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Sample records for radical reactions mechanistic

  1. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, F.P.

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  2. Antioxidant Activity of Magnolol and Honokiol: Kinetic and Mechanistic Investigations of Their Reaction with Peroxyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Zotova, Julija; Baschieri, Andrea; Valgimigli, Luca

    2015-11-06

    Magnolol and honokiol, the bioactive phytochemicals contained in Magnolia officinalis, are uncommon antioxidants bearing isomeric bisphenol cores substituted with allyl functions. We have elucidated the chemistry behind their antioxidant activity by experimental and computational methods. In the inhibited autoxidation of cumene and styrene at 303 K, magnolol trapped four peroxyl radicals, with a kinh of 6.1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) in chlorobenzene and 6.0 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile, and honokiol trapped two peroxyl radicals in chlorobenzene (kinh = 3.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) and four peroxyl radicals in acetonitrile (kinh = 9.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Their different behavior arises from a combination of intramolecular hydrogen bonding among the reactive OH groups (in magnolol) and of the OH groups with the aromatic and allyl π-systems, as confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Comparison with structurally related 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbiphenyl-4,4'-diol, 2-allylphenol, and 2-allylanisole allowed us to exclude that the antioxidant behavior of magnolol and honokiol is due to the allyl groups. The reaction of the allyl group with a peroxyl radical (C-H hydrogen abstraction) proceeds with rate constant of 1.1 M(-1) s(-1) at 303 K. Magnolol and honokiol radicals do not react with molecular oxygen and produce no superoxide radical under the typical settings of inhibited autoxidations.

  3. Mechanistic study on the reaction of the CH2ClO2 radical with NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesar, Antonija

    2013-07-01

    CBS-QB3 investigation of the ground-state potential energy surface for the title reaction shows that the initial addition of the chloromethylperoxy radical, CH2ClO2, and NO leads to the CH2ClOONO intermediate formed without energy barrier. Two conformeric forms of CH2ClOONO exhibit different behavior and follow different production pathways. The calculations suggest that the CH2ClO + NO2 radicals are the major products formed through CH2ClOONO intermediate. We demonstrate that the nitrite-nitrate isomerization is significantly facilitated by the assistance of single NO2 molecule compared to the unimolecular isomerization.

  4. Radical Reactions Induced by Visible Light in Dichloromethane Solutions of Hünig's Base: Synthetic Applications and Mechanistic Observations.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Alexander; Bach, Thorsten

    2016-10-24

    β-(3-Iodopropoxy)-substituted α,β-unsaturated lactams, lactones, and cycloalkenones (eight examples) underwent reductive radical reactions in a dichloromethane solution of N,N-diisopropylethylamine (Hünig's base) upon irradiation with visible light (λ=419 nm). Apart from plain reduction reactions (hydro-de-iodination), a significant degree of cyclization was observed in three cases. In parallel to the conversion of the substrates, the formation of intensely colored by-products was observed. Based on mass spectrometric evidence and upon comparison with known compounds, the by-products were identified as cyanine dyes. Their formation supports the hypothesis that irradiation of dichloromethane solutions of Hünig's base leads to the formation of radicals, which in turn can either initiate a radical reaction or combine with cyanine precursors. It was shown by deuterium-labelling experiments, that one equivalent of dichloromethane is incorporated into the cyanine dyes and that the reductive quenching of radical intermediates is at least partially due to hydrogen abstraction from the solvent. As a consequence, a reductive cyclization of the starting materials is favored in CD2 Cl2 solutions as shown for two β-(3-iodopropoxy)-substituted tetronates, which underwent in dichloromethane almost exclusive reduction, but gave predominantly the cyclization products in CD2 Cl2 .

  5. Mechanistic analysis of intramolecular free radical reactions toward synthesis of 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Elena; Marco-Contelles, José

    2009-06-05

    The mechanisms for the formation of conformationally constrained epibatidine analogues by intramolecular free radical processes have been computationally addressed by means of DFT methods. The mechanism and the critical effect of the 7-nitrogen protecting group on the outcome of these radical-mediated cyclizations are discussed. Theoretical findings account for unexpected experimental results and can assist in the selection of proper precursors for a successful cyclization.

  6. Formation of OH radicals in the gas-phase reaction of propene, isobutene, and isoprene with O{sub 3}: Yields and mechanistic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Neeb, P.; Moortgat, G.K.

    1999-11-11

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with alkenes is one of the very few reactions of atmospheric interest that are initiated without free radicals. This tropospheric oxidation pathway for unsaturated compounds has received considerable attention because of the reported formation of OH radicals. OH radicals originating from the alkene-ozone reaction have been proposed as a relevant source of OH radicals in the lower troposphere. Since the reported yields of OH radicals differ considerably, the authors redetermined the OH radical yield for three terminal alkenes by performing a series of pseudo-first-order experiments. Ozonolysis studies were carried out under excess ozone conditions in the presence of different cyclohexane concentrations. The decay rate of the alkene ({kappa}{sub obs}) was followed by long-path FTIR spectroscopy. From the decrease of the effective rate constant ({kappa}{sub obs} = {kappa}{sub eff}[O{sub 3}]) upon addition of cyclohexane, the OH radical yield was determined. The OH radical yields were found to be independent of the concentration of reactants for the Criegee intermediates, which are formed in ozonolysis systems. From these results the authors conclude that OH radicals are formed in a unimolecular process, presumably from the decomposition of the excited Criegee intermediate. Determined yields of OH radical formation in the ozonolysis of propene, isobutene, and isoprene were 0.34, 0.60, and 0.26, respectively. Detailed product studies were performed to verify if the observed stable products can be explained by the assumption that OH radicals are formed via the hydroperoxide channel as proposed by Niki et al. For the isobutene-ozone system, experimental product yields were found to agree well with predictions from a chemical mechanism based on the chemistry of the acetonylperoxy radical CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which is formed as an important radical product from the decomposition of the (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO Criegee intermediate.

  7. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII.

    PubMed

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2015-04-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  8. Theoretical Mechanistic Study of the Oxidative Degradation of Benzene in the Troposphere: Reaction of Benzene-HO Radical Adduct with O2.

    PubMed

    Olivella, Santiago; Solé, Albert; Bofill, Josep M

    2009-06-09

    Competing pathways arising from the reaction of hydroxycyclohexadienyl radical (1) with O2, a key reaction in the oxidative degradation of benzene under tropospheric conditions, have been investigated by means of density functional theory (UB3LYP) and quantum-mechanical (UCCSD(T) and RCCSD(T)) electronic structure calculations. The energetic, structural, and vibrational results furnished by these calculations were subsequently used to perform conventional transition-state computations to predict the rate coefficients and evaluate the product yields. The trans stereoisomer of the peroxyl radical (4) produced by the O2 addition to position 2 of benzene ring in radical 1 is energetically more stable than the cis one, although the rate coefficients at 298 K for the formation of both isomers are predicted to be similar. The cyclization of the cis isomer of 4 to a bicyclic allyl radical (5) involves calculated barrier heights (ΔU(⧧), ΔE(⧧), ΔH(⧧), and ΔG(⧧)) significantly lower than those of the cyclization of the trans isomer of 4. This implies that the formation of the cis isomer of 4 can lead to irreversible loss of radical 1 and that the observed chemical equilibrium 1 + O2 ↔ 4 essentially involves the trans isomer of 4. Although the reaction enthalpies computed for the O2 addition to position 4 of benzene ring in radical 1, affording the cis and trans stereoisomers of a peroxyl radical (6), are similar to those for the addition to position 2, the latter addition mode is clearly preferred because it involves lower barrier heights. The barrier heights computed for the cyclization of either the cis or the trans isomers of 6 to a bicyclic radical bearing a peroxy bridge (7) are about twice those computed for the cyclization of either the cis or the trans isomers of 4. Thus, under tropospheric conditions, it is unlikely that the O2 addition to position 4 of the benzene ring in radical 1 can contribute to the formation of benzene oxidation products.

  9. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  10. Hydrogen abstraction reactions of OH radicals with CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl and CH₃CHClCH₃: a mechanistic and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Yanjie; He, Hongqing; Zhang, Jinglai

    2012-01-05

    The hydrogen abstraction reactions of OH radicals with CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl and CH₃CHClCH₃ (R2) have been investigated theoretically by a dual-level direct dynamics method. The optimized geometries and frequencies of the stationary points are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. To improve the reaction enthalpy and potential barrier of each reaction channel, the single point energy calculation is performed by the BMC-CCSD method. Using canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with the small-curvature tunneling correction, the rate constants are evaluated over a wide temperature range of 200-2000 K at the BMC-CCSD//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. For the reaction channels with the negative barrier heights, the rate constants are calculated by using the CVT. The calculated total rate constants are consistent with available experimental data. The results show that at lower temperatures, the tunneling correction has an important contribution in the calculation of rate constants for all the reaction channels with the positive barrier heights, while the variational effect is found negligible for some reaction channels. For reactions OH radicals with CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl (R1) and CH₃CHClCH₃ (R2), the channels of H-abstraction from -CH₂ - and -CHCl groups are the major reaction channels, respectively, at lower temperatures. With temperature increasing, contributions from other channels should be taken into account. Finally, the total rate constants are fitted by two models, i.e., three-parameter and four-parameter expressions. The enthalpies of formation of the species CH₃CHClCH₂, CH₃CHCH₂Cl, and CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl are evaluated by isodesmic reactions.

  11. Radical behaviorism and scientific frameworks. From mechanistic to relational accounts.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, M

    1992-11-01

    A substantial portion of B. F. Skinner's scholarship was devoted to developing methods and terms for a scientific study of behavior. Three concepts central to scientific accounts--cause, explanation, and theory--are examined to illustrate the distinction between mechanistic and relational frameworks and radical behaviorism's relationship to those frameworks. Informed by a scientific tradition that explicitly rejects mechanistic interpretations, radical behaviorism provides a distinctive stance in contemporary psychology. The present analysis suggests that radical behaviorism makes closer contact with the "new world view" advocated by physicists and philosophers of science than does much of contemporary psychology.

  12. Spectroscopic, steady-state kinetic, and mechanistic characterization of the radical SAM enzyme QueE, which catalyzes a complex cyclization reaction in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurines

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Reid M.; Krebs, Carsten; Bandarian, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes the complex heterocyclic radical-mediated conversion of 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4) to CDG in the third step of the biosynthetic pathway to all 7-deazapurines. Here we present a detailed characterization of QueE from Bacillus subtilis to delineate the mechanism of conversion of CPH4 to CDG. QueE is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily, all of which use a bound [4Fe-4S]+ cluster to catalyze the reductive cleavage of SAM cofactor to generate methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dAdo•), which initiates enzymatic transformations requiring H-atom abstraction. The UV-visible, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopic features of the homodimeric QueE point to the presence of a single [4Fe-4S] cluster per monomer. Steady-state kinetic experiments indicate a Km of 20 ± 7 μM for CPH4 and kcat of 5.4 ± 1.2 min-1 for the overall transformation. The kinetically determined Kapp for SAM is 45 ± 1 μM. QueE is also magnesium-dependent and exhibits a Kapp for the divalent metal ion of 0.21 ± 0.03 mM. The SAM cofactor supports multiple turnovers, indicating that it is regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle. The mechanism of rearrangement of QueE was probed with CPH4 isotopologs containing deuterium at C-6 or the two prochiral positions at C-7. These studies implicate 5′-dAdo• as initiating the ring contraction reaction catalyzed by QueE by abstraction of the H-atom from C-6 of CPH4. PMID:23194065

  13. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  14. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  15. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions.

  16. Mechanistic investigations of the ethylene tetramerisation reaction.

    PubMed

    Overett, Matthew J; Blann, Kevin; Bollmann, Annette; Dixon, John T; Haasbroek, Daleen; Killian, Esna; Maumela, Hulisani; McGuinness, David S; Morgan, David H

    2005-08-03

    The unprecedented selective tetramerisation of ethylene to 1-octene was recently reported. In the present study various mechanistic aspects of this novel transformation were investigated. The unusually high 1-octene selectivity in chromium-catalyzed ethylene tetramerisation reactions is caused by the unique extended metallacyclic mechanism in operation. Both 1-octene and higher 1-alkenes are formed by further ethylene insertion into a metallacycloheptane intermediate, whereas 1-hexene is formed by elimination from this species as in other reported trimerisation reactions. This is supported by deuterium labeling studies, analysis of the molar distribution of 1-alkene products, and identification of secondary co-oligomerization reaction products. In addition, the formation of two C6 cyclic products, methylenecyclopentane and methylcyclopentane, is discussed, and a bimetallic disproportionation mechanism to account for the available data is proposed.

  17. Mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations in DNA.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Cadet, Jean; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2014-04-23

    The mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations, G(•+) in double- and single-stranded oligonucleotides were investigated by direct time-resolved spectroscopic monitoring methods. The G(•+) radical one-electron oxidation products were generated by SO4(•-) radical anions derived from the photolysis of S2O8(2-) anions by 308 nm laser pulses. In neutral aqueous solutions (pH 7.0), after the complete decay of SO4(•-) radicals (∼5 μs after the actinic laser flash) the transient absorbance of neutral guanine radicals, G(-H)(•) with maximum at 312 nm, is dominant. The kinetics of decay of G(-H)(•) radicals depend strongly on the DNA secondary structure. In double-stranded DNA, the G(-H)(•) decay is biphasic with one component decaying with a lifetime of ∼2.2 ms and the other with a lifetime of ∼0.18 s. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA the G(-H)(•) radicals decay monophasically with a ∼ 0.28 s lifetime. The ms decay component in double-stranded DNA is correlated with the enhancement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) yields which are ∼7 greater than in single-stranded DNA. In double-stranded DNA, it is proposed that the G(-H)(•) radicals retain radical cation character by sharing the N1-proton with the N3-site of C in the [G(•+):C] base pair. This [G(-H)(•):H(+)C ⇆ G(•+):C] equilibrium allows for the hydration of G(•+) followed by formation of 8-oxoG. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA, deprotonation of G(•+) and the irreversible escape of the proton into the aqueous phase competes more effectively with the hydration mechanism, thus diminishing the yield of 8-oxoG, as observed experimentally.

  18. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples.

  19. REACTIONS OF FREE RADICALS CONTAINING NITROGEN.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    deduced. The reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with a variety of amino compounds were studied. The reactions of difluoroamino radicals in the...Hydrazines, Anilines and Cyanides were pyrolysed and the heats of formation of the resultant radicals and the strengths of the bonds formed by them

  20. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL).

    PubMed

    Li, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores' extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the CS bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA) radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in Bacillus subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5'-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue

  1. Kinetic and Mechanistic Investigations of Atom Abstraction Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Philip Stanford

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-flow system at 1-4 torr total pressure, employing resonance fluorescence detection of Br, Cl, O, H, N, and D, and laser magnetic resonance detection of OH and ClO, was used to measure the rate constants for a number of hydrogen and non-hydrogen atom abstraction reactions. The rate constants are examined within established reactivity trends in order to reveal the dominant forces governing the potential-energy surfaces. The activation energies for the F + rm H_2O/D_2O reactions are found to be smaller than that defined by the Evans-Polyani relationship between activation energy and exothermicity. The low activation energy and enhanced kinetic isotope effect for these reactions suggests that this deviation may be the result of quantum -mechanical tunneling. The rate constants for these and other heavy-light-heavy reactions are interpreted using transition-state theory and a one-dimensional tunneling model, in conjunction with ab initio calculations, to gain insight into the mechanism of these reactions. For the reactions of X + ClOCl to Products (X = Br, Cl, F, N), the rate constants correlate with the electron affinity of the radical, indicating that these mechanisms are dominated by electron transfer from ClOCl to X, similar to the reactivity of other non -hydrogen abstractions. The reactions of O and OH with ClOCl do not follow this trend, suggesting that electron transfer is not the only driving force in these reactions. These deviations are interpreted in terms of long-range attractive forces forming stable intermediates. The ClO + O_3 to ClOO + O_2 reaction has been proposed as an additional mechanism for ozone destruction within the antarctic vortex. Upper limits for the bimolecular rate constant for the ClO + O _3 reaction were measured directly between 233 and 413 K at 1-2 torr. The rate constants are several orders-of-magnitude smaller than estimated from the trend for non-hydrogen abstractions. From these results, it is concluded that this

  2. Towards mechanistic representations of SOA from BVOC + NO3 reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monoterpene reaction with nitrate radicals is a significant source of organic aerosol in the southeast United States. This source of organic aerosol represents an anthropogenic control on biogenic organic aerosol since nitrate radicals result from NOx emissions and are generally ...

  3. Hydroxyl radical induced oxidation of theophylline in water: a kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Sunil Paul, M M; Aravind, U K; Pramod, G; Saha, A; Aravindakumar, C T

    2014-08-14

    Oxidative destruction and mineralization of emerging organic pollutants by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH) is a well established area of research. The possibility of generating hazardous by-products in the case of ˙OH reaction demands extensive investigations on the degradation mechanism. A combination of pulse radiolysis and steady state photolysis (H2O2/UV photolysis) followed by high resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) analysis have been employed to explicate the kinetic and mechanistic features of the destruction of theophylline, a model pharmaceutical compound and an identified pollutant, by ˙OH in the present study. The oxidative destruction of this molecule, for intermediate product studies, was initially achieved by H2O2/UV photolysis. The transient absorption spectrum corresponding to the reaction of ˙OH with theophylline at pH 6, primarily caused by the generation of (T8-OH)˙, was characterised by an absorption band at 330 nm (k2 = (8.22 ± 0.03) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)). A significantly different spectrum (λmax: 340 nm) was observed at highly alkaline pH (10.2) due to the deprotonation of this radical (pKa∼ 10.0). Specific one electron oxidants such as sulphate radical anions (SO4˙(-)) and azide radicals (N3˙) produce the deprotonated form (T(-H)˙) of the radical cation (T˙(+)) of theophylline (pKa 3.1) with k2 values of (7.51 ± 0.04) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and (7.61 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) respectively. Conversely, oxide radicals (O˙(-)) react with theophylline via a hydrogen abstraction protocol with a rather slow k2 value of (1.95 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The transient spectral studies were complemented by the end product profile acquired by HRMS analysis. Various transformation products of theophylline induced by ˙OH were identified by this technique which include derivatives of uric acids (i, iv & v) and xanthines (ii, iii & vi). Further breakdown of the early formed product due to ˙OH attack leads to

  4. From formamide to purine: an energetically viable mechanistic reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Springsteen, Greg; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-02-28

    A step-by-step mechanistic pathway following the transformation of formamide to purine through a five-membered ring intermediate has been explored by density functional theory computations. The highlight of the mechanistic route detailed here is that the proposed pathway represents the simplest reaction pathway. All necessary reactants are generated from a single starting compound, formamide, through energetically viable reactions. Several important reaction steps are involved in this mechanistic route: formylation-dehydration, Leuckart reduction, five- and six-membered ring-closure, and deamination. On the basis of the study of noncatalytic pathways, catalytic water has been found to provide energetically viable step-by-step mechanistic pathways. Among these reaction steps, five-member ring-closure is the rate-determining step. The energy barrier (ca. 42 kcal/mol) of this rate-control step is somewhat lower than the rate-determining step (ca. 44 kcal/mol) for a pyrimidine-based pathway reported previously. The mechanistic pathway reported herein is less energetically demanding than for previously proposed routes to adenine.

  5. Laser Studies of Gas Phase Radical Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Acremonium chrysogenum , was prepared according to the published procedure [6]. This fungal enzyme had a specific activity of 0.023 IUmg1, and was estimated to...Dist-lbitionj Avdielbiity Codes jAvail atidjor Dist 6a A-I . p -1- Laser Studies of Gas Phase Radical Reactions G. Hancock Physical Chemistry...some additional experiments concerning the formation of carbene radicals in liquid phase enzyme cleavage studies are described. Keywords Laser

  6. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  7. Deuterium Substitution used as a Tool for Investigating Mechanisms of Gas-Phase Free-Radical Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Hynes, A. J.; Nicovich, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented and discussed for a number of gas phase free radical reactions where H/D isotope effects provide valuable mechanistic insights. The cases considered are (1) the reactions of OH, NO3, and Cl with atmospheric reduced sulfur compounds, (2) the reactions of OH and OD with CH3CN and CD3CN, and (3) the reactions of alkyl radicals with HBr and DBr.

  8. Laser Studies of Gas Phase Radical Reaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-30

    1nai Irvest-aator Or.G. Hancock gn; FILE CO, Contr3ctor : Oxford University . Physical Chemistry Laboratory. South Parks Road.AD-A 193 689 Oxfor o~d...HIF spectrum and study of reaction of this and the CCI radical with atoms vi) sea;rchtrr; f(r FC) ’ndlict of the 0 *CF, reaction. OXFORD UNIVERSITY -. - SOUTH...0 Awtilability Codes I Avail ’and/or Dis Spcal0 Spoo OXFORD UNIVERSITY Tt SOUTH PARKS ROAD OXFCRD OXFORD � X3Z U.S. Army Contract DAJA45-85-C-0034

  9. Inhibition of hydroxyl radical reaction with aromatics by dissolved natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, M.E.; Tarr, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compound molecules bound to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H2O2 + Fe2+ ??? Fe3+ + HO- + HO??). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanism for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical formation occurs in microenvironmental sites remote from the aromatic compounds. In addition to changes in kinetics, pyrene hydroxyl radical reaction also exhibited a mechanistic change in the presence of fulvic acid. The mechanism changed from a reaction that was apparently firstorder in pyrene to one that was apparently secondorder in pyrene, indicating that pyrene self-reaction may have become the dominant mechanism in the presence of fulvic acid. Dissolved NOM causes significant changes in the rate and mechanism of hydroxyl radical degradation of aromatic compounds. Consequently, literature rate constants measured in pure water will not be useful for predicting the degradation of pollutants in environmental systems. The kinetic and mechanistic information in this study will be useful for developing improved degradation methods involving Fenton chemistry.Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compounds molecules bounds to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H2O2 + Fe2+ ??? Fe3+ + HO- + HO??). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanisms for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical

  10. Proton-coupled electron transfer: the mechanistic underpinning for radical transport and catalysis in biology.

    PubMed

    Reece, Steven Y; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2006-08-29

    Charge transport and catalysis in enzymes often rely on amino acid radicals as intermediates. The generation and transport of these radicals are synonymous with proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which intrinsically is a quantum mechanical effect as both the electron and proton tunnel. The caveat to PCET is that proton transfer (PT) is fundamentally limited to short distances relative to electron transfer (ET). This predicament is resolved in biology by the evolution of enzymes to control PT and ET coordinates on highly different length scales. In doing so, the enzyme imparts exquisite thermodynamic and kinetic controls over radical transport and radical-based catalysis at cofactor active sites. This discussion will present model systems containing orthogonal ET and PT pathways, thereby allowing the proton and electron tunnelling events to be disentangled. Against this mechanistic backdrop, PCET catalysis of oxygen-oxygen bond activation by mono-oxygenases is captured at biomimetic porphyrin redox platforms. The discussion concludes with the case study of radical-based quantum catalysis in a natural biological enzyme, class I Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase. Studies are presented that show the enzyme utilizes both collinear and orthogonal PCET to transport charge from an assembled diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor to the active site over 35A away via an amino acid radical-hopping pathway spanning two protein subunits.

  11. Taming the free radical shrew - learning to control homolytic reactions at higher heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Schiesser, Carl H

    2006-10-21

    Free radical chemistry has come a long way in a relatively short period of time. Armed with mechanistic and rate constant data, the synthetic practitioner can now apply free radical chemistry to the synthesis of many different classes of target molecule with confidence. This Feature Article highlights progress made in the understanding and application of free radical reactions at main group higher heteroatoms and demonstrates how this knowledge can be used to construct interesting higher heterocycles, many of which exhibit biological activity, through the use of intramolecular homolytic substitution chemistry.

  12. Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions: The NO2 + N2H3 System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    investigating the kinetics of this elementary reaction . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...Viewgraph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) September 2013- October 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions (I): The NO2...characteristics in relevant operating environments. Here we report theoretical results obtained on the prototypical radical- radical reaction : NO2 + N2H3

  13. Radical addition-initiated domino reactions of conjugated oxime ethers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The application of conjugated oxime ethers to the synthesis of complex chemical scaffolds using domino radical reactions has been described in detail. The triethylborane-mediated hydroxysulfenylation reaction allows for the regioselective construction of a carbon-sulfur bond and a carbon-oxygen bond in a single operation for the formation of β-hydroxy sulfides. This reaction proceeds via a radical pathway involving regioselective thiyl addition and the subsequent trapping of the resulting α-imino radical with O₂, where the imino group enhances the stability of the intermediate radical. Hydroxyalkylation reactions that occur via a carbon radical addition reaction followed by the hydroxylation of the resulting N-borylenamine with O₂ have also been developed. We investigated sequential radical addition aldol-type reactions in detail to explore the novel domino reactions that occur via the generation of N-borylenamine. The radical reaction of a conjugated oxime ether with triethylborane in the presence of an aldehyde affords γ-butyrolactone via sequential processes including ethyl radical addition, the generation of N-borylenamine, an aldol-type reaction with an aldehyde, and a lactonization reaction. A novel domino reaction has also been developed involving the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of N-boryl-N-phenoxyenamine. The triethylborane-mediated domino reactions of O-phenyl-conjugated oxime ethers afforded the corresponding benzofuro[2,3-b]pyrrol-2-ones via a radical addition/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement/cyclization/lactamization cascade.

  14. Mechanistic Insights into Two-Phase Radical C–H Arylations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational studies of radical C–H arylations highlight the interplay between chemical and physical rate processes in these multiphase reactions. Anomalous concentration dependences observed here may be reconciled by considering the role of phase transfer processes that mediate concentrations in each phase. In addition, understanding interactions through phase boundaries enables their use in optimization of reaction performance. PMID:26640819

  15. Mechanistic insight into the photoredox catalysis of anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Romero, Nathan A.; Nicewicz, David A.

    2014-11-12

    Here, we describe our efforts to understand the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions using 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium (Mes-Acr+) as a photoredox catalyst. Importantly, we are able to detect alkene cation radical intermediates, and confirm that phenylthiyl radical is capable of oxidizing the persistent acridinyl radical in a fast process that unites the catalytic activity of the photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) manifolds. Additionally, we present evidence that diphenyl disulfide ((PhS)2) operates on a common catalytic cycle with thiophenol (PhSH) by way of photolytic cleaveage of the disulfide bond. Transition structure analysis of the HAT step usingmore » DFT reveals that the activation barrier for H atom donation from PhSH is significantly lower than 2-phenylmalononitrile (PMN) due to structural reorganization. In the early stages of the reaction, Mes-Acr+ is observed to engage in off-cycle adduct formation, presumably as buildup of PhS– becomes significant. The kinetic differences between PhSH and (PhS)2 as HAT catalysts indicate that the proton transfer step may have significant rate limiting influence.« less

  16. Mechanistic insight into the photoredox catalysis of anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Nathan A.; Nicewicz, David A.

    2014-11-12

    Here, we describe our efforts to understand the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions using 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium (Mes-Acr+) as a photoredox catalyst. Importantly, we are able to detect alkene cation radical intermediates, and confirm that phenylthiyl radical is capable of oxidizing the persistent acridinyl radical in a fast process that unites the catalytic activity of the photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) manifolds. Additionally, we present evidence that diphenyl disulfide ((PhS)2) operates on a common catalytic cycle with thiophenol (PhSH) by way of photolytic cleaveage of the disulfide bond. Transition structure analysis of the HAT step using DFT reveals that the activation barrier for H atom donation from PhSH is significantly lower than 2-phenylmalononitrile (PMN) due to structural reorganization. In the early stages of the reaction, Mes-Acr+ is observed to engage in off-cycle adduct formation, presumably as buildup of PhS becomes significant. The kinetic differences between PhSH and (PhS)2 as HAT catalysts indicate that the proton transfer step may have significant rate limiting influence.

  17. Formation of bromate in sulfate radical based oxidation: mechanistic aspects and suppression by dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lutze, Holger V; Bakkour, Rani; Kerlin, Nils; von Sonntag, Clemens; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2014-04-15

    Sulfate radical based oxidation is discussed being a potential alternative to hydroxyl radical based oxidation for pollutant control in water treatment. However, formation of undesired by-products, has hardly been addressed in the current literature, which is an issue in other oxidative processes such as bromate formation in ozonation of bromide containing water (US-EPA and EU drinking water standard of bromate: 10 μg L(-1)). Sulfate radicals react fast with bromide (k = 3.5 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) which could also yield bromate as final product. The mechanism of bromate formation in aqueous solution in presence of sulfate radicals has been investigated in the present paper. Further experiments were performed in presence of humic acids and in surface water for investigating the relevance of bromate formation in context of pollutant control. The formation of bromate by sulfate radicals resembles the well described mechanism of the hydroxyl radical based bromate formation. In both cases hypobromous acid is a requisite intermediate. In presence of organic matter formation of bromate is effectively suppressed. That can be explained by formation of superoxide formed in the reaction of sulfate radicals plus aromatic moieties of organic matter, since superoxide reduces hypobromous acid yielding bromine atoms and bromide. Hence formation of bromate can be neglected in sulfate radical based oxidation at typical conditions of water treatment.

  18. Revisiting the Radical Initiation Mechanism of the Diamine-Promoted Transition-Metal-Free Cross-Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Huan; Jiao, Lei

    2016-06-08

    Radical chain reactions leading to C-C bond formation are widely used in organic synthesis, and initiation of the radical chain process usually requires thermolabile radical initiators. Recent studies on transition-metal-free cross-coupling reactions between aryl halides and arenes have demonstrated an unprecedented initiation system for radical chain reactions, where the combination of simple organic additives and a base was used in place of conventional radical initiators. Among them, the combination of N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine (DMEDA) and t-BuOK is one of the most efficient and representative reaction systems, and the radical initiation mechanism of this system has attracted considerable research interest. In this study, through the combination of kinetic studies, deuterium labeling experiments, and DFT calculations, the radical initiation mechanism of the diamine-promoted cross-coupling reaction was carefully reinvestigated. In light of the present study, a mechanistic network of radical initiation in the DMEDA/t-BuOK system was revealed, which differs dramatically from the previously realized single radical initiation pathway. In this mechanism, the diamine acts as a hydrogen atom donor and plays a dual role as both "radical amplifier" and "radical regulator" to initiate the radical chain process as well as to control the concentration of reactive radical species. This represents a rare example of a structurally simple molecule playing such a subtle role in the radical chain reaction system. The present study sheds some light on the novel radical initiation mode in transition-metal-free cross-coupling reactions following a base-promoted homolytic aromatic substitution (BHAS) mechanism, and may also help to understand the mechanism of relevant reactions.

  19. Intermediate Q from soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylates the mechanistic substrate probe norcarane: evidence for a stepwise reaction.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Austin, R N; Tarr, C; Groves, J T; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-12-05

    Norcarane is a valuable mechanistic probe for enzyme-catalyzed hydrocarbon oxidation reactions because different products or product distributions result from concerted, radical, and cation based reactions. Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b catalyzes the oxidation of norcarane to afford 3-hydroxymethylcyclohexene and 3-cycloheptenol, compounds characteristic of radical and cationic intermediates, respectively, in addition to 2- and 3-norcaranols. Past single turnover transient kinetic studies have identified several optically distinct intermediates from the catalytic cycle of the hydroxylase component of sMMO. Thus, the reaction between norcarane and key reaction intermediates can be directly monitored. The presence of norcarane increases the rate of decay of only one intermediate, the high-valent bis-mu-oxo Fe(IV)(2) cluster-containing species compound Q, showing that it is responsible for the majority of the oxidation chemistry. The observation of products from both radical and cationic intermediates from norcarane oxidation catalyzed by sMMO is consistent with a mechanism in which an initial substrate radical intermediate is formed by hydrogen atom abstraction. This intermediate then undergoes either oxygen rebound, intramolecular rearrangement followed by oxygen rebound, or loss of a second electron to yield a cationic intermediate to which OH(-) is transferred. The estimated lower limit of 20 ps for the lifetime of the putative radical intermediate is in accord with values determined from previous studies of sterically hindered sMMO probes.

  20. Enzymatic Halogenation and Dehalogenation Reactions: Pervasive and Mechanistically Diverse.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Miles, Zachary D; Winter, Jaclyn M; Eustáquio, Alessandra S; El Gamal, Abrahim A; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-01-20

    Naturally produced halogenated compounds are ubiquitous across all domains of life where they perform a multitude of biological functions and adopt a diversity of chemical structures. Accordingly, a diverse collection of enzyme catalysts to install and remove halogens from organic scaffolds has evolved in nature. Accounting for the different chemical properties of the four halogen atoms (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine) and the diversity and chemical reactivity of their organic substrates, enzymes performing biosynthetic and degradative halogenation chemistry utilize numerous mechanistic strategies involving oxidation, reduction, and substitution. Biosynthetic halogenation reactions range from simple aromatic substitutions to stereoselective C-H functionalizations on remote carbon centers and can initiate the formation of simple to complex ring structures. Dehalogenating enzymes, on the other hand, are best known for removing halogen atoms from man-made organohalogens, yet also function naturally, albeit rarely, in metabolic pathways. This review details the scope and mechanism of nature's halogenation and dehalogenation enzymatic strategies, highlights gaps in our understanding, and posits where new advances in the field might arise in the near future.

  1. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  2. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Takahide; Kawamoto, Takuji; Kobayashi, Mikako

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products. PMID:24062844

  3. Oxysterols from Free Radical Chain Oxidation of 7-Dehydrocholesterol: Product and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Libin; Korade, Zeljka; Porter, Ned A.

    2010-01-01

    Free radical chain oxidation of highly oxidizable 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) initiated by 2,2′-azobis(4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) was carried out at 37°C in benzene for 24 hours. Fifteen oxysterols derived from 7-DHC were isolated and characterized with 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. A mechanism that involves abstraction of hydrogen atoms at C-9 and/or C-14 is proposed to account for the formation of all of the oxysterols and the reaction progress profile. In either the H-9 or H-14 mechanism, a pentadienyl radical intermediate is formed after abstraction of H-9 or H-14 by a peroxyl radical. This step is followed by the well-precedented transformations observed in peroxidation reactions of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as oxygen addition, peroxyl radical 5-exo cyclization, and SHi carbon radical attack on the peroxide bond. The mechanism for peroxidation of 7-DHC also accounts for the formation of numerous oxysterol natural products isolated from fungal species, marine sponges, and cactaceous species. In a cell viability test, the oxysterol mixture from 7-DHC peroxidation was found to be cytotoxic to Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells in the micromolar concentration range. We propose that the high reactivity of 7-DHC and the oxysterols generated from its peroxidation may play important roles in the pathogenesis of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2), and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), all of these being metabolic disorders having an elevated level of 7-DHC. PMID:20121089

  4. Inhibition of hydroxyl radical reaction with aromatics by dissolved natural organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, M.E.; Tarr, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Remediation of hydrophobic pollutants is complicated by sorption of these compounds to hydrophobic sites of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM), suspended particulates, soil, and sediment. This sorption causes the pollutants to be less easily degraded by remediation techniques. Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compound molecules bound to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+} + HO{sup {minus}} + HO{sm_bullet}). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanism for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical formation occurs in microenvironmental sites remote from the aromatic compounds. In addition to changes in kinetics, pyrene hydroxyl radical reaction also exhibited a mechanistic change in the presence of fulvic acid. The mechanism changed from a reaction that was apparently first-order in pyrene to one that was apparently second-order in pyrene, indicating that pyrene self-reaction may have become the dominant mechanism in the presence of fulvic acid. Dissolved NOM causes significant changes in the rate and mechanism of hydroxyl radical degradation of aromatic compounds. Consequently, literature rate constants measured in pure water will not be useful for predicting the degradation of pollutants in environmental systems. The kinetic and mechanistic information in this study will be useful for developing improved degradation methods involving Fenton chemistry.

  5. Bimetallic oxidative addition involving radical intermediates in nickel-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, Jan; Ruiz, Jesus; Wodrich, Matthew D; Hu, Xile

    2013-08-14

    Many nickel-based catalysts have been reported for cross-coupling reactions of nonactivated alkyl halides. The mechanistic understanding of these reactions is still primitive. Here we report a mechanistic study of alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling catalyzed by a preformed nickel(II) pincer complex ([(N2N)Ni-Cl]). The coupling proceeds through a radical process, involving two nickel centers for the oxidative addition of alkyl halide. The catalysis is second-order in Grignard reagent, first-order in catalyst, and zero-order in alkyl halide. A transient species, [(N2N)Ni-alkyl(2)](alkyl(2)-MgCl), is identified as the key intermediate responsible for the activation of alkyl halide, the formation of which is the turnover-determining step of the catalysis.

  6. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  7. Characteristics of Radical Reactions, Spin Rules, and a Suggestion for the Consistent Use of a Dot on Radical Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojnarovits, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    In many chemical reactions, reactive radicals have been shown to be transient intermediates. The free radical character of a chemical species is often, but not always, indicated by adding a superscript dot to the chemical formula. A consistent use of this radical symbol on all species that have radical character is suggested. Free radicals have a…

  8. Pathways of arachidonic acid peroxyl radical reactions and product formation with guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Crean, Conor; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-02-01

    Peroxyl radicals were derived from the one-electron oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by sulfate radicals that were generated by the photodissociation of peroxodisulfate anions in air-equilibrated aqueous solutions. Reactions of these peroxyl and neutral guanine radicals, also generated by oxidation with sulfate radicals, were investigated by laser kinetic spectroscopy, and the guanine oxidation products were identified by HPLC and mass spectrometry methods. Sulfate radicals rapidly oxidize arachidonic (ArAc), linoleic (LnAc), and palmitoleic (PmAc) acids with similar rate constants, (2-4) x 10 (9) M (-1) s (-1). The C-centered radicals derived from the oxidation of ArAc and LnAc include nonconjugated Rn(.) ( approximately 80%) and conjugated bis-allylic Rba(.) ( approximately 20%) radicals. The latter were detectable in the absence of oxygen by their prominent, narrow absorption band at 280 nm. The Rn(.) radicals of ArAc (containing three bis-allylic sites) transform to the Rba(.) radicals via an intramolecular H-atom abstraction [rate constant (7.5 +/- 0.7) x 10 (4) s (-1)]. In contrast, the Rn(.) radicals of LnAc that contain only one bis-allylic site do not transform intramolecularly to the Rba(.) radicals. In the case of PmAc, which contains only one double bond, the Rba(.) radicals are not observed. The Rn(.) radicals of PmAc rapidly combine with oxygen with a rate constant of (3.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The Rba(.) radicals of ArAc are less reactive and react with oxygen with a rate constant of (2.2 +/- 0.2) x 10 (8) M (-1) s (-1). The ArAc peroxyl radicals formed spontaneously eliminate superoxide radical anions [rate constant = (3.4 +/- 0.3) x 10 (4) M (-1) s (-1)]. The stable oxidative lesions derived from the 2',3',5'-tri- O-acetylguanosine or 2',3',5'-tri- O-acetyl-8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine radicals and their subsequent reactions with ArAc peroxyl radicals were also investigated. The major products found were the 2,5-diamino-4 H

  9. Probing Complex Free-Radical Reaction Pathways of Fuel Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan III, A C; Kidder, Michelle; Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F

    2012-01-01

    Fossil (e.g. coal) and renewable (e.g. woody biomass) organic energy resources have received considerable attention as possible sources of liquid transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Knowledge of the reactivity of these complex materials has been advanced through fundamental studies of organic compounds that model constituent substructures. In particular, an improved understanding of thermochemical reaction pathways involving free-radical intermediates has arisen from detailed experimental kinetic studies and, more recently, advanced computational investigations. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent investigations of the fundamental pyrolysis pathways of model compounds that represent key substructures in the lignin component of woody biomass with a focus on molecules representative of the dominant beta-O-4 aryl ether linkages. Additional mechanistic insights gleaned from DFT calculations on the kinetics of key elementary reaction steps will also be presented, as well as a few thoughts on the significant contributions of Jim Franz to this area of free radical chemistry.

  10. Tropospheric aqueous-phase free-radical chemistry: radical sources, spectra, reaction kinetics and prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Dirk; Schaefer, Thomas; Bräuer, Peter; Tilgner, Andreas

    2010-12-17

    The most important radicals which need to be considered for the description of chemical conversion processes in tropospheric aqueous systems are the hydroxyl radical (OH), the nitrate radical (NO(3)) and sulphur-containing radicals such as the sulphate radical (SO(4)(-)). For each of the three radicals their generation and their properties are discussed first in the corresponding sections. The main focus herein is to summarize newly published aqueous-phase kinetic data on OH, NO(3) and SO(4)(-) radical reactions relevant for the description of multiphase tropospheric chemistry. The data compilation builds up on earlier datasets published in the literature. Since the last review in 2003 (H. Herrmann, Chem. Rev. 2003, 103, 4691-4716) more than hundred new rate constants are available from literature. In case of larger discrepancies between novel and already published rate constants the available kinetic data for these reactions are discussed and recommendations are provided when possible. As many OH kinetic data are obtained by means of the thiocyanate (SCN(-)) system in competition kinetic measurements of OH radical reactions this system is reviewed in a subchapter of this review. Available rate constants for the reaction sequence following the reaction of OH+SCN(-) are summarized. Newly published data since 2003 have been considered and averaged rate constants are calculated. Applying competition kinetics measurements usually the formation of the radical anion (SCN)(2)(-) is monitored directly by absorption measurements. Within this subchapter available absorption spectra of the (SCN)(2)(-) radical anion from the last five decades are presented. Based on these spectra an averaged (SCN)(2)(-) spectrum was calculated. In the last years different estimation methods for aqueous phase kinetic data of radical reactions have been developed and published. Such methods are often essential to estimate kinetic data which are not accessible from the literature. Approaches for

  11. Tropospheric reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from hydroxyl radical reaction with a series of alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Roger

    1990-01-01

    In the present assessment, the hydrogen containing halocarbons being considered as alternatives to the the presently used chlorofluorocarbons are the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 123 (CF3CHCl2), 141b (CFCl2CH3), 142b (CF2ClCH3), 22 (CHF2Cl) and 124 (CF3CHFCl) and the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 134a (CF3CH2F), 152a (CHF2CH3) and 125 (CF3CHF2). All of these HCFCs and HFCs will react with the hydroxyl (OH) radical in the troposphere, giving rise to haloalkyl radicals which then undergo a complex series of reactions in the troposphere. These reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from the initial OH radical reactions with the HCFCs and HFCs under tropospheric conditions are the focus here.

  12. Hydroxyl radical reaction with trans-resveratrol: initial carbon radical adduct formation followed by rearrangement to phenoxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dan; Han, Rui-Min; Liang, Ran; Chen, Chang-Hui; Lai, Wenzhen; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2012-06-21

    In the reaction between trans-resveratrol (resveratrol) and the hydroxyl radical, kinetic product control leads to a short-lived hydroxyl radical adduct with an absorption maximum at 420 nm and a lifetime of 0.21 ± 0.01 μs (anaerobic acetonitrile at 25 °C) as shown by laser flash photolysis using N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione (N-HPT) as a "photo-Fenton" reagent. The transient spectra of the radical adduct are in agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations showing an absorption maximum at 442 or 422 nm for C2 and C6 hydroxyl adducts, respectively, and showing the lowest energy for the transition state leading to the C2 adduct compared to other radical products. From this initial product, the relative long-lived 4'-phenoxyl radical of resveratrol (τ = 9.9 ± 0.9 μs) with an absorption maximum at 390 nm is formed in a process with a time constant (τ = 0.21 ± 0.01 μs) similar to the decay constant for the C2 hydroxyl adduct (or a C2/C6 hydroxyl adduct mixture) and in agreement with thermodynamics identifying this product as the most stable resveratrol radical. The hydroxyl radical adduct to phenoxyl radical conversion with concomitant water dissociation has a rate constant of 5 × 10(6) s(-1) and may occur by intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer or by stepwise proton-assisted electron transfer. Photolysis of N-HPT also leads to a thiyl radical which adds to resveratrol in a parallel reaction forming a sulfur radical adduct with a lifetime of 0.28 ± 0.04 μs and an absorption maximum at 483 nm.

  13. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  14. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with tert-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džeba, Iva; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Mihaljević, Branka

    2012-09-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of t-butoxyl radicals with resveratrol was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The rate constant was determined by measuring the phenoxyl radical formation rate at 390 nm as function of resveratrol concentration in acetonitrile. The rate constant was determined to be 6.5×108 M-1s-1. This high value indicates the high reactivity consistent with the strong antioxidant activity of resveratrol.

  15. Pressure effects on the radical-radical recombination reaction of photochromic bridged imidazole dimers.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Katsuya; Abe, Jiro

    2014-09-07

    The bridged imidazole dimers are some of the attractive fast photochromic compounds which have potential applications to the ophthalmic lenses, real-time hologram and molecular machines. The strategy for expanding their photochromic properties such as the colour variation and tuning the decolouration rates has been vigorously investigated, but the insight into the structural changes along the photochromic reactions has not been demonstrated in detail. Here, we demonstrated the pressure dependence of the radical-radical recombination reaction of the bridged imidazole dimers. The radical-radical interaction can be controlled by applying high pressure. Our results give fundamental information about the molecular dynamics of the bridged imidazole dimers, leading to the development of new functional photochromic machines and pressure-sensitive photochromic materials.

  16. Roaming dynamics in radical addition-elimination reactions.

    PubMed

    Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Suits, Arthur G; Mebel, Alexander M

    2014-06-06

    Radical addition-elimination reactions are a major pathway for transformation of unsaturated hydrocarbons. In the gas phase, these reactions involve formation of a transient strongly bound intermediate. However, the detailed mechanism and dynamics for these reactions remain unclear. Here we show, for reaction of chlorine atoms with butenes, that the Cl addition-HCl elimination pathway occurs from an abstraction-like Cl-H-C geometry rather than a conventional three-centre or four-centre transition state. Furthermore, access to this geometry is attained by roaming excursions of the Cl atom from the initially formed adduct. In effect, the alkene π cloud serves to capture the Cl atom and hold it, allowing many subsequent opportunities for the energized intermediate to find a suitable approach to the abstraction geometry. These bimolecular roaming reactions are closely related to the roaming radical dynamics recently discovered to play an important role in unimolecular reactions.

  17. Direct assembly of multiply oxygenated carbon chains by decarbonylative radical-radical coupling reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kengo; Nagatomo, Masanori; Inoue, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    Pentoses and hexoses contain more than three oxygen-bearing stereocentres and are ideal starting materials for the synthesis of multiply oxygenated natural products such as sagittamide D, maitotoxin and hikizimycin. Here we demonstrate new radical-radical homocoupling reactions of sugar derivatives with minimal perturbation of their chiral centres. The radical exchange procedure using Et3B/O2 converted sugar-derived α-alkoxyacyl tellurides into α-alkoxy radicals via decarbonylation and rapidly dimerized the monomeric radicals. The robustness of this process was demonstrated by a single-step preparation of 12 stereochemically diverse dimers with 6-10 secondary hydroxy groups, including the C5-C10 stereohexad of sagittamide D and the enantiomer of the C51-C60 stereodecad of maitotoxin. Furthermore, the optimally convergent radical-radical cross-coupling reaction achieved a one-step assembly of the protected C1-C11 oxygenated carbon chain of the anthelmintic hikizimycin. These exceptionally efficient homo- and heterocoupling methods together provide a powerful strategy for the expedited total synthesis of contiguously hydroxylated natural products.

  18. Mechanistic Study of the Validity of Using Hydroxyl Radical Probes To Characterize Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yin; Chaplin, Brian P

    2017-02-21

    The detection of hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) is typically accomplished by using reactive probe molecules, but prior studies have not thoroughly investigated the suitability of these probes for use in electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), due to the neglect of alternative reaction mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the suitability of four OH(•) probes (coumarin, p-chlorobenzoic acid, terephthalic acid, and p-benzoquinone) for use in EAOPs. Experimental results indicated that both coumarin and p-chlorobenzoic acid are oxidized via direct electron transfer reactions, while p-benzoquinone and terephthalic acid are not. Coumarin oxidation to form the OH(•) adduct product 7-hydroxycoumarin was found at anodic potentials lower than that necessary for OH(•) formation. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations found a thermodynamically favorable and non-OH(•) mediated pathway for 7-hydroxycoumarin formation, which is activationless at anodic potentials > 2.10 V/SHE. DFT simulations also provided estimates of E° values for a series of OH(•) probe compounds, which agreed with voltammetry results. Results from this study indicated that terephthalic acid is the most appropriate OH(•) probe compound for the characterization of electrochemical and catalytic systems.

  19. Radical reactions in pyrolysis of triethylarsine and diethylarsine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. H.; Larsen, C. A.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1991-06-01

    Pyrolysis of triethylarsine (TEAs) and diethylarsine (DEAsH) has been studied at atmospheric pressure in a flow tube reactor using mass spectrometry. He and D 2 were selected as the carrier gases to determine the ambient effects and to isotopically label the pyrolysis products. For some experiments, supplemental C 2H 5 radicals, produced from pyrolysis of a co-reactant azoethane ((C 2H 5) 2N 2), were added to investigate the role of C 2H 5 in the pyrolysis reactions of the ethylarsines. A significant ambient effect was observed for pyrolysis of TEAs, but not for DEAsH. The pyrolysis of DEAsH was enhanced by adding C 2H 5 radicals while the TEAs pyrolysis was nearly unaffected. DEAsD, rather than DEAsH, was a product for TEAs pyrolysis in D 2; however, the DEAsH pyrolysis produced TEAs in either ambient. This demonstrates that the β-elimination reaction is not a major step. Instead, radical reactions are more likely to dominate the pyrolysis process. Reaction mechanisms for pyrolysis of TEAs and DEAsH in both ambients have been proposed. The rate constants for the reactions involved were determined. In addition, consistency between the proposed reaction pathways and the experimental data has been examined using computer modelling.

  20. Bromine radical-mediated sequential radical rearrangement and addition reaction of alkylidenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Kippo, Takashi; Hamaoka, Kanako; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2013-01-16

    Bromine radical-mediated cyclopropylcarbinyl-homoallyl rearrangement of alkylidenecyclopropanes was effectively accomplished by C-C bond formation with allylic bromides, which led to the syntheses of 2-bromo-1,6-dienes. A three-component coupling reaction comprising alkylidenecyclopropanes, allylic bromides, and carbon monoxide also proceeded well to give 2-bromo-1,7-dien-5-ones in good yield.

  1. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions. [Gamma rays and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-08-21

    Phosphite radicals HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/-, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/- are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO/sub 2/)/sub 3/- are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO/sub 3//sup 2/-. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO/sub 5//sup -/. reversible PO/sub 5//sup 2 -/. + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed.

  2. Modeling of the Reaction Mechanism of Enzymatic Radical C–C Coupling by Benzylsuccinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Szaleniec, Maciej; Heider, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques and density functional theory calculations were performed to study the mechanism of enzymatic radical C–C coupling catalyzed by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS). BSS has been identified as a glycyl radical enzyme that catalyzes the enantiospecific fumarate addition to toluene initiating its anaerobic metabolism in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica, and this reaction represents the general mechanism of toluene degradation in all known anaerobic degraders. In this work docking calculations, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and DFT+D2 cluster modeling was employed to address the following questions: (i) What mechanistic details of the BSS reaction yield the most probable molecular model? (ii) What is the molecular basis of enantiospecificity of BSS? (iii) Is the proposed mechanism consistent with experimental observations, such as an inversion of the stereochemistry of the benzylic protons, syn addition of toluene to fumarate, exclusive production of (R)-benzylsuccinate as a product and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) ranging between 2 and 4? The quantum mechanics (QM) modeling confirms that the previously proposed hypothetical mechanism is the most probable among several variants considered, although C–H activation and not C–C coupling turns out to be the rate limiting step. The enantiospecificity of the enzyme seems to be enforced by a thermodynamic preference for binding of fumarate in the pro(R) orientation and reverse preference of benzyl radical attack on fumarate in pro(S) pathway which results with prohibitively high energy barrier of the radical quenching. Finally, the proposed mechanism agrees with most of the experimental observations, although the calculated intrinsic KIE from the model (6.5) is still higher than the experimentally observed values (4.0) which suggests that both C–H activation and radical quenching may jointly be involved in the kinetic control of the reaction. PMID:27070573

  3. Catalytic reactions of titanium alkoxides with Grignard reagents and imines: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akshai; Samuelson, Ashoka G

    2010-08-02

    The reactivity of Grignard reagents towards imines in the presence of catalytic and stoichiometric amounts of titanium alkoxides is reported. Alkylation, reduction, and coupling of imines take place. Whereas reductive coupling is the major reaction in stoichiometric reactions, alkylation is favored in catalytic reactions. Mechanistic studies clearly indicate that intermediates involved in the two reactions are different. Catalytic reactions involve a metal-alkyl complex. This has been confirmed by reactions of deuterium-labeled substrates and different alkylating agents. Under the stoichiometric conditions, however, titanium olefin complexes are formed through reductive elimination, probably through a multinuclear intermediate.

  4. Adenosyl radical: reagent and catalyst in enzyme reactions

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dustin P.

    2010-01-01

    Lead in Adenosine is undoubtedly an ancient biological molecule that is a component of many enzyme cofactors; ATP, FADH, NAD(P)H, and coenzyme A, to name but a few, and, of course, of RNA. Here we present an overview of the role of adenosine in its most reactive form: as an organic radical formed either by homolytic cleavage of adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B12, AdoCbl) or by single-electron reduction of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) complexed to an iron-sulfur cluster. Although many of the enzymes we discuss are newly discovered, adenosine’s role as a radical cofactor most likely arose very early in evolution, before the advent of photosynthesis and the production of molecular oxygen which rapidly inactivates many radical enzymes. AdoCbl-dependent enzymes appear to be confined to a rather narrow repertoire of rearrangement reactions involving 1,2-hydrogen atom migrations. In contrast, there has been a recent explosion in the number radical AdoMet enzymes discovered that catalyze a remarkably wide range of chemically challenging reactions. Although all the radical AdoMet enzymes so far characterized come from anaerobically growing microbes and are very oxygen sensitive, there is tantalizing evidence that some of these enzymes may be active in aerobic organisms including humans. PMID:20191656

  5. Firefly bioluminescence: a mechanistic approach of luciferase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Marques, Simone M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2009-01-01

    Luciferase is a general term for enzymes catalyzing visible light emission by living organisms (bioluminescence). The studies carried out with Photinus pyralis (firefly) luciferase allowed the discovery of the reaction leading to light production. It can be regarded as a two-step process: the first corresponds to the reaction of luciferase's substrate, luciferin (LH(2)), with ATP-Mg(2+) generating inorganic pyrophosphate and an intermediate luciferyl-adenylate (LH(2)-AMP); the second is the oxidation and decarboxylation of LH(2)-AMP to oxyluciferin, the light emitter, producing CO(2), AMP, and photons of yellow-green light (550- 570 nm). In a dark reaction LH(2)-AMP is oxidized to dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP). Luciferase also shows acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity, which leads to the formation of dehydroluciferