) is using 8961 {+-} 105 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +} and 4680 {+-} 90 D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){sup 0} K{sup +} decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  7. Measurement of the Lambdab0 lifetime using semileptonic decays.

    PubMed

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Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-02

    We report a measurement of the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda(b)(0) baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda(b)(0)-->micronuLambda(c)(+)X. Using 4437+/-329 signal candidates, we measure the Lambda(b)(0) lifetime to be tau(Lambda(b)(0))=1.290(-0.110)(+0.119)(stat)(-0.091)(+0.087)(syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda(b)(0) decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value.

  8. Neutron lifetime measurement on setups with gravitational trap

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Fomin, A. K.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Varlamov, V. E.; Kolomenskiy, E. A.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.; Chechkin, A. V.

    2016-01-15

    Currently, the best accuracy of neutron lifetime measurements has been attained in the experiment with a gravitational trap for ultracold neutrons (UCNs), performed at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI); the measured lifetime was 878.5 ± 0.8 s. A new setup with a big gravitational trap has been designed to continue the methods and approaches used in the previous experiment. It is planned to reduce the measurement error to 0.2 s, i.e., improve the existing accuracy by a factor of 4. The spectrometer was designed at PNPI and installed on the PF2/MAM beam at the Institute Laue–Langevin. Test experiments have been performed.

  9. Statistical approaches to lifetime measurements with restricted observation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. C.; Zeng, Q.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Tu, X. L.; Walker, P. M.; Wang, M.; Wang, Q.; Yue, K.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2017-09-01

    Two generic methods based on frequentism and Bayesianism are presented in this work aiming to adequately estimate decay lifetimes from measured data, while accounting for restricted observation times in the measurements. All the experimental scenarios that can possibly arise from the observation constraints are treated systematically and formulas are derived. The methods are then tested against the decay data of bare isomeric 44+94mRu, which were measured using isochronous mass spectrometry with a timing detector at the CSRe in Lanzhou, China. Applying both methods in three distinct scenarios yields six different but consistent lifetime estimates. The deduced values are all in good agreement with a prediction based on the neutral-atom value modified to take the absence of internal conversion into account. Potential applications of such methods are discussed.

  10. Measurements of the lifetimes of electron bubbles in large size selected 4HeN- droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fárník, Michal; Samelin, Björn; Toennies, J. Peter

    1999-05-01

    The lifetimes of electron bubbles in large size selected 4HeN- droplets have been measured in a molecular beam experiment to lie between 2ṡ10-3 and 0.2 s in droplets with sizes between N≈105 and 107 atoms, respectively. The dependence of the lifetimes on the electric fields used to size select the droplets, on the energies of the incident electrons, and on the infrared radiation emitted from the apparatus walls were investigated and taken into account. The experimental lifetimes are many orders of magnitude smaller than predicted by earlier theories but consistent with a recent theory published by the authors in Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3892 (1998).

  11. Fast-timing lifetime measurement of 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, J.; Kern, R.; Lizarazo, C.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Jolos, R. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Florea, N.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mihai, R.; Mitu, I. O.; Negret, A.; Nita, C.; Olacel, A.; Pascu, S.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Turturica, A.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime τ (02+) of 152Gd has been measured using fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detectors. 152Gd was produced via an (α ,n ) reaction on a gold backed 149Sm target. The measured lifetime of τ (02+) =96 (6 ) ps corresponds to a reduced transition strength of B (E 2 ;02+→21+) =111 (7 ) W.u. and an E 0 transition strength of ρ2(E 0 ) =39 (3 ) ×10-3 to the ground state. This result provides experimental support for the validity of a correlation that would be a novel indicator for a quantum phase transition (QPT).

  12. High Precision Measurement of the ^19Ne Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah; Back, H. O.; Boswell, M. S.; Crowell, A. S.; Howell, C. R.; Kidd, M. F.; Pattie, R. W., Jr.; Young, A. R.; Dendooven, P. G.; Giri, G. S.; van der Hoek, D. J.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W. L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Santra, B.; Shidling, P. D.; Sohani, M.; Versolota, O. O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2009-10-01

    Recently, a rigorous review of the T=12 mirror transitions has identified several systems which can contribute to high precision tests exploring deviations from the Standard Model's description of the electroweak interaction. Arguably, one of the best candidates is the &+circ; decay of ^19Ne to ^19F. In this system, the main contribution to the uncertainty of extracted Standard Model parameters is due to the measured value of the lifetime of the decay. In March 2009, a high precision measurement of the lifetime of ^19Ne was made by a collaboration between the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) and the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) at the Trapped Radioactive Isotopes: Microlaboratories for Fundamental Physics (Triμp) facility. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results will be presented.

  13. Lifetime Measurements of Tagged Exotic- and Unbound Nuclear States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2011-11-30

    A new Differential Plunger device for measuring pico-second lifetimes of Unbound Nuclear States (DPUNS) is being built at The University of Manchester. DPUNS has been designed to work with alpha-, beta- and isomer-tagging methods using the existing JUROGAM II--RITU--GREAT infrastructure at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. The importance of proton emission from nuclei is that it provides valuable nuclear-structure information as direct input to nuclear models beyond the drip line. New experimental data beyond the drip line can provide new extensions to these models especially with the possible coupling of weakly bound and unbound states to the continuum. The results of the first experiments to measure lifetimes of unbound nuclear states with this method was discussed along with possible future experiments which can be addressed with DPUNS using proton-, isomer- and alpha-tagging.

  14. Measurement of the lifetime difference between Bs mass eigenstates.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; 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Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-18

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B(0)(s)-->J/psiphi and B(0)(d)-->J/psiK(*0) decays. Lifetimes of the heavy and light mass eigenstates in the B(0)(s) system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time. Using 203+/-15 B(0)(s) decays we obtain tau(L) = (1.05(+0.16)(-0.13) +/- 0.02) ps and tau(H) = (2.07(+0.58)(-0.46) +/- 0.03) ps. Expressed in terms of the difference DeltaGamma(s) and average Gamma(s), of the decay rates of the two eigenstates, the results are DeltaGamma(s)/Gamma(s) = (65(+25)(-33) +/- 1)% and DeltaGamma(s) = (0.47(+0.19)(-0.24) +/- 0.01) ps(-1).

  15. Muon Lifetime Measurement in Chiapas and the Escaramujo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodolfo Pérez Sánchez, Luis; Izraelevitch, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Escaramujo is a project with the goal of promote scientific development and integration regarding science for Latin America. It consists of a series of Laboratories and Workshops for High Energy Physics, astroparticle and instrumentation, given by Federico Izraelevitch. Escaramujo has been conduced at several institutions in Latin America. In this work, the moun mean lifetime measurements performed during the workshop held in Chiapas are presented. The results are compared with the corresponding value reported by the Particle Data Group (PDG).

  16. Lifetime Measurement in the Yrast Band of 119I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, Yu. N.; Pasternak, A. A.; Srebrny, J.; Droste, Ch.; Hagemann, G. B.; Juutinen, S.; Morek, T.; Piiparinen, M.; Podsvirova, E. O.; Toermaenen, S.; Starosta, K.; Virtanen, A.; Wasilewski, A. A.

    1999-05-01

    The lifetime of levels in the yrast band of 119I were measured by DSAM and RDM using the 109Ag (13C,3n) reaction at E=54 MeV. The detailed description of data analysis including the stopping power determination and estimation of side feeding time is given. A modified method of RDM data analysis --- Recoil Distance Doppler Shape Attenuation (RDDSA) is used.

  17. Muon lifetime measurement in Chiapas and the Escaramujo project

    DOE PAGES

    Sanchez, Luis Rodolfo Perez; Izraelevitch, Federico

    2017-07-05

    Escaramujo is a project with the goal of promote scientific development and integration regarding science for Latin America. It consists of a series of Laboratories and Workshops for High Energy Physics, astroparticle and instrumentation, given by Federico Izraelevitch. Escaramujo has been conduced at several institutions in Latin America. In this work, the moun mean lifetime measurements performed during the workshop held in Chiapas are presented. Furthermore, the results are compared with the corresponding value reported by the Particle Data Group (PDG).

  18. Lifetime measurements probing triple shape coexistence in 175Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, H.; Joss, D. T.; Grahn, T.; Page, R. D.; Carroll, R. J.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hackstein, M.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Labiche, M.; Leino, M.; Lumley, N.; Maierbeck, P.; Nyman, M.; Nieminen, P.; O'Donnell, D.; Ollier, J.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Pissulla, T.; Rahkila, P.; Revill, J. P.; Rother, W.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Rigby, S. V.; Sarén, J.; Sapple, P. J.; Scheck, M.; Scholey, C.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Venhart, M.

    2011-11-01

    Lifetimes of the low-lying excited states in the very neutron-deficient nucleus 175Au have been measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method using γ-ray spectra obtained with the recoil-decay tagging technique. Transition quadrupole moments and reduced transition probabilities extracted for this odd-Z nucleus indicate the existence of three different shapes and the competition between collective and noncollective structures.

  19. Consistent sets of atmospheric lifetimes and radiative forcings on climate for CFC replacements: HCFCs and HFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaishali; Jain, Atul K.; Patten, Kenneth O.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    2000-03-01

    Recognition of deleterious effects of chlorine and bromine on ozone and climate over the last several decades has resulted in international accords to halt the production of chlorine-containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and bromine-containing halons. It is well recognized, however, that these chemicals have had important uses to society, particularly as refrigerants, as solvents, as plastic blowing agents, as fire retardants and as aerosol propellants. This has led to an extensive search for substitute chemicals with appropriate properties to be used in place of the CFCs and halons. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in a consistent manner the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing on climate for a number of replacement compounds. The unique aspect of this study is its attempt to resolve inconsistencies in previous evaluations of atmospheric lifetimes and radiative forcings for these compounds by adopting a uniform approach. Using the latest version of our two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model of the global atmosphere, we have determined the atmospheric lifetimes of 28 hydrohalocarbons (HCFCs and HFCs). Through the comparison of the model-calculated lifetimes with lifetimes derived using a simple scaling method, our study adds to earlier findings that consideration of stratospheric losses is important in determining the lifetimes of gases. Discrepancies were found in the reported lifetimes of several replacement compounds reported in the international assessment of stratospheric ozone published by the World Meteorological Organization [Granier et al., 1999] and have been resolved. We have also derived the adjusted and instantaneous radiative forcings for CFC-11 and 20 other halocarbons using our radiative transfer model. The sensitivity of radiative forcings to the vertical distribution of these gases is investigated in this study and is shown to be significant. The difference in the global radiative forcing arising from the assumption of a

  20. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl

  1. Lifetime measurements and shape coexistence in {sup 144}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Procter, M. G.; Cullen, D. M.; Niclasen, B.; Mason, P. J. R.; Rigby, S. V.; Dare, J. A.; Lumley, N. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Saren, J.

    2010-05-15

    The known level scheme of {sup 144}Dy has been extended and lifetime measurements have been made with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. Reduced transition probabilities and deformations have been determined for four low-lying transitions. These states form part of the first observed band crossing, giving information on the change in nuclear deformation resulting from the rearrangement of h{sub 11/2} protons in the nucleus. Two bands built upon excited 10{sup +} states have been assigned pi(h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} prolate and nu(h{sub 11/2}){sup -2} oblate configurations with tau=12(2)ps and 0.01lifetimes are reasoned to be a result of shape coexistence at low energy and moderate spin. A known four-quasiparticle dipole band has been extended to higher spin and lifetime measurements suggest a long-lived bandhead state. In this case, the excited states in the band may be consistent with a shears model interpretation of a magnetic dipole rotor. However, the measured B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios reveal a larger than expected deformed rotational component compared with that in the analogous band in the lower mass isotone {sup 142}Gd.

  2. Lifetime measurements and shape coexistence in Dy144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procter, M. G.; Cullen, D. M.; Scholey, C.; Niclasen, B.; Mason, P. J. R.; Rigby, S. V.; Dare, J. A.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Iwasaki, H.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Lumley, N. M.; Möller, O.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Pissulla, T.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Rother, W.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sarén, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2010-05-01

    The known level scheme of Dy144 has been extended and lifetime measurements have been made with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. Reduced transition probabilities and deformations have been determined for four low-lying transitions. These states form part of the first observed band crossing, giving information on the change in nuclear deformation resulting from the rearrangement of h11/2 protons in the nucleus. Two bands built upon excited 10+ states have been assigned π(h11/2)2 prolate and ν(h11/2)-2 oblate configurations with τ=12(2)ps and 0.01<τ≲16ns, respectively. These long lifetimes are reasoned to be a result of shape coexistence at low energy and moderate spin. A known four-quasiparticle dipole band has been extended to higher spin and lifetime measurements suggest a long-lived bandhead state. In this case, the excited states in the band may be consistent with a shears model interpretation of a magnetic dipole rotor. However, the measured B(M1)/B(E2) branching ratios reveal a larger than expected deformed rotational component compared with that in the analogous band in the lower mass isotone Gd142.

  3. A Precise measurement of the B0(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-04-01

    The authors report a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{nu}X (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. They have reconstructed 5176 D{sub s}{sup -} {mu}{sup +} signal events, where the D{sub s}{sup -} is identified via the decay D{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Using these events, they have measured the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to be {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.398 {+-} 0.044 (stat){sub -0.025}{sup +0.028}(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to date.

  4. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Haidar, D Abi; Leh, B; Zanello, M; Siebert, R

    2015-04-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumor margins is difficult because the infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. We use a fiber-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements to assist surgeon in differentiating the healthy and the infiltrated tissues. First study was performed on rats that were previously injected with tumorous cells. Measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumor brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analyzed. The study aimed at defining an optical index that can act as an indicator for discriminating healthy from tumorous tissue.

  5. Measurement requirements and techniques for degradation studies and lifetime prediction testing of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Derringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Tests of weathering and aging behavior are being developed to characterize the degradation and predict the lifetimes of low-cost photovoltaic arrays. Environmental factors which affect array performance include UV radiation, thermal energy, water, oxygen (generally involved in synergistic effects with UV radiation or high temperatures), physical stress, pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and ozone), abrasives and dirt. A survey of photovoltaic array testing has shown the need to establish quantitative correlations between certain measurable properties (carbonyl formation, glass transition temperature, and molecular weight change) and modes of degradation and failure.

  6. Measurement of short lifetimes in highly-charged ions using a two-foil target

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Dunford, R.W.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    One of the frontiers in the study of the atomic physics of highly-charged ions is the measurement of lifetimes in the 100 fs to 10 ps regime. The standard technique for measuring lifetimes of states in highly-charged ions is the beam-foil time-of-flight method in which the intensity of an emission line is monitored as a function of the separation between the exciting foil and the portion of the beam being viewed by the detector. This method becomes increasingly difficult as the decay lengths of the states of interest become shorter. At a typical beam velocity of 10% of the speed of light, the beam travels 30 microns in a picosecond. The standard beam-foil time-of-flight method necessitates observation of the decay radiation within one or two decay lengths from the foil while preventing the detectors from observing the beam spot at the foil. For short-lived states this requires tight collimation of the detector with a resulting loss in solid angle. We are developing a method for measuring ultrashort atomic lifetimes utilizing a two-foil target. As a specific case to demonstrate the feasibility of our method, we are studying the decay of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} level in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. This level has a calculated lifetime of 9.5 ps which corresponds to a decay length of 380 {mu}m. For krypton, theory predicts that 90% of the 2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} states decay via M2 radiation to the ground state. A measurement of the lifetime of this state would contribute to an important current problem which concerns the understanding of atomic structure when both electron correlations and relativistic effects are simultaneously important.

  7. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  8. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  9. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  10. RADIATION MEASURING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Bouricius, G.M.B.; Rusch, G.K.

    1960-03-22

    A radiation-measuring device is described having an a-c output. The apparatus has a high-energy particle source responsive to radiation flux disposed within a housing having a pair of collector plates. A potential gradient between the source and collector plates causes ions to flow to the plates. By means of electrostatic or magnetic deflection elements connected to an alternating potential, the ions are caused to flow alternately to each of the collector plates causing an a-c signal thereon.

  11. Organ radiation doses and lifetime risk of excess cancer for several space shuttle missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, W.; Hardy, A. C.; Peterson, L. E.

    Previously, we presented a methodology for extrapolating a crewmember's skin dose obtained from thermoluminescent dosimetry to organ doses by use of computerized anatomical male and female models. The organs considered are those identified in National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report 98. Using this technique, we have analyzed those Shuttle missions where crew doses >=5 mGy were observed. Radiation absorbed doses are directly proportional to spacecraft shielding and attitude, orbital altitude, inclination, and mission duration. For 28.5 degree inclination missions, the dominant source of exposure is due to penetrating protons from the South Atlantic Anomaly. Results of Shuttle missions 41-C, 51-D, 51-J, STS-33, STS-31, STS-57, and STS-61 are presented and discussed in detail. Projected lifetime incidence risks of radiation-induced cancer for these missions that were based on NCRP Report 98 may not overestimate risks based on recent findings in cancer incidence studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors.

  12. Beam-laser lifetime measurements for some selected levels in singly ionized thulium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Georg; McCurdy, Michelle M.; Pinnington, Eric H.

    1999-11-01

    The lifetimes of 16 levels in Tm II have been measured using the fast-beam-laser technique to resolve the disagreement between time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements recently published by Anderson, Den Hartog, and Lawler [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 13, 2382 (1996)] and a new relativistic Hartree-Fock calculation by Quinet, Palmeri, and Biémont [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 62, 625 (1999)]. In all cases except one, our results support the previous measurement, but with a higher precision.

  13. Radiative Lifetimes of NH2(\\Atilde2A1): Rotational Quantum Number Dependence and Implications for Cometary Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Doumi, M.; Halpern, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Fluorescence (X2B1 ← \\Atilde2A1) from the first electronically excited state transition of NH2 (\\Atilde2A1), extends from 300 to 830 nm and, can be seen as a major visible emission from comets where it is a marker of ammonia NH3 concentrations via photolysis and solar excitation. Inference of ammonia concentrations from the intensity of the NH2 emission depends on knowledge of the radiative lifetime. Petrongolo et al. 2003 remeasured radiative lifetimes of various vibrational levels in the first electronically excited state NH2 (\\Atilde2A1). Their results were a factor of 2.5 or more lower than previous experimental measurements from 1985 and earlier. Collision free, radiative lifetimes from the first electronically excited state of the amidogen free radical, NH2(\\Atilde2A1) are reported here for a number of rotational states in the (0,8,0) and the (0,9,0) vibrational levels. In particular, the (0,8,0) band overlaps the strong OI emission at 630 nm and is commonly used to determine NH3 abundance and the ratio of NH3 to H2O in comets. The results from this work generally agree the older measurements and not with those of Petrolongo, et al. Further, the radiative lifetimes in a vibrational level are shown for the first time to increase with increasing rotational quantum number and also with the projection of the total electronic angular momentum along the internuclear axis. The average radiative lifetimes of the (0,9,0) Γ, τ1 = 18.4 ± 0.2 μs and (0,8,0) Φ, τ2 = 23.4 ± 0.1 μs levels were much longer than those of the (0,9,0) Σ, τ3 = 10.5 ± 0.2 μs and (0,8,0) Π, τ4 = 13.2 ± 0.3 μs states suggesting increased mixing of the first electronic excited and the ground states. This study suggests that the variation of radiative lifetime within the emission band should be taken into consideration in calculations of concentrations of NH2 in comet tails and the inferred NH3 concentration in the comets themselves. Petrongolo, C.; Fan, H.; Ionescu, I.; Kuffel

  14. Lifetime measurements in shape transition nucleus 188Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohilla, Aman; Gupta, C. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Chakraborty, S.; Sharma, H. P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I. M.; Biswas, D. C.; Chamoli, S. K.

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear level lifetimes of high spin states in yrast and non-yrast bands of 188Pt nucleus have been measured using recoil distance plunger setup present at IUAC, Delhi. In the experiment nuclear states of interest were populated via 174Yb(18O,4 n)188Pt reaction at a beam energy of 79MeV provided by 15 UD Pelletron accelerator. The extracted B(E2\\downarrow) values show an initial rise up to 4+ state and then a nearly constant behavior with spin along yrast band, indicating change of nuclear structure in 188Pt at low spins. The good agreement between experimental and TPSM model B(E2\\downarrow) values up to 4^+ state suggests an increase in axial deformation of the nucleus. The average absolute β2 = 0.20 (3) obtained from measured B(E2\\downarrow) values matches well the values predicted by CHFB and IBM calculations for oblate ( β2 ˜ -0.19) and prolate (β2 ˜ 0.22) shapes. As the lifetime measurements do not yield the sign of β2, no definite conclusion can be drawn on the prolate or oblate collectivity of 188Pt on the basis of present measurements.

  15. Precision lifetime measurements of the 2p levels in lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Kurtz, C.; Tanner, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    These measurements are motivated by the theoretical challenges posed by lithium. The three-electron lithium atom is one of the simplest atomic systems with which to test atomic structure calculations. Recently, there were several ab initio calculations of the lithium 2s-2p oscillator strengths, which agree to 0.15%. However, the theoretical results differ by 5 sigma from the precise fast-beam-laser lifetime measurement of Gaupp and Andra (Berlin). Hence the need for a new independent and precise measurement. Improvements were added to the fast beam laser techniques developed for cesium in order to measure the lithium 2p state lifetime. Although the technique is similar to that of cesium, the lithium atom presents a few new complications. Since the atom is lighter, it travels more quickly through the interaction and detection regions. Therefore, the 670 nm wavelength requires a dye laser to produce sufficient intensity to populate the excited state. Unfortunately, the intensity of the dye laser is inherently less stable than that of a diode laser. Another complication is that the ion-beam intensity is much more sensitive to fluctuations in the accelerating voltage. Two detectors were added: one to monitor the ion-beam intensity, and the other to monitor the laser power. With the information from the additional detectors, a new data analysis scheme was developed. Sufficient data were taken to evaluate the benefits of the new detectors. No additional work is planned at Argonne for this experiment.

  16. Excess lifetime cancer mortality risk attributable to radiation exposure from computed tomography examinations in children.

    PubMed

    Chodick, Gabriel; Ronckers, Cécile M; Shalev, Varda; Ron, Elaine

    2007-08-01

    The use of computed tomography in Israel has been growing rapidly during recent decades. The major drawback of this important technology is the exposure to ionizing radiation, especially among children who have increased organ radiosensitivity and a long lifetime to potentially develop radiation-related cancer. To estimate the number of excess lifetime cancer deaths related to annual CT scans performed in children in Israel. We used CT scan utilization data from 1999 to 2003 obtained from the second largest health management organization in the country to project age and gender-specific CT scan use nationwide. Based on published organ doses for common CT examinations and radiation-related cancer mortality risk estimates from studies in survivors of the atomic bomb, we estimated the excess lifetime risks for cancer mortality attributed to use of CT in children and adolescents (up to 18 years old) in Israel. We estimated that 17,686 pediatric scans were conducted annually in Israel during 1999-2003. We project that 9.5 lifetime deaths would be associated with 1 year of pediatric CT scanning. This number represents an excess of 0.29% over the total number of patients who are eventually estimated to die from cancer in their lifetime. Pediatric CT scans in Israel may result in a small but not negligible increased lifetime risk for cancer mortality. Because of the uncertainty regarding radiation effects at low doses, our estimates of CT-related cancer mortality should be considered with caution. Nevertheless, physicians, CT technologists, and health authorities should work together to minimize the radiation dose for children to as low as reasonably achievable and encourage responsible use of this essential diagnostic tool.

  17. A Superconducting Magnet UCN Trap for Precise Neutron Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Picker, R; Altarev, I; Bröcker, J; Gutsmiedl, E; Hartmann, J; Müller, A; Paul, S; Schott, W; Trinks, U; Zimmer, O

    2005-01-01

    Finite-element methods along with Monte Carlo simulations were used to design a magnetic storage device for ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure their lifetime. A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from β-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency. Alongside with the optimization of the magnetic and electrostatic design, the properties of the trap were investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  19. Energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes for transitions in Br-like ions with 38 ⩽ Z ⩽ 42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-12-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in five Br-like ions (Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII and Mo VIII) are calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (grasp). Extensive configuration interaction has been included and results are presented among the lowest 31 levels of the 4s24p5, 4s24p44d and 4s4p6 configurations. Lifetimes for these levels have also been determined, although unfortunately no measurements are available with which to compare. However, recently theoretical results have been reported by Singh et al (2013 Phys. Scr. 88 035301) using the same grasp code. But their reported data for radiative rates and lifetimes cannot be reproduced and show discrepancies of up to five orders of magnitude with the present calculations.

  20. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  1. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  2. B(S) LIFETIME DIFFERENCE MEASUREMENTS FROM THE TEVATRON.

    SciTech Connect

    YIP, K.

    2006-07-02

    The two collider experiments at the Tevatron, CDF and D0, have made a lot of progress in B{sub s} lifetime difference measurements. Here, they have included 3 different channels of measurements, namely, B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi} + {phi}, B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}. Combining all the available measurements, they have obtained {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} = 0.097{sub -0.042}{sup +0.041} ps{sup -1} and {bar {tau}} = 1/{Lambda}{sub s} = 1.461 {+-} 0.030 ps. {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} is now 2.3 {sigma} away from zero.

  3. Direct lifetime measurements of the excited states in Ni72

    DOE PAGES

    Kolos, K.; Miller, D.; Grzywacz, R.; ...

    2016-03-22

    The lifetimes of the first excited 2+ and 4+ states in 72Ni were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method, a model-independent probe to obtain the reduced transition probability. Excited states in 72Ni were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of an intermediate energy 73Cu beam. γ-ray-recoil coincidences were detected with the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA and the S800 spectrograph. Our results provide evidence of enhanced transition probability B(E2;2+ → 0+) as compared to 68Ni, but do not confirm the trend of large B(E2) values reported in the neighboring isotope 70Ni obtained from Coulomb excitationmore » measurement. The results are compared to shell model calculations. Here, the lifetime obtained for the excited 4+1 state is consistent with models showing decay of a seniority ν = 4, 4+ state, which is consistent with the disappearance of the 8+ isomer in 72Ni.« less

  4. Lifetime measurements in 166Re: Collective versus magnetic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. J.; Cederwall, B.; Doncel, M.; Peng, J.; Chen, Q. B.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, P. W.; Meng, J.; Bäck, T.; Jakobsson, U.; Auranen, K.; Bönig, S.; Drummond, M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; HerzáÅ, A.; Joss, D. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Leino, M.; McPeake, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧı, B.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Taylor, M. J.; Thornthwaite, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Xiao, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    Lifetimes of excited states in the neutron-deficient odd-odd nucleus 166Re have been measured for the first time using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The measured lifetime for the (8-) state; τ =480 (80) ps, enabled an assessment of the multipolarities of the γ rays depopulating this state. Information on electromagnetic transition strengths were deduced for the γ -ray transitions from the (9-),(10-), and (11-) states, and in the case of the (10-) and (11-) states limits on the B (M 1 ) and B (E 2 ) strengths were estimated. The results are compared with total Routhian surface predictions and semiclassical calculations. Tilted-axis cranking calculations based on a relativistic mean-field approach (TAC-RMF) have also been performed in order to test the possibility of magnetic rotation in the 166Re nucleus. While the TAC-RMF calculations predict a quadrupole-deformed nuclear shape with similar β2 deformation as obtained by using the TRS model, it was found that the experimental electromagnetic transition rates are in better agreement with a collective-rotational description.

  5. Direct Lifetime Measurements of the Excited States in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolos, K.; Miller, D.; Grzywacz, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Al-Shudifat, M.; Bazin, D.; Bingham, C. R.; Braunroth, T.; Cerizza, G.; Gade, A.; Lemasson, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Madurga, M.; Morse, C.; Portillo, M.; Rajabali, M. M.; Recchia, F.; Riedinger, L. L.; Voss, P.; Walters, W. B.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    The lifetimes of the first excited 2+ and 4+ states in 72>Ni were measured at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method, a model-independent probe to obtain the reduced transition probability. Excited states in 72Ni were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of an intermediate energy 73Cu beam. γ -ray-recoil coincidences were detected with the γ -ray tracking array GRETINA and the S800 spectrograph. Our results provide evidence of enhanced transition probability B (E 2 ;2+→0+) as compared to 68Ni, but do not confirm the trend of large B (E 2 ) values reported in the neighboring isotope 70Ni obtained from Coulomb excitation measurement. The results are compared to shell model calculations. The lifetime obtained for the excited 41+ state is consistent with models showing decay of a seniority ν =4 , 4+ state, which is consistent with the disappearance of the 8+ isomer in 72Ni.

