Science.gov

Sample records for radiatively cooled plasma

  1. Radiative cooling of a hydrogen plasma in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickford, G. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A method of computing radiative cooling of a hydrogen plasma assuming quasi-isothermal radiative transfer is described. A comparison with nonisothermal calculations for a plane parallel slab indicates good agreement for temperature gradients up to 300 K/cm. The calculations are compared with shock-tube data obtained in the JPL high-performance shock-tube facility. The calculations agreed with the data for one run but were 20 percent high for the other. Due to greater radiative cooling at the test slug boundaries a lateral temperature variation typically exists. This would cause the intensity measurement, which is integrated across the diameter of the test slug, to be below the prediction.

  2. Expansion of radiative cooling of the laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Chunyi; Greif, Ralph; Russo,Richard

    2006-05-05

    To study the expansion and cooling process of the laser induced plasma generated by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation, experiments have been conducted which measure the position of the external shockwaves and the temperature of the vapor plumes. The positions of external shockwaves were determined by a femtosecond laser time-resolved imaging system. Vapor plume temperature was determined from spectroscopic measurements of the plasma emission lines. A model which considers the mass, momentum, and energy conservation of the region affected by the laser energy was developed. It shows good agreement to the experimental data.

  3. Plasma acceleration and cooling by strong laser field due to the action of radiation reaction force.

    PubMed

    Berezhiani, V I; Mahajan, S M; Yoshida, Z

    2008-12-01

    It is shown that for super intense laser pulses propagating in a hot plasma, the action of the radiation reaction force (appropriately incorporated into the equations of motion) causes strong bulk plasma motion with the kinetic energy raised even to relativistic values; the increase in bulk energy is accompanied by a corresponding cooling (intense cooling) of the plasma. The effects are demonstrated through explicit analytical calculations.

  4. Experiments With Radiatively Cooled Supersonic Plasma Jets Generated in Conical Wire Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Naz, N.; Haines, M. G.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Gardiner, T.

    2002-12-01

    We present results of astrophysically relevant experiments where highly supersonic plasma jets are generated via conically convergent plasma flows in a conical wire array Z-pinch. Stagnation of plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock effectively collimating the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Canto and collaborators [1] as a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for jet formation in astrophysical systems. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a hypersonic (M ~ 20), well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant.

  5. Radiation cooling and gain calculation for C VI 182 A line in C/Se plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, C.H.; Valeo, E.; Suckewer, S.; Feldman, U.

    1986-04-01

    A model is developed which is capable of describing the evolution of gain resulting from both rapid radiative and expansion cooling of a recombining, freely expanding plasma. It is demonstrated for the particular case of a carbon/selenium plasma that the cooling rate which leads to optimal gain can be achieved by adjusting the admixture of an efficiently radiating material (selenium) in the gain medium (carbon). Comparison is made to a recent observation of gain in a recent NRL/Rochester experiment with carbon/selenium plasma for the n = 3 ..-->.. 2 transition in C VI occurring at 182 A. The predicted maximum gain is approx.10 cm/sup -1/, as compared to observation of 2 to 3 cm/sup -1/.

  6. Application of the theory of damping of kink oscillations by radiative cooling of coronal loop plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. J.; Erdélyi, R.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We present here a first comparative study between the observed damping of numerous fast kink oscillations and the theoretical model of their damping due to the cooling of coronal loops. The theory of damping of kink oscillations due to radiation of the solar plasma with a temporally varying background is applied here to all known cases of coronal kink oscillations. Methods: A recent dynamic model of cooling coronal loops predicts that transverse oscillations of such loops could be significantly damped due to the radiative cooling process (Morton & Erdélyi 2009, ApJ, 707, 750). The cooling of the loop plasma also has the consequence that the kink oscillation has a time-dependent frequency. The theory is applied to a relatively large number of known and reported examples of TRACE observations of damped kink oscillations. Results: We find that, for cooling timescales that are typical of EUV loops (500-2000 s), the observed damping of the transversal (i.e. kink) oscillations can be accounted for almost entirely by the cooling process in half of the examples. No other dissipative mechanism(s) seems to be needed to model the damping. In the remaining other examples, the cooling process does not appear to be able to account fully for the observed damping, though could still have a significant influence on the damping. In these cases another mechanism(s), e.g. resonant absorption, may be additionally required to account for the complete decay of oscillations. Also, we show that because of the dynamic nature of the background plasma, allowing for a time-dependent frequency provides a better fit profile for the data points of observations than a fit profile with a constant frequency, opening novel avenues for solar magneto-seismology.

  7. Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion using highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, plasma slugs.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, J P; Dunne, M; Zepf, M; Lebedev, S V; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N

    2002-06-10

    We present a new approach to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion which makes use of highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, slugs of plasma to energize a hohlraum. 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of slug formation in shaped liner Z-pinch implosions are presented along with 2D-radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the slug impacting a converter foil and 3D-view-factor simulations of a double-ended hohlraum. Results for the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory indicate that two synchronous slugs of 250 kJ kinetic energy could be produced, resulting in a capsule surface temperature of approximately 225 eV.

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics and Collimated Stellar Outflows: The Production of Radiatively Cooled Hypersonic Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Beg, F. N.; Bland, S. N.; Ciardi, A.; Ampleford, D.; Hughes, S.; Haines, M. G.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.; Gardiner, T.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first results of astrophysically relevant experiments where highly supersonic plasma jets are generated via conically convergent flows. The convergent flows are created by electrodynamic acceleration of plasma in a conical array of fine metallic wires (a modification of the wire array Z-pinch). Stagnation of plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock effectively collimating the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Cantó and collaborators as a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for jet formation in astrophysical systems. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe, and W) show that a highly supersonic (M~20), well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant. We discuss scaling issues for the experiments and their potential use for numerical code verification. The experiments also may allow direct exploration of astrophysically relevant issues such as collimation, stability, and jet-cloud interactions.

  9. Radiatively cooled supersonic plasma jets generated in wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Simon; Lebedev, Sergey; Chittenden, Jerry; Beg, F. N.; Ciardi, A.; Haines, M. G.

    2000-10-01

    We will present experiments on the generation of a highly supersonic plasma jet by a convergent plasma flow, produced by electrodynamic acceleration of plasma in a conical array of fine metallic wires (a modification of the wire array Z-pinch [1]). Stagnation of the plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock, which effectively collimates the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Cantó et al. [2] as a possible, purely hydrodynamic mechanism of jet formation in young stellar objects. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a highly supersonic (M 20) and a well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant. The interaction of this jet with a plasma target could be used for scaled [3] laboratory astrophysical experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities in decelerated plasma flow. [1] M.K. Matzen, Phys. Plasmas v.4, 1519 (1997) [2] J. Cantó, et. al. Astron. Astrophys. v.192, 287 (1994). [3] D. Ryutov et al., ApJ, v.518, 821 (1999)

  10. Radiative cooling efficiencies and predicted spectra of species of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemansky, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of the physical condition of the Io plasma torus have been made based on the recent Voyager EUV observations. The calculations represent an assumed thin plasma collisional ionization equilibrium among the states within each species. The observations of the torus are all consistent with this condition. The major energy loss mechanism is radiative cooling in discrete transitions. Calculations of radiative cooling efficiencies of the identified species leads to an estimated energy loss rate of at least 1.5 x 10 to the 12th watts. The mean electron temperature and density of the plasma are estimated to be 100,000 K and 2100/cu cm. The estimated number densities of S III, S IV, and O III are roughly 95, 80, and 190-740/cu cm. Upper limits have been placed on a number of other species based on the first published Voyager EUV spectrum of the torus. The assumption that energy is supplied to the torus through injection of neutral particles from Io leads to the conclusion that ion loss rates are controlled by diffusion, and relative species abundances consequently are not controlled by collisional ionization equilibrium.

  11. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  12. The structure of shocks with thermal conduction and radiative cooling. [in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, Cedric G.

    1988-01-01

    A general analysis is presented of the structure of a steady state, plane-parallel shock wave in which both thermal conduction and radiative cooling are important. The fluid is assumed to have a perfect-gas equation of state, with radiative cooling a function only of its temperature and density. Conduction in both diffusive and saturated regimes is treated. For the case of a strong shock, with conductivity and cooling function varying as power laws in temperature, approximate analytic solutions describing the shock wave are derived. For a plasma of solar composition, conduction is found to have a significant effect on the shock temperature and overall thickness of the postshock layer only for shock velocities greater than about 30,000 km/s, corresponding to shock temperatures greater than about 10 to the 10th K, but it affects the local structure of parts of the shock wave at much lower velocities. The effects of conduction are greatly enhanced if the heavy-element abundance is increased.

  13. Effect of ion radiative cooling on Jeans instability of partially ionized dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerana; Patidar, Archana

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of ion radiative cooling on the gravitational instability of dusty plasma is studied, incorporating dust charge fluctuation with dust-neutral, neutral-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. The basic equations are linearized using normal mode analysis to obtain a general dispersion relation. The general dispersion relation is analytically and numerically discussed to explain the role of ion radiative cooling in the structure formation through gravitational instability. The Jeans collapse criteria are found to be modified due to ion and electron radiative cooling, dust charge fluctuations, and collisions effects. It is determined from the analytical and numerical calculations that the support of radiative cooling of ions drives thermal fluctuations and gives instability to the system. The electron cooling effect remains dominating over ion cooling effect, and thus, it enhances the collapse more efficiently than ion cooling effect. Although the radiative cooling is slow, it may precede the collapse in molecular cloud, which further leads to the structure formation. The present work is relevance for the structure formation in the molecular cloud.

  14. Evidence for gain on the C VI 182 A transition in a radiation-cooled selenium/Formvar plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, J. F.; Brown, C. M.; Feldman, U.; Richardson, M.; Behring, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Thin plastic foils coated with selenium have been irradiated using from 4 to 8 beams of the OMEGA laser in a line focus configuration. Spectra were recorded using a 3 meter spectrograph that viewed the plasma along the line focus. Based on a comparison of the intensities of the spectral lines from plasmas with lengths of 1.7, 3.4, 6.8, and 13.6 mm, the C VI n = 3 to 2 transition at 182 A was anomalously intense in the spectra from the longer plasmas. Calculations indicate that the carbon plasma was cooled by radiation from the highly-charged selenium plasma in a time that was smaller than the expansion time of the plasma. These plasma conditions are favorable for the occurrence of population inversions between the n = 2 and 3 levels of C VI resulting from recombination and cascading from higher levels. The measured gain coefficient for the C VI 182 A transition is 3/cm, and this corresponds to a gain-length product of 4 in the longest plasma.

  15. Interaction of radiatively cooled plasma jets with static gas and collimated supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Skidmore, J.; Bocchi, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; de Grouchy, P.; Hall, G. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L. A.; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Krishnan, M.; Madden, R. E.; Elliot, K. W.; Coleman, P. L.; Ciardi, A.

    2011-10-01

    The MAGPIE generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns) drives an ablative plasma from a thin Al foil. The convergence of the plasma from the foil on its axis leads to the formation of a supersonic plasma jet, with a typical velocity of ~100 km/s. Jet-ambient interactions are studied either by injecting a highly-collimated, supersonic, cold gas jet above the foil using a nozzle, or by enclosing the foil inside a cell filled with neutral, static gas. In both cases, the plasma jet creates several shock features in the ambient medium. Experimental results from varied ambient parameters such as gas pressure and composition are presented together with 3-D MHD simulations. Work supported at AASC by DOE SBIR Grant DE-FG02-08ER85030, and at Imperial College by EPSRC Grant No. EP/G001324/1, by the NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreements No. DE-F03-02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063, and by a Marie Curie ERG grant.

  16. Radiative cooling for thermophotovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Sun, Xingshu; Bermel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Radiative cooling has recently garnered a great deal of attention for its potential as an alternative method for photovoltaic thermal management. Here, we will consider the limits of radiative cooling for thermal management of electronics broadly, as well as a specific application to thermal power generation. We show that radiative cooling power can increase rapidly with temperature, and is particularly beneficial in systems lacking standard convective cooling. This finding indicates that systems previously operating at elevated temperatures (e.g., 80°C) can be passively cooled close to ambient under appropriate conditions with a reasonable cooling area. To examine these general principles for a previously unexplored application, we consider the problem of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion of heat to electricity via thermal radiation illuminating a photovoltaic diode. Since TPV systems generally operate in vacuum, convective cooling is sharply limited, but radiative cooling can be implemented with proper choice of materials and structures. In this work, realistic simulations of system performance are performed using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) techniques to capture thermal emitter radiation, PV diode absorption, and radiative cooling. We subsequently optimize the structural geometry within realistic design constraints to find the best configurations to minimize operating temperature. It is found that low-iron soda-lime glass can potentially cool the PV diode by a substantial amount, even to below ambient temperatures. The cooling effect can be further improved by adding 2D-periodic photonic crystal structures. We find that the improvement of efficiency can be as much as an 18% relative increase, relative to the non-radiatively cooled baseline, as well as a potentially significant improvement in PV diode lifetime.

  17. Radiative power and electron cooling rates for oxygen in steady-state and transient plasmas at densities beyond the coronal limit

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, C.; Skinner, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a time-dependent, collisional-radiative model to calculate radiative power and electron cooling rates for oxygen at intermediate densities (10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ less than or equal to n/sub e/ less than or equal to 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/) where the usual coronal approximation is not valid. Large differences from coronal values are predicted. The behavior of the steady-state radiative power loss coefficient, L/sub Z, is investigated as the electron density is increased. Generalized power loss coefficients applicable to transient plasmas are derived and applied to ionizing and recombining oxygen plasmas. Time-dependent effects are found to play a large role both in terms of the total radiated power and the net electron energy loss rate. 41 refs., 11 figs.

  18. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation Cooling in Textor-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A. M.

    1996-11-01

    A new discharge regime has been observed on the pumped limiter tokamak TEXTOR-94 in the presence of strong radiation cooling and for different scenarii of additional hearing. The radiated power fraction (up to 90%) is feedback controlled by the amount of Ne seeded in the edge. This regime meets many of the necessary conditions for a future fusion reactor. Energy confinement increases with increasing densities (reminiscent of the Z-mode obtained at ISX-B) and as good as ELM-free H-mode confinement (enhancement factor verus ITERH93-P up to 1.2) is obtained at high densities (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit) with peaked density profiles showing a peaking factor of about 2 and central density values around 10^14cm-3. In experiments where the energy content of the discharges is kept constant with an energy feedback loop acting on the amount of ICRH power, stable and stationary discharges are obtained for intervals of more than 5s, i.e. 100 times the energy confinement time or about equal to the skin resistive time, even with the cylindrical q_α as low as 2.8 β-values up to the β-limits of TEXTOR-94 are achieved (i.e. β n ≈ 2 of and β p ≈ 1.5) and the figure of merit for ignition margin f_Hqa in these discharges can be as high as 0.7. No detrimental effects of the seeded impurity on the reactivity of the plasma are observed. He removal in these discharges has also been investigated. [1] Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association "EURATOM-Belgian State", Ecole Royale Militaire-Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels, Belgium [2] Institut für Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, GmbH, Association "EURATOM-KFA", Jülich, Germany [3] Fusion Energy Research Program, Mechanical Engineering Division, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, USA [4] FOM Institüt voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie "FOM-EURATOM", Nieuwegein, The Netherlands [*] Researcher at NFSR, Belgium itemize

  19. Synchrotron cooling and annihilation of an e/+/-e/-/ plasma - The radiation mechanism for the 5 March, 1979 transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Bussard, R. W.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Positron-electron pair radiation is examined as a mechanism that could be responsible for the impulsive phase emission of the 5 March, 1979 transient. Synchrotron cooling and subsequent annihilation of the pairs can account for the energy spectrum, the very high brightness, and the 0.4 MeV feature observed from this transient, whose source is likely to be a neutron star in the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In this model, the observed radiation is produced in the skin layer of a hot, radiation-dominated pair atmosphere, probably confined to the vicinity of the neutron star by a strong magnetic field. In this layer, about 10 to the 12th generations of pairs are formed (by photon-photon collisions), cooled and annihilated during the 0.15 s duration of the impulsive phase.

  20. Radiative cooling for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Wang, Ken X.; Anoma, Marc A.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-03-01

    Standard solar cells heat up under sunlight, and the resulting increased temperature of the solar cell has adverse consequences on both its efficiency and its reliability. We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the operating temperature of a solar cell through sky access, while maintaining its sunlight absorption. We present first an ideal scheme for the radiative cooling of solar cells. For an example case of a bare crystalline silicon solar cell, we show that the ideal scheme can passively lower the operating temperature by 18.3 K. We then show a microphotonic design based on realistic material properties, that approaches the performance of the ideal scheme. We also show that the radiative cooling effect is substantial, even in the presence of significant non-radiative heat change, and parasitic solar absorption in the cooling layer, provided that we design the cooling layer to be sufficiently thin.

  1. Synchrotron cooling and annihilation of an E(+)-E(-) plasma: The radiation mechanism for the March 5, 1979 transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Bussard, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Positron-electron pair radiation is examined as a mechanism that could be responsible for the impulsive phase emission of the March 5, 1979 transient. Synchrotron cooling and subsequent annihilation of the pairs can account for the energy spectrum, the very high brightness, and the approximately 0.4 MeV feature observed from this transient, whose source is likely to be a neutron star in the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In this model, the observed radiation is produced in the skin layer of a hot, radiation dominated pair atmosphere, probably confined to the vicinity of the neutron star by a strong magnetic field. The width of this layer is only about 0.1 mm. In this layer, approximately 10 to the 12th power generations of pairs are formed (by photon-photon collisions), cooled and annihilated during the approximately 0.15 sec duration of the impulsive phase. The very large burst energy implied by the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and its very rapid release, are unsolved problems. Nonetheless, the possibility of neutron star vibrations, which could transport the energy coherently to the surface, heat the atmosphere mechanically to a hot, pair-producing temperature, and have a characteristic damping time roughly equal to the duration of the impulsive phase are addressed.

  2. Bow shocks in ablated plasma streams for nested wire array z-pinches: A laboratory astrophysics testbed for radiatively cooled shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bott, S. C.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.; Ciardi, A.

    2010-05-15

    Astrophysical observations have demonstrated many examples of bow shocks, for example, the head of protostellar jets or supernova remnants passing through the interstellar medium or between discrete clumps in jets. For such systems where supersonic and super-Alfvenic flows and radiative cooling are all important, carefully scaled laboratory experiments can add insight into the physical processes involved. The early stage of a wire array z-pinch implosion consists of the steady ablation of material from fine metallic wires. Ablated material is accelerated toward the array axis by the JxB force. This flow is highly supersonic (M>5) and becomes super-Alfvenic (M{sub A}>2). Radiative cooling is significant in this flow and can be controlled by varying the material in the ablated plasma. The introduction of wires as obstructions in this steady flow leads to the formation of bow shocks, which can be used as a laboratory testbed for astrophysical bow shocks. The magnetic field associated with this obstruction wire can be controlled by varying the current through it. Differences in the shock for different cooling rates and different magnetic fields associated with the obstruction will be discussed, along with comparisons of dimensionless parameters in the experiments to astrophysical systems.

  3. Cooling of solar flares plasmas. 1: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Mariska, John T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the cooling of flare plasma are reexamined. By assuming that the cooling occurs in two separate phase where conduction and radiation, respectively, dominate, a simple analytic formula for the cooling time of a flare plasma is derived. Unlike earlier order-of-magnitude scalings, this result accounts for the effect of the evolution of the loop plasma parameters on the cooling time. When the conductive cooling leads to an 'evaporation' of chromospheric material, the cooling time scales L(exp 5/6)/p(exp 1/6), where the coronal phase (defined as the time maximum temperature). When the conductive cooling is static, the cooling time scales as L(exp 3/4)n(exp 1/4). In deriving these results, use was made of an important scaling law (T proportional to n(exp 2)) during the radiative cooling phase that was forst noted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations (Serio et al. 1991; Jakimiec et al. 1992). Our own simulations show that this result is restricted to approximately the radiative loss function of Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana (1978). for different radiative loss functions, other scaling result, with T and n scaling almost linearly when the radiative loss falls off as T(exp -2). It is shown that these scaling laws are part of a class of analytic solutions developed by Antiocos (1980).

  4. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-20

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  5. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. ~5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  6. Nonlinear radiative transfer in high temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2017-10-01

    An approximation to the nonlinear radiative transfer equation is considered in the context of magnetohydrodynamics. This approximation retains nonlinear terms which are responsible for the Compton plasma heating in addition to the radiation cooling. The effect is studied numerically. In particular, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Dai-Woodward case are modeled. It is shown that radiation-plasma coupling results in damping of small scale instabilities and alters the shock wave structure.

  7. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  8. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  9. Radiative Cooling: Principles, Progress, and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Muntasir

    2016-01-01

    The recent progress on radiative cooling reveals its potential for applications in highly efficient passive cooling. This approach utilizes the maximized emission of infrared thermal radiation through the atmospheric window for releasing heat and minimized absorption of incoming atmospheric radiation. These simultaneous processes can lead to a device temperature substantially below the ambient temperature. Although the application of radiative cooling for nighttime cooling was demonstrated a few decades ago, significant cooling under direct sunlight has been achieved only recently, indicating its potential as a practical passive cooler during the day. In this article, the basic principles of radiative cooling and its performance characteristics for nonradiative contributions, solar radiation, and atmospheric conditions are discussed. The recent advancements over the traditional approaches and their material and structural characteristics are outlined. The key characteristics of the thermal radiators and solar reflectors of the current state‐of‐the‐art radiative coolers are evaluated and their benchmarks are remarked for the peak cooling ability. The scopes for further improvements on radiative cooling efficiency for optimized device characteristics are also theoretically estimated. PMID:27812478

  10. Radiative Cooling: Principles, Progress, and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Muntasir; Gu, Min

    2016-07-01

    The recent progress on radiative cooling reveals its potential for applications in highly efficient passive cooling. This approach utilizes the maximized emission of infrared thermal radiation through the atmospheric window for releasing heat and minimized absorption of incoming atmospheric radiation. These simultaneous processes can lead to a device temperature substantially below the ambient temperature. Although the application of radiative cooling for nighttime cooling was demonstrated a few decades ago, significant cooling under direct sunlight has been achieved only recently, indicating its potential as a practical passive cooler during the day. In this article, the basic principles of radiative cooling and its performance characteristics for nonradiative contributions, solar radiation, and atmospheric conditions are discussed. The recent advancements over the traditional approaches and their material and structural characteristics are outlined. The key characteristics of the thermal radiators and solar reflectors of the current state-of-the-art radiative coolers are evaluated and their benchmarks are remarked for the peak cooling ability. The scopes for further improvements on radiative cooling efficiency for optimized device characteristics are also theoretically estimated.

  11. High-power radiating plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the use of radiating plasmas for the optical pumping of lasers are described. Particular consideration is given to the properties of radiating plasmas; radiation selectivity; the dynamics, equilibrium, and stability of radiating plasmas; the radiative Reynolds number; and experimental results on radiating discharges.

  12. Time-dependent Cooling in Photoionized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnat, Orly

    2017-02-01

    I explore the thermal evolution and ionization states in gas cooling from an initially hot state in the presence of external photoionizing radiation. I compute the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooling efficiencies, heating rates, and ion fractions for low-density gas cooling while exposed to the ionizing metagalactic background radiation at various redshifts (z = 0 ‑ 3), for a range of temperatures (108–104 K), densities (10‑7–103 cm‑3), and metallicities (10‑3–2 times solar). The results indicate the existence of a threshold ionization parameter, above which the cooling efficiencies are very close to those in photoionization equilibrium (so that departures from equilibrium may be neglected), and below which the cooling efficiencies resemble those in collisional time-dependent gas cooling with no external radiation (and are thus independent of density).

  13. Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Ulrich; Weitz, Martin

    2009-09-03

    The general idea that optical radiation may cool matter was put forward 80 years ago. Doppler cooling of dilute atomic gases is an extremely successful application of this concept. More recently, anti-Stokes cooling in multilevel systems has been explored, culminating in the optical refrigeration of solids. Collisional redistribution of radiation has been proposed as a different cooling mechanism for atomic two-level systems, although experimental investigations using moderate-density gases have not reached the cooling regime. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of an atomic gas based on collisional redistribution of radiation, using rubidium atoms in argon buffer gas at a pressure of 230 bar. The frequent collisions in the ultradense gas transiently shift a highly red-detuned laser beam (that is, one detuned to a much lower frequency) into resonance, whereas spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed atomic resonance frequency. During each excitation cycle, kinetic energy of order k(B)T-that is, the thermal energy (k(B), Boltzmann's constant; T, temperature)-is extracted from the dense atomic sample. In a proof-of-principle experiment with a thermally non-isolated sample, we demonstrate relative cooling by 66 K. The cooled gas has a density more than ten orders of magnitude greater than the typical values used in Doppler-cooling experiments, and the cooling power reaches 87 mW. Future applications of the technique may include supercooling beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature and optical chillers.

  14. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-25

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  15. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  16. Cooling and recombination processes in cometary plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1976-01-01

    The ion electron plasma in comets is examined for cooling processes which result from its interactions with the neutral coma. A cometary coma model is formulated that is composed predominantly of H2O and its decomposition products where electrons are cooled in a variety of processes at rates varying with energy. It is shown that solar plasma plus accumulated cometary ions and electrons is affected very strongly as it flows into the coma. The electrons are rapidly cooled and all but some 10% of the ions undergo charge exchange. Photodissociation of H2O is assumed where ion electron recombination is the dominant loss process.

  17. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  18. Radiative cooling computed for model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, T. S.; Granqvist, C. G.

    1982-12-01

    The radiative cooling power and temperature drop of horizontal surfaces are evaluated on the basis of calculations of spectral radiance from model atmospheres representative of various climatic conditions. Calculations of atmospheric radiance from the zenith and from off-zenith angles were performed with the LOWTRAN 5 atmospheric transmittance/radiance computer code (Kneizys et al., 1980) for model atmospheres corresponding to the tropics, midlatitude summer, midlatitude winter, subarctic summer, subarctic winter and the 1962 U.S. standard atmosphere. Comparison of the computed spectral radiance curves with the radiative fluxes from blackbody surfaces and ideal infrared-selective surfaces (having reflectance in the 8-13 micron range and unity reflectance elsewhere) at various ambient-surface temperature differences shows cooling powers to lie between 58 and 113 W/sq m at ambient temperature for a freely radiating surface, with maximum temperature differences of 11-21 C for a blackbody and 18-33 C for an infrared-selective surface. Both cooling powers and temperature differences were higher for surfaces exposed only to atmospheric zenith radiance. In addition, water vapor content is found to affect strongly the radiative cooling, while ozone and aerosol contents had little effect.

  19. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  20. Electron Cooling in a Magnetically Expanding Plasma.

    PubMed

    Little, J M; Choueiri, E Y

    2016-11-25

    Electron cooling in a magnetically expanding plasma, which is a fundamental process for plasma flow and detachment in magnetic nozzles, is experimentally investigated using a radio frequency plasma source and magnetic nozzle (MN). Probe measurements of the plasma density, potential, and electron temperature along the center line of the MN indicate that the expansion follows a polytropic law with exponent γ_{e}=1.15±0.03. This value contradicts isothermal electron expansion, γ_{e}=1, which is commonly assumed in MN models. The axial variation of the measured quantities can be described by a simple quasi-1D fluid model with classical electron thermal conduction, for which it has been previously shown that a value of γ_{e}≈1.19 is expected in the weakly collisional limit. A new criterion, derived from the model, ensures efficient ion acceleration when a critical value for the ratio of convected to conducted power is exceeded.

  1. Runaway electron generation in a cooling plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Helander, P.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Fueloep, T.

    2005-12-15

    The usual calculation of Dreicer [Phys. Rev. 115, 238 (1959); 117, 329 (1960)] generation of runaway electrons assumes that the plasma is in a steady state. In a tokamak disruption this is not necessarily true since the plasma cools down quickly and the collision time for electrons at the runaway threshold energy can be comparable to the cooling time. The electron distribution function then acquires a high-energy tail which can easily be converted to a burst of runaways by the rising electric field. This process is investigated and simple criteria for its importance are derived. If no rapid losses of fast electrons occur, this can be a more important source of runaway electrons than ordinary Dreicer generation in tokamak disruptions.

  2. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-11-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  3. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-01-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  4. Experimental radiation cooled magnetrons for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.; Pollock, M.

    1991-01-01

    The heat disposal problem that occurs in the microwave generator of the Solar Power Satellite when it converts dc power from solar photovoltaic arrays into microwave power for transmission to earth is examined. A theoretical study is made of the radiation cooling of a magnetron directional amplifier, and some experimental data obtained from the QKH 2244 magnetron are presented. This instrument is an unpackaged microwave oven magnetron to which an anodized aluminum radiator has been attached and whose magnetic field is supplied by special samarium cobalt magnets.

  5. Experimental radiation cooled magnetrons for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. C.; Pollock, M.

    The heat disposal problem that occurs in the microwave generator of the Solar Power Satellite when it converts dc power from solar photovoltaic arrays into microwave power for transmission to earth is examined. A theoretical study is made of the radiation cooling of a magnetron directional amplifier, and some experimental data obtained from the QKH 2244 magnetron are presented. This instrument is an unpackaged microwave oven magnetron to which an anodized aluminum radiator has been attached and whose magnetic field is supplied by special samarium cobalt magnets.

  6. Radiative Cooling of Warm Molecular Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Kaufman, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the radiative cooling of warm (T >= 100 K), fully molecular astrophysical gas by rotational and vibrational transitions of the molecules H2O, CO, and H2. Using an escape probability method to solve for the molecular level populations, we have obtained the cooling rate for each molecule as a function of temperature, density, and an optical depth parameter. A four-parameter expression proves useful in fitting the run of cooling rate with density for any fixed values of the temperature and optical depth parameter. We identify the various cooling mechanisms which are dominant in different regions of the astrophysically relevant parameter space. Given the assumption that water is very abundant in warm regions of the interstellar medium, H2O rotational transitions are found to dominate the cooling of warm interstellar gas over a wide portion of the parameter space considered. While chemical models for the interstellar medium make the strong prediction that water will be produced copiously at temperatures above a few hundred degrees, our assumption of a high water abundance has yet to be tested observationally. The Infrared Space Observatory and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite will prove ideal instruments for testing whether water is indeed an important coolant of interstellar and circumstellar gas.

  7. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  8. Resistance and Cooling Power of Various Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R H

    1928-01-01

    This reports combines the wind tunnel results of radiator tests made at the Navy Aerodynamical Laboratory in Washington during the summers of 1921, 1925, and 1926. In all, 13 radiators of various types and capacities were given complete tests for figure of merit. Twelve of these were tested for resistance to water flow and a fourteenth radiator was tested for air resistance alone, its heat dissipating capacity being known. All the tests were conducted in the 8 by 8 foot tunnel, or in its 4 by 8 foot restriction, by the writer and under conditions as nearly the same as possible. That is to say, as far as possible, the general arrangement and condition of the apparatus, the observation intervals, the ratio of water flow per unit of cooling surface, the differential temperatures, and the air speeds were the same for all.

  9. Cooling of radiative quantum dot excitons by THz-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxberg, Fredrik; Tulkki, Jukka; Yusa, Go; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2007-04-01

    Yusa et al. reported an anomalous cooling of radiative quantum dot (QD) excitons by THz-radiation in [Proc. 24th ICPS, 1083 (1998)] We have analyzed this experiment using continuum elasticity, multi-band kṡp and spin-resolved Monte-Carlo methods. We show that the unexpected discovery is related to hole relaxation via piezo-electric potential minima, induced in the QD sample by InP stressor islands. The THz-radiation gives rise to a drift of dark excitons from the piezo-electric minima to radiative states in the deformation potential minimum. This increases the QD ground state luminescence at the expense of the luminescence from higher QD states. We reproduce also the delayed flash of QD ground state luminescences when a THz-radiation pulse hits the sample even ˜ 1 s after switching off the carrier generation.

  10. Effect of Precipitable Water Vapor Amount on Radiative Cooling Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mingke; Zhao, Bin; Ao, Xianze; Pei, Gang

    2017-05-01

    A radiative cooler based on aluminum-evaporated polyvinyl-fluoride surface was employed to investigate the effect of precipitable water vapor amount on its radiative cooling performance. A mathematic model of steady heat transfer that considers the spectral radiant distribution of the sky, the transparent cover and the collecting surface was established. The results indicate that the amount of precipitable water vapor shows a remarkable and negative effect on radiative cooling performance of the radiative cooler. Both the temperature difference between the cooler and surroundings and the net radiative cooling power decrease as the precipitable water vapor amount increases. The net radiative cooling power drops by about 41.0% as the the precipitable water vapor amount changes from 1.0 cm to 7.0 cm. Besides, the radiative cooler shows better cooling performance in winter than in summer. The net radiative cooling power in summer of Hefei is about 82.2% of that in winter.

  11. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94)

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; Jaspers, R.; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H.R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M.Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J. ||||

    1997-05-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [{ital Proceedings of the 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering} (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p. 470] is given. This regime is obtained under quasistationary conditions with edge neon seeding in a pumped limiter tokamak with circular cross section. It combines high confinement and high {beta} (up to a normalized beta, {beta}{sub n}=2) with low edge q values (down to q{sub a}=2.8) and high density even above the Greenwald limit together with dominant edge radiative heat exhaust, and therefore shows promise for the future of fusion research. Bulk and edge properties of these discharges are described, and a detailed account is given of the energy and particle confinement and their scaling. Energy confinement scales linearly with density as for the nonsaturated Ohmic Neo-Alcator scaling, but the usual degradation with total power remains. No deleterious effects of the neon seeding on fusion reactivity and plasma stability have been observed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Radiative Cooling With Pigmented Polyethylene Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Eriksson, Tord S.

    1989-03-01

    Polyethylene foils containing a nonabsorbing pigment can be suitable for radiative cooling because of their high reflectance of solar radiation combined with a high transmittance in the atmospheric window region in the thermal infrared. We have studied the optical properties in the wavelength range 0.3-50 μm of extruded polyethylene foils containing various amounts of 0.23 μm diameter Ti02 particles. It appears that the foils can prevent heating of an underlying material, even when directly illuminated by the sun. The total transmittance and reflectance of the Ti02-polyethylene foils were compared with multiple scattering calculations. Lorenz-Mie theory was used to model the scattering and absorption of a single TiO2 sphere. The single scattering parameters were then introduced into the four flux theory, by which the transmittance and reflectance were calculated. We find a satisfactory agreement between theory and experiments in most cases.

  13. Grackle: Chemistry and radiative cooling library for astrophysical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Britton D.; Bryan, Greg L.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Turk, Matthew J.; Regan, John; Wise, John H.; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Abel, Tom; Emerick, Andrew; O'Shea, Brian W.; Anninos, Peter; Hummels, Cameron B.; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2016-12-01

    The chemistry and radiative cooling library Grackle provides options for primordial chemistry and cooling, photo-heating and photo-ionization from UV backgrounds, and support for user-provided arrays of volumetric and specific heating rates for astrophysical simulations and models. The library provides functions to update chemistry species; solve radiative cooling and update internal energy; and calculate cooling time, temperature, pressure, and ratio of specific heats (gamma), and has interfaces for C, C++, Fortran, and Python codes.

  14. The Cool Surge Following Flux Emergence in a Radiation-MHD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóbrega-Siverio, D.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2016-05-01

    Cool and dense ejections, typically Hα surges, often appear alongside EUV or X-ray coronal jets as a result of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the solar interior. Idealized numerical experiments explain those ejections as being indirectly associated with the magnetic reconnection taking place between the emerging and preexisting systems. However, those experiments miss basic elements that can importantly affect the surge phenomenon. In this paper we study the cool surges using a realistic treatment of the radiation transfer and material plasma properties. To that end, the Bifrost code is used, which has advanced modules for the equation of state of the plasma, photospheric and chromospheric radiation transfer, heat conduction, and optically thin radiative cooling. We carry out a 2.5D experiment of the emergence of magnetized plasma through (meso) granular convection cells and the low atmosphere to the corona. Through detailed Lagrange tracing we study the formation and evolution of the cool ejection and, in particular, the role of the entropy sources; this allows us to discern families of evolutionary patterns for the plasma elements. In the launch phase, many elements suffer accelerations well in excess of gravity; when nearing the apex of their individual trajectories, instead, the plasma elements follow quasi-parabolic trajectories with accelerations close to {g}⊙ . We show how the formation of the cool ejection is mediated by a wedge-like structure composed of two shocks, one of which leads to the detachment of the surge from the original emerged plasma dome.

  15. Radiating properties of solar plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Mcwhirter, R. W. P.

    1988-01-01

    Using a series of 14 previously obtained empirical emission measure distributions and a number of spectral lines observed by the SMM and P78-1 instruments, the total power radiated by a hot plasma is compared to that radiated by individual spectrum lines. Results are presented for different choices of ionization balance and power loss functions. The results indicate that for some lines such as the C IV resonance doublet at 1548 A and 1550 A, the ratio of the line intensity to the total radiated power varied only over a factor of 2, suggesting that well-calibrated measurements of a single line intensity may provide a fairly good estimation of the total radiated power output from the solar plasma.

  16. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-02-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  17. Electromechanically-cooled germanium radiation detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Lavietes, A. D., LLNL.

    1998-05-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++[1], GAMANL[2], GRPANL[3] and MGAU[4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organizations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service[5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  18. Charge exchange cooling in the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Logan, B. Grant

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus for cooling a plasma of warm charged species confined in the center mirror cell of the tandem mirror apparatus by injecting cold neutral species of the plasma into at least one mirroring region of the center mirror cell, the cooling due to the loss of warm charged species through charge exchange with the cold neutral species with resulting diffusion of the warm neutral species out of the plasma.

  19. Heating and cooling of the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic-field models based on pressure equilibrium in the quiet magnetotail require nonadiabatic cooling of the plasma as it convects inward or a decrease of the flux tube content. Recent in situ observations of plasma density and temperature indicate that, during quiet convection, the flux tube content may actually increase. Thus the plasma must be cooled during quiet times. The earth plasma sheet is generally significantly hotter after the expansion phase of a substorm than before the plasma sheet thinning begins and cools during the recovery phase. Heating mechanisms such as reconnection, current sheet acceleration, plasma expansion, and resonant absorption of surface waves are discussed. It seems that all mechanisms are active, albeit in different regions of the plasma sheet. Near-earth tail signatures of substorms require local heating as well as a decrease of the flux tube content. It is shown that the resonant absorption of surface waves can provide both.

  20. Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Schertz, William W.

    1986-01-01

    A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

  1. Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

    1985-06-27

    A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

  2. Laser cooling of electron – ion plasma in the case of optimal scanning of the laser frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, A P; Isaev, I L

    2015-11-30

    Laser cooling of ions of electron – ion plasma is studied under the action of spontaneous radiation pressure forces. It is shown that the use of a constant detuning of the laser frequency from the quantum transition frequency w0 in ions significantly limits the conditions under which the ions are cooled. To extend the range of initial temperatures of possible cooling of ions and to increase the cooling efficiency we suggest scanning the laser frequency detuning so that the cooling rate remained maximal in the process of changing the temperature of ions. In the case of an optimal detuning, we have found an asymptotic expression for the cooling rate and identified intervals of electron concentrations and temperatures, where cooling of ions is possible. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  4. Influence of plasma loading in a hybrid muon cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Freemire, B.; Stratakis, D.; Yonehara, K.

    2015-05-03

    In a hybrid 6D cooling channel, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in wedge absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss in the longitudinal direction with gas-filled rf cavities. While the gas acts as a buffer to prevent rf breakdown, gas ionization also occurs as the beam passes through the pressurized cavity. The resulting plasma may gain substantial energy from the rf electric field which it can transfer via collisions to the gas, an effect known as plasma loading. In this paper, we investigate the influence of plasma loading on the cooling performance of a rectilinear hybrid channel. With the aid of numerical simulations we examine the sensitivity in cooling performance and plasma loading to key parameters such as the rf gradient and gas pressure.

  5. Radiative cooling: Energy savings from the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoff; Gentle, Angus

    2017-09-01

    Environmental heat sinks beyond local air are available for use with normal air conditioners to increase their efficiency. A study has exploited outer space and the atmosphere as remote sinks to demonstrate daytime sub-ambient fluid cooling and its application in reducing the energy needed to cool an interior.

  6. Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Butler, B.L.

    1985-03-29

    A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

  7. Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry L.

    1987-01-01

    A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

  8. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xingshu; Sun, Yubo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Bermel, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

  9. Radiative and gas cooling of falling molten drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    The supercooling rate and solidification time for molten drops of niobium, copper, and lead are calculated. Calculations for both radiation and helium gas cooling are presented in order to estimate the influence that the presence of helium gas would have upon the cooling rate of falling drops in the Marshall Space Flight Center space processing drop tube.

  10. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  11. Trapping of radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Alford, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors analyze the problem of radiation trapping (imprisonment) by the method of Holstein. The process is described by an integrodifferential equation which shows that the effective radiative decay rate of the system depends on the size and the shape of the active medium. Holstein obtains a global decay rate for a particular geometry by assuming that the radiating excited species evolves into a steady state spatial mode. The authors derive a new approximation for the trapped decay which has a space dependent decay rate and is easy to implement in a detailed computer simulation of a plasma confined within an arbitrary geometry. They analyze the line shapes that are relevant to a near-atmospheric-pressure mixture of He and Xe. This line-shape analysis can be utilized in either the Holstein formulae or the space-dependent decay approximation.

  12. Heat pipe radiation cooling evaluation: Task 2 concept studies report

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, C.C.

    1991-10-01

    This report presents the result of Task 2, Concept Studies for Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC), which was performed for Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract 9-XT1-U9567. Studies under a prior contract defined a reference HPRC conceptual design for hypersonic aircraft engines operating at Mach 5 and an altitude of 80,000 ft. Task 2 involves the further investigation of heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) systems for additional design and operating conditions.

  13. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  14. Dense Plasma Heating and Radiation Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The investigations under this grant consist of three parts: CO2 laser heating of dense preformed plasmas, interaction of a dense hot plasma with a...small solid pellet, and pulsed power systems and technology. The laser plasma heating experiment has demonstrated both beam guiding by the plasma and...plasma heating by the beam. These results will be useful in heating plasmas for radiation generation. Experiments have shown that the pellet-plasma

  15. Effects of nature of cooling surface on radiator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R; Kleinschmidt, R V

    1921-01-01

    This report discusses the effects of roughness, smoothness, and cleanness of cooling surfaces on the performance of aeronautic radiators, as shown by experimental work, with different conditions of surface, on (1) heat transfer from a single brass tube and from a radiator; (2) pressure drop in an air stream in a single brass tube and in a radiator; (3) head resistance of a radiator; and (4) flow of air through a radiator. It is shown that while smooth surfaces are better than rough, the surfaces usually found in commercial radiators do not differ enough to show marked effect on performance, provided the surfaces are kept clean.

  16. Radiation Pressure Cooling as a Quantum Dynamical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing; Yang, Liu; Lin, Qing; Xiao, Min

    2017-06-01

    One of the most fundamental problems in optomechanical cooling is how small the thermal phonon number of a mechanical oscillator can be achieved under the radiation pressure of a proper cavity field. Different from previous theoretical predictions, which were based on an optomechanical system's time-independent steady states, we treat such cooling as a dynamical process of driving the mechanical oscillator from its initial thermal state, due to its thermal equilibrium with the environment, to a stabilized quantum state of higher purity. We find that the stabilized thermal phonon number left in the end actually depends on how fast the cooling process could be. The cooling speed is decided by an effective optomechanical coupling intensity, which constitutes an essential parameter for cooling, in addition to the sideband resolution parameter that has been considered in other theoretical studies. The limiting thermal phonon number that any cooling process cannot surpass exhibits a discontinuous jump across a certain value of the parameter.