  6. Mass and lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei in storage rings.

    PubMed

    Franzke, Bernhard; Geissel, Hans; Münzenberg, Gottfried

    2008-01-01

    Mass and lifetime measurements lead to the discovery and understanding of basic properties of matter. The isotopic nature of the chemical elements, nuclear binding, and the location and strength of nuclear shells are the most outstanding examples leading to the development of the first nuclear models. More recent are the discoveries of new structures of nuclides far from the valley of stability. A new generation of direct mass measurements which allows the exploration of extended areas of the nuclear mass surface with high accuracy has been opened up with the combination of the Experimental Storage Ring ESR and the FRragment Separator FRS at GSI Darmstadt. In-flight separated nuclei are stored in the ring. Their masses are directly determined from the revolution frequency. Dependent on the half-life two complementary methods are applied. Schottky Mass Spectrometry SMS relies on the measurement of the revolution frequency of electron cooled stored ions. The cooling time determines the lower half-life limit to the order of seconds. For Isochronous Mass Spectrometry IMS the ring is operated in an isochronous ion-optical mode. The revolution frequency of the individual ions coasting in the ring is measured using a time-of-flight method. Nuclides with lifetimes down to microseconds become accessible. With SMS masses of several hundreds nuclides have been measured simultaneously with an accuracy in the 2 x 10(-7)-range. This high accuracy and the ability to study large areas of the mass surface are ideal tools to discover new nuclear structure properties and to guide improvements for theoretical mass models. In addition, nuclear half-lives of stored bare and highly charged ions have been measured. This new experimental development is a significant progress since nuclear decay characteristics are mostly known for neutral atoms. For bare and highly charged ions new nuclear decay modes become possible, such as bound-state beta decay. Dramatic changes in the nuclear lifetime

  7. Measurement of the B0 and B- meson lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A. E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Thomson, E.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Heister, A.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Yuan, C.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B0 and B- mesons are measured using a sample of about four million hadronic /Z decays collected from 1991 to 1995 with the Aleph detector at LEP. The data sample has been recently reprocessed, achieving a substantial improvement in the tracking performance. Semileptonic decays of B0 and B- mesons are partially reconstructed by identifying events containing a lepton with an associated D*+ or D0 meson. The proper time of the /B meson is estimated from the measured decay length and the momentum of the /D-lepton system. A fit to the proper time of 1880 D*+l- and 2856 D0l- candidates yields the following results: τB^0=1.518+/-0.053+/-0.034 ps, τB^-=1.648+/-0.049+/-0.035 ps, τB^-/τB^0=1.085+/- 0.059+/-0.018.

  8. Lifetime measurements by open circuit voltage decay in GaAs and InP diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhimnathwala, H. G.; Tyagi, S. D.; Bothra, S.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetimes in the base of solar cells made on GaAs and InP were measured by the open-circuit voltage decay method. The measurement technique and the conditions under which the minority carrier lifetimes can be measured are described. Minority carrier lifetimes ranging from 1.6 to 34 ns in InP of different doping concentrations were measured. A minority carrier lifetime of 6 ns was measured in n-type GaAs, which agrees well with the lifetime of 5.7 ns measured by transient microwave reflection.

  9. Radiative lifetime of the a 3Σ+ state of HeH+ from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; Liévin, J; Vaeck, N

    2010-09-21

    The first metastable triplet state of HeH(+) was found to be present in ion beam experiments, with its lifetime estimated to be between hundreds of milliseconds and thousand of seconds. In this work, we use ab initio methods to evaluate the radiative lifetimes of the six vibrational levels of the a (3)Σ(+) of HeH(+). The transition a (3)Σ(+)→X (1)Σ(+) is spin-forbidden, but acquires intensity through spin-orbit interaction with the singlet and triplet Π states. Large scale CASSCF/MRCI calculations using an adapted basis set were performed to determine the potential energy curves of the relevant states of HeH(+) as well as the matrix elements of the dipole and spin-orbit operators. The wave functions and energies of the vibrational levels of the a (3)Σ(+) and X (1)Σ(+) states are obtained using a B-spline method and compared to previous works. We find that the radiative lifetime of the vibrational levels increases strongly with v, the lifetime of the v=0 state being 150 s. We also analyze the contributions from discrete and continuum parts of the spectrum. With such a long lifetime, the a (3)Σ(+) state could have astrophysical implications.

  10. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  11. Inhomogeneous linewidth broadening and radiative lifetime dispersion of size dependent direct bandgap radiation in Si quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chung-Lun; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2012-12-15

    The SiO{sub x} (SiO{sub x}:Si-QDs) with buried Si quantum dots (Si-QDs) is synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the size-dependent wave-function of Si-QDs embedded in Si-rich SiO{sub 2} matrix is experimentally and theoretically analyzed to reformulate its bandgap energy as E{sub g}(d) = 1.12+5.83/d{sup 1.78}. The photoluminescent lifetime of Si-QDs is dominated by the non-phonon assisted radiative recombination. Shrinking the Si-QD size from 4.3 to 1.9 nm increases the overlapping probability of electron-hole wave-functions in Si-QD to shorten the non-phonon assisted radiative lifetime from 6.3 {mu}s to 83 ns. Fitting the time-resolved photoluminescence trace with a stretched exponential decay function reveals a lifetime dispersion factor. The lifetime dispersion greatly reduced from 0.8 to 0.39 by enlarging the size distribution of Si-QDs from 0.2 to 1.1 nm, which elucidates the inhomogeneous linewidth broadening feature of Si-QDs. Based on the simulation of non-phonon assisted recombination process, the full-band stretched exponential decay analysis confirms the correlation between inhomogeneous linewidth broadening and lifetime dispersion in Si-QDs.

  12. Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer: Low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.E.; Schull, W.J.; Davis, B.R.; Buffler, P.A.

    1994-04-01

    Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error ({sigma}=0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V Report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from {minus}15% to {minus}30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative project model was {minus}37.1% for males and {minus}23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased {minus}27.1% for males and {minus}43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 65 (DRREF=2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.92%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risk increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for US nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors.

  13. RadRAT: a radiation risk assessment tool for lifetime cancer risk projection.

    PubMed

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Iulian Apostoaei, A; Veiga, Lene H S; Rajaraman, Preetha; Thomas, Brian A; Owen Hoffman, F; Gilbert, Ethel; Land, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Risk projection methods allow for timely assessment of the potential magnitude of radiation-related cancer risks following low-dose radiation exposures. The estimation of such risks directly through observational studies would generally require infeasibly large studies and long-term follow-up to achieve reasonable statistical power. We developed an online radiation risk assessment tool (RadRAT) which can be used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-related cancer with uncertainty intervals following a user-specified exposure history (https://irep.nci.nih.gov/radrat). The uncertainty intervals constitute a key component of the program because of the various assumptions that are involved in such calculations. The risk models used in RadRAT are broadly based on those developed by the BEIR VII committee for estimating lifetime risk following low-dose radiation exposure of the US population for eleven site-specific cancers. We developed new risk models for seven additional cancer sites, oral, oesophagus, gallbladder, pancreas, rectum, kidney and brain/central nervous system (CNS) cancers, using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The lifetime risk estimates are slightly higher for RadRAT than for BEIR VII across all exposure ages mostly because the weighting of the excess relative risk and excess absolute risk models was conducted on an arithmetic rather than a logarithmic scale. The calculator can be used to estimate lifetime cancer risk from both uniform and non-uniform doses that are acute or chronic. It is most appropriate for low-LET radiation doses < 1 Gy, and for individuals with life-expectancy and cancer rates similar to the general population in the US.

  14. Lifetime measurements and magnetic rotation in 107Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, S. H.; Ma, H. L.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, B.; Li, G. S.; Li, C. B.; Hu, S. P.; Cao, X. P.; Yu, B. B.; Xu, C.; Cheng, Y. Y.

    2014-01-01

    The excited states in 107Ag were populated through the heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction 100Mo (11B, 4n) 107Ag at a beam energy of 46 MeV. Lifetimes of high-spin states in 107Ag have been measured through the Doppler shift attenuation method. The deduced B (M1) values, gradually decreasing with increasing spin, clearly demonstrate that both the yrast positive-parity band and the yrast negative-parity band in 107Ag are magnetic rotation bands. Furthermore, experimental deduced B (M1) values for the yrast positive-parity band are compared with the predictions of the particle rotor model. The approximate agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results further confirms the mechanism of magnetic rotation for the yrast positive-parity band. In addition, a systematic investigation shows the evolution of the magnetic rotation mechanism in the A ≈110 mass region.

  15. Measurement of picosecond lifetimes in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, S.; Kröll, Th.; Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Blanc, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Fraile, L. M.; de France, G.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Jentschel, M.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Köster, U.; Lalkovski, S.; Lozeva, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Regan, P. H.; Simpson, G. S.; Soldner, T.; Thürauf, M.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Warr, N.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Lifetimes of nuclear excited states in fission fragments have been studied in the past following isotope separation, thus giving access mainly to the fragments' daughters and only to long-lived isomeric states in the primary fragments. For the first time now, short-lived excited states in the primary fragments, produced in neutron-induced prompt fission of 235U and 241Pu, were studied within the EXILL&FATIMA campaign at the intense neutron-beam facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. Purpose: We aim to investigate the quadrupole collective properties of neutron-rich even-even 138,140,142Xe isotopes lying between the double shell closure N =82 and Z =50 and a deformed region with octupole collectivity. Method: The γ rays emitted from the excited fragments were detected with a mixed array consisting of 8 HPGe EXOGAM Clover detectors (EXILL) and 16 LaBr3(Ce) fast scintillators (FATIMA). The detector system has the unique ability to select the interesting fragment making use of the high resolution of the HPGe detectors and determine subnanosecond lifetimes using the fast scintillators. For the analysis the generalized centroid difference method was used. Results: We show that quadrupole collectivity increases smoothly with increasing neutron number above the closed N =82 neutron shell. Our measurements are complemented by state-of-the-art theory calculations based on shell-model descriptions. Conclusions: The observed smooth increase in quadrupole collectivity is similar to the evolution seen in the measured masses of the xenon isotopic chain and is well reproduced by theory. This behavior is in contrast to higher Z even-even nuclei where abrupt change in deformation occurs around N =90 .

  16. Radiative lifetime of the 3s3p exp 3(exp 5 S sub 2 exp 0) metastable level of P(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calamai, Anthony G.; Han, Xiaofeng; Parkinson, William H.

    1992-01-01

    The present experimental and theoretical results for the radiative lifetime of the 3s3p exp 3(exp 5 S sub 2 exp 0) metastable level of P(+) encompass an experimental determination of the (exp 5 S sub 2 exp 0) lifetime which represents the first measured lifetime of a low charge-state ion in the Si I sequence. This constitutes a fundamental test of the theoretical methods used to determine transition possibilities for intercombination lines involving this level, and suggests that theoretical techniques used to determine such transition probabilities in low-Z species of the Si I isoelectronic sequence should be reevaluated.

  17. Radiative lifetime of the 3s3p exp 3(exp 5 S sub 2 exp 0) metastable level of P(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calamai, Anthony G.; Han, Xiaofeng; Parkinson, William H.

    1992-01-01

    The present experimental and theoretical results for the radiative lifetime of the 3s3p exp 3(exp 5 S sub 2 exp 0) metastable level of P(+) encompass an experimental determination of the (exp 5 S sub 2 exp 0) lifetime which represents the first measured lifetime of a low charge-state ion in the Si I sequence. This constitutes a fundamental test of the theoretical methods used to determine transition possibilities for intercombination lines involving this level, and suggests that theoretical techniques used to determine such transition probabilities in low-Z species of the Si I isoelectronic sequence should be reevaluated.

  18. Multiparameter analysis of a screen for progesterone receptor ligands: comparing fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence polarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Marks, Bryan D; Qadir, Naveeda; Eliason, Hildegard C; Shekhani, Mohammed Saleh; Doering, Klaus; Vogel, Kurt W

    2005-12-01

    Direct measurement of the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of a fluorescent label is an emerging method for high-throughput screening. Changes in the fluorescence lifetime can be correlated to changes in the non-radiative relaxation pathway(s) for the excited state of the label. These pathways can be environmentally sensitive, such as when a labeled analyte is free in solution versus bound to a receptor. Because lifetime is an intrinsic property of a fluorophore, it is not concentration dependent, and therefore has advantages similar to those of ratiometric fluorescent techniques such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer or fluorescence polarization. We have applied the FLT measurement technique to a screen of a small compound library in order to identify compounds that bind to the progesterone receptor, and compared the results to those obtained by performing the assay in fluorescence polarization mode. Each readout modality showed excellent Z'; values, with the FLT readout performing slightly better in this respect. Interfering compounds could be rapidly identified for either assay format by comparing the results between the two formats.

  19. A Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Lifetime via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The neutral pion radiative width has been measured to 8.411 eV ± 1.8% + 1.13% - 1.70% (lifetime = 7.826 ± 0.14 + 0.088 - 0.133 x 10-17 s) utilizing the Primakoff effect and roughly 4.9 to 5.5 GeV photons at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The Hall B Photon Tagger, the Hall B Pair Spectrometer, a state of the art Hybrid Calorimter enabled precision incident photon energy measurement, photon flux measurement, and neutral pion identification, respectively. With these and other hardware and software tools, elastic neutral pion yields were extracted from the data. A well developed and understood simulation calculated geometric and software cut efficiency curves. The simulation also provided photo-pion production response functions to fit the experimental cross sections and extract the Primakoff cross section and thus the neutral pion radiative width and lifetime. Future work includes improving understanding of the nuclear incoherent process and any other background sources of elastic neutral pions in this data.

  20. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  1. Simple device measures solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

  2. Precise Measurement of the 21+ Level Lifetime in 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Bader, V. M.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E. M.; Morse, C.; Recchia, F.; Whitmore, K.

    2013-10-01

    For many years, it has been suggested that 12Be exhibits a breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap. This reflects the tension between the propensity for alpha-clustering in beryllium, with 12Be appearing as a 2-alpha dumb bell bound by a cloud of four poorly bound neutrons, and a more conventional Shell Model picture with the N = 8 neutrons filling the p-shell and holding the nucleus to a near spherical shape. To provide a better understanding of the extent of the breakdown of the N = 8 shell gap, the lifetime of the first 2+ state in 12Be was measured using intermediate-energy inelastic scattering of a 12Be beam combined with the Doppler Shift attenuation method. Gamma rays emitted at the target position were measured with GRETINA in coincidence with reaction residues detected in the S800 spectrometer at NSCL. Three different targets were measured, allowing for consistency checks and a better understanding of systematic effects. Preliminary results on the B(E2) transition strength from the first 2+ state will be presented. Work supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  3. Neutron Lifetime Measurement Using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffer, Craig; Huffman, P. R.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Dewey, M. S.; Huber, M. G.; Hughes, P. P.; Mumm, H. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Coakley, K.; Yue, A. T.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime is important in both nuclear astrophysics and in understanding weak interactions in the framework of the Standard Model. An experiment based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research was designed to address statistical and systematic limitations of former measurements. In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. Some of the neutrons are subsequently downscattered by single phonons in the helium to low energies (< 100 neV) and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process, upscattering of UCN, is suppressed by the low phonon density in the < 300 mK helium, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed through the helium. When the neutron decays the energetic electron produces a scintillation signal in the helium that is detected in real time using photomultiplier tubes. The current measurement is limited by larger than expected systematic corrections. We will discuss the result of the latest dataset and comment on the potential of future measurements.

  4. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: Bc lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the Bc± meson is studied in the Bc± → J/Ψμ± + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/Ψ + μ invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 ± 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: τ(Bc±) = 0.448-0.036+0.038(stat) ± 0.032(sys) ps.

  5. Spin Lifetime Measurements of GaAsBi Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursley, Brennan; Vardar, G.; Goldman, R. S.; Sih, V.

    2012-02-01

    Substituting a small amount of As with Bi, the largest non-radioactive group V element, leads to a large reduction in the GaAs band gap and expected large spin-orbit effects ootnotetextB. Fluegel et al., Giant Spin-Orbit Bowing in GaAs1-xBix, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 067205 (2006).. Both properties are advantageous with potential applications ranging from infrared detectors to spin valves. Compressively strained GaAsBi films with varying bismuth compositions were grown on GaAs using molecular-beam epitaxy. Spin lifetimes were measured using the Hanle effect, a magneto-optical technique where an out-of-plane spin polarization is generated by circularly polarized light and then made to precess about an in-plane magnetic field. A Lorentzian lineshape can be fit to the field-dependent photoluminescence polarization to extract gTs, where g is the Lande g-factor and Ts is a function of the carrier recombination time and spin dephasing time and provides a lower bound for both. Temperature and power dependent measurements were conducted and our extracted values for gTs vary from 100ps to 1ns.

  6. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  7. c, b, and tau lifetime measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments at e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage rings have successfully measured the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes and set interesting limits on the B lifetime. So far, the conventional wisdom has prevailed. The tau lifetime is consistent with prediction; there is no sign (but little sensitivity) of a violation of universality. The charmed particle lifetimes are roughly as expected, but richer in their phenomenology than anticipated. The B lifetime is still unknown. The experimental art is developing rapidly. Several experiments have by now installed vertex detectors. Measurements of charmed particle lifetimes from e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments will complement the work that has been done at fixed target machines. Measurements of tau and B lifetimes may be the exclusive province of e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments for the next few years. (WHK)

  8. Branching ratios, cross sections, and radiative lifetimes of rare earth ions in solids: Application to Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions in LiYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    1998-03-01

    The measurement of branching ratios, cross sections and radiative lifetimes for rare earth ions in solids is considered. The methods are applied to Tm and Ho in YLF as a test case. De-activation rates for electric dipole and magnetic dipole emission are calculated for many of the lower lying manifolds in Tm:YLF and Ho:YLF in the context of the Judd-Ofelt theory to determine radiative lifetimes. Measured values for the branching ratios as well as the absorption and emission cross sections are also presented for many of the excited state manifolds. From these measurements, a methodology is developed to extract measured values for the radiative lifetimes. These results are compared with the Judd-Ofelt theory as a guide for consistency and for determining the accuracy of the Judd-Ofelt theory in predicting branching ratios and radiative lifetimes. The parameters generated by the methods covered here have potential applications for more accurate modeling of Tm:Ho laser systems.

  9. Analysis of the radiative lifetime of Pr{sup 3+} d-f emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zych, Aleksander; Lange, Matthijs de; Mello Donega, Celso de; Meijerink, Andries

    2012-07-01

    The radiative lifetime of excited states is governed by Fermi's Golden Rule. For many applications, the radiative decay rate is an important parameter. For example, for scintillators materials in PET scanners, a short response time is crucial and it has been realized that the d-f emission of Pr{sup 3+} is faster than for the widely applied d-f emission from Ce{sup 3+}. In this paper, the radiative decay rate of d-f emission from Pr{sup 3+} is systematically investigated in a wide variety of host lattices, including scintillators materials. The variation in the decay rate is analyzed based on Fermi's Golden Rule. The trend observed is best described using a full cavity model to correct for local-field effects and a {lambda}{sup 3} factor to account for the energy of the transition. Still, there is a considerable scatter of the experimental data around the best fit to these data. The variation is explained by uncertainties in the refractive indices and a variation in the transition dipole moment of the d-f transition for Pr{sup 3+}. Based on the results, the shortest radiative lifetime that can be achieved for Pr{sup 3+} d-f emission is predicted to be {approx}6 ns.

  10. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  11. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  12. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  13. Accurate Alternative Measurements for Female Lifetime Reproductive Success in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trinh T. X.; Moehring, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Fitness is an individual’s ability to survive and reproduce, and is an important concept in evolutionary biology. However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified. Lifetime reproductive success, the total progeny an organism can produce in their lifetime, is thought to be a suitable proxy for fitness, but the measure of an organism’s reproductive output across a lifetime can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another. PMID:26125633

  14. Measurement of the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the semileptonic decay channel.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-03-06

    Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, we measure the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the Bc-/+-->J/psimicro+/-+X final state. A simultaneous unbinned likelihood fit to the J/psi+micro invariant mass and lifetime distributions yields a signal of 881+/-80(stat) candidates and a lifetime measurement of tau(Bc+/-)=0.448(-0.036)(+0.038)(stat)+/-0.032(syst) ps.

  15. Lower thresholds for lifetime health effects in mammals from high-LET radiation - Comparison with chronic low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, Tatiana G; Kryshev, Alexander I

    2016-12-01

    Lower threshold dose rates and confidence limits are quantified for lifetime radiation effects in mammalian animals from internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides. Extensive datasets on effects from internal alpha-emitters are compiled from the International Radiobiological Archives. In total, the compiled database includes 257 records, which are analyzed by means of non-parametric order statistics. The generic lower threshold for alpha-emitters in mammalian animals (combined datasets) is 6.6·10(-5) Gy day(-1). Thresholds for individual alpha-emitting elements differ considerably: plutonium and americium - 2.0·10(-5) Gy day(-1); radium - 2.1·10(-4) Gy day(-1). Threshold for chronic low-LET radiation is previously estimated at 1·10(-3) Gy day(-1). For low exposures, the following values of alpha radiation weighting factor wR for internally deposited alpha-emitters in mammals are quantified: wR(α) = 15 as a generic value for the whole group of alpha-emitters; wR(Pu) = 50 for plutonium; wR(Am) = 50 for americium; wR(Ra) = 5 for radium. These values are proposed to serve as radiation weighting factors in calculations of equivalent doses to non-human biota. The lower threshold dose rate for long-lived mammals (dogs) is significantly lower than comparing with the threshold for short-lived mammals (mice): 2.7·10(-5) Gy day(-1), and 2.0·10(-4) Gy day(-1), respectively. The difference in thresholds is exactly reflecting the relationship between the natural longevity of these two species. Graded scale of severity in lifetime radiation effects in mammals is developed, based on compiled datasets. Being placed on the severity scale, the effects of internal alpha-emitters are situated in the zones of considerably lower dose rates than effects of the same severity caused by low-LET radiation. RBE values, calculated for effects of equal severity, are found to depend on the intensity of chronic exposure: different RBE values are characteristic for low

  16. A new method for measuring the neutron lifetime using an in situ neutron detector

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Christopher L.; Adamek, Evan Robert; Broussard, Leah Jacklyn; ...

    2017-05-30

    Here, we describe a new method for measuring surviving neutrons in neutron lifetime measurements using bottled ultracold neutrons (UCN), which provides better characterization of systematic uncertainties and enables higher precision than previous measurement techniques. We also used an active detector that can be lowered into the trap to measure the neutron distribution as a function of height and measure the influence of marginally trapped UCN on the neutron lifetime measurement. Additionally, measurements have demonstrated phase-space evolution and its effect on the lifetime measurement.

  17. Radiative lifetime of the metastable excited singlet A^1Σ^+ state of (CaNa)^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Côté, R.; Michels, H.; Smith, W. W.

    2002-05-01

    New experiments were proposed recently to investigate the regime of cold atomic and molecular ion-atom collision processes in a special hybrid neutral-atom--ion trap under high vacuum conditions. The collisional cooling of laser pre-cooled Ca^+ ions by ultracold Na atoms is being studied. Modeling this process requires knowledge of the radiative lifetime of the excited metastable singlet A^1Σ^+ state of the (CaNa)^+ molecular system. We present calculations for the oscillator strength values of free-bound transitions between the A^1Σ^+ and ground X^1Σ^+ states of the molecular system. The calculations were carried out using Complete Active Set Self-Consistent Field and Möller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (CASSCF/MP2) with an extended Gaussian basis, 6-311+G(3df). These states asymptotically go to the excited (Ca^+ +Na(3s)) and ground (Na^+ +Ca) limits of the ion-atom quasimolecular system, respectively. The matrix elements between low-energy free excited states and individual vibrational levels of the ground state are calculated, and the resulting matrix elements are summed to obtain the integrated collisional radiative lifetime. We are investigating the competition between collisional cooling and heating from radiative charge transfer. Work is supported in part by NSF grant PHY-9988215.

  18. Wavelength-resolved measurements of fluorescence lifetime of indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerega, Anna; Zolek, Norbert; Soltysinski, Tomasz; Milej, Daniel; Sawosz, Piotr; Toczylowska, Beata; Liebert, Adam

    2011-06-01

    We study fluorescence lifetime of indocyanine green (ICG) using femtosecond laser and sensitive detection based on time-correlated single-photon counting. A time-resolved multichannel spectral system is constructed and applied for determination of the fluorescence lifetime of the ICG in different solvents. Emission properties of ICG in water, milk, and 1% intralipid solution are investigated. Fluorescence of the fluorophore of different concentrations (in a range of 1.7-160 μM) dissolved in different solutions is excited by femtosecond pulses generated with the use of Ti:Sa laser tuned within the range of 740-790 nm. It is observed that fluorescence lifetime of ICG in water is 0.166 +/- 0.02 ns and does not depend on excitation and emission wavelengths. We also show that for the diffusely scattering solvents (milk and intralipid), the lifetime may depend on the dye concentration (especially for large concentrations of ICG). This effect should be taken into account when analyzing changes in the mean time of arrival of fluorescence photons excited in ICG dissolved in such optically turbid media.

  19. Increased radiative lifetime of Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}F{sub 4} → {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition in oxyfluoride tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yaoyao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Liyan; Huang, Feifei; Hu, Lili

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We prepare Tm{sup 3+}-doped tellurite-zinc glasses with F{sup −} substitution. • Thermal stability becomes better with increasing F{sup −} in present glasses. • Tm{sup 3+} 1.8 μm radiative lifetime increases with F{sup −} concentration. • The origin of the increased lifetime has been discussed. - Abstract: The 1.8 μm emission properties of Tm{sup 3+}-doped zinc tellurite glasses modified by the substitution of ZnF{sub 2} are investigated in this paper. The thermal stability, Raman and phonon sideband spectra, transmission and absorption spectra, emission spectra and decay curves are discussed. It is found that substitution of fluoride ions into the zinc tellurite matrix produces dramatic increase in the emission lifetime of Tm{sup 3+} 1.8 μm emission. Absorption, Raman and phonon sideband spectra are used to estimate the local structure of Tm{sup 3+} ions. These analyses indicate structural change around Tm{sup 3+} ions caused by substitution of fluoride ions monitors the increased intrinsic radiative lifetimes. An increase in the measured radiative lifetimes of the Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}F{sub 4} → {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition is observed. The origin has been discussed and the reduction of OH{sup −} absorption, decrease of maximum phonon energy and phonon density are considered to be dominant in all of the nonradiative relaxations.

  20. On the determination of radiative lifetimes of excited Mn I and Mn II levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, R.; Bard, A.; Kock, M.

    1995-12-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to measure the lifetimes of 46 Mn I and 7 Mn II levels. A high-current hollow cathode produces an effusive beam of manganese atoms and ions in the ground states and in metastable states. Selected states are populated with tunable dye laser pulses. The following fluorescence is measured by means of a Tektronix 1 GHz transient digitizer. Including the separately measured response function of the system in the evaluation procedure the full decay curve can be applied for a determination of the lifetimes. All measurements are performed with linearly polarized laser beams adjusted to the magic angle in order to exclude systematic error sources. A comparison with literature data is given.

  1. Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othmer, S.; Chen, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plate arrays. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results are compared with those obtained using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

  2. Measurement of the Average B Hadron Lifetime Using Reconstructed Vertices in Three-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S

    2003-12-17

    This thesis describes a measurement of the average B hadron lifetime using data collected with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Collider in 1993. An inclusive analysis selects three dimensional vertices with B hadron lifetime information in a sample of 50,000 Z{sup 0} decays. A lifetime of 1.564 {+-} 0.030(stat) {+-} 0.036(syst) ps is extracted from the decay length distribution of these vertices using a binned maximum likelihood method.

  3. The determination of minority carrier lifetimes in direct band-gap semiconductors by monitoring intensity-modulated luminescence radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1985-01-01

    When an extrinsic, direct band-gap semiconductor sample is irradiated by photons of an energy higher than the energy of the band gap between valence and conduction bands, excess electron-hole pairs are generated which, while diffusing through the sample, produce luminescence via radiative recombination. If, furthermore, the intensity of the impinging beam of photons is modulated sinusoidally, the luminescence radiation escaping from the sample will be phase shifted with respect to the original photon beam in a characteristic way. It will be shown that by measuring the phase shift at different modulation frequencies, the Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime of minority carriers may be ascertained. The method is nondestructive inasmuch as there is no need to fabricate p-n junctions or Ohmic contacts, nor is it necessary to remove already existing Ohmic contacts of angle lap the surface, etc., procedures often needed when determining lifetimes with the scanning electron microscope (in which case a p-n junction must be present).

  4. The determination of minority carrier lifetimes in direct band-gap semiconductors by monitoring intensity-modulated luminescence radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1985-01-01

    When an extrinsic, direct band-gap semiconductor sample is irradiated by photons of an energy higher than the energy of the band gap between valence and conduction bands, excess electron-hole pairs are generated which, while diffusing through the sample, produce luminescence via radiative recombination. If, furthermore, the intensity of the impinging beam of photons is modulated sinusoidally, the luminescence radiation escaping from the sample will be phase shifted with respect to the original photon beam in a characteristic way. It will be shown that by measuring the phase shift at different modulation frequencies, the Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime of minority carriers may be ascertained. The method is nondestructive inasmuch as there is no need to fabricate p-n junctions or Ohmic contacts, nor is it necessary to remove already existing Ohmic contacts of angle lap the surface, etc., procedures often needed when determining lifetimes with the scanning electron microscope (in which case a p-n junction must be present).

  5. Lifetime prevalence of schizophrenia among individuals prenatally exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki City.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Y; Nakane, Y; Ohta, Y; Kondo, H

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between prenatal exposure to atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation and the development of schizophrenia in adulthood. We investigated the lifetime prevalence of schizophrenia among people prenatally exposed to the 1945 Nagasaki A-bomb, using the schizophrenia register and the A-bomb survivors' database. Among 1867 prenatally exposed individuals, 18 subjects (0.96%) had developed schizophrenia later in life. The prevalence was significantly higher in people exposed in the second trimester of pregnancy than in those exposed in the third trimester. The closer they had been to the hypocentre, the higher was the prevalence, but no statistically significant linear relationship was seen. This investigation could not clarify the nature of exposure to A-bomb radiation as a risk factor for schizophrenia in the prenatal period.

  6. Radiation thermometry: The measurement problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutter, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the theory and techniques of radiometric thermometry is presented. The characteristics of thermal radiators (targets) are discussed along with surface roughness and oxidation effects, fresnel reflection and subsurface effects in dielectrics. The effects of the optical medium between the radiating target and the radiation thermometer are characterized including atmospheric effects, ambient temperature and dust environment effects and the influence of measurement windows. The optical and photodetection components of radiation thermometers are described and techniques for the correction of emissivity effects are addressed.

  7. Study of PRIMAVERA steel samples by positron annihilation spectroscopy technique II - Lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsjak, V.; Grafutin, V.; Ilyukhina, O.; Burcl, R.; Ballesteros, A.; Hähner, P.

    2012-02-01

    In the present article, a positron annihilation lifetime technique was used for the study of VVER-440/230 weld materials, manufactured in the frame of the international PRIMAVERA project on microstructural investigation of the irradiated WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steel. The present results complement our previous report of positron angular correlation experiments and provide in-depth characterization of vacancy type defects behavior under irradiation and thermal treatment. The results give new insight into the previously published atom probe tomography and angular correlation of annihilation radiation studies. The measurements do not show any association of phosphorus or its segregation to the open volume defects investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The embrittlement effects related to the phosphorus seem to be effectively annealed-out during 475 °C thermal treatment and the post annealing microstructure and mechanical properties of the material are consequently affected mostly by agglomerations of vacancy clusters coarsened during thermal treatment.

  8. Determining a fluorophore's transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-11-11

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin's model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  9. Fine-structure energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes in Si-like nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Large scale CIV3 calculations of excitation energies from ground state as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p2, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s23p3d, 3s23p4s, 3s23p4p, 3s23p4d and 3s23p4f configurations of Ni XV, are performed using very extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST results. From our radiative decay rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. It is noted that our calculated radiative rates show significant disagreement (23-30%) with those calculated by Ishikawa and Vilkas (2002 Phys. Scr. 65 219) for the transitions involving the 3s3p3(5S2) level. For this high spin level 3s3p3(5S2) our calculated lifetime is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Träbert et al (1989 Z. Phys. D 11 207). In this calculation, we also predict many additional new and accurate data for various optically allowed and intercombination transitions to complete the void in the existing data.

  10. Anomalously high lifetimes measured by quasi-steady-state photoconductance in advanced solar cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhl, Mattias; Chan, Catherine; Abbott, Malcolm D.; Trupke, Thorsten

    2013-12-01

    Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance is widely used in photovoltaics industry to measure the effective minority carrier lifetime of silicon wafers, a key material parameter affecting final solar cell efficiency. When interpreting photoconductance based lifetime measurements, it is important to account for various artefacts that can cause an over-estimation of the carrier lifetime, such as minority carrier trapping. This paper provides experimental evidence for another artefact in photoconductance lifetime measurements, affecting samples that have a conductive layer that is interrupted by lines of the opposite polarity doping, forming laterally alternating regions of p/n doping. This structure often appears in the emitter region of samples used to monitor the lifetime of interdigitated back contact cells. The cause of this artefact is linked to a reduction in the measured dark conductance. Experimental data are presented that suggest this is due to the formation of a phototransistor type structure on the samples surface, resulting in variations in conductivity under different illumination levels.

  11. Astrophysical constraints on the radiative lifetime of neutrinos with mass between 10 and 100 eV/c-squared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Jakobsen, P.

    1981-01-01

    Upper limits to astronomical photon backgrounds are used to derive constraints on the radiative lifetime of neutrinos. With the assumption that the radiative decay dominates the decay routes available, comparisons with predicted fluxes exclude radiative lifetimes between 10 to the 13th and 10 to the 22nd-23rd sec for neutrinos which decay to lighter neutrinos and 5-50 eV photons. For a secondary neutrino mass much less than the parent neutrino mass, this photon-energy range corresponds to a parent-neutrino-mass range of 10-100 eV/c-squared.

  12. Radiative lifetime of the 5S2 metastable state of N/+/. [with interpretation of auroral emission spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of metastable N(+)(5S2) has been measured to be 4.2 + or - 0.6 msec, a value generally in agreement with theory, by direct monitoring of the spontaneous emission from approximately 1,000,000 ions stored in a radio-frequency ion trap. Additional measurements were made of the quenching rate coefficient (2.5 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/sec) and the production cross section (greater than or equal to 10 to the -18th sq cm) of N(+)(5S2) in N2. This work supports the interpretation of the 2145-A feature in the spectrum of aurorae as being due to N(+)(5S2) emission.

  13. Lifetime measurements on electronically excited C 2(A 1Π u) and C 2(d 3Π g) by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, W.; Becker, K. H.; Bielefeld, M.; Meuser, R.

    1986-01-01

    The radiative lifetimes of C 2(A 1Π u, ν'= 0 and 3) were determined by laser-induced fluorescence to be τ 0(0) = 18.5 ± 3 and τ 0(3) = 11.4 ± 2 μs. In addition, the lifetimes of C 2C 2(A 1Π u,ν' = 0 and 1) were measured as τ 0 = 106 ± 15 ns and 105 ± 15 ns, respectively. The error is 3σ.

  14. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  15. Measurement of the Excited-State Lifetime of a Microelectronic Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. W.; Bladh, K.; Spietz, L. F.; Gunnarsson, D.; Schuster, D. I.; Delsing, P.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a continuously measured microelectronic circuit, the Cooper-pair box measured by a radio-frequency single-electron transistor, approximates a quantum two-level system. We extract the Hamiltonian of the circuit through resonant spectroscopy and measure the excited-state lifetime. The lifetime is more than 105 times longer than the inverse transition frequency of the two-level system, even though the measurement is active. This lifetime is also comparable to an estimate of the known upper limit, set by spontaneous emission, for this circuit.

  16. Cumulative radiation exposure from imaging procedures and associated lifetime cancer risk for patients with lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fabritius, Grete; Brix, Gunnar; Nekolla, Elke; Klein, Stefan; Popp, Henning D.; Meyer, Mathias; Glatting, Gerhard; Hagelstein, Claudia; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the cumulative radiation exposure and the associated lifetime-cancer-risk from diagnostic imaging in patients with Hodgkin-lymphoma-(HL) or diffuse-large-B-cell-lymphoma (DLBCL). 99 consecutive patients (53-males) diagnosed with HL or DLBCL were included in the study and followed. Based on the imaging reports, organ and effective-doses-(ED) were calculated individually for each patient and the excess lifetime risks were estimated. The average ED in the first year after diagnosis was significantly different for men (59 ± 33 mSv) and women (744 ± 33 mSv)-(p < 0.05). The mean cumulative ED in each of the following 5 years was 16 ± 16 mSv without significant differences between men and women-(p > 0.05). Over all years, more than 90% of the ED resulted from CT. The average cumulative radiation risk estimated for the first year was significantly lower for men (0.76 ± 0.41%) as compared to women (1.28 ± 0.54%)-(p < 0.05). The same was found for each of the subsequent 5-years (men-0.18 ± 0.17%; women-0.28 ± 0.25%)-(p < 0.05). In conclusion, for HL and DLBCL patients investigated in this study, a cumulative radiation risk of about 1 excess cancer per 100 patients is estimated for diagnostic imaging procedures performed during both the first year after diagnosis and a follow-up period of 5 years. PMID:27748377

  17. Effect of EMIC Waves on the Lifetime of Energetic Electrons in the Earth's Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Demekhov, A.

    2008-12-01

    The stably trapped electrons in the inner radiation belt have lifetimes of years and energies higher than a few hundred keV. These energetic electrons can have serious effects on the way spacecrafts and satellites operate and cause significant hazards to low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. For mitigating these hazards it is necessary to investigate ways for reducing the electron life times, for example, through pitch angle scattering by waves. For these waves, the gyro-resoance condition yields the minimum wavelength requirement for given particle energy and local magnetic field. For example, at the magnetic equator at L = 2 the waves resonant with 1 MeV electrons should have wavelengths less than 10 km. Low frequency Electromagnetic Ion-Cyclotron (EMIC) waves occur in three bands with frequencies below the hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ion gyro-frequencies, respectively. At frequencies close to the ion gyro-frequencies, the EMIC waves can have wavelength short enough to gyro-resonate with energetic electrons, which can lead to significant changes in the lifetimes of electrons in the inner ration belt. However at these altitudes the amplitudes of naturally excited EMIC waves do not yield significant scattering of the energetic electrons and artificial sources are needed. In order to define the characteristics of such sources we investigated the lifetime of inner belt energetic electrons subject to pitch angle scattering with EMIC waves. The resonant wave characteristics are obtained using the global core plasma model (GCPM). The lifetimes of the electrons in the presence of these waves are computed using the pitch angle diffusion coefficient for broadband waves. For several hundred Watts of broadband EMIC waves in the shell volume enclosed by magnetic field lines at L = 2.0 with width dL = 0.1, the lifetime of 1 MeV electrons can be reduced to a few months. This is a considerable reduction compared to the average life times of about years and have important

  18. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  19. Contactless measurements of charge traps and carrier lifetimes in detector-grade cadmium zinc telluride and mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Gary C.; Kessick, Royal; James, Ralph B.; Van den Berg, Lodewijk

    2000-11-01

    An understanding of compensation and trapping in Cd1-xZnxTe and HgI2 is necessary in order to improve the size and spectroscopic performance of radiation detectors fabricated from these materials. Although several electron and hole traps have been identified, very little is currently understood about the effect of specific carrier traps on the mean free path of the charge carriers. Characterization techniques such as Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) or Thermoelectric Emission Spectroscopy (TEES) have been used for trap identification, while time-of-flight techniques have been employed to determine carrier mobility and lifetime but it has proven difficult to correlate the results of these independent measurements. Furthermore, these characterization methods are complicated by the need to make electrical contacts to the material. Here we report on contactless, thermally stimulated lifetime measurements performed on detector-grade Cd1- xZnxTe (x approximately 0.1) and HgI2 crystals using a microwave cavity perturbation method. The microwave technique is complimentary to contact-based methods and provides both trap identification and lifetime determination in a single measurement. The results provide evidence of lifetime-limiting deep traps in these materials. The trap activation energies and the minimum detrapping times are estimated and the results are compared to previous TSC and TEES investigations.

  20. BEAM LIFETIME AND EMITTANCE GROWTH MEASUREMENTS OF GOLD BEAMS IN RHIC AT STORAGE.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; DREES,A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; CONNOLLY,R.; FLILLER,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    During stores of gold beams, longitudinal and transverse beam sizes were recorded. Longitudinal profiles were obtained with a wall current monitor. Transverse profiles were reconstructed from gold-gold collision rates at various relative transverse beam positions. The total beam lifetime was measured with a beam current transformer, the bunched beam lifetime with the wall current monitor. Diffusion rates in the beam halo were determined from the change in the loss rate when a scraper is retracted. The measurements are used to determine the lifetime limiting effects. Beam growth measurements are compared with computations of beam-growth times from intra-beam scattering.

  1. An infrared pump-probe measurement of the Sm3+6H7/2 lifetime in LiYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Sebastian P.; Wells, Jon-Paul R.; van der Meer, Alexander F. G.; Reid, Michael F.

    2017-04-01

    We report a pump-probe measurement of the lifetime of the 6H7/2 multiplet of Sm3+:LiYF4. A lifetime of 3.1 ± 0.3 ps was inferred for the Y2 level of the 6H7/2 multiplet. This lifetime is two orders of magnitude faster than for a similar energy gap in Nd3+:LiYF4, and does not follow the prediction of a simple exponential energy-gap law for non-radiative relaxation in this material.

  2. A lifetime in photochemistry; some ultrafast measurements on singlet states.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the development of time-correlated single-photon counting techniques from the early use of spark discharge lamps as light sources through to the use of femtosecond mode-locked lasers through the personal work of the author. We used laser-excited fluorescence in studies on energy migration and rotational relaxation in synthetic polymer solutions, in biological probe molecules and in supersonic jet expansions. Time-correlated single-photon counting was the first method used in early fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and we outline the development of this powerful technique, with a comparison of techniques including wide-field microscopy. We employed these modern forms of FLIM to study single biological cells, and applied FLIM also to gain an understanding the distribution in tissue, and fates of photosensitizer molecules used in photodynamic therapy. We also describe the uses and instrumental design of laser systems for the study of ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy.

  3. A lifetime in photochemistry; some ultrafast measurements on singlet states

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, David

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the development of time-correlated single-photon counting techniques from the early use of spark discharge lamps as light sources through to the use of femtosecond mode-locked lasers through the personal work of the author. We used laser-excited fluorescence in studies on energy migration and rotational relaxation in synthetic polymer solutions, in biological probe molecules and in supersonic jet expansions. Time-correlated single-photon counting was the first method used in early fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and we outline the development of this powerful technique, with a comparison of techniques including wide-field microscopy. We employed these modern forms of FLIM to study single biological cells, and applied FLIM also to gain an understanding the distribution in tissue, and fates of photosensitizer molecules used in photodynamic therapy. We also describe the uses and instrumental design of laser systems for the study of ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27436979

  4. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  5. Curiosity First Radiation Measurements on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-08

    Like a human working in a radiation environment, NASA Curiosity rover carries its own version of a dosimeter to measure radiation from outer space and the sun. This graphic shows the flux of radiation detected the rover Radiation Assessment Detector.

  6. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W LVIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Cl-like W LVIII. Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 44 configurations (generating 4978 levels) over a wide energy range up to 363 Ryd, and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) adopted for the calculations. Since no other results of comparable complexity are available, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code (FAC), which help in assessing the accuracy of our results. Energies are listed for the lowest 400 levels (with energies up to ∼98 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}, 3s3p{sup 6}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 4}3d{sup 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}3d{sup 3}, and 3p{sup 6}3d configurations, and radiative rates are provided for four types of transitions, i.e. E1, E2, M1, and M2. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.5%, whereas radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF RADIATION DOSE AND EXCESSIVE LIFE-TIME CANCER RISK FROM THE BUNAIR GRANITE, NORTHERN PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, A A; Manzoor, S; Younis, H; Shah, K H; Ahmed, T

    2017-07-20

    Natural radioactivity was measured in Bunair Granite using high purity germanium gamma-ray spectrometer and compared to world's granites and building materials to access its suitability for the construction purpose. Average gamma-activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were found to be 52.41, 58.41 and 1130.12 Bq kg-1, respectively. The Indoor and outdoor radiation indices including excessive life-time cancer risk (ELCR) were calculated. The average indoor ELCR was estimated as 3.49 × 10-3. The average outdoor ELCR was assessed as 0.46 × 10-3. As a basic building material Bunair Granite should be on low propriety. For flooring, facing the buildings and as Table tops, in kitchens and other utilities it is safe. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Radiative Lifetime in Near-IR-Luminescent Ytterbium Cryptates: The Key to Extremely High Quantum Yields.

    PubMed

    Doffek, Christine; Seitz, Michael

    2015-08-10

    A powerful strategy for the improvement of near-IR lanthanoid luminescence has been successfully employed for the first time, which involves the rational and deliberate shortening of the radiative luminescence lifetimes τ(rad) in molecular ytterbium complexes. In this context, the bidentate chelating unit 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide has been identified as being responsible for decreasing τ(rad) substantially in macrobicyclic Yb cryptates. This strategy, when combined with conventional approaches, yields unprecedented absolute near-IR quantum yields of up to 12%. This extraordinary efficiency represents the highest value measured for any molecular lanthanoid near-IR emitter. The proof-of-concept for the implementation of the new strategy opens up entirely new prospects for the field of lanthanoid luminescence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Transition dipole function and radiative lifetimes for the A and C 1Σ+ states of the LiH molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriche, Hamid; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The transition dipole moments of the first eight 1Σ+ states of the LiH molecule have been calculated using ab initio approach based on the pseudopotential technique. Such transition dipole moments have been used to determine the radiative lifetimes for all vibrational levels of the first and the second excited states, A and C 1Σ+, using accurate adiabatic potential energy curves. In addition to the bound-bound transitions, we have included the bound-free emissions probabilities. The latter was calculated exactly and using the Franck-Condon approximation and then included in the total radiative lifetime. A significant change in these lifetimes has been observed, particularly for the higher excited vibrational levels for which the approximate evaluation breaks down. The radiative lifetimes of the vibrational levels of the A1Σ+ exited sate are in very good agreement with the few available theoretical and experimental results. However, the radiative lifetimes associated to the C1Σ+ state are presented here for the first time.

  10. Note: Rapid measurement of fluorescence lifetimes using SiPM detection and waveform sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, H.-M.; Souris, J. S.; Kim, H.-J.; Cheng, S.-H.; Chen, L.; Lo, L.-W.; Chen, C.-T.; Kao, C.-M.

    2017-09-01

    In fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurement—assessing the average time fluorophores spend in their excited state before returning to their ground state—offers a number of advantages over quantifying fluorescence intensities that include resistance to photo-bleaching and independence from fluorophore concentration, excitation intensity, and measurement methodology. Despite growing interest, fluorescence lifetime techniques frequently mandate relatively complex instrumentation, slow data acquisition rates, and significant data analyses. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fluorescence lifetimes using off-the-shelf analog silicon photomultipliers and switched-capacitor array waveform sampling techniques, with precision matching that of much larger and more elaborate commercial instruments.

  11. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  12. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in 69As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczyński, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczén, J.; Ziebliński, M.; de Angelis, G.; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; Brambilla, S.; Leoni, S.; Montanari, D.; Jaworski, G.; Palacz, M.; Wadsworth, R.

    2012-10-01

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in 69As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  13. Relativistic Calculations and Measurements of Energies, Auger Rates, and Lifetimes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Research and Industry, Denton, Texas, 8-10 November 1982. 7. B. Crasemann: "Efectos Relativ’sticos y de QED Sobre las Transiciones Rayos - X y Auger Entre...INNER-SHELL IONIZATION BY PROTONS X -RAY EMISSION BREIT INTERACTION AUGER TRANSITIONS DIRAC-HARTREE-SLATER COMPUTATIONS SYNCHROTRON RADIATION RESONANT...computations, including relativistic and quantum- electrodynamic effects, of atomic energy levels and of x -ray and Auger transitions in atoms with one or

  14. Minority carrier lifetime in mid-wavelength infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattices: Photon recycling and the role of radiative and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Höglund, L.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Fisher, A.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Hill, C. J.; Keo, S.; Gunapala, S. D.

    2014-11-10

    The influence of radiative recombination on the minority carrier lifetime in mid-wavelength InAs/InAsSb superlattices was investigated. From the lifetime's dependence on temperature, photon recycling, and carrier concentration, it was demonstrated that radiative lifetime dominates for carrier concentrations >5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination starts to dominate the minority carrier lifetime for carrier concentrations <5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. An observed increase of the minority carrier lifetime with increasing superlattice thickness was attributed to photon recycling, and good agreement between measured and theoretical values of the photon recycling factor was obtained.

  15. Neutron Detection Improvements for Measurement of Neutron Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manus, Gregory; Liu, Chen-Yu; Salvat, Daniel; Cude, Christopher; Hanson, Aaron; Sawtelle, Sonya

    2010-11-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) have energies low enough to be confined in material and magnetic traps, yet it makes transmission into typical neutron detectors a nontrivial task. The neutron lifetime experiment at LANL may require improvements to a standard ionization chamber detector or an entirely different approach to UCN detection [1]. We compare Si and Zr ionization chamber windows to their Al counterparts. Si's smooth surface and uniform bulk density reduces the total elastic scattering cross-section. Zr's mechanical strength enables thinner, more transparent detector windows than Al. Also, various geometries of electrode grid planes are simulated in Garfield and built. Furthermore, to minimize time and spectrum dependent systematic errors of collection efficiency, we bypass transporting the UCN from trap to detector by detecting UCN directly in the trap. Here we empty BF3 and Ar into the trap where UCN capture in B releases Li and α particles detected by their ionization of Ar. The B capture also emits a gamma which can be detected. Details and progress will be presented at the conference. [4pt] [1] Nucl Instrum Meth A 599 (2009) 82-92

  16. B physics: measurement of the lifetime difference between b_s mass eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-28

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K*{sup 0} decays. Lifetimes of the heavy (H) and light (L) mass eigenstates in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time.

  17. Measurement of the [Formula: see text] meson lifetime using [Formula: see text] decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Cartelle, P Alvarez; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Gutierrez, O Aquines; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manzali, M; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spinella, F; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    The lifetime of the [Formula: see text] meson is measured using semileptonic decays having a [Formula: see text] meson and a muon in the final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of [Formula: see text], are collected by the LHCb detector in [Formula: see text] collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The measured lifetime is [Formula: see text]where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Lifetime measurements in an electrostatic ion beam trap using image charge monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk

    2012-03-15

    A technique for mass-selective lifetime measurements of keV ions in a linear electrostatic ion beam trap is presented. The technique is based on bunching the ions using a weak RF potential and non-destructive ion detection by a pick-up electrode. This method has no mass-limitation, possesses the advantage of inherent mass-selectivity, and offers a possibility of measuring simultaneously the lifetimes of different ion species with no need for prior mass-selection.

  19. EXOMARS IRAS (DOSE) radiation measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, C.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Fonte, S.; Pauselli, C.; Reitz, G.; Beaujean, R.

    The characterization and the study of the radiations on their interaction with organic matter is of great interest in view of the human exploration on Mars. The Ionizing RAdiation Sensor (IRAS) selected in the frame of the ExoMars/Pasteur ESA mission is a lightweight particle spectrometer combining various techniques of radiation detection in space. It characterizes the first time the radiation environment on the Mars surface, and provide dose and dose equivalent rates as precursor information absolutely necessary to develop ways to mitigate the radiation risks for future human exploration on Mars. The Martian radiation levels are much higher than those found on Earth and they are relatively low for space. Measurements on the surface will show if they are similar or not to those seen in orbit (modified by the presence of ``albedo'' neutrons produced in the regolith and by the thin Martian atmosphere). IRAS consists of a telescope based on segmented silicon detectors of about 40\\userk\\milli\\metre\\user;k diameter and 300\\user;k\\micro\\metre\\user;k thickness, a segmented organic scintillator, and of a thermoluminescence dosimeter. The telescope will continuously monitor temporal variation of the particle count rate, the dose rate, particle and LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra. Tissue equivalent BC430 scintillator material will be used to measure the neutron dose. Neutrons are selected by a criteria requiring no signal in the anti-coincidence. Last, the passive thermoluminescence dosimeter, based on LiF:Mg detectors, regardless the on board operation timing, will measure the total dose accumulated during the exposure period and due to beta and gamma radiation, with a responsivity very close to that of a human tissue.

  20. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-05

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst).

  1. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  2. Lifetime radiation risks from low-dose rate radionuclides in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1985-11-01

    One of the largest, long-term (25-yr) animal studies on the effects of low-dose internal irradiation is almost completed. Some 335 beagles were given continuous exposure to graded /sup 90/Sr (low linear energy transfer (LET)) in their diets (D-dogs) through adulthood. A second group (R-dogs) was given fractionated doses of /sup 225/Ra (high LET) as young adults. A third group of 44 was given a single injection of /sup 90/Sr as adults (S-dogs) to compare single to continuous dosages. All dogs were followed through their lifetimes. Only one of the 848 dogs is still alive. The animals were whole-body counted over their entire life span and were examined frequently for assessment of medical status. There were no acute radiation lethalities. Analyses of the large data base from these dogs have begun and preliminary indications are that /sup 90/Sr, which was tested over a 1500-fold skeletal dose rate range, does not cause significant life shortening at average accumulation skeletal doses of approx.2500 rads (25 Gy) and that a curvilinear dose response curve for life shortening was seen at higher accumulation doses. The data will be discussed in terms of modern epidemiological concepts and quantifications will be related to certain parameters of human risk from acute or chronic radiation exposures.

  3. Radiative Lifetime for Nuclear Spin Conversion of Water-Ion H_2O^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Harada, Kensuke; Oka, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear spin conversion interaction of the water ion, H_2O^+, has been studied to derive the spontaneous emission lifetime between the ortho- and para-levels. The H_2O^+ ion is a radical with ^2 B _1 electronic ground state and the off-diagonal electron spin-nuclear spin interaction term, T_{ab} (S_aΔ I_b + S_bΔ I_a), connects para and ortho levels, because Δ {I} = {I}_1 - {I}_2 has nonvanishing matrix elements between I = 0 and 1. The T_{ab} coupling constant, derived by an ab initio calculation in MRD-CI/Bk level to be 72 MHz, is larger than that of H_2O by 4 orders of magnitude, makes the ortho to para conversion of H_2O^+ faster than that of H_2O by 8 orders of magnitude and possibly competitive with other astrophysical processes. Last year we reported ortho and para coupling channels below 900 cm^{-1} caused by accidental near degeneracy of rotational levels. For example, hyperfine components of the 4_{2,2}(o) and 3_{3,0}(p) levels mix each other by 1.2 x 10^{-3} due to the near degeneracy (Δ E = 0.417 cm^{-1}), but the lower lying 1_{0,1}(p) and 1_{1,1}(o) levels mix only by 8.9 x 10^{-5} because of their large separation (Δ E = 16.27 cm^{-1}). In the present study, we solved the radiative rate equations including all the rotational levels below 900 cm^{-1} to give the o-p conversion lifetime to be 0.451, 3.27, 398 and 910 years for the equilibrium o/p ratio of 3.00, 3.00, 4.52, and 406 when the radiation temperature T_r is 100, 60, 20 and 5 K. These results qualitatively help to understand the observed high o/p ratio of 4.8 ± 0.5 (corresponding to the nuclear spin temperature of 21 K) toward Sgr B2, but they are too slow to compete with the reaction by collision unless the number of density of H_2 in the region is very low (n˜1 cm^{-3}) or the radiative temperature is very high (T_r > 50K). K. Tanaka, K. Harada, and T. Oka, the 67th OSU Symposium MG06, 2012. P. Schilke, et al., A&A 521, L11 (2010). K. Tanaka, K. Harada, and T. Oka, J. Phys. Chem. A

  4. Standard reference for instrument response function in fluorescence lifetime measurements in visible and near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Zelent, Bogumil; Corradini, Maria G.; Ludescher, Richard D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Allura red (AR) fluorophore, a common dye in the food industry, displays a broad emission spectrum in water (visible-to-near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and has a remarkably short fluorescence lifetime of about 10 ps. This short lifetime does not depend on the emission (observation) wavelength. We examined time responses of AR fluorescence across emission wavelengths from 550 nm to 750 nm and found that it is an ideal candidate for impulse response functions in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  5. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  6. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  7. Radiation measurements aboard Spacelab 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Almasi, J.; Cassou, R.; Frank, A.; Henke, R. P.; Rowe, V.; Parnell, T. A.; Schopper, E.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation environment inside Spacelab 1 was measured by a set of passive radiation detectors distributed throughout the volume inside the module, in the access tunnel, and outside on the pallet. Measurements of the low linear energy transfer (LET) component obtained from the thermoluminescence detectors ranged from 102 to 190 millirads, yielding an average low LET dose rate of 11.2 millirads/day inside the module, about twice the low LET dose rate measured on previous flights of the Space Shuttle. Because of the higher inclination of the orbit (57 versus 28.5 deg for previous Shuttle flights), substantial fluxes of highly ionizing high charge and energy galactic cosmic ray particles were observed, yielding an overall average mission dose-equivalent of about 150 millirems, more than three times higher than that measured on previous Shuttle missions.

  8. Doppler-shift attenuation lifetime measurement of the 36Ar21+ level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, P.; Drake, T. E.; Starosta, K.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Chester, A.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Henderson, R.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Ketelhut, S.; Krücken, R.; Laffoley, A. T.; Leach, K. G.; Miller, D.; Orlandi, R.; Pearson, C. J.; Pore, J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rand, E. T.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E.; Unsworth, C.; Wang, Z.-M.; Signoracci, A.

    2017-08-01

    At TRIUMF, the TIGRESS Integrated Plunger device and its suite of ancillary detector systems have been implemented for charged-particle tagging and light-ion identification in coincidence with γ -ray spectroscopy for Doppler-shift lifetime studies and low-energy Coulomb excitation measurements. As a test of the device, the lifetime of the first 2+ excited state in 36Ar was measured from the γ -ray line shape of the 21+→0g.s . + transition using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique following Coulomb excitation. The line-shape signatures, vital for precision lifetime measurements, were significantly improved by enhanced reaction-channel selectivity using a complementary approach of kinematic gating and digital rise-time discrimination of recoiling charged particles in a silicon PIN diode array. The lifetime was determined by comparisons between the data and simulated line shapes generated using our TIGRESS Coulomb excitation code as an input to the Lindhard method, which was then extended and included as a class in geant4. The model-independent lifetime result of 490 ±50 fs corresponds to a reduced quadrupole transition strength of B (E 2 ;21+→0g.s . +) =56 ±6 e2fm4 and agrees well with previous intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements, thereby resolving reported discrepancies in the 21+ level lifetime in this self-conjugate nucleus.

  9. Measurement of the 7p{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} Level Lifetime in Atomic Francium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.Z.; Simsarian, J.E.; Orozco, L.A.; Shi, W.; Sprouse, G.D.

    1997-06-01

    We present the first measurement of an atomic radiative lifetime in Fr. We use a time-correlated single photon counting technique with a cold sample of {sup 210}Fr atoms in a magneto-optic trap. The results are a precision experimental test of the atomic many-body perturbation theory applied to the heaviest alkali. The lifetime for the 7p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} level of 21.02(16) ns gives a value for the reduced transition matrix element between the levels 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} {r_arrow} 7p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} of 5.898(22)a{sub {infinity}} atomic units. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Lifetime of Ionic Vacancy Created in Redox Electrode Reaction Measured by Cyclotron MHD Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya; Mogi, Iwao; Asanuma, Miki; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    The lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in ferricyanide-ferrocyanide redox reaction have been first measured by means of cyclotron magnetohydrodynamic electrode, which is composed of coaxial cylinders partly exposed as electrodes and placed vertically in an electrolytic solution under a vertical magnetic field, so that induced Lorentz force makes ionic vacancies circulate together with the solution along the circumferences. At low magnetic fields, due to low velocities, ionic vacancies once created become extinct on the way of returning, whereas at high magnetic fields, in enhanced velocities, they can come back to their initial birthplaces. Detecting the difference between these two states, we can measure the lifetime of ionic vacancy. As a result, the lifetimes of ionic vacancies created in the oxidation and reduction are the same, and the intrinsic lifetime is 1.25 s, and the formation time of nanobubble from the collision of ionic vacancies is 6.5 ms. PMID:26791269

  11. Lifetime measurements using the Jefferson Lad Load-Lock Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Grames; P. Adderley; M. Baylac; J. Brittian; D. Charles; J. Clark; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; K. Surles-Law

    2000-10-07

    Lifetime measurements of bulk GaAs using a 100 kV load-lock electron gun and beam line were made. Initial tests used anodized samples to study lifetime under various conditions (gun vacuum, laser spot location, activated area). Subsequent tests used a mechanical mask to limit the active area and included improved monitoring of the gun chamber and beam line vacuum pressure. Results of these measurements support claims made at past workshops, namely photocathode lifetime improves when gun vacuum is enhanced and when electron emission from the edge of the photocathode is eliminated. The dependence upon laser spot location is less certain. Tests studying lifetime at higher beam intensity (I ~ 8 mA) have begun.

  12. Ruby fluorescence lifetime measurements for temperature determinations at high (p, T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johannes D.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Winkler, Björn

    2012-06-01

    The lifetime of the ruby R1 fluorescence line was measured as a function of pressure (up to about 20 GPa) and temperature (550 K) in an externally heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). At constant temperatures, the lifetime is increasing linearly with increasing pressure. The slope of the pressure dependence is constant up to a temperature of 450 K and it is decreasing at higher temperatures. At constant pressure, the lifetime is exponentially decreasing with increasing temperature. The (p, T)-dependence can be parametrized by the combination of a linear and an exponential function. This allows an accurate p, T-determination by the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy using Sm2+-doped strontium tetraborate and lifetime measurements of ruby, as the energy of the Sm2+ fluorescence is nearly temperature-independent.

  13. Reflectance measurements on cavity radiators.

    PubMed

    Jones, O C; Forno, C

    1971-12-01

    A knowledge of the emissivity of a cavity radiator may be deduced from reflectance measurements, but these may be difficult to make if the cavity has a small aperture and low reflectance. The use of a He-Ne laser as a source facilitates such measurements. Results are presented for one ceramic and three metallic cavities that have been used in photometric and spectroradoimetric standards work. An integrating sphere method appears more satisfactory than a goniophotometric approach.

  14. Radiative lifetimes and transition probabilities for electric-dipole delta n equals zero transitions in highly stripped sulfur ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Elston, S. B.; Griffin, P. M.; Forester, J. P.; Thoe, R. S.; Peterson, R. S.; Sellin, I. A.; Hayden, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The beam-foil time-of-flight method has been used to investigate radiative lifetimes and transition rates involving allowed intrashell transitions within the L shell of highly ionized sulfur. The results for these transitions, which can be particularly correlation-sensitive, are compared with current calculations based upon multiconfigurational models.

  15. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ϕ = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  16. Detecting and Quantifying Biomolecular Interactions of a Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Nanoparticle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    Boreham, Alexander; Pikkemaat, Jens; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Kuehne, Christian; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Dernedde, Jens; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-12-24

    Interactions of nanoparticles with biomaterials determine the biological activity that is key for the physiological response. Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates (dPGS) were found recently to act as an inhibitor of inflammation by blocking selectins. Systemic application of dPGS would present this nanoparticle to various biological molecules that rapidly adsorb to the nanoparticle surface or lead to adsorption of the nanoparticle to cellular structures such as lipid membranes. In the past, fluorescence lifetime measurements of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles at a molecular and cellular/tissue level have been proven to reveal valuable information on the local nanoparticle environment via characteristic fluorescent lifetime signatures of the nanoparticle bound dye. Here, we established fluorescence lifetime measurements as a tool to determine the binding affinity to fluorescently tagged dPGS (dPGS-ICC; ICC: indocarbocyanine). The binding to a cell adhesion molecule (L-selectin) and a human complement protein (C1q) to dPGS-ICC was evaluated by the concentration dependent change in the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC. The apparent binding affinity was found to be in the nanomolar range for both proteins (L-selectin: 87 ± 4 nM and C1q: 42 ± 12 nM). Furthermore, the effect of human serum on the unique fluorescence lifetime signature of dPGS-ICC was measured and found to be different from the interactions with the two proteins and lipid membranes. A comparison between the unique lifetime signatures of dPGS-ICC in different biological environments shows that fluorescence lifetime measurements of unique dPGS-ICC fluorescence lifetime signatures are a versatile tool to probe the microenvironment of dPGS in cells and tissue.

  17. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  19. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; Mulholland, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4 He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE office of Science, NIST and NSF.

  20. Quantum well intersubband lifetimes measured by mid-IR pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.L.; Sung, B.; Proctor, M.

    1995-12-31

    Semiconductor quantum wells exhibit quantum-confined electronic energy levels, or subbands, that are similar to one-dimensional {open_quotes}particle in a box{close_quotes} wavefunctions. The light effective mass of electrons allows large spatial extents of the wavefunctions and concomitantly large dipole overlaps between states. These large dipoles have been exploited in a variety of experiments including nonlinear frequency conversion, infrared photodetection, and lasing. A key parameter for many devices is the upper state lifetime. The decay of carriers in the upper state is believed to be dominated by optical phonon scattering and lifetimes on-the order of 1ps are expected. While Raman and saturation measurements have shown good agreement with theory, direct pump-probe measurements have reported longer lifetimes, partially due to carrier heating. In this paper, we discuss our mid-IR (5{mu}m) pump-probe measurements of intersubband lifetimes, performed at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center. At low excitation densities we observe lifetimes of about 1.5 ps, in good agreement with phonon theory. At high excitation densities the lifetime increases to 3.5 ps, demonstrating the transition from the low- to high-excitation agree.

  1. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cudzinovic, M; Sopori, B

    1995-11-01

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  2. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  3. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  4. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode.

    PubMed

    Ariño-Estrada, G; Chmeissani, M; de Lorenzo, G; Kolstein, M; Puigdengoles, C; García, J; Cabruja, E

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a (241)Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  5. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    PubMed Central

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data. PMID:25729405

  6. Measurement of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime in Ds⁺π⁻ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the B¯s⁰ meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to Ds⁺π⁻, to that of the B¯⁰ meson. The pp collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1  fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010±0.010±0.008 for this ratio with the known B¯⁰ lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific B¯s⁰ lifetime to be τ(B¯s⁰ )=1.535±0.015±0.014  ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  7. Radiative charge-transfer lifetime of the excited state of (NaCa){sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Cote, R.; Michels, H.; Smith, W.W.

    2003-04-01

    New experiments were proposed recently to investigate the regime of cold atomic and molecular ion-atom collision processes in a special hybrid neutral-atom-ion trap under high-vacuum conditions. We study the collisional cooling of laser precooled Ca{sup +} ions by ultracold Na atoms. Modeling this process requires knowledge of the radiative lifetime of the excited singlet A {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} state of the (NaCa){sup +} molecular system. We calculate the rate coefficient for radiative charge transfer using a semiclassical approach. The dipole radial matrix elements between the ground and the excited states, and the potential curves were calculated using complete active space self-consistent field and Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory with an extended Gaussian basis, 6-311+G (3df). The semiclassical charge-transfer rate coefficient was averaged over a thermal Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we also present elastic collision cross sections and the spin-exchange cross section. The rate coefficient for charge transfer was found to be 2.3x10{sup -16} cm{sup 3}/sec, while those for the elastic and spin-exchange cross sections were found to be several orders of magnitude higher (1.1x10{sup -8} cm{sup 3}/sec and 2.3x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/sec, respectively). This confirms our assumption that the milli-Kelvin regime of collisional cooling of calcium ions by sodium atoms is favorable with the respect to low loss of calcium ions due to the charge transfer.

  8. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W XL

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Br-like tungsten, W XL, calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP). Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 46 configurations (generating 4215 levels) over a wide energy range up to 213 Ryd. However, for conciseness results are only listed for the lowest 360 levels (with energies up to ∼43 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 5},4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4f,4s4p{sup 6},4p{sup 6}4d,4s4p{sup 5}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d{sup 2}, and 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d4f configurations, and provided for four types of transitions, E1, E2, M1, and M2. Comparisons are made with existing (but limited) results. However, to fully assess the accuracy of our data, analogous calculations have been performed with the flexible atomic code, including an even larger CI than in GRASP. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.02 Ryd, whereas results for radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  9. Vibrational branching ratios and radiative lifetimes in the laser cooling of AlBr.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yufeng; Wan, Mingjie

    2017-02-15

    The feasibility of laser cooling of the AlBr molecule is investigated using ab initio quantum chemistry. Potential energy curves, permanent dipole moments, and transition dipole moments for the ground state X(1)Σ(+) and the first two excited states (a(3)Π and A(1)Π) are calculated using the multi-reference configuration interaction plus Davidson corrections (MRCI+Q) method with the ACVQZ basis set; the spin-orbit coupling effects are also taken into account in electronic structure calculations at the MRCI level. Based on the acquired potential energy curves and transition dipole moments, highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors (f00 = 0.9540, f11 = 0.8172) and vibrational branching ratios (R00 = 0.9708, R11 = 0.8420) for the transition are determined. Radiative lifetime calculations of the A(1)Π1 (ν' = 0-4) state are found to be short (9.16-11.48 ns) enough for rapid laser cooling. The proposed main cycling laser drives the transition at the wavelength λ00 = 279.19 nm. The vibrational branching loss ratios of the A(1)Π1 (ν') state to the intervening states a(3)Π0(+) and a(3)Π1 are small (<5.2 × 10(-6)) enough to be negligible. The present theoretical results indicate that the AlBr molecule is a promising candidate for laser cooling.

  10. Theoretical oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and radiative lifetimes of levels in Pb V

    SciTech Connect

    Colón, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Porcher, P.

    2014-01-15

    Theoretical values of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for 306 spectral lines arising from the 5d{sup 9}ns(n=7,8,9),5d{sup 9}np(n=6,7),5d{sup 9}6d, and 5d{sup 9} 5f configurations, and radiative lifetimes of 9 levels, of Pb V have been obtained. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree–Fock calculations including core-polarization effects. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least squares fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. We included in these calculations the 5d{sup 8}6s6p and 5d{sup 8}6s{sup 2} configurations. These calculations have facilitated the identification of the 214.25, 216.79, and 227.66 nm spectral lines of Pb V. In the absence of experimental results of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, we could not make a direct comparison with our results. However, the Stark broadening parameters calculated from these values are in excellent agreement with experimental widening found in the literature. -- Highlights: •Theoretical values of transition probabilities of Pb V have been obtained. •We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square. •The parameters calculated from these values are in agreement with the experimental values.

  11. A new measurement of the lifetime of the Ξc+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E687 Collaboration; Frabetti, P. L.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dallapiccola, C.; Ginkel, J. F.; Johns, W. E.; Nehring, M. S.; Vaandering, E. W.; Butler, J. N.; Cihangir, S.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garren, L.; Gourlay, S. A.; Harding, D. J.; Kasper, P.; Kreymer, A.; Lebrun, P.; Shukla, S.; Vittone, M.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Sarwar, S.; Zallo, A.; Cawlfield, C.; Culbertson, R.; Gardner, R. W.; Gottschalk, E.; Greene, R.; Park, K.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Alimonti, G.; Bellini, G.; Boschini, M.; Brambilla, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Cinquini, L.; di Corato, M.; Dini, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Meroni, E.; Milazzo, L.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Perasso, L.; Prelz, F.; Sala, A.; Sala, S.; Torretta, D.; Buchholz, D.; Claes, D.; Gobbi, B.; O'Reilly, B.; Bishop, J. M.; Cason, N. M.; Kennedy, C. J.; Kim, G. N.; Lin, T. F.; Puseljic, D. L.; Ruchti, R. C.; Shephard, W. D.; Swiatek, J. A.; Wu, Z. Y.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Castoldi, C.; Gianini, G.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, L.; Mirles, A.; Montiel, E.; Olaya, D.; Ramirez, E.; Rivera, C.; Zhang, Y.; Link, J. M.; Paolone, V. S.; Yager, P. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Cao, J.; Hosack, M.; Sheldon, P. D.; Davenport, F.; Cho, K.; Danyo, K.; Handler, T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chung, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Myung, S. S.

    1998-05-01

    New measurements of the lifetime and mass of the Ξc+ are presented. The Ξc+ has been reconstructed through the two decay channels Ξ-π+π+ and Σ+K-π+. The data were accumulated by the Fermilab high energy photoproduction experiment E687. The lifetime is measured to be 0.34+0.07-0.05 (stat.)+/-0.02 (syst.) ps while the mass is measured to be 2465.8+/-1.9 (stat.)+/-2.5 (syst.) MeV/c2.

  12. A measurement of lifetime differences in the neutral /D-meson system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, J. M.; Paolone, V. S.; Reyes, M.; Yager, P. M.; Anjos, J. C.; Bediaga, I.; Göbel, C.; Magnin, J.; de Miranda, J. M.; Pepe, I. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Simão, F. R. A.; Vale, M. A.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Mendez, H.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ramirez, J. E.; O'Reilly, B.; Vaandering, E. W.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garren, L. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Gourlay, S. A.; Kasper, P. H.; Kreymer, A. E.; Kutschke, R.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Sarwar, S.; Zallo, A.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Park, K. S.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Chung, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Ko, B. R.; Kwak, J. W.; Lee, K. B.; Myung, S. S.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Boschini, M.; Brambilla, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calandrino, A.; D'Angelo, P.; DiCorato, M.; Dini, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Milazzo, L.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, A.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T. F., III; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Merlo, M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A. M.; Mendez, L.; Mirles, A.; Montiel, E.; Olaya, D.; Quinones, J.; Rivera, C.; Zhang, Y.; Copty, N.; Purohit, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Cho, K.; Handler, T.; Engh, D.; Johns, W. E.; Hosack, M.; Nehring, M. S.; Sales, M.; Sheldon, P. D.; Stenson, K.; Webster, M. S.; Sheaff, M.; Kwon, Y. J.

    2000-07-01

    Using a high statistics sample of photoproduced charm particles from the FOCUS experiment at Fermilab, we compare the lifetimes of neutral /D mesons decaying via D0-->K-π+andK- K+ to measure the lifetime differences between CP even and CP odd final states. These measurements bear on the phenomenology of D0-D¯0 mixing. If the D0-->K-π+ is an equal mixture of CP even and CP odd eigenstates, we measure yCP=(Γ(CPeven)- Γ(CPodd))/(Γ(CPeven)+Γ(CPodd))=0.0342+/-0.0139+/- 0.0074.

  13. Plunger lifetime measurements after Coulomb excitation at intermediate beam energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, A.; Hackstein, M.; Rother, W.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Pissulla, T.; Shimbara, Y.; Starosta, K.; Adrich, P.; Amthor, A. M.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bowen, M.; Chester, A.; Dunomes, A.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Glasmacher, T.; Ginter, T.; Hausmann, M.

    2009-01-28

    Absolute transition probabilities of the first 2{sup +} state in {sup 110,114}Pd were remeasured using the recoil distance Doppler shift technique following projectile Coulomb excitation at intermediate beam energies for the first time. The {sup 110}Pd experiment served to check the novel technique as well as the method used for the data analysis which is based on the examination of {gamma}-ray lineshapes. Whereas the measured B(E2) value for {sup 110}Pd agrees very well with the literature, the value obtained for {sup 114}Pd differs considerably. The data is also used to test a novel concept, called the valence proton symmetry, which allows one to extrapolate nuclear properties to very neutron rich nuclei.

  14. Apparatus and methods of measuring minority carrier lifetime using a liquid probe

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian

    2016-04-12

    Methods and apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes using liquid probes are provided. In one embodiment, a method of measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor material comprises: providing a semiconductor material having a surface; forming a rectifying junction at a first location on the surface by temporarily contacting the surface with a conductive liquid probe; electrically coupling a second junction to the semiconductor material at a second location, wherein the first location and the second location are physically separated; applying a forward bias to the rectifying junction causing minority carrier injection in the semiconductor material; measuring a total capacitance as a function of frequency between the rectifying junction and the second junction; determining an inflection frequency of the total capacitance; and determining a minority lifetime of the semiconductor material from the inflection frequency.

  15. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J- PARC: TPC and DAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takahito; Katayama, Ryo; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yamashita, Satoru; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyukio; Otono, Hidetoshi; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Seki, Yoshichika; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Ino, Takashi; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is an important parameter for Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The best neutron lifetime measurements have uncertainties at the 0.1% level; however, they differ by 3.8 sigma. In order to resolve this discrepancy, we plan to measure the neutron lifetime using a method originally developed by Kossakowski et al. which is different from the other 0.1% accuracy experiments. In our method, which uses a pulsed cold neutron beam at J-PARC, the electrons from the beta decay of the neutron are detected with a time projection chamber (TPC). A small amount of 3He is added to the gas mixture in order to simultaneously measure the neutron flux. We report on the recent upgrade of the TPC and the Data Acquisition System which were used to take data during the period of February-June 2014.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of doping concentration and carrier lifetime in silicon using terahertz time-domain transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, M.; Matheisen, C.; Nagel, M.; Knoch, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present a measurement approach enabling the simultaneous determination of sheet resistance and carrier lifetime in semiconductor samples. It is based on a classic Terahertz (THz) time-domain transmission spectroscopy scheme extended by quasi-steady state optical excitation. The carrier lifetime is determined by contactless THz probing of the increase in sheet conductance associated with quasi-steady-state excitation. Combining a successive etch-back of the surface with repeated THz measurements yields a depth profile of the doping concentration and the carrier lifetime, which is important for the optimization of the emitter of solar cells, for instance. The viability of our approach is demonstrated by investigating a phosphorous doped emitter of a silicon solar cell with the THz approach and comparing the results with electrochemical capacitance voltage measurements.

  17. Radiative lifetimes and quenching rate coefficients for directly excited rotational levels of OH/A 2Sigma +, v-prime = 0/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, I. S.; Laudenslager, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A narrow-bandwidth pulsed dye laser was used to excite OH X 2Pi i radicals to the A 2Sigma(+) state by pumping in the (0, 0) vibrational band around 308 nm. The radiative lifetimes of specific (K-prime, J-prime) rotational levels in v-prime = 0 were measured at low pressures (not greater than 1 mtorr), which yielded a mean lifetime of 0.71 + or - 0.009 microsec (2 sigma). Electronic quenching rate constants for N2, O2, H2O, and H2 were measured for a range of initially excited rotational levels. A strong dependence of this rate constant on the initially excited rotational level was found for N2, and less markedly for O2, with the rate constant tending to increase for the lowest rotational levels K-prime not greater than 3. The implications of these results for the laser-induced fluorescence detection of atmospheric OH are discussed.

  18. Measuring radiative capture rates at DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.

    2013-04-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. The Supernanogan ion source at ISAC provides stable beams of high intensities. The DRAGON collaboration has taken advantage of this over the last years by measuring several reactions requiring high-intensity stable oxygen beams. In particular,the ^17O(p,γ) and ^16O(α,γ) reaction rates were recently measured. The former reaction is part of the hot CNO cycle, and strongly influences the abundance of ^18F in classical novae. Because of its relatively long lifetime, ^18F is a possible target for satellite-based gamma-ray spectroscopy. The ^16O(α,γ) reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the ^12C(α,γ) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In both cases, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. Results from both experiments will be presented.

  19. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  20. On the Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Ultracold Neutrons in a Vacuum Quadrupole Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David; Penttila, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime (~886 s) with an accuracy of 10−4. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100/cm3 [1]. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10−4 in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic uncertainty in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap. PMID:27308151

  1. Measurement of the Ratio of B+ and B0 Meson Lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beauceron, S.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Butler, J. M.; Bystricky, J.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golling, T.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kau, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, K. H.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lueking, L.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Oshima, N.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Parashar, N.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Phaf, L.; Piegaia, R.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rani, K. J.; Rapidis, P. A.; Ratoff, P. N.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schukin, A. A.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shephard, W. D.; Shpakov, D.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Song, Y.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thomas, E.; Thooris, B.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vlimant, J.-R.; von Toerne, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Wahl, H. D.; Walker, R.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Warsinsky, M.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; White, A.; White, V.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2005-05-01

    The ratio of the B+ and B0 meson lifetimes was measured using data collected in 2002 2004 by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These mesons were reconstructed in B→μ+νD*-X decays, which are dominated by B0 and B→μ+νD¯0X decays, which are dominated by B+. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be τ+/τ0=1.080±0.016(stat)±0.014(syst).

  2. Measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime using the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-07-07

    We present a measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime in the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about of 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/Psie+ pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4< M(J/Psie) < 6 GeV/c2. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured Bc+ meson lifetime of 0.463(-0.065)(+0.073)(stat) +/- 0.036(syst) ps.

  3. New lifetime measurements in the stable semimagic Sn isotopes using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Walker, J.; Leske, J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; East, M.; Boutachkov, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Doornenbal, P.; Egido, J. L.; Ekström, A.; Gerl, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Maier-Komor, P.; Modamio, V.; Naqvi, F.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Schwengner, R.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2011-09-01

    Precise measurements of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited states in the stable even-A Sn isotopes 112,114,116,122Sn have been performed using the Doppler shift attenuation technique. For the first excited 2+ states in 112Sn, 114Sn and 116Sn the E2 transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes are in disagreement with the previously adopted values. They indicate a shallow minimum at N = 66 in contrast to the maximum at mid-shell predicted by modern shell model calculations.

  4. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 2 3P 0 state in He-like uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toleikis, S.; Manil, B.; Bednarz, G.; Berdermann, E.; Beyer, H. F.; Bosch, F.; Bräuning-Demian, A.; Gumberidze, A.; Indelicato, P.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Marrus, R.; Mokler, P. H.; Stachura, Z.; Stöhlker, T.; Warczak, A.

    2005-07-01

    The lifetime of the 2 3P0 state in He-like uranium has been measured in a beam-foil time-of-flight experiment at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung accelerator facility with the result τ(2 3P0) = 58.2(9.5) ps. With the measured lifetime it is possible to derive a value of Δ E2s Lamb = 76. 3 ± 20. 6 eV for the n = 2 Lamb shift in uranium.

  5. Measurement of the ratio of B+ and B0 meson lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-05-13

    The ratio of the B+ and B0 meson lifetimes was measured using data collected in 2002-2004 by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These mesons were reconstructed in B-->mu(+)nuD(*-)X decays, which are dominated by B0 and B-->mu(+)nuD 0X decays, which are dominated by B+. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be tau(+)/tau(0)=1.080+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.014(syst).

  6. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  7. Radiative Rotational Lifetimes and State-Resolved Relative Detachment Cross Sections from Photodetachment Thermometry of Molecular Anions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, C.; Becker, A.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; von Hahn, R.; Herwig, P.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lion, J.; Lohmann, S.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-07-01

    Photodetachment thermometry on a beam of OH- in a cryogenic storage ring cooled to below 10 K is carried out using two-dimensional frequency- and time-dependent photodetachment spectroscopy over 20 min of ion storage. In equilibrium with the low-level blackbody field, we find an effective radiative temperature near 15 K with about 90% of all ions in the rotational ground state. We measure the J =1 natural lifetime (about 193 s) and determine the OH- rotational transition dipole moment with 1.5% uncertainty. We also measure rotationally dependent relative near-threshold photodetachment cross sections for photodetachment thermometry.

  8. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.

    2014-04-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident documents 137Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0-13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a simulation of 137Cs and 133Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated 137Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound 137Cs over a 6-month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean 137Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric versus boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than that for the 137Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after Fukushima emissions), but similar to the

  9. Lifetime measurement of 2+- state in 74Zn by recoil-distance Doppler-shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, M.; Mouginot, B.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Matea, I.; Stefan, I.; Verney, D.; Assie, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Borcea, C.; Burger, A.; Burgunder, G.; Buta, A.; Cáceres, L.; Cléement, E.; Coquard, L.; de Angelis, G.; de France, G.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Dewald, A.; Dijon, A.; Dombradi, Z.; Fiori, E.; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Gaudefroy, L.; Georgiev, G.; Grévy, S.; Hackstein, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Ibrahim, F.; Kamalou, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mihai, C.; Möller, O.; Myalski, S.; Negoita, F.; Pantelica, D.; Perrot, L.; Pissulla, Th.; Rotaru, F.; Rother, W.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujic, P.

    2013-09-01

    We have performed the first direct lifetime measurement of the 2+- state in 74Zn. The neutron-rich 74Zn beam was produced by in-flight fragmentation of 76Ge at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds and separated with the LISE spectrometer. The lifetime of the 2+- state was measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method with the Cologne plunger device combined with the EXOGAM detectors. The lifetime of the 2+- state in 74Zn was determined to be 27.0(24) ps, which corresponds to a reduced transition probability B(E2; 2+- -> 0+) = 370(33) e2fm4.

  10. Lifetime measurement of excited low-spin states via the (p, p‧ γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, A.; Derya, V.; Mineva, M. N.; Petkov, P.; Pickstone, S. G.; Spieker, M.; Zilges, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a method for lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) following the inelastic proton scattering reaction is presented. In a pioneering experiment we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited low-spin states of 96Ru, taking advantage of the coincident detection of scattered protons and de-exciting γ-rays as well as the large number of particle and γ-ray detectors provided by the SONIC@HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. The large amount of new experimental data shows that this technique is suited for the measurement of lifetimes of excited low-spin states, especially for isotopes with a low isotopic abundance, where (n ,n‧ γ) or - in case of investigating dipole excitations - (γ ,γ‧) experiments are not feasible due to the lack of sufficient isotopically enriched target material.

  11. Measuring lifetimes of long-lived charged massive particles stopped in LHC detectors.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shoji; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Shirai, Satoshi

    2009-10-02

    Long-lived charged massive particles (CHAMPs) appear in various particle physics models beyond the standard model. In this Letter, we discuss the prospects for studying the stopping and decaying events of such long-lived CHAMPs at the LHC detectors, and show that the lifetime measurement (and the study of decay products) is possible with the LHC detectors for a wide range of the lifetime O(0.1)-O(10(10)) sec, by using periods of no pp collision. Even a short lifetime of order 1 sec can be measured by (i) identifying the stopping event with the on-line event filter, (ii) immediately making a beam-dump signal which stops the pp collision of the LHC, and at the same time (iii) changing the trigger menu to optimize it for the detection of a CHAMP decay in the calorimeter. Other possibilities are also discussed.

  12. The Radiative Lifetime of N2(a 1IIg, v=O-2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-03

    8217!, N,!-ihcr study’ uhd.’ standing of such plenatnea ts energy transfer processes ill radiative decay ofth a’ state in the italyi, of lii line-ut...strength is due to contributions from measurements. tile magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. In Several studies nave eliployCd abSorl)tiun...GarstangŘ analyzed lieasurenlelis of gen- diative exchange of energy in this coupled system. A poten- tial- energy level diagram of these states is

  13. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in a flow cytometer by amplitude demodulation using digital data acquisition technique.

    PubMed

    Deka, C; Sklar, L A; Steinkamp, J A

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a method for fluorescence lifetime measurements in a flow cytometer based upon the amplitude demodulation of the fluorescence signals using digital data acquisition techniques. Amplitude demodulation is one of the two methods by which excited state lifetimes may be investigated in the frequency domain. The other method involves the phase-shift measurements. In frequency-domain measurement techniques, the amplitude-demodulation and phase-shift data serve mutually complementary roles to enhance the analytical capabilities of the measurements. The purpose of having amplitude demodulation measurement capability is to obtain information that supplements, rather than replaces, that obtained by the phase-shift method alone. Application of amplitude demodulation measurements has been widely explored in static, cuvette-based, frequency domain systems. However, due to time dependence of the amplitude of the modulated fluorescence signal in a flow cytometer, the amplitude demodulation measurements in flow turns out to be more complicated than similar measurements in a static system. The goal of the present work is to explore the problems involved in amplitude demodulation measurements in flow (using digital method), through detailed theoretical modeling and use the model to develop a practical method that can be incorporated into a flow cytometer to measure amplitude modulation lifetimes. We experimentally verify the amplitude demodulation measurement capability of this method using fluorescent microspheres. The experimental measurements show good agreement with static frequency-domain measurements on microspheres in bulk suspensions.

  14. Empirical Study of the Disparity in Radiation Tolerance of the Minority-Carrier Lifetime Between II-VI and III-V MWIR Detector Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Geoffrey D.; Morath, Christian P.; Cowan, Vincent M.

    2017-09-01

    The degradation of the minority-carrier recombination lifetime of various III-V nB n and II-VI HgCdTe midwave-infrared space detector materials under stepwise 63-MeV proton irradiation up to fluence of 7.5 × 1011 cm-2 and above has been measured using time-resolved photoluminescence while samples were held at 120 K to limit thermal annealing. As expected, the recombination rate of each sample was found to increase with proton fluence at a nearly constant rate, implying a near-linear increase in defect concentration. The rate of change of the carrier recombination rate, herein called the minority-carrier lifetime damage factor, was then plotted as a function of the initial recombination rate for each sample. Juxtaposing the III-V and II-VI results revealed a distinct disparity, with the incumbent detector material HgCdTe being roughly an order of magnitude more radiation tolerant to displacement damage from proton irradiation than any of the nB n materials. The results for the latter also suggest some degree of interrelation between the damage factor and initial lifetime. The behavior of the lifetime of each material under annealing revealed that HgCdTe exhibited nearly 100% recovery at 295 K whereas III-V materials recovered to only about 50% under the same conditions.

  15. Theoretical evaluation of the radiative lifetimes of LiCs and NaCs in the A1Σ+ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouk, N.; Berriche, H.

    2017-08-01

    Calculations of the adiabatic potential energy curves and the transition dipole moments between the ground (A1Σ+) and the first excited (A1Σ+) states have been determined for the LiCs and NaCs molecules. The calculations are performed using an ab initio approach based on non-empirical pseudopotentials for Cs+, Li+ and Na+ cores, parameterized l-dependent polarization potentials and full configuration interaction calculations. The potential energy curves and the transition dipole moment are used to estimate the radiative lifetimes of the vibrational levels of the A+Σ+ state using the Franck-Condon (FC) approximation and the approximate sum rule method. The radiative lifetimes associated with the A+Σ+ state are presented here for the first time. These data can help experimentalists to optimize photoassociative formation of ultracold molecules and their longevity in a trap or in an optical lattice.

  16. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  17. Monte Carlo mixture model of lifetime cancer incidence risk from radiation exposure on shuttle and international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, L. E.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Estimating uncertainty in lifetime cancer risk for human exposure to space radiation is a unique challenge. Conventional risk assessment with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET)-based risk from Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies may be inappropriate for relativistic protons and nuclei in space due to track structure effects. This paper develops a Monte Carlo mixture model (MCMM) for transferring additive, National Institutes of Health multiplicative, and multiplicative excess cancer incidence risks based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to determine excess incidence risk for various US astronaut exposure profiles. The MCMM serves as an anchor point for future risk projection methods involving biophysical models of DNA damage from space radiation. Lifetime incidence risks of radiation-induced cancer for the MCMM based on low-LET Japanese data for nonleukemia (all cancers except leukemia) were 2.77 (90% confidence limit, 0.75-11.34) for males exposed to 1 Sv at age 45 and 2.20 (90% confidence limit, 0.59-10.12) for males exposed at age 55. For females, mixture model risks for nonleukemia exposed separately to 1 Sv at ages of 45 and 55 were 2.98 (90% confidence limit, 0.90-11.70) and 2.44 (90% confidence limit, 0.70-10.30), respectively. Risks for high-LET 200 MeV protons (LET=0.45 keV/micrometer), 1 MeV alpha-particles (LET=100 keV/micrometer), and 600 MeV iron particles (LET=180 keV/micrometer) were scored on a per particle basis by determining the particle fluence required for an average of one particle per cell nucleus of area 100 micrometer(2). Lifetime risk per proton was 2.68x10(-2)% (90% confidence limit, 0.79x10(-3)%-0. 514x10(-2)%). For alpha-particles, lifetime risk was 14.2% (90% confidence limit, 2.5%-31.2%). Conversely, lifetime risk per iron particle was 23.7% (90% confidence limit, 4.5%-53.0%). Uncertainty in the DDREF for high-LET particles may be less than that for low-LET radiation because typically there is very little dose-rate dependence

  18. Monte Carlo mixture model of lifetime cancer incidence risk from radiation exposure on shuttle and international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, L. E.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Estimating uncertainty in lifetime cancer risk for human exposure to space radiation is a unique challenge. Conventional risk assessment with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET)-based risk from Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies may be inappropriate for relativistic protons and nuclei in space due to track structure effects. This paper develops a Monte Carlo mixture model (MCMM) for transferring additive, National Institutes of Health multiplicative, and multiplicative excess cancer incidence risks based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to determine excess incidence risk for various US astronaut exposure profiles. The MCMM serves as an anchor point for future risk projection methods involving biophysical models of DNA damage from space radiation. Lifetime incidence risks of radiation-induced cancer for the MCMM based on low-LET Japanese data for nonleukemia (all cancers except leukemia) were 2.77 (90% confidence limit, 0.75-11.34) for males exposed to 1 Sv at age 45 and 2.20 (90% confidence limit, 0.59-10.12) for males exposed at age 55. For females, mixture model risks for nonleukemia exposed separately to 1 Sv at ages of 45 and 55 were 2.98 (90% confidence limit, 0.90-11.70) and 2.44 (90% confidence limit, 0.70-10.30), respectively. Risks for high-LET 200 MeV protons (LET=0.45 keV/micrometer), 1 MeV alpha-particles (LET=100 keV/micrometer), and 600 MeV iron particles (LET=180 keV/micrometer) were scored on a per particle basis by determining the particle fluence required for an average of one particle per cell nucleus of area 100 micrometer(2). Lifetime risk per proton was 2.68x10(-2)% (90% confidence limit, 0.79x10(-3)%-0. 514x10(-2)%). For alpha-particles, lifetime risk was 14.2% (90% confidence limit, 2.5%-31.2%). Conversely, lifetime risk per iron particle was 23.7% (90% confidence limit, 4.5%-53.0%). Uncertainty in the DDREF for high-LET particles may be less than that for low-LET radiation because typically there is very little dose-rate dependence

  19. Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, P L

    2008-09-30

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation. (laser cooling)

  20. Measurement of the π K atom lifetime and the π K scattering length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeva, B.; Afanasyev, L.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Anania, A.; Aogaki, S.; Benelli, A.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Cechak, T.; Chiba, M.; Chliapnikov, P.; Drijard, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dumitriu, D.; Federicova, P.; Fluerasu, D.; Gorin, A.; Gorchakov, O.; Gritsay, K.; Guaraldo, C.; Gugiu, M.; Hansroul, M.; Hons, Z.; Horikawa, S.; Iwashita, Y.; Karpukhin, V.; Kluson, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kruglov, V.; Kruglova, L.; Kulikov, A.; Kulish, E.; Kuptsov, A.; Lamberto, A.; Lanaro, A.; Lednicky, R.; Mariñas, C.; Martincik, J.; Nemenov, L.; Nikitin, M.; Okada, K.; Olchevskii, V.; Pentia, M.; Penzo, A.; Plo, M.; Prusa, P.; Rappazzo, G.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ryazantsev, A.; Rykalin, V.; Saborido, J.; Schacher, J.; Sidorov, A.; Smolik, J.; Takeutchi, F.; Tauscher, L.; Trojek, T.; Trusov, S.; Urban, T.; Vrba, T.; Yazkov, V.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhabitsky, M.; Zrelov, P.; Dirac Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    After having announced the statistically significant observation (5.6 σ ) of the new exotic π K atom, the DIRAC experiment at the CERN proton synchrotron presents the measurement of the corresponding atom lifetime, based on the full π K data sample: τ =(5. 5-2.8+5.0)×10-15 s . By means of a precise relation (≈1 %) between atom lifetime and scattering length, the following value for the S -wave isospin-odd π K scattering length a0-=1/3 (a1 /2-a3 /2) has been derived: |a0-| =(0.07 2-0.020+0.031)Mπ-1 .

  1. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  2. Measurement of the Bs0 → J / ψη lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Gillies, E.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-11-01

    Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the effective lifetime in the Bs0 → J / ψη decay mode, τeff, is measured to be

  3. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    PubMed Central

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  4. Doppler-shift attenuation method lifetime measurements in 115Sb and 117Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ilaş, G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C. A.

    1995-08-01

    The lifetimes of several low-lying excited levels in 115Sb and 117Sb have been measured by using the DSA method in the 115,117Sn(p,nγ)115,117Sb reactions, respectively. The structure of these nuclei is discussed in the frame of the interacting boson-fermion model.

  5. A Lifetime Measurement of the Exclusive Charged and Neutral B Meson States

    SciTech Connect

    Cammerata, Jeffrey Donald

    1996-01-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the charged and neutral B lifetimes using the decay modes B → ΨK where B symbolizes Bu or Bd, Ψ denotes J/Ψ or Ψ(2S), and K denotes K K$0\\atop{s}$, or K* (892).

  6. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  7. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  8. New measurements of the lifetimes of excited states of {sup 55}Mn below 2.7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, J. A.; Warren, G. A.; Hasty, R. D.; Korbly, S. E.; Park, W. H.

    2009-09-15

    The lifetimes of the excited states of {sup 55}Mn between 1.5 and 2.7 MeV were measured using nuclear resonance fluorescence. The absolute lifetimes of the excited levels were determined from simultaneous measurements of manganese and aluminum. In this approach, the precisely known aluminum state serves as a means to normalize the results. Our findings differ from the evaluated level lifetimes in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), but agree with earlier nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements.

  9. New Measurements of the Lifetimes of Excited States of Mn-55 Below 2.7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hasty, R.; Korbly, Steve; Park, William H.; Warren, Glen A.

    2009-09-14

    The lifetimes of the excited states of 55 Mn between 1.5 and 2.7 MeV were measured using nuclear resonance fluorescence. The absolute lifetimes of the excited levels were determined from simultaneous measurements of manganese and aluminum. In this approach, the precisely known aluminum states serves as a means to normalize the results. Our findings differ from the evaluated level lifetimes in ENSDF, but agree with earlier nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements.

  10. Evaluation of single-photon-counting measurements of excited-state lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Howard E.; Penn, John H.; Carpenter, Clint W.

    1982-01-01

    An extremely short instrumental response function for a single-photon-counting system has been obtained by using a low-jitter photomultiplier tube, fast amplification of the single photoelectron pulse from this photomultiplier, a constant fraction discriminator with a wide bandwidth input, and a stable reference timing signal. This synchronously mode-locked laser system has been shown to be capable of measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of compounds from 66 psec to 4.5 nsec. The estimated error in these determinations is 6% or 10 psec, whichever is greater. This apparatus has proved itself to be superior to the previously used nitrogen flashlamp apparatus for the determination of subnanosecond lifetimes. The validity of using deconvolution to determine lifetimes shorter than the instrumental response function has been verified. PMID:16593174

  11. Conforming the measured lifetimes of the 5 d 2D3 /2 ,5 /2 states in Cs with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.

    2016-02-01

    We find very good agreement between our theoretically evaluated lifetimes of the 5 d 2D3 /2 and 5 d 2D5 /2 states of Cs with the experimental values reported by DiBerardino et al. [Phys. Rev. A 57, 4204 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevA.57.4204], which were demonstrated to disagree with an earlier rigorous theoretical study [Safronova and Clark, Phys. Rev. A 69, 040501(R) (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.040501] and with the other available precise measurement [Hoeling et al., Opt. Lett. 21, 74 (1996), 10.1364/OL.21.000074]. In this work, we carry out calculations of the radiative transition matrix elements using many variants of relativistic many-body methods, mainly in the coupled-cluster theory framework, and analyze the propagation of electron correlation effects to elucidate their roles in accurate evaluations of the matrix elements. We also demonstrate contributions explicitly from Dirac-Coulomb interactions, frequency-independent Breit interaction, and lower order quantum electrodynamics effects. Uncertainties in these matrix elements due to different possible sources of errors are estimated. By combining our calculated radiative matrix elements with the experimental values of the transition wavelengths, we obtain the transition probabilities due to both the allowed and the lower order forbidden channels. Adding these quantities together, the lifetimes of the above two states are determined precisely and plausible reasons for the reported inconsistencies between the earlier theoretical calculations and the experimental results are pointed out.

  12. Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the earth's radiation budget, its climatology and its interannual variation, are described briefly. In addition, preliminary results are given on ocean energy transports, specific large scale and local radiation budget anamolies, and studies of the separate radiation budgets of the atmosphere and ocean. Initial work in preparation for additional radiation budget measurements from EOS and ATS satellites is described. A radiation budget system simulation program and several smaller projects (including a radiance normalization technique) are also mentioned. First annual global maps of the earth's radiation budget as measured from Nimbus 3 are included.

  13. Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error ([sigma] = 0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with covariates for age at-time-of-bombing, age at-time-of-death and gender. Excess risks were in good agreement with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from [minus]15% to [minus]30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative projection model was [minus]37.1% for males and [minus]23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased [minus]27.1% for males and [minus]43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 85 (DRREF = 2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.02%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risks increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10%/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04%/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for U.S. nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors.

  14. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    Measurement of the bulk minority-carrier lifetime (T{sub b}) by optical methods, such as photocurrent decay or quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC), is strongly influenced by surface recombination. Several techniques are known to lower the effective surface recombination velocity, including the following: use of oxidation, floating N/P junction, SiN:H layer, HF immersion, and use of iodine in ethanol or methanol (I-E solution). Using I-E appears to be very simple and does not require any high-temperature treatment such as oxidation, diffusion, or nitridation processes, which can change T{sub b}. However, this is not a preferred procedure within the photovoltaic community because it is difficult to obtain same T{sub b} values reproducibly, particularly when the wafer lifetime is long. The objectives are: (1) Investigate various reasons why lifetime measurements may be irreproducible using I-E solution passivation. (2) Study the influence of the strength of iodine in the ethanol solution, wafer-cleaning procedures, influence of the wafer container during lifetime measurements, and the stability of I-E. (3) Compare lifetimes of wafers (having different T{sub b}) by various techniques such as QSSPC and transient photoconductive decay using short laser pulses of different light intensity; (4) Make minority-carrier diffusion length (L) measurements by a surface photovoltage technique, and to use T{sub b} and L data to determine diffusivity (D) values for various impurity and defect concentrations, using the relationship L{sup 2} = D* T{sub b}.

  15. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  16. Reliability and validity of an internet-based questionnaire measuring lifetime physical activity.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Mary A; Ratzlaff, Charles; Doerfling, Paul; Kopec, Jacek

    2010-11-15

    Lifetime exposure to physical activity is an important construct for evaluating associations between physical activity and disease outcomes, given the long induction periods in many chronic diseases. The authors' objective in this study was to evaluate the measurement properties of the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (L-PAQ), a novel Internet-based, self-administered instrument measuring lifetime physical activity, among Canadian men and women in 2005-2006. Reliability was examined using a test-retest study. Validity was examined in a 2-part study consisting of 1) comparisons with previously validated instruments measuring similar constructs, the Lifetime Total Physical Activity Questionnaire (LT-PAQ) and the Chasan-Taber Physical Activity Questionnaire (CT-PAQ), and 2) a priori hypothesis tests of constructs measured by the L-PAQ. The L-PAQ demonstrated good reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.67 (household activity) to 0.89 (sports/recreation). Comparison between the L-PAQ and the LT-PAQ resulted in Spearman correlation coefficients ranging from 0.41 (total activity) to 0.71 (household activity); comparison between the L-PAQ and the CT-PAQ yielded coefficients of 0.58 (sports/recreation), 0.56 (household activity), and 0.50 (total activity). L-PAQ validity was further supported by observed relations between the L-PAQ and sociodemographic variables, consistent with a priori hypotheses. Overall, the L-PAQ is a useful instrument for assessing multiple domains of lifetime physical activity with acceptable reliability and validity.

  17. Measurement of B_{s}^{0} and D_{s}^{-} Meson Lifetimes.

    PubMed

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Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, C; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevens, H; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-09-08

    We report on a measurement of the flavor-specific B_{s}^{0} lifetime and of the D_{s}^{-} lifetime using proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to 3.0  fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. Approximately 407 000 B_{s}^{0}→D_{s}^{(*)-}μ^{+}ν_{μ} decays are partially reconstructed in the K^{+}K^{-}π^{-}μ^{+} final state. The B_{s}^{0} and D_{s}^{-} natural widths are determined using, as a reference, kinematically similar B^{0}→D^{(*)-}μ^{+}ν_{μ} decays reconstructed in the same final state. The resulting differences between widths of B_{s}^{0} and B^{0} mesons and of D_{s}^{-} and D^{-} mesons are Δ_{Γ}(B)=-0.0115±0.0053(stat)±0.0041(syst)  ps^{-1} and Δ_{Γ}(D)=1.0131±0.0117(stat)±0.0065(syst)  ps^{-1}, respectively. Combined with the known B^{0} and D^{-} lifetimes, these yield the flavor-specific B_{s}^{0} lifetime, τ_{B_{s}^{0}}^{fs}=1.547±0.013(stat)±0.010(syst)±0.004(τ_{B})  ps and the D_{s}^{-} lifetime, τ_{D_{s}^{-}}=0.5064±0.0030(stat)±0.0017(syst)±0.0017(τ_{D})  ps. The last uncertainties originate from the limited knowledge of the B^{0} and D^{-} lifetimes. The results improve upon current determinations.

  18. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optomechanics in a handheld form factor. We examined the characteristics of the optomechanics with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  19. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  20. New lifetime measurements in Pd109 and the onset of deformation at N=60

    DOE PAGES

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; ...

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements.more » Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.« less

  1. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J-PARC:Incident Beam Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Risa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Sugino, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Satoru; Katayama, Ryo; Yamada, Takahito; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Ino, Takashi; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is one of the important parameters in the estimation of the abundance of the light elements in the early universe through the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). The accuracy of 0.1% is desired in the neutron lifetime to quantitatively discuss the BBN in combination with the observation of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave. We have started a lifetime measurement with pulsed neutrons at J-PARC/BL05. To measure the lifetime, we detect the decay electrons from the bunched neutrons and the incident neutron flux in the TPC at the same time. By diluting a small amount of 3He gas into the TPC, the incident flux is estimated by counting protons via 3He(n,p)3H reactions. The accuracy of the selection of 3He(n,p)3H events and the influence of the contamination of nitrogen gas are the major systematic errors. In this paper, the estimation of the systematic error in the incident flux is reported.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify sub-cellular oxygen measurements in live macrophage during bacterial invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragavon, Joe; Amiri, Megdouda; Marteyn, Benoit; Sansonetti, Philipe; Shorte, Spencer

    2011-03-01

    Fluorophore concentration, the surrounding microenvironment, and photobleaching greatly influence the fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore, increasing the difficulty to directly observe micro-environmental factors such as pH and oxygen. However, the fluorescence lifetime of a fluorophore is essentially independent of both the fluorophore concentration and photobleaching, providing a viable alternative to intensity measurements. The development of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) allows for the direct measurement of the microenvironment surrounding a fluorophore. Pt-porphyrin is a fluorophore whose optical properties include a very stable triplet excited state. This energy level overlaps strongly with the ground triplet state of oxygen, making the phosphorescent lifetime directly proportional to the surrounding oxygen concentration. Initial experiments using this fluorophore involved the use of individual microwells coated with the porphyrin. Cells were allowed to enter the micro-wells before being sealed to create a diffusionally isolated volume. The decrease in the extracellular oxygen concentration was observed using FLI. However, this isolation technique provides only the consumption rate but cannot indicate the subcellular oxygen distribution. To improve upon this, live macrophages are loaded with the porphyrin and the fluorescence lifetime determined using a Lambert Instruments Lifa-X FLI system. Initial results indicate that an increase in subcellular oxygen is observed upon initial exposure to invasive bacteria. A substantial decrease in oxygen is observed after about 1 hour of exposure. The cells remain in this deoxygenated state until the bacteria are removed or cell death occurs.

  3. CMOS direct time interval measurement of long-lived luminescence lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Yung, Ka Yi; Cheung, Maurice C; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-01-01

    We describe a Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Direct Time Interval Measurement (DTIM) Integrated Circuit (IC) to detect the decay (fall) time of the luminescence emission when analyte-sensitive luminophores are excited with an optical pulse. The CMOS DTIM IC includes 14 × 14 phototransistor array, transimpedance amplifier, regulated gain amplifier, fall time detector, and time-to-digital convertor. We examined the DTIM system to measure the emission lifetime of oxygen-sensitive luminophores tris(4,7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)(3)](2+)) encapsulated in sol-gel derived xerogel thin-films. The DTIM system fabricated using TSMC 0.35 μm process functions to detect lifetimes from 4 μs to 14.4 μs but can be tuned to detect longer lifetimes. The system provides 8-bit digital output proportional to lifetimes and consumes 4.5 mW of power with 3.3 V DC supply. The CMOS system provides a useful platform for the development of reliable, robust, and miniaturized optical chemical sensors.

  4. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Radiation Quantities

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, N O

    1955-01-25

    This patent application describes a compact dosimeter for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation by the use of solutions which undergo a visible color change upon exposure to a predetermined quantity of radiation.

  5. Measurement of the B(s) lifetime using semileptonic decays with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun

    The measurement of the lifetime of the B0s meson has great importance and is of special interest. The first motivation is to check the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) predictions for the B meson lifetimes. Besides testing HQE, the lifetime of the b quark is directly related to the CKM matrix element Vcb; the B meson lifetime measurement thus gives a good probe of the weak decay mechanics of the heavy hadrons. The B0s meson is of special interest because of the expected B0sB¯0 s mixing with large oscillation frequency, which can be expressed in terms of Deltam, the mass difference of the two mass eigenstates of the B0s meson. The B0s mesons contain short and long lived components, the light (L) and heavy (H) eigenstates, BL and BH . They differ not only in their masses Deltam = mL - mH, but also in their widths DeltaGamma = GammaL - Gamma H, which is expected to be large enough to be measurable. In flavor-specific decays, such as the semileptonic decay in this analysis, the B0s will have equal fractions of BL and BH when generated. A superposition of two exponentials thus results with decay width Gammas +/- DeltaGamma s/2. When fitting to a single exponential we obtain a measure of the flavor-specific lifetime: tB0s fs=1Gs 1+DGs/2G s21- DGs/2Gs 2 Hence by measuring tau( B0s )fs, in combination with other measurements, we can reduce the significant correlations between the average B0s lifetime tau( B0s ) = 1Gs and DeltaGammas/Gamma s, and determine them more precisely. In this dissertation, the lifetime of the B0s meson is measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. The following semileptonic decay processes (and their charge conjugates) are used in this analysis: B0s→l++D- s+X where l denotes either a muon or an electron, and the Ds decays into D-s→f+p -,f→K++K- D-s→K*0 +K-,K*0→K+ +p- D-s→p ++p-+p- The data were collected during the years 2002 to 2005 using 4 GeV lepton plus displaced track triggers (lepton+SVT) by the CDF Collaboration at

  6. Measurements of Lifetimes and f-Values In Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven; Chutjian, Ara; Hossain, Sabbir

    2006-05-01

    Measurements have been made of lifetimes of metastable levels of highly-charged ions (HCI). These contribute to the optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the ISM, stellar and solar atmospheres, etc. The experimental lifetime measurements are carried out using the 14.0 GHz electron cyclotron ion source at the JPL facility.[l] Ions are injected into a Kingdon ion trap and stored for times longer than the metastable lifetimes. Decay channels include inter-combination, E2, M1 and 2E transitions. The UV photons are filtered by an interference filter and detected by a UV grade photomultiplier tube using a UV grade optical system. The Kingdon trap was constructed in collaboration with Texas A and M University [2]. We previously have reported lifetimes for transitions of C^+ [1]and 0^2+ [4]. Additional metastable lifetimes have been measured for M^6+, Fe^9+, Fe^10+ and Fe^13+ metastable states [5]. New results for Fe^11+ will be presented. Sabbir Hossain acknowledges support through NASA-NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech and was supported by the NASA [1] Steven J. Smith, A. Chutjian, J.B. Greenwood, Phys. Rev. A 60, 3569 (1999). [2] L.Yang and D.A. Church, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3860 (1993).[3] S.J. Smith, I. Cadez, A. Chutjian, and M. Niimura, Ap. J. 602, 1075 (2004).[5] S.J. Smith , A. Chutjian, J. Lozano, Phys Rev. A 72, 062504 (2005).

  7. Atmospheric lifetimes, infrared absorption spectra, radiative forcings and global warming potentials of NF3 and CF3CF2Cl (CFC-115)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totterdill, Anna; Kovács, Tamás; Feng, Wuhu; Dhomse, Sandip; Smith, Christopher J.; Gómez-Martín, Juan Carlos; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Forster, Piers M.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-09-01

    Fluorinated compounds such as NF3 and C2F5Cl (CFC-115) are characterised by very large global warming potentials (GWPs), which result from extremely long atmospheric lifetimes and strong infrared absorptions in the atmospheric window. In this study we have experimentally determined the infrared absorption cross sections of NF3 and CFC-115, calculated the radiative forcing and efficiency using two radiative transfer models and identified the effect of clouds and stratospheric adjustment. The infrared cross sections are within 10 % of previous measurements for CFC-115 but are found to be somewhat larger than previous estimates for NF3, leading to a radiative efficiency for NF3 that is 25 % larger than that quoted in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A whole atmosphere chemistry-climate model was used to determine the atmospheric lifetimes of NF3 and CFC-115 to be (509 ± 21) years and (492 ± 22) years, respectively. The GWPs for NF3 are estimated to be 15 600, 19 700 and 19 700 over 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively. Similarly, the GWPs for CFC-115 are 6030, 7570 and 7480 over 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively.

  8. Influence of age, sex and calendar year on lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose from diagnostic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Meiboom, Merle Friederike; Weitmann, Kerstin; Terschüren, Claudia; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of different factors influencing lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose, such as calendar year, age and sex. The lifetime dose was estimated for controls interviewed in person (N = 2811, 37.5% women) of the population-based representative Northern Germany Leukemia and Lymphoma Study. Data were assessed in standardized computer-assisted personal interviews. The calculation of doses is based on a comprehensive quantification model including calendar year, sex, kind of examination, and technical development. In multivariate regression models the annual red bone marrow dose was analyzed depending on age, sex and calendar year to consider simultaneously temporal changes in radiologic practice and individual risk factors. While the number of examinations continuously rises over time, the dose shows two peaks around 1950 and after 1980. Men are exposed to higher doses than woman. Until 1970 traditional examinations like conventional and mass screening examinations caused the main dose. They were then replaced by technically advanced examinations mainly computed tomography and cardiac catheter. The distribution of the red bone marrow dose over lifetime depends highly on the technical standards and radiation protection survey. To a lesser extent it is influenced by age and sex of the subjects. Thus epidemiological studies concerning the assessment of radiation exposure should consider the calendar year in which the examination was conducted.

  9. [The analysis of sinusoidal modulated method used for measuring fluorescence lifetime].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying; Huang, Shi-hua

    2007-12-01

    This paper has built a system with a sinusoidal modulated LED as the excitation source. Such exciter was used upon the sample Eu2 L'3 x nH2O (L' = C4H4O4). Both the excitation light and the 5Do-7F2 emission of Eu3+ ion were measured. Fluorescence lifetime, which approximate to 0.680 ms, can then be obtained from the measured excitation and fluorescence waveforms by non-linear least square curve fitting based on the principle of phase-shift measurement of fluorescence lifetime. Data processing methods considering respectively the high order harmonics in the modulation and multi-exponential decay of the fluorescence were discussed. A method of utilizing Fourier series expandedness to amendatory the result was put forward. Accordingly, the applicability for phase-shift method was expanded as well as a more exact result was acquired.

  10. New precision lifetime measurement of the first excited state of 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, C. J.; Morse, C.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Sonzogni, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Gade, A.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2016-09-01

    12Be presents an important opportunity for nuclear structure studies. It has a canonically magic number of neutrons, N = 8, but on the other hand the beryllium isotopes are well-known for their α-clustering behavior. 12Be is at the limit of computationally feasible GFMC ab initio calculations, and is experimentally accessible for the purposes of making precision measurements. Although recent experiments indicate that 12Be favors the development of clustering over magicity, the electromagnetic decay properties of this system are poorly constrained due to the single measurement (_30% uncertainty) of the B(E2; 2+-0+) value. Here we present a new precise measurement of the 2+ state lifetime using GRETINA at NSCL. We find that the lifetime is about a factor of two shorter than previously reported, so even more collective and clustered then expected. The implications for the structure of 12Be will be discussed.

  11. Measuring the carrier lifetime by using a quasi-optical millimeter- and THz-wave system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Mun Seok; Sawant, Ashwini; Lee, Kyu-Sup; Yu, Nan Ei; Choi, EunMi

    2017-02-01

    The existing method for contactless measurement of the photoconductivity decay time is limited in terms of sample selection according to the injection level or doping density. To solve this problem and improve the measurement sensitivity, we developed a quasi-optical photoconductivity decay (QO-PCD) technique based on millimeter- and terahertz-wave technology. A semi-insulating silicon (Si) wafer was used in a proof-of-concept experiment with the proposed QO-PCD system to find the initial excess carrier density and carrier lifetime based on the Drude-Zener model with a single decay function. The initial excess carrier density and carrier lifetime were measured to be 1.5 × 1015 cm-3 and 30.6 μs, respectively, in semi-insulating Si wafer (460 μm thickness). A 2D areal measurement of the decay time of the Si wafer was experimentally obtained. The proposed QO-PCD technique can provide more reliable and sensitive carrier lifetime measurement data for semiconductor wafers, which may impact the fields of photovoltaic solar cells and power electronics.

  12. Measurements of fluorescence lifetimes by use of a hybrid time-correlated and multifrequency phase fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Hedstrom, J; Sedarous, S; Prendergast, F G

    1988-08-23

    Measurements of homogeneous and heterogeneous fluorescence intensity decays using a hybrid time-correlated single photon counting/multifrequency phase fluorometer are reported. A trio of fluorophores exhibiting a range of decay profiles was selected. p-Terphenyl, 1,4-bis[2-(4-methyl-5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene [(Me)2POPOP], and p-bis[2-(5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene (POPOP), commonly used reference fluorophores, were analyzed initially; their emissions were characterized by monoexponential decay functions. Additionally, emissions from two single tryptophan proteins with different decay profiles were measured. Scorpion neurotoxin variant 3 required three exponentials to fit the emission decay properly (average lifetime approximately 500 ps). At pH 5.5, the fluorescence emission of ribonuclease T1 showed a monoexponential decay with a measured lifetime of approximately 4.0 ns. Thus, in each case, the results from both measurements were consistent between the two detection systems, confirming the view that the two approaches for measuring fluorescence lifetimes are equivalent.

  13. Contamination and gettering evaluation by lifetime measurements during single crystal cell processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, R.; Moehlecke, A.; Alonso, J.; Tobias, I.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this work, the effects of contamination and gettering through two fabrication processes of monocrystalline solar cells are evaluated using lifetime measurements. The processes characterized were developed to produce n{sup +}pp{sup +} and p{sup +}nn{sup +} solar cells with phosphorus/aluminum and boron/phosphorus. The experiments indicate that in the laboratory environment, the lifetime degradation is influenced by the number of thermal processes. The gettering produced by aluminum in n{sup +}pp{sup +} cell processing and by phosphorus (with heavy doping) in p{sup +}nn{sup +} cell processing enhances the base lifetime. Slight phosphorus diffusion without supersaturation conditions, performed in the n{sup +}pp{sup +} process, does not produce sufficient gettering and has lower effect on the lifetime than boron diffusions that produce some gettering too. Also, the authors discovered that gettering is strongly reduced when local aluminum back surface field regions are formed in the rear face in a failed attempt of reducing the BSF recombination.

  14. Molecular rotor measures viscosity of live cells via fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuimova, Marina K; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-05-28

    The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the 4,4'-difluoro-4-bora-5-(p-oxoalkyl)phenyl-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (1) show a strong correlation with the viscosity of the medium due to the viscosity-dependent twisting of the 5-phenyl group, which gives access to the dark nonemissive excited state. We propose a sensitive and versatile method for measuring the local microviscosity in biological systems, based on the determination of the fluorescence lifetime of 1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) performed on live cells incubated with 1 demonstrates the distinct intracellular lifetime of the molecular rotor of 1.6 +/- 0.2 ns corresponding to the intracellular viscosity of ca. 140 cP. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of 1 in cells confirms insignificant binding of the fluorophore. The viscosity value obtained in the present study is considerably higher than that of water and of cellular cytoplasm. The high viscosity of intracellular compartments is likely to play an important role in vital intracellular processes, including the rate of diffusion of reactive oxygen species, causing programmed cell destruction.

  15. Lifetime measurement of neutron-rich even-even molybdenum isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralet, D.; Pietri, S.; Rodríguez, T.; Alaqeel, M.; Alexander, T.; Alkhomashi, N.; Ameil, F.; Arici, T.; Ataç, A.; Avigo, R.; Bäck, T.; Bazzacco, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Boutachkov, P.; Bruyneel, B.; Bruce, A. M.; Camera, F.; Cederwall, B.; Ceruti, S.; Clément, E.; Cortés, M. L.; Curien, D.; De Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Dewald, M.; Didierjean, F.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Doncel, M.; Duchêne, G.; Eberth, J.; Gadea, A.; Gerl, J.; Ghazi Moradi, F.; Geissel, H.; Goigoux, T.; Goel, N.; Golubev, P.; González, V.; Górska, M.; Gottardo, A.; Gregor, E.; Guastalla, G.; Givechev, A.; Habermann, T.; Hackstein, M.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Henning, G.; Hess, H.; Hüyük, T.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D. S.; Jungclaus, A.; Knoebel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Korichi, A.; Korten, W.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Lalović, N.; Louchart-Henning, C.; Mengoni, D.; Merchán, E.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D.; Naqvi, F.; Nyberg, J.; Pietralla, N.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pullia, A.; Prochazka, A.; Quintana, B.; Rainovski, G.; Reese, M.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rudolph, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Sanchis, E.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Schaffner, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sengele, L.; Singh, B. S. Nara; Singh, P. P.; Stahl, C.; Stezowski, O.; Thoele, P.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.; Weick, H.; Wendt, A.; Wieland, O.; Winfield, J. S.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Zielinska, M.; PreSPEC Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Background: In the neutron-rich A ≈100 mass region, rapid shape changes as a function of nucleon number as well as coexistence of prolate, oblate, and triaxial shapes are predicted by various theoretical models. Lifetime measurements of excited levels in the molybdenum isotopes allow the determination of transitional quadrupole moments, which in turn provides structural information regarding the predicted shape change. Purpose: The present paper reports on the experimental setup, the method that allowed one to measure the lifetimes of excited states in even-even molybdenum isotopes from mass A =100 up to mass A =108 , and the results that were obtained. Method: The isotopes of interest were populated by secondary knock-out reaction of neutron-rich nuclei separated and identified by the GSI fragment separator at relativistic beam energies and detected by the sensitive PreSPEC-AGATA experimental setup. The latter included the Lund-York-Cologne calorimeter for identification, tracking, and velocity measurement of ejectiles, and AGATA, an array of position sensitive segmented HPGe detectors, used to determine the interaction positions of the γ ray enabling a precise Doppler correction. The lifetimes were determined with a relativistic version of the Doppler-shift-attenuation method using the systematic shift of the energy after Doppler correction of a γ -ray transition with a known energy. This relativistic Doppler-shift-attenuation method allowed the determination of mean lifetimes from 2 to 250 ps. Results: Even-even molybdenum isotopes from mass A =100 to A =108 were studied. The decays of the low-lying states in the ground-state band were observed. In particular, two mean lifetimes were measured for the first time: τ =29 .7-9.1+11.3 ps for the 4+ state of 108Mo and τ =3 .2-0.7+0.7 ps for the 6+ state of 102Mo. Conclusions: The reduced transition strengths B (E 2 ) , calculated from lifetimes measured in this experiment, compared to beyond

  16. Lifetime measurement of a collision complex using ion cyclotron double resonance - H2C6N2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, Vincent G.; Sen, Atish D.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.; Mcewan, Murray J.

    1991-01-01

    In the ion-molecule reaction between HC3N(+) and HC3N, the lifetime of the collision complex (H2C6N2+)-asterisk was long enough that ion cyclotron double-resonance techniques could be used to probe the distribution of the lifetimes of the collision complex. The mean lifetime of the collision complex at room temperature was measured as 180 microsec with a distribution ranging from 60 to 260 microsec as measured at the half-heights in the distribution. Lifetimes of this magnitude with respect to unimolecular dissociation allow for some stabilization of the collision complex by the slower process of infrared photon emission.

  17. Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes reasons that lifetime measurments may be irreproducible using iodine-in-ethanol (I-E) passivation. Possible factors include the strength of the iodine in ethanol solution, wafer cleaning procedures, influence of wafer container during lifetime measurement, and stability of I-E.

  18. NEW APPROACHES: Measurement of the mean lifetime of cosmic ray muons in the A-level laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Peter; Costich, David; O'Sullivan, Sean

    1998-09-01

    The Turning Points in Physics module from the NEAB A-level Modular Physics syllabus requires students to have an understanding of relativistic time dilation and offers the measurement of the mean lifetime of cosmic ray muons as an example of supporting experimental evidence. This article describes a direct measurement of muon lifetime carried out in the A-level laboratory.

  19. Precision Measurement of the Lifetime and Decay Asymmetry of the Cascade-Zero Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, Keith Alan

    1990-01-01

    The non-leptonic decays of strange baryons such as the cascade-zero ($\\Xi^0$ ) are a sensitive probe of long-range strong interaction effects on electro-weak interaction physics. Recent improvements in the accuracy of the theoretical predictions of the decay amplitudes will soon require improved precision in the experimental measurements of the decay rates and asymmetry parameters. fu an experiment at Fermilab, a multi-wire chamber magnetic spectrometer and a lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter were used to reconstruct the $\\Lambda \\to p \\pi^-$ and $\\Xi^0 \\to \\Lambda \\pi^0$ hyperon decays in a high-energy neutral beam. The measured lifetime of the $\\Lambda$ , based on 724,000 events, was 2.62 ± 0.01 ( statistical + systematic error) x$10^{-10}$s. This data, together with previous results, demonstrated the Lorentz invariance of the A lifetime for momentum from 1 to 400 Ge V / c. The lifetime of the s0 , from 88,000 events, was found to be 2.98± 0.04(stat.) ± 0.02(syst.) X 10-10 s. This measurement had an uncertainty almost three times smaller than any previous determination. The same $\\Xi^0$ data was used to measure a value for the decay asymmetry product $\\alpha_{\\Lambda} \\alpha _{\\Xi}$ of -0.242 ± 0.006(stat.) ± 0.006(syst.).

  20. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb⁻ baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)⁻ baryon using about 1800 Ξ(b)⁻ decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb⁻¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξ(b)⁻→Ξ(c)⁰π⁻, Ξ(c)⁰→pK⁻K⁻π⁺ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λ(b)⁰→Λ(c)⁺π⁻ mode as a reference. We measure M(Ξ(b)⁻)-M(Λ(b)⁰)=178.36±0.46±0.16  MeV/c², (τ(Ξ(b)⁻)/τ(Λ(b)⁰)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξ(b)⁻ mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  1. Excited State Lifetime Measurements in Rare Earth Nuclei with Fast Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Bonett-Matiz, M.; Williams, E.; Régis, J.-M.; Rudigier, M.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Berant, Z.; Bunce, M.; Elvers, M.; Heinz, A.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Radeck, D.; Savran, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the collectivity of the lowest excited 2+ states of even-even rare earth nuclei. The B(E2) excitation strengths of these nuclei should directly correlate to the size of the valence space, and maximize at mid-shell. The previously identified saturation of B(E2) strength in well-deformed rotors at mid-shell is put to a high precision test in this series of measurements. Lifetimes of the 2+1 states in 168Hf and 174W have been measured using the newly developed LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The excellent energy resolution in conjunction with superb time properties of the new material allows for reliable handling of background, which is a source of systematic error in such experiments. Preliminary lifetime values are obtained and discussed in the context of previous and ongoing work.

  2. A new plunger device to measure lifetimes of unbound states in tagged exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Procter, M. G.; Smith, A. J.; Twist, V.; Jones, P. M.; Nieminen, P.; Grahn, T.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.

    2012-09-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and is being built at the University of Manchester to measure lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei approaching the proton drip-line. The device is designed to work in both vacuum and gas environments and will be used in conjunction with the gas filled separator RITU and the vacuum-mode separator MARA at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. This will enable the accurate measurement of excited state lifetimes identified via isomer and charged-particle tagging. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  3. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guevara, Z. E. Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of {sup 106}Cd to study excited states of {sup 110}Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  4. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Z. E.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of 106Cd to study excited states of 110Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  5. Emission spectra and radiative lifetimes of the Cameron bands of CO trapped in solid rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, J.; Mohammed, Hassan H.; Deson, J.; Vermeil, C.; Schamps, J.

    1980-12-01

    The emission spectrum of the Cameron bands (a 3Π→X1 Σ+) of CO molecules trapped in solid Ne, Ar, and Kr has been studied using Xe resonance lamp excitation (λ=147 nm). The lifetime of the a 3Π state has been measured in solid Ne and found to be 90 msec. The decay time of this state is exponential within the range of experimental errors. The lifetime has been calculated assuming spin-orbit mixing between 1Σ+ and 3Π0 states, and found to be 94 msec for J=0. The lifetime values in Ar and Kr matrices are found to be 7.2 and <1 msec, respectively; this is consistent with the matrix shifts in solid Ne, Ar, and Kr, which for the 0-0 bands have been found to be -305, -946, and -2812 cm-1, respectively.

  6. Electron Tomography of Nanoparticle Clusters: Implications for Atmospheric Lifetimes and Radiative Forcing of Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanPoppel, Laura H.; Friedrich, Heiner; Spinsby, Jacob; Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld, John H.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature. Their large surface areas and consequent chemical reactivity typically result in their aggregation into clusters. Their chemical and physical properties depend on cluster shapes, which are commonly complex and unknown. This is the first application of electron tomography with a transmission electron microscope to quantitatively determine the three-dimensional (3D) shapes, volumes, and surface areas of nanoparticle clusters. We use soot (black carbon, BC) nanoparticles as an example because it is a major contributor to environmental degradation and global climate change. To the extent that our samples are representative, we find that quantitative measurements of soot surface areas and volumes derived from electron tomograms differ from geometrically derived values by, respectively, almost one and two orders of magnitude. Global sensitivity studies suggest that the global burden and direct radiative forcing of fractal BC are only about 60% of the value if it is assumed that BC has a spherical shape.

  7. Electron Tomography of Nanoparticle Clusters: Implications for Atmospheric Lifetimes and Radiative Forcing of Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanPoppel, Laura H.; Friedrich, Heiner; Spinsby, Jacob; Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld, John H.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature. Their large surface areas and consequent chemical reactivity typically result in their aggregation into clusters. Their chemical and physical properties depend on cluster shapes, which are commonly complex and unknown. This is the first application of electron tomography with a transmission electron microscope to quantitatively determine the three-dimensional (3D) shapes, volumes, and surface areas of nanoparticle clusters. We use soot (black carbon, BC) nanoparticles as an example because it is a major contributor to environmental degradation and global climate change. To the extent that our samples are representative, we find that quantitative measurements of soot surface areas and volumes derived from electron tomograms differ from geometrically derived values by, respectively, almost one and two orders of magnitude. Global sensitivity studies suggest that the global burden and direct radiative forcing of fractal BC are only about 60% of the value if it is assumed that BC has a spherical shape.

  8. Lifetime measurements using the CLARA-PRISMA setup around the {sup 48}Ca doubly-magic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Fioretto, E.; Grodner, E.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Mengoni, D.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Dewald, A.

    2008-11-11

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of nuclei around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been determined using a novel method that combines the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This novel method and some preliminary results on lifetimes are presented.

  9. Determination of ππ scattering lengths from measurement of ππ atom lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeva, B.; Afanasyev, L.; Benayoun, M.; Benelli, A.; Berka, Z.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Caragheorgheopol, G.; Cechak, T.; Chiba, M.; Chliapnikov, P. V.; Ciocarlan, C.; Constantinescu, S.; Costantini, S.; Curceanu (Petrascu), C.; Doskarova, P.; Dreossi, D.; Drijard, D.; Dudarev, A.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fungueiriño Pazos, J. L.; Gallas Torreira, M.; Gerndt, J.; Gianotti, P.; Goldin, D.; Gomez, F.; Gorin, A.; Gorchakov, O.; Guaraldo, C.; Gugiu, M.; Hansroul, M.; Hons, Z.; Hosek, R.; Iliescu, M.; Karpukhin, V.; Kluson, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kokkas, P.; Komarov, V.; Kruglov, V.; Kruglova, L.; Kulikov, A.; Kuptsov, A.; Kuroda, K. I.; Lamberto, A.; Lanaro, A.; Lapshin, V.; Lednicky, R.; Leruste, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Lucherini, V.; Maki, T.; Manuilov, I.; Marin, J.; Narjoux, J. L.; Nemenov, L.; Nikitin, M.; Nunez Pardo, T.; Okada, K.; Olchevskii, V.; Pazos, A.; Pentia, M.; Penzo, A.; Perreau, J. M.; Plo, M.; Ponta, T.; Rappazzo, G. F.; Riazantsev, A.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Rodriguez Fernandez, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronjin, V. M.; Rykalin, V.; Saborido, J.; Santamarina, C.; Schacher, J.; Schuetz, C.; Sidorov, A.; Smolik, J.; Takeutchi, F.; Tarasov, A.; Tauscher, L.; Tobar, M. J.; Trojek, T.; Trusov, S.; Utkin, V.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vlachos, S.; Voskresenskaya, O.; Vrba, T.; Willmott, C.; Yazkov, V.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhabitsky, M.; Zrelov, P.

    2011-10-01

    The DIRAC experiment at CERN has achieved a sizeable production of ππ atoms and has significantly improved the precision on its lifetime determination. From a sample of 21 227 atomic pairs, a 4% measurement of the S-wave ππ scattering length difference |a-a||syst-0.0073+0.0078)Mπ-1 has been attained, providing an important test of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  10. Carrier Lifetime Measurement in n(-) 4H-SiC Epilayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    limitations of Si -based technology. However, in spite of the progress that has been made in both materials growth and device fabrication, material...lifetime measurement techniques have been primarily fo- cused on Si and on electrical techniques that are directly applicable to device structures...compared to experi- ment. A. Transient free carrier absorption The TFCA technique has been applied in Si Refs. 18–20 as well as in SiC.21–23 In this

  11. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  12. Line identification and lifetime measurements in the XUV and soft X-ray regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of the data acquired concerning line identification and lifetime measurements in the xuv and soft X-ray regions for a variety of both resonance transitions and forbidden transitions in ions of astrophysical interest is provided. Particular attention is called to a few papers which appeared in the Astrophysical Journal. These are of special relevance to specific astrophysical data needs. The many experiments completed in areas related to but somewhat outside the confines of the project title are mentioned.

  13. Lifetime measurements in 71Ge and a new interacting boson-fermion model interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ur, C. A.; Lobach, Yu. N.

    1999-08-01

    The lifetimes of twelve low spin excited states have been measured in 71Ge using the Doppler shift attenuation method in the 71Ga(p,nγ) reaction at 3.0 and 3.5 MeV incident energy. New interacting boson-fermion model calculations for this nucleus account well for the properties of all its levels known up to about 1.5 MeV excitation.

  14. Doppler-shift attenuation method lifetime measurements of low-lying states in 111In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ilaş, G.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C. A.

    1996-11-01

    The lifetimes of nine low-lying excited states in 111In have been measured with the Doppler-shift attenuation method in the 111Cd(p,nγ) reaction. A comparison of experimental quantities with predictions based on the interacting boson-fermion model unravels the states due to the coupling of a g9/2 proton hole to the quadrupole vibrations of the core.

  15. UCNtau: Study of Lifetime Measurement in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Alexander; Salvat, D.; Adamek, E.; Bowman, D.; Clayton, S.; Cude, C.; Fox, W.; Hogan, G.; Hickerson, K.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Manus, G.; Morris, C.; Penttila, S.; Ramsey, J.; Sawtelle, S.; Solberg, K.; Vanderwerp, J.; VornDick, B.; Walstrom, P.; Wang, Z.; Young, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The UCNtau project is intended to develop a new measurement of the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons (UCNs) stored in a magneto-gravitational trap. In this article, we will describe the development of the experiment so far, including the trap itself, the UCN transport and monitoring system, the neutron detection methods, and the Monte Carlo simulations that have been used to model these elements. Finally, we will describe the first systematic effects that we plan to study using this apparatus.

  16. Determining a fluorophore’s transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin’s model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  17. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellular localization of human LC3 protein with the fluorescence lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Subcellular LC3 localization to autophagosomes is a marker of the cellular process called autophagy. In breast cancer cells expressing native EGFP and EGFP-LC3 fusion proteins, we measured the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of (i) diffuse EGFP (ii) punctate EGFP-LC3 and (iii) diffuse EGFP-ΔLC3 after amino acid starvation to induce autophagy-dependent LC3 localization. We verify EGFP-LC3 localization with low-throughput confocal microscopy and compare to fluorescence intensity measured by standard flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that time-resolved flow cytometry can be correlated to subcellular localization of EGFP fusion proteins by measuring changes in fluorescence lifetime. PMID:24010001

  18. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  19. Measurement of the B- lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Huffman, B. T.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N. L.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-02-01

    The collection of a large number of B-hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II Detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper-decay-time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias, and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty due to the differences between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B- using the mode B-→D0π-. The B- lifetime is measured as τB-=1.663±0.023±0.015ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  20. Laser induced fluorescence and radiative lifetimes of the low-lying electronic states of gaseous AgF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Gole, James L.

    1993-06-01

    At the fringes of the visible region, two low-lying 1 (Ω=1) electronic states A'Ω1 and aΩ1 of gaseous AgF located ˜4300 cm-1 below the previously known lowest excited A0+ state have been excited for the first time in a silver vapor-fluorine reaction system. The A'Ω1-X 1Σ+ and a Ω1-X 1Σ+ band systems (also observed in chemiluminescence) have been excited and studied using pulsed laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The band system associated with the A'Ω1-X 1Σ+ transition has been rotationally analyzed. The UV fluorescence of the A0+ and B0+-X 1Σ+ transitions has also been excited. The radiative lifetimes of these four low-lying electronic states have been measured as 7.1 μs (A'Ω1), 9.1 μs (aΩ1), 240 ns (A0+), and 21 ns (B0+), respectively, revealing that the two Ω=1 states are of triplet character, while the two 0+ states are of singlet character. The observed low-lying states of AgF appear to dissociate adiabatically to neutral atoms in contrast to the apparent dissociation of the low-lying electronic states in CuF to ion pairs. The observation of the low-lying 1 states of AgF also indicates the existence of similar stable 1 states for the remaining silver halides, all of which should absorb visible photons. Major molecular constants of the newly observed A'Ω1 state of 107AgF are Te=24 950.71(10) cm-1, ΔG1/2=506.74(8) cm-1, Be=0.281 32(15) cm-1, De=0.116(60)×10-6 cm-1, and re=1.927 Å.

  1. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime Using the SLD Detector at the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, J

    2004-01-05

    The lifetime of the tau lepton is measured to be (2.50 {+-} 0.35) x 10{sup -14}s. The measurement combines the results of two different techniques used on separate samples of tau events collected at the Stanford Linear Collider by the SLD detector during the 1992 physics run. The first technique measures the decay length from the known interaction position to the reconstructed decay vertex position. This requires that the taus have at least three charged decay products. The second technique infers the decay length by correlating the differences in signed impact parameters (for single-charged track decays) with the angles between the tracks.

  2. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  3. On the uncertainty in single molecule fluorescent lifetime and energy emission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; Mccollom, Alex D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least square methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67% of those can be noise and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probably density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. the ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background nose and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  4. Photoluminescence spectroscopy and lifetime measurements from self assembled semiconducting quantum dot- metal nanoparticle hybrid arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridas, M.; Basu, J. K.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate how the emission properties of a hybrid array consisting of semiconducting quantum dot (QD) and metal nanoparticles (NP) can be controlled by varying the density and distance between QD and NP independently. Our hybrid system consists of chemically synthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) and polymer capped gold nanoparticles (Au NP) embedded in a block copolymer matrix having the topology of cylinders oriented perpendicular to the substrate. We have prepared hybrid arrays with two different densities of CdSe QDs (ρQD) each having same Au NP densities (ρAu) . The photoluminescence measurements (PL) from such hybrid system shows enhancement in emission with increase in ρAu , compared to the CdSe QD film and the enhancement factor is lower for hybrid films with high ρQD . The lifetime measurement shows double exponent PL decay with systematic reduction in exciton lifetime for hybrid arrays with respect to ρAu . The film with high ρQD shows larger reduction in lifetime. Similarly, the amplitudes of the two relaxations switch over with increase in ρAu . It is clear that the shorter time becomes the dominant relaxation mode with increasing ρAu . Observed phenomena have been explained in terms of exciton plasmon interaction .

  5. Ruby crystal for demonstrating time- and frequency-domain methods of fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Danielle E; Majumdar, Zigurts K; Heiss, Gregor J; Clegg, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    We present experiments that are convenient and educational for measuring fluorescence lifetimes with both time- and frequency-domain methods. The sample is ruby crystal, which has a lifetime of about 3.5 milliseconds, and is easy to use as a class-room demonstration. The experiments and methods of data analysis are used in the lab section of a class on optical spectroscopy, where we go through the theory and applications of fluorescence. Because the fluorescence decay time of ruby is in the millisecond region, the instrumentation for this experiment can be constructed easily and inexpensively compared to the nanosecond-resolved instrumentation required for most fluorescent compounds, which have nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. The methods are applicable to other luminescent compounds with decay constants from microseconds and longer, such as transition metal and lanthanide complexes and phosphorescent samples. The experiments, which clearly demonstrate the theory and methods of measuring temporally resolved fluorescence, are instructive and demonstrate what the students have learned in the lectures without the distraction of highly sophisticated instrumentation.

  6. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Ξ$+\\atop{c}$ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the Ξ$+\\atop{c}$ lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 ± 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of Ξ$+\\atop{c}$ as 427 ± 31 ± 13 fs.

  7. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Johnston, Steven W.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  8. Measurement of the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    CDF Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    The lifetimes of the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} have been measured using a sample of fully reconstructed B decays. Using {approximately} 19,000 J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} decays recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab, 75 {plus_minus} 10 charged and 61 {plus_minus} 9 neutral B mesons have been reconstructed in the CDF silicon vertex detector. Unbinned likelihood fits to the proper lifetime distributions of these B mesons give {tau}{sup {plus_minus}} = 1.63 {plus_minus} 0.21 (stat) {plus_minus} 0.16 (sys) ps, {tau}{sup 0} = 1.54 {plus_minus} 0.2 (stat) {plus_minus} 0.10 (sys) ps, {tau}{sup {plus_minus}}{tau}{sup 0} = 1.06 {plus_minus} 0.20 (stat) {plus_minus} 0.12 (sys).

  9. Electronic transition dipole moment and radiative lifetime calculations of sodium dimer ion-pair states.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Aydin; Beser, Bediha; Edwardson, John R; Magnier, Sylvie; Ahmed, Ergin H; Marjatta Lyyra, A

    2015-09-14

    We report here ab initio calculated electronic transition dipole moments for the sodium dimer ion pair states of (1)Σg (+) symmetry. They vary strongly as a function of internuclear distance because of the effect of the Na(+) + Na(-) ion pair potential, which also causes the formation of additional wells and shoulders in the molecular potential energy curves. We also present a computational study of the transition dipole moment matrix elements and lifetimes for these ion-pair states.

  10. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  11. Thermal degradation kinetics and estimation of lifetime of radiation grafted polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dev K.; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.; Bhalla, Vinod Kumar

    2017-07-01

    In this research work, thermal stability and degradation behavior of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene (PP-g-PAAc) films were investigated by using thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis at four different heating rates 5, 10, 15 and 20 °C/min over a temperature range of 40-550 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The kinetic parameters namely activation energy (Ea), reaction order (n) and frequency factor (Z) were calculated by three multiple heating rate methods. The thermal stability of PP-g-PAAc films is found to decrease with increase in degree of grafting. The TGA data and thermal kinetic parameters were also used to predict the lifetime of grafted PP films. The estimated lifetime of neat PP as well as grafted PP decreased with increase in temperature by all the three methods. Studies also indicated that Ea and lifetime of PP-g-PAAc films decreased with increase in degree of grafting, which may also be helpful in biodegradation of grafted PP films.

  12. B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing and lifetime difference measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi

    2010-02-10

    We review latest experimental results on the Bs mixing and lifetime difference measurements at CDF. We report on the latest beta{sub s} and DELTAGAMMA{sub s} results from B{sub s}->J/psiphi. We also discuss flavor specific DELTAGAMMA{sub s} measurements, including information from hadronic channels, B{sub s}->D{sub s}D{sub s} and B{sub s}->KK. We describe the new flavor tagging methodology and its calibration using the B{sub s} oscillations.

  13. Measurement of Beauty and Charm Photoproduction at H1 using inclusive lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, L.

    2005-10-06

    A measurement of the charm and beauty photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The lifetime signature of c and b-flavoured hadrons is exploited to determine the fractions of events in the sample containing charm or beauty. Differential cross sections as a function of the jet transverse momentum, the rapidity and x{sub {gamma}}{sup obs} are measured in the photoproduction region Q2 < 1 GeV2, with inelasticity 0.15 < y < 0.8. The results are compared with calculations in next-to-leading order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo models as implemented in PYTHIA and CASCADE.

  14. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  15. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  16. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Y.; Higashi, N.; Igarashi, Y.; Iwashita, Y.; Ino, T.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Kitahara, R.; Matsumura, H.; Mishima, K.; Nagakura, N.; Oide, H.; Otono, H.; Sakakibara, R.; Shima, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Sugino, T.; Sumi, N.; Sumino, H.; Taketani, K.; Tanaka, G.; Tanaka, M.; Tauchi, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tomita, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoshioka, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with 6Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  17. Prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime based on measurement of I- V curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashov, V. S.; Nikolski, K. N.; Baturin, A. S.; Sheshin, E. P.

    2003-06-01

    A technique is presented, which allows the prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime without long-term direct measurements of cathode parameters stability. This technique is based on periodic measurements of cathode I- V characteristics. Moreover, it allows performing a post-experiment optimization for the appropriate choice of the feedback system to provide a stable operation during a long time. The proposed technique was applied to study the emission properties of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and thermo-enlarged graphite (TEG). For the given cathodes, the characteristic time of the cathode destruction was estimated.

  18. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  19. Method for radiation detection and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength.

  20. Method for radiation detection and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.D.

    1993-12-21

    Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. 9 figures.

  1. A Measurement of the Charged and Neutral B Meson Lifetimes Using Fully Reconstructed Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-08-30

    Data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC are used to study the lifetimes of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons. The data sample consists of 7.4 fb{sup -1} collected near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons are fully reconstructed in several exclusive hadronic decay modes to charm and charmonium final states. The B lifetimes are determined from the flight length difference between the two B mesons which are pair-produced in the {Upsilon}(4S) decay. The preliminary measurements of the lifetimes are {tau}B{sup 0} = 1.506 {+-} 0.052 (stat) {+-} 0.029 (syst) ps, {tau}B{sup +} = 1.602 {+-} 0.049 (stat) {+-} 0.035 (syst) ps, and of their ratio is {tau}B{sup +}/{tau}B{sup 0} = 1.065 {+-} 0.044 (stat) {+-} 0.021 (syst).

  2. A Measurement of the Charged and Neutral B Meson Lifetimes Using Fully Reconstructed Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-08-30

    Data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC are used to study the lifetimes of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons. The data sample consists of 7.4 fb{sup {minus}1} collected near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons are fully reconstructed in several exclusive hadronic decay modes to charm and charmonium final states. The B lifetimes are determined from the flight length difference between the two B mesons which are pair-produced in the Upsilon(4S) decay. The preliminary measurements of the lifetimes are tau{sub B0} = 1.506 {+-} 0.052 (stat) {+-} 0.029 (syst) ps, tau{sub B+} = 1.602 {+-} 0.049 (stat) {+-} 0.035 (syst) ps, and of their ratio is tau{sub B+}/tau{sub B0} = 1.065 {+-} 0.044 (stat) {+-} 0.021 (syst).

  3. Electron lifetime measurement using cosmic ray muons at the MicroBooNE LArTPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddage, Varuna Crishan; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE, a 170 ton liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) located on the Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB), is designed to both probe neutrino physics phenomena and further develop the LArTPC detector technology. MicroBooNE is the largest currently operating LArTPC detector and began collecting data in Fall 2015. LArTPCs are imaging detectors that offer exceptional capabilities for studying neutrinos. A fundamental requirement for the performance of such detectors is to maintain electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water at extremely low concentrations, which otherwise can absorb the ionization electrons. The impurity levels in liquid argon can be estimated from the drift electron lifetime as they are inversely proportional to each other. This talk presents a measurement of the drift electron lifetime using cosmic ray muon data collected by MicroBooNE. An interpretation of the observed drift electron lifetime as a function of time indicates that the electron attenuation due to impurities in the liquid argon is negligible during normal operations, implying that the argon purification and gas recirculation system in MicroBooNE is performing successfully.

  4. Measurement of the lifetimes of the neutral and charged D mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1985-03-01

    Results are presented on the use of a high-resolution drift chamber in the Mark II Detector at PEP to measure the lifetimes of D/sup 0/ and D/sup + -/ mesons produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at 29 GeV. Based on a sample of 74 events for the D/sup 0/ mesons and 23 events for the D/sup + -/ mesons, the lifetimes are found to be tau/sub D/sup 0/ = 4.7/sub -0.8//sup +0.9/ +- 0.5 x 10/sup -13/ s; tau/sub D/sup + -// = 8.9/sub -2.7//sup +3.8/ +- 1.3 x 10/sup -13/ s. The ratio of these lifetimes, tau/sub D/sup 0///tau/sub D/sup + -// = 1.9/sub -0.7//sup +0.9/ +- 0.3, indicates that the decays of these mesons cannot be explained by the simple spectator model of charmed particle decay.

  5. Studies on the Use of Liquid Surface Passivation for Lifetime Measurements on Good-Quality Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Devayajanam, S.; Rupnowski, P.; Shet, S.; Sopori, B. L.; Ravindra, N. M.; Caskey, D.; Chang, J.; Covington, J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated several liquid passivants, viz. solutions of iodine ethanol (IE), quinhydrone methanol (QHM), and potassium cyanide (KCN), for measuring minority-carrier lifetime. Lifetime was measured by the WCT-100 (Sinton Instruments) and WT-2000 (Semilab). Our results show that both IE and QHM passivation are reliable mechanisms. We also find that the KCN solution is moderately passivating on oxidized surfaces, but is only minimally effective on bare Si surfaces. This paper presents details of our studies. In particular, the effect of illumination on IE-passivated surfaces and possible reasons for variations in lifetime measurement are discussed.

  6. Quantitative multi-color FRET measurements by Fourier lifetime excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Huang, Run; Peng, Leilei

    2012-11-19

    Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is extensively used to probe macromolecular interactions and conformation changes. The established FRET lifetime analysis method measures the FRET process through its effect on the donor lifetime. In this paper we present a method that directly probes the time-resolved FRET signal with frequency domain Fourier lifetime excitation-emission matrix (FLEEM) measurements. FLEEM separates fluorescent signals by their different phonon energy pathways from excitation to emission. The FRET process generates a unique signal channel that is initiated by donor excitation but ends with acceptor emission. Time-resolved analysis of the FRET EEM channel allows direct measurements on the FRET process, unaffected by free fluorophores that might be present in the sample. Together with time-resolved analysis on non-FRET channels, i.e. donor and acceptor EEM channels, time resolved EEM analysis allows precise quantification of FRET in the presence of free fluorophores. The method is extended to three-color FRET processes, where quantification with traditional methods remains challenging because of the significantly increased complexity in the three-way FRET interactions. We demonstrate the time-resolved EEM analysis method with quantification of three-color FRET in incompletely hybridized triple-labeled DNA oligonucleotides. Quantitative measurements of the three-color FRET process in triple-labeled dsDNA are obtained in the presence of free single-labeled ssDNA and double-labeled dsDNA. The results establish a quantification method for studying multi-color FRET between multiple macromolecules in biochemical equilibrium.

  7. Measurement of the inclusive b-lifetime using Jp's at the CDF-experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Hans; Benjamin, Doug

    1996-05-01

    We present the measurement of the average lifetime of b-hadrons produced in pbarp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV weighted by their branching ratios into J/ψ We use dimuon data which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ≈ 90 pb-1 recorded with the CDF-detector during the 1994 to 95 running period. After all selection cuts and background subtraction we are left with a high statistics sample of 62656 J/ψ decaying into μ^+μ^- reconstructed in the CDF Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) where 17.8% of these events come from b-decays. We measure the average B lifetime to be 1.52 ; ± 0.015; (stat);^+0.038_-0.027;(sys); ps (preliminary). The precision of this measurement is significantly improved compared to the inclusive lifetime measurement published previously using ≈ 10 pb-1 of data recorded in 91-92. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC03-76SF00098. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DEFG03-95-ER-40938. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  8. Radiation: Physical Characterization and Environmental Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session WP4, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Production of Neutrons from Interactions of GCR-Like Particles; Solar Particle Event Dose Distributions, Parameterization of Dose-Time Profiles; Assessment of Nuclear Events in the Body Produced by Neutrons and High-Energy Charged Particles; Ground-Based Simulations of Cosmic Ray Heavy Ion Interactions in Spacecraft and Planetary Habitat Shielding Materials; Radiation Measurements in Space Missions; Radiation Measurements in Civil Aircraft; Analysis of the Pre-Flight and Post-Flight Calibration Procedures Performed on the Liulin Space Radiation Dosimeter; and Radiation Environment Monitoring for Astronauts.

  9. Fiber thermometer based on the cross detection of the fluorescence lifetime of Cr3+:YAG crystal fiber and Plank"s blackbody radiation from cryogenic up to 1400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Linhua; Qiu, Yanqing; Shen, Yonghang; He, Sailing

    2005-02-01

    A fiber thermometer using the cross detection of the fluorescence lifetime and blackbody radiation was presented to measure temperature from -10°C up to 1400°C. Using a long pure YAG crystal fiber as the seed and a 0.1 at. % Cr2O3-doped Y3Al5O12 sintered powder rod as the source rod, a YAG fiber thermal probe with Cr3+ -ions doped end was grown by laser heated pedestal growth method. A blackbody cavity was constructed by sintered a thin ceramic layer around the Cr3+: YAG fiber end. A phase-locked detection scheme was used for the fluorescence lifetime detection. The fluorescence characteristics of the Cr3+-ions doped YAG was analyzed in a temperature range from -10°C up to 500°C. From 350°C to 1400°C the blackbody radiation signal in a narrow waveband were detected. Because the fluorescence lifetime was intensity independent, it should have the long-term stability and would not change if the fiber connectors of the probes were realigned. So the fluorescence lifetime based temperature measurement could be used to recalibrate that based on the blackbody radiation detection. Preliminary experimental results showed that the system could achieve a resolution much better than 1°C over the whole temperature range from -10°C to 1400°C.

  10. Measurement and Applications of Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy; Munday Lab Team

    Light reflected off a material or absorbed within it exerts radiation pressure through the transfer of momentum. Measuring and utilizing radiation pressure have aroused growing interest in a wide spectrum of research fields. Micromechanical transducers and oscillators are good candidates for measuring radiation pressure, but accompanying photothermal effects often obscure the measurement. In this work, we investigate the accurate measurement of the radiation force on microcantilevers in ambient conditions and ways to separate radiation pressure and photothermal effects. Further, we investigate an optically broadband switchable device based on polymer dispersed liquid crystal which has potential applications in solar sails and maneuvering spacecraft without moving parts. The authors would like to thank NASA Early Career Faculty Award and NASA Smallsat Technology Partnership Award for their funding support.

  11. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in Cd106

    DOE PAGES

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K. -H.; ...

    2016-09-06

    The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. As a result, the g factorsmore » of the 2+1 and 4+1 states in 106Cd were measured to be g(2+1) = +0.398(22) and g(4+1) = +0.23(5). A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ(106Cd; 2+1) = 7.0(3) ps and τ(106Cd; 4+1) = 2.5(2) ps. The mean life τ(106Cd; 2+2) = 0.28(2) ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ(106Cd; 4+3) = 1.1(1) ps and τ(106Cd; 3–1) = 0.16(1) ps were determined for the first time. In conclusion, the newly measured g(4+1) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g(2+1). This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.« less

  12. Magnetic moment and lifetime measurements of Coulomb-excited states in 106Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kumbartzki, G. J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Torres, D. A.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J. E.; Crawford, H. L.; Guevara, Z. E.; Hurst, A. M.; Kirsch, L.; Laplace, T. A.; Lo, A.; Matthews, E. F.; Mayers, I.; Phair, L. W.; Ramirez, F.; Wiens, A.

    2016-09-01

    Background: The Cd isotopes are well studied, but experimental data for the rare isotopes are sparse. At energies above the Coulomb barrier, higher states become accessible. Purpose: Remeasure and supplement existing lifetimes and magnetic moments of low-lying states in 106Cd. Methods: In an inverse kinematics reaction, a 106Cd beam impinging on a 12C target was used to Coulomb excite the projectiles. The high recoil velocities provide a unique opportunity to measure g factors with the transient-field technique and to determine lifetimes from lineshapes by using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Large-scale shell-model calculations were carried out for 106Cd. Results: The g factors of the 21+ and 41+ states in 106Cd were measured to be g (21+)=+0.398 (22 ) and g (41+)=+0.23 (5 ) . A lineshape analysis yielded lifetimes in disagreement with published values. The new results are τ (106Cd;21+)=7.0 (3 )ps and τ (106Cd;41+)=2.5 (2 )ps . The mean life τ (106Cd;22+)=0.28 (2 )ps was determined from the fully-Doppler-shifted γ line. Mean lives of τ (106Cd;43+)=1.1 (1 )ps and τ (106Cd;31-)=0.16 (1 )ps were determined for the first time. Conclusions: The newly measured g (41+) of 106Cd is found to be only 59% of the g (21+) . This difference cannot be explained by either shell-model or collective-model calculations.

  13. Experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility: lifetime products for large sample of pixilated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Shanmugam, M.; Purohit, Shishir; Acharya, Y. B.; Sudhakar, Manju

    2012-07-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) is thought to be a primary work horse for hard X-ray astronomy in future. Due to the relatively large band-gap, it offers near room temperature operation while maintaining much better energy resolution then scintillator detectors operating in similar energy range. Further, CZT detectors are available in the form of pixilated detectors with area up to few cm2 and hence it is possible to realize very large detector area by having an array of such pixilated CZT detectors. However, it is well known that the energy spectrum of mono-energetic X-ray measured by CZT detectors does not have a Gaussian shape but has significant low-energy tail. This is mainly due to relatively poor mobility and small life time of the charge carriers, particularly of holes, in the CZT crystals. Thus, in order to understand spectral response for a large array of CZT detectors consisting of multiple elements / pixels, it is essential to characterize the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers for each individual elements / pixels. Here we present experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility-lifetime products for large sample of multi-pixel CZT detectors. The mobility-lifetime products are measured by simultaneously fitting a ‘CZT line’ model to pixel wise spectra of 122 keV X-rays from 57Co at three different bias voltages. These were carried out as a part of selection of CZT detector modules for the “High Energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX)” onboard Indian moon mission - Chandrayaan-1.

  14. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  15. Lifetime measurements in neutron-rich 63,65Co isotopes using the AGATA demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modamio, V.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Lunardi, S.; Lenzi, S. M.; Gadea, A.; Mengoni, D.; Bazzacco, D.; Algora, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Birkenbach, B.; Bracco, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Bürger, A.; Chavas, J.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; de France, G.; Depalo, R.; Dewald, A.; Doncel, M.; Erduran, M. N.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gottardo, A.; Görgen, A.; Habermann, T.; Hackstein, M.; Hess, H.; Hüyük, T.; John, P. R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Kempley, R.; Leoni, S.; Melon, B.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Million, B.; Möller, O.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Nannini, A.; Napoli, D. R.; Podolyak, Zs.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Rother, W.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Sieja, K.; Söderström, P. A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Szilner, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Travers, B.; Ur, C. A.

    2013-10-01

    Lifetimes of the low-lying (11/2-) states in 63,65Co have been measured employing the recoil distance doppler shift method (RDDS) with the AGATA γ-ray array and the PRISMA mass spectrometer. These nuclei were populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction by bombarding a 238U target with a beam of 64Ni. The experimental B(E2) reduced transition probabilities for 63,65Co are well reproduced by large-scale shell-model calculations that predict a constant trend of the B(E2) values up to the N=40 67Co isotope.

  16. Lifetime measurements in the A(180) region using the Doppler-shift recoil distance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpe, John Courtney

    Lifetime measurements, using the Doppler-shift recoil distance technique, have been performed on the ground state rotational bands in P182,186t and the rotational bands built on the proton h9/2 and i13/2 bandheads in I181r and A187u, in order to study the systematics of proton intruder states in the A ~ 180 nuclei and their relationship to the phenomenon known as shape coexistence. High spin levels were populated using the S122n(N 64i,4n)182 Pt,154 Sm(S 36,4n) 186Pt,154 Sm(P31,4n) 181Ir, and S154m(C 37l,4n)187 Au reactions at the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS). γ-rays were measured using the 12 Compton- suppressed HPGe detectors of the Argonne-Notre Dame γ-ray facility, in conjunction with the Notre Dame ``plunger'' device. The plunger allowed for positioning of stretched, self-supporting target foils to within less than 10μm of another similarly stretched Au foil, which was used to stop the recoiling nuclei. γ-rays were measured at target-to-stopper distances ranging from <10μm to ~1cm, and lifetimes extracted from the ratios of the intensities of unshifted components of the γ-rays of interest, to the total peak intensity, at various recoil distances. The lifetime results for the P182,186t nuclei indicate that the ground state band in each case is coexisting with another band built on an excited 0+ state at ~500 keV. This is evidenced by the good agreement of the experimental results with simple two- band mixing calculations which were performed. The lifetime measurements in the I181r and A187u nuclei also indicate shape coexistence. In both nuclei, the results clearly indicate that the band built on the pi13/2 state has a larger quadrupole deformation than that of the band built on the ph9/2 state. In addition, the percentage increase in deformation between the pi13/2 and ph9/2 bands is lower in A187u when compared with that in I181r, due to the addition of the two extra protons.

  17. Measurements of nuclear-level lifetimes by the Doppler techniques with large multidetector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2008-07-15

    This is a brief review of the investigations carried out by scientists from the Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (St. Petersburg) within the framework of international projects for the study of the structure of high-spin nuclear states using heavy-ion beams and arrays of tens and hundreds of detectors for recording gamma rays and charged particles. The development and results of measurements of nuclear-level lifetime by Doppler techniques in the range 10{sup -14}-10{sup -9} s are discussed.

  18. Differential lifetime measurements and identical superdeformed bands in {sup 192,194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.F.; Amro, H.; Lauritsen, T.; Janssens, R.V.; Khoo, T.L.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Amro, H.; Blumenthal, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fischer, S.M.; Hackman, G.; Nisius, D.; Hannachi, F.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Korichi, A.; Asztalos, S.; Clark, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Stephens, F.S.; Becker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.; Farris, L.P.; Henry, E.A.

    1997-05-01

    High-precision lifetime measurements have been performed in superdeformed (SD) bands of {sup 192,194}Hg with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Intrinsic quadrupole moments Q{sub 0} were extracted for three SD bands in {sup 194}Hg and for the yrast SD band in {sup 192}Hg. Within experimental uncertainties, all four SD bands have equal Q{sub 0} values. These results provide constraints on differences in Q{sub 0} values between the {open_quotes}identical{close_quotes} SD bands {sup 194}Hg(3) and {sup 192}Hg(1). {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Neutron Lifetime Measurement Initiated at J-PARC/MLF/BL05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Genki; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Sumi, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Satoru; Katayama, Ryo; Yamada, Takahito; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Shimizu, Hirohiko; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Ino, Takashi; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime τn is one of the important parameters for the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) which predicts an abundance of the light elements in the early universe. However, the He/(H+He) ratio recently measured by Izotov et al. has been deviated from that of the BBN prediction. Thus a precise τn measurement is desired. Historically, there are two methods for τn measurement, and there exists 3.8 σ deviation between their results. We are therefore conducting the τn measurement at the J-PARC/MLF/BL05 by using a third method. In this experiment we count the number of decay electrons by using Time Projection Chamber (TPC). We expect 1% accuracy with the collected data in JFY 2014. In this presentation, we will report some analysis results and future plan.

  20. A measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, Marcus Philip

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ-$\\bar{v}$μX was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fbμ-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 ± 329 Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ- pairs was obtained, and the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime was measured using a binned X2 fit, which gives a value {tau}(Λ$0\\atop{b}$) = 1.290$+0.091\\atop{-1.110}$(stat)$+0.085\\atop{-0.091}$(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  1. Muon Lifetime Measurement and Introduction to the use of FPGAs in Experimental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor, L.

    2008-07-01

    During the laboratory sessions at the Workshop, the students used a simple experimental setup to measure the muon lifetime with a 10% statistical error. The muon detector consisted of a sealed container, filled with liquid scintillator, coupled to a 2.5″ photomultiplier (PMT). A personal computer (PC) was used to control a digital oscilloscope which directly measured the time interval between two consecutive PMT pulses in a time window of 20 μs. The students were also introduced to the use of root to analyze the muon data and to measure the muon lifetime. They were also presented with a basic introduction to the application of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in data acquisition (DAQ) systems by means of examples. We started with a brief introduction to the VHDL language and the software package used to program FPGAs and PROMs on a commercial FPGA development board. They learned to program FPGAs for handling data transfers using the RS-232 port of a PC. They were also introduced to the concepts of circular RAMs (Random Access Memory) and FIFO (First-In First-Out) memories in the context of fast and efficient DAQ systems. We emphasized the way in which inexpensive FPGA-based electronics replaces the use of traditionally used electronics modules, such as NIM, CAMAC, FASTBUS, VME, etc., to construct fast and powerful DAQ systems.

  2. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ωb- baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at √{s }=7 and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct 63 ±9 Ωb-→Ωc0π-, Ωc0→p K-K-π+ decays. Using the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ decay mode for calibration, the lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of the Ωb- baryon are measured to be τΩb-/τΞb-=1.11 ±0.16 ±0.03 , τΩb-=1.78 ±0.26 ±0.05 ±0.06 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the calibration mode (for τΩb- only). A measurement is also made of the mass difference, mΩb--mΞb-, and the corresponding Ωb- mass, which yields mΩb--mΞb-=247.4 ±3.2 ±0.5 MeV /c2 , mΩb-=6045.1 ±3.2 ±0.5 ±0.6 MeV /c2 . These results are consistent with previous measurements.

  3. Recoil Distance Method Lifetime Measurements in 107Cd and 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S. F.; Regan, P. H.; McCutchan, E. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Clark, R. M.; Erduran, M. N.; Gürdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Meyer, D. A.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Plettner, C.; Rainovski, G.; Ribas, R. V.; Thomas, N. J.; Vinson, J.; Warner, D. D.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2006-04-01

    Preliminary lifetime values have been measured for a number of near-yrast states in the odd-A transitional nuclei 107Cd and 103Pd. The reaction used to populate the nuclei of interest was 98Mo(12C,3nxα)107Cd, 103Pd, with the beam delivered by the tandem accelerator of the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. Our experiment was aimed at the investigation of collective excitations built on the unnatural parity, ν h11/2 orbital, specifically by measuring the B(E2) values of decays from the excited levels built on this intrinsic structure, using the Doppler Recoil Distance Method. We report lifetimes and associated transition probabilities for decays from the 15/2- and the 19/2- states in 107Cd and the first measurement of the 15/2- state in 103Pd. These results suggest that neither a simple rotational or vibrational interpretation is sufficient to explain the observed structures.

  4. Simultaneously measured photoluminescence lifetime and quantum yield of two-photon cascade emission on single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshige, Nao; Ihara, Toshiyuki; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-06-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and quantum yield (QY) of the two-photon cascade emission (TPCE) provide critical information for assessing the quality of optoelectronic devices. The QY of TPCE has been conventionally evaluated by second-order photon correlation, g(2 ), measurements under weak-excitation conditions in single nanocrystals (NCs). Here, we report that by measuring simultaneously both the g(2 ) and PL-decay curves, the QY of the TPCE can be determined even under strong-excitation conditions. With this technique, the effect of ionization on the QY of the TPCEs in single CdSe/ZnS NCs, which appears under strong-excitation condition, can be revealed. The obtained QYs were compared with the PL lifetime of the first and second photon emissions. We demonstrate that even for ionized NCs, the radiative recombination rates during TPCE are almost proportional to the product of the numbers of electrons and holes.

  5. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warrington, N; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps.

  6. Measurements of Smith--Purcell radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, I.; Salisbury, W.; Masters, D.; Chang, D. )

    1990-03-01

    We present experimental results on Smith--Purcell radiation. Our primary interest was in the measurement of radiation angular distribution, output power, and spectral content. The variations of the angular distribution and the output power were shown for different electron-beam voltages and currents. The output power measured with a 3-mA and 120-kV electron beam was {similar to}30 {mu}W/cm{sup 2}-sr. The spectral analysis of the radiation shows excellent agreement between the measurements and the theoretical predictions. Our results were compared with those obtained by Gover et al. (J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 1, 723 (1984)).

  7. Radiative flux measurements in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to determine how the stratospheric tropospheric exchange of water vapor is affected by the interaction of solar (visible) and planetary (infrared) radiation with tropical cumulonimbus anvils. This research involves field measurements from the ER-2 aircraft as well as radiative transfer modelling to determine heating and cooling rates and profiles that directly affect the exchange between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  8. The lifetime probability tag measurement of R{sub b} using the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    SLD Collaboration

    1995-08-01

    The authors present a new measurement of R{sub b} = {Lambda}{sub Z{degree}{yields}b{anti b}}/{Lambda}{sub Z{degree}{yields}hadrons} using a lifetime double tag on 150k hadronic Z{degree} events collected from the SLD 1993 and 1994 runs. The method utilizes the high precision 3-D position measurements provided by the CCD vertex detector and the small stable SLC beams to obtain a b hemisphere tagging efficiency of 31% for a purity of 94%. The b-Hemisphere tagging efficiency is measured from the data reducing dependence on the B-decay model and detector simulation. They obtain a result of R{sub b} = 0.2171 {+-} 0.0040{sub statistical} {+-} 0.0037{sub systematic} {+-} 0.0023{sub R{sub c}}.

  9. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  10. Precision excited-state lifetime measurements of neutron-rich Li isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, C.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; McCutchan, E. A.; Hackman, G.; Bowry, M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Henderson, J.; Kurkjian, A.; Measures, J. P.; Moukaddam, M.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Smallcombe, J.; Smith, J. K.; Southall, D.; Williams, M.; Mitchell, A. J.; Wu, C. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Recent successes with ab initio calculations are allowing increasingly subtle nuclear phenomena to be investigated, such as Δ-isobar and meson exchange effects which are necessary to reproduce M 1 properties of nuclei. In order to guide such explorations, precise experimental data are required to discriminate between various theoretical descriptions. The lithium isotopes, which are dominated by M 1 spin-flip transitions, provide an ideal testing ground for such studies. We have performed lifetime measurements of the excited states of 7,8Li, as well as explored the feasibility of such an experiment on 9Li, to provide precise data on the M 1 transition matrix elements in these nuclei. The experiment used the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method to measure the lifetimes at TRIUMF with TIGRESS, with the excited states populated by inverse (d , p) reactions. Preliminary results from the analysis will be presented. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Grants DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  11. Spectral and lifetime endomicroscopic measurements using one and two-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, A.; Poulon, F.; Zanello, M.; Habert, R.; Varlet, P.; Devaux, B.; Kudlinski, A.; Abi Haidar, D.

    2017-02-01

    Current surgical biopsy needs several days for the analysis process to be finished. Anatomopathologists provide analysis reports to the surgeon a few days after the surgical intervention, which makes it a lengthy decision making practice. In addition, the lack of precise guidance often leads to inaccuracies in the selection of tissue regions for biopsy and so necessitates repeating the operation sometimes. Our project aims at reducing this time as well as patient discomfort. In this context, we propose to develop a multimodal nonlinear endomicroscope providing several means of contrast. Among these contrast that are useful in the detection of tumor regions, we note imaging by linear and non-linear fluorescence, by second and third harmonic generation and by reflectance. In addition, this technique allows fluorescence lifetime and spectral measurements. Our endomicroscopic system is based on a new homemade customized double-clad photonic crystal fiber (DC-PCF). Finally, this double-clad micro structured optical fiber insures visible and near infrared excitation. This system was tested by measuring fluorescence lifetime and the spectral shape of a fixed tumoral brain sample in one and two photon excitations.

  12. A new differentially pumped plunger device to measure excited-state lifetimes in proton emitting nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Smith, A. J.; McFarlane, A.; Twist, V.; Alharshan, G. A.; Procter, M. G.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Ellinger, E.; Fransen, C.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.; Joss, D. T.; Saygi, B.; McPeake, C. G.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.

    2013-04-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and built to measure the lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. The device has been designed to work in both vacuum and dilute-gas environments made possible through the introduction of a low-voltage stepping motor. DPUNS will be used in conjunction with the gas-filled separator RITU and the vacuum separator MARA at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, to measure the lifetimes of excited states with low population cross-sections. This is achieved by eliminating the need for a carbon foil to isolate the helium gas of RITU from the beam line thus reducing the background from beam-foil reactions. The inclusion of a high-sampling rate data acquisition card increases further the sensitivity of the device. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  13. Interferences in and lifetime measurement of a resonance electronic Raman effect using tunable pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollin, D.; Koningstein, J. A.

    1980-07-01

    The excitation profile for the intensity of electronic Raman transitions of terbium aluminum garnet (TbAlG) in the spectral range of 483.0-680.0 nm is reported. The electronic Raman transitions take place between the crystal field levels of the split 7F 6 ground manifold of TbAlG with shifts of 73 cm -1 and 83 cm -1 and the electronic Raman process is induced with tunable pulsed and fixed wavelength cw lasers. The tunability of the former was employed to obtain detailed information of the behaviour of the Raman intensity if the wavelength of the exciting source is tuned throughout the region of 483.0-490.0 nm where 5Da 4 ← 7F 6 absorptions of TbAlG occur and the data reveal the occurrence of interference effects. We also report measurements of the shape of the pulse — due to resonance enhanced electronic Raman scattered light — in real time. These studies reveal that the lifetime of the resonating state (which is responsible for the enhancement of the Raman intensity) as determined from the tailing end of the said pulse is within experimental error equal to the lifetime τ = 33.5 ± 1 μs of this state measured in a direct way from the intensity decay of an appropriate fluorescence transition of TbAlG.

  14. Measurement of lifetimes in Fe,6462,Co,6361 , and 59Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintefjord, M.; Ljungvall, J.; Görgen, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Blazhev, A.; Clément, E.; de France, G.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Désesquelles, P.; Dewald, A.; Doherty, D. T.; Fransen, C.; Gengelbach, A.; Georgiev, G.; Girod, M.; Goasduff, A.; Gottardo, A.; Hadyńska-KlÈ©k, K.; Jacquot, B.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Korichi, A.; Lemasson, A.; Libert, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Navin, A.; Nyberg, J.; Pérez-Vidal, R. M.; Roccia, S.; Sahin, E.; Stefan, I.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Zielińska, M.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Boston, A.; Charles, L.; Ciemala, M.; Dudouet, J.; Eberth, J.; Gadea, A.; González, V.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Hess, H.; Jungclaus, A.; Korten, W.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Pullia, A.; Ralet, D.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Salsac, M. D.; Sanchis, E.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.

    2017-02-01

    Lifetimes of the 41+ states in Fe,6462 and the 11 /21- states in Co,6361 and 59Mn were measured at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) facility by using the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) and the large-acceptance variable mode spectrometer (VAMOS++). The states were populated through multinucleon transfer reactions with a 238U beam impinging on a 64Ni target, and lifetimes in the picosecond range were measured by using the recoil distance Doppler shift method. The data show an increase of collectivity in the iron isotopes approaching N =40 . The reduction of the subshell gap between the ν 2 p1 /2 and ν 1 g9 /2 orbitals leads to an increased population of the quasi-SU(3) pair (ν 1 g9 /2,ν 2 d5 /2 ), which causes an increase in quadrupole collectivity. This is not observed for the cobalt isotopes with N <40 for which the neutron subshell gap is larger due to the repulsive monopole component of the tensor nucleon-nucleon interaction. The extracted experimental B (E 2 ) values are compared with large-scale shell-model calculations and with beyond-mean-field calculations with the Gogny D1S interaction. A good agreement between calculations and experimental values is found, and the results demonstrate in particular the spectroscopic quality of the Lenzi, Nowacki, Poves, and Sieja (LNPS) shell-model interaction.

  15. Bacterial ice nuclei impact cloud lifetime and radiative properties and reduce atmospheric heat loss in the BRAMS simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Tassio S.; Gonçalves, Fábio L. T.; Yamasoe, Marcia A.; Martins, Jorge A.; Morris, Cindy E.

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the effect of the bacterial species Pseudomonas syringae acting as ice nuclei (IN) on cloud properties to understand its impact on local radiative budget and heating rates. These bacteria may become active IN at temperatures as warm as -2 °C. Numerical simulations were developed using the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Model System (BRAMS). To investigate the isolated effect of bacterial IN, four scenarios were created considering only homogeneous and bacterial ice nucleation, with 1, 10 and 100 IN per cubic meter of cloud volume and one with no bacteria. Moreover, two other scenarios were generated: the BRAMS default parameterization and its combination with bacterial IN. The model reproduced a strong convective cell over São Paulo on 3 March 2003. Results showed that bacterial IN may change cloud evolution as well as its microphysical properties, which in turn influence cloud radiative properties. For example, the reflected shortwave irradiance over an averaged domain in a scenario considering bacterial IN added to the BRAMS default parameterization was 14% lower than if bacteria were not considered. Heating rates can also be impacted, especially due to differences in cloud lifetime. Results suggest that the omission of bacterial IN in numerical models, including global cloud models, could neglect relevant ice nucleation processes that potentially influence cloud radiative properties.

  16. Measurement of the Radiation Incident on NbFeB Insertion Devices at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Gary; Holmes, Michael

    1997-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories Advanced Light Source is a third generation light source containing NdFeB permanent magnet insertion devices.The lifetime of the permanent magnets in a radiation environment is of paramount importance. Measurements of the radiation incident on the insertion device magnets under various operating conditions are presented.

  17. Radiation Measurements on the Russian MIR Orbital Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1999-01-01

    The Russian Mir orbital station was launched into an orbit with a 51.65 deg inclination in March 1986. It has operated continuously in the altitude range of 380 to 460 km. Almost immediately, cosmonauts began to carry out missions to the station. To date, there have been some 25 Russian missions. As part of the NASA Mir Program, a comprehensive set of radiation measurements were made to map the radiation in all of the Mir module. Numerous radiation measurements have been made on the Mir station throughout its lifetime. However, the comparison of these measurements have been difficult because of different sensitivities of detectors, some active and some passive, differing self shielding and in most cases unknown location shielding. In spite of these complications, very significant progress in the knowledge of the radiation environment onboard the Mir station has been made. These results are directly applicable to expected radiation environment on the International Space Station. In this paper, we describe the combined results from all seven NASA Mir missions. We show: (1) the absorbed dose rate from trapped particles is well correlated with the atmospheric density computed nearly 400 days earlier than the time of observation, (2) developed a relationship between the absorbed dose rate from galactic cosmic rays to the deceleration potential derived using the Climax neutron monitor rate, giving a tool to predict GCR dose rates to +/- 15% nearly 90 days prior to observations, (3) describe the drift of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) with time, (4) compare the predictions of the dose rates as a function of time from the November 6-8, 1998 solar particle event with observations, (5) compare measurements made with NASA Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) with the ESA DOSTEL device, the Hungarian Pille system, and the Russian R-16 dosimeter. Implications of these measurements for the ISS will be discussed.

  18. Radiation Measurements on the Russian MIR Orbital Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1999-01-01

    The Russian Mir orbital station was launched into an orbit with a 51.65 deg inclination in March 1986. It has operated continuously in the altitude range of 380 to 460 km. Almost immediately, cosmonauts began to carry out missions to the station. To date, there have been some 25 Russian missions. As part of the NASA Mir Program, a comprehensive set of radiation measurements were made to map the radiation in all of the Mir module. Numerous radiation measurements have been made on the Mir station throughout its lifetime. However, the comparison of these measurements have been difficult because of different sensitivities of detectors, some active and some passive, differing self shielding and in most cases unknown location shielding. In spite of these complications, very significant progress in the knowledge of the radiation environment onboard the Mir station has been made. These results are directly applicable to expected radiation environment on the International Space Station. In this paper, we describe the combined results from all seven NASA Mir missions. We show: (1) the absorbed dose rate from trapped particles is well correlated with the atmospheric density computed nearly 400 days earlier than the time of observation, (2) developed a relationship between the absorbed dose rate from galactic cosmic rays to the deceleration potential derived using the Climax neutron monitor rate, giving a tool to predict GCR dose rates to +/- 15% nearly 90 days prior to observations, (3) describe the drift of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) with time, (4) compare the predictions of the dose rates as a function of time from the November 6-8, 1998 solar particle event with observations, (5) compare measurements made with NASA Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) with the ESA DOSTEL device, the Hungarian Pille system, and the Russian R-16 dosimeter. Implications of these measurements for the ISS will be discussed.

  19. Solar-Radiation Measuring Equipment and Glossary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. A.; Patel, A. M.; Greenbaum, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    1976 listing of commercially available solar-radiation measuring equipment is presented in 50-page report. Sensor type, response time, cost data, and comments concerning specifications and intended usage are listed for 145 instruments from 38 manufactures.

  20. Measurement of the Average $B^{0}_{s}$ Lifetime in the Decay $B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\Psi\\Phi$

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, Thilo

    2003-01-01

    The lifetime difference between the long (CP odd) and short (CP even) lived components of the Bg meson is currently predicted to be of the order of 10 % in the Standard Model. It has been suggested that the decay Bg —>• J/\\|> 4) is predominantly CP even and thus the measured average lifetime could be shorter than the lifetime measured in the inclusive decay modes. We present a measurement of the average lifetime of the 6° meson in its decay Eg —>• J/4> cj), with J/\\|) —> M.+ M.~ and cj) —>• K+K-. During January 2002 and August 2003 the CDF experiment at the Tevatron has been exposed to about 135 pb" 1 of pp collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of A/S = 1.96 TeV. In the data sample collected with the J/\\Jj dimuon trigger we fully reconstruct about 125 Bg —> J/\\J) (J) candidates with precision silicon information. This is currently the largest exclusive Bg sample. We perform a fit to the proper decay time information to extract the average Bg lifetime and simultaneously use the mass information to disentangle signal from background. For cross-checks we measure the lifetime in the higher statistics modes Bj -» J/\\J> K* and B° —> J/4> K*°, which both have similar decay topologies and kinematics. We obtain r(B°s -> J/\\|> cf>) = (1.31±5:l3(stat.) ± 0.02(syst.)) ps , which is currently the best single measurement of the Bg lifetime and is consistent with other measurements. This result is not accurate enough to establish the existence of a possible significant lifetime difference between the CP odd and even states.

  1. XUV polarimeter for undulator radiation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gluskin, E.; Mattson, J.E.; Bader, S.D.; Viccaro, P.J. ); Barbee, T.W. Jr. ); Brookes, N. ); Pitas, A. ); Watts, R. )

    1991-01-01

    A polarimeter for x-ray and vacuum ultraviolet (XUV) radiation was built to measure the spatial spectral dependence of the polarization of the light produced by the new undulator at the U5 beamline at NSLS. The fourth-harmonic radiation was measured, and it does not agree with predictions based on ideal simulation codes in the far-field approximation. 13 ref., 7 figs.

  2. Silicon microstrip detectors and the measurement of lifetimes of charmed hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Masciocchi, Silvia

    1996-10-16

    WA89 is a fixed target experiment with a 340 GeV/c hyperon beam at the SPS at CERN. One of the main topics of its physics program is the study of the properties of charmed baryons. For the measurement of their lifetimes, silicon microstrip detectors are an essential tool to measure with the required resolution the production and the decay point of short living particles. The development and the test of a system with double sided counters and zero suppression readout has been presented. The device is now installed at the “next generation” hyperon beam experiment SELEX at Fermilab, downstream of the vertex area. The success of the project supports the possibility of including double sided detectors close to the vertex area to limit the amount of scattering material and improve pattern recognition.

  3. RDDS lifetime measurements of low-lying superdeformed states in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, R.; Dewald, A.; Kruecken, R.

    1996-12-31

    The lifetimes of three low-lying states in the superdeformed (SD) yrast band of {sup 194}Hg were measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The deduced transition quadrupole moments, Q{sub t}, equal those extracted from a DSAM measurement for the high-lying states of the band corroborate the assumption that the decay out of SD bands does not strongly affect the structure of the corresponding states. By a simple mixing-model the decay can be described assuming a very small admixture of normal-deformed (ND) states to the decaying SD states. The deduced ND mixing amplitudes for the yrast SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg and {sup 194}Pb are presented along with average transition quadrupole moments for the lower parts of the excited SD bands.

  4. Centrifugal stretching from lifetime measurements in the 170Hf ground state band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Terry, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Petkov, P.; Berant, Z.; Casperson, R. J.; Heinz, A.; Henning, G.; Lüttke, R.; Qian, J.; Shoraka, B.; Rainovski, G.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.

    2013-04-01

    Centrifugal stretching in the deformed rare-earth nucleus 170Hf is investigated using high-precision lifetime measurements, performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University. Excited states were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 124Sn(50Ti,4n)170Hf at a beam energy of 195 MeV. Recoil distance doppler shift data were recorded for the ground state band through the J=16+ level. The measured B(E2) values and transition quadrupole moments improve on existing data and show increasing β deformation in the ground state band of 170Hf. The results are compared to descriptions by a rigid rotor and by the confined β-soft rotor model.

  5. Lifetime measurement for the possible antimagnetic rotation band in 101Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Hayakawa, T.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.; Osa, A.; Matsuda, M.; Shizuma, T.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Kusakari, H.; Morikawa, T.; Gan, Z. G.; Czosnyka, T.

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime measurements were made for the ν h11 /2 band in 101Pd , which had been interpreted as a possible antimagnetic rotation band based on the comparison of I -ω behavior with the calculation of a semiclassical particle-rotor model in our previous study. Doppler broadened line shapes were analyzed for the decaying γ rays in the band following the reaction 68Zn (37Cl ,1p3n)101Pd . The semiclassical particle-rotor model was modified to reproduce both the I -ω plot and the B (E 2 ) behavior simultaneously for the antimagnetic rotation bands in Pd and Cd nuclei, for which B (E 2 ) values had been measured so far. Reasonable agreements between the experiment and the calculation were obtained. It is concluded that the lower part of the ν h11 /2 band in 101Pd can be interpreted as an antimagnetic rotor.

  6. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navrátil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; Fallon, P.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Loelius, C.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Morse, C.; Parker, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Recchia, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-12-01

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1 /2+ and 5 /2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B (M 1 ;1 /2+→3 /2g.s . +) =1 .04-0.12+0.03×10-2μN2 and B (M 1 ;5 /2+→3 /2g.s . +) =7 .12-0.96+1.27×10-2μN2 . The quenched M 1 transition strength for the 1 /2+→3 /2g.s . + transition, with respect to the 5 /2+→3 /2g.s . + transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. The current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  7. SPS Outstanding Student Award for Undergraduate Research Talk: Lifetime Measurements and Deformation in 79Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Kaye, Robert; Arora, S. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Doring, J.; Sun, Y.; Baldwin, T. D.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Cooper, M. W.; Gerbick, S. M.; Wiedeking, M.; Hoffman, C. R.; Pavan, J.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Riley, L. A.

    2008-04-01

    High-spin states in ^79Sr were produced following the ^54Fe(^28Si, 2pn) fusion-evaporation reaction using a beam kinetic energy of 90 MeV at the Florida State University (FSU) Tandem-Linac particle accelerator facility, and the resulting de-exciting γ rays were detected with the FSU array of 10 Compton-suppressed high-purity Ge detectors comprised of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The synthesized nuclei were stopped completely in the target, resulting in Doppler-shifted γ-ray line shapes that could be analyzed using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The experimental line shapes were acquired at detection angles of 35 and 145 , and the resulting Doppler-shifted peaks were analyzed to extract the lifetime of their parent states. In all, 23 lifetimes were measured in three separate band structures using this method, and then used to infer transition quadrupole moments (Qt) and quadrupole deformations (β2) using the rotational model. The resulting Qt values indicated a high degree of collectivity and deformation in all three observed sequences of excited states (bands) with only a modest decline in collectivity with increasing angular momentum. The results show good qualitative agreement with the predictions of both cranked Woods-Saxon (CWS) and projected shell model (PSM) calculations. In addition, the pattern of excited energy states and their de-exciting gamma-ray transitions (level scheme) was re-examined and compared to the most recent study of ^79Sr using γ-γ coincidence measurements, intensity measurements, and directional correlation of oriented nuclei (DCO) ratios in addition to the lifetime measurements. Overall, the level scheme was verified, with the exception of the re-arrangement of one transition. The band based on the intrinsic d5/2 single-particle orbital from the shell model, was found to have the largest average deformation (β2,ave = 0.41) among the three observed bands, in agreement with the CWS and PSM

  8. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  9. Lifetime Measurements of ^170Hf and a test of the Confined Beta Soft Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Werner, V.; Heinz, A.; Terry, J. R.; Qian, J.; Winkler, R.; Casperson, R.; Williams, E.; Berant, Z.; L"Uttke, R.; Shoraka, B.; Henning, G.

    2009-10-01

    Significant deviations from rigid rotor model energy level predictions have been known to occur in rare earth nuclei. Recently, it was shown these deviations may be caused by centrifugal stretching effects within the nucleus [1]. New geometrical models have been proposed that account for centrifugal stretching, such as the confined beta soft model (CBS). We present the results from a high precision lifetime experiment performed with the New Yale Plunger Device at WNSL, Yale University. The ground state band of ^170Hf was measured through the J=12^+ level using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift method. Excited states were populated in the ^124Sn(^50Ti,γ)^170Hf fusion evaporation reaction. Using the lifetimes, the B(E2) values and the quadrupole deformation parameter are determined. Centrifugal stretching is observed as an increased deviation in energy at higher spins in 170Hf. These results are compared to theoretical predictions from the CBS rotor model. Supported by grant DE-FG02-91ER40609.[4pt] [1] Costin et al, Phys.Rev. C 79, 024307 (2009)

  10. Single-shot lifetime-based PSP and TSP measurements on turbocharger compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Jiao, Lingrui; Yu, Yuelong; Liu, Yingzheng; Oshio, Tetsuya; Kawakubo, Tomoki; Yakushiji, Akimitsu

    2017-09-01

    Fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (Fast PSP) and temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) measurements were conducted on two turbocharger compressors using a single-shot lifetime-based technique. The fast PSP and TSP were applied on separate blades of one compressor, and both paints were excited by a pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser. The luminescent decay signals following the laser pulse were recorded by a CCD camera in a double-exposure mode. Instantaneous pressure and temperature fields on compressor blades were obtained simultaneously, for rotation speeds up to 150,000 rpm. The variations in pressure and temperature fields with rotation speed, flow rate and runtime were clearly visualized, showing the advantage of high spatial resolution. Severe image blurring problems and significant temperature-induced errors in the PSP results were found at high rotation speeds. The first issue was addressed by incorporating a deconvolution-based deblurring algorithm to recover the clear image from the blurred image using the combination of luminescent lifetime and rotation speed. The second issue was resolved by applying a pixel-by-pixel temperature correction based on the TSP results. The current technique has shown great capabilities in flow diagnostics of turbomachinery and can serve as a powerful tool for CFD validations and design optimizations.

  11. Shot noise as a measure of the lifetime and energy splitting of Majorana bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Hai-Feng; Guo, Zhen; Ke, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    We propose a scheme to measure the lifetime and energy splitting of a pair of Majorana bound states at the ends of a superconducting nanowire by using the shot noise in a dynamical channel blockade system. A quantum dot is coupled to one end of the wire and connected with two electron reservoirs. It is found that a finite Majorana energy splitting tends to produce a super-Poissonian shot noise, while Majorana relaxation process relieves the dynamical channel blockade and suppresses the noise Fano factor. When the dot energy level locates in the middle of the gap of topological superconductor, the Fano factor is independent on Majorana lifetime and Majorana energy splitting is thus extracted. For a finite energy splitting, we could evaluate the Majorana relaxation rate from the suppression of Fano factor. Under a realistic condition, the expected resolution of Majorana energy splitting and its relaxation rate calculated from our model are about 1μeV and 0.01−1μeV, respectively.

  12. Z =50 core stability in 110Sn from magnetic-moment and lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbartzki, G. J.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Speidel, K.-H.; Torres, D. A.; Allmond, J. M.; Fallon, P.; Abramovic, I.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J. E.; Crawford, H. L.; Guevara, Z. E.; Gürdal, G.; Hurst, A. M.; Kirsch, L.; Laplace, T. A.; Lo, A.; Matthews, E. F.; Mayers, I.; Phair, L. W.; Ramirez, F.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Wiens, A.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The structure of the semimagic 50Sn isotopes were previously studied via measurements of B (E 2 ;21+→01+ ) and g factors of 21+ states. The values of the B (E 2 ;21+ ) in the isotopes below midshell at N = 66 show an enhancement in collectivity, contrary to predictions from shell-model calculations. Purpose: This work presents the first measurement of the 2 1+ and 4 1+ states' magnetic moments in the unstable neutron-deficient 110Sn. The g factors provide complementary structure information to the interpretation of the observed B (E 2 ) values. Methods: The 110Sn nuclei have been produced in inverse kinematics in an α -particle transfer reaction from 12C to 106Cd projectiles at 390, 400, and 410 MeV. The g factors have been measured with the transient field technique. Lifetimes have been determined from line shapes using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Results: The g factors of the 21+ and 41+ states in 110Sn are g (21+) = +0.29(11) and g (41+) = +0.05(14), respectively. In addition, the g (41+) = +0.27(6) in 106Cd has been measured for the first time. A line-shape analysis yielded τ (110Sn ; 21+) = 0.81(10) ps and a lifetime of τ (110Sn ; 31-) = 0.25(5) ps was calculated from the fully Doppler-shifted γ line. Conclusions: No evidence has been found in 110Sn that would require excitation of protons from the closed Z =50 core.

  13. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  14. Evaluation of arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Nievergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2011-08-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  15. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Niebergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW) and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW), radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  16. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Racquel E.; Sheets, Nathan C.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Nutting, Chris; Hall, Emma; Chera, Bhishamjit S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  17. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  18. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    PubMed Central

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D.; Wilkinson, Martin G.; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A. E.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening. PMID:25798136

  19. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed. PMID:28091553

  20. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  1. Microscopic imaging of intracellular calcium in live cells using lifetime-based ratiometric measurements of Oregon Green BAPTA-1.

    PubMed

    Lattarulo, Carli; Thyssen, Diana; Kuchibholta, Kishore V; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskaiq, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger that has important functions in normal neuronal function. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to alter calcium homeostasis in neurons and astrocytes. Several calcium dye indicators are available to measure intracellular calcium within cells, including Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB-1). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we adapted this single wavelength calcium dye into a ratiometric dye to allow quantitative imaging of cellular calcium. We used this approach for in vitro calibrations, single-cell microscopy, high-throughput imaging in automated plate readers, and in single cells in the intact living brain. While OGB is a commonly used fluorescent dye for imaging calcium qualitatively, there are distinct advantages to using a ratiometric approach, which allows quantitative determinations of calcium that are independent of dye concentration. Taking advantage of the distinct lifetime contrast of the calcium-free and calcium-bound forms of OGB, we used time-domain lifetime measurements to generate calibration curves for OGB lifetime ratios as a function of calcium concentration. In summary, we demonstrate approaches using commercially available tools to measure calcium concentrations in live cells at multiple scales using lifetime contrast. These approaches are broadly applicable to other fluorescent readouts that exhibit lifetime contrast and serve as powerful alternatives to spectral or intensity readouts in multiplexing experiments.

  2. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  3. Measurement of the B(0) and B(+) meson lifetimes with fully reconstructed hadronic final states.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D W; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weideman, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, L; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-12

    The B(0) and B(+) meson lifetimes have been measured in e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected in 1999 and 2000 with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. Events are selected in which one B meson is fully reconstructed in a hadronic final state while the second B meson is reconstructed inclusively. A combined fit to the B(0) and the B(+) decay time difference distributions yields tau(B(0)) = 1.546+/-0.032(stat)+/-0.022(syst) ps, tau(B(+)) = 1.673+/-0.032(stat)+/-0.023(syst) ps, and tau(B(+))/tau(B(0)) = 1.082+/-0.026(stat)+/-0.012(syst).

  4. Lifetime measurements of yrast states in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchan, E.A.; Casten, R.F.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Heinz, A.; Meyer, D.A.; Plettner, C.; Qian, J.; Ressler, J.J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.; Zamfir, N.V.; Babilon, M.; Brenner, D.S.; Guerdal, G.; Hughes, R.O.; Thomas, N.J.

    2006-03-15

    Lifetime measurements of yrast levels in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf were performed using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method in coincidence mode. Excited states in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf were populated via the reactions {sup 116}Cd({sup 50}Ti, 4n) and {sup 122}Sn({sup 48}Ti, 4n), respectively. The resulting B(E2) values are compared with the X(5) critical point model predictions and interacting boson approximation (IBA) model calculations. The X(5) model provides a reasonable description of the yrast B(E2) values in {sup 166}Hf, whereas the IBA fails to reproduce the transition strengths from the higher spin levels. In {sup 162}Yb, some transitions agree with the X(5) predictions while others are more consistent with the predictions of the IBA or a deformed symmetric rotor.

  5. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosive molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    McKenzie-Coe, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-08-21

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailor the stability of the molecular adduct complex. The flexibility of TIMS to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments/low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with high confidence levels.

  6. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} State in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Paschalis, S.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gros, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Lee, I. Y.; Starosta, K.; Baugher, T.; Gade, A.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Voss, P.; Walsh, K. A.; Bazin, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Weisshaar, D.

    2011-09-02

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub 2{sub 1}{sup +}}=9.8{+-}2.8(stat){sub -1.1}{sup +0.5}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub g.s.}{sup +})=7.5{sub -1.7}{sup +3.0}(stat){sub -0.4}{sup +1.0}(syst) e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  7. Lifetime measurement of the 2(1)+ state in 20C.

    PubMed

    Petri, M; Fallon, P; Macchiavelli, A O; Paschalis, S; Starosta, K; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Cartegni, L; Clark, R M; Crawford, H L; Cromaz, M; Dewald, A; Gade, A; Grinyer, G F; Gros, S; Hackstein, M; Jeppesen, H B; Lee, I Y; McDaniel, S; Miller, D; Rajabali, M M; Ratkiewicz, A; Rother, W; Voss, P; Walsh, K A; Weisshaar, D; Wiedeking, M; Brown, B A

    2011-09-02

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2(1)+ state in the near-dripline nucleus 20C. The deduced value of τ(2(1)+)=9.8±2.8(stat)(-1.1)(+0.5)(syst)  ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2; 2(1)+→0(g.s.)+)=7.5(-1.7)(+3.0)(stat)(-0.4)(+1.0)(syst)  e2  fm4 in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  8. Shape coexistence from lifetime and branching-ratio measurements in 68,70Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, B. P.; Prokop, C. J.; Liddick, S. N.; Al-Shudifat, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chen, J.; Chiara, C. J.; David, H. M.; Dombos, A. C.; Go, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Harker, J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Larson, N.; Lauritsen, T.; Lewis, R.; Quinn, S. J.; Recchia, F.; Spyrou, A.; Suchyta, S.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Shape coexistence near closed-shell nuclei, whereby states associated with deformed shapes appear at relatively low excitation energy alongside spherical ones, is indicative of the rapid change in structure that can occur with the addition or removal of a few protons or neutrons. Near 68Ni (Z = 28, N = 40), the identification of shape coexistence hinges on hitherto undetermined transition rates to and from low-energy 0+ states. In 68,70Ni, new lifetimes and branching ratios have been measured. These data enable quantitative descriptions of the 0+ states through the deduced transition rates and serve as sensitive probes for characterizing their nuclear wave functions. The results are compared to, and consistent with, large-scale shell-model calculations which predict shape coexistence. With the firm identification of this phenomenon near 68Ni, shape coexistence is now observed in all currently accessible regions of the nuclear chart with closed proton shells and mid-shell neutrons.

  9. Radiation budget measurement/model interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Ciesielski, P.; Randel, D.; Stevens, D.

    1983-01-01

    This final report includes research results from the period February, 1981 through November, 1982. Two new results combine to form the final portion of this work. They are the work by Hanna (1982) and Stevens to successfully test and demonstrate a low-order spectral climate model and the work by Ciesielski et al. (1983) to combine and test the new radiation budget results from NIMBUS-7 with earlier satellite measurements. Together, the two related activities set the stage for future research on radiation budget measurement/model interfacing. Such combination of results will lead to new applications of satellite data to climate problems. The objectives of this research under the present contract are therefore satisfied. Additional research reported herein includes the compilation and documentation of the radiation budget data set a Colorado State University and the definition of climate-related experiments suggested after lengthy analysis of the satellite radiation budget experiments.

  10. Direction finding measurements of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Baumback, M. M.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Direction finding measurements with plasma wave experiments onboard the Hawkeye-1 and IMP-8 satellites were used to locate the source region of auroral kilometric radiation. The radiation exhibits peak intensities between about 100 kHz and 300 kHz, and emits intense sporadic bursts lasting for between one half hour to several hours. The total power emitted in this frequency range exceeds 10 to the 9th power watts at peak intensity. The occurrence of the radiation is known to be closely associated with bright auroral arcs which occur in the local evening auroral regions.