  17. The Role of Cerenkov Radiation in the Pressure Balance of Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Despite the substantial progress made recently in understanding the role of AGN feedback and associated non-thermal effects, the precise mechanism that prevents the core of some clusters of galaxies from collapsing catastrophically by radiative cooling remains unidentified. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the evolution of a cluster's cooling core, in terms of its density, temperature, and magnetic field strength, inevitably enables the plasma electrons there to quickly become Cerenkov loss dominated, with emission at the radio frequency of ≲350 Hz, and with a rate considerably exceeding free–free continuum and line emission. However, the same does not apply to the plasmas at the cluster's outskirts, which lacks such radiation. Owing to its low frequency, the radiation cannot escape, but because over the relevant scale size of a Cerenkov wavelength the energy of an electron in the gas cannot follow the Boltzmann distribution to the requisite precision to ensure reabsorption always occurs faster than stimulated emission, the emitting gas cools before it reheats. This leaves behind the radiation itself, trapped by the overlying reflective plasma, yet providing enough pressure to maintain quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium. The mass condensation then happens by Rayleigh–Taylor instability, at a rate determined by the outermost radius where Cerenkov radiation can occur. In this way, it is possible to estimate the rate at ≈2 M ⊙ year‑1, consistent with observational inference. Thus, the process appears to provide a natural solution to the longstanding problem of “cooling flow” in clusters; at least it offers another line of defense against cooling and collapse should gas heating by AGN feedback be inadequate in some clusters.

  18. Passive radiative cooling of a HTS coil for attitude orbit control in micro-spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Ozaki, Naoya; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiative cooling system for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil for an attitude orbit control system in nano- and micro-spacecraft missions. These days, nano-spacecraft (1-10 kg) and micro-spacecraft (10-100 kg) provide space access to a broader range of spacecraft developers and attract interest as space development applications. In planetary and high earth orbits, most previous standard-size spacecraft used thrusters for their attitude and orbit control, which are not available for nano- and micro-spacecraft missions because of the strict power consumption, space, and weight constraints. This paper considers orbit and attitude control methods that use a superconducting coil, which interacts with on-orbit space plasmas and creates a propulsion force. Because these spacecraft cannot use an active cooling system for the superconducting coil because of their mass and power consumption constraints, this paper proposes the utilization of a passive radiative cooling system, in which the superconducting coil is thermally connected to the 3 K cosmic background radiation of deep space, insulated from the heat generation using magnetic holders, and shielded from the sun. With this proposed cooling system, the HTS coil is cooled to 60 K in interplanetary orbits. Because the system does not use refrigerators for its cooling system, the spacecraft can achieve an HTS coil with low power consumption, small mass, and low cost.

  19. Density effects on bremsstrahlung radiation in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of plasma number-density and quantum shielding of ions by degenerate electrons on the free-free and electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation spectra in dense quantum plasmas for a wide range of plasma number-density and atomic-number of the constituent ions. We use previously reported results from the extended Shukla-Eliasson quantum-dressed ionic potential, which takes into account the relativistic degeneracy effect, the quantum statistical pressure, the electron-exchange correlations, the Wigner-Seitz cell interaction feature, as well as the important collective quantum diffraction of electrons. It is observed that the electron number-density has fundamental effect on the free-free and bound-bound bremsstrahlung radiation spectra over the whole frequency range of radiation. By comparing the radiation spectra for the quantum plasmas with ions of bare Coulomb, Thomas-Fermi, and extended quantum potentials, many important features of the bremsstrahlung radiation is highlighted. Current investigation can provide important information on plasma diagnostics for atomic processes in dense plasmas, such as the inertial-confinement fusion, warm dense matter, and the planetary cores. The results can also help in better understanding of the cooling processes in completely degenerate hot compact stellar objects such as white dwarfs.

  20. Self-cooling of a micromirror by radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Gigan, S; Böhm, H R; Paternostro, M; Blaser, F; Langer, G; Hertzberg, J B; Schwab, K C; Bäuerle, D; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A

    2006-11-02

    Cooling of mechanical resonators is currently a popular topic in many fields of physics including ultra-high precision measurements, detection of gravitational waves and the study of the transition between classical and quantum behaviour of a mechanical system. Here we report the observation of self-cooling of a micromirror by radiation pressure inside a high-finesse optical cavity. In essence, changes in intensity in a detuned cavity, as caused by the thermal vibration of the mirror, provide the mechanism for entropy flow from the mirror's oscillatory motion to the low-entropy cavity field. The crucial coupling between radiation and mechanical motion was made possible by producing free-standing micromirrors of low mass (m approximately 400 ng), high reflectance (more than 99.6%) and high mechanical quality (Q approximately 10,000). We observe cooling of the mechanical oscillator by a factor of more than 30; that is, from room temperature to below 10 K. In addition to purely photothermal effects we identify radiation pressure as a relevant mechanism responsible for the cooling. In contrast with earlier experiments, our technique does not need any active feedback. We expect that improvements of our method will permit cooling ratios beyond 1,000 and will thus possibly enable cooling all the way down to the quantum mechanical ground state of the micromirror.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  2. Decay processes and radiative cooling of small anionic copper clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenfeldt, Christian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael W.; George, Sebastian; Guzmán-Ramírez, Gregorio; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Schweikhard, Lutz; Wolf, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The decay of copper clusters Cun- with size n =4 -7 , produced in a metal ion sputter source, was studied in an electrostatic ion-beam trap. The neutral products after electron emission and fragmentation were monitored for ion storage times of up to a second. The observations indicated the presence of radiative cooling. The energy distributions of the remaining clusters were probed by laser irradiation up to several further seconds of storage time. This defined excitation lead to photoinduced decay signals which, again, showed signs of radiative cooling for Cu6,7 -, not, however, for Cu4,5 -.

  3. Space cooling system using nocturnal heat rejection and sky radiation cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Satoshi; Saitoh, Takeo

    1998-07-01

    A space cooling system using natural energy, a range of atmospheric temperature and sky radiation, is considered. Behavior of the system using nocturnal heat rejection in the summer is characterized by numerical simulation. The system consists of sky radiators, a thermal energy storage tank, and an air-conditioner. The sky radiators are fin-tube heat exchanger type with fans. The air conditioner is water-to-air type. The water in the storage tank is circulated to the sky radiators by a pump at night to be cooled using forced convection of outdoor air and sky radiation cooling. In the daytime, the condenser of the air conditioner is cooled by the cold water in the storage tank. Total consumption of electric power for air conditioning is used for evaluating the system performance. From the calculation, it is found that there are optimum conditions to reduce the total consumption of electric power. The reason is that the storage system requires additional consumption of electric power by the sky radiator pump and fans though the system could reduce the consumption of electric power by the air conditioner. When the sky radiators are operated during some limited hours, the total consumption of electric power becomes smaller than that when the sky radiators are continuously operated throughout night. The consumption of electric power decreases as the capacity of the thermal energy storage tank increases. This system has a possibility to save energy and to level the uneven consumption of electric power throughout a 24-hour period. For an example of some operating condition, the total consumption of electric power is reduced by 2.4 % compared with a conventional system, and 19 % of the power is consumed late at night for operating the sky radiator pump and fans. Combining with seasonal thermal energy storage could more reduce demand for electricity or shift the demand to off-peak hours.

  4. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  7. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

  8. Physical Properties of Cooling Plasma in Quiescent Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.; Curdt, W.; Hara, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the present work, we use SOHO/SUMER, SOHO/UVCS, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO/EUVI, and Hinode/EIS coordinated observations of an active region (AR 10989) at the west limb taken on 2008 April 8 to study the cooling of coronal loops. The cooling plasma is identified using the intensities of SUMER spectral lines emitted at temperatures in the 4.15 <= log T <= 5.45 range. EIS and SUMER spectral observations are used to measure the physical properties of the loops. We found that before cooling took place these loops were filled with coronal hole-like plasma, with temperatures in the 5.6 <= log T <= 5.9 range. SUMER spectra also allowed us to determine the plasma temperature, density, emission measure, element abundances, and dynamic status during the cooling process. The ability of EUVI to observe the emitting region from a different direction allowed us to measure the volume of the emitting region and estimate its emission measure. Comparison with values measured from line intensities provided us with an estimate of the filling factor. UVCS observations of the coronal emission above the active region showed no streamer structure associated with AR 10989 at position angles between 242°and 253fdg EIT, LASCO, and EUVI-A narrowband images and UVCS spectral observations were used to discriminate between different scenarios and monitor the behavior of the active region in time. The present study provides the first detailed measurements of the physical properties of cooling loops, a very important benchmark for theoretical models of loop cooling and condensation.

  9. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  10. Forming chondrules in impact splashes. I. Radiative cooling model

    SciTech Connect

    Dullemond, Cornelis Petrus; Stammler, Sebastian Markus; Johansen, Anders

    2014-10-10

    The formation of chondrules is one of the oldest unsolved mysteries in meteoritics and planet formation. Recently an old idea has been revived: the idea that chondrules form as a result of collisions between planetesimals in which the ejected molten material forms small droplets that solidify to become chondrules. Pre-melting of the planetesimals by radioactive decay of {sup 26}Al would help produce sprays of melt even at relatively low impact velocity. In this paper we study the radiative cooling of a ballistically expanding spherical cloud of chondrule droplets ejected from the impact site. We present results from numerical radiative transfer models as well as analytic approximate solutions. We find that the temperature after the start of the expansion of the cloud remains constant for a time t {sub cool} and then drops with time t approximately as T ≅ T {sub 0}[(3/5)t/t {sub cool} + 2/5]{sup –5/3} for t > t {sub cool}. The time at which this temperature drop starts t {sub cool} depends via an analytical formula on the mass of the cloud, the expansion velocity, and the size of the chondrule. During the early isothermal expansion phase the density is still so high that we expect the vapor of volatile elements to saturate so that no large volatile losses are expected.

  11. Platelet-cooled plasma arc torch. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    In this 12-month program sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Aerojet designed, fabricated, and tested six platelet cooled electrodes for a Retech 75T (90 MW) plasma arc torch capable of processing mixed radioactive waste. Two of the electrodes with gas injection through the electrode wall demonstrated between eight and forty times the life of conventional water cooled electrodes. If a similar life increase can be produced in a 1 Mw size electrode, then electrodes possessing thousands, rather than hundreds, of hours of life will be available to DOE for potential application to mixed radioactive waste processing.

  12. Radiative heating and cooling rates in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, John C.; Lyjak, Lawrence V.

    1986-01-01

    One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on Nimbus-7 has been extended to the South Pole with the aid of other observations. The data have been used as input to codes developed by Ramanathan and Dickinson to calculate the individual components and the net radiative heating rates from 100-0.1 mb. Solar heating due to ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon dioxide, water vapor and oxygen is shown to be nearly balanced by cooling in the thermal infrared spectral region due to carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor. In the lower stratosphere, infrared transfer by ozone leads to heating that is sensitive to the distribution of tropospheric ozone, clouds and water vapor. The heating and cooling rates are adjusted slightly in order to satisfy the global mass balance. The results are in qualitative agreement with earlier calculations, but show additional detail. There is as strong temporal and vertical variation of cooling in the tropics. Radiative relaxation times are as short as 7 days or less at the stratopause.

  13. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Whelan, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism by which unstable electrostatic waves of an electron-beam plasma system are converted into observed electromagnetic waves is of great current interest in space plasma physics. Electromagnetic radiation arises from both natural beam-plasma systems, e.g., type III solar bursts and kilometric radiation, and from man-made electron beams injected from rockets and spacecraft. In the present investigation the diagnostic difficulties encountered in space plasmas are overcome by using a large laboratory plasma. A finite diameter (d approximately equal to 0.8 cm) electron beam is injected into a uniform quiescent magnetized afterglow plasma of dimensions large compared with electromagnetic wavelength. Electrostatic waves grow, saturate and decay within the uniform central region of the plasma volume so that linear mode conversion on density gradients can be excluded as a possible generation mechanism for electromagnetic waves.

  14. Impact-Ionization Cooling in Laser-Induced Plasma Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Filin, A.; Romanov, D. A.; Compton, R.; Levis, R. J.

    2009-04-17

    The ionization rates and subsequent electron dynamics for laser-induced plasma channels are measured for the noble gas series He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe at 1.0 atm. The cw fluorescence emission increases superlinearly in the series from He to Xe in agreement with Ammosov-Delone-Krainov tunnel ionization calculations. The electron temperature after laser-induced plasma formation, measured by four-wave mixing, evolves from >20 eV to <1 eV kinetic energies with time constants ranging from 1 ns for He to 100 ps for Xe in agreement with an impact-ionization cooling model.

  15. Simulations Of Laser Cooling In An Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Pohl, Thomas; Vrinceanu, Daniel; Killian, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) generated by photoionization of laser-cooled, magneto-optically trapped neutral gases, are useful systems for studying strongly coupled plasmas. Coupling is parameterized by Γi, the ratio of the average nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction energy to the ion kinetic energy. For typical UNPs, Γi is currently limited to ~ 3 . For alkaline earth ions, higher Γi can be achieved by laser-cooling. Using Molecular Dynamics and a quantum trajectories approach, we have simulated laser-cooling of Sr+ ions interacting through a Yukawa potential. The simulations include re-pumping from two long-lived D-states, and are conducted at experimentally achievable parameters (density n = 2 e+14 m-3, size σ0 = 4 mm, Te = 19 K). Laser-cooling is shown to both reduce the temperature by a factor of 2 over relevant timescales (tens of μ s) and slow the electron thermal-pressure driven radial expansion of the UNP. We also discuss the unique aspects of laser-cooling in a highly collisional system; in particular, the effect of collisions on dark state formation due to the coupling of the P3/2 state to both the S1/2 (via the cooling transition) and the D5/2 (via a re-pump transition) states. Supported by NSF and DoE, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the NDSEG Program, and NIH NCRR S10RR02950, an IBM SUR Award in partnership with CISCO, Qlogic and Adaptive Computing.

  16. Radiation Belt and Plasma Model Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Radiation belt and plasma model environment. Environment hazards for systems and humans. Need for new models. How models are used. Model requirements. How can space weather community help?

  17. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Radiation-Cooled Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Biaglow, James A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation-cooled rockets are used for a range of low-thrust propulsion functions, including apogee insertion, attitude control, and repositioning of satellites, reaction control of launch vehicles, and primary propulsion for planetary space- craft. The key to high performance and long lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets is the chamber temperature capability. The material system that is currently used for radiation-cooled rockets, a niobium alloy (C103) with a fused silica coating, has a maximum operating temperature of 1370 C. Temperature limitations of C103 rockets force the use of fuel film cooling, which degrades rocket performance and, in some cases, imposes a plume contamination issue from unburned fuel. A material system composed of a rhenium (Re) substrate and an iridium (Ir) coating has demonstrated operation at high temperatures (2200 C) and for long lifetimes (hours). The added thermal margin afforded by iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) allows reduction or elimination of fuel film cooling. This, in turn, leads to higher performance and cleaner spacecraft environments. There are ongoing government- and industry-sponsored efforts to develop flight Ir/ Re engines, with the primary focus on 440-N, apogee insertion engines. Complementing these Ir/Re engine development efforts is a program to address specific concerns and fundamental characterization of the Ir/Re material system, including (1) development of Ir/Re rocket fabrication methods, (2) establishment of critical Re mechanical properly data, (3) development of reliable joining methods, and (4) characterization of Ir/Re life-limiting mechanisms.

  18. Transient cooling of a square region of radiating medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1991-01-01

    A time-accurate numerical solution was carried out for transient radiative cooling of a gray emitting and absorbing medium in a square two-dimensional region. The integro-differential energy equation for transient temperature distributions was solved in two stages. At each time increment, the local radiative source term was obtained by numerical integration of the temperature field using two-dimensional Gaussian integration over rectangular subregions. Then the differential portion of the equation was integrated forward in time by use of the local first and second time derivatives. The results were compared with available limiting case, and excellent agreement was obtained. Transient results are given for a wide range of optical thicknesses of the region. Optimum transient cooling is obtained when the optical side length is about 4.

  19. Radiative human body cooling by nanoporous polyethylene textile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Song, Alex Y.; Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Chong; Peng, Yucan; Xie, Jin; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management through personal heating and cooling is a strategy by which to expand indoor temperature setpoint range for large energy saving. We show that nanoporous polyethylene (nanoPE) is transparent to mid-infrared human body radiation but opaque to visible light because of the pore size distribution (50 to 1000 nanometers). We processed the material to develop a textile that promotes effective radiative cooling while still having sufficient air permeability, water-wicking rate, and mechanical strength for wearability. We developed a device to simulate skin temperature that shows temperatures 2.7° and 2.0°C lower when covered with nanoPE cloth and with processed nanoPE cloth, respectively, than when covered with cotton. Our processed nanoPE is an effective and scalable textile for personal thermal management.

  20. Radiative cooling of C{sub 7}{sup −}

    SciTech Connect

    Najafian, K.; Pettersson, M. S.; Hansen, K.; Dynefors, B.; Shiromaru, H.; Matsumoto, J.; Tanuma, H.; Furukawa, T.; Azuma, T.

    2014-03-14

    The spontaneous and photo-induced neutralization of C{sub 7}{sup −} produced in a laser ablation source was measured in an electrostatic storage ring. The measurements provide three independent determinations of the radiative cooling of the ions, based on the short time spontaneous decay and on the integrated amplitude and the shape of the photo-induced neutralization signal. The amplitude of the photo-induced signal was measured between 0.5 ms and 35 ms and found to depend on photon wavelength and ion storage time. All three signals can be reproduced with identical thermal IR radiative cooling rates with oscillator strengths equal to theoretical predictions. In addition, the measurements provide the excitation energy distribution.

  1. Radiative human body cooling by nanoporous polyethylene textile.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Song, Alex Y; Catrysse, Peter B; Liu, Chong; Peng, Yucan; Xie, Jin; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2016-09-02

    Thermal management through personal heating and cooling is a strategy by which to expand indoor temperature setpoint range for large energy saving. We show that nanoporous polyethylene (nanoPE) is transparent to mid-infrared human body radiation but opaque to visible light because of the pore size distribution (50 to 1000 nanometers). We processed the material to develop a textile that promotes effective radiative cooling while still having sufficient air permeability, water-wicking rate, and mechanical strength for wearability. We developed a device to simulate skin temperature that shows temperatures 2.7° and 2.0°C lower when covered with nanoPE cloth and with processed nanoPE cloth, respectively, than when covered with cotton. Our processed nanoPE is an effective and scalable textile for personal thermal management.

  2. Parametric Study of Radiative Cooling of Solid Antihydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    RADIATIVE COOLING OF SOLID ANTIHYDROGEN THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air...University 5 In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering Accc-sion For NTIS GRA&I DTIC TAB...knowledge of things academic and otherwise. 0 Abstract - .. . / ’A computer model of a cryogenic system for storing solid antimatter is used to explore the

  3. On the quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling self-gravitating gas clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Meerson, B.; Megged, E.; Tajima, T.

    1995-03-01

    Two model problems are considered, illustrating the dynamics of quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling, optically thin self-gravitating gas clouds. In the first problem, spherically symmetric flows in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. For a power-law dependence of the radiative loss function on the temperature, a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions is found. The authors concentrate on a constant-mass cloud, one of the cases, when the self-similarity indices are uniquely selected. In this case, the self-similar flow problem can be formally reduced to the classical Lane-Emden equation and therefore solved analytically. The cloud is shown to undergo radiative condensation, if the gas specific heat ratio {gamma} > 4/3. The condensation proceeds either gradually, or in the form of (quasihydrostatic) collapse. For {gamma} < 4/3, the cloud is shown to expand. The second problem addresses a magnetized plasma slab that undergoes quasihydrostatic radiative cooling and condensation. The problem is solved analytically, employing the Lagrangian mass coordinate.

  4. Effect of a Radiation Cooling and Heating Function on Standing Longitudinal Oscillations in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-06-01

    Standing long-period (with periods longer than several minutes) oscillations in large, hot (with a temperature higher than 3 MK) coronal loops have been observed as the quasi-periodic modulation of the EUV and microwave intensity emission and the Doppler shift of coronal emission lines, and they have been interpreted as standing slow magnetoacoustic (longitudinal) oscillations. Quasi-periodic pulsations of shorter periods, detected in thermal and non-thermal emissions in solar flares could be produced by a similar mechanism. We present theoretical modeling of the standing slow magnetoacoustic mode, showing that this mode of oscillation is highly sensitive to peculiarities of the radiative cooling and heating function. We generalized the theoretical model of standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in a hot plasma, including the effects of the radiative losses and accounting for plasma heating. The heating mechanism is not specified and taken empirically to compensate the cooling by radiation and thermal conduction. It is shown that the evolution of the oscillations is described by a generalized Burgers equation. The numerical solution of an initial value problem for the evolutionary equation demonstrates that different dependences of the radiative cooling and plasma heating on the temperature lead to different regimes of the oscillations, including growing, quasi-stationary, and rapidly decaying. Our findings provide a theoretical foundation for probing the coronal heating function and may explain the observations of decayless long-period, quasi-periodic pulsations in flares. The hydrodynamic approach employed in this study should be considered with caution in the modeling of non-thermal emission associated with flares, because it misses potentially important non-hydrodynamic effects.

  5. Adiabatic cooling of the artificial Porcupine plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruizhin, Iu. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Moskalenko, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma density obtained during the interaction of the artificial plasma jet, fired into the ionosphere with the body of the Porcupine main payload, have been analyzed for times when there was a well-developed wake effect. Using wake theory, the maximum temperature of the quasi-neutral xenon ion beam has been determined for an intermediate distance from the ion beam source when the beam has left the diamagnetic region but is still much denser than the ionospheric background plasma. The beam temperature is found to be about 4 times less than the temperature at injection. This observation is very well explained by adiabatic cooling of the beam during its initial diamagnetic and current-buildup phases at distances r smaller than 10 m. Outside this region, the beam conserves the temperature achieved. The observation proves that the artificial plasma jet passes through an initial gas-like diamagnetic phase restricted to the vicinity of the beam source, where it expands adiabatically. Partial cooling also takes place outside the diamagnetic region where the beam current still builds up. The observations also support a recently developed current-closure model of the quasi-neutral ion beam.

  6. Sensitivity of transient synchrotron radiation to tokamak plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

    1988-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from a hot plasma can inform on certain plasma parameters. The dependence on plasma parameters is particularly sensitive for the transient radiation response to a brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose a variety of plasma parameters in a tokamak. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    PubMed

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches.

  8. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Jones, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  9. Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ta Phuoc, Kim; Esarey, E.; Leurent, V.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Rousse, A.; Leemans, W.P.

    2009-04-11

    In laser wakefield accelerators, electron motion is driven by intense forces that depend on the plasma density. Transverse oscillations in the accelerated electron orbits produce betatron radiation. The electron motion and the resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore be controlled by shaping the plasma density along the orbit of the electrons. Here, a method based on the use of a plasma with a longitudinal density variation (density depression or step) is proposed to increase the transverse oscillation amplitude and the energy of the electrons accelerated in a wakefield cavity. For fixed laser parameters, by appropriately tailoring the plasma profile, the betatron radiation emitted by these electrons is significantly increased in both flux and energy.

  10. Enhanced betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. He, X. T.; Cao, L. H.; Liu, Z. J.

    2016-04-15

    Betatron radiation in strongly magnetized plasma is investigated by two dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The results show that the betatron radiation in magnetized plasmas is strongly enhanced and is more collimated compared to that in unmagnetized plasma. Single particle model analysis shows that the frequency and the amplitude of the electrons's betatron oscillation are strongly influenced by the axial external magnetic field and the axial self-generated magnetic field. And the 2D PIC simulation shows that the axial magnetic field is actually induced by the external magnetic field and tends to increase the betatron frequency. By disturbing the perturbation of the plasma density in the laser-produced channel, the hosing instability is also suppressed, which results in a better angular distribution and a better symmetry of the betatron radiation.

  11. Characterization of AN Actively Cooled Metal Foil Thermal Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.

    2010-04-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (˜20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVELY COOLED METAL FOIL THERMAL RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2010-04-09

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (approx20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  13. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  14. Relativistically strong electromagnetic radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V. E-mail: bulanov.sergei@jaea.go.jp; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Kondo, K.

    2016-03-15

    Physical processes in a plasma under the action of relativistically strong electromagnetic waves generated by high-power lasers have been briefly reviewed. These processes are of interest in view of the development of new methods for acceleration of charged particles, creation of sources of bright hard electromagnetic radiation, and investigation of macroscopic quantum-electrodynamical processes. Attention is focused on nonlinear waves in a laser plasma for the creation of compact electron accelerators. The acceleration of plasma bunches by the radiation pressure of light is the most efficient regime of ion acceleration. Coherent hard electromagnetic radiation in the relativistic plasma is generated in the form of higher harmonics and/or electromagnetic pulses, which are compressed and intensified after reflection from relativistic mirrors created by nonlinear waves. In the limit of extremely strong electromagnetic waves, radiation friction, which accompanies the conversion of radiation from the optical range to the gamma range, fundamentally changes the behavior of the plasma. This process is accompanied by the production of electron–positron pairs, which is described within quantum electrodynamics theory.

  15. The Design of Actively Cooled Plasma-Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheerer, M.; Bolt, H.; Gervash, A.; Linke, J.; Smid, I.

    In future fusion devices, like in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X, the target plates of the divertor will be exposed to heat loads up to power densities of 10 MW/m2 for 1000 s. For this purpose actively cooled target elements with an internal coolant flow return, made of 2-D CFC armor tiles brazed onto a two tube cooling structure were developed and manufactured at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. Individual bent- and coolant flow reversal elements were used to achieve a high flexibility in the shape of the target elements. A special brazing technology, using a thin layer of plasma-arc deposited titanium was used for the bonding of the cooling structure to the plasma facing armor (PFA). FEM-simulations of the thermal and mechanical behavior show that a detachment of about 25% of the bonded area between the copper tubes and the PFA can be tolerated, without exceeding the critical heat flux at 15 MW/m2 or a surface temperature of 1400°C at 10 MW/m2 by using twisted tape inserts with a twist ratio of 2 at a cooling water velocity of 10 m/s. Thermal cycling tests in an electron beam facility up to a power density level 10.5 MW/m2 show a very good behavior of parts of the target elements, which confirms the performance under fusion relevant conditions. Even defected parts in the bonding interface of the target elements, known from ultrasonic inspections before, show no change in the thermal performance under cycling, which confirms also the structural integrity of partly defected regions.

  16. Heat pipe radiation cooling of advanced hypersonic propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Keddy, M.; Merrigan, M. A.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer, heat pipe, and system studies were performed to assess the newly proposed heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) concept. With an HPRC system, heat is removed from the ramburner and nozzle of a hypersonic aircraft engine by a surrounding, high-temperature, heat pipe nacelle structure, transported to nearby external surfaces, and rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. With HPRC, the Mach number range available for using hydrocarbon fuels for aircraft operation extends into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 range, up from the current limit of about Mach 4. Heat transfer studies using a newly developed HPRC computer code determine cooling system and ramburner and nozzle temperatures, heat loads, and weights for a representative combined-cycle engine cruising at Mach 5 at 80,000 ft altitude. Heat pipe heat transport calculations, using the Los Alamos code HTPIPE, reveal that adequate heat trasport capability is available using molybdenum-lithium heat pipe technology. Results show that the HPRC system radiator area is limited in size to the ramburner-nozzle region of the engine nacelle; reasonable system weights are expected; hot section temperatures are consistent with advanced structural materials development goals; and system impact on engine performance is minimal.

  17. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  18. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: plasma mixing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward; Lasenby, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on light scalars and vectors with a variety of SM couplings. In particular, we improve the bounds on light ( m ≲ keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors. Scalars with mass ≲ 2 keV that couple through the Higgs portal are constrained to mixing angle sin θ ≲ 3 × 10-10, which gives the dominant bound for scalar masses above ˜ 0 .2eV.

  19. Plasma Motion and Kinematics in Cool and Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Nazé, Yaël

    2010-12-01

    The environments of both hot and cool stars are the sites of highly dynamic processes involving motion of gas and plasma in winds, flows across shocks, plasma motions in closed magnetic fields, or streams along magnetospheric accretion funnels. X-ray spectroscopy has opened new windows toward the study of these processes. Kinematics are evident in line shifts and line broadening, and also more indirectly through the analysis and interpretation of density-sensitive lines. In hot stellar winds, expanding-wind kinematics are directly seen in broadened lines although the broadening has turned out to often be smaller than anticipated, and some lines are so narrow that coronal models have been revived. Although X-ray spectra of cool stars have shown line shifts and broadening due to the kinematics of the entire corona, e.g., in binary systems, intrinsic mass motions are challenging to observe at the presently available resolution. Much indirect evidence for mass motion in magnetic coronae is nevertheless available. And finally, spectral diagnostics has also led to a new picture of X-ray production in accreting pre-main sequence stars where massive accretion flows collide with the photospheric gas, producing shocks in which gas is heated to high temperatures. We summarize evidence for the above mechanisms based on spectroscopic data from XMM-Newton and Chandra.

  20. Development of a plasma panel radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Bensimon, B; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Levin, Daniel S.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wetzel, R.; Zhou, Bing; Anderson, T; McKinny, K; Bentefour, E

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) design and materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

  1. Development of a plasma panel radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, R.; Beene, J. R.; Ben-Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Y.; Bensimon, B.; Chapman, J. W.; Etzion, E.; Ferretti, C.; Friedman, P. S.; Levin, D. S.; Silver, Y.; Varner, R. L.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wetzel, R.; Zhou, B.; Anderson, T.; McKinny, K.; Bentefour, E. H.

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) design and materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

  2. Radiation from High Temperature Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-09

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IO7PUOAM i. .’- "--"--o TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMIERS SI I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS .... D...8217’ -REPORT OATM September 19 14. MONITOING AGENCY NAME & AOORESS(I! dilfl ,rn lm Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of tli repot) Unclassified 1S...together (specifically 25-50 X, in aluminum) id show comparable intensities is an indicatiou oE a rather substantial temperatura aradient in the plasma

  3. Radiative cooling of Al{sub 4}{sup -} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Toker, Y.; Aviv, O.; Eritt, M.; Rappaport, M. L.; Heber, O.; Zajfman, D.; Schwalm, D.

    2007-11-15

    The radiative cooling of isolated, negatively charged four-atom aluminum clusters has been measured using an electrostatic ion beam trap. Stored Al{sub 4}{sup -} ions were irradiated by a short laser pulse at different times after their production in a hot ion source, and delayed electron emission was observed up to hundreds of microseconds after the laser pulse. The decay curves could be well reproduced using an Arrhenius decay law and allowed us to deduce the cluster temperatures at the time of the laser pulse. Using this sensitive molecular thermometer, the cluster temperature could be determined as a function of storage time. The radiation intensity is found to decrease from 40 eV/s at T=1400 K to 1 eV/s at 500 K with a temperature dependence as given by T{sup b} with b=3.5{+-}0.2--i.e., similar to what would be expected from a blackbody. This cooling behavior requires the presence of either electronic transitions or very collective infrared-active vibrations at transition energies around {approx}200 meV.

  4. An efficient radiative cooling approximation for use in hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, James C.; McInally, William G.; Faber, Joshua A.

    2015-02-01

    To make relevant predictions about observable emission, hydrodynamical simulation codes must employ schemes that account for radiative losses, but the large dimensionality of accurate radiative transfer schemes is often prohibitive. Stamatellos and collaborators introduced a scheme for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations based on the notion of polytropic pseudo-clouds that uses only local quantities to estimate cooling rates. The computational approach is extremely efficient and works well in cases close to spherical symmetry, such as in star formation problems. Unfortunately, the method, which takes the local gravitational potential as an input, can be inaccurate when applied to non-spherical configurations, limiting its usefulness when studying discs or stellar collisions, among other situations of interest. Here, we introduce the `pressure scale height method,' which incorporates the fluid pressure scaleheight into the determination of column densities and cooling rates, and show that it produces more accurate results across a wide range of physical scenarios while retaining the computational efficiency of the original method. The tested models include spherical polytropes as well as discs with specified density and temperature profiles. We focus on applying our techniques within an SPH code, although our method can be implemented within any particle-based Lagrangian or grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamic scheme. Our new method may be applied in a broad range of situations, including within the realm of stellar interactions, collisions, and mergers.

  5. A water-cooled mirror system for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    DiGennaro, R.; Gee, B.; Guigli, J.; Hogrefe, H.; Howells, M.; Rarback, H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a directly-cooled soft x-ray mirror system which has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for synchrotron radiation beam lines in which mirror thermal distortion must be minimized for acceptable optical performance. Two similar mirror systems are being built: the first mirror has been installed and operated at the National Synchrotron Light Source on the X-17T mini-undulator beam line and will be moved to the permanent X-1 beam line when a new, more powerful undulator is installed there. The second system is being built for installation at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory on Beam Line VI, where the total absorbed power on the mirror may be as high as 2400 W with peak absorbed power density of 520 W/cm/sup 2/. Direct cooling by convection is achieved using internal water channels in a brazed, dispersion-strengthened copper and OFHC copper substrate with a polished electroless-nickel surface. A simple kinematic linkage and flexural pivot mounting provide for mirror positioning about two rotational axes that coincide with the optical surface. Surface figure metrology, optical configurations, and tolerancing are also discussed. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Small global-mean cooling due to volcanic radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, J. M.; Andrews, T.; Good, P.; Mauritsen, T.; Forster, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    In both the observational record and atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) simulations of the last ˜150 years, short-lived negative radiative forcing due to volcanic aerosol, following explosive eruptions, causes sudden global-mean cooling of up to ˜0.3 K. This is about five times smaller than expected from the transient climate response parameter (TCRP, K of global-mean surface air temperature change per W m-2 of radiative forcing increase) evaluated under atmospheric CO2 concentration increasing at 1 % yr-1. Using the step model (Good et al. in Geophys Res Lett 38:L01703, 2011. doi: 10.1029/2010GL045208), we confirm the previous finding (Held et al. in J Clim 23:2418-2427, 2010. doi: 10.1175/2009JCLI3466.1) that the main reason for the discrepancy is the damping of the response to short-lived forcing by the thermal inertia of the upper ocean. Although the step model includes this effect, it still overestimates the volcanic cooling simulated by AOGCMs by about 60 %. We show that this remaining discrepancy can be explained by the magnitude of the volcanic forcing, which may be smaller in AOGCMs (by 30 % for the HadCM3 AOGCM) than in off-line calculations that do not account for rapid cloud adjustment, and the climate sensitivity parameter, which may be smaller than for increasing CO2 (40 % smaller than for 4 × CO2 in HadCM3).

  7. A water-cooled mirror system for synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGennaro, Richard; Gee, Bruce; Guigli, Jim; Hogrefe, Henning; Howells, Malcolm; Rarback, Harvey

    1988-04-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a directly-cooled soft X-ray mirror system which has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for synchrotron radiation beam lines in which mirror thermal distortion must be minimized for acceptable optical performance . Two similar mirror systems are being built: the first mirror has been installed and operated at the National Synchrotron Light Source on the X-17T miniundulator beam line and will be moved to the permanent X-1 beam line when a new, more powerful undulator is installed there. The second system is being built for installation at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory on Beam Line VI, where the total absorbed power on the mirror may be as high as 2400 W with a peak absorbed power density of 520 W/cm 2. Direct cooling by convection is achieved using internal water channels in a brazed, dispersion-strengthened copper and OFHC copper substrate with a polished electroless-nickel surface. A simple kinematic linkage and flexural pivot mounting provide for mirror positioning about two rotational axes that coincide with the optical surface. Surface figure metrology, optical configurations, and tolerancing are also discussed. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy, under contract #DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  8. Local cooling, plasma reheating and thermal pinching induced by single aerosol droplets injected into an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-07-01

    The injection of a single micrometer-sized droplet into an analytical inductively coupled plasma (ICP) perturbs the plasma and involves three sequential effects: local cooling, thermal pinching and plasma reheating. Time-resolved two-dimensional monochromatic imaging of the load-coil region of an ICP was used to monitor this sequence of plasma perturbations. When a microdroplet enters the plasma, it acts as a local heat sink and cools the nearby plasma region. The cooling effect is considered local, although the cooling volume can be large and extends 6 mm from the physical location of the vaporizing droplet. The liberated hydrogen, from decomposition of water, causes a thermal pinch effect by increasing the thermal conductivity of the bulk plasma and accelerating heat loss at the plasma periphery. As a response to the heat loss, the plasma shrinks in size, which increases its power density. Plasma shrinkage starts around the same time when the microdroplet enters the plasma and lasts at least 2 ms after the droplet leaves the load-coil region. Once the vaporizing droplet passes through a particular plasma volume, that volume is reheated to an even higher temperature than under steady-state conditions. Because of the opposing effects of plasma cooling and reheating, the plasma conditions are different upstream (downward) and downstream (upward) from a vaporizing droplet - cooling dominates the downstream region whereas reheating controls in the upstream domain. The boundary between the local cooling and reheating zones is sharp and is only ~ 1 mm thick. The reheating effect persists a relatively long time in the plasma, at least up to 4 ms after the droplet moves out of the load-coil region. The restoration of plasma equilibrium after the perturbation induced by microdroplet injection is slow. Microdroplet injection also induces a momentary change in plasma impedance, and the impedance change was found to correlate qualitatively with the different stages of plasma

  9. Thermal radiation properties of PTFE plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Siyu; Zhou, Yang; Wu, Zhiwen; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei

    2017-06-01

    To illuminate the thermal transfer mechanism of devices adopting polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as ablation materials, the thermal radiation properties of PTFE plasma are calculated and discussed based on local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and optical thin assumptions. It is clarified that line radiation is the dominant mechanism of PTFE plasma. The emission coefficient shows an opposite trend for both wavelength regions divided by 550 nm at a temperature above 15 000 K. The emission coefficient increases with increasing temperature and pressure. Furthermore, it has a good log linear relation with pressure. Equivalent emissivity varies complexly with temperature, and has a critical point between 20 000 K to 25 000 K. The equivalent cross points of the average ionic valence and radiation property are about 10 000 K and 15 000 K for fully single ionization.

  10. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  11. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  12. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  13. EDISON project and radiatively cooled infrared space observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Hawarden, Timothy G.; Bradshaw, Tom W.; Orlowska, Anna H.; Penny, Alan J.; Turner, R. F.; Rapp, Donald

    1993-11-01

    We describe the current design for Edison, the first large radiatively-cooled infrared space observatory, now under consideration by the European Space Agency. Without the large cryogen tanks, more of the spacecraft can be filled with light-collecting optics and, of course, the observatory has no built-in lifetime. Our proposal is for a telescope with a 1.7 m primary to be launched by an Atlas, Ariane 5, or Proton. The baseline orbit for the observatory is a 'halo' around L2, a location which allows additional radiating area to be placed anti-sunward. Models of the temperature behavior of the observatory indicate an equilibrium temperature via radiation alone of about 20 K. Use of near-future cryo-coolers may allow optical system temperatures as low as approximately 15 K. Consequently, Edison will be limited in sensitivity by the celestial thermal background at wavelengths shortward of about 60 micrometers and by celestial source confusion at longer wavelengths.

  14. Anomalous radiation from a nonstationary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Larsson, J.; Lindgren, T.; Stenflo, L.; Tegeback, R.; Uddholm, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers the anomalous growth of the radiation intensity, which is caused by an EM wave incident on an inhomogeneous nonstationary plasma. The amplitude of the reflected signal can thus during relatively short time intervals be larger than that of the incident wave. The reason is that the plasma parameters can pass through values, for which linear resonance of leaking surface waves exist. An analytical expression is obtained for the maximum value of the intensity of the reflected wave for two different plasma density profiles, interacting with waves of different polarization. It is shown that the effect can occur repeatedly in a nonstationary plasma with a nonmonotonous density profile, if the region, where the inhomogeneity gradient changes sign, increases.

  15. Edison and radiatively-cooled IR space observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A.; Hawarden, T. G.; Bally, J.; Burnell, S. J. Bell; Penny, A. J.; Rapp, D.

    1993-01-01

    Radiative cooling of IR space telescopes is an alternative to embedding within massive cryostats and should offer advantages for future missions, including longer life, larger aperture for a fixed spacecraft size, lower cost due to less complex engineering, and easier ground handling. Relatively simple analyses of conventional designs show that it is possible to achieve telescope temperatures in the range of 25 to 40 K at distances from the sun of about 1 AU. Lower temperatures may be possible with 'open' designs or distant orbits. At approximately 25 K, an observatory will be limited by the celestial thermal background in the near- and mid-IR and by the confusion limit in the far-IR. We outline here our concept for a moderate aperture (approximately 1.75 m; Ariane 4 or Atlas launch) international space observatory for the next decade.

  16. Updating Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, J.

    2010-05-01

    The monograph Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation was published by Academic Press in 1975. A Russian edition, Atomidzat, came out in 1978. An updated version is being prepared by D. Froula, S. Glenzer. N Luhmann, and J. Sheffield for publication in 2010 by Elsevier. The new version will discuss the broader applications of Thomson scattering, which include the full range of plasmas used in research and industry. The expansion of the field has been made possible by the growing number of powerful radiation sources (from X-rays to microwaves), detectors, and innovative techniques. When the book was published, the highest temperatures in laboratory plasmas were around 2 keV for the electrons. Compare this to today's 25 keV where the relativistic effects are dramatic. The application to low temperature plasmas with Te in the range of 1 - 30+ eV, important in industry, has grown. Important capabilities have been developed in the areas of energetic particle, micro-instability, and high energy density plasma measurements. For the future, we look forward to the use of scattering as a diagnostic on the large new fusion facilities-NIF, LMJ, and ITER.

  17. The enhancement mechanism of thin plasma layer on antenna radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunsheng Jiang, Binhao; Li, Xueai

    2015-03-09

    A model of plasma-antenna is carried out to study the radiation enhancement mechanism of antenna covered by thin plasma layer. The results show when the radiation intensity achieves maximum, a region of equal electric field is formed due to the reflection of electric field at the interface of plasma and air. The plasma layer acted as an extension of the antenna. Furthermore, the shape of plasma layer is changed to verify the effect of plasma boundary on antenna radiation. The study shows the effect of thin plasma layer on electromagnetic field and provides a type of plasma antenna.

  18. Scattering of radiation in collisionless dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.

    2013-04-15

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves in collisionless dusty plasmas is studied in the framework of a multi-component kinetic model. The investigation focuses on the spectral distribution of the scattered radiation. Pronounced dust signatures are identified in the coherent spectrum due to scattering from the shielding cloud around the dust grains, dust acoustic waves, and dust-ion acoustic waves. The magnitude and shape of the scattered signal near these spectral regions are determined with the aid of analytical expressions and its dependence on the dust parameters is investigated. The use of radiation scattering as a potential diagnostic tool for dust detection is discussed.

  19. Radiated emission noise of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijichi, K.; Yoshida, T.; Kudo, I.; Kuriki, K.

    1982-11-01

    Measurement of the emission noise radiated by an MPD arcjet and an electron beam accelerator plasma in a large space chamber shows that such noise slightly exceeds current electromagnetic compatibility standards, although chamber wall reflection was incompatible with test specifications. No interference is expected for the case of S band communications links, although some may appear in UHF links. The Spacelab-1 Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators flight hardware employed in these tests exhibited no malfunctions.

  20. Radiation and Plasma Environments for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Diekmann, Anne M.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.; Harine, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    Space system design for lunar orbit and extended operations on the lunar surface requires analysis of potential system vulnerabilities to plasma and radiation environments to minimize anomalies and assure that environmental failures do not occur during the mission. Individual environments include the trapped particles in Earth s radiation belts, solar energetic particles and galactic cosmic rays, plasma environments encountered in transit to the moon and on the lunar surface (solar wind, terrestrial magnetosheath and magnetotail, and lunar photoelectrons), and solar ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet photons. These are the plasma and radiation environments which contribute to a variety of effects on space systems including total ionizing dose and dose rate effects in electronics, degradation of materials in the space environment, and charging of spacecraft and lunar dust. This paper provides a survey of the relevant charged particle and photon environments of importance to lunar mission design ranging from the lowest (approx.few 10 s eV) photoelectron energies to the highest (approx.GeV) cosmic ray energies.

  1. Radiative electron capture in nonequilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, H.M.; Weisheit, J.C.

    1982-01-19

    Formulae have been obtained for the degree of linear polarization of recombination radiation from a homogeneous plasma having an anisotropic electron velocity distribution, f(v vector), characterized by an axis of symmetry. Polarization measurements are described which utilize these formulae to determine aspects of the anisotropy such as the symmetry axis direction and the lowest order even angular moments of f(v vector). As a special case, if the plasma conforms to a distribution such as a bi-Maxwellian with drift, one can determine the quantities u/sub D//T/sub parallel to/ and (1/T/sub parallel to/ - 1/T/sub perpendicular to/) which involve the electron drift speed, and the perpendicular and parallel electron temperatures. Also, the radiative recombination rate has been calculated for ions whose speeds are comparable to or greater than the electron thermal speed. The change in the rate is small for thermonuclear products in fusion plasmas, but large for cosmic rays in interstellar plasma.

  2. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  3. A new air-cooled argon/helium-compatible inductively coupled plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Hidekazu; Iwai, Takahiro; Kaburaki, Yuki; Kozuma, Tomokazu; Shigeta, Kaori; Okino, Akitoshi

    2014-01-01

    A new inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch with an air-cooling system has been designed and developed for both argon and helium plasma. The same torch and impedance-matching network could be used to generate stable Ar- and He-ICP. The torch consists of three concentric quartz tubes. The carrier gas, plasma gas, and cooling gas flow through the intervals between each tube. In an experiment, it was found that Ar-ICP could form a stable plasma under the following conditions: RF power of 1 kW, plasma gas flow rate of 11 L min(-1), and cooling gas flow rate of 20 L min(-1). For He-ICP, an input RF power of 2 kW, which is two-times higher than that of a conventional He-ICP, could be constantly applied to the plasma with plasma gas and cooling gas flow rates of 15 and 20 L min(-1), respectively. Using this torch, it is possible to realize lower plasma gas consumption for Ar- and He-ICP and a high-power drive for He-ICP. It has been found that the air-cooling gas stabilizes the shape of the plasma due to the pressure difference between the cooling gas and the plasma gas.

  4. Cooling of Electronically-Excited He2 Molecules in a Microcavity Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui; Houlahan, Thomas J., Jr.; Eden, J. Gary

    2016-06-01

    Helium dimers in the d3Σ+u excited electronic state with potential energy >24 eV and radiative lifetime of 25 ns have been generated in a microcavity plasma jet and rotationally cooled by supersonic expansion in vacuum. The dynamic process of cooling is recorded by imaging the axis of expansion onto the slit of Czerny-Turner spectrometer, yielding spatial-temporal spectrograms of d3Σ+u→b3Πg (v', v'')=(0, 0) emission. Analysis of the data shows the spatial-temporal evolution of the rotational temperature to be a damped sinusoid that reaches a minimum value of 100K. This reproducible behavior is attributed to the reflection of electrons from a virtual cathode located downstream of the nozzle and indicates that the spatially-averaged electron density is 108 cm-3. We present this observed rotational temperature oscillation during the supersonic cooling process as an example of the potential of our supersonic microplasma expansion as a tool to explore physical dynamics in diatomic molecules having high excitation energies and small lifetimes.

  5. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apley, Walter J.; Babb, Albert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6 to 10 percent). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the liquid droplet radiator, fabric radiator, bubble membrane radiator, rotating film radiator, and dust radiator.

  6. Material Response of One-Dimensional, Steady-State Transpiration Cooling in Radiative and Convective Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Hirotoshi

    1975-01-01

    A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a transpiration-cooled porous heat-shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. Essential features of this approach are "two-flux method" for radiative transfer process and "two-temperature" assumption for solid and gas temperatures. Incident radiative-convective heatings are specified as boundary conditions. Sample results are shown using porous silica with CO2 transpiration and some parameters quantitatively show the effect on this transpiration cooling system. Summarized maps for mass injection rate, porosity and blowing correction factor for radiation are obtained in order to realize such a cooling system.

  7. Combined Radiation Belt - Plasma Sheet System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, Nikita; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander; Zhu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Recent years have given rise to numerous mathematical models of the Earth's radiation belt dynamics. Driven by observations at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) where satellites (e.g. GOES and LANL) provide extensive in-situ measurements, radiation belt models usually take into account only diffusion processes in the energetic electron belts (100 keV and greater), leaving aside the dynamics of colder source population (tens of keV). Such models are able to reconstruct the radiation belt state, but they are not capable of predicting the electron dynamics at GEO, where many communication and navigation satellites currently operate. In this work we present combined four-dimensional electron radiation belt - plasma sheet model accounting for adiabatic advective transport, radial diffusion due to interaction with ULF waves, local acceleration of electrons, scattering into the atmosphere, magnetopause shadowing, and adiabatic effects due to contraction and expansion of the magnetic field. The developed model is applicable to energetic, relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons as well as to source electron population. The model provides spatial particle distribution allowing us to compare and validate the model with multiple satellite measurements at different MLT sectors (e.g. Van Allen Probes, GOES, LANL, THEMIS). The model can be helpful for the prediction of crucial for satellite operators geosynchronous electron fluxes and electron radiation belt dynamics including the heart of the outer belt, slot region and inner belt.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of the Effects of Plasma Actuation Strength on Film Cooling Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guozhan; Chen, Fu; Li, Linxi; Song, Yanping

    2016-11-01

    In this article, numerical investigation of the effects of different plasma actuation strengths on the film cooling flow characteristics has been conducted using large eddy simulation (LES). For this numerical research, the plasma actuator is placed downstream of the trailing edge of the film cooling hole and a phenomenological model is employed to provide the electric field generated by it, resulting in the body forces. Our results show that as the plasma actuation strength grows larger, under the downward effect of the plasma actuation, the jet trajectory near the cooling hole stays closer to the wall and the recirculation region observably reduces in size. Meanwhile, the momentum injection effect of the plasma actuation also actively alters the distributions of the velocity components downstream of the cooling hole. Consequently, the influence of the plasma actuation strength on the Reynolds stress downstream of the cooling hole is remarkable. Furthermore, the plasma actuation weakens the strength of the kidney shaped vortex and prevents the jet from lifting off the wall. Therefore, with the increase of the strength of the plasma actuation, the coolant core stays closer to the wall and tends to split into two distinct regions. So the centerline film cooling efficiency is enhanced, and it is increased by 55% at most when the plasma actuation strength is 10.

  9. NightCool: Nocturnal Radiation Cooling Concept Long Term Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny S.; Sherwin, John R.; Hermelink, Andreas; Moyer, Neil

    2009-12-01

    This report is about an experimental evaluation that has been conducted on a building-integrated night sky cooling system designed to substantialy reduce space cooling needs in homes in North American climates.

  10. Extinguishing ELMs in detached radiative divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, Alexander; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Rognlien, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In order to avoid deleterious effects of ELMs on PFCs in next-step fusion devices it has been suggested to operate with small-sized ELMs naturally extinguishing in the divertor. Our modeling effort is focusing at extinguishing type-I ELMs: conditions for expelled plasma dissipation; efficiency of ELM power handling by detached radiative divertors; and the ELM impact on detachment state. Here time-dependent modeling of a sequence of many ELMs was performed with 2-D edge plasma transport code UEDGE-MB-W which incorporates the Macro-Blob (MB) approach to simulate non-diffusive filamentary transport and various ``Wall'' (W) models for time-dependent hydrogen wall inventory and recycling. Three cases were modeled, in which extinguishing ELMs are achieved due to: (i) intrinsic impurities via graphite sputtering, (ii) extrinsic impurity gas puff (Ne), and (iii) =(i) +(ii). For each case, we performed a series of UEDGE-MB-W runs scanning the deuterium and impurity inventories, pedestal losses and ELM frequency. Temporal variations of the degree of detachment, ionization front shape, recombination sink strength, radiated fraction, peak power loads, OSP, impurity charge states, and in/out asymmetries were analyzed. We discuss the onset of extinguishing ELMs, conditions for not burning through and enhanced plasma recombination as functions of scanned parameters. Efficiencies of intrinsic and extrinsic impurities in ELM extinguishing are compared.

  11. Quantum-radiative cooling for solar cells with textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Boris; Ivanov, Igor

    2004-11-01

    Efficient technique of Quantum Radiative Cooling (QRC) of textured Solar Cells and Modules is described that is capable of Solar Module (SM) temperature reduction by 5-20C, resulting in 3-10% efficiency increase. Novel methods are based on the quantum assisted IR emission from the surface covered by either multi-layer coatings made of Si-nitride, SiO or Si oxy-nitride films or specifically designed insulating sun-transparent chamber (QRC zone) that contains Selective Emissive (SE) gas or gas mix. QRC zone is mounted on the top of Solar Module replacing existing lamination coatings. To enhance the efficiency of QRC some specific methods and fabrication procedures are proposed to form an electricly charged textured surface that provide a high Electric Field at the surface thus enhancing IR emissivity from the surface. Such procedure can be also used to form the field Induced Surface Barriers in the Si-based Solar Cells that can substitute the existing diffused Emitters resulting in significant reduction of the Cycle Time as well as prospective Fabrication Cost.

  12. A numerical simulation of magnetic reconnection and radiative cooling in line-tied current sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Malherbe, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiative MHD equations are used for an optically thin plasma to carry out a numerical experiment related to the formation of 'postflare' loops. The numerical experiment starts with a current sheet that is in mechanical and thermal equilibrium but is unstable to both tearing-mode and thermal-condensation instabilities. The current sheet is line-tied at one end to a photospheric-like boundary and evolves asymmetrically. The effects of thermal conduction, resistivity variation, and gravity are ignored. In general, reconnection in the nonlinear stage of the tearing-mode instability can strongly affect the onset of condensations unless the radiative-cooling time scale is much smaller than the tearing-mode time scale. When the ambient plasma is less than 0.2, the reconnection enters a regime where the outflow from the reconnection region is supermagnetosonic with respect to the fast-mode wave speed. In the supermagnetosonic regime the most rapidly condensing regions occur downstream of a fast-mode shock that forms where the outflow impinges on closed loops attached to the photospheric-like boundary. A similar shock-induced condensation might occur during the formation of 'postflare' loops.

  13. A numerical simulation of magnetic reconnection and radiative cooling in line-tied current sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Malherbe, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiative MHD equations are used for an optically thin plasma to carry out a numerical experiment related to the formation of 'postflare' loops. The numerical experiment starts with a current sheet that is in mechanical and thermal equilibrium but is unstable to both tearing-mode and thermal-condensation instabilities. The current sheet is line-tied at one end to a photospheric-like boundary and evolves asymmetrically. The effects of thermal conduction, resistivity variation, and gravity are ignored. In general, reconnection in the nonlinear stage of the tearing-mode instability can strongly affect the onset of condensations unless the radiative-cooling time scale is much smaller than the tearing-mode time scale. When the ambient plasma is less than 0.2, the reconnection enters a regime where the outflow from the reconnection region is supermagnetosonic with respect to the fast-mode wave speed. In the supermagnetosonic regime the most rapidly condensing regions occur downstream of a fast-mode shock that forms where the outflow impinges on closed loops attached to the photospheric-like boundary. A similar shock-induced condensation might occur during the formation of 'postflare' loops.

  14. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  15. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  16. Heating and cooling of a two-dimensional electron gas by terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2011-04-15

    The absorption of terahertz radiation by free charge carriers in n-type semiconductor quantum wells accompanied by the interaction of electrons with acoustic and optical phonons is studied. It is shown that intrasubband optical transitions can cause both heating and cooling of the electron gas. The cooling of charge carriers occurs in a certain temperature and radiation frequency region where light is most efficiently absorbed due to intrasubband transitions with emission of optical phonons. In GaAs quantum wells, the optical cooling of electrons occurs most efficiently at liquid nitrogen temperatures, while cooling is possible even at room temperature in GaN heterostructures.

  17. Non-planckian equilibrium radiation of plasma-like media

    SciTech Connect

    Triger, S. A.; Khomkin, A. L.

    2010-12-15

    Consideration of equilibrium radiation of plasma-like media shows that the spectral distribution of such radiation differs from that of Planckian equilibrium radiation (blackbody radiation). The physical reason for this difference consists in the impossibility of propagation of photons with the dispersion law {omega} = ck in systems of charged particles. The thermodynamics of equilibrium electromagnetic radiation in plasma is also considered. It is shown that the difference of the thermodynamic properties of such radiation from those of Planckian radiation is characterized by the parameter a = h{Omega}{sub p}/T. This difference is especially pronounced in plasma media in which a {>=} 1. Applications of the results obtained to plasmas of metals (first of all, liquid metals in which charged particles have no distant order) and to the plasma model of the early Universe are discussed.

  18. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-04-16

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008-2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002-2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 10(18) more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years.

  19. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008–2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002–2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 1018 more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Key Points First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years PMID:26074647

  20. Absolute intensity of radiation emitted by uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute intensity of radiation emitted by fissioning and nonfissioning uranium plasmas in the spectral range from 350 nm to 1000 nm was measured. The plasma was produced in a plasma-focus apparatus and the plasma properties are simular to those anticipated for plasma-core nuclear reactors. The results are expected to contribute to the establishment of design criteria for the development of plasma-core reactors.

  1. Scalable-manufactured randomized glass-polymer hybrid metamaterial for daytime radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yao; Ma, Yaoguang; David, Sabrina N; Zhao, Dongliang; Lou, Runnan; Tan, Gang; Yang, Ronggui; Yin, Xiaobo

    2017-03-10

    Passive radiative cooling draws heat from surfaces and radiates it into space as infrared radiation to which the atmosphere is transparent. However, the energy density mismatch between solar irradiance and the low infrared radiation flux from a near-ambient-temperature surface requires materials that strongly emit thermal energy and barely absorb sunlight. We embedded resonant polar dielectric microspheres randomly in a polymeric matrix, resulting in a metamaterial that is fully transparent to the solar spectrum while having an infrared emissivity greater than 0.93 across the atmospheric window. When backed with a silver coating, the metamaterial shows a noontime radiative cooling power of 93 watts per square meter under direct sunshine. More critically, we demonstrated high-throughput, economical roll-to-roll manufacturing of the metamaterial, which is vital for promoting radiative cooling as a viable energy technology.

  2. Hand-held, mechanically cooled, radiation detection system for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Burks, Morgan Thomas; Eckels, Joel Del

    2010-06-08

    In one embodiment, a radiation detection system is provided including a radiation detector and a first enclosure encapsulating the radiation detector, the first enclosure including a low-emissivity infra-red (IR) reflective coating used to thermally isolate the radiation detector. Additionally, a second enclosure encapsulating the first enclosure is included, the first enclosure being suspension mounted to the second enclosure. Further, a cooler capable of cooling the radiation detector is included. Still yet, a first cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure is included for coupling the cooler and the first enclosure. Furthermore, a second cooling interface positioned on the second enclosure and capable of coupling the first enclosure to a cooler separate from the radiation detection system is included. Other embodiments are also presented.

  3. Scalable-manufactured randomized glass-polymer hybrid metamaterial for daytime radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yao; Ma, Yaoguang; David, Sabrina N.; Zhao, Dongliang; Lou, Runnan; Tan, Gang; Yang, Ronggui; Yin, Xiaobo

    2017-03-01

    Passive radiative cooling draws heat from surfaces and radiates it into space as infrared radiation to which the atmosphere is transparent. However, the energy density mismatch between solar irradiance and the low infrared radiation flux from a near-ambient-temperature surface requires materials that strongly emit thermal energy and barely absorb sunlight. We embedded resonant polar dielectric microspheres randomly in a polymeric matrix, resulting in a metamaterial that is fully transparent to the solar spectrum while having an infrared emissivity greater than 0.93 across the atmospheric window. When backed with a silver coating, the metamaterial shows a noontime radiative cooling power of 93 watts per square meter under direct sunshine. More critically, we demonstrated high-throughput, economical roll-to-roll manufacturing of the metamaterial, which is vital for promoting radiative cooling as a viable energy technology.

  4. Radiation Effects in a Semitransparent Gray Coating Heated by Convection and Cooled by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2002-01-01

    A parametric study using a one dimensional model of a semitransparent gray thermal barrier coating was performed to gain an understanding of the role thermal radiation can play in the heat transferred. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges were thermal radiation is important. Therefore, absorption, emission, and scattering of thermal radiation can affect the he at transfer through the coating. In this paper, a one dimensional layer was used to model the heat transfer process occurring, in a burner test rig. The semitransparent layer is heated by a hot gas flowing over its surface. The layer and substrate at a cooled by radiation to the surroundings. The back side of the substrate is insulated. The coating is assumed to be gray (absorption and scattering coefficients are not function of wavelength). An absorption coefficient of 0.3/cm and scatter a rig coefficients of 0 (no scattering) and 100/cm (isotropic scattering) were used. The thickness and thermal conductivity of the layer are varied. The results show that the temperatures are affected by the properties of the semitransparent .ever and the emissivity of the substrate. The substrate and surface temperatures are presented. The apparent temperature an optical pyrometer would read for the emitted energy is also given. An apparent thermal conductivity was calculated for the layer.

  5. Intense terahertz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. M.; Yuan, X. H.; Nilsen, J.; Ozaki, T.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The development of tabletop intense terahertz (THz) radiation sources is extremely important for THz science and applications. This paper presents our measurements of intense THz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions under different experimental conditions. Several THz generation mechanisms have been proposed and investigated, including coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by fast electrons from the target rear surface, transient current radiation at the front of the target, and mode conversion from electron plasma waves (EPWs) to THz waves. The results indicate that relativistic laser plasma is a promising driver of intense THz radiation sources.

  6. System for control of cooled CCD and image data processing for plasma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, M.; Kakeda, T.; Inoko, A.

    1995-12-31

    A Spectroscopic measurement system which has a spacial resolution is important for plasma study. This is especially true for a measurement of a plasma without axial symmetry like the LHD-plasma. Several years ago, we developed an imaging spectroscopy system using a CCD camera and an image-memory board of a personal computer. It was very powerful to study a plasma-gas interaction phenomena. In which system, however, an ordinary CCD was used so that the dark-current noise of the CCD prevented to measure dark spectral lines. Recently, a cooled CCD system can be obtained for the high sensitivity measurement. But such system is still very expensive. The cooled CCD itself as an element can be purchased cheaply, because amateur agronomists began to use it to take a picture of heavenly bodies. So we developed an imaging spectroscopy system using such a cheap cooled CCD for plasma experiment.

  7. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  8. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions. PMID:28176862

  9. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-02-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  10. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  11. Radiation temperature of non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.

    1991-07-01

    In fusion devices measurements of the radiation temperature T{sub r} ({omega}, k) near the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub C} and the second harmonic 2{omega}{sub C} in directions nearly perpendicular to the confining magnetic field B (i.e., k {approx} k {perpendicular}) serve to map out the electron temperature profiles T{sub e}(r,t). For optically thick plasma at thermodynamic equilibrium T{sub r} = T{sub e}. However, there is increasing experimental evidence for the presence of non-equilibrium electron distributions (such as a drifting Maxwellian with appreciable values of the streaming parameter {omicron} = v{sub d}/v{sub t}, a bi- Maxwellian, and anisotropic Maxwellian with T {perpendicular} {ne} T {parallel}, etc.,) in tokamak plasmas, especially in the presence of radio-frequency heating. Here, we examine (both non-relativistically and relativistically) the dependence of T{sub r} on {omicron}, T{perpendicular}/T{parallel}, T{sub h}/T{sub b}, n{sub h}/n{sub b}etc., where n{sub b}, n{sub h}, T{sub b}, T{sub h} are the densities and temperatures, respectively, of the bulk and the hot components of the bi-Maxwellian plasma. Our bi-Maxwellian results predict that the ratio T{sub r}/T{sub e} is a very sensitive function of the ratios n{sub h}/n{sub b} and T{sub h}/T{sub b}. Further, these relativistic and non-relativistic results satisfy the well-known limit c {yields} {infinity} correspondence principle'', showing that the intensity of the emission and absorption line is independent of the line broadening mechanism. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  13. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-23

    or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non- equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we...published online 23 December 2013) Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional

  14. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Apley, W.J.; Babb, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6--10%). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the: liquid droplet radiator; fabric radiator; bubble membrane radiator; rotating film radiator; and dust radiator. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Convection induced by radiative cooling of a layer of participating medium

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanna, Swaminathan; Venkateshan, S. P.

    2014-05-15

    Simulations and experiments have been conducted to study the effect of radiative cooling on natural convection in a horizontal layer of a participating medium enclosed between isothermal opaque wall and radiatively transparent wall and exposed to a cold background. The study is of relevance to a nocturnal boundary layer under clear and calm conditions. The focus of the study is to capture the onset of convection caused by radiative cooling. The experiments have been designed to mimic the atmospheric radiative boundary conditions, and hence decoupling convection and radiation boundary conditions. Planck number Pl and optical thickness of the layer τ{sub H} are the two important parameters that govern the interaction between radiation and convection. The radiation-convection coupling is a strong function of length scale. Convection sets up within first few seconds for all the experiments. Strong plume like convection is observed for the experimental conditions used in the present study. Both simulations and experiments confirm that radiative cooling increases substantially with decrease in emissivity of the bottom wall. Radiative cooling is strongly influenced by the nongray nature of the participating medium, especially when strong emission from the medium escapes to space, in the window region of the atmosphere. Accurate representation of radiative properties is critical. Linear stability analysis of onset of convection indicates that radiation stabilizes convection as Pl decreases. The observations are similar to the case of Rayleigh Bénard convection in a radiating gas. However, for both experimental and numerical conditions, the observed Rayleigh numbers are much greater than the critical Rayleigh number. To conclude, the role of radiation is to drive and sustain convection in the unstable layer.

  16. Three Canted Radiator Panels to Provide Adequate Cooling for Instruments on Slewing Spacecraft in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Certain free-flying spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) or payloads on the International Space Station (ISS) are required to slew to point the telescopes at targets. Instrument detectors and electronics require cooling. Traditionally a planar thermal radiator is used. The temperature of such a radiator varies significantly when the spacecraft slews because its view factors to space vary significantly. Also for payloads on the ISS, solar impingement on the radiator is possible. These thermal adversities could lead to inadequate cooling for the instrument. This paper presents a novel thermal design concept that utilizes three canted radiator panels to mitigate this problem. It increases the overall radiator view factor to cold space and reduces the overall solar or albedo flux absorbed per unit area of the radiator.

  17. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  18. The Effect of Radiative Cooling on Coronal Loop Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Terradas, Jaume

    2008-10-01

    Coronal loops that exhibit kink-mode oscillations have generally been assumed to have a constant density and temperature during the observed time interval. Analyzing their intensities in an EUV wave band, however, clearly shows that their brightness varies in a way that is consistent with a temperature cooling through the EUV passband, which limits their detection time, observed damping time, and number of observable periods. We study kink-mode oscillations of eight loops observed during the so-called harmonica event on 2001 April 15, 21:58-22:27 UT in the 171 Å band. We find loop densities of ne = (1.4 +/- 0.6) × 109 cm-3, loop widths of w = 2.0 +/- 2.6 Mm, and e-folding cooling times of τcool = 17 +/- 7 minutes, when they cool through the peak temperature T = 0.95 MK of the 171 Å band. We conclude that oscillations of a single loop cannot be detected longer than 10-20 minutes in one single filter and appropriate light curve modeling is necessary to disentangle the subsequent oscillation phases of multiple near-cospatial loops.

  19. Enhancing the radiative heat dissipation from high-temperature SF6 gas plasma by using selective absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Shinichiro; Horinouchi, Katsuhiko; Yugami, Hiroo

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling accomplished by tailoring the properties of spectral thermal emission is an interesting method for energy harvesting and high-efficiency passive cooling of terrestrial structures. This strategy, however, has not been extended to cool enclosed heat sources, common in engineering applications, and heat sources in high-temperature environments where radiative transfer plays a dominant role. Here we show a radiative cooling scheme for a high-temperature gaseous medium, using radiative heat extraction with selective absorbers matched to the gas-selective emission properties. We used SF6 gas plasma as a model, because this gas is used in gas circuit breakers, which require effective cooling of the hot insulating gas. Our theoretical analysis confirms that a copper photonic absorber, matched to the ultraviolet-to-near-infrared-selective emission properties of the gas, effectively extracts heat from the high-temperature gas plasma and lowers the radiative equilibrium gas temperature by up to 1270 K, exceeding both blackbody-like and metallic surfaces in practical operating conditions.

  20. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.

    1991-10-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emission resulting from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator and in an ac FEL undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques. The spontaneous radiation frequency spectrum and angular distribution emitted by a single electron oscillating in these two undulators are then calculated. The radiation gain of a copropagating electromagnetic wave is calculated. The approximate analytic results for the trajectories, spontaneous radiation and gain are compared with 3-D simulation results. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared with the ac FEL undulator and linearly polarized magnetic undulator. 50 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Radiation force on a relativistic plasma and the Eddington limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the radiation force due to Thomson scattering on a relativistic plasma are presented and discussed in relation to certain astronomical objects which operate within a few orders of magnitude of their Eddington luminosity. The radiation force on a hot isotropic plasma is shown to exceed that on a cold plasma by a factor depending on the electron Lorentz factor, which can be substantial in a relativistic plasma. In such a plasma, radiative bulk acceleration is found to occur through the anisotropic loss of internal energy during the Thomson scattering, resulting in an effect termed a Compton rocket. The Compton rocket is shown to be a relevant acceleration mechanism in situations where a relativistic electron plasma lies in the vicinity of a luminous source operating near the classical Eddington limit, including compact galactic X-ray sources and objects associated with active galactic nuclei (quasars, blazars, and Seyfert nuclei).

  2. Radiation force on a relativistic plasma and the Eddington limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the radiation force due to Thomson scattering on a relativistic plasma are presented and discussed in relation to certain astronomical objects which operate within a few orders of magnitude of their Eddington luminosity. The radiation force on a hot isotropic plasma is shown to exceed that on a cold plasma by a factor depending on the electron Lorentz factor, which can be substantial in a relativistic plasma. In such a plasma, radiative bulk acceleration is found to occur through the anisotropic loss of internal energy during the Thomson scattering, resulting in an effect termed a Compton rocket. The Compton rocket is shown to be a relevant acceleration mechanism in situations where a relativistic electron plasma lies in the vicinity of a luminous source operating near the classical Eddington limit, including compact galactic X-ray sources and objects associated with active galactic nuclei (quasars, blazars, and Seyfert nuclei).

  3. On plasma radiative properties in stellar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Delahaye, F.; Gilles, D.; Loisel, G.; Piau, L.

    2009-09-01

    The knowledge of stellar evolution is evolving quickly thanks to an increased number of opportunities to scrutinize the stellar internal plasma properties by stellar seismology and by 1D and 3D simulations. These new tools help us to introduce the internal dynamical phenomena in stellar modeling. A proper inclusion of these processes supposes a real confidence in the microscopic physics used, partly checked by solar or stellar acoustic modes. In the present paper we first recall which fundamental physics has been recently verified by helioseismology. Then we recall that opacity is an important ingredient of the secular evolution of stars and we point out why it is necessary to measure absorption coefficients and degrees of ionization in the laboratory for some well identified astrophysical conditions. We examine two specific experimental conditions which are accessible to large laser facilities and are suitable to solve some interesting questions of the stellar community: are the solar internal radiative interactions properly estimated and what is the proper role of the opacity in the excitation of the non-radial modes in the envelop of the β Cepheids and the Be stars? At the end of the paper we point out the difficulties of the experimental approach that we need to overcome.

  4. Removal of seminal plasma enhances membrane stability on fresh and cooled stallion spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barrier-Battut, I; Bonnet, C; Giraudo, A; Dubois, C; Caillaud, M; Vidament, M

    2013-02-01

    Fertility is reduced after semen cooling for a considerable number of stallions. The main hypotheses include alterations in plasma membrane following cooling and deleterious influence of seminal plasma. However, interindividual variability is controversial. We hypothesized that the removal of seminal plasma could enhance motility in some 'poor cooler' stallions, but could also affect, negatively or positively, membrane quality in some stallions. This study examined the effect of centrifugation, followed or not by removal of seminal plasma, on parameters indicating semen quality after 48 h at 4 °C: motility, plasma membrane integrity as evaluated by hypo-osmotic swelling test, acrosome integrity and response to a pharmacological induction of acrosome reaction using ionophore A23187. Sixty-six ejaculates from 14 stallions were used, including stallions showing high or low sperm motility after cooled storage. Centrifugation without removal of seminal plasma did not affect sperm parameters. Removal of seminal plasma did not affect motility, but significantly stabilized sperm membranes, as demonstrated by a higher response to the osmotic challenge, and a reduced reactivity of the acrosome. Moreover, for the same semen sample, the response to an induction of acrosome reaction was significantly higher when the induction was performed in the presence of seminal plasma, compared with the induction in the absence of seminal plasma. This was observed both for fresh and cooled semen. When the induction of acrosome reaction with ionophore A23187 is used to evaluate sperm quality, care must therefore be taken to standardize the proportion of seminal plasma between samples. For the 10 stallions serving at least 25 mares, the only variable significantly correlated with fertility was motility. The influence of membrane stabilization regarding fertility requires further investigations.

  5. Annular Plasmas for Intense X-Radiation Sources: Assessment Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-14

    AD-Al29 382 ANNULAR PLASMAS FOR INTENSE X-RADIATION4 SOURCES: f ASSESSMENT REPORT(U) OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH LONDON (ENGLAND) D MOSHER 14 MAR 83...STANDARDS 1963-A CNR LON inPO.T R-4-83 OFFICEIF NAVAL ___ ___ ___ ___ ANNULAR PLASMAS FOR INTENSE X-RADIATION SOURCES: ASSESSMENT REPORT D. MOSHER 14 MARCH...REPORT B PFmoo COVERED Annular Plasmas for Intense X-radiation Sources: Assessment Asses’sment Report I. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMSER 7. AUTHOR(*) S

  6. Radiative lifetimes and cooling functions for astrophysically important molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Hulme, Kelsey; Naim, Omree K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2016-02-01

    Extensive line lists generated as part of the ExoMol project are used to compute lifetimes for individual rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic excited states, and temperature-dependent cooling functions by summing over all dipole-allowed transitions for the states concerned. Results are presented for SiO, CaH, AlO, ScH, H2O and methane. The results for CH4 are particularly unusual with four excited states with no dipole-allowed decay route and several others, where these decays lead to exceptionally long lifetimes. These lifetime data should be useful in models of masers and estimates of critical densities, and can provide a link with laboratory measurements. Cooling functions are important in stellar and planet formation.

  7. A Novel Approach to Thermal Design of Solar Modules: Selective-Spectral and Radiative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xingshu; Dubey, Rajiv; Chattopadhyay, Shashwata; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Chavali, Raghu Vamsi; Silverman, Timothy J.; Kottantharayil, Anil; Vasi, Juzer; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-11-21

    For commercial solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 degrees C higher than the ambient. In the long run, extreme self-heating may erode efficiency and shorten lifetime, thereby, dramatically reducing the total energy output by almost ~10% Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical cooling methods to combat PV self-heating. In this paper, we explore two fundamental sources of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical and thermal properties of the solar module to eliminate the parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance the thermal emission to the cold cosmos (radiative cooling). The proposed technique should cool the module by ~10 degrees C, to be reflected in significant long-term energy gain (~ 3% to 8% over 25 years) for PV systems under different climatic conditions.

  8. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahi, A.; Duraschlag, H.; Elliott, D.; Hartsough, J.; Shukla, N.; Kosny, J.

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  9. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahi, A.; Durschlag, H.; Elliott, D.; Hartsough, J.; Shukla, N.; Kosny, J.

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulkinsulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosedreflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  10. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets. 2: Nonlinear Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James M.; Xu, Jianjun; Hardee, Philip

    1997-01-01

    We use two-dimensional time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations to follow the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability in cooling jets into the nonlinear regime. We focus primarily on asymmetric modes that give rise to transverse displacements of the jet beam. A variety of Mach numbers and two different cooling curves are studied. The growth rates of waves in the linear regime measured from the numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the linear stability analysis presented in the first paper in this series. In the nonlinear regime, the simulations show that asymmetric modes of the K-H instability can affect the structure and evolution of cooling jets in a number of ways. We find that jets in which the growth rate of the sinusoidal surface wave has a maximum at a so-called resonant frequency can be dominated by large-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations near this frequency. Eventually, growth of this wave can disrupt the jet. On the other hand, nonlinear body waves tend to produce low-amplitude wiggles in the shape of the jet but can result in strong shocks in the jet beam. In cooling jets, these shocks can produce dense knots and filaments of cooling gas within the jet. Ripples in the surface of the jet beam caused by both surface and body waves generate oblique shock "spurs" driven into the ambient gas. Our simulations show these shock "spurs" can accelerate ambient gas at large distances from the jet beam to low velocities, which represents a new mechanism by which low-velocity bipolar outflows may be driven by high-velocity jets. Rapid entrainment and acceleration of ambient gas may also occur if the jet is disrupted. For parameters typical of protostellar jets, the frequency at which K-H growth is a maximum (or highest frequency to which the entire jet can respond dynamically) will be associated with perturbations with a period of - 200 yr. Higher frequency (shorter period) perturbations excite waves associated with body

  11. Computational study of plasma actuator on film cooling performance for different shaped holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng-ji; Xiao, Yang; He, Li-ming; Jin, Tao; Hou, Peng-hui; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Zi-chen

    2015-06-01

    An investigation on film cooling holes with plasma actuators are performed for circular hole, expansion-shaped hole and fan-shaped hole on the surface of flat plate. The results are compared with those obtained from the same combination of varied shaped holes without plasma actuator. Computational results suggest that plasma-induced body force mitigates the intensity of the counter rotating vortex pair by creating a new pair of vortexes, thereby providing greater coolant-surface attachment for each hole shape, resulting in the improvement of film cooling effectiveness. As for the holes of varied shapes with plasma actuator, the expansion-shaped hole shows superior laterally averaged film cooling effectiveness to that of the circular hole. Comparing with the abovementioned two shaped holes, the fan-shaped one performs worse in terms of laterally averaged film cooling effectiveness at low blow ratios, and better at high blow ratios. The fan-shaped hole also provides the best uniformity of film cooling effectiveness among all cases.

  12. Formation and role of cool flames in plasma-assisted premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Mungal, M. G.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    The structure of a plasma-assisted laminar premixed flame is studied numerically. The initial radical yield generated by a nonequilibrium discharge serves as the boundary condition for a one-dimensional flame code predicting the formation of a cool flame which pilots the premixed methane/air combustion. The ignition of the surrounding unactivated methane-air mixture by this cool flame is modeled as an opposed diffusion flame. Our findings indicate that the nonequilibrium discharge is an in situ reformer of the fuel for the production of the cool flame, producing primarily H2 and CO, thus, facilitating the burning of the lean methane-air mixture.

  13. Oxygen impurity radiation from Tokamak-like plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. E.; Davis, J.; Jacobs, V. L.

    1977-01-01

    We have constructed a nonhydrodynamic coronal model for calculating radiation from impurity atoms in a heated plasma. Some recent developments in the calculation of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients and collisional excitation rate coefficients are included. The model is applied to oxygen impurity radiation during the first few milliseconds of a TFR Tokamak plasma discharge, and good agreement with experimental results is obtained. Estimates of total line and continuum radiation from the oxygen impurity are given. It is shown that impurity radiation represents a considerable energy loss.

  14. Multifocal terahertz radiation by intense lasers in rippled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Reenu; Singh, Divya; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the generation of terahertz radiation by cosh-Gaussian laser beams of high intensity, which are capable of creating relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. We find the components of the terahertz radiation for the relativistic laser plasma interaction, i.e. beating of the two lasers of same amplitude and different frequency in under dense plasma. We plot the electric field profile of the emitted radiation under the effect of lasers index. By creating a dip in peak of the incident lasers' fields, we can achieve multifocal terahertz radiation.

  15. Nonlocality of radiative transfer in continuous spectra and Bremsstrahlung radiation transport in hot dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Kukushkin, A. B.

    1997-05-05

    The importance of nonlocal effects in radiative transfer in continuous spectra is shown in numerical modelling of space profiles of plasma temperature and Bremsstrahlung total power losses in a layer of adiabatically compressed hot dense plasma, via comparing the results of the exact, integral equation formalism and widely used approach of radiation temperature diffusion with Rosseland mean diffusion coefficient.

  16. Thermal Design and Analysis of a Multi-Stage 30K Radiative Cooling System for EPIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Bock, Jamie; Holmes, Warren; Raab, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology (EPIC) is an implementation of the NASA Einstein Inflation Probe mission, to answer questions about the physics of Inflation in the early Universe by measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The mission relies on a passive cooling system to cool the enclosure of a telescope to 30 K; a cryocooler then cools this enclosure to 18 K and the telescope to 4 K. Subsequently, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator further cools a large focal plane to approx.100 mK. For this mission, the telescope has an aperture of 1.4 m, and the spacecraft's symmetry axis is oriented approx. 45 degrees relative to the direction of the sun. The spacecraft will be spun at approx. 0.5 rpm around this axis, which then precesses on the sky at 1 rph. The passive system must both supply the necessary cooling power for the cryocooler and meet demanding temperature stability requirements. We describe the thermal design of a passive cooling system consisting of four V-groove radiators for shielding of solar radiation and cooling the telescope to 30 K. The design realizes loads of 20 and 68 mW at the 4 K and 18 K stages on the cooler, respectively. A lower cost option for reaching 40 K with three V-groove radiators is also described. The analysis includes radiation coupling between stages of the radiators and sunshields, and parasitic conduction in the bipod support, harnesses, and ADR leads. Dynamic effects are also estimated, including the very small variations in temperature due to the scan motion of the spacecraft.

  17. Thermal design and analysis of a multi-stage 30 K radiative cooling system for EPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Talso; Bock, Jamie; Holmes, Warren; Raab, Jeff

    2010-09-01

    The Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology (EPIC) is an implementation of the NASA Einstein Inflation Probe mission, to answer questions about the physics of Inflation in the early Universe by measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The mission relies on a passive cooling system to cool the enclosure of a telescope to 30 K; a cryocooler then cools this enclosure to 18 K and the telescope to 4 K. Subsequently, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator further cools a large Focal Plane to ˜100 mK. For this mission, the telescope has an aperture of 1.4 m, and the spacecraft's symmetry axis is oriented ˜45° relative to the direction of the sun. The spacecraft will be spun at ˜0.5 rpm around this axis, which then precesses on the sky at 1 rph. The passive system must both supply the necessary cooling power for the cryocooler and meet demanding temperature stability requirements. We describe the thermal design of a passive cooling system consisting of four V-groove radiators for shielding of solar radiation and cooling the telescope to 30 K. The design realizes loads of 20 and 68 mW at the 4 K and 18 K stages on the cooler, respectively. A lower cost option for reaching 40 K with three V-groove radiators is also described. The analysis includes radiation coupling between stages of the radiators and sunshields, and parasitic conduction in the bipod support, harnesses, and ADR leads. Dynamic effects are also estimated, including the very small variations in temperature due to the scan motion of the spacecraft.

  18. Thermal Design and Analysis of a Multi-Stage 30K Radiative Cooling System for EPIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Bock, Jamie; Holmes, Warren; Raab, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology (EPIC) is an implementation of the NASA Einstein Inflation Probe mission, to answer questions about the physics of Inflation in the early Universe by measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The mission relies on a passive cooling system to cool the enclosure of a telescope to 30 K; a cryocooler then cools this enclosure to 18 K and the telescope to 4 K. Subsequently, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator further cools a large focal plane to approx.100 mK. For this mission, the telescope has an aperture of 1.4 m, and the spacecraft's symmetry axis is oriented approx. 45 degrees relative to the direction of the sun. The spacecraft will be spun at approx. 0.5 rpm around this axis, which then precesses on the sky at 1 rph. The passive system must both supply the necessary cooling power for the cryocooler and meet demanding temperature stability requirements. We describe the thermal design of a passive cooling system consisting of four V-groove radiators for shielding of solar radiation and cooling the telescope to 30 K. The design realizes loads of 20 and 68 mW at the 4 K and 18 K stages on the cooler, respectively. A lower cost option for reaching 40 K with three V-groove radiators is also described. The analysis includes radiation coupling between stages of the radiators and sunshields, and parasitic conduction in the bipod support, harnesses, and ADR leads. Dynamic effects are also estimated, including the very small variations in temperature due to the scan motion of the spacecraft.

  19. A simplified, numerically verified model for the global plasma reaction on a local cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Koltunov, M.

    2013-10-01

    An analytical model for heat losses along a magnetic surface to its small region cooled down abruptly to a very low temperature is deduced by applying a principle of minimum entropy production and verified by comparing with the results obtained by solving non-stationary two-dimensional heat conduction equation numerically. The model is elaborated further by taking into account heat flux limit and the plasma density modification due to the particle convection along the magnetic surface, triggered by the plasma pressure imbalance arising by the local cooling.

  20. A simplified, numerically verified model for the global plasma reaction on a local cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, M. Z.; Koltunov, M.

    2013-10-15

    An analytical model for heat losses along a magnetic surface to its small region cooled down abruptly to a very low temperature is deduced by applying a principle of minimum entropy production and verified by comparing with the results obtained by solving non-stationary two-dimensional heat conduction equation numerically. The model is elaborated further by taking into account heat flux limit and the plasma density modification due to the particle convection along the magnetic surface, triggered by the plasma pressure imbalance arising by the local cooling.

  1. Microscopic properties of xenon plasmas for density and temperature regimes of laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R; Espinosa, G; Gil, J M; Stehlé, C; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Rubiano, J G; Martel, P; Mínguez, E

    2015-05-01

    This work is divided into two parts. In the first one, a study of radiative properties (such as monochromatic and the Rosseland and Planck mean opacities, monochromatic emissivities, and radiative power loss) and of the average ionization and charge state distribution of xenon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics and extreme ultraviolet lithography is performed. We have made a particular emphasis in the analysis of the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the influence of the atomic description in the calculation of the radiative properties. Using the results obtained in this study, in the second part of the work we have analyzed a radiative shock that propagated in xenon generated in an experiment carried out at the Prague Asterix Laser System. In particular, we have addressed the effect of plasma self-absorption in the radiative precursor, the influence of the radiation emitted from the shocked shell and the plasma self-emission in the radiative precursor, the cooling time in the cooling layer, and the possibility of thermal instabilities in the postshock region.

  2. Microscopic properties of xenon plasmas for density and temperature regimes of laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, R.; Espinosa, G.; Gil, J. M.; Stehlé, C.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.; Mínguez, E.

    2015-05-01

    This work is divided into two parts. In the first one, a study of radiative properties (such as monochromatic and the Rosseland and Planck mean opacities, monochromatic emissivities, and radiative power loss) and of the average ionization and charge state distribution of xenon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics and extreme ultraviolet lithography is performed. We have made a particular emphasis in the analysis of the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the influence of the atomic description in the calculation of the radiative properties. Using the results obtained in this study, in the second part of the work we have analyzed a radiative shock that propagated in xenon generated in an experiment carried out at the Prague Asterix Laser System. In particular, we have addressed the effect of plasma self-absorption in the radiative precursor, the influence of the radiation emitted from the shocked shell and the plasma self-emission in the radiative precursor, the cooling time in the cooling layer, and the possibility of thermal instabilities in the postshock region.

  3. A saw-tooth plasma actuator for film cooling efficiency enhancement of a shaped hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guozhan; Yu, Jianyang; Liu, Huaping; Chen, Fu; Song, Yanping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the large eddy simulations of the effects of a saw-tooth plasma actuator and the laidback fan-shaped hole on the film cooling flow characteristics, and the numerical results are compared with a corresponding standard configuration (cylindrical hole without the saw-tooth plasma actuator). For this numerical research, the saw-tooth plasma actuator is installed just downstream of the cooling hole and a phenomenological plasma model is employed to provide the 3D plasma force vectors. The results show that thanks to the downward force and the momentum injection effect of the saw-tooth plasma actuator, the cold jet comes closer to the wall surface and extends further downstream. The saw-tooth plasma actuator also induces a new pair of vortex which weakens the strength of the counter-rotating vortex pair (CRVP) and entrains the coolant towards the wall, and thus the diffusion of the cold jet in the crossflow is suppressed. Furthermore, the laidback fan-shaped hole reduces the vertical jet velocity causing the disappearance of downstream spiral separation node vortices, this compensates for the deficiency of the saw-tooth plasma actuator. Both effects of the laidback fan-shaped hole and the saw-tooth plasma actuator effectively control the development of the CRVP whose size and strength are smaller than those of the anti-counter rotating vortex pair in the far field, thus the centerline and the spanwise-averaged film cooling efficiency are enhanced. The average film cooling efficiency is the biggest in the Fan-Dc = 1 case, which is 80% bigger than that in the Fan-Dc = 0 case and 288% bigger than that in the Cyl-Dc = 0 case.

  4. Fullerene and nanotube formation in cool terrestrial ``dusty plasmas''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, A. P.; Silva, S. R. P.

    1998-11-01

    The simultaneous generation of dust during the deposition of semiconducting thin films by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has so far been regarded as a troublesome by-product. However, we present results from recent microstructural investigations of carbonaceous dust particles from a methane precursor that demonstrate that the technique may be suited to generating fullerene molecules, nanotubes, and nanoparticles. Chemical analysis reveals that these particles contain few contaminant species, and we deduce that they nucleated in the plasma, with the carbon ions possibly self-arranging through the action of coulombic forces.

  5. Radiation shielding calculations for MuCool test area at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Rakhno; Carol Johnstone

    2004-05-26

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this shielding study the results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding calculations performed using the MARS14 code for the MuCool Test Area and including the downstream portion of the target hall and berm around it, access pit, service building, and parking lot are presented and discussed within the context of the proposed MTA experimental configuration.

  6. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Microwave generation in an optical breakdown plasma created by modulated laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, A. A.; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z.; Losev, Leonid L.; Soskov, V. I.

    1990-06-01

    It was established that when laser radiation, intensity modulated at a frequency of 2.2 GHz, interacted with an optical breakdown plasma which it had created, a microwave component appeared in the thermal emf of the plasma. The amplitude of the microwave thermal emf reached 0.7 V for a laser radiation intensity of 6 GW/cm2. Laser radiation with λL = 1.06 μm was converted to the microwave range with λmω = 13 cm in the optical breakdown plasma. A microwave signal power of ~ 0.5 W was obtained from a laser power of ~ 5 MW.

  7. Actively cooled plasma electrode for long pulse operations in a cesium-seeded negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Trainham, Rusty; Jacquot, Claude

    2005-01-01

    An actively cooled plasma electrode has been developed for long pulse operation in a cesium-seeded negative ion source. To keep the electrode temperature at about 300°C, which is the optimum range of temperature to enhance cesium effects, the electrode cooling structure has been designed using three-dimensional numerical simulation assuming that the heat flux from the source plasma was 15W/cm2. Water cooling tubes were brazed to the plasma electrode substrate with spacers made of stainless steel, which acts as a thermal resistance. The fabricated plasma electrode has been tested in a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source called Kamaboko source. The temperature of the electrode reached 280°C for the arc power of 41kW, which is the operating condition required for producing D- beams with current densities exceeding 20mA/cm2. It was demonstrated that the actively cooled plasma electrode is applicable to long pulse operations, meeting the temperature requirement for optimizing the surface-production process of negative ions in the cesium-seeded ion source.

  8. Studies of classical radiation emission from plasma wave undulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Ronald L.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emitted by a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques and are then compared to numerical simulation results. The frequency spectrum and angular distribution of the spontaneous radiation emitted by a single electron and the stimulated radiation gain are obtained analytically, and are then compared to 3-D numerical simulations. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared to the ac FEL undulator and the conventional FEL.

  9. Spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz spectra modulation can be potentially used in the remote sensing. The spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from two plasmas is demonstrated experimentally. With the comparison of the spectra of terahertz radiated from single and two plasmas, the output spectrum of terahertz wave has been proved to be of interference superposition of the two separate terahertz waves. With measurement and analysis of the polarization states of the output terahertz wave, it is fund that the two orthogonal components of THz electric fields have effects on the components involved in the interference of two terahertz waves. The output terahertz radiation from two plasmas is simulated, and the result shows that the distance between two plasmas contributes greatly to the spectrum modulation of terahertz radiation.

  10. Radiation and Ablation Cooling for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1960-01-01

    The necessity of reducing heat transfer to reentry vehicles has led I to the consideration of both radiative and ablation shields. The paper reviews briefly the heating problems for manned vehicles and the means whereby ablation and radiation afford thermal protection. The principal energy disposal and weight parameters are then presented and their relation to the vehicle and trajectory parameters is discussed. A comparative analysis of three types of ablation shield is made and broad conclusions are drawn as to the type of shield most appropriate to manned reentry vehicles.

  11. Combining the Strong Drive Regime with Evaporative Cooling to Control Plasma Parameters in the ALPHA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruth, Celeste; Fajans, Joel; Alpha Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    To make antihydrogen at the ALPHA experiment at CERN, we need to produce antiproton and positron plasmas with consistent plasma parameters. We developed a technique that allows us to eliminate initial variations in the density and the number of particles by combining evaporative cooling and the strong drive regime. The strong drive regime is a non-neutral plasma regime driven by a rotating electric field, where the drive frequency synchronizes with the plasma rotation frequency; this controls the density. Evaporative cooling is a space-charge dominated effect where a potential well is completely filled with the space charge of a plasma and one side is lowered, which sets the on-axis potential. For cold non-neutral plasmas, the density and on-axis potential give a unique solution to the plasma parameters, so we want to simultaneously combine these two techniques. Experimental results using electron plasmas show this combination of techniques does an excellent job at producing plasmas with the same number of particles and densities from a wide range of initial conditions. Special thanks to the United States Department of Energy and to the ALPHA collaboration for supporting this research.

  12. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 5: Integrated radiator/expendable cooling system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheps, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to gather data on a space shuttle active control system (ATCS) incorporating both radiators and an expendable cooling device to provide vehicle heat removal. Two systems were tested and design information was provided for both nominal and limit conditions. The tests verified the concept that an integrated radiator/expendable cooling system can adequately maintain desired water quantities while responding to variations in heat loads and environments. In addition, the need for duct heating was demonstrated, while exhaust nozzle heating was also shown to be unnecessary.

  13. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  14. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    DOEpatents

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  15. THERMAL STABILITY OF MAGNETIZED, OPTICALLY THIN, RADIATIVE COOLING-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Fei; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Ma, Ren-Yi; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of optically thin, two-temperature, radiative cooling-dominated accretion disks. Our linear analysis shows that the disk is thermally unstable without magnetic fields, which agrees with previous stability analysis on the Shapiro-Lightman-Eardley disk. By taking into account the effects of magnetic fields, however, we find that the disk can be, or partly be, thermally stable. Our results may be helpful to understand the outflows in optically thin flows. Moreover, such radiative cooling-dominated disks may provide a new explanation of the different behaviors between black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries on the radio/X-ray correlation.

  16. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  17. Cooling capacity of high porosity open-cell metal foams as passive cryogenic radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Tisha; Ghosh, Indranil

    2017-06-01

    This work presents an innovative avenue for employment of high porosity open-cell metal foams as extended heat transfer surfaces in passive cryogenic radiators. Metal foams are known for being light in weight and possess high surface area density. In contrast to a solid surface, porosity of metal foams makes it feasible for penetration of radiation thereby resulting in higher radiatively interactive surface area. Two 20 PPI metal foams made of copper and aluminum with 94.9% and 90.3% porosity respectively have been chosen for this study. A laboratory-scale test rig measures the radiative cooling capacity of metal foams in vacuum (10-6 mbar) subjected to liquid nitrogen environment. Heat load to the foam has been provided by means of convective fluid loop. Simultaneously, a theoretical model based on radiation-conduction fin analysis has been developed to predict the foam cooling capacity at a specified temperature. The required radiation heat transfer coefficient has been obtained from a previous experiment wherein the foam samples are freely suspended in similar conditions but with no heat load. Lastly, performance of the foams under study has been expressed in terms of a commonly used performance parameter (surface area/cooling capacity) for passive cryogenic radiators.

  18. Theoretical estimation of the radiative cooling rate in the Jovian troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuto; Hashimoto, George L.; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki O.; Sugiyama, Ko-ichiro; Onishi, Masanori; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Jupiter exhibits characteristic cloud activities but their physical mechanism remains poorly understood. Recently, Sugiyama et al. (2014) demonstrated that the Jovian cloud convection may have a significant intermittency in the generation of cumulonimbus clouds with the typical interval length controlled by the radiative cooling rate in the upper troposphere. In spite of such importance as a controlling factor of cloud activity, the tropospheric radiative cooling rate profile has never been systematically quantified for the Jovian system. In the Jovian troposphere, condensable species (NH3, H2S, H2O) and their condensates might significantly contribute to radiative transfer.Here we show numerical estimates of radiative cooling rate profile under Jovian troposphere condition by using our non-gray radiative transfer model that contains optical properties of gas species (H2, He, H2O, CH4, NH3, H2S, and PH3) and cloud layers made of H2O, NH4SH, and NH3 ice particles. The temperature profile is determined by the radiative-convective equilibrium state satisfying an observed potential temperature of Jovian troposphere. The mean vertical distributions of gas and cloud are given on the basis of the latest hydrodynamic simulation of Jovian cloud convection (Sugiyama et al., 2014) and cosmochemical consideration.The modeled atmosphere has the tropopause at ~0.38 bar level. The radiative cooling rate reaches the maximum 15 x 10-3 K/Jovian day at ~0.5 bar level, then decreases with depth and approaches zero below 5 bar level. This profile is largely determined by the thermal absorption and emission due to gaseous NH3 and H2 with a slight modification by solar heating due to CH4. The cloud layers are found to have only a weak effect on either radiative cooling or heating because their opacities in the longwave radiation are estimated to be very small, which agrees with the observed 5-micron spectrum with high brightness temperatures. The uncertainty in H2O abundance in deep

  19. Rock cooling history using thermoluminescence of natural radiation dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rabiul; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Recently, optical luminescences from quartz and feldspar have been proposed to have great potential in low temperature thermochronology (<100°C). The present study aims to explore thermoluminescence (TL) of feldspar to determine cooling history of rock. The advantage of thermoluminescence over optical luminesce is single TL glow curve has different thermal and athermal stability at different temperature of the glow curve, which can be determined by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) method and estimation of rate of anomalous fading in the laboratory. The rock samples were collected from Alex Knob of Franz Josef glacier, New Zealand, which is expected to be one of the rapidly exhuming settings in Southern Alps. The natural luminescence levels, which are in the dynamic equilibrium because of competition between growth due to ambient radioactivity and decay due thermal and athermal loss, are determined using multiple aliquot regeneration (MAR) protocol. Multiple thermal signals with wide range of thermal stability, extracted from composite glow curve, particularly low temperature part which is more sensitive to ambient temperature, is promising for better constraint on late stage cooling history.

  20. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. III. ENTHALPY TRANSFER AS A MECHANISM FOR ENERGY LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Cargill, P. J. E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.u

    2010-07-01

    The cooling of impulsively heated coronal loops is examined with emphasis on the phase when optically thin radiation is dominant over conduction. It is shown that this regime cannot be described as purely 'radiative cooling' because an enthalpy flux to the transition region plays an important and, on occasions, a dominant role. The scaling between coronal temperature and density (T {proportional_to} n {sup {delta}}) during such cooling is reconsidered. The parameter {delta} is determined by the relative importance of the coronal radiative losses to the enthalpy flux to the transition region, which in turn powers the transition region radiation. It is seen that {delta} is in the region of 2 for short loops, while gravitational stratification reduces {delta} to below 2 and values of 1 occur for very long, tenuous loops. This can be understood by noting that for given transition region parameters (and hence required inward enthalpy flux), stratification reduces the coronal losses. It is thus appropriate to refer to this stage of coronal evolution as 'radiative-enthalpy cooling'.

  1. Radiative cooling of shock-heated air in an explosively driven shock tube.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Chien, K. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program to measure the effect of radiative cooling on the enthalpy distribution behind incident shock waves traveling in air. The shock velocity was nominally 16 km/sec and the preshock ambient pressure was varied from 0.4 to 1.6 torr. Shock-tube diameters of 4.7 and 9.4 cm were used to investigate the effects of varying optical depths. Radiative cooling rates were determined from spatially resolved measurements of the profile of the H sub alpha line and from absolute measurements of the continuum radiation. The measured enthalpy profiles are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of Chien and Compton which account for both nongrey and multidimensional aspects of the radiative transport in the shock tube.

  2. Radiation Thermodynamics with Applications to Lasing and Fluorescent Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    the flux temperatures of the fluorescence and pump radiation, respectively. The reversible Carnot limit is obtained by choosing the equality sign in...into light and can be interpreted as an optically pumped laser running in reverse . Optical pumping in such devices drives the level populations out of...relaxation cycle . The simplest possible level scheme of such an absorber is depicted in Fig. 2. The material has only three energy levels, where level 1

  3. Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1986-01-01

    A material for a wavelength-selective radiative cooling system, the material comprising an infrared-reflective substrate coated with magnesium oxide and/or lithium fluoride in a polycrystalline form. The material is non-absorptive for short wavelengths, absorptive from 8 to 13 microns, and reflective at longer wavelengths. The infrared-reflective substrate inhibits absorption at wavelengths shorter than 8 microns, and the magnesium oxide and/or lithium fluoride layers reflect radiation at wavelengths longer than 13 microns.

  4. Low flow, externally air cooled torch for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with axial viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Towhid; Praphairaksit, Narong; Houk, R. S.

    2001-04-01

    The torch wall is cooled largely by air passing through a cooling jacket added to the outside of a Fassel torch. The plasma is viewed axially through a cooled cone interface centered on the axial channel. The outer argon gas flow can be reduced to 7 l min -1 with no compromise in performance or torch lifetime. The plasma exhibits the same 'robustness index' and interference effects from Na as the conventional, high-flow ICP supplied with the particular spectrometer used. Detection limits (DL) for lines at ˜200 nm are poorer by approximately a factor of two, while those for lines at ˜400 nm are actually better than values typically seen for the same lines by axial viewing of a conventional, high-flow ICP.

  5. Vanadium dioxide based Fabry-Perot emitter for dynamic radiative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sydney; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    An asymmetric Fabry-Perot emitter is proposed with a lossless dielectric spacer inserted between a vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin film and an opaque aluminum substrate. Switchable mid-infrared emittance has been achieved due to the insulator-to-metal transition of VO2. When VO2 is dielectric below 341 K, the structure is highly reflective, thereby minimizing thermal radiation loss. Above 345 K, the VO2 becomes metallic and forms a Fabry-Perot resonance cavity with high broadband emissivity around 10 μm wavelength, providing a radiative cooling effect due to enhanced thermal emission. The radiative properties are calculated via a uniaxial transfer matrix method and Bruggeman effective medium theory. The physical mechanisms that provide the observed absorption enhancements are elucidated by examining the total phase shift in the multilayer structure and the phonon modes of VO2. When experiencing the VO2 phase transition, the radiative power of the proposed coating achieves a 6.5 fold enhancement for extraterrestrial spacecraft systems, and 7.3 fold enhancement for terrestrial systems such as buildings, making it a promising choice for dynamic radiative cooling applications in a variable environment. The findings here will facilitate research and development of novel coating materials for radiative cooling applications.

  6. Radiative Shocks And Plasma Jets As Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Ozaki, N.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Rabec le Goahec, M.; Falize, E.; Bouquet, S.; Courtois, C.; Nazarov, W.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Schiavi, A.

    2007-08-02

    Dedicated laboratory astrophysics experiments have been developed at LULI in the last few years. First, a high velocity (70 km/s) radiative shock has been generated in a xenon filled gas cell. We observed a clear radiative precursor, measure the shock temperature time evolution in the xenon. Results show the importance of 2D radiative losses. Second, we developed specific targets designs in order to generate high Mach number plasma jets. The two schemes tested are presented and discussed.

  7. Highly-luminous Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies: Mechanically-driven or Radiatively-driven AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Fabian, Andy

    2011-12-01

    Cool core clusters of galaxies require strong feedback from their central AGN to offset cooling. We present a study of strong cool core, highly-luminous (most with Lx >= 1045 erg s-1), clusters of galaxies in which the mean central AGN jet power must be very high yet no central point X-ray source is detected. Using the unique spatial resolution of Chandra, a sample of 13 clusters is analysed, including A1835, A2204, and one of the most massive cool core clusters, RXCJ1504.1-0248. All of the central galaxies host a radio source, indicating an active nucleus, and no obvious X-ray point source. For all clusters in the sample, the nucleus has an X-ray bolometric luminosity below 2 per cent of that of the entire cluster. We investigate how these clusters can have such strong X-ray luminosities, short radiative cooling-times of the inner intracluster gas requiring strong energy feedback to counterbalance that cooling, and yet have such radiatively-inefficient cores with, on average, Lkin/Lnuc exceeding 200. Explanations of this puzzle carry significant implications for the origin and operation of jets, as well as on establishing the importance of kinetic feedback for the evolution of galaxies and their surrounding medium.

  8. Generation of auroral kilometric radiation in inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskaya, T. M.; Shevelev, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The generation of auroral kilometric radiation in a narrow 3D plasma cavity, in which a weakly relativistic electron flow is propagated along the magnetic field against a low-density cold background plasma, is studied. The time dynamics of the propagation and intensification of waves are analyzed using geometric optics equations. The waves have different wave vector components and start from the cavity center at an altitude of about the Earth's radius at plasma parameters typical for the auroral zone at this altitude. It is shown that the global inhomogeneity of the Earth's magnetic field is of key importance in shaping the auroral kilometric radiation spectra.

  9. Observations of the Earth's Radiation Budget in relation to atmospheric hydrology. 4: Atmospheric column radiative cooling over the world's oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Slingo, Anthony; Webb, Mark J.; Minnett, Peter J.; Daum, Peter H.; Kleinman, Lawrence; Wittmeyer, Ian; Randall, David A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for deriving climatological values of the longwave flux emitted from the clear sky atmosphere to the ice-free ocean surface. It is shown using both theory and data from simulations how the ratio of the surface to top-of-atmosphere (TOA) flux is a simple function of water vapor (W) and a validation of the simple relationship is presented based on a limited set of surface flux measurements. The rms difference between the retrieved surface fluxes and the simulated surface fluxes is approximately 6 W/sq m. The clear sky column cooling rate of the atmosphere is derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) values of the clear sky TOA flux and the surface flux retrieved using Special Scanning Microwave Imager (SSM/I) measurements of w together with ERBE clear sky fluxes. The relationship between this column cooling rate, w, and the sea surface temperature (SST) is explored and it is shown how the cooling rate systematically increases as both w and SST increase. The uncertainty implied in these estmates of cooling are approximately +/- 0.2 K/d. The effects of clouds on this longwave cooling are also explored by placing bounds on the possible impact of clouds on the column cooling rate based on certain assumptions about the effect of clouds on the longwave flux to the surface. It is shown how the longwave effects of clouds in a moist atmosphere where the column water vapor exceeds approximately 30 kg/sq m may be estimated from presently available satellite data with an uncertainty estimated to be approximately 0.2 K/d. Based on an approach described in this paper, we show how clouds in these relatively moist regions decrease the column cooling by almost 50% of the clear sky values and the existence of significant longitudinal gradients in column radiative heating across the equatorial and subtropical Pacific Ocean.

  10. Observations of the Earth's Radiation Budget in relation to atmospheric hydrology. 4: Atmospheric column radiative cooling over the world's oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Slingo, Anthony; Webb, Mark J.; Minnett, Peter J.; Daum, Peter H.; Kleinman, Lawrence; Wittmeyer, Ian; Randall, David A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for deriving climatological values of the longwave flux emitted from the clear sky atmosphere to the ice-free ocean surface. It is shown using both theory and data from simulations how the ratio of the surface to top-of-atmosphere (TOA) flux is a simple function of water vapor (W) and a validation of the simple relationship is presented based on a limited set of surface flux measurements. The rms difference between the retrieved surface fluxes and the simulated surface fluxes is approximately 6 W/sq m. The clear sky column cooling rate of the atmosphere is derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) values of the clear sky TOA flux and the surface flux retrieved using Special Scanning Microwave Imager (SSM/I) measurements of w together with ERBE clear sky fluxes. The relationship between this column cooling rate, w, and the sea surface temperature (SST) is explored and it is shown how the cooling rate systematically increases as both w and SST increase. The uncertainty implied in these estmates of cooling are approximately +/- 0.2 K/d. The effects of clouds on this longwave cooling are also explored by placing bounds on the possible impact of clouds on the column cooling rate based on certain assumptions about the effect of clouds on the longwave flux to the surface. It is shown how the longwave effects of clouds in a moist atmosphere where the column water vapor exceeds approximately 30 kg/sq m may be estimated from presently available satellite data with an uncertainty estimated to be approximately 0.2 K/d. Based on an approach described in this paper, we show how clouds in these relatively moist regions decrease the column cooling by almost 50% of the clear sky values and the existence of significant longitudinal gradients in column radiative heating across the equatorial and subtropical Pacific Ocean.

  11. Optimised radiative cooling of infrared space telescopes and applications to possible missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawarden, T. G.; Cummings, R. O.; Telesco, C. M.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Simple guidelines are presented for designing radiatively cooled space telescopes that must reach low temperatures. The limits achievable by such means are explored and secondary issues such as the on-orbit cooling time are examined. Results to date from a program of more detailed model simulations are summarized. These indicate that radiative cooling can indeed lower the temperatures of large-aperture telescopes sufficiently to make the technique of great interest for future IR space missions, while retaining advantages of size and duration, and can attain such low temperatures in quite reasonable times. Possible missions of this type are outlined, including the Edison proposal, the Japanese SMIRT survey mission, and an intermediate-size ESA/NASA mission.

  12. Passive cryogenic cooling of electrooptics with a heat pipe/radiator.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B E; Goldstein, G A

    1974-09-01

    The current status of the heat pipe is discussed with particular emphasis on applications to cryogenic thermal control. The competitive nature of the passive heat pipe/radiator system is demonstrated through a comparative study with other candidate systems for a 1-yr mission. The mission involves cooling a spaceborne experiment to 100 K while it dissipates 10 W.

  13. Moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice under sequenced infrared radiation heating and cooling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice drying with infrared (IR) radiation has been investigated during recent years and showed promising potential with improved quality and energy efficiency. The objective of this study was to further investigate the moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice heated by IR and cooled ...

  14. Development of radiative-cooling materials. Final technical report: FY 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Work on research and development on glazing and selective emitter materials that will enhance day and night sky radiative cooling is described. The emphasis is on glazing development with a secondary interest in the appropriate selective emitter. The testing focused on the individual material properties. (MHR)

  15. Radiation Power Affected by Current and Wall Radius in Water Cooled Vortex Wall-stabilized Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwao, Toru; Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the arc lamp mixed with metal vapor for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The metal vapor can emit the high intense radiation. In addition, the radiation is derived from the high temperature medium. Because the arc temperature can be controlled by current and arc radius, the radiation can be controlled by the current and arc radius. This research elucidates the radiation power affected by the current and wall radius in wall-stabilized arc of water-cooled vortex type. As a result, the radiation power increases with increasing the square of current / square of wall radius because of the temperature distribution which is derived from the current density at the simulation.

  16. Modelling of intense line radiation from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yim T.; Gee, M.

    1990-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss modelling of Lyman-{alpha} (i.e. Ly-{alpha}) radiation emitted from laser-produced plasmas. We are interested in the application of one of these line radiations to pump a transition of an ion in a different plasma spatially separated from the emitting source. The interest is in perturbing the plasma rather than just probing it as in some backlighting experiments. As a result of pumping, the populations of certain excited levels are inverted. The resulting gain coefficients depend strongly on the population inversion density which in turn depends on the brightness of the pump radiation. As a result, we must produce an intense bright radiation source. In addition, to pump a transition effectively, we also need a pump line with a width larger than the mismatch of the resonance since the widths of the pumped transitions are rather narrow

  17. Change of radiation pattern in a plasma monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahpoush, V.; Shokri, B.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we have numerically solved the dispersion equation of the surface wave propagating on a uniform collisional plasma column. The electric field and surface current distributions have been computed in different situations. We have investigated the effect of plasma frequency variation on the spatial distribution of the surface current. Results show that varying the electron density of the plasma column enables the plasma column to work as a plasma monopole antenna with a fixed geometrical structure and excited frequency which is able to create different radiation patterns. Our numerical analysis also shows that a little change in the radius of the plasma column has a strong influence on the current distribution at the excited frequency in RF region. This effect can be ignored in the usual (metallic) antenna while it is very important in designing of the plasma monopole antenna.

  18. Observation of a Velocity Domain Cooling Instability in a Radiative Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenberger, M.; Lazarus, J.; Doyle, H. W.; Carley, R. E.; Smith, R. A.; Symes, D. R.; Notley, M. M.; Clarke, R. J.; Dunne, M.; Moore, A. S.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2010-11-12

    We report on experimental investigations into strong, laser-driven, radiative shocks in cluster media. Cylindrical shocks launched with several joules of deposited energy exhibit strong radiative effects including rapid deceleration, radiative preheat, and shell thinning. Using time-resolved propagation data from single-shot streaked Schlieren measurements, we have observed temporal modulations on the shock velocity, which we attribute to the thermal cooling instability, a process which is believed to occur in supernova remnants but until now has not been observed experimentally.

  19. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation.more » Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.« less

  20. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  1. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  2. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Klein, R. I.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron-ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  3. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-06

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.

  4. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  5. Direct observations of plasma upflows and condensation in a catastrophically cooling solar transition region loop

    SciTech Connect

    Orange, N. B.; Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Hesterly, K.; Patel, M.; Champey, P.

    2013-12-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we observe fast upflows (v {sub λ} ≤ –10 km s{sup –1}) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8 ≤log T ≤ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop (log T ≤ 6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of +5 km s{sup –1} and –60 km s{sup –1} are observed at footpoint sites. These flows, speeds, and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at the site of upflows only) derived from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic Magnetic Imager's line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30% mass influx at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic cooling event, with subsequent plasma evaporation indicating that the TR is the heating site. From the magnetic flux evolution, we conclude that magnetic reconnection between the footpoint and background field is responsible for the observed fast TR plasma upflows.

  6. Water cooling system leak proofing strategy for the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Hernandez, Wilson; Jaeger, Austin; Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Nikolau, Ethan; Tabbutt, Megan; Waleffe, Roger; Wallace, John; Xu, Yufan; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    An improved system for water cooling several experimental components has been installed for the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U). The most important aspect of the upgrade was to cool the new SmCo permanent magnet cage array. Many methods of connecting water cooling pipes, tubes, and fittings were employed balancing several factors. These factors included ease of assembly/disassembly, reliability, operating pressure, operating temperature, chemical reactivity, and cost. The actions taken to develop the water cooling system will be discussed and illustrated. A focus will be made on sealing cooling water leaks from the inside out on small diameter metal passages (including extrusions, tubing, and fittings). These passages were located inside a vacuum environment, and only the ends of each passage were accessible to do the work. The vacuum vessel of PCX-U is a 1 meter diameter, 1 meter tall cylinder comprised of 0.25'' thick stainless steel. PCX-U has one removable end. Rings of SmCo magnets attached to a removable frame create a cusp field to contain the plasma and provide a resonance surface for the RF. This work is supported by the NSF.

  7. Physical Properties of CO2 Frost Formed by Radiative Cooling in a Mars Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Stephen; Bruckner, A.; Hansen, G.; Cornwall, C.; Kimber, N.; Alvarez, F.

    2013-10-01

    We have performed realistic laboratory simulations of the thermal and radiative environment at the surface of Mars to produce the first samples of carbon dioxide ice formed as it does on Mars, by radiative cooling from a near-pure CO2 gas. It is important to determine the physical characteristics of Mars' seasonal CO2 polar ice caps because these determine their radiative properties which, in turn, control the polar energy balance and the seasonal variation in global surface pressure. It is not known whether they form as fluffy fine-grained deposits, dense solid ice, or something in between. Previous simulations have used conductive cooling, condensing CO2 onto a substrate cooled by liquid nitrogen (Kieffer 1968, Ditteon and Kieffer 1979). This technique favors the growth of grains having the best thermal contact with the surface, resulting in large grain sizes and a coarse texture. On Mars, however, the latent heat released by condensation must be lost radiatively to space. For this experiment, we have constructed a Mars simulation chamber containing low thermal conductivity analog regolith and low pressure CO2 gas. To grow radiation frost in the laboratory requires simultaneous containment of the atmosphere/vapor while allowing infrared radiation to escape (to balance the latent heat of condensation). Planets accomplish this using gravity to hold down the atmosphere. The key to our simulation is the use of a thin polypropylene film that is largely transparent in the thermal infrared yet strong enough to maintain the required pressure differential between our Mars-like "atmosphere" and the vacuum-enclosed space simulator (a liquid-nitrogen cooled plate). We use internal and external light sources to briefly illuminate the frost and obtain high resolution images of its physical morphology and texture using an in situ fiberscope with an articulated tip. Initial results will be presented.

  8. Optics-based approach to thermal management of photovoltaics: Selective-spectral and radiative cooling

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xingshu; Silverman, Timothy J.; Zhou, Zhiguang; ...

    2017-01-20

    For commercial one-sun solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 °C higher than the ambient. In the long term, extreme self-heating erodes efficiency and shortens lifetime, thereby dramatically reducing the total energy output. Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical (and preferably passive) cooling methods to reduce operating temperature of photovoltaic (PV) modules. In this paper, we explore two fundamental (but often overlooked) origins of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical properties of themore » solar module to eliminate parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance thermal emission (radiative cooling). Comprehensive opto-electro-thermal simulation shows that the proposed techniques would cool one-sun terrestrial solar modules up to 10 °C. As a result, this self-cooling would substantially extend the lifetime for solar modules, with corresponding increase in energy yields and reduced levelized cost of electricity.« less

  9. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  10. Influence of atomic kinetics in the simulation of plasma microscopic properties and thermal instabilities for radiative bow shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, G.; Rodríguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ciardi, A.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulations of laboratory astrophysics experiments on plasma flows require plasma microscopic properties that are obtained by means of an atomic kinetic model. This fact implies a careful choice of the most suitable model for the experiment under analysis. Otherwise, the calculations could lead to inaccurate results and inappropriate conclusions. First, a study of the validity of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in the calculation of the average ionization, mean radiative properties, and cooling times of argon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks is performed in this work. In the second part, we have made an analysis of the influence of the atomic kinetic model used to calculate plasma microscopic properties of experiments carried out on magpie on radiative bow shocks propagating in argon. The models considered were developed assuming both local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium and, for the latter situation, we have considered in the kinetic model different effects such as external radiation field and plasma mixture. The microscopic properties studied were the average ionization, the charge state distributions, the monochromatic opacities and emissivities, the Planck mean opacity, and the radiative power loss. The microscopic study was made as a postprocess of a radiative-hydrodynamic simulation of the experiment. We have also performed a theoretical analysis of the influence of these atomic kinetic models in the criteria for the onset possibility of thermal instabilities due to radiative cooling in those experiments in which small structures were experimentally observed in the bow shock that could be due to this kind of instability.

  11. Enhancing photovoltaic efficiency through radiative cooling of solar cells below ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Taqiyyah; Munday, Jeremy

    Sunlight heats up solar cells and the resulting elevated solar cell temperature adversely effects the photovoltaic efficiency and the reliability of the cell. Currently, a variety of active and passive cooling strategies are used to lower the operating temperature of the solar cell. Passive radiative cooling requires no energy input, and is ideal for solar cells; however, previously demonstrated devices still operate above the ambient, leading to a lower efficiency as compared to the ideal Shockley-Queisser limit, which is defined for a cell in contact with an ideal heat sink at ambient temperature (300 K). In this talk, we will describe the use of radiative cooling techniques to lower the cell temperature below the ambient temperature. We show that by combining specifically designed radiative cooling structures with solar cells, efficiencies higher than the limiting efficiency achievable at 300 K can be obtained for solar cells in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. We show that these structures yield an efficiency 0.87% higher than a typical PV module at operating temperatures in a terrestrial application. We also demonstrate an efficiency advantage of 0.4-2.6% for cells in an extraterrestrial environment in near-earth orbit.

  12. Exoplanet Host Star Radiation and Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Güdel, Manuel

    Radiation from host stars controls the planetary energy budget, photochemistry in planetary atmospheres, and mass loss from the outer layers of these atmospheres. Stellar optical and infrared radiation, the major source of energy for the lower atmosphere and planetary surfaces, increases slowly as stars evolve from the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence. Ultraviolet radiation, including the Lyman-α emission line that dominates the UV spectrum of M dwarf stars, controls photochemical reactions of important molecules, including H2O, CO2, and CH4. Extreme ultraviolet and X-radiation from host stars ionizes and heats the outer layers of planetary atmospheres driving mass loss that is rapid for close-in Jupiter-like planets. The strength of the stellar UV, EUV, and X-radiation depends on stellar activity, which decays with time as stellar rotation decreases. As a result, the evolution of an exoplanet's atmosphere depends on the evolution of its host star. We summarize the available techniques for measuring or estimating the X-ray, EUV, and UV radiation of host stars with different spectral types and ages.

  13. Hot ion plasma production in HIP-1 using water-cooled hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Layman, R. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    A steady-state ExB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the mirror throats. Most of the results were for hydrogen, but deuterium and helium plasmas were also studied. Three water-cooled hollow cathodes were operated in the hot-ion plasma mode with the following results: (1) thermally emitting cathodes were not required to achieve the hot-ion mode; (2) steady-state operation (several minutes) was attained; (3) input powers greater than 40 kW were achieved; (4) cathode outside diameters were increased from 1.2 cm (uncooled) to 4.4 cm (water-cooled); (5) steady-state hydrogen plasma with ion temperatures from 185 to 770 eV and electron temperatures from 5 to 21 eV were produced. Scaling relations were empirically obtained for discharge current, ion temperature, electron temperature, and relative ion density as a function of hydrogen gas feed rate, magnetic field, and cathode voltage. Neutrons were produced from deuterium plasma, but it was not established whether thay came from the plasma volume or from the electrode surfaces.

  14. THz Radiation Generation via Laser Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2008-12-01

    Recently radiation generation from the interaction between laser and plasma is studied. Terahertz radiation from photo-conductive antenna which is based on semiconductor technology is widely used, The power is in the order of nano-watt level so that it is hard to use for application. On the other hand, terahertz radiation from laser plasma interaction is much higher than that of semiconductor technology. In our experiments, we have studied by use DARC (dc to ac radiation converter) mechanism by using YAG laser with nano-second pulse duration. DARC is novel radiation source using the interaction between laser-created ionization front and static electric field. The frequency of radiation is determined by both plasma density of ionization front and the geometry of DARC structure. We observed radiation pulse of frequency of 1.2 THz and pulse duration of 2 ps with ZnSe crystal as media detected by EO (electro-optics) sampling technique. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  15. Terahertz waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Hai-Wei; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Otani, Chiko; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-11-23

    Terahertz (THz) waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments with a crossing angle of 25° are investigated. The irradiated THz waves from the crossing filaments show a small THz pulse after the main THz pulse, which was not observed in those from single-filament scheme. Since the position of the small THz pulse changes with the time-delay of two filaments, this phenomenon can be explained by a model in which the small THz pulse is from the second filament. The denser plasma in the overlap region of the filaments changes the movement of space charges in the plasma, thereby changing the angular distribution of THz radiation. As a result, this schematic induces some THz wave from the second filament to propagate along the path of the THz wave from the first filament. Thus, this schematic alters the direction of the THz radiation from the filamentation, which can be used in THz wave remote sensing.

  16. On physical and numerical instabilities arising in simulations of non-stationary radiatively cooling shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjin, D. A.; Glazyrin, S. I.; Manukovskiy, K. V.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2016-06-01

    We describe our modelling of the radiatively cooling shocks and their thin shells with various numerical tools in different physical and calculational setups. We inspect structure of the dense shell, its formation and evolution, pointing out physical and numerical factors that sustain its shape and also may lead to instabilities. We have found that under certain physical conditions, the circular shaped shells show a strong bending instability and successive fragmentation on Cartesian grids soon after their formation, while remain almost unperturbed when simulated on polar meshes. We explain this by physical Rayleigh-Taylor-like instabilities triggered by corrugation of the dense shell surfaces by numerical noise. Conditions for these instabilities follow from both the shell structure itself and from episodes of transient acceleration during re-establishing of dynamical pressure balance after sudden radiative cooling onset. They are also easily excited by physical perturbations of the ambient medium. The widely mentioned non-linear thin shell instability, in contrast, in tests with physical perturbations is shown to have only limited chances to develop in real radiative shocks, as it seems to require a special spatial arrangement of fluctuations to be excited efficiently. The described phenomena also set new requirements on further simulations of the radiatively cooling shocks in order to be physically correct and free of numerical artefacts.

  17. Effectiveness of a night radiative cooling system in different geographical latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoy, A. P.; Granovskiy, A. S.; Baranenko, A. V.; Tsoy, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Growth of world energy consumption and depletion of energy resources make humanity to constantly work on the creation of the energy efficient technologies and increase usage of the alternative and renewable sources of energy. One of such alternative sources of energy is the night radiative cooling (NRC). NRC is an alternative and renewable source of energy, derived from the effective radiation of the Earth into the Space. If the given surface is located so that it looks to the night sky, then under the particular condition more energy can be generated under the effect of radiative cooling, than received from the atmosphere. As a result the temperature of the surface can be kept lower than the temperature of the ambient air. This effect can be used for creation of the refrigeration systems with the low energy consumption and as a result lower negative influence on the environment. During the research it has been identified that the possibility of the NRC usage is mostly predetermined by the specifics of the climate of the each region. In particular climate conditions the refrigeration systems working on night radiative cooling will be more effective that in others.

  18. Observations of infrared radiative cooling in the thermosphere on daily to multiyear timescales from the TIMED/SABER instrument (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    We present observations of the infrared radiative cooling by carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO) in Earth’s thermosphere. These data have been taken over a period of 7 years by the SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite and are the dominant radiative cooling mechanisms for the thermosphere. From the SABER observations we derive vertical profiles of radiative cooling rates (W m-3), radiative fluxes (W m-2), and radiated power (W). In the period from January 2002 through January 2009 we observe a large decrease in the cooling rates, fluxes, and power consistent with the declining phase of solar cycle 23. The power radiated by NO during 2008 when the Sun exhibited few sunspots was nearly one order of magnitude smaller than the peak power observed shortly after the mission began. Substantial short-term variability in the infrared emissions is also observed throughout the entire mission duration. Radiative cooling rates and radiative fluxes from NO exhibit fundamentally different latitude dependence than do those from CO2, with the NO fluxes and cooling rates being largest at high latitudes and polar regions. The cooling rates are shown to be derived relatively independent of the collisional and radiative processes that drive the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the CO2 15 μm and the NO 5.3 μm vibration-rotation bands. The observed NO and CO2 cooling rates have been compiled into a separate dataset and represent a climate data record that is available for use in assessments of radiative cooling in upper atmosphere general circulation models.

  19. Observations of Infrared Radiative Cooling in the Thermosphere on Daily to Multiyear Timescales from the TIMED/SABER Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Hunt, Linda A.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Mertens, Christopher J.; Russell, James M., III; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Picard, Richard; Winick, Jeremy; Wintersteiner, Peter; Thompson, R. Earl; Gordley, Larry L.

    2009-01-01

    We present observations of the infrared radiative cooling by carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO) in Earth s thermosphere. These data have been taken over a period of 7 years by the SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite and are the dominant radiative cooling mechanisms for the thermosphere. From the SABER observations we derive vertical profiles of radiative cooling rates (W/cu m), radiative fluxes (W/sq m), and radiated power (W). In the period from January 2002 through January 2009 we observe a large decrease in the cooling rates, fluxes, and power consistent with the declining phase of solar cycle. The power radiated by NO during 2008 when the Sun exhibited few sunspots was nearly one order of magnitude smaller than the peak power observed shortly after the mission began. Substantial short-term variability in the infrared emissions is also observed throughout the entire mission duration. Radiative cooling rates and radiative fluxes from NO exhibit fundamentally different latitude dependence than do those from CO2, with the NO fluxes and cooling rates being largest at high latitudes and polar regions. The cooling rates are shown to be derived relatively independent of the collisional and radiative processes that drive the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the CO2 15 m and the NO 5.3 m vibration-rotation bands. The observed NO and CO2 cooling rates have been compiled into a separate dataset and represent a climate data record that is available for use in assessments of radiative cooling in upper atmosphere general circulation models.

  20. Effect of solar radiation on the performance of cross flow wet cooling tower in hot climate of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2016-11-01

    In some cities such as Ahvaz-Iran, the solar radiation is very high and the annual-mean-daily of the global solar radiation is about 17.33 MJ m2 d-1. Solar radiation as an external heat source seems to affect the thermal performance of the cooling towers. Usually, in modeling cooling tower, the effects of solar radiation are ignored. To investigate the effect of sunshade on the performance and modeling of the cooling tower, the experiments were conducted in two different states, cooling towers with and without sunshade. In this study, the Merkel's approach and finite difference technique are used to predict the thermal behavior of cross flow wet cooling tower without sunshade and the results are compared with the data obtained from the cooling towers with and without sunshade. Results showed that the sunshade is very efficient and it reduced the outlet water temperature, the approach and the water exergy of the cooling tower up to 1.2 °C, 15 and 1.1 %, respectively and increased the range and the efficiency of the cooling tower up to 29 and 37 %, respectively. Also, the sunshade decreased the error between the experimental data of the cooling tower with sunshade and the modeling results of the cooling tower without sunshade 1.85 % in average.

  1. Laser-Produced Plasmas and Radiation Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-31

    Vlases, H. Rutkowski, A. Hertzberg, A. Hoffman, L. Steinhauer, J. Dawson, D.R. Cohn, W. Halverson, B. Lax, J.D. Daugherty, J.E. Eninger , E.R. Pugh, T.K...Meeting, Albuquerque (October 1974). J.D. Daugherty, J.E. Eninger , D.R. Cohn, and W. Halverson, "Scaling of Laser Heated Plasmas Confined in Long Solenoids...Cohn, H.E. Eninger , W. Halverson, and D.J. Rose, "Stress, Dissipation, and Neutronics Constraints on ’fagnets for Laser-Solenoid Reactors," APS Plasma

  2. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency was observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50 omega miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 10 million/cu cm to 8 hundred million/cu cm. A linear relation was observed betweeen the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  3. A Reduced-order NLTE Kinetic Model for Radiating Plasmas of Outer Envelopes of Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, Alessandro; Mansour, Nagi N.; Panesi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The present work proposes a self-consistent reduced-order NLTE kinetic model for radiating plasmas found in the outer layers of stellar atmospheres. A detailed collisional-radiative kinetic mechanism is constructed by leveraging the most up-to-date set of ab initio and experimental data available in the literature. This constitutes the starting point for the derivation of a reduced-order model, obtained by lumping the bound energy states into groups. In order to determine the needed thermo-physical group properties, uniform and Maxwell–Boltzmann energy distributions are used to reconstruct the energy population of each group. Finally, the reduced set of governing equations for the material gas and the radiation field is obtained based on the moment method. Applications consider the steady flow across a shock wave in partially ionized hydrogen. The results clearly demonstrate that adopting a Maxwell–Boltzmann grouping allows, on the one hand, for a substantial reduction of the number of unknowns and, on the other, to maintain accuracy for both gas and radiation quantities. Also, it is observed that, when neglecting line radiation, the use of two groups already leads to a very accurate resolution of the photo-ionization precursor, internal relaxation, and radiative cooling regions. The inclusion of line radiation requires adopting just one additional group to account for optically thin losses in the α, β, and γ lines of the Balmer and Paschen series. This trend has been observed for a wide range of shock wave velocities.

  4. Imploding Plasma Radiation Sources: Basic Concepts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-31

    100eV 50 eV Figure 6 7 I" FOR ANY DENSITY AND TEMPERTURE , THERE IS A SPECTRUM OF RADIATED PHOTON ENERGIES- ONLY THE HIGHER PHOTON ENERGIES ARE OF... EFFECTS (FIG. 7). 10161 1015-_ i16 Ciol Z. 101__CD 1012- a-. oil -- 1010I 0.01 0.1 1.0 10.0 PHOTON ENERGY (keV) Figure 7 ~8 THE RADIATED POWER IN...CURRENT LAYER OF THICKNESS 6 AND CROSS-SECTION AREA ACURR - 2nRs. THE THICKNESS 6 WOULD INCREASE WITH TIME BY IMAGNETIC DIFFUSION ’ IF THE SURFACE WERE

  5. A capillary discharge plasma source of intense VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel'man, Igor I; Shevelko, A P; Yakushev, O F; Knight, L V; Turley, R S

    2003-01-31

    The results of investigation of a capillary discharge plasma, used as a source of intense VUV radiation and soft X-rays, are presented. The plasma was generated during the discharge of low-inductance condensers in a gas-filled ceramic capillary. Intense line radiation was observed in a broad spectral range (30-400 A) in various gases (CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). The absolute radiation yield for the xenon discharge was {approx}5 mJ (2{pi} sr){sup -1} pulse{sup -1} within a spectral band of width 9 A at 135 A. Such a radiation source can be used for various practical applications, such as EUV projection lithography, microscopy of biological objects in a 'water window', reflectometry, etc. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  6. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  7. Terahertz radiation generation in magnetized plasma under relativistic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Gill, Reenu

    2017-08-01

    We have carried out analytical calculations for the emission of Terahertz (THz) radiation in the magnetized and rippled density plasma by beating of two high intensity cosh-Gaussian laser beams, which are capable of creating a relativistic effect in electrons' motion. We find the expression for the THz field achieved during the relativistic laser plasma interaction and study the effect of density of ripples, laser beam width, and magnetic field on the THz field. The role of skewness parameters of the lasers is also discussed in detail for efficient THz radiation.

  8. Non-LTE modeling of radiatively driven dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, H. A.

    2017-03-01

    There are now several experimental facilities that use strong X-ray fields to produce plasmas with densities ranging from ˜1 to ˜103 g/cm3. Large laser facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the Omega laser reach high densities with radiatively driven compression, short-pulse lasers such as XFELs produce solid density plasmas on very short timescales, and the Orion laser facility combines these methods. Despite the high densities, these plasmas can be very far from LTE, due to large radiation fields and/or short timescales, and simulations mostly use collisional-radiative (CR) modeling which has been adapted to handle these conditions. These dense plasmas present challenges to CR modeling. Ionization potential depression (IPD) has received much attention recently as researchers work to understand experimental results from LCLS and Orion [1,2]. However, incorporating IPD into a CR model is only one challenge presented by these conditions. Electron degeneracy and the extent of the state space can also play important roles in the plasma energetics and radiative properties, with effects evident in recent observations [3,4]. We discuss the computational issues associated with these phenomena and methods for handling them.

  9. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  10. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Hafizi, B.; Chen, Y.-H.; Johnson, L. A.; Peñano, J. R.; Helle, M. H.; Mamonau, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ˜2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  11. Collisional Radiative Models for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartgers, Bart; van Dijk, Jan; van der Mullen, Joost

    1999-10-01

    Collisional Radiative models are a useful tool for studying plasmas. In their simplest form, they are used to calculate an atomic state distribution function (ASDF) from given electron and neutral densities and an electron temperature. Additionally, global ionization and recombination coefficients can be calculated as a function of electron density and temperature. In turn, these coefficients are used as input for the general plasma model

  12. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random walk treatment of inelastic collisions. The calculated electron distributions have been incorporated into another code that evaluates both the excited atomic state densities within the plasma and the radiative flux emitted from the plasma.

  13. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasma facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.

  14. Electrolyte changes in the blood plasma of broilers as influenced by cooling during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. L.; Gangwar, P. C.

    1987-09-01

    High temperature significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the Na+ and K+ concentrations in the blood plasma of both the sexes of broilers during 4 to 8 weeks of age. Relatively constant levels of these electrolytes were observed during this phase of growth and the sex of the bird had no significant effect on their levels. Greater broiler weights and higher levels of plasma electrolyte were achieved by the use of cooling systems (which were more effective in the hot dry part of the summer than in the hot humid part).

  15. Research on Radiation Characteristic of Plasma Antenna through FDTD Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianming; Fang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiuyuan; Liu, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The radiation characteristic of plasma antenna is investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach in this paper. Through using FDTD method, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in free space in stretched coordinate. And the iterative equations of Maxwell equation are derived. In order to validate the correctness of this method, we simulate the process of electromagnetic wave propagating in free space. Results show that electromagnetic wave spreads out around the signal source and can be absorbed by the perfectly matched layer (PML). Otherwise, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in plasma by using the Boltzmann-Maxwell theory. In order to verify this theory, the whole process of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma under one-dimension case is simulated. Results show that Boltzmann-Maxwell theory can be used to explain the phenomenon of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma. Finally, the two-dimensional simulation model of plasma antenna is established under the cylindrical coordinate. And the near-field and far-field radiation pattern of plasma antenna are obtained. The experiments show that the variation of electron density can introduce the change of radiation characteristic. PMID:25114961

  16. Research on radiation characteristic of plasma antenna through FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianming; Fang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiuyuan; Liu, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The radiation characteristic of plasma antenna is investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach in this paper. Through using FDTD method, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in free space in stretched coordinate. And the iterative equations of Maxwell equation are derived. In order to validate the correctness of this method, we simulate the process of electromagnetic wave propagating in free space. Results show that electromagnetic wave spreads out around the signal source and can be absorbed by the perfectly matched layer (PML). Otherwise, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in plasma by using the Boltzmann-Maxwell theory. In order to verify this theory, the whole process of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma under one-dimension case is simulated. Results show that Boltzmann-Maxwell theory can be used to explain the phenomenon of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma. Finally, the two-dimensional simulation model of plasma antenna is established under the cylindrical coordinate. And the near-field and far-field radiation pattern of plasma antenna are obtained. The experiments show that the variation of electron density can introduce the change of radiation characteristic.

  17. Kinetic and radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of x-ray heating in laboratory photoionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    In experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories a cm-scale cell filled with neon gas was driven by the burst of broadband x-rays emitted at the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch turning the gas into a photoionized plasma. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the plasma. The data show a highly-ionized neon plasma with a rich line absorption spectrum that permits the extraction of the ionization distribution among Be-, Li-, He- and H-like ions. Analysis of the spectra produced atomic ground and low excited state areal densities in these ions, and from the ratio of first-excited to ground state populations in Li-like neon a temperature of 19±4eV was extracted to characterize the x-ray heating of the plasma. To interpret this observation, we have performed data-constrained view-factor calculations of the spectral distribution of the x-ray drive, self-consistent modeling of electron and atomic kinetics, and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the conditions of the experiment, the electron distribution thermalizes quickly, has a negligible high-energy tail, and is very well approximated by a single Maxwellian distribution. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with either LTE or NLTE (i.e. non-equilibrium) atomic physics provide a more complete modeling of the experiment. We found that in order to compute electron temperatures consistent with observation inline non-equilibrium collisional-radiative neon atomic kinetics needs to be taken into account. We discuss the details of LTE and NLTE simulations, and the impact of atomic physics on the radiation heating and cooling rates that determine the plasma temperature. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  18. The effect of line-tying on the radiative MHD stability of coronal plasmas with radial pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of photospheric line-tying, i.e., solar coronal loop structures, was investigated in terms of the effect on radiative modes and the influence that different radial pressure profiles exert on the effects of line-tying on radiative MHD stability. Energy is assumed dissipated by heat conduction and radiation and zero- and first-order solutions are obtained for the radiative time scales. Line-tying is a magnetic tension in the zero-order MHD mode and produces stability. Heat conduction occurs along bent field lines in first-order MHD modes when plasmas cross the field lines. Irradiated cool-core loops can experience MHD instabilities in the cylinder center, while line-tying can stabilize the plasma in the surrounding hot medium. Line-tying also adds stability to magnetosonic and condensation modes.

  19. Passive radiative cooling design with broadband optical thin-film filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecebas, Muhammed Ali; Menguc, M. Pinar; Kosar, Ali; Sendur, Kursat

    2017-09-01

    The operation of most electronic semiconductor devices suffers from the self-generated heat. In the case of photovoltaic or thermos-photovoltaic cells, their exposure to sun or high temperature sources make them get warm beyond the desired operating conditions. In both incidences, the solution strategy requires effective radiative cooling process, i.e., by selective absorption and emission in predetermined spectral windows. In this study, we outline two approaches for alternative 2D thin film coatings, which can enhance the passive thermal management for application to electronic equipment. Most traditional techniques use a metallic (silver) layer because of their high reflectivity, although they display strong absorption in the visible and near-infrared spectrums. We show that strong absorption in the visible and near-infrared spectrums due to a metallic layer can be avoided by repetitive high index-low index periodic layers and broadband reflection in visible and near-infrared spectrums can still be achieved. These modifications increase the average reflectance in the visible and near-infrared spectrums by 3-4%, which increases the cooling power by at least 35 W/m2. We also show that the performance of radiative cooling can be enhanced by inserting an Al2O3 film (which has strong absorption in the 8-13 μm spectrum, and does not absorb in the visible and near-infrared) within conventional coating structures. These two approaches enhance the cooling power of passive radiative cooling systems from the typical reported values of 40 W/m2-100 W/m2 and 65 W/m2 levels respectively.

  20. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  1. Radiation protection performance for the dismantling of the WWR-M primary cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Yu N; Luferenko, E D; Shevel, V N

    2014-12-01

    The WWR-M is a light-water-cooled and moderated heterogonous research reactor with a thermal output of 10 MW. The reactor has been in operation for >50 y and has had an excellent safety record. A non-hermeticity of the inlet line of the primary cooling circuit (PCC) was found, and the only reasonable technical solution was the complete replacement of the PCC inlet and outlet pipe lines. Such a replacement was a challenging technical task due to the necessity to handle large size components with complex geometries under conditions of high-level radiation fields, and therefore, it required detailed planning aiming to reduce staff exposure. This paper describes the dismantling and removal of the PCC components focusing on radiation protection issues.

  2. Radiating plasma species density distribution in EUV-induced plasma in argon: a spatiotemporal experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; van de Ven, T. H. M.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we experimentally study temporally and spatially resolved radiating plasma species density distribution in plasma induced by irradiating a low pressure argon gas with high energy photons with a wavelength of 13.5 nm, i.e. extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This is done by recording the optical emission spatially and temporally resolved by an iCCD camera as a function of the argon gas pressure. Our experimental results show that the emission intensity, i.e. density of radiating plasma species, depends quadratically on the gas pressure. The linear term is due to photoionization and simultaneous excitation by EUV photons, the quadratic term due to electron impact excitation by electrons generated by photoionization. The decay of radiating plasma species can be divided into two phases. At time scales shorter than 10 μs (first phase), the decay is governed by radiative decay of radiating plasma species. At longer time scales (second phase, >10 μs), the decay is dominated by diffusion and subsequent de-excitation at the wall. The experimental decay and expansion during this phase corresponds well with a simplified diffusion model. In order to gain more insight in this exotic type of plasma, we compare the electron density from previous measurements with the results obtained here.

  3. Finite difference solution for transient radiative cooling of a conducting semitransparent square region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Molls, F. B.

    1992-01-01

    Transient solutions were obtained for a square region of heat conducting semitransparent material cooling by thermal radiation. The region is in a vacuum environment, so energy is dissipated only by radiation from within the medium leaving through its boundaries. The effect of heat conduction during the transient is to partially equalize the internal temperature distribution. As the optical thickness of the region is increased, the temperature gradients increase near the boundaries and corners, unless heat conduction is large. The solution procedure must provide accurate temperature distributions in these regions to prevent error in the calculated radiation losses. Two-dimensional numerical Gaussian integration is used to obtain the local radiative source term. A finite difference procedure with variable space and time increments is used to solve the transient energy equation. Variable spacing was used to concentrate grid points in regions with large temperature gradients.

  4. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  5. Nonlinearly induced radiation from an overdense plasma region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1983-09-01

    Consideration is given to a new mechanism for the nonlinear transparency of a bounded plasma. The expectation is that the incident electromagnetic wave will decay into quasistatic eigenmodes that can propagate around the overdense region. It is shown that most of the transformed energy can be reradiated in particular directions from the particular plasma surface regions where the plasma parameters have proper values. Attention is also given to the stationary state, which is established when the power of the induced radiation is equal to that of the incident.

  6. The absorption and emission spectrum of radiative cooling galactic fountain gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Robert A.; Shapiro, Paul R.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the time-dependent, nonequilibrium thermal and ionization history of gas cooling radiatively from 10(exp 6) K in a one-dimensional, planar, steady-state flow model of the galactic fountain, including the effects of radiative transfer. Our previous optically thin calculations explored the effects of photoionization on such a flow and demonstrated that self-ionization was sufficient to cause the flow to match the observed galactic halo column densities of C 4, Si 4, and N 5 and UV emission from C 4 and O 3 in the constant density (isochoric) limit, which corresponded to cooling regions homogeneous on scales D less than or approximately equal to 1 kpc. Our new calculations which take full account of radiative transfer confirm the importance of self-ionization in enabling such a flow to match the data but allow a much larger range for cooling region sizes, i.e. D(sub 0) greater than or approximately equal to 15 pc. For an initial flow velocity v(sub 0) approximately equal to 100 km/s, comparable to the sound speed of a 10(exp 6) K gas, the initial density is found to be n(sub h,0) is approximately 2 x 10(exp -2) cm(exp -3), in reasonable agreement with other observation estimates, and D(sub 0) is approximately equal to 40 pc. We also compare predicted H(alpha) fluxes, UV line emission, and broadband x-ray fluxes with observed values. One dimensional numerical hydrodynamical calculations including the effects of radiative cooling are also presented.

  7. The Impact of Radiative Atmospheres on Spectroscopic and Photometric Analyses of Cool White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavalier-Hurtubise, É.; Bergeron, P.

    2017-03-01

    It has been recently suggested in the literature that convective energy transport can be seriously impeded by magnetic fields, in particular in the photosphere of white dwarf stars. We push this idea to the extreme and explore the consequences of using purely radiative atmosphere models for the spectroscopic and photometric analyses of cool (Teff<12,000 K) DA white dwarfs. We also perform a similar analysis for known magnetic DA stars with weak sub-megagauss magnetic fields.

  8. Ultra-thin plasma radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Peter S.

    2017-01-24

    A position-sensitive ionizing-radiation counting detector includes a radiation detector gas chamber having at least one ultra-thin chamber window and an ultra-thin first substrate contained within the gas chamber. The detector further includes a second substrate generally parallel to and coupled to the first substrate and defining a gas gap between the first substrate and the second substrate. The detector further includes a discharge gas between the substrates and contained within the gas chamber, where the discharge gas is free to circulate within the gas chamber and between the first and second substrates at a given gas pressure. The detector further includes a first electrode coupled to one of the substrates and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first electrode. The detector further includes a first discharge event detector coupled to at least one of the electrodes for detecting a gas discharge counting event in the electrode.

  9. Laboratory Simulation of CO2 Ice Condensation on Mars by Radiative Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, S. E.; Paige, D. A.; Smythe, W. D.

    1997-07-01

    We have performed realistic laboratory simulations of the thermal and radiative environment at the surface of Mars to produce the first samples of carbon dioxide ice formed as it does on Mars, by radiative cooling from a 600 Pa, near-pure CO2 gas. It is important to determine the physical characteristics of Mars' seasonal CO2 polar ice caps because these determine their radiative properties which, in turn, control the polar energy balance and the seasonal variation in global surface pressure. It is not known whether they form as fluffy fine-grained deposits, dense solid ice, or something in between. Previous simulations have used conductive cooling, condensing CO2 onto a substrate cooled by liquid nitrogen (Kieffer 1968, Ditteon and Kieffer 1979). This technique favors the growth of grains having the best thermal contact with the surface, resulting in large grain sizes and a coarse texture. On Mars, however, the latent heat released by condensation must be lost radiatively to space. To simulate this process in a lab it is necessary to separate the gas from the space simulator (a lN2-cooled black copper plate) using a material which is transparent at the appropriate thermal infrared wavelengths (> 10 /mu). For this experiment, we have constructed a Mars simulation chamber, an air-tight copper pot containing low thermal conductivity "soil" and CO2 gas, placed inside a thermal/vacuum chamber for insulation. To enable radiative cooling of the gas and "soil" inside the Mars chamber, its top is an infrared window; thin (12 /mum) polypropylene film. To be sure that the latent heat of condensation is not lost conductively to the chamber, the walls of the Mars chamber are maintained at a temperature just slightly higher than the condensation temperature. As the CO2 condenses, the pressure is maintained at 600 Pa automatically with a pressure control system. We will present measurements of the physical and radiative properties of the ice including; temperature, texture

  10. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, Dario; Portale, Giuseppe; Androsch, René

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  11. Double planar wire array as a compact plasma radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Osborne, G. C.; Rudakov, L. I.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.

    2008-03-15

    Magnetically compressed plasmas initiated by a double planar wire array (DPWA) are efficient radiation sources. The two rows in a DPWA implode independently and then merge together at stagnation producing soft x-ray yields and powers of up to 11.5 kJ/cm and more than 0.4 TW/cm, higher than other planar arrays or low wire-number cylindrical arrays on the 1 MA Zebra generator. DPWA, where precursors form in two stages, produce a shaped radiation pulse and radiate more energy in the main burst than estimates of implosion kinetic energy. High radiation efficiency, compact size (as small as 3-5 mm wide), and pulse shaping show that the DPWA is a potential candidate for ICF and radiation physics research.

  12. Tunable Circularly Polarized Terahertz Radiation from Magnetized Gas Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-06-26

    It is shown, by simulation and theory, that circularly or elliptically polarized terahertz radiation can be generated when a static magnetic (B) field is imposed on a gas target along the propagation direction of a two-color laser driver. The radiation frequency is determined by √[ω(p)(2)+ω(c)(2)/4]+ω(c)/2, where ω(p) is the plasma frequency and ω(c) is the electron cyclotron frequency. With the increase of the B field, the radiation changes from a single-cycle broadband waveform to a continuous narrow-band emission. In high-B-field cases, the radiation strength is proportional to ω(p)(2)/ω(c). The B field provides a tunability in the radiation frequency, spectrum width, and field strength.

  13. Plasma shock waves excited by THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, S.; Rupper, G.; Shur, M.

    2016-10-01

    The shock plasma waves in Si MOS, InGaAs and GaN HEMTs are launched at a relatively small THz power that is nearly independent of the THz input frequency for short channel (22 nm) devices and increases with frequency for longer (100 nm to 1 mm devices). Increasing the gate-to-channel separation leads to a gradual transition of the nonlinear waves from the shock waves to solitons. The mathematics of this transition is described by the Korteweg-de Vries equation that has the single propagating soliton solution.

  14. Dense Plasma Heating and Radiation Generation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-30

    INSTRUCTIONS ~~~~~~ B OUET ~iNPGEFORE COMPLETING FORM I. RPORTmumsZ. GVT AC INNo.i S. ACCIPIENT’S CATALOG MUM694 ~~ 80-0981 F,6-~IS~ � 4. r r~ejandsw... p M. Kristiansen and M.O. Hagler AFOSR 74-2639 ~ 9. 9%RFOR4fpN ORGAMIZAT1om NAME ANO ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMEN T. DRO.IECT, TASK Plasma Laboratory...8217AA P ’t1JIMIS Dept. of Electrical Engineering 2301/A Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409, 61102F 20Il It. CONTROLLING OFFICE MAMIE AND AOhESS

  15. Analysis of radiation performances of plasma sheet antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Zhang, Zu-Fan; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    A novel concept of plasma sheet antennas is presented in this paper, and the radiation performances of plasma sheet antennas are investigated in detail. Firstly, a model of planar plasma antenna (PPA) fed by a microstrip line is developed, and its reflection coefficient is computed by the JE convolution finite-difference time-domain method and compared with that of the metallic patch antenna. It is found that the design of PPA can learn from the theory of the metallic patch antenna, and the impedance matching and reconstruction of resonant frequency can be expediently realized by adjusting the parameters of plasma. Then the PPA is mounted on a metallic cylindrical surface, and the reflection coefficient of the conformal plasma antenna (CPA) is also computed. At the same time, the influence of conformal cylinder radius on the reflection coefficient is also analyzed. Finally, the radiation pattern of a CPA is given, the results show that the pattern agrees well with the one of PPA in the main radiation direction, but its side lobe level has deteriorated significantly.

  16. Simulations of a molecular plasma in collisional-radiative nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Moreau, Stephane

    1993-01-01

    A code for the simulation of nonequilibrium plasmas is being developed, with the capability to couple the plasma fluid-dynamics for a single fluid with a collisional-radiative model, where electronic states are treated as separate species. The model allows for non-Boltzmann distribution of the electronic states. Deviations from the Boltzmann distributions are expected to occur in the rapidly ionizing regime behind a strong shock or in the recombining regime during a fast expansion. This additional step in modeling complexity is expected to yield more accurate predictions of the nonequilibrium state and the radiation spectrum and intensity. An attempt at extending the code to molecular plasma flows is presented. The numerical techniques used, the thermochemical model, and the results of some numerical tests are described.

  17. Surface protection from high energy electrons and X-ray radiation analysis in tokamak plasma.

    PubMed

    Salar Elahi, A; Ghoranneviss, M

    2017-05-24

    Plasma cooling due to hard x-ray radiation from the Runaway electrons is an important issue in tokamaks. Thus, developing effective methods to reduce the Runaway electrons and the emitted hard x-ray is also important for optimal tokamak plasma operation. In this study, we investigated the effects of external fields on hard x-ray intensity and the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. In other words, we presented the effects of positive biased limiter and Resonant Helical Field (RHF) on the MHD fluctuations and hard x-ray emission from the Runaway electrons. MHD activity and hard x-ray intensity were analyzed using Wavelet transform in the presence of external fields and without them. The experimental results showed that the MHD activity and therefore the hard x-ray intensity could be controlled by the external electric and magnetic fields.

  18. Intense ion beam generation, plasma radiation source and plasma opening switch research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, D. A.; Coleman, M. D.; Qi, N.; Similon, P. L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on intense ion beam diodes, plasma opening switches and dense z-pinch plasma radiators. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to map the electrostatic potential profile in a plasma-prefilled magnetically insulated ion diode. In a simple planar diode, the measured profile is inconsistent with the electrons being confined in a sheath near the cathode by the magnetic field. Rather, the profile implies the presence of electrons throughout the accelerating gap. A theoretical model of the penetration of current and magnetic field into a plasma, and of the current-driven effective collision frequency has been developed. The snowplow action of the rising magnetic field causes a steep rise in the plasma density at the leading edge. The subsequent multistreaming of the ions caused by ion reflection at the current layer could lead to ion heating through collective effects. The two-dimensional electron flow in the plasma cathode vacuum gap is also treated. Dense z-pinch plasma radiation source experiments have been initiated on the LION accelerator using gas puff and fine wire loads. The x-pinch was found to be a more effective way to generate soft x-rays than a single wire pinch or a gas puff implosion. Plasma opening switch experiments being initiated, and plasma anode ion diode development work being terminated are also briefly described.

  19. Hydrodynamic modelling of accretion impacts in classical T Tauri stars: radiative heating of the pre-shock plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, G.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Bonito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. It is generally accepted that, in classical T Tauri stars, the plasma from the circumstellar disc accretes onto the stellar surface with free-fall velocity and the impact generates a shock. The impact region is expected to contribute to emission in different spectral bands; many studies have confirmed that the X-rays arise from the post-shock plasma but, otherwise, there are no studies in the literature investigating the origin of the observed UV emission which is apparently correlated to accretion. Aims: We investigated the effect of radiative heating of the infalling material by the post-shock plasma at the base of the accretion stream, with the aim to identify in which region a significant part of the UV emission originates. Methods: We developed a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model describing the impact of an accretion stream onto the stellar surface; the model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling of an optically thin plasma, the thermal conduction, and the heating due to absorption of X-ray radiation. The latter term represents the heating of the infalling plasma due to the absorption of X-rays emitted from the post-shock region. Results: We found that the radiative heating of the pre-shock plasma plays a non-negligible role in the accretion phenomenon. In particular, the dense and cold plasma of the pre-shock accretion column is gradually heated up to a few 105K due to irradiation of X-rays arising from the shocked plasma at the impact region. This heating mechanism does not affect significantly the dynamics of the post-shock plasma. On the other hand, a region of radiatively heated gas (that we consider a precursor) forms in the unshocked accretion column and contributes significantly to UV emission. Our model naturally reproduces the luminosity of UV emission lines correlated to accretion and shows that most of the UV emission originates from the precursor.

  20. A high-tech low-energy house with solar thermal and sky radiation cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Takeo; Fujino, Tetsuji; Suzuki, Masanori

    1998-07-01

    A unique energy-independent house (HARBEMAN HOUSE; HARmony BEtween Man And Nature) incorporating solar thermal, underground coolness, sky radiation cooling, photovoltaic electricity generation and rain water was built in Sendai, Japan on July, 1996. The average solar energy received on a horizontal surface in January is 7900 kJ/m{sup 2}/day. This paper reports the experimental results since September 1996 to date. The annual variations of water temperature in the underground main tank, heating/cooling/domestic hot water demands, collected and emitted heats by solar collector and sky radiator, were obtained by the measured data. The paper also clarifies the method of computer simulation results for the HARBEMAN HOUSE and its results compared with the annual experimental data. The proposed HARBEMAN house, which meets almost all its energy demands, including space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, electricity generated by photovoltaic cell and rainwater for standard Japanese homes. The proposed system has two operational modes: (i) a long-term thermal energy storage mode extending from September to next March and (ii) a long-term cool storage mode extending from April to August. The system is intended to utilize as little energy as possible to collect and emit the heat. This paper also clarifies the primary energy consumption, the external costs (externalities) and the effect for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions of the proposed house are only one-tenth of these of the conventional standard house. Finally, this paper validates the external costs of this house, which have been intensively discussed in recent years in European countries. The present energy-sufficient house will be promising in the 21st century to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, which will be one of the key factors for mitigating global warming.

  1. Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-14

    A selective radiation cooling material which is absorptive only in the 8 to 13 microns wavelength range is accomplished by placing ceramic magnesium oxide and/or polycrystalline lithium fluoride on an infrared-reflective substrate. The reflecting substrate may be a metallic coating, foil or sheet, such as aluminum, which reflects all atmospheric radiation from 0.3 to 8 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride being nonabsorptive at those wavelengths. <10% of submicron voids in the material is permissible in which case the MgO and/or LiF layer is diffusely scattering, but still nonabsorbing, in the wavelength range of 0.3 to 8 microns. At wavelengths from 8 to 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride radiate power through the ''window'' in the atmosphere, and thus remove heat from the reflecting sheet of material and the attached object to be cooled. At wavelengths longer than 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride reflects the atmospheric radiation back into the atmosphere. This high reflectance is only obtained if the surface is sufficiently smooth: roughness on a scale of 1 micron is permissible but roughness on a scale of 10 microns is not. An infrared-transmitting cover or shield is mounted in spaced relationship to the material to reduce convective heat transfer. If this is utilized in direct sunlight, the infrared transmitting cover or shield should be opaque in the solar spectrum of 0.3 to 3 microns.

  2. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOEpatents

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  3. Effect of Radiative Cooling on Cloud-SST Relationship within the Tropical Pacific Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Chou, Ming-Dah; Lau, Ka-Ming; Li, Xiao-Fan; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A recent analysis found a negative correlation between the area-mean cloud amount and the corresponding mean Sea Surface Temperature (SST) within the cloudy areas. The SST-cloud relation becomes more evident when the SST contrast between warm pool and surrounding cold pool (DSST) in the tropical Pacific is stronger than normal. The above feature is related to the finding that the strength of subsidence over the cold pool is limited by radiative cooling because of its small variability. As a result, the area of radiatively-driven subsidence must expand in response to enhanced low-boundary forcing due to SST warming or enhanced basin-scale DSST. This leads to more cloud free regions and less cloudy regions. The increased ratio of cloud-free areas to cloudy areas leads to more high SST areas (>29.50C) due to enhanced solar radiation.

  4. Quantifying cloud-base updraft speeds of marine stratocumulus from cloud-top radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Rosenfeld, D.; Li, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds play a significant role in the earth's radiation budget. The updrafts at cloud base (Wb) govern the supersaturation and therefore the activation of cloud condensation nuclei, which modifies the cloud and precipitation properties. A statistically significant relationship between Wb and cloud-top radiative cooling rate (CTRC) is found from the measurements of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) on board a ship sailing between Honolulu and Los Angeles has documented. A similar relation was found on the Graciosa Island, but with greater scatter and weaker correlation presumably due to perturbation of island effect. Based on the relation, we are able to estimate the cloud-base updrafts using a simple formula: Wb = -0.43*CTRC + 22.46 ±13, where the Wb and CTRC have the units of cm/s and W/m2, respectively. This quantification can be utilized by satellite remote sensing and model parameterization of Wb.

  5. Quantifying cloud base updraft speeds of marine stratocumulus from cloud top radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Youtong; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Li, Zhanqing

    2016-11-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds play a significant role in the Earth's radiation budget. The updrafts at cloud base (Wb) govern the supersaturation and therefore the activation of cloud condensation nuclei, which modifies the cloud and precipitation properties. A statistically significant relationship between Wb and cloud top radiative cooling rate (CTRC) is found from the measurements of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility on board a ship sailing between Honolulu and Los Angeles. A similar relation was found on Graciosa Island but with greater scatter and weaker correlation presumably due to the island effect. Based on the relation, we are able to estimate the cloud base updrafts using a simple formula: Wb = -0.44 × CTRC + 22.30 ± 13, where the Wb and CTRC have units of cm/s and W/m2, respectively. This quantification can be utilized in satellite remote sensing and parameterizations of Wb in general circulation models.

  6. Thermal physiology. Keeping cool: Enhanced optical reflection and radiative heat dissipation in Saharan silver ants.

    PubMed

    Shi, Norman Nan; Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Camino, Fernando; Bernard, Gary D; Yu, Nanfang; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2015-07-17

    Saharan silver ants, Cataglyphis bombycina, forage under extreme temperature conditions in the African desert. We show that the ants' conspicuous silvery appearance is created by a dense array of triangular hairs with two thermoregulatory effects. They enhance not only the reflectivity of the ant's body surface in the visible and near-infrared range of the spectrum, where solar radiation culminates, but also the emissivity of the ant in the mid-infrared. The latter effect enables the animals to efficiently dissipate heat back to the surroundings via blackbody radiation under full daylight conditions. This biological solution for a thermoregulatory problem may lead to the development of biomimetic coatings for passive radiative cooling of objects. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. A NEW DIAGNOSTIC OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS IN RADIATIVELY COOLED SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Wright, A.

    2015-09-20

    We show that it is possible to measure Alfvénic Mach numbers, defined as the shock velocity in the flow divided by the Alfvén velocity, for low-velocity (V{sub shock} ≲ 100 km s{sup −1}) radiative shocks. The method combines observations of bright forbidden lines with a measure of the size of the cooling zone, the latter typically obtained from spatial separation between the Balmer emission lines and the forbidden lines. Because magnetic fields become compressed as gas in the postshock region cools, even relatively weak preshock magnetic fields can be detected with this method. We derive analytical formulae that explain how the spatial separations relate to emission-line ratios, and compute a large grid of radiatively cooled shock models to develop diagnostic diagrams that can be used to derive Alfvénic Mach numbers in flows. Applying the method to existing data for a bright knot in the HH 111 jet, we obtain a relatively low Alfvénic Mach number of ∼2, indicative of a magnetized jet that has super-magnetosonic velocity perturbations within it.

  8. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    DOE PAGES

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; ...

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasmamore » facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.« less

  9. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Temporal and thermodynamic characteristics of plasma formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatavichyus, M. V.; Kazakyavichyus, É.; Orshevski, G.; Danyunas, V.

    1991-11-01

    An investigation was made of plasma formation accompanying the interaction with aluminum, iron, and VK-6 alloy targets of nanosecond radiation from a YAG:Nd3+ laser (Emax = 50 mJ, τ = 3-8 ns). The duration of the plasma formation process depended weakly on the laser radiation parameters [the power density was varied in the range 1-3 GW/cm2, the pulse rise time in the range 2-8 ns, or the rate of rise of the power density in the range (1-8) × 108 W · cm - 2 · ns -1]. A study was made of the establishment of a local thermodynamic equilibrium in a plasma jet excited by radiation from nanosecond and picosecond (E = 30 mJ, τ = 40 ps) lasers. The maximum of the luminescence from an aluminum plasma excited by picosecond laser radiation was found to correspond to a local thermodynamic equilibrium. A local thermodynamic equilibrium could be absent in the case of excitation by nanosecond laser radiation.

  10. Electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing in low density plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.; Doreswamy, C. V.

    1996-01-01

    An unavoidable step in the process of space exploration is to use high-power, very large spacecraft launched into Earth orbit. Obviously, the spacecraft will need powerful energy sources. Previous experience has shown that electrical discharges occur on the surfaces of a high-voltage array, and these discharges (arcs) are undesirable in many respects. Moreover, any high voltage conductor will interact with the surrounding plasma, and that interaction may result in electrical discharges between the conductor and plasma (or between two conductors with different potentials, for example, during docking and extravehicular activity). One very important aspect is the generation of electromagnetic radiation by arcing. To prevent the negative influence of electromagnetic noise on the operation of spacecraft systems, it seems necessary to determine the spectra and absolute levels of the radiation, and to determine limitations on the solar array bias voltage that depend on the parameters of LEO plasma and the technical requirements of the spacecraft equipment. This report describes the results of an experimental study and computer simulation of the electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing on spacecraft surfaces. A large set of high quality data was obtained during the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE, flight STS-62) and ground test. These data include the amplitudes of current, pulse forms, duration of each arc, and spectra of plasma waves. A theoretical explanation of the observed features is presented in this report too. The elaborated model allows us to determine the parameters of the electromagnetic noise for different frequency ranges, distances from the arcing site, and distinct kinds of plasma waves.

  11. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of complex sidearms subject to solar radiation and surface cooling.

    PubMed

    Dittko, Karl A; Kirkpatrick, Michael P; Armfield, Steven W

    2013-09-15

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to model two lake sidearms subject to heating from solar radiation and cooling from a surface flux. The sidearms are part of Lake Audrey, NJ, USA and Lake Alexandrina, SA, Australia. The simulation domains are created using bathymetry data and the boundary is modelled with an Immersed Boundary Method. We investigate the cooling and heating phases with separate quasi-steady state simulations. Differential heating occurs in the cavity due to the changing depth. The resulting temperature gradients drive lateral flows. These flows are the dominant transport process in the absence of wind. Study in this area is important in water quality management as the lateral circulation can carry particles and various pollutants, transporting them to and mixing them with the main lake body.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by helium microwave driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E. Alves, L. L.

    2016-06-28

    The extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by helium microwave-driven (2.45 GHz) plasmas operating at low-pressure conditions was investigated. Novel data regarding emitted spectral lines of excited helium atoms and ions in the 20–33 nm wavelength range and their intensity behavior with variation of discharge operational conditions are presented. The intensity of all the spectral emissions was found to strongly increase with the microwave power delivered to the plasma. Furthermore, the intensity of the ionic spectral emissions decreases by nearly one order of magnitude as the pressure was raised from 0.2 to 0.5 mbar.

  14. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  15. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  16. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-09-21

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. Whenmore » placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Lastly, our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.« less

  17. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Merrigan, M. A.; Elder, M. G.; Sena, J. T.; Keddy, E. S.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, it is found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700 F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90,000 ft lowers the peak hot-section temperatures to around 2800 F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature.

  18. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. ); Silverstein, C.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  19. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  20. Numerical modelling of lawsonite thin film as radiative cooling minerals for dew harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlattar, M.; Laatioui, S.; Oualim, E. M.; Mazroui, M.; Mouhsen, A.; Harmouchi, M.

    Harvesting dew can be used as a renewable complementary source of water both for drinking and agriculture in specific arid or semi-arid water-stressed areas. Condensation of water vapor by nighttime radiative cooling is the phenomenon that can be explained the dew formation on plants or surfaces. In this paper, we propose the lawsonite mineral, as a potential radiative cooling material, for exploiting this natural phenomenon. Furthermore, a computer model that includes meteorological parameters, obtained from the coastal region of Southern Morrocco (Mirleft-South of Agadir), is used to determine the thermal balance and fit to dew mass evolution. In order to form global estimates of dew formation potential via our dew formation model, we combined different meteorological data with radiative properties of natural lawsonite condenser (CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2·H2O) to enhance the modelled dew yield. The daily modelled yields show that significant amounts of dew water can be calculated as a function of the condenser temperature, the thickness condenser as well as the wind speed.

  1. Jeans instability of rotating magnetized quantum plasma: Influence of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, H.; Pensia, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The effect of radiative heat-loss function and rotation on the Jeans instability of quantum plasma is investigated. The basic set of equations for this problem is constructed by considering quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using normal mode analysis, the general dispersion relation is obtained. This dispersion relation is studied in both, longitudinal and transverse direction of propagations. In both case of longitudinal and transverse direction of propagation, the Jeans instability criterion is modified due to presence of radiative heat-loss function and quantum correction.

  2. Radiation Yield and Dynamics of Planar Wire-Array Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Fedin, Dmitry; Ivanov, Vladimir; Esaulov, Andrey; Nalajala, Vidya; Shrestha, Ishor; Pokala, Shivaji; Ouart, Nicholas; Yilmaz, Fatih; Batie, Steven; Astanovitsky, Alexey; Laca, Paul; Le Galloudec, Bruno; Cowan, Thomas; Velikovich, Alexander; Chuvatin, Alexander; Gradel, Joshua

    2006-01-05

    In our experiments, we compared planar wire arrays, to which little energy could be coupled via the conventional magnetic-to-kinetic conversion mechanism, to cylindrical wire arrays of comparable dimensions and mass. The planar wire arrays were shown to radiate much higher peak power and more energy in sub-keV and keV spectral ranges, than cylindrical wire arrays. We tested the theoretical conjecture that enhanced resistivity due to the small-scale inhomogeneity of wire-array plasmas has a major effect on dynamics, energy coupling to and radiation performance of wire-array Z-pinches.

  3. Thermal instability of a radiative and resistive coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal instability is believed to determine the evolution and formation of cool structures in the solar atmosphere such as the transition region and prominences (or filaments). The linear modes that arise in a sheared, force-free, magnetic field due to thermal instability are studied numerically. Previous studies have considered separately modes that arise due to the effects of radiation, compression, anisotropic thermal conduction, and ohmic heating. Here the results of such studies are integrated, first by presenting simple arguments that illustrate the essential physics of ideal, sheared-field, condensation modes, and second by showing numerically how finite resistivity affects the condensational instability in parameter regimes applicable to the solar corona.

  4. Nonlinear currents generated in plasma by a radiation pulse with a frequency exceeding the electron plasma frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2016-09-15

    It is shown that the nonlinear currents generated in plasma by a radiation pulse with a frequency exceeding the electron plasma frequency change substantially due to a reduction in the effective electron–ion collision frequency.

  5. Radiative cooling test facility and performance evaluation of 4-MIL aluminized polyvinyl fluoride and white-paint surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kruskopf, M.S.; Berdahl, P.; Martin, M.; Sakkal, F.; Sobolewski, M.

    1980-11-01

    A test facility designed to measure the amount of radiative cooling a specific material or assembly of materials will produce when exposed to the sky is described. Emphasis is placed upon assemblies which are specifically designed to produce radiative cooling and which therefore offer promise for the reduction of temperatures and/or humidities in occupied spaces. The hardware and software used to operate the facility are documented and the results of the first comprehensive experiments are presented. A microcomputer-based control/data acquisition system was employed to study the performance of two prototype radiator surfaces: 4-mil aluminized polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and white painted surfaces set below polyethylene windscreens. The cooling rates for materials tested were determined and can be approximated by an equation (given). A computer model developed to simulate the cooling process is presented. (MCW)

  6. Computation of vertical profiles of longwave radiative cooling over the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Perry G.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1995-01-01

    An important quantity whose magnitude has not been throughly examined is the vertical distribution of heating in the Tropics. The details of the vertical distribution of heating have a significant impact on a number of phenomena, including the 30-60 day oscillation, sometimes known as the intraseasonal oscillation. Prior attempts to establish the structure of the heating relied on limited field data or assimilated data, coupled with climatological radiative heating parameters. The availability of high quality global-scale datasets has made it possible to make more accurate calculations than were possible a few years ago. An important component of the apparent heat budget is the longwave radiative cooling, which in this paper is found by using the ECMWF/WCRP/TOGA Archive 2 and ISCCP C1 datasets, together with a well-established parameterization scheme. A method is developed that can be used to estimate the vertical structure of cloud amounts based on top-of-atmosphere cloud observations, and the results are used with a wide-band longwave parameterization to produce longwave cooling rates over the tropical Pacific Ocean. Outgoing longwave radiation is calculated and compared the ERBE results. The calculated values are generally higher than those from ERBE, though the spatial distributions are similar. Some significant problems exist with the ECMWF upper-tropospheric water vapor amounts, which could imply uncertainties of 0.5 C/day in the calculated cooling rates. This is comparable to the differences associated with the minimum or random overlap assumptions used to generate cloud profiles.

  7. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  8. Radiative divertor plasmas with convection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Leornard, A.W.; Porter, G.D.; Wood, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation of divertor heat flux on DIII-D is shown to greatly exceed the limits imposed by assumptions of energy transport dominated by electron thermal conduction parallel to the magnetic field. Approximately 90% of the power flowing into the divertor is dissipated through low Z radiation and plasma recombination. The dissipation is made possible by an extended region of low electron temperature in the divertor. A one-dimensional analysis of the parallel heat flux finds that the electron temperature profile is incompatible with conduction dominated parallel transport. Plasma flow at up to the ion acoustic speed, produced by upstream ionization, can account for the parallel heat flux. Modeling with the two-dimensional fluid code UEDGE has reproduced many of the observed experimental features.

  9. A nonventing cooling system for space environment extravehicular activity, using radiation and regenerable thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayes, Stephen A.; Trevino, Luis A.; Dinsmore, Craig E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the selection, design, and testing of a prototype nonventing regenerable astronaut cooling system for extravehicular activity space suit applications, for mission durations of four hours or greater. The selected system consists of the following key elements: a radiator assembly which serves as the exterior shell of the portable life support subsystem backpack; a layer of phase change thermal storage material, n-hexadecane paraffin, which acts as a regenerable thermal capacitor; a thermoelectric heat pump; and an automatic temperature control system. The capability for regeneration of thermal storage capacity with and without the aid of electric power is provided.

  10. Astrophysical Jets with Conical Wire Arrays: Radiative Cooling, Rotation and Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Bott, S. C.

    2009-01-21

    Highly collimated outflows or jets are produced by a number of astrophysical objects including protostars. The morphology and collimation of these jets is thought to be strongly influenced by the effects of radiative cooling, angular momentum and the interstellar medium surrounding the jet. Astrophysically relevant experiments are performed with conical wire array z-pinches investigating each of these effects. It is possible in each case to enter the appropriate parameter regime, leading the way towards future experiments where these different techniques can be more fully combined.

  11. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  12. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  13. Absorption of resonance laser radiation in ultracold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaparev, N. Ya

    2017-08-01

    The absorption of resonance laser radiation in an expanding ultracold plasma is considered. Initially the optical thickness τ0 of the medium decreases due to correlation heating of the ions; the subsequent lowering of τ0 is due to the variation of radial ion velocities. The expanding optically thick medium is shown to become transparent when the ratio between the particle expansion velocity at the sphere boundary and the thermal velocity exceeds the optical thickness τ0.

  14. Polarization of atomic radiation in stochastic plasma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenko, V.I.; Fisch, N.J.

    1997-05-12

    When a laser pulse of certain polarization or an electron beam excites atoms in a plasma, the atomic spectrum of the radiation emitted by the atoms exhibits differently polarized line core and line wings. This unusual effect, which is predicted to occur under a variety of conditions, can be accompanied by the appearance of the forbidden component in the spectrum, with polarization opposite to that of the exciting laser pulse.

  15. Theory of density fluctuations in strongly radiative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. E.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.

    2016-03-01

    Derivation of the dynamic structure factor, an important parameter linking experimental and theoretical work in dense plasmas, is possible starting from hydrodynamic equations. Here we obtain, by modifying the governing hydrodynamic equations, a new form of the dynamic structure factor which includes radiative terms. The inclusion of such terms has an effect on the structure factor at high temperatures, which suggests that its effect must be taken into consideration in such regimes.

  16. Resonant four-wave mixing of laser radiation in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, A.; Joshi, C. )

    1991-10-01

    Experimental evidence of resonant four-wave mixing of CO{sub 2} laser radiation in a plasma is presented for the first time to our knowledge. Comparison of the experiment with theory indicates that, while collisions lead to a narrow spectral width of the ion acoustic resonance, convection and detuning owing to laser heating limit the enhancement of the signal reflectivity to below the expected value.

  17. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Conversion of the energy of fast electrons to thermal plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergunova, G. A.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the conversion of the energy of highly energetic fast electrons, generated by the action of CO2 laser radiation on a target, into characteristic radiation emitted by a plasma formed from shell targets which, for instance, may be present inside targets irradiated by the CO2 laser. Analytical formulas are obtained for the temperature of the converted radiation. The results show that it is possible to control this radiation by choosing the parameters of the target and of the fast electron flux. The efficiency of conversion into characteristic thermal radiation is found numerically to be 95%. This method of conversion is more favorable than direct interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a target since the emitting region is localized in the target mass. When a laser interacts with a target the mass of this region increases with time and so the temperature of the emitted radiation is lower than in the case when fast electrons act on the target.

  18. Study of radiatively sustained cesium plasmas for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Dunning, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at developing a high temperature solar electric converter are reported. The converter concept is based on the use of an alkali plasma to serve as both an efficient high temperature collector of solar radiation as well as the working fluid for a high temperature working cycle. The working cycle is a simple magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Rankine cycle employing a solid electrode Faraday MHD channel. Research milestones include the construction of a theoretical model for coupling sunlight in a cesium plasma and the experimental demonstration of cesium plasma heating with a solar simulator in excellent agreement with the theory. Analysis of a solar MHD working cycle in which excimer laser power rather than electric power is extracted is also presented. The analysis predicts a positive gain coefficient on the cesium-xenon excimer laser transition.

  19. Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or

  20. Radiative cooling of a solidifying droplet layer including absorption and scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1987-01-01

    A simple solution for the transient cooling of a solidifying layer filled with drops that can emit and scatter radiation is discussed, with application to a liquid drop radiator proposed for the Space Station (Mattick and Hertzberg, 1981). The layer remains at uniform temperature during solidification, and the outer portions rapidly lose heat, producing a variation along the length of the layer in the distribution of liquid concentration across the layer. The analysis is used to obtain both the amount of energy dissipated by the two-phase system at uniform temperature and the velocity distribution necessary to maintain a uniform liquid fraction across the entire layer at all locations along the layer length.

  1. Numerical simulation of zirconia splat formation and cooling during plasma spray deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, YeMeng; Zheng, YunZhai; Zheng, ZhengHuan; Li, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    The adhesion/cohesion of plasma-sprayed coatings depends strongly on the flattening and solidification of individual splat, taking place in a few microseconds. Such a short time makes it difficult to thoroughly study the splat formation. A three-dimensional numerical model incorporating the substrate melting and solidification was developed using CFD method to simulate the flattening and cooling of zirconia splat involving the influence of interface thermal contact resistance. On smooth substrate where the thermal contact resistance is zero, the splat has a cooling rate of 1.7 × 108 K/s, resulting in substrate melting, and a disk-like splat is formed with a spread factor of approximately 3.5. While on substrate with thermal contact resistance of 10-7 m2 K/W, corresponding cooling rate is 3.17 × 108 K/s and a central splat surrounded by satellite droplets is formed due to the rapid solidification of the splat edges.

  2. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Winds and Circumstellar Environments of Hot and Cool Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2010-06-01

    We present modeling research work of the winds and circumstellar environments of a variety of prototypical hot and cool massive stars using advanced radiative-transfer calculations. This research aims at unraveling the detailed physics of various mass-loss mechanisms of luminous stars in the upper portion of the H-R diagram. Very recent 3D radiative-transfer calculations, combined with hydrodynamic simulations, show that radiatively-driven winds of OB supergiants are structured due to large-scale density and velocity fields caused by rotating bright spots at the stellar equator. The mass-loss rates computed from matching Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) in IUE observations of HD 64760 (B Ib) do not reveal appreciable changes from the rates of unstructured (smooth) wind models. Intermediate yellow supergiants (such as the yellow hypergiant ρ Cas, F-G Ia0), on the other hand, show prominent spectroscopic signatures of strongly increased mass-loss rates during episodic outbursts that cause dramatic changes of the stellar photospheric conditions. Long-term high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring of cool hypergiants near the Yellow Evolutionary Void reveals that their mass-loss rates and wind-structure are dominated by photospheric eruptions and large-amplitude pulsations that impart mechanical momentum to the circumstellar environment by propagating acoustic (shock) waves. In massive red supergiants, however, clear evidence for mechanical wave propagation from the sub-photospheric convection zones is lacking, despite their frequently observed spectroscopic and photometric variability. Recent spatially resolved HST-STIS observations inside Betelgeuse's (M Iab) very extended chromosphere and dust envelope show evidence of warm chromospheric gas far beyond the dust-condensation radius of radiative-transfer models. Models for these long-term spectroscopic observations demonstrate that the chromospheric pulsations are not spherically symmetric. The STIS observations

  3. In Situ Synchrotron Radiation Diffraction during Solidification of Mg15Gd: Effect of Cooling Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakács, G.; Mendis, C. L.; Tolnai, D.; Stark, A.; Schell, N.; Ovri, H.; Wolff, M.; Kainer, K. U.; Gröbner, J.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.; Hort, N.

    In situ synchrotron radiation diffraction experiments were performed during the solidification of Mg15Gd at the P07 (HEMS) Beamline of PETRA III at DESY. The measurements were carried out in the chamber of a modified DIL 805A/D dilatometer with a beam energy of 100 keV. The temperature was controlled by type S thermocouples welded on the steel lid of the graphite crucibles containing the samples. The two dimensional diffraction patterns were recorded with a Perkin Elmer 1621 Flatpanel. The phase evolution observed during cooling at rates of 5, 20 and 100 K/min show formation of GdMg3 at elevated temperatures, which transforms into GdMg5 during continued cooling. Phases were identified with the information from the Pearsońs database for crystalline structures. This is different from that predicted with thermodynamic databases. Although the equilibrium phase diagram suggests a simple eutectic solidification, the experiments show a metastable phase formation and its transformation. The formation of GdMg3 becomes more pronounced at higher cooling rates.

  4. Cooling following large volcanic eruptions corrected for the effect of diffuse radiation on tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2005-03-01

    The lack of a larger cooling in proxy records of climate change following large volcanic eruptions such as those of Tambora in 1815 and Krakatau in 1883 has long been a puzzle for climatologists. These records, however, may have been biased by enhanced tree growth for several years following each eruption induced by additional diffuse radiation caused by the stratospheric volcanic aerosol clouds from the eruptions. By comparing proxy reconstructions of climate with and without tree ring data, this effect is demonstrated for the five largest eruptions for the period 1750-1980. When proxy records of Northern Hemisphere climate change are corrected for this proposed diffuse effect, there is no impact on climate change for time scales longer than 20 years. However, it now appears that there was a hemispheric cooling of about 0.6°C for a decade following the unknown volcanic eruption of 1809 and Tambora in 1815, and a cooling of 0.3°C for several years following the Krakatau eruption of 1883.

  5. Vibrational branching ratios and radiative lifetimes in the laser cooling of AlBr.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yufeng; Wan, Mingjie

    2017-02-15

    The feasibility of laser cooling of the AlBr molecule is investigated using ab initio quantum chemistry. Potential energy curves, permanent dipole moments, and transition dipole moments for the ground state X(1)Σ(+) and the first two excited states (a(3)Π and A(1)Π) are calculated using the multi-reference configuration interaction plus Davidson corrections (MRCI+Q) method with the ACVQZ basis set; the spin-orbit coupling effects are also taken into account in electronic structure calculations at the MRCI level. Based on the acquired potential energy curves and transition dipole moments, highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors (f00 = 0.9540, f11 = 0.8172) and vibrational branching ratios (R00 = 0.9708, R11 = 0.8420) for the transition are determined. Radiative lifetime calculations of the A(1)Π1 (ν' = 0-4) state are found to be short (9.16-11.48 ns) enough for rapid laser cooling. The proposed main cycling laser drives the transition at the wavelength λ00 = 279.19 nm. The vibrational branching loss ratios of the A(1)Π1 (ν') state to the intervening states a(3)Π0(+) and a(3)Π1 are small (<5.2 × 10(-6)) enough to be negligible. The present theoretical results indicate that the AlBr molecule is a promising candidate for laser cooling.

  6. Improving photovoltaic performance through radiative cooling in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Safi, Taqiyyah S; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-09-21

    The method of detailed balance, introduced by Shockley and Queisser, is often used to find an upper theoretical limit for the efficiency of semiconductor pn-junction based photovoltaics. Typically the solar cell is assumed to be at an ambient temperature of 300 K. In this paper, we describe and analyze the use of radiative cooling techniques to lower the solar cell temperature below the ambient to surpass the detailed balance limit for a cell in contact with an ideal heat sink. We show that by combining specifically designed radiative cooling structures with solar cells, efficiencies higher than the limiting efficiency achievable at 300 K can be obtained for solar cells in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. We show that our proposed structure yields an efficiency 0.87% higher than a typical PV module at operating temperatures in a terrestrial application. We also demonstrate an efficiency advantage of 0.4-2.6% for solar cells in an extraterrestrial environment in near-earth orbit.

  7. Plasma radiation distribution and radiation loads onto the vessel during transient events in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Philipps, V.; Andrew, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Coad, J. P.; Eich, T.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fundamenski, W.; Jachmich, S.; Matthews, G. F.; McCormick, K.; Mertens, Ph.; Rapp, J.; Sergienko, G.; Stamp, M. F.; JET EFDA contributors

    2009-06-01

    The JET bolometer camera system allows greatly improved tomographic reconstruction of the radiation pattern on a timescale of the order of the typical duration of a Type I ELM period (≈0.1-0.4 ms). The ELM-induced radiation is always higher at the inner than at the outer divertor with an approximately linear increase of the asymmetry up to a total Δ WELM of about 0.6 MJ and a decrease for higher Δ WELM. Large Type I ELMs with energy losses above 0.65-0.7 MJ show enhanced radiation losses, which are associated with the ablation of thick co-deposited layers in the inner divertor. During the 'compound' phase, plasma contamination can increase but does not usually lead to radiative collapse of the plasma. It is found that the radiation distribution during the transient events is poloidally asymmetric with a maximum of the observed 'radiation peaking factor' for the disruptive current quench and for MARFEs of about 4.5, and less than 5 during VDEs.

  8. Storm time variation of radiative cooling of thermosphere by nitric oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. V. Sunil; Bag, Tikemani; Bharti, Gaurav

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental vibration-rotation band emission (Δν=1, Δ j=0,± 1) by nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm is one of the most important cooling mechanisms in thermosphere. The collisional vibrational excitation of NO(ν=0) by impact with atomic oxygen is the main source of vibrationally excited nitric oxide. The variation of NO density depends on latitude, longitude and season. The present study aims to understand how the radiative flux gets influenced by the severe geomagnetic storm conditions. The variation of Nitric Oxide (NO) radiative flux exiting thermosphere is studied during the superstorm event of 7-12 November, 2004. The observations of TIMED/SABER suggest a strong anti-correlation with the O/N_2 ratio observed by GUVI during the same period. On a global scale the NO radiative flux showed an enhancement during the main phase on 8 November, 2004, whereas maximum depletion in O/N_2 is observed on 10 November, 2004. Both O/N_2 and NO radiative flux were found to propagate equatorward due to the effect of meridional wind resulting from joule and particle heating in polar region. Larger penetrations is observed in western longitude sectors. These observed variations are effectively connected to the variations in neutral densities. In the equatorial sectors, O/N_2 shows enhancement but almost no variation in radiative flux is observed. The possible reasons for the observed variations in NO radiative emission and O/N_2 ratios are discussed in the light of equator ward increase in the densities and prompt penetration.

  9. Guiding of Laser Beams in Plasmas by Radiation Cascade Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-11-27

    The near-resonant heatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few-fs electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the beat frequency. Consequently, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted from the fundamental by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion [S. Kalmykov and G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046403 (2006)]. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser frequency, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the multi-frequency laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. A train of high-intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self-guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasmas. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW [using the code WAKE by P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] show that achieving GeV electron energy is possible under realistic experimental parameters.

  10. Guiding of Laser Beams in Plasmas by Radiation Cascade Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-11-01

    The near-resonant heatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few-fs electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the beat frequency. Consequently, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted from the fundamental by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion [S. Kalmykov and G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046403 (2006)]. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser frequency, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the multi-frequency laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. A train of high-intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self-guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasmas. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW [using the code WAKE by P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] show that achieving GeV electron energy is possible under realistic experimental parameters.

  11. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipchak, A. I.; Solomonov, V. I.; Tel'nov, V. A.; Osipov, V. V.

    1995-04-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma formed by the interaction of a CO2 laser pulse with a target in atmospheric air. The results obtained indicate that the main role in the process of filling the excited states in a laser plasma is played by a recombination cascade and that both atoms and molecules of the atmospheric gases are excited. The result also show that a laser plasma can be used in spectroscopic analysis of multicomponent samples. The solution of the thermophysical problem of heating of a target by laser radiation supports the existing ideas on the process of formation of a plasma near the target surface in air.

  12. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Low-threshold generation of harmonics and hard x radiation in a laser plasma. 1. Single-peak generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Kazakov, K. Kh

    1993-02-01

    A source of hard x radiation based on a laser plasma has been studied under conditions such that parametric instabilities are driven in the plasma at low intensities of the pump radiation (below 10 GW/cm2). A qualitative interpretation of the observed effects is offered.

  13. Collisional and radiative processes in high-pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt H.; Kurunczi, Peter F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2002-05-01

    Discharge plasmas at high pressures (up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure), where single collision conditions no longer prevail, provide a fertile environment for the experimental study of collisions and radiative processes dominated by (i) step-wise processes, i.e., the excitation of an already excited atomic/molecular state and by (ii) three-body collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of excimers. The dominance of collisional and radiative processes beyond binary collisions involving ground-state atoms and molecules in such environments allows for many interesting applications of high-pressure plasmas such as high power lasers, opening switches, novel plasma processing applications and sputtering, absorbers and reflectors for electromagnetic waves, remediation of pollutants and waste streams, and excimer lamps and other noncoherent vacuum-ultraviolet light sources. Here recent progress is summarized in the use of hollow cathode discharge devices with hole dimensions in the range 0.1-0.5 mm for the generation of vacuum-ultraviolet light.

  14. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Navarro-Cavallé, J.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  15. Nighttime Infrared radiative cooling and opacity inferred by REMS Ground Temperature Sensor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Torres, Javier; Paz Zorzano, María; Pla-García, Jorge; Rafkin, Scot; Lepinette, Alain; Sebastián, Eduardo; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    Due to the low density of the Martian atmosphere, the temperature of the surface is controlled primarily by solar heating, and infrared cooling to the atmosphere and space, rather than heat exchange with the atmosphere. In the absence of solar radiation the infrared (IR) cooling, and then the nighttime surface temperatures, are directly controlled by soil termal inertia and atmospheric optical thickness (τ) at infrared wavelengths. Under non-wind conditions, and assuming no processes involving latent heat changes in the surface, for a particular site where the rover stands the main parameter controlling the IR cooling will be τ. The minimal ground temperature values at a fixed position may thus be used to detect local variations in the total dust/aerosols/cloud tickness. The Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS) and Air Temperature Sensor (ATS) in the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover provides hourly ground and air temperature measurements respectively. During the first 100 sols of operation of the rover, within the area of low thermal inertia, the minimal nightime ground temperatures reached values between 180 K and 190 K. For this season the expected frost point temperature is 200 K. Variations of up to 10 K have been observed associated with dust loading at Gale at the onset of the dust season. We will use these measurements together with line-by-line radiative transfer simulations using the Full Transfer By Optimized LINe-by-line (FUTBOLIN) code [Martín-Torres and Mlynczak, 2005] to estimate the IR atmospheric opacity and then dust/cloud coverage over the rover during the course of the MSL mission. Monitoring the dust loading and IR nightime cooling evolution during the dust season will allow for a better understanding of the influence of the atmosphere on the ground temperature and provide ground truth to models and orbiter measurements. References Martín-Torres, F. J. and M. G. Mlynczak

  16. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  17. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Formation of amplified spontaneous radiation in an expanding laser plasma allowing for refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulov, A. V.; Derzhiev, V. I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Terskikh, A. O.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    1990-06-01

    Calculations are made of the divergence of amplified spontaneous radiation in a laser plasma allowing for refraction by free electrons. An analysis is made of the divergence of the radiation generated due to a 3p→3s' transition in neon-like ions. Calculations are made of the divergence of the radiation due to the 4→3 transition in the O VIII ion allowing for refraction during expansion of a Formvar plasma.

  18. The Fully Developed Stage of Radiative Plasma Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazak, G.; Klapisch, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Colombant, D. G.; Gardner, J. H.; Phillips, L.; Metzler, N.

    1999-11-01

    Radiating plasma structures (RPS) discovered in the simulations by Dahlburg et al., JQSRT 54, 113 (1995), and observed experimentally by Obenschain et al., BAPS 43, 1710 (1998), are nonlinear waves with peaked density and pressure profiles that propagate upstream the mass flow in the blow-off plasma. The RPS can strongly modify laser energy coupling to a direct-drive fusion target, and imprint large mass perturbations into the target. We study the developed stage of RPS in plastic targets irradiated by a KrF laser analytically and numerically. Shock-like features of the RPS (density jump, super-to-subsonic transition, and downstream expansion), characteristic of laser-supported detonation waves, are discussed. Self-similar and steady-state propagation regimes of RPS are described analytically and compared to the simulations. Methods of controlling the emergence of the RPS via adjusting the density profile in the target and the laser pulse shape are discussed.

  19. Electromagnetic radiation trapped in the magnetosphere above the plasma frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Shaw, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electromagnetic noise band is frequently observed in the outer magnetosphere by the Imp 6 spacecraft at frequencies from about 5 to 20 kHz. This noise band generally extends throughout the region from near the plasmapause boundary to near the magnetopause boundary. The noise typically has a broadband field strength of about 5 microvolts/meter. The noise band often has a sharp lower cutoff frequency at about 5 to 10 kHz, and this cutoff has been identified as the local electron plasma frequency. Since the plasma frequency in the plasmasphere and solar wind is usually above 20 kHz, it is concluded that this noise must be trapped in the low-density region between the plasmapause and magnetopause boundaries. The noise bands often contain a harmonic frequency structure which suggests that the radiation is associated with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency.

  20. Xenon plasma sustained by pulse-periodic laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudoy, I. G.; Solovyov, N. G.; Soroka, A. M.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu.

    2015-10-15

    The possibility of sustaining a quasi-stationary pulse-periodic optical discharge (POD) in xenon at a pressure of p = 10–20 bar in a focused 1.07-μm Yb{sup 3+} laser beam with a pulse repetition rate of f{sub rep} ⩾ 2 kHz, pulse duration of τ ⩾ 200 μs, and power of P = 200–300 W has been demonstrated. In the plasma development phase, the POD pulse brightness is generally several times higher than the stationary brightness of a continuous optical discharge at the same laser power, which indicates a higher plasma temperature in the POD regime. Upon termination of the laser pulse, plasma recombines and is then reinitiated in the next pulse. The initial absorption of laser radiation in successive POD pulses is provided by 5p{sup 5}6s excited states of xenon atoms. This kind of discharge can be applied in plasma-based high-brightness broadband light sources.

  1. Propagation of radiation in fluctuating multiscale plasmas. II. Kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pal Singh, Kunwar; Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H.; Tyshetskiy, Yu.

    2012-11-15

    A numerical algorithm is developed and tested that implements the kinetic treatment of electromagnetic radiation propagating through plasmas whose properties have small scale fluctuations, which was developed in a companion paper. This method incorporates the effects of refraction, damping, mode structure, and other aspects of large-scale propagation of electromagnetic waves on the distribution function of quanta in position and wave vector, with small-scale effects of nonuniformities, including scattering and mode conversion approximated as causing drift and diffusion in wave vector. Numerical solution of the kinetic equation yields the distribution function of radiation quanta in space, time, and wave vector. Simulations verify the convergence, accuracy, and speed of the methods used to treat each term in the equation. The simulations also illustrate the main physical effects and place the results in a form that can be used in future applications.

  2. A quantum transport model for atomic line radiation in plasmas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Joël

    2017-02-01

    Emission and absorption lines in plasmas are investigated theoretically using a phase space formulation of quantum electrodynamics. A transport equation for the one-photon Wigner function is derived and formulated in terms of the noncommutative Moyal product. This equation reduces to the standard radiative transfer equation at the large spectral band limit, when the characteristic spectral band of the emission and absorption coefficients is larger than the inverse photon absorption length and time. We examine deviations to this limit. An ideal slab geometry is considered. The Wigner function relative to hydrogen Lyman α in stellar atmospheric conditions is calculated.

  3. Calculation of atomic structures and radiative properties of fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrah, Walid; Pain, Jean-Christophe; Benredjem, Djamel

    2017-03-01

    The opacity is an important issue in the knowledge of the radiative properties of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and astrophysical plasmas. In this work we present the opacity of the mixture C+Si, composing the ablator of some ICF capsules. We have used Cowan's code to calculate the atomic structure of carbon and silicon. We also have developed a collisional-radiative model in order to obtain the opacity of the mixture. Line broadening, line shift and ionization potential depression are taken into account in the opacity profile. Comparisons to other calculations are carried out. NLTE and LTE opacity calculations show discrepancies mainly in the range 1900-2000 eV for the bound-bound contribution to the total opacity and in the range 50-350 eV for the bound-free contribution. We have also accounted for photoexcitation and photoionization processes. The corresponding rates are obtained by modeling the Hohlraum radiation by a Planckian distribution at a radiative temperature of 300 eV.

  4. A new nonlocal thermodynamical equilibrium radiative transfer method for cool stars. Method and numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J.; Josselin, E.; Ryde, N.; Faure, A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The solution of the nonlocal thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer equation usually relies on stationary iterative methods, which may falsely converge in some cases. Furthermore, these methods are often unable to handle large-scale systems, such as molecular spectra emerging from, for example, cool stellar atmospheres. Aims: Our objective is to develop a new method, which aims to circumvent these problems, using nonstationary numerical techniques and taking advantage of parallel computers. Methods: The technique we develop may be seen as a generalization of the coupled escape probability method. It solves the statistical equilibrium equations in all layers of a discretized model simultaneously. The numerical scheme adopted is based on the generalized minimum residual method. Results: The code has already been applied to the special case of the water spectrum in a red supergiant stellar atmosphere. This demonstrates the fast convergence of this method, and opens the way to a wide variety of astrophysical problems.

  5. Performance analysis of radiation cooled dc transmission lines for high power space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    As space power levels increase to meet mission objectives and also as the transmission distance between power source and load increases, the mass, volume, power loss, and operating voltage and temperature become important system design considerations. This analysis develops the dependence of the specific mass and percent power loss on the power and voltage levels, transmission distance, operating temperature and conductor material properties. Only radiation cooling is considered since the transmission line is assumed to operate in a space environment. The results show that the limiting conditions for achieving low specific mass, percent power loss, and volume for a space-type dc transmission line are the permissible transmission voltage and operating temperature. Other means to achieve low specific mass include the judicious choice of conductor materials. The results of this analysis should be immediately applicable to power system trade-off studies including comparisons with ac transmission systems.

  6. Performance analysis of radiation cooled dc transmission lines for high power space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    As space power levels increase to meet mission objectives and also as the transmission distance between power source and load increases, the mass, volume, power loss, and operating voltage and temperature become important system design considerations. This analysis develops the dependence of the specific mass and percent power loss on hte power and voltage levels, transmission distance, operating temperature and conductor material properties. Only radiation cooling is considered since the transmission line is assumed to operate in a space environment. The results show that the limiting conditions for achieving low specific mass, percent power loss, and volume for a space-type dc transmission line are the permissible transmission voltage and operating temperature. Other means to achieve low specific mass include the judicious choice of conductor materials. The results of this analysis should be immediately applicable to power system trade-off studies including comparisons with ac transmission systems.

  7. Generation of high-power electromagnetic radiation by a beam-driven plasma antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study how efficiently electromagnetic radiation can be generated by a relativistic electron beam with a gigawatt power level during its injection into a thin magnetized plasma. It is shown that, if the transverse beam and plasma size is compared with the radiation wavelength and the plasma density is modulated along the magnetic field, such a beam-plasma system can radiate electromagnetic waves via the antenna mechanism. We propose a theoretical model describing generation of electromagnetic waves by this plasma antenna and calculate its main radiation characteristics. In the two-dimensional case theoretical predictions on the radiation efficiency are shown to be confirmed by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, and the three-dimensional variant of this theory is used to estimate the peak power of sub-terahertz radiation that can be achieved in beam-plasma experiments in mirror traps.

  8. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-13

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  9. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day–night cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-01-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8–13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day–night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance. PMID:27959339

  10. Hybrid optical-thermal devices and materials for light manipulation and radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Weinstein, Lee; Huang, Xiaopeng; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-09-01

    We report on optical design and applications of hybrid meso-scale devices and materials that combine optical and thermal management functionalities owing to their tailored resonant interaction with light in visible and infrared frequency bands. We outline a general approach to designing such materials, and discuss two specific applications in detail. One example is a hybrid optical-thermal antenna with sub-wavelength light focusing, which simultaneously enables intensity enhancement at the operating wavelength in the visible and reduction of the operating temperature. The enhancement is achieved via light recycling in the form of whispering-gallery modes trapped in an optical microcavity, while cooling functionality is realized via a combination of reduced optical absorption and radiative cooling. The other example is a fabric that is opaque in the visible range yet highly transparent in the infrared, which allows the human body to efficiently shed energy in the form of thermal emission. Such fabrics can find numerous applications for personal thermal management and for buildings energy efficiency improvement.

  11. Thermal model and associated novel approach for synchrotron radiation liner with end cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Yu, Kun; Clay, W.; Maddocks, J.; Morales, G.; Zbasnik, J.

    1993-05-01

    An end-conductive cooling approach has been developed to reduce the radial space budget of a synchrotron radiation liner to permit the maximum possible liner tube inner diameter (ID). A thermal model has also been developed to analyze the thermal performance of such liners. This approach is found to be acceptable for a liner in a 5-m-long quadrupole magnet and 3-m-long spool piece, but not for a longer 15-m dipole. The heat transfer and temperature distribution were calculated respectively along the axis of two different liner models: 20 K and 80 K liner with different thicknesses (0.5--2 mm) of liner tubes and different emissivities (0.05--0.3) of liner surface for a variety of magnets. The thermal model is also applied to the case of an 80 K liner connected directly to a 4 K beam position monitor (BPM). In order to utilize the end cooling, a good thermal joint and a compact heat exchanger are designed.

  12. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  13. PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the Iliad, King Agamemnon used Kardamyli as a dowry offering in order to draw a sulking Achilles into the Trojan War. 3000 years later, Kardamyli is no less seductive. Its remoteness and tranquility made it an ideal venue for promoting the free exchange of ideas between various disciplines that do not normally interact. Through invited presen tations, informal poster discussions and working group sessions, the Workshop brought together leaders from the laboratory and space/astrophysics communities working on common problems of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. It was clear from the presentation and discussion sessions that there is a great deal of common ground between these disciplines which is not at first obvious due to the differing terminologies and types of observations available to each community. All of the papers in this Special Issue highlight the role collective plasma processes play in accelerating particles or generating radiation. Some are state-of-the-art presentations of the latest research in a single discipline, while others investi gate the applicability of known laboratory mechanisms to explain observations in natural plasmas. Notable among the latter are the papers by Marshall et al. on kHz radiation in the magnetosphere ; Barletta et al. on collective acceleration in solar flares; and by Dendy et al. on ion cyclotron emission. The papers in this Issue are organized as follows: In Section 1 are four general papers by Dawson, Galeev, Bingham et al. and Mon which serves as an introduction to the physical mechanisms of acceleration

  14. Radiative energy balance of Venus: An approach to parameterize thermal cooling and solar heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal cooling rates QC and solar heating rates QH in the atmosphere of Venus at altitudes between 0 and 100 km are investigated using the radiative transfer and radiative balance simulation techniques described by Haus et al. (2015b, 2016). QC strongly responds to temperature profile and cloud parameter changes, while QH is less sensitive to these parameters. The latter mainly depends on solar insolation conditions and the unknown UV absorber distribution. A parameterization approach is developed that permits a fast and reliable calculation of temperature change rates Q for different atmospheric model parameters and that can be applied in General Circulation Models to investigate atmospheric dynamics. A separation of temperature, cloud parameter, and unknown UV absorber influences is performed. The temperature response parameterization relies on a specific altitude and latitude-dependent cloud model. It is based on an algorithm that characterizes Q responses to a broad range of temperature perturbations at each level of the atmosphere using the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) as basis temperature model. The cloud response parameterization considers different temperature conditions and a range of individual cloud mode factors that additionally change cloud optical depths as determined by the initial latitude-dependent model. A QH response parameterization for abundance changes of the unknown UV absorber is also included. Deviations between accurate calculation and parameterization results are in the order of a few tenths of K/day at altitudes below 90 km. The parameterization approach is used to investigate atmospheric radiative equilibrium (RE) conditions. Polar mesospheric RE temperatures above the cloud top are up to 70 K lower and equatorial temperatures up to 10 K higher than observed values. This radiative forcing field is balanced by dynamical processes that maintain the observed thermal structure.

  15. Collisional and Radiative Processes in High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt

    2001-10-01

    High-pressure discharge plasmas (HPDPs) with operating pressures up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure have gained prominence in many areas of application such as EM absorbers and reflectors, remediation of waste streams, deposition and surface modification, surface cleaning and sterilization, and light source development. In particular, HPDPs are widely used as sources for the generation of non-coherent UV and VUV light such as excimer emissions in the spectral range from 50 nm to 300 nm using rare gases or rare gas admixed with other gases as the operating medium. In this talk we will discuss several common types of HPDPs (e.g. microhollow cathode discharge plasmas, dielectric barrier discharge plasmas, capillary dielectrode discharge plasmas) that are commonly used for the generation of non-coherent excimer emissions. The main focus of this talk will be on the elucidation of the underlying microscopic collisional and radiative processes in these plasmas that lead to the photon emission and that determine the efficiency and spectral characteristics of various sources. Processes of particular interest are the generation of intense, monochromatic atomic line emissions in the 90 - 130 nm range, in particular the H Lyman-alpha emission at 121.6 nm, from HPDPs in gas mixtures containing high-pressure He, Ne, or Ar with trace amounts (1which may have great potential in photolithography and related applications. The mechanism for the emission of these intense atomic VUV lines are near-resonant energy transfer processes from the excimer molecule to the diatomic gas (H2, O2, N2). This work was supported by the NSF and by DARPA/ARO and carried out in collaboration with P. Kurunczi, K.H. Schoenbach, M. Laroussi, M. Gupta, and N. Masoud. Helpful discussions with U. Kogelschatz and E. Kunhardt are gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Performance of a microwave induced plasma (MIP) operated in a liquid-cooled discharge tube for atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzwa, J.; Brandt, R.; Broekaert, J. A. C.; Tschöpel, P.; Tölg, G.

    1996-01-01

    Different types of microwave induced plasma (MIP) discharge operated in liquid-cooled tubes, namely a glass tube of Duran ®, a quartz tube of Herasil ®, and a very simple demountable discharge tube made of glass and quartz have been investigated. The last tube leads to the best analytical properties and the longest lifetime. The intensities of silicon lines and of the continuum spectral background, together with the signal-to-background ratios for B, Ca, Cd, Co and Zn in the case of the pneumatic nebulization of solutions have been measured and used as an indicator for the cooling efficiency. The MIP torch was cooled with a thermostated silicon oil. The decrease of the temperature of the cooling medium causes a measurable decrease of the spectral background intensity. Diagnostic measurements of the plasma include radial profiles of spectral line intensities and excitation temperatures with the lines of Fe I; values of 5000-6000 K are found. The influence of different plasma parameters, e.g. microwave power and helium flow rate, is investigated. The preliminary analytical characterization of a helium MIP maintained with the liquid-cooled demountable discharge tube is presented. Limits of detection for Al, B, Ca, Co, Fe, P, Sb and Zn (between 0.002 and 1.2 μg ml -1) are comparable with or better than those reported for low power helium MIPs with sample introduction in the form of a wet aerosol.

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation emitted by microwave driven argon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.

    2017-04-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted by microwave driven argon plasmas has been investigated at low-pressure conditions (0.36 mbar). A classical surface-wave sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz has been used as plasma source. VUV radiation has been detected by emission spectroscopy in the 30-125 nm spectral range. The spectrum exhibits atomic and ionic argon emissions with the most intense spectral lines corresponding to the atomic resonance lines, at 104.8 nm and 106.7 nm, and to the ion lines, at 92.0 nm and 93.2 nm. Emissions at lower wavelengths were also detected, including lines with no information concerning level transitions in the well-known NIST database (e.g., the atomic line at 89.4 nm). The dependence of the lines' intensity on the microwave power delivered to the launcher was investigated. The electron density was estimated to be around 1012 cm-3 using the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Hβ line at 486.1 nm. The main population and loss mechanisms considered in the model for the excited argon atom and ion states emitting in the VUV range are discussed. The experimental results were compared to self-consistent model predictions, and a good agreement was obtained.

  18. The Plasma Parameters and Geometry of Cool and Warm Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haixia; Madjarska, Maria S.; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou

    2017-06-01

    How the solar corona is heated to high temperatures remains an unsolved mystery in solar physics. In the present study we analyze observations of 50 whole active region loops taken with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode satellite. Eleven loops were classified as cool loops (<1 MK) and 39 as warm loops (1-2 MK). We study their plasma parameters, such as densities, temperatures, filling factors, nonthermal velocities, and Doppler velocities. We combine spectroscopic analysis with linear force-free magnetic field extrapolation to derive the 3D structure and positioning of the loops, their lengths and heights, and the magnetic field strength along the loops. We use density-sensitive line pairs from Fe xii, Fe xiii, Si x, and Mg vii ions to obtain electron densities by taking special care of intensity background subtraction. The emission measure loci method is used to obtain the loop temperatures. We find that the loops are nearly isothermal along the line of sight. Their filling factors are between 8% and 89%. We also compare the observed parameters with the theoretical Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law. We find that most of the loops are in an overpressure state relative to the RTV predictions. In a follow-up study, we will report a heating model of a parallel-cascade-based mechanism and will compare the model parameters with the loop plasma and structural parameters derived here.

  19. Numerical studies of fast ion slowing down rates in cool magnetized plasma using LSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Kolmes, Elijah; Cohen, Samuel A.; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Bruce; Meier, Eric; Welch, Dale R.

    2016-10-01

    In MFE devices, rapid transport of fusion products from the core into the scrape-off layer (SOL) could perform the dual roles of energy and ash removal. The first-orbit trajectories of most fusion products from small field-reversed configuration (FRC) devices will traverse the SOL, allowing those particles to deposit their energy in the SOL and be exhausted along the open field lines. Thus, the fast ion slowing-down time should affect the energy balance of an FRC reactor and its neutron emissions. However, the dynamics of fast ion energy loss processes under the conditions expected in the FRC SOL (with ρe <λDe) are analytically complex, and not yet fully understood. We use LSP, a 3D electromagnetic PIC code, to examine the effects of SOL density and background B-field on the slowing-down time of fast ions in a cool plasma. As we use explicit algorithms, these simulations must spatially resolve both ρe and λDe, as well as temporally resolve both Ωe and ωpe, increasing computation time. Scaling studies of the fast ion charge (Z) and background plasma density are in good agreement with unmagnetized slowing down theory. Notably, Z-scaling represents a viable way to dramatically reduce the required CPU time for each simulation. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Resonant terahertz radiation from warm collisional inhomogeneous plasma irradiated by two Gaussian laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R. Banjafar, M. R.; Jahangiri, F.; Barzegar, S.; Massudi, R.

    2016-05-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generation by the interaction of two co-propagating high intensity laser beams with a warm collisional inhomogeneous plasma is analytically investigated. By presenting the dielectric permittivity of plasma and taking into account the ponderomotive force, the nonlinear current at THz frequency is obtained. A secondary resonant enhancement of THz radiation is observed, in addition to that occurs at the plasma frequency, which can be tuned by plasma density and temperature. Moreover, we show that for each beat frequency, there exists an optimum temperature at which THz radiation is maximized. It is also shown that the power and efficiency of THz radiation decrease by increasing the collision frequency.

  1. 'Averaged' Diffusion of Radiation in Spectral Lines intra Interjacent Plasma-Gas Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Demura, A. V.; Demchenko, G. V.

    2008-10-22

    The approximate model of 'averaged diffusion' for resonance radiation transfer is introduced. It allows to reduce computational efforts preserving satisfactory accuracy while modeling divertor plasmas.

  2. X-ray line formation in radiation dominated astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Bailey, J. E.; Hansen, S. B.; Nagayama, T.; Rochau, G. A.; Liedahl, D.; Mancini, R.; Koepke, M.

    2014-10-01

    A remarkable opportunity to observe matter in a regime where the effects of General Relativity are significant has arisen through measurements of strongly red-shifted iron x-ray lines emitted from black hole accretion disks. A major uncertainty in the spectral formation models is the efficiency of Resonant Auger Destruction (RAD), in which fluorescent Ka photons are resonantly absorbed by neighbor ions. The absorbing ion preferentially decays by Auger ionization, thus reducing the emerging Ka intensity. If Ka lines from L-shell ions are not observed in iron spectral emission, why are such lines observed from silicon plasma surrounding other accretion powered objects? To help answer this question, we are investigating photoionized silicon plasmas produced using intense x-rays from the Z facility. For the first time in a terrestrial lab, we measured simultaneous absorption and emission spectra from these plasmas at high resolution. The charge state distribution, electron temperature, and electron density are determined through space-resolved absorption spectra. The emission spectra have been recorded at different column densities thus testing different radiative transport regime. These should allow us to answer quantitatively the original RAD hypothesis. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Does the plasma radiate near a Double Layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottelette, Raymond; Berthomier, Matthieu; Pickett, Jolene

    2016-04-01

    Earth is an intense radio source in the kilometer wavelength range. Being a direct consequence of the parallel acceleration processes taking place in the Earth's auroral region, the radiation contains fundamental information on the characteristic spatial and temporal scales of the turbulent accelerating layer. It is now widely assumed that the cyclotron maser instability leads to Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) generation. It has been suggested from the FAST measurements that the AKR results from a so-called horseshoe electron distribution. This distribution is generated when a localized parallel electric field - called Double Layer (DL) - accelerates earthward the electrons that propagate into an increasing magnetic field. The magnetic moment of the electrons is conserved so that their pitch angle is increased. This results in the creation of a horseshoe-like shape for the electron distribution exhibiting large positive velocity gradients in the direction perpendicular to B, thereby providing free energy for the AKR generation which takes place at the local electron gyrofrequency. In these circumstances, the radiation is generated far away (several thousand kilometers) from a DL, because the parallel accelerated electrons need to travel a long distance before forming a horseshoe distribution. From an experimental point of view, it is not an easy task to highlight the presence of DLs, because they are moving transient structures so that high time resolution measurements are needed. A detailed analysis suggests that these large-amplitude parallel electric fields are located inside sharp density gradients at the interface separating the cold, dense ionospheric plasma from the hot, tenuous magnetospheric plasma. We present some FAST observations which illustrate the generation of elementary radiation events in the neighborhood of a DL. The events occur 10 to 20% above the local electron gyrofrequency in association with the presence of nonlinear coherent structures

  4. Electromagnetic radiation and nonlinear energy flow in an electron beam-plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, D. A.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the unstable electron-plasma waves of a beam-plasma system can generate electromagnetic radiation in a uniform plasma. The generation mechanism is a scattering of the unstable electron plasma waves off ion-acoustic waves, producing electromagnetic waves whose frequency is near the local plasma frequency. The wave vector and frequency matching conditions of the three-wave mode coupling are experimentally verified. The electromagnetic radiation is observed to be polarized with the electric field parallel to the beam direction, and its source region is shown to be localized to the unstable plasma wave region. The frequency spectrum shows negligible intensity near the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. These results suggest that the observed electromagnetic radiation of type III solar bursts may be generated near the local plasma frequency and observed downstream where the wave frequency is near the harmonic of the plasma frequency.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation and nonlinear energy flow in an electron beam-plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, D. A.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the unstable electron-plasma waves of a beam-plasma system can generate electromagnetic radiation in a uniform plasma. The generation mechanism is a scattering of the unstable electron plasma waves off ion-acoustic waves, producing electromagnetic waves whose frequency is near the local plasma frequency. The wave vector and frequency matching conditions of the three-wave mode coupling are experimentally verified. The electromagnetic radiation is observed to be polarized with the electric field parallel to the beam direction, and its source region is shown to be localized to the unstable plasma wave region. The frequency spectrum shows negligible intensity near the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. These results suggest that the observed electromagnetic radiation of type III solar bursts may be generated near the local plasma frequency and observed downstream where the wave frequency is near the harmonic of the plasma frequency.

  6. Predicting radiative transport properties of plasma sprayed porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. X.; Zhao, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    The typical yttria-stabilized zirconia material for making the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is intrinsically semitransparent to thermal radiation, and the unique disordered microstructures in TBCs make them surprisingly highly scattering. To quantitatively understand the influence of disordered microstructures, this paper presents a quantitative prediction on the radiative properties, especially the transport scattering coefficient of plasma sprayed TBC based on microstructure analysis and rigorous electromagnetic theory. The impact of the porosity, shape, size, and orientation of different types of voids on transport scattering coefficient is comprehensively investigated under the discrete dipole approximation. An inverse model integrating these factors together is then proposed to quantitatively connect transport scattering coefficient with microstructural information, which is also validated by available experimental data. Afterwards, an optimization procedure is carried out based on this model to obtain the optimal size and orientation distribution of the microscale voids to achieve the maximal radiation insulation performance at different operating temperatures, providing guidelines for practical coating design and fabrication. This work suggests that the current model is effective and also efficient for connecting scattering properties to microstructures and can be implemented as a quantitative tool for further studies like non-destructive infrared imaging as well as micro/nanoscale thermal design of TBCs.

  7. Moderating night radiative cooling reduces frost damage to Metrosideros polymorpha seedlings used for forest restoration in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Paul G. Scowcroft; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guillermo Goldstein; Peter J. Melcher; Jack Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    Winter frosts caused by radiative cooling were hypothesized to limit successful reintroduction of Hawaiian plants other than Acacia koa to alien-dominated grasslands above 1700 m elevation. We determined, in the laboratory, the temperature at which irreversible tissue damage occurred to Metrosideros polymorpha leaves. We also...

  8. Pulsar electrodynamics: Relativistic kinetic theory of radiative plasmas--collective phenomena and their radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. A. da; Diver, D. A.; Laing, E. W.; Stark, C. R.; Teodoro, L. F. A.

    2011-01-15

    The classical modeling of radiation by accelerated charged particles in pulsars predicts a cutoff in photon energy at around 25 GeV. While this is broadly consistent with observations, the classical treatment is not self-consistent, and cannot be extended to explain the rare high-energy detections of photons in the 100s of GeV range. In this paper we revisit the theoretical modeling of high-energy radiation processes in very strong electromagnetic fields, in the context of both single particles and collective plasmas. There are no classical constraints on this description. We find that there is indeed a critical energy of around 50 GeV that arises naturally in this self-consistent treatment, but rather than being a cutoff, this critical energy signals a transition from radiation that is classical to a quasiquantum description, in which the particle is able to radiate almost its total energy in a single event. This new modeling therefore places pulsar radiation processes on a more secure physical basis, and admits the possibility of the production of TeV photons in a self-consistent way.

  9. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. Shadi; Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon; Laghrouche, Omar

    2014-02-01

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  10. Investigation in the 7-By-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators Within an Airplane Wing, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A.; Recant, Isidore G.

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional flow set-up with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included. It was found that radiators could be mounted in the wing and efficiently pass enough air for cooling with duct outlets located at any point from 0.25c to 0.70c from the wing leading edge on the upper surface. The duct-inlet position was found to be critical and, for maximum efficiency, had to be at the stagnation point of the airfoil and to change with flight attitude. The flow could be efficiently throttled only by a simultaneous variation of duct inlet and outlet sizes and of inlet position. It was desirable to round both inlet and outlet lips. With certain arrangements of duct, the power required for cooling at high speed was a very low percentage of the engine power.

  11. Immobilized enzymes in blood plasma exchangers via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombotz, Wayne; Hoffman, Allan; Schmer, Gottfried; Uenoyama, Satoshi

    The enzyme asparaginase was immobilized onto a porous hollow polypropylene (PP) fiber blood plasma exchange device for the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia. The devices were first radiation grafted with polymethacrylic acid (poly(MAAc)). This introduces carboxyl groups onto the surface of the fibers. Several variables were studied in the grafting reaction including the effects of solvent type and monomer concentration. The carboxyl groups were activated with N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) using carbodiimide chemistry. Asparaginase was then covalently immobilized on the activated surfaces. Quantitative relationships were found relating the percent graft to the amount of immobilized enzyme which was active. The enzyme reactor was tested both in vitro and in vivo using a sheep as an animal model.

  12. Wavelength scaling of terahertz radiation in plasma gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Huang, Suxia; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Liangliang

    2016-11-01

    In our experiments, terahertz radiation via two-color generated laser plasma gas targets is studied using nitrogen and the noble gases (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) as the generation media. Carried out at the infrared beam of the advanced laser light source, we studied the effects of different pump wavelengths (between 1200 nm and 1600 nm) on THz generation. Terahertz pulse energy is measured as functions of input pulse energy, gas species, gas pressure. The experimental results show that the terahertz pulse energy approach a maximum value of 0.0578 μJ per pulse in xenon gas when the input 1600 nm pulse energy is 0.4 mJ per pulse.

  13. Silicon carbide detector for laser-generated plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Donatella; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Lanzieri, Claudio

    2013-05-01

    We present the performance of a Silicon Carbide (SiC) detector in the acquisition of the radiation emitted by laser generated plasmas. The detector has been employed in time of flight (TOF) configuration within an experiment performed at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS). The detector is a 5 mm2 area 100 nm thick circular Nisbnd SiC Schottky junction on a high purity 4Hsbnd SiC epitaxial layer 115 μm thick. Current signals from the detector with amplitudes up to 1.6 A have been measured, achieving voltage signals over 80 V on a 50 Ω load resistance with excellent signal to noise ratios. Resolution of few nanoseconds has been experimentally demonstrated in TOF measurements. The detector has operated at 250 V DC bias under extreme operating conditions with no observable performance degradation.

  14. Generation of terahertz radiation by focusing femtosecond bichromatic laser pulses in a gas or plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhov, P A; Volkov, Roman V; Bukin, V V; Ushakov, A A; Garnov, Sergei V; Savel'ev-Trofimov, Andrei B

    2013-04-30

    The generation of terahertz radiation by focusing two-frequency femtosecond laser pulses is studied. Focusing is carried out both in an undisturbed gas and in a pre-formed plasma. The energy of the terahertz radiation pulses is shown to reduce significantly in the case of focusing in a plasma. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. An oil-free compact X-pinch plasma radiation source: Design and radiation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, Roman V.; Spielman, Rick B.; Imel, George R.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a new, high-current, X-pinch radiation source recently developed and tested at Idaho State University. Our design is based on two linear transformer driver (LTD) bricks arranged in side-by-side geometry and directly coupled with an X-pinch load. The salient features of our 2-LTD-bricks are its simplicity, compactness, and portability: there is no oil, no water, and no SF6. It can be easily relocated to any place where a compact X-pinch radiation source is wanted. The driver can store up to 2.8 kJ of initial energy and can deliver more than 200-kA peak-current with less than 200-ns, 10%-90%, rise time into a short-circuit load. When the driver is coupled with an X-pinch load, it generates a very fast and bright radiation pulse. Source size measurements indicate that this radiation originates from a very small dense plasma, known as a "hot spot."

  16. On the origin of the coherent x-ray radiation from plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhevago, N.K.; Glebov, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    In the experiments with plasma focus a highly monochromatic radiation at {lambda}{approx}13{angstrom} was observed at a small angle to the direction of the plasma discharge. This radiation was attributed to the following features. Firstly, during the development of a plasma focus the short-period (T {approx_lt} 1{mu}m) modulation of the plasma density due to the increasing instabilities takes place along the discharge over many periods. Secondly, a definite part of electrons is accelerated up to MeV energies due the cyclotron instability and the increasing diffusion of the magnetic field in the pinch region. In the present report in order to explain the experimental results, we discuss possible mechanisms of coherent X-ray radiation in plasma focus, including the transition radiation from relativistic electrons in the medium with periodically modulated dielectric permittivity, undulator radiation in periodic electric field in the medium, and Cherenkov radiation from plasma in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The calculations of the spectral and angular distributions of X-rays are presented for the various types of radiation under discussion and estimates of the radiation power are made. We also discuss the possibility of the stimulated radiation from plasma focus.

  17. Exoplanetary Habitability: Radiation, Particles, Plasmas, and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedel, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Exoplanetary environments are made of an intricate mixture of plasmas, radiation, energetic particles, winds, and magnetic fields; these all play crucial roles for the structure and evolution of planetary atmospheres and the formation and possibly protection of planetary habitable environments. Interactions between planetary atmospheric particles and solar-wind ions result in various non-thermal loss mechanisms that are relevant for atmospheric erosion; energetic neutral atoms from charge exchange interactions can even deposit their energy in upper atmospheres and contribute to their heating. We present results from simulations and discuss the effects of magnetospheric obstacles, the resulting atmospheric loss rates and neutral hydrogen clouds detectable through Ly a absorption. We also present estimates for secondary X-ray production as a result of charge exchange interactions. Combined modeling of expanding hydrogen clouds resulting from such interactions are now also used to estimate magnetic moments of exoplanets. We emphasize that the interplay between all these mechanisms, also including radiation-driven thermal escape of atmospheres, changes with stellar evolution; for a full understanding of the state of an observed exoplanetary atmosphere, the long-term evolution of the host star, in particular its rotation and magnetic activity, needs to be studied. In this respect, radio astronomy plays a central role as it sensitively probes these environments and their constituents in time, such as magnetospheres, high-energy particles, stellar magnetic fields and winds, and therefore contributes to our understanding of the emergence of habitable planetary environments.

  18. Evaporation of Droplets in Plasma Spray–Physical Vapor Deposition Based on Energy Compensation Between Self-Cooling and Plasma Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-10-01

    In the plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process (PS-PVD), there is no obvious heating to the feedstock powders due to the free molecular flow condition of the open plasma jet. However, this is in contrast to recent experiments in which the molten droplets are transformed into vapor atoms in the open plasma jet. In this work, to better understand the heating process of feedstock powders in the open plasma jet of PS-PVD, an evaporation model of molten ZrO2 is established by examining the heat and mass transfer process of molten ZrO2. The results reveal that the heat flux in PS-PVD open plasma jet (about 106 W/m2) is smaller than that in the plasma torch nozzle (about 108 W/m2). However, the flying distance of molten ZrO2 in the open plasma jet is much longer than that in the plasma torch nozzle, so the heating in the open plasma jet cannot be ignored. The results of the evaporation model show that the molten ZrO2 can be partly evaporated by self-cooling, whereas the molten ZrO2 with a diameter <0.28 μm and an initial temperature of 3247 K can be completely evaporated within the axial distance of 450 mm by heat transfer.

  19. Evaporation of Droplets in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition Based on Energy Compensation Between Self-Cooling and Plasma Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-08-01

    In the plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process (PS-PVD), there is no obvious heating to the feedstock powders due to the free molecular flow condition of the open plasma jet. However, this is in contrast to recent experiments in which the molten droplets are transformed into vapor atoms in the open plasma jet. In this work, to better understand the heating process of feedstock powders in the open plasma jet of PS-PVD, an evaporation model of molten ZrO2 is established by examining the heat and mass transfer process of molten ZrO2. The results reveal that the heat flux in PS-PVD open plasma jet (about 106 W/m2) is smaller than that in the plasma torch nozzle (about 108 W/m2). However, the flying distance of molten ZrO2 in the open plasma jet is much longer than that in the plasma torch nozzle, so the heating in the open plasma jet cannot be ignored. The results of the evaporation model show that the molten ZrO2 can be partly evaporated by self-cooling, whereas the molten ZrO2 with a diameter <0.28 μm and an initial temperature of 3247 K can be completely evaporated within the axial distance of 450 mm by heat transfer.

  20. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spatial distribution of laser radiation scattered in a plasma formed by optical breakdown of a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufetov, Igor'A.; Bufetova, G. A.; Fyodorov, V. B.

    1994-12-01

    Spatial distributions of laser radiation scattered by a laser spark were determined at different laser radiation wavelengths (λ = 1060, 530, 353, and 265 nm) and gas pressures (air at 10-760 Torr). An interference structure of the cone of the scattered radiation behind the spark was detected for the first time. The structure was attributed to interference of the radiation scattered in two or more self-focusing centres in the laser-spark plasma in air. The dependences of the maximum scattering angle on the gas pressure and on the laser radiation wavelength were determined experimentally.

  1. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  2. The heat removal capability of actively cooled plasma-facing components for the ITER divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missirlian, M.; Richou, M.; Riccardi, B.; Gavila, P.; Loarer, T.; Constans, S.

    2011-12-01

    Non-destructive examination followed by high-heat-flux testing was performed for different small- and medium-scale mock-ups; this included the most recent developments related to actively cooled tungsten (W) or carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components. In particular, the heat-removal capability of these mock-ups manufactured by European companies with all the main features of the ITER divertor design was investigated both after manufacturing and after thermal cycling up to 20 MW m-2. Compliance with ITER requirements was explored in terms of bonding quality, heat flux performances and operational compatibility. The main results show an overall good heat-removal capability after the manufacturing process independent of the armour-to-heat sink bonding technology and promising behaviour with respect to thermal fatigue lifetime under heat flux up to 20 MW m-2 for the CFC-armoured tiles and 15 MW m-2 for the W-armoured tiles, respectively.

  3. Particle exhaust of helium plasmas with actively cooled outboard pump limiter on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, T.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Loarer, T.; Chatelier, M.; Guilhem, D.; Lutz, T.; Nygren, R.E.; Mahdavi, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    The superconducting tokamak Tore Supra was designed for long-pulse (30-s) high input power operation. Here observations on the particle-handling characteristics of the actively cooled modular outboard pump limiter (OPL) are presented for helium discharges. The important experimental result was that a modest pumping speed (1 m{sup 3}/s) of the OPL turbomolecular pump (TMP) provided background helium exhaust. This result came about due to a well-conditioned vessel wall with helium discharges that caused no wall outgasing. The particle accountability in these helium discharges was excellent, and the well-conditioned wall did not play a significant role in the particle balance. The helium density control, 25% density drop with OPL exhaust efficiency of {approximately}1%, was possible with TMP although this may not be the case with reactive gases such as deuterium. The observed quadratic increase of the OPL neutral pressure with helium density was consistent with an improvement of the particle control with increasing plasma density.

  4. CFC/Cu bond damage in actively cooled plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Henninger, C.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Escourbiac, F.; Leguillon, D.; Missirlian, M.; Mitteau, R.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) armours have been successfully used for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak. They were also selected for the divertor of the stellarator W7-X under construction and for the vertical target of the ITER divertor. In TS and W7-X a flat tile design for heat fluxes of 10 MW m-2 has been chosen. To predict the lifetime of such PFCs, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation when the component is exposed to thermal cycling loads. Work has been performed to identify a constitutive law for the CFC and parameters to model crack propagation from the edge singularity. The aim is to predict damage rates and to propose geometric or material improvements to increase the strength and the lifetime of the interfacial bond. For ITER a tube-in-tile concept (monoblock), designed to sustain heat fluxes up to 20 MW m-2, has been developed. The optimization of the CFC/Cu bond, proposed for flat tiles, could be adopted for the monoblock concept.

  5. Middle atmosphere project: A radiative heating and cooling algorithm for a numerical model of the large scale stratospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrbein, W. M.; Leovy, C. B.

    1981-01-01

    A Curtis matrix is used to compute cooling by the 15 micron and 10 micron bands of carbon dioxide. Escape of radiation to space and exchange the lower boundary are used for the 9.6 micron band of ozone. Voigt line shape, vibrational relaxation, line overlap, and the temperature dependence of line strength distributions and transmission functions are incorporated into the Curtis matrices. The distributions of the atmospheric constituents included in the algorithm, and the method used to compute the Curtis matrices are discussed as well as cooling or heating by the 9.6 micron band of ozone. The FORTRAN programs and subroutines that were developed are described and listed.

  6. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  7. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-15

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  8. Radiation enhancement mechanism for a cylindrical metallic antenna surrounded by a thin plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenqiu; Wang, Gang; Su, Xiaobao

    2017-05-01

    Based on the dispersion equation obtained from Helmholtz equation in the sheath region and plasma layer region, and free space region of the azimuthally symmetric surface wave, the propagation constant properties on the interface of the plasma layer region and free space region, the mode radiation enhancement characteristics in the free space region are studied. The analytical results indicate that the collision effect has an evident influence on the attenuation constant, but the impact on phase constant can be ignored when the wave frequency is equal to the plasma frequency. While the radiation enhancement phenomenon due to a plasma layer is confirmed, both the sheath thickness and plasma layer thickness have a notable effect on the amplitude of the maximum radiation enhancement intensity. These analytic results have an important theoretical guidance value in the optimization of plasma antenna radiation field.

  9. Diffusion mechanisms in Ir-coated Re for high-temperature, radiation-cooled rocket thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. C.; Yang, N. Y. C.; Clift, W. M.; Boehme, D. R.; Mccarty, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Materials used for radiation-cooled rocket thrusters must be capable of surviving under extreme conditions of high temperatures and oxidizing environments. Thruster chambers were developed using chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Re coated with CVD Ir on the inside surface which is exposed to hot combustion gases. Ir serves as an oxidation barrier protecting the Re which maintains structural integrity at high temperatures. In order to predict and extend the performance limits of these Ir-coated Re thrusters, the diffusion kinetics of CVD materials at temperature are studied. Thruster end ring sections were examined using electron microprobe analysis both before and after exposure to high temperature vacuum environments. The resulting elemental maps for Re, Ir, and Mo in the near-surface region allow identification of diffusion mechanisms operating at these temperatures. Line scans for Ir and Re were fit using a diffusion model to extract relevant diffusion constants. The fastest diffusion process is seen to be grain boundary diffusion with Re diffusing down grain boundaries in the Ir overlayer. The measured dependence of the diffusion rate on temperature will allow prediction of operating lifetimes for these thrusters.

  10. A Method Based on Radiative Cooling for Detecting Structural Changes in Undercooled Metallic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a structure-sensitive parameter for undercooled melts which can be measured in containerless processing experiments. We have established that the ratio, R(T), of hemispherical total emissivity epsilon(sub T)(T) to constant-pressure specific heat c(sub p)(T) can serve as an indicator which is sensitive to any changes in short range atomic order in undercooled metallic melts. R(T) (triple bonds) epsilon(sub T)(T)/c(sub p)(T) values for nickel, zirconium, and silicon have been obtained using the high temperature electrostatic levitator while the levitated melts were undergoing purely radiative cooling into the deeply undercooled region. R(T) plots for undercooled liquid nickel and zirconium indicate no significant change in short-range structure from their melting temperatures to 15% undercooling. In contrast, liquid silicon shows marked short-range structural changes beginning above its melting temperature and extending throughout the undercooled region. The short-range structure of liquid silicon is related to the highly-directional covalent bonding which characterizes its solid form. The nickel and zirconium data show that epsilon(sub T) varies linearly with T, in support of metal emissivity theories.

  11. THE LAUNCHING OF COLD CLOUDS BY GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTIONS WITH RADIATIVE COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, Evan; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations accurately describe the evolution of cold clouds in the absence of thermal conduction and magnetic fields, physical processes whose roles will be studied in forthcoming papers.

  12. A Method Based on Radiative Cooling for Detecting Structural Changes in Undercooled Metallic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a structure-sensitive parameter for undercooled melts which can be measured in containerless processing experiments. We have established that the ratio, R(T), of hemispherical total emissivity epsilon(sub T)(T) to constant-pressure specific heat c(sub p)(T) can serve as an indicator which is sensitive to any changes in short range atomic order in undercooled metallic melts. R(T) (triple bonds) epsilon(sub T)(T)/c(sub p)(T) values for nickel, zirconium, and silicon have been obtained using the high temperature electrostatic levitator while the levitated melts were undergoing purely radiative cooling into the deeply undercooled region. R(T) plots for undercooled liquid nickel and zirconium indicate no significant change in short-range structure from their melting temperatures to 15% undercooling. In contrast, liquid silicon shows marked short-range structural changes beginning above its melting temperature and extending throughout the undercooled region. The short-range structure of liquid silicon is related to the highly-directional covalent bonding which characterizes its solid form. The nickel and zirconium data show that epsilon(sub T) varies linearly with T, in support of metal emissivity theories.

  13. VUV radiation in the plasma of nanosecond discharges initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Sorokin, Dmitry A.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2017-05-01

    VUV radiation of run-away electron preionized discharge (REP DD) in different gas mixtures is studied. Efficient lasing was achieved on ArF* (193 nm) and F2* (157 nm) molecules. Narrowband VUV radiation (near 147 nm), corresponding to the optical transition of a heteronuclear dimer ArXe*, was recorded from the REP DD plasma in (He)-Ar-Xe mixture. Amplifying properties of the discharge plasma related to this radiation were found.

  14. Discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiation from diesel engine cooling fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geon-Seok

    This effort focuses on measuring and predicting the discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiated by diesel engine cooling fans. Unsteady forces developed by the interaction of the fan blade with inlet flow are the dominant source for both discrete-frequency and broadband noise of the subject propeller fan. In many cases, a primary source of discrepancy between fan noise prediction and measurement is due to incomplete description of the fan inflow. Particularly, in such engine cooling systems where space is very limited, it would be very difficult, if not, impossible to measure the fan inflow velocity field using the conventional, stationary hot-wire method. Instead, the fan inflow was measured with two-component x-type hot-film probes attached very close to the leading edge of a rotating blade. One of the advantages of the blade-mounted-probe measurement technique is that it measures velocities relative to the rotating probe, which enables the acquired data to be applied directly in many aerodynamic theories that have been developed for the airfoil fixed-coordinate system. However, the velocity time data measured by this technique contains the spatially non-uniform mean velocity field along with the temporal fluctuations. A phase-locked averaging technique was successfully employed to decompose the velocity data into time-invariant flow distortions and fluctuations due to turbulence. The angles of attack of the fan blades, obtained from inlet flow measurements, indicate that the blades are stalled. The fan's radiated noise was measured without contamination from the engine noise by driving the fan with an electric motor. The motor operated at a constant speed while a pair of speed controllable pulleys controlled the fan speed. Narrowband and 1/3-octave band sound power of the cooling fan was measured by using the comparison method with a reference sound source in a reverberant room. The spatially non-uniform mean velocity field was used in axial-flow fan noise

  15. Terahertz radiation emission from plasma beat-wave interactions with a relativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. N.; Kulagin, V. V.; Suk, H.

    2017-10-01

    We present a mechanism to generate terahertz radiation from laser-driven plasma beat-wave interacting with an electron beam. The theory of the energy transfer between the plasma beat-wave and terahertz radiation is elaborated through nonlinear coupling in the presence of a negative-energy relativistic electron beam. An expression of terahertz radiation field is obtained to find out the efficiency of the process. Our results show that the efficiency of terahertz radiation emission is strongly sensitive to the electron beam energy. Emitted field strength of the terahertz radiation is calculated as a function of electron beam velocity.

  16. Theory of coherent transition radiation generated at a plasma-vacuum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Leemans, Wim P.

    2003-06-26

    Transition radiation generated by an electron beam, produced by a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the self-modulated regime, crossing the plasma-vacuum boundary is considered. The angular distributions and spectra are calculated for both the incoherent and coherent radiation. The effects of the longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions on the differential energy spectra are examined. Diffraction radiation from the finite transverse extent of the plasma is considered and shown to strongly modify the spectra and energy radiated for long wavelength radiation. This method of transition radiation generation has the capability of producing high peak power THz radiation, of order 100 (mu)J/pulse at the plasma-vacuum interface, which is several orders of magnitude beyond current state-of-the-art THz sources.

  17. Evolution analysis of EUV radiation from laser-produced tin plasmas based on a radiation hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M. G.; Min, Q.; Cao, S. Q.; Sun, D. X.; Hayden, P.; O’Sullivan, G.; Dong, C. Z.

    2017-03-01

    One of fundamental aims of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is to maximize brightness or conversion efficiency of laser energy to radiation at specific wavelengths from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) of specific elements for matching to available multilayer optical systems. Tin LPPs have been chosen for operation at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. For an investigation of EUV radiation of laser-produced tin plasmas, it is crucial to study the related atomic processes and their evolution so as to reliably predict the optimum plasma and experimental conditions. Here, we present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation to rapidly investigate the evolution of radiation properties and dynamics in laser-produced tin plasmas. The self-absorption features of EUV spectra measured at an angle of 45° to the direction of plasma expansion have been successfully simulated and explained, and the evolution of some parameters, such as the plasma temperature, ion distribution and density, expansion size and velocity, have also been evaluated. Our results should be useful for further understanding of current research on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray source development for applications such as lithography, metrology and biological imaging.

  18. Evolution analysis of EUV radiation from laser-produced tin plasmas based on a radiation hydrodynamics model.

    PubMed

    Su, M G; Min, Q; Cao, S Q; Sun, D X; Hayden, P; O'Sullivan, G; Dong, C Z

    2017-03-23

    One of fundamental aims of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is to maximize brightness or conversion efficiency of laser energy to radiation at specific wavelengths from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) of specific elements for matching to available multilayer optical systems. Tin LPPs have been chosen for operation at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. For an investigation of EUV radiation of laser-produced tin plasmas, it is crucial to study the related atomic processes and their evolution so as to reliably predict the optimum plasma and experimental conditions. Here, we present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation to rapidly investigate the evolution of radiation properties and dynamics in laser-produced tin plasmas. The self-absorption features of EUV spectra measured at an angle of 45° to the direction of plasma expansion have been successfully simulated and explained, and the evolution of some parameters, such as the plasma temperature, ion distribution and density, expansion size and velocity, have also been evaluated. Our results should be useful for further understanding of current research on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray source development for applications such as lithography, metrology and biological imaging.

  19. Evolution analysis of EUV radiation from laser-produced tin plasmas based on a radiation hydrodynamics model

    PubMed Central

    Su, M. G.; Min, Q.; Cao, S. Q.; Sun, D. X.; Hayden, P.; O’Sullivan, G.; Dong, C. Z.

    2017-01-01

    One of fundamental aims of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is to maximize brightness or conversion efficiency of laser energy to radiation at specific wavelengths from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) of specific elements for matching to available multilayer optical systems. Tin LPPs have been chosen for operation at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. For an investigation of EUV radiation of laser-produced tin plasmas, it is crucial to study the related atomic processes and their evolution so as to reliably predict the optimum plasma and experimental conditions. Here, we present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation to rapidly investigate the evolution of radiation properties and dynamics in laser-produced tin plasmas. The self-absorption features of EUV spectra measured at an angle of 45° to the direction of plasma expansion have been successfully simulated and explained, and the evolution of some parameters, such as the plasma temperature, ion distribution and density, expansion size and velocity, have also been evaluated. Our results should be useful for further understanding of current research on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray source development for applications such as lithography, metrology and biological imaging. PMID:28332621

  20. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  1. Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Assmann, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Whittum, D.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K.; Mori, W.B.; Wang, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for using Cerenkov radiation near atomic spectral lines to measure plasma source properties for plasma wakefield applications has been discussed and experimentally verified. Because the radiation co-propagates with the electron beam, the radiation samples the source properties exactly along the path of interest with perfect temporal synchronization. Observation wavelengths were chosen with respect to the atomic resonances of the plasma source, where the relative change in the index of refraction strongly affects the Cerenkov cone angle, and permits flexible diagnostic design. The Cerenkov spatial profiles were systematically studied for a Lithium heat pipe oven as a function of oven temperature and observation wavelength. Neutral densities and plasma densities were extracted from the measurements.

  2. Water freezing at outdoor temperatures higher than 0 °C by the effect of radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Tago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2017-07-01

    A numerical analysis is adopted to construct a diagram for estimating freezing of thin water layers at outdoor temperatures higher than 0 °C by the effect of radiative cooling. Freezing is affected significantly by the wind-temperature and - velocity as well as cloud temperature which are encountered in winter seasons. On a fine day, the observed outdoor freezing data show fairly good agreement with the present diagram.

  3. Theory and Apparatus for Measurement of Emissivity for Radiative Cooling of Hypersonic Aircraft with Data for Inconel and Inconel X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, William J , Jr; Wade, William R

    1957-01-01

    The importance of radiation as a means of cooling high-supersonic- and hypersonic-speed aircraft is discussed to show the need for measurements of the total hemispherical emissivity of surfaces. The theory underlying the measurement of the total hemispherical emissivity of surfaces is presented, readily duplicable apparatus for performing the measurements is described, and measurements for stably oxidized Inconel and Inconel X are given for the temperature range from 600 F to 2,000 F.

  4. A Regulation of Tropical Climate by Radiative Cooling as Simulated in a Cumulus Ensemble Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Lau, K.-M.; Li, X.; Chou, M.-D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Responses of tropical atmosphere to low-boundary forcing are investigated in a 2-D cumulus ensemble model (CEM) with an imposed warm-pool and cold-pool SST contrast (deltaSST). The domain-mean vertical motion is constrained to produce heat sink and moisture source as in the observed tropical climate. In a series of experiments, the warm pool SST is specified at different values while the cold pool SST is specified at 26 C. The strength of the circulation increases with increasing deltaSST until deltaSST reaches 3.5 C, and remains unchanged as deltaSST exceeds 3.5 C. The regulation of tropical convection by zonal SST gradient is constrained by the radiative cooling over the cold pool. For deltaSST less than 3.5 C, an enhanced subsidence warming is balanced by a reduced condensation heating over the cold pool. For deltaSST greater than 3.5 C, the subsidence regime expands over the entire cold pool where no condensation heating exist so that a further enhanced subsidence warming can no longer be sustained. The above regulation mechanism is also evident in the change of energy at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) that is dominated by cloud and water vapor greenhouse effect (c (sub LW)) and G (sub clear). The change in shortwave radiation at TOA is largely cancelled between the warm pool and cold pool, likely due to the same imposed vertical motion in our experiments. For deltaSST less than 3.5 C, an increase of deltaSST is associated with a large increase in c (sub Lw) due to increased total clouds in response to enhanced SST-induced circulation. For deltaSST greater than 3.5 C, clouds over the warm pool decrease with increasing SST, and the change in c (sub LW) is much smaller. In both dSST regimes, the change in CLW is larger than the change in G(sub clear) which is slightly negative. However, in the case of uniform warming (deltaSST=0), DeltaG(sub clear), is positive, approximately 5 W per square meters per degree change of SST.

  5. Characterization of Iridium Coated Rhenium Used in High-Temperature, Radiation-Cooled Rocket Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stulen, R. H.; Boehme, D. R.; Clift, W. M.; McCarty, K. F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials used for radiation-cooled rocket thrusters must be capable of surviving under extreme conditions of high-temperatures and oxidizing environments. While combustion efficiency is optimized at high temperatures, many refractory metals are unsuitable for thruster applications due to rapid material loss from the formation of volatile oxides. This process occurs during thruster operation by reaction of the combustion products with the material surface. Aerojet Technical Systems has developed a thruster cone chamber constructed of Re coated with Ir on the inside surface where exposure to the rocket exhaust occurs. Re maintains its structural integrity at high temperature and the Ir coating is applied as an oxidation barrier. Ir also forms volatile oxide species (IrO2 and IrO3) but at a considerably slower rate than Re. In order to understand the performance limits of Ir-coated Re thrusters, we are investigating the interdiffusion and oxidation kinetics of Ir/Re. The formation of iridium and rhenium oxides has been monitored in situ by Raman spectroscopy during high temperature exposure to oxygen. For pure Ir, the growth of oxide films as thin as approximately 200 A could be easily detected and the formation of IrO2 was observed at temperatures as low as 600 C. Ir/Re diffusion test specimens were prepared by magnetron sputtering of Ir on Re substrates. Concentration profiles were determined by sputter Auger depth profiles of the heat treated specimens. Significant interdiffusion was observed at temperatures as low as 1000 C. Measurements of the activation energy suggest that below 1350 C, the dominant diffusion path is along defects, most likely grain boundaries, rather than bulk diffusion through the grains. The phases that form during interdiffusion have been examined by x ray diffraction. Analysis of heated test specimens indicates that the Ir-Re reaction produces a solid solution phase of Ir dissolved in the HCP structure of Re.

  6. Laser beat wave excitation of terahertz radiation in a plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, Santosh; Parashar, Jetendra

    2014-10-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generation by nonlinear mixing of lasers, obliquely incident on a plasma slab is investigated. Two cases are considered: (i) electron density profile is parabolic but density peak is below the critical density corresponding to the beat frequency, (ii) plasma boundaries are sharp and density is uniform. In both cases, nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force that gives rise to electron drift at the beat frequency. In the case of inhomogeneous plasma, non zero curl of the nonlinear current density gives rise to electromagnetic THz generation. In case of uniform plasma, the sharp density variation at the plasma boundaries leads to radiation generation. In a slab width of less than a terahertz wavelength, plasma density one fourth of terahertz critical density, laser intensities ∼10{sup 17 }W/cm{sup 2} at 1 μm, one obtains the THz intensity ∼1 GW/cm{sup 2} at 3 THz radiation frequency.

  7. Radiation hydrodynamic simulation of a photoionised plasma experiment at the Z facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.

    2011-11-01

    New, high spectral resolution X-ray observations from astrophysical photoionised plasmas have been recorded in recent years by the Chandra and XMM-Newton orbiting telescopes. These observations provide a wealth of detailed information and have motivated new efforts at developing a detailed understanding of the atomic kinetics and radiation physics of photoionised plasmas. The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is a powerful source of X-rays that enables us to produce and study photoionised plasmas in the laboratory under well characterised conditions. We discuss a series of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to help understand the X-ray environment, plasma hydrodynamics and atomic kinetics in experiments where a collapsing wire array at Z is used as an ionising source of radiation to create a photoionised plasma. The numerical simulations are used to investigate the role that the key experimental parameters have on the photoionised plasma characteristics.

  8. The Radiative Transfer Of CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} Plasma Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Benallal, R.; Liani, B.

    2008-09-23

    Any physical modelling of a circuit-breaker arc therefore requires an understanding of the radiated energy which is taken into account in the form of a net coefficient. The evaluation of the net emission coefficient is performed by the knowledge of the chemical plasma composition and the resolution of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper, the total radiation which escapes from a CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} plasma is calculated in the temperature range between 5000 and 30000K on the assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium and we have studied the nitrogen effect in the hydrocarbon plasmas.

  9. Estimation of radiation characteristics of circular microstrip antenna in weakly ionized plasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Pramod

    2010-02-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of circular microstrip antenna in weakly ionized plasma medium using the concept of vector magnetic potential, the expression for electric field and magnetic field has been obtained. Attempt has also been made to obtain the radiation resistance, trans-conductance and power radiated from the antenna. Particular emphasis has been given to estimate the effects of weakly ionized plasma medium on the directivity of antenna. It has been found that radiation characteristics and directivity of antenna affected sincerely by the weakly ionized plasma medium.

  10. Double Langmuir frequency radiation due to transformation processes in turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, V. N.; Panchenko, V. G.; Beloshenko, N. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the transformation process of longitudinal Langmuir wave into the transverse electromagnetic wave in turbulent plasma subjected to an upper hybrid pump. The case, when upper hybrid pump wave decays into daughter and ion - sound waves is considered. The transformation of the Langmuir wave into electromagnetic one is considered as the possible mechanism of energy radiation from the plasma. It is shown that the frequency of such radiation is chosen to be near double electron Langmuir frequency 2ωpe . These results give us the possibility to explain the nature of radiation from the laboratory and cosmic plasmas (particularly, from the solar crown).

  11. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  12. Cool in the Kitchen: Radiation, Conduction, and the Newton "Hot Block" Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Mark P.; Silverman, Christopher R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the development of Newton's Law of Cooling. Describes an experiment conducted in the kitchen that is designed to test the rate of cooling of a hot block of iron. Finds that Newton's law does not represent very well the mechanism of heat loss. (Contains over 10 references.) (WRM)

  13. Numerical investigation to study effect of radiation on thermal performance of radiator for onan cooling configuration of transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandak, V.; Paramane, S. B.; Veken, W. V. d.; Codde, J.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, flow and temperature distribution in the radiator fins of a power transformer is studied numerically with conjugate heat transfer using commercial CFD software to study the effect of radiation on heat dissipation. The approach considered here is a complete 3D geometry of the radiator fins with average height of the flute geometry of the fins for meshing and computational time reduction. Simulations are performed for ONAN (Oil Natural Air Natural) case for one radiator configuration. The simulations also study the effect of radiation and its impact on the overall heat dissipation. These results would give a holistic picture of heat transfer phenomenon to the designers.

  14. Analysis of the Solar Radiation Impact on Cooling Performance of the Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorčák, Pavol; Košičanová, Danica; Nagy, Richard; Mlynár, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Absorption cooling at low power is a new technology which has not yet been applied to current conditioning elements. This paper analyzes the various elements of solar absorption cooling. Individual states were simulated in which working conditions were set for the capability of solar absorption cooling to balance heat loads in the room. The research is based on an experimental device (absorption units with a performance of 10kW) developed at the STU in Bratislava (currently inputs and outputs of cold sources are being measured). Outputs in this paper are processed so that they connect the entire scheme of the solar absorption cooling system (i.e. the relationship between the solar systems hot and cold storage and the absorption unit). To determine the size of the storage required, calculated cooling for summer months is considered by the ramp rate of the absorption unit and required flow rate of the collectors.

  15. Electrode-plasma-driven radiation cutoff in long-pulse, high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Welch, D. R.; Portillo, S.

    2013-03-15

    The impact of electrode plasma dynamics on the radiation production in a high power microwave device is examined using particle-in-cell simulations. Using the design of a compact 2.4 GHz magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO) as the basis for numerical simulations, we characterize the time-dependent device power and radiation output over a range of cathode plasma formation rates. These numerical simulations can self-consistently produce radiation characteristics that are similar to measured signals in long pulse duration MILOs. This modeling capability should result in improved assessment of existing high-power microwave devices and lead to new designs for increased radiation pulse durations.

  16. Performance of a silicon photovoltaic module under enhanced illumination and selective filtration of incoming radiation with simultaneous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Subarna; Vyas, Kairavi; Ghosh, Pushpito K.

    2010-08-15

    A promising option to reduce the cost of silicon photovoltaic systems is to concentrate the sunlight incident on the solar cells to increase the output power. However, this leads to higher module temperatures which affects performance adversely and may also cause long term damage. Proper cooling is therefore necessary to operate the system under concentrated radiation. The present work was undertaken to circumvent the problem in practical manner. A suitable liquid, connected to a heat exchanger, was placed in the housing of the photovoltaic module and unwanted wavelengths of solar radiation were filtered out to minimise overheating of the cells. The selection of the liquid was based on factors such as boiling point, transparency towards visible radiation, absorption of infrared and ultraviolet radiation, stability, flow characteristics, heat transfer properties, and electrical nonconductivity. Using a square parabolic type reflector, more than two fold increase in output power was realised on a clear sunny day employing a 0.13 m{sup 2} silicon solar module. Without the cooling arrangement the panel temperature rose uncontrollably. (author)

  17. Heat loads to divertor nearby components from secondary radiation evolved during plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, V. Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental issue in tokamak operation related to power exhaust during plasma instabilities is the understanding of heat and particle transport from the core plasma into the scrape-off layer and to plasma-facing materials. During abnormal and disruptive operation in tokamaks, radiation transport processes play a critical role in divertor/edge-generated plasma dynamics and are very important in determining overall lifetimes of the divertor and nearby components. This is equivalent to or greater than the effect of the direct impact of escaped core plasma on the divertor plate. We have developed and implemented comprehensive enhanced physical and numerical models in the upgraded HEIGHTS package for simulating detailed photon and particle transport in the evolved edge plasma during various instabilities. The paper describes details of a newly developed 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport model, including optimization methods of generated plasma opacities in the full range of expected photon spectra. Response of the ITER divertor's nearby surfaces due to radiation from the divertor-developed plasma was simulated by using actual full 3D reactor design and magnetic configurations. We analyzed in detail the radiation emission spectra and compared the emission of both carbon and tungsten as divertor plate materials. The integrated 3D simulation predicted unexpectedly high damage risk to the open stainless steel legs of the dome structure in the current ITER design from the intense radiation during a disruption on the tungsten divertor plate.

  18. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  19. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  20. Toward sub-Kelvin resistive cooling and non destructive detection of trapped non-neutral electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domizio, S.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Testera, G.; Vaccarone, R.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2015-01-01

    A resonant circuit tuned to a particular frequency of the motion of charged particles stored in a Penning trap and connected to a low noise amplifier allows, at the same time, cooling and non destructive detection of the particles. Its use is widely diffused when single or few particles are stored near the centre of a hyperbolic Penning trap. We present a consistent model that predicts the shape of the induced signal when the tuned circuit is used to detect and cool the axial motion of a cold non neutral plasma stored in an open-ended cylindrical Penning trap. The model correctly accounts for the not negligible axial plasma size. We show that the power spectrum of the signal measured across the tuned circuit provides information about the particle number and insights about the plasma temperature. We report on the design of a HEMT-based cryogenic amplifier working at 14.4 MHz and 4.2 K and the results of the noise measurements. We have measured a drain current noise in the range from 6 to 17 pA/√Hz, which corresponds to an increase of the tuned circuit equivalent temperature of at maximum 0.35 K. The cryogenic amplifier has a very low power consumption from few tens to few hundreds of μW corresponding to a drain current in the range 100-800 μ A. An additional contribution due to the gate noise has been identified when the drain current is below 300 μA above that value an upper limit of the increase of the equivalent tuned circuit temperature due to this contribution of 0.02 K has been obtained. These features make the tuned circuit connected to this amplifier a promising device for detecting and cooling the axial motion of an electron plasma when the Penning trap is mounted inside a dilution refrigerator.

  1. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscicki, T.; Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1-100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm2 with a power density of 1 × 109 W/cm2 (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  2. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  3. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, T.; Yamaura, S.; Fukuma, Y.; Sakai, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  4. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, T.; Yamaura, S.; Fukuma, Y.; Sakai, O.

    2016-09-15

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  5. A physical model of radiated enhancement of plasma-surrounded antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiaotian; Wang, Chunsheng Jiang, Binhao; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2014-09-15

    A phenomenon that the radiated power may be enhanced when an antenna is surrounded by a finite plasma shell has been found in numerical and experimental studies. In this paper, a physical model was built to express the mechanism of the radiated enhancement. In this model, the plasma shell is treated as a parallel connection of a capacitance and a conductance whose parameters change with the system parameters (plasma density, collision frequency, and antenna frequency). So, the radiated enhancement can be explained by the resonance between the plasma shell and the infinite free space. Furthermore, the effects of system parameters on the radiated power are given and effects corresponding to mechanisms are performed based on the physical model.

  6. Prediction of Critical Heat Flux in Water-Cooled Plasma Facing Components Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 °C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where

  7. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin

  8. Photon-dominated regions around cool stars: The effects of the color temperature of the radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaans, Marco; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Dishoeck, Ewine F. Van; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of the color temperature of the illuminating radiation field on the chemical and thermal structure of photon-dominated regions (PDRs). We present the results of a study of the photoelectric efficiency of heating by large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains for radiation fields characterized by different effective temperatures. We show that the efficiency for cooler (T(sub eff) approximately = 6000-10,000 K) stars is at most an order of magnitude smaller than that for hotter (T(sub eff) approximately = 20,000-30,000 K) stars. While cooler radiation fields result in less ultraviolet photons capable of heating, the efficiency per absorbed photon is higher, because the grains become less positively charged. We also present detailed calculations of the chemistry and thermal balance for generic PDRs (n(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3), G(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3)). For cooler radiation fields, the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition layers shift toward the surface of the PDR, because fewer photons are available to photodissociate H2 and CO and to ionize C. The dominant cooling lines are the (C II) 158 micron and the (O I) 63 micron lines for the hotter radiation fields, but cooling by CO becomes dominant for a color temperature of 6000 K or lower. The (C II)/CO and (O I)/CO ratios are found to be very good diagnostics for the color temperature of the radiation field.

  9. Comparison of two cooling protocols for llama semen: with and without collagenase and seminal plasma in the medium.

    PubMed

    Carretero, M I; Giuliano, S M; Arraztoa, C C; Santa Cruz, R C; Fumuso, F G; Neild, D M

    2017-08-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) of South American Camelids could interfere with the interaction of spermatozoa with the extenders; therefore it becomes necessary to improve semen management using enzymatic treatment. Our objective was to compare two cooling protocols for llama semen. Twelve ejaculates were incubated in 0.1% collagenase and then were divided into two aliquots. One was extended in lactose and egg yolk (LEY) (Protocol A: collagenase and SP present). The other aliquot was centrifuged, and the pellet was resuspended in LEY (Protocol B: collagenase and SP absent). Both samples were maintained at 5°C during 24 hr. Routine and DNA evaluations were carried out in raw and cooled semen. Both cooling protocols maintained sperm viability, membrane function and DNA fragmentation, with Protocol A showing a significantly lowered total and progressive motility (p < .05) and Protocol B showing a significant increase in chromatin decondensation (p < .05). Protocol A avoids centrifugation, reducing processing times and making application in the field simpler. However, as neither protocol showed a significant superiority over the other, studies should be carried out in vivo to evaluate the effect on pregnancy rates of the presence of collagenase and SP in semen samples prior to either cooling or freeze-thawing. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Absorption spectroscopy of wire-array plasma at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Anderson, A.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Chalyy, O.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; McKee, E.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Shevelko, A. P.

    2010-11-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to 1 MA wire-array Z-pinches. The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for x-ray backlighting of wire arrays. Wire-array plasmas were investigated at the ablation and implosion stages. Broadband x-ray radiation from a laser produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 å. Two time-integrated x-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and main spectra. The backlighting radiation was separated from the powerful Z-pinch x-ray burst by collimators. A comparison of the backlighting radiation spectra that passed through the plasma with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.2-8.4 å. A plasma density profile was simulated with a 3D resistive MHD code. Simulations with atomic kinetics models derived an electron temperature of Al wire-array plasma.

  11. Radiation properties and hydrodynamics evolution of highly charged ions in laser-produced silicon plasma.

    PubMed

    Min, Qi; Su, Maogen; Cao, Shiquan; Sun, Duixiong; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong

    2016-11-15

    We present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation, which can be used to investigate the radiation properties and dynamics evolution of highly charged ions in a laser-produced plasma in vacuum. The outputs of the model consist of the evolution of the electron temperature, atom, and ion density, and the temporal and spatial evolution of various transient particles in plasma, as well as the simulated spectrum related to certain experimental conditions in a specified spectral window. In order to test the model and provide valuable experimental feedback, a series of EUV emission spectra of silicon plasmas have been measured using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma is reliably reconstructed by using this model.

  12. Covering Materials Incorporating Radiation-Preventing Techniques to Meet Greenhouse Cooling Challenges in Arid Regions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Al-Helal, Ibrahim M.; Alzahrani, Saeed M.; Alsadon, Abdullah A.; Ali, Ilias M.; Elleithy, Rabeh M.

    2012-01-01

    Cooling greenhouses is essential to provide a suitable environment for plant growth in arid regions characterized by brackish water resources. However, using conventional cooling methods are facing many challenges. Filtering out near infra-red radiation (NIR) at the greenhouse cover can significantly reduce the heating load and can solve the overheating problem of the greenhouse air. This paper is to review (i) the problems of using conventional cooling methods and (ii) the advantages of greenhouse covers that incorporate NIR reflectors. This survey focuses on how the cover type affects the transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), the reflectance or absorptance of NIR and the greenhouse air temperature. NIR-reflecting plastic films seem to be the most suitable, low cost and simple cover for greenhouses under arid conditions. Therefore, this review discusses how various additives should be incorporated in plastic film to increase its mechanical properties, durability and ability to stand up to extremely harsh weather. Presently, NIR-reflecting covers are able to reduce greenhouse air temperature by no more than 5°C. This reduction is not enough in regions where the ambient temperature may exceed 45°C in summer. There is a need to develop improved NIR-reflecting plastic film covers. PMID:22629223

  13. Analysis of cooling effect by blood vessel on temperature rise due to ultrasound radiation in tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuma; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Fukasawa, Kota; Hatano, Yuichi; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound diagnostic equipment using ultrasound pulse-echo techniques is considered minimally invasive and highly versatile. However, one of the causes of damage due to ultrasound radiation is temperature rise caused by the absorption of sound energy. Therefore, it is very important to estimate the temperature rise caused by the radiation of ultrasound. Sound intensity in a medium is analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the temperature distribution caused by sound is estimated by the heat conduction equation (HCE) method in this study. Because blood vessels keep the temperature constant in tissues, the cooling effect of blood flow has to be taken into account for the precise estimation of temperature rise in human tissues. In general, it is well known that capillary vessels are mainly responsible for the cooling effect in tissues and their effect can be estimated as a function of bloodstream ratio. In this paper, a preliminary study on the cooling effect by a large vessel is described for the precise estimation of temperature rise. Blood flow in blood vessels is analyzed using the Navier-Stokes equation. To confirm the precision of the numerical analysis, the results of the numerical analysis are compared with the experimental results using a soft tissue phantom.

  14. Prediction of radiation doses during the dismantling of the pressurized tank from emergency core cooling system of RBMK- 1500 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, A.; Poskas, P.; Poskas, G.

    2013-07-01

    Preparation for the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant involves multiple problems. Personnel radiation safety during the performance of dismantling activities is one of them. In order to assess the optimal personnel radiation safety, the modelling is performed for large components by the means of computer code 'VISIPLAN 3D ALARA Planning tool' developed by SCK CEN (Belgium). Modelling results of radiation doses during the dismantling of the pressurized tank from the emergency core cooling system (ECCS PT) of RBMK-1500 reactor are presented in this paper. The mass of one ECCS PT is approximately 47.6 tons. The radiological surveys indicate that the inner surface of the ECCS PT is contaminated with radioactive products of corrosion and sediments due to the radioactive water. The assessment of workers exposure was performed to comply with ALARA. The effective doses to the workers were modeled for different strategies of ECCS PT dismantling. The impact of dismantling tools and shielding types and extract ventilation flow rate during the dismantling of ECCS PT on effective doses were analyzed. The total effective personnel doses were obtained by summarizing the effective personnel doses from various sources of exposure, i. e., direct radiation from radioactive equipment, internal radiation due to inhalation of radioactive aerosols, and direct radiation from radioactive aerosols arising during hot cutting in premises. (authors)

  15. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., ``sub-Larmor scales''. Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  16. Radiative heating and cooling in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus and responses to atmospheric and spectroscopic parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2015-11-01

    A sophisticated radiative transfer model that considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents over the broad spectral range 0.125-1000 μm is applied to calculate radiative fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km). Responses of these quantities to spectroscopic and atmospheric parameter variations are examined in great detail. Spectroscopic parameter studies include the definition of an optimum spectral grid for monochromatic calculations as well as comparisons for different input data with respect to spectral line databases, continuum absorption, line shape factors, and solar irradiance spectra. Atmospheric parameter studies are based on distinct variations of an initial model data set. Analyses of actual variations of the radiative energy budget using atmospheric features that have been recently retrieved from Venus Express data will be subject of a subsequent paper. The calculated cooling (heating) rates are very reliable at altitudes below 95 (85) km with maximum uncertainties of about 0.25 K/day. Heating uncertainties may reach 3-5 K/day at 100 km. Using equivalent Planck radiation as solar insolation source in place of measured spectra is not recommended. Cooling rates strongly respond to variations of atmospheric thermal structure, while heating rates are less sensitive. The influence of mesospheric minor gas variations is small, but may become more important near the cloud base and in case of episodic SO2 boosts. Responses to cloud mode 1 particle abundance changes are weak, but variations of other mode parameters (abundances, cloud top and base altitudes) may significantly alter radiative temperature change rates up to 50% in Venus' lower mesosphere and upper troposphere. A new model for the unknown UV absorber for two altitude domains is proposed. It is not directly linked to cloud particle modes and permits an investigation of radiative effects regardless of

  17. Mm-Wave Spectroscopy and Determination of the Radiative Branching Ratios of 11BH for Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, Stefan; Holland, Darren; Hendricks, Richard James; Hinds, Ed; Tarbutt, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We aim to slow a supersonic, molecular beam of 11BH using a Zeeman slower and subsequently cool the molecules to sub-millikelvin temperatures in a magneto-optical trap. Most molecules are not suitable for direct laser cooling because the presence of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom means there is no closed-cycle transition which is necessary to scatter a large number of photons. As was pointed out by Di Rosa, there exists a class of molecules for which the excitation of vibrational modes is suppressed due to highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors. Furthermore, Stuhl et al. showed that angular momentum selection rules can be used to suppress leakage to undesired rotational states. Here we present a measurement of the radiative branching ratios of the A^1Π→ X^1Σ transition in 11BH - a necessary step towards subsequent laser cooling experiments. We also perform high-resolution mm-wave spectroscopy of the J'=1← J=0 rotational transition in the X^1Σ (v=0) state near 708 GHz. From this measurement we derive new, accurate hyper fine constants and compare these to theoretical descriptions. The measured branching ratios suggest that it is possible to laser cool 11BH molecules close to the recoil temperature of 4 μK using three laser frequencies only. M. D. Di Rosa, The European Physical Journal D, 31, 395, 2004 B. K. Stuhl et al., Physical Review Letters, 101, 243002, 2008

  18. Radiation shielding issues for MuCool test area at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this study the origin of the outgoing collimated neutron beam is examined. An alternative shielding option for MTA is investigated as well as the hypothetical worst case of experimental setup is considered.

  19. DIII-D Edge Plasma, Disruptions, and Radiative Processes. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J. A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Moyer, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    The scientific goal of the UCSD-DIII-D Collaboration during this period was to understand the coupling of the core plasma to the plasma-facing components through the plasma boundary (edge and scrape-off layer). To achieve this goal, UCSD scientists studied the transport of particles, momentum, energy, and radiation from the plasma core to the plasma-facing components under normal (e.g., L-mode, H-mode, and ELMs), and off-normal (e.g., disruptions) operating conditions.

  20. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulation of plasma formed on a surface by a megagauss field.

    PubMed

    Esaulov, A A; Bauer, B S; Makhin, V; Siemon, R E; Lindemuth, I R; Awe, T J; Reinovsky, R E; Struve, K W; Desjarlais, M P; Mehlhorn, T A

    2008-03-01

    Radiation magnetohydrodynamic modeling is used to study the plasma formed on the surface of a cylindrical metallic load, driven by megagauss magnetic field at the 1MA Zebra generator (University of Nevada, Reno). An ionized aluminum plasma is used to represent the "core-corona" behavior in which a heterogeneous Z-pinch consists of a hot low-density corona surrounding a dense low-temperature core. The radiation dynamics model included simultaneously a self-consistent treatment of both the opaque and transparent plasma regions in a corona. For the parameters of this experiment, the boundary of the opaque plasma region emits the major radiation power with Planckian black-body spectrum in the extreme ultraviolet corresponding to an equilibrium temperature of 16 eV. The radiation heat transport significantly exceeds the electron and ion kinetic heat transport in the outer layers of the opaque plasma. Electromagnetic field energy is partly radiated (13%) and partly deposited into inner corona and core regions (87%). Surface temperature estimates are sensitive to the radiation effects, but the surface motion in response to pressure and magnetic forces is not. The general results of the present investigation are applicable to the liner compression experiments at multi-MA long-pulse current accelerators such as Atlas and Shiva Star. Also the radiation magnetohydrodynamic model discussed in the paper may be useful for understanding key effects of wire array implosion dynamics.

  1. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Low-threshold generation of harmonics and hard x radiation in a laser plasma. 2. Multipeak generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Kazakov, K. Kh

    1993-02-01

    The conditions for the generation of hard x radiation with a multipeak structure in a plasma pumped by a long pulse from a free-running CO2 laser at a low intensity (q≲10 GW/cm2) have been studied. This x-ray generation had been observed in a previous study by the present authors. It is shown that this generation of hard x radiation with a multipeak structure leads to a more than tenfold increase in the yield of hard x radiation per laser pulse, under optimum conditions. This increase results from the additional peaks in the x-ray signal. An explanation of this effect is proposed.

  2. Ion acoustic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal hot electrons and Boltzmann cool electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rufai, O. R. Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2014-08-15

    Arbitrary amplitude, ion acoustic solitons, and supersolitons are studied in a magnetized plasma with two distinct groups of electrons at different temperatures. The plasma consists of a cold ion fluid, cool Boltzmann electrons, and nonthermal energetic hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique, the effect of nonthermal hot electrons on soliton structures with other plasma parameters is studied. Our numerical computation shows that negative potential ion-acoustic solitons and double layers can exist both in the subsonic and supersonic Mach number regimes, unlike the case of an unmagnetized plasma where they can only exist in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the first time, it is reported here that in addition to solitions and double layers, the ion-acoustic supersoliton solutions are also obtained for certain range of parameters in a magnetized three-component plasma model. The results show good agreement with Viking satellite observations of the solitary structures with density depletions in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  3. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-09-07

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust{sup 2} and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  4. Mechanism analysis of radiation generated by the beam-plasma interaction in a vacuum diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zengchao; Chen, Shixiu; Gao, Shen

    2017-01-01

    When we were studying the vacuum switch, we found that the vacuum diode can radiate a broadband microwave. The vacuum diode is comprised of a cathode with a trigger device and planar anode, there is not a metallic bellows waveguide structure in this device, so the radiation mechanism of the vacuum diode is different from the plasma filled microwave device. It is hard to completely imitate the theory of the plasma filled microwave device. This paper analyzes the breakdown process of the vacuum diode, establishes the mathematical model of the radiating microwave from the vacuum diode. Based on the analysis of the dispersion relation in the form of a refractive index, the electromagnetic waves generated in the vacuum diode will resonate. The included angle between the direction of the electromagnetic radiation and the initial motion direction of electron beam is 45 degrees. The paper isolates the electrostatic effect from the beam-plasma interaction when the electromagnetic radiation occurs. According to above analyses, the dispersion relations of radiation are obtained by solving the wave equation. The dispersion curves are also obtained based on the theoretical dispersion relations. The theoretical dispersion curves are consistent with the actual measurement time-frequency maps of the radiation. Theoretical deduction and experiments indicate that the reason for microwave radiating from the vacuum diode can be well explained by the interaction of the electron beam and magnetized plasma. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 11075123), the Young Scientists Fund of Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 51207171).

  5. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  6. Mechanism analysis of radiation generated by the beam-plasma interaction in a vacuum diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengchao, Ji; Shixiu, Chen; Shen, Gao

    2017-01-01

    When we were studying the vacuum switch, we found that the vacuum diode can radiate a broadband microwave. The vacuum diode is comprised of a cathode with a trigger device and planar anode, there is not a metallic bellows waveguide structure in this device, so the radiation mechanism of the vacuum diode is different from the plasma filled microwave device. It is hard to completely imitate the theory of the plasma filled microwave device. This paper analyzes the breakdown process of the vacuum diode, establishes the mathematical model of the radiating microwave from the vacuum diode. Based on the analysis of the dispersion relation in the form of a refractive index, the electromagnetic waves generated in the vacuum diode will resonate. The included angle between the direction of the electromagnetic radiation and the initial motion direction of electron beam is 45 degrees. The paper isolates the electrostatic effect from the beam-plasma interaction when the electromagnetic radiation occurs. According to above analyses, the dispersion relations of radiation are obtained by solving the wave equation. The dispersion curves are also obtained based on the theoretical dispersion relations. The theoretical dispersion curves are consistent with the actual measurement time-frequency maps of the radiation. Theoretical deduction and experiments indicate that the reason for microwave radiating from the vacuum diode can be well explained by the interaction of the electron beam and magnetized plasma. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 11075123), the Young Scientists Fund of Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 51207171).

  7. Enhancing VHTR passive safety and economy with thermal radiation based direct reactor auxiliary cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.; Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The RVACS can be characterized as a surface-based decay heat removal system. It is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to the core volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to the vessel surface area). Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environmental side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps or annular regions formed between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions among the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very

  8. The mechanism of the effect of a plasma layer with negative permittivity on the antenna radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunsheng Liu, Hui; Jiang, Binhao; Li, Xueai

    2015-06-15

    A model of a plasma–antenna system is developed to study the mechanism of the effect of the plasma layer on antenna radiation. Results show a plasma layer with negative permittivity is inductive, and thus affects the phase difference between electric and magnetic fields. In the near field of antenna radiation, a plasma layer with proper parameters can compensate the capacitivity of the vacuum and enhance the radiation power. In the far field of antenna radiation, the plasma layer with negative permittivity increases the inductivity of the vacuum and reduces the radiation power.

  9. Strong Field-Induced Frequency Conversion of Laser Radiation in Plasma Plumes: Recent Achievements

    PubMed Central

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications. PMID:23864818

  10. On the Transport and Radiative Properties of Plasmas with Small-Scale Electromagnetic Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett D.

    Plasmas with sub-Larmor-scale ("small-scale") electromagnetic fluctuations are a feature of a wide variety of high-energy-density environments, and are essential to the description of many astrophysical/laboratory plasma phenomena. Radiation from particles, whether they be relativistic or non-relativistic, moving through small-scale electromagnetic turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying information on the statistical properties of the turbulence, is also intimately related to the particle diffusive transport. We investigate, both theoretically and numerically, the transport of non-relativistic and transrelativistic particles in plasmas with high-amplitude isotropic sub-Larmor-scale magnetic turbulence---both with and without a mean field component---and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. Furthermore, the transport of particles through small-scale electromagnetic turbulence---under certain conditions---resembles the random transport of particles---via Coulomb collisions---in collisional plasmas. The pitch-angle diffusion coefficient, which acts as an effective "collision" frequency, may be substantial in these, otherwise, collisionless environments. We show that this effect, colloquially referred to as the plasma "quasi-collisionality", may radically alter the expected radiative transport properties of candidate plasmas. We argue that the modified magneto-optic effects in these plasmas provide an attractive, novel, diagnostic tool for the exploration and characterization of small-scale electromagnetic turbulence. Lastly, we speculate upon the manner in which quasi-collisions may affect inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and other laser-plasma experiments. Finally, we show that mildly relativistic jitter radiation, from laser-produced plasmas, may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the

  11. Experimental observations and model calculations of impurity radiation in a plasma gun compact torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenbaum, G.C.; Granneman, E.H.A.; Hartman, C.W.; Prono, D.S.; Taska, J.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-08-10

    Several types of radiation measurements were performed on the Beta II compact forms experiment. Among these are time integrated spectra ranging in wavelength from the vuv to the uv, time resolved bolometer measurements of radiation from the x-ray to the infrared, and time and wavelength resolved measurements of certain spectral lines. It is difficult to relate any one of these measurements to plasma parameters of interest such as temperature, density, or impurity content. In this report we compare the results of these, and other measurements with two simple models of the power balance in the plasma in order to estimate the effect of carbon and oxygen impurities on plasma lifetime.

  12. Basic knowledge on radiative and transport properties to begin in thermal plasmas modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Cressault, Y.

    2015-05-15

    This paper has for objectives to present the radiative and the transport properties for people beginning in thermal plasmas. The first section will briefly recall the equations defined in numerical models applied to thermal plasmas; the second section will particularly deal with the estimation of radiative losses; the third part will quickly present the thermodynamics properties; and the last part will concern the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, viscosity and electrical conductivity of the gas or mixtures of gases). We shall conclude the paper with a discussion about the validity of these results the lack of data for some specific applications, and some perspectives concerning these properties for non-equilibrium thermal plasmas.

  13. Radiation rates for low Z impurities in edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.; Abdallah, J.; Post, D.

    1994-08-01

    The potential role of impurity radiation in the reduction of heat loads on divertor plates places a new degree of importance on the accuracy of low Z impurity radiation emission rates for electron temperatures below 300 eV. We have calculated the radiated power loss using a collisional-radiative model for Be, B, C, Ne and Ar using a multiple configuration interaction model which includes density dependent effects, as well as a very detailed treatment of the energy levels and meta-stables. These rates indicate that significant enhancements above steady state collisional-radiative rates due to such effects as rapid recycling and charge exchange recombination will be necessary for impurity radiation to reduce the peak heat loads on divertor plates for high heat flux experiments such as ITER.

  14. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Influence of the ambient air pressure on short-wavelength radiation from a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, A. F.; Zemtsov, S. S.; Fedyushin, B. T.

    1991-12-01

    A detailed experimental investigation was made of the radiation from a plasma created on an aluminum target by a pulsed CO2 laser at different ambient gas pressures. Measurements were made of the energy and angular distribution of the radiation and of the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into reemitted plasma radiation. The intensity of this radiation was found to exhibit pressure-dependent pulsations. The maximum reflection of the laser radiation from the plasma was recorded at a pressure of ~ 40 Torr. An interpretation is given of the experimental data.

  15. Laser plasma influence on the space-time structure of powerful laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyin, O. B.; Bogdanov, G. S.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Gerasimov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Melekhov, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of laser plasma on the structure of the radiation field of a powerful Nd-glass laser with pulse energy up to 30 J and with the diameter of the output beam 45 mm. Laser plasma is generated by focusing the laser radiation on a low-density target such as nylon mesh and teflon or mylar films. Temporal profile of the laser pulse with a total duration of 25 ns consists of a several short pulse train. Duration of each pulse is about 2 ns. Notable smoothing of spatially non-uniform radiation structure was observed in the middle of the laser pulse.

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet line radiation measurements of a shock-heated nitrogen plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclenahan, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Line radiation, in the wavelength region from 1040 to 2500 A from nitrogen plasmas, was measured at conditions typical of those produced in the shock layer in front of vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at superorbital velocities. The radiation was also predicted with a typical radiation transport computer program to determine whether such calculations adequately model plasmas for the conditions tested. The results of the comparison show that the radiant intensities of the lines between 1040 and 1700 A are actually lower than are predicted by such computer models.

  17. Hot topic, warm loops, cooling plasma? Multithermal analysis of active region loops

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Brooks, D. H.

    2014-11-10

    We have found indications of a relationship between the differential emission measure (DEM) weighted temperature and the cross-field DEM width for coronal loops. The data come from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. These data show that cooler loops tend to have narrower DEM widths. If most loops observed by these instruments are composed of bundles of unresolved magnetic strands and are only observed in their cooling phase, as some studies have suggested, then this relationship implies that the DEM of a coronal loop narrows as it cools. This could imply that fewer strands are seen emitting in the later cooling phase, potentially resolving the long standing controversy of whether the cross-field temperatures of coronal loops are multithermal or isothermal.

  18. Plasma miRNA as biomarkers for assessment of total-body radiation exposure dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanchang; Ma, Jinfang; Wang, Yulei; Biswal, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    The risk of radiation exposure, due to accidental or malicious release of ionizing radiation, is a major public health concern. Biomarkers that can rapidly identify severely-irradiated individuals requiring prompt medical treatment in mass-casualty incidents are urgently needed. Stable blood or plasma-based biomarkers are attractive because of the ease for sample collection. We tested the hypothesis that plasma miRNA expression profiles can accurately reflect prior radiation exposure. We demonstrated using a murine model that plasma miRNA expression signatures could distinguish mice that received total body irradiation doses of 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy, and 10 Gy (at 6 h or 24 h post radiation) with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of above 90%. Taken together, these data demonstrate that plasma miRNA profiles can be highly predictive of different levels of radiation exposure. Thus, plasma-based biomarkers can be used to assess radiation exposure after mass-casualty incidents, and it may provide a valuable tool in developing and implementing effective countermeasures.

  19. Effect of ionized plasma medium on the radiation from a RITMA structure on ferrite substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Tiwari, V. K.; Bhatnagar, D.; Saini, J. S.; Sharma, K. B.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents theoretical investigations on the radiation properties of a right isosceles triangular microstrip antenna (RITMA) printed on a magnetized ferrite substrate Ni_{0.62}Co_{0.02}Fe_{1.948}O_{4} in the presence of ionized plasma medium. The theoretical study on RITMA structure in free space is carried out in TM_{11} mode of excitation by applying cavity model-based modal expansion technique while hydrodynamic theory is used for its analysis in plasma medium. By varying the bias magnetic field, far-field radiation patterns in free space and plasma medium are obtained which in turn are applied in computing radiated power, directivity, quality factor and bandwidth of antenna. It is found that the presence of plasma medium affects the performance of RITMA structure significantly.

  20. A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a one-dimensional, steady state transpiration cooling system in radiative and convective environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, H.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified analytical method for calculation of thermal response within a transpiration-cooled porous heat shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. The essential assumptions of the radiative and convective transfer processes in the heat shield matrix are the two-temperature approximation and the specified radiative-convective heatings of the front surface. Sample calculations for porous silica with CO2 injection are presented for some typical parameters of mass injection rate, porosity, and material thickness. The effect of these parameters on the cooling system is discussed.

  1. Strong terahertz radiation generation by beating of two spatial-triangular beams in collisional magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hematizadeh, Ayoob; Bakhtiari, Farhad; Jazayeri, Seyed Masud; Ghafary, Bijan

    2016-05-01

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) radiation generation is proposed by beating of two spatial-triangular laser beams in plasma with a spatially periodic density when electron-neutral collisions have taken into account. In this process, the laser beams exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons of the plasma and impart the oscillatory velocity at the difference frequency in the presence of a static magnetic field which is applied parallel to the direction of the lasers. We show that higher efficiency and stronger THz radiation are achieved when the parallel magnetic field is used to compare the perpendicular magnetic field. The effects of beam width of lasers, collision frequency, periodicity of density ripples, and magnetic field strength are analyzed for strong THz radiation generation. The THz field of the emitted radiations is found to be highly sensitive to collision frequency and magnetic field strength. In this scheme with the optimization of plasma parameters, the efficiency of order 21% is achieved.

  2. Temporal structure of X-ray radiation pulses of picosecond laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V S; Kovkov, D V; Matafonov, A P; Karabadzhak, G F; Raikunov, G G; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Fokin, D A; Fortov, V E; Ignat'ev, G N; Kapitanov, S V; Krapiva, P S; Korotkov, K E

    2013-09-30

    The shape of the X-ray pulse generated by picosecond laser plasma is experimentally studied. The unusual phenomenon was experimentally observed for the first time for targets made of moderate-heavy chemical elements, namely, the pulse of hard X-ray radiation generated by laser plasma at the laser radiation flux of ∼10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} had a longer duration than the pulse of softer X-ray radiation. A simple kinetic model is suggested for explaining this fact. We have suggested a method for controlling the temporal shape of X-ray pulse emitted by laser plasma by varying the contrast of laser pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Strong terahertz radiation generation by beating of two spatial-triangular beams in collisional magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hematizadeh, Ayoob Bakhtiari, Farhad; Jazayeri, Seyed Masud; Ghafary, Bijan

    2016-05-15

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) radiation generation is proposed by beating of two spatial-triangular laser beams in plasma with a spatially periodic density when electron–neutral collisions have taken into account. In this process, the laser beams exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons of the plasma and impart the oscillatory velocity at the difference frequency in the presence of a static magnetic field which is applied parallel to the direction of the lasers. We show that higher efficiency and stronger THz radiation are achieved when the parallel magnetic field is used to compare the perpendicular magnetic field. The effects of beam width of lasers, collision frequency, periodicity of density ripples, and magnetic field strength are analyzed for strong THz radiation generation. The THz field of the emitted radiations is found to be highly sensitive to collision frequency and magnetic field strength. In this scheme with the optimization of plasma parameters, the efficiency of order 21% is achieved.

  4. Electromagnetic wave radiation by an electron beam spiraling in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Zaboronkova, T. M.; Krafft, C.

    2007-06-15

    The paper studies the electromagnetic wave radiation by a density modulated and thin electron beam of finite length injected obliquely with respect to the constant external magnetic field into a cylindrical plasma column embedded in a homogeneous medium (plasma, dielectric, or free space) and aligned along the magnetic field lines. The time-averaged power radiated at the modulation frequency is determined as a function of the beam, the plasma column, and the medium parameters. Particular attention is devoted to the case when the beam modulation frequency belongs to the whistler frequency band. The paper shows what significant differences exist between the physical features of the emissions when the beam radiates in a plasma column embedded in a homogeneous medium or in a uniform and unbounded magnetized plasma. Based on the results of numerical calculations, the time-averaged power radiated by pulsed and modulated beams has been estimated for typical laboratory plasma experiments. In particular, it is shown that a beam propagating in a plasma column can efficiently enhance its wave emission due to Cherenkov and normal cyclotron excitation of guided whistler modes.

  5. Jet-Cooled Spectroscopy on the Ailes Infrared Beamline of the Synchrotron Radiation Facility Soleil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The Advanced Infrared Line Exploited for Spectroscopy (AILES) extracts the bright far infrared (FIR) synchrotron continuum of the third generation radiation facility SOLEIL. This beamline is equipped with a high resolution (10-3 cm-1) Bruker IFS125 Fourier transform spectrometer which can be operated in the FIR but also in the mid and near infrared by using its internal conventional sources. The jet-AILES consortium (IPR, PhLAM, MONARIS, SOLEIL) has implemented a supersonic-jet apparatus on the beamline to record absorption spectra at very low temperature (5-50 K) and in highly supersaturated gaseous conditions. Heatable slit-nozzles of various lengths and widths are used to set properly the stagnation conditions. A mechanical pumping (roots pumps) was preferred for its ability to evacuate important mass flow rates and therefore to boost the experimental sensitivity of the set-up, the counterpart being a non-negligible consumption of both carrier (argon, helium or nitrogen) and spectroscopic gases. Various molecular systems were investigated up to now using the Jet-AILES apparatus. The very low temperature achieved in the gas expansion was either used to simplify the rotation-vibration structure of monomers, such as SF6, CF4 or naphthalene, or to stabilize the formation of weakly bonded molecular complexes such as the trimer of HF or the dimer of acetic acid. The nucleation of water vapor and the nuclear spin conversion of water were also investigated under free-jet conditions in the mid infrared. High-resolution spectroscopy and analysis of the νb{2} + νb{3} combination band of SF6 in a supersonic jet expansion. V. Boudon, P. Asselin, P. Soulard, M. Goubet, T. R. Huet, R. Georges, O. Pirali, P. Roy, Mol. Phys. 111, 2154-2162 (2013) The far infrared spectrum of naphthalene characterized by high resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy and anharmonic DFT calculations. O. Pirali, M. Goubet, T.R. Huet, R. Georges, P. Soulard, P. Asselin, J. Courbe, P. Roy and M

  6. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  7. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  8. The stratosphere - Climatologies of the radiative heating and cooling rates and the diabatically diagnosed net circulation fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, Linwood B.; Boughner, Robert E.; Lambeth, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Stratospheric solar, IR, and net radiative heating are calculated on a monthly basis using solar and IR radiative codes and satellite derived distributions of ozone, water vapor, and temperature. Divergence-free, zonally averaged, advective fields are diagnosed using the calculated diabatic heating; associated stream functions are derived. The stratospheric transport of inert tracers is studied. Analysis of the diagnosed advective fields reveal that: (1) entry into the mid- to upper stratosphere of tropospheric air is mainly from altitude regions of + or - 10 deg at the equatorial tropopause; (2) at latitudes poleward of + or - 15 deg, tracers transported from the troposphere into the stratosphere are transported toward the pole and then downward and out of the stratosphere; and (3) the presence of net cooling cells in the lower stratospheric polar regions is important. The interannual variability of the diabatic circulation is estimated using heating and advection fields derived from LIMS data.

  9. Terahertz radiation with high power and high efficiency in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiari, Farhad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Ghafary, Bijan

    2017-07-01

    We propose a scheme for the generation of terahertz (THz) radiation in a plasma by beating of two flat-topped laser beams when a static magnetic field is applied to the plasma with a parallel or perpendicular direction. We show that the presence of a static magnetic field can enhance drastically the power and efficiency of THz radiation. The power and efficiency enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic field is greater than that of parallel one. Furthermore, the perpendicular magnetic field produces THz radiation with a square shaped field profile which has many applications in industries especially in optical communication. Optimizing the laser beams and magnetized plasma parameters and considering the interaction (mutual effect) between laser beams, THz radiation, and plasma, the THz radiation efficiency up to 8.3% can be obtained. A comparison between the THz radiation generated by flat-topped and super Gaussian laser beams shows that, at the same conditions, the THz radiation generated by flat-topped beam lasers has some advantages such as about two times wider flat-topped region and more than two times higher efficiency.

  10. Intestinal Microbiota Derived Metabolomic Blood Plasma Markers for Prior Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Broin, Pilib Ó; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Saha, Subhrajit; Hartil, Kirsten; Chen, Emily I.; Goldman, Devorah; Fleming, William Harv; Kurland, Irwin J.; Guha, Chandan; Golden, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessing whole-body radiation injury and absorbed dose is essential for remediation efforts following accidental or deliberate exposure in medical, industrial, military, or terrorist incidents. We hypothesize that variations in specific metabolite concentrations extracted from blood plasma would correlate with whole-body radiation injury and dose. Methods and Materials Groups of C57BL/6 mice (n=12 per group) were exposed to 0 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy, 8 Gy, and 10.4 Gy of whole-body γ-radiation. At 24 hours post treatment all animals were euthanized and both plasma and liver biopsies obtained - the latter being used to deconvolve a distinct hepatic radiation injury response within plasma. A semi-quantitative untargeted metabolites/lipid profiling using both GC/MS and LC/MS/MS platforms was performed and identified 354 biochemicals. A second set of C57BL/6 mice (n=6 per group) were used to assess a subset of identified plasma markers beyond 24 hours. Results We identified a cohort of 37 biochemical compounds in plasma that yielded the optimal separation of the irradiated sample groups, with the most correlated metabolites associated with pyrimidine (positively correlated) and tryptophan (negatively correlated) metabolism. The latter were predominantly associated with indole compounds, and there was evidence to indicate that these were also correlated between liver and plasma. No evidence of saturation as a function of dose was observed, as has been noted for studies involving metabolite analysis of urine. Conclusion Plasma profiling of specific metabolites related to the pyrimidine and tryptophan pathways can be used to differentiate whole-body radiation injury and dose response. As the tryptophan associated indole compounds have their origin in the intestinal microbiome and subsequently the liver, these metabolites in particular represent an attractive marker for radiation injury within blood plasma. PMID:25636760

  11. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived Metabolomic Blood Plasma Markers for Prior Radiation Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ó Broin, Pilib; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Saha, Subhrajit; Hartil, Kirsten; Chen, Emily I.; Goldman, Devorah; Fleming, William Harv; Kurland, Irwin J.; Guha, Chandan; Golden, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Assessing whole-body radiation injury and absorbed dose is essential for remediation efforts following accidental or deliberate exposure in medical, industrial, military, or terrorist incidents. We hypothesize that variations in specific metabolite concentrations extracted from blood plasma would correlate with whole-body radiation injury and dose. Methods and Materials: Groups of C57BL/6 mice (n=12 per group) were exposed to 0, 2, 4, 8, and 10.4 Gy of whole-body gamma radiation. At 24 hours after treatment, all animals were euthanized, and both plasma and liver biopsy samples were obtained, the latter being used to identify a distinct hepatic radiation injury response within plasma. A semiquantitative, untargeted metabolite/lipid profile was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which identified 354 biochemical compounds. A second set of C57BL/6 mice (n=6 per group) were used to assess a subset of identified plasma markers beyond 24 hours. Results: We identified a cohort of 37 biochemical compounds in plasma that yielded the optimal separation of the irradiated sample groups, with the most correlated metabolites associated with pyrimidine (positively correlated) and tryptophan (negatively correlated) metabolism. The latter were predominantly associated with indole compounds, and there was evidence that these were also correlated between liver and plasma. No evidence of saturation as a function of dose was observed, as has been noted for studies involving metabolite analysis of urine. Conclusions: Plasma profiling of specific metabolites related to pyrimidine and tryptophan pathways can be used to differentiate whole-body radiation injury and dose response. As the tryptophan-associated indole compounds have their origin in the intestinal microbiome and subsequently the liver, these metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for radiation injury within blood plasma.

  12. Evaluation of the NightCool Nocturnal Radiation Cooling Concept: Annual Performance Assessment in Scale Test Buildings Stage Gate 1B

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny S.; Sherwin, John R.

    2008-03-01

    In this report, data is presented on the long-term comparative with all of NightCool system fully operational, with circulating fans when attic conditions are favorable for nocturnal cooling and with conventional air conditioning at other times. Data is included for a full year of the cooling season in Central Florida, which stretches from April to November of 2007.

  13. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatible with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.

  14. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    DOE PAGES

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; ...

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatiblemore » with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.« less

  15. Registration of RF Plasma Radiation in Ultra-Violet Range by Solar-blind Photoreceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Kuok, Shi; Malakhov, Yury; Korotkikh, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    A spectrum response of a photoreceptor to the RF plasma radiation is determined in the present work by means of a spectrophotometer utilizing a gas-filled photoreceptor. A continuous radiation spectrum was observed in the wavelength interval of 190 - 270 nm. The photoreceptor allows measuring of absolute radiation taking into account the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptor and the values of quantum output for the given wavelength. A continuous spectrum was observed in all three orders of magnitude of diffraction. Develop and test a technique for measuring the intensity of the plasma radiation in the UV wavelength range measured amount of discharge pulses can be used to determine the spectral sensitivity range of UV radiation receivers. Professor.

  16. Interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a dense Z-pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Results obtained when a TEA-CO2 laser pulse is radially incident on a dense hydrogen Z-pinch plasma are presented. Perturbations of the plasma column are visible on high-speed streak photographs. Spectral measurements indicate that stimulated Brillouin scattering in the underdense plasma regions is the dominant mechanism for the observed backscattering of laser radiation by the plasma column. The time behavior of the backscattered signal can be very complex, both prompt and delayed backscatter having been observed under ostensibly identical experimental conditions. The backscattered power is typically 1-2 percent of the incident laser power.

  17. Controlling the radiative properties of cool black-color coatings pigmented with CuO submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonome, Hiroki; Baneshi, Mehdi; Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design a pigmented coating with dark appearance that maintains a low temperature while exposed to sunlight. The radiative properties of a black-color coating pigmented with copper oxide (CuO) submicron particles are described. In the present work, the spectral behavior of the CuO-pigmented coating was calculated. The radiative properties of CuO particles were evaluated, and the radiative transfer in the pigmented coating was modeled using the radiation element method by ray emission model (REM2). The coating is made using optimized particles. The reflectivity is measured by spectroscopy and an integrating sphere in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) regions. By using CuO particles controlled in size, we were able to design a black-color coating with high reflectance in the NIR region. The coating substrate also plays an important role in controlling the reflectance. The NIR reflectance of the coating on a standard white substrate with appropriate coating thickness and volume fraction was much higher than that on a standard black substrate. From the comparison between the experimental and calculated results, we know that more accurate particle size control enables us to achieve better performance. The use of appropriate particles with optimum size, coating thickness and volume fraction on a suitable substrate enables cool and black-color coating against solar irradiation.

  18. Terahertz Radiation from Laser Created Plasma by Applying a Transverse Static Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takuya; Katahira, Koji; Yugami, Noboru; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Nagatomo, Hideo

    2016-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation, which is emitted in narrow cone in the forward direction from laser created plasma has been observed by N.Yugami et al.. Additionally, Löffler et al. have observed that a significantly increased THz emission intensity in the forward direction when the transverse static electric field is applied to the plasma. The purpose of our study is to derive the mechanism of the THz radiation from laser created plasma by applying the transverse static electric field. To study the radiation mechanism, we conducted 2D-PIC simulation. With the static electric field of 10 kV/cm and gas density of 1020 cm-3, we obtain 1.2 THz single cycle pulse radiation, whose intensity is 1.3 ×105 W/cm2. The magnetic field called ``picket fence mode'' is generated in the laser created plasma. At the boundary surface between the plasma and vacuum, the magnetic field is canceled because eddy current flows. We conclude that the temporal behavior of the magnetic field at the boundary surface radiates the THz wave.

  19. First measurement of plasma stagnation radiation in a hohlraum in the Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye; Xie, Xufei; Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Yang, Dong; Zhao, Yang; Yan, Ji; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Zhichao; Dong, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Cao, Zhurong; Chen, Yaohua; Lan, Ke; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2017-08-01

    The measurement of plasma stagnation radiation in a hohlraum is of key importance when exploring the influence of plasma stagnation on hohlraum drive symmetry in indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted on the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the x-ray flux and radiation temperature from a plasma stagnation area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured for the first time through the hohlraum laser entrance hole (LEH) using a time and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures of the plasma stagnation area in the LEH measured using the SRFD were compared with the results detected for the entire LEH using flat-response x-ray detectors. The stagnation area radiation detected using the SRFD was found to be transient and 8.57% lower than that of the entire LEH, which is obviously higher than the tolerable drive asymmetry of an implosion. This important improvement in x-ray radiation measurement of plasma stagnation will further the quantitative understanding of the drive symmetry inside the hohlraum and conduct a strict adjustment for that.

  20. Radiative properties of a plasma moving across a magnetic field. I - Theoretical analysis. II - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Miller, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    The early-time evolution of plasmas moving across a background magnetic field is addressed with a 2D model in which a plasma cloud is assumed to have formed instantaneously with a velocity across a uniform background magnetic field and with a Gaussian density profile in the two dimensions perpendicular to the direction of motion. This model treats both the dynamics associated with the formation of a polarization field and the generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves. In general, the results indicate that, to zeroth order, the plasma cloud behaves like a large dipole antenna oriented in the direction of the polarization field which oscillates at frequencies defined by the normal mode of the system. Radiation damping is shown to play an important role in defining the plasma cloud evolution, causing a rapid decay of the polarizaiton field and a loss of plasma kinetic energy and momentum on time scales comprable to several ion gyroperiods. Scaling laws are derived for the plasma momentum and energy loss rates, and predictions for the braking time, the amplitude and spectrum of the radiation field, and the total radiated power are presented for conditions relevant to the recent Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite experiments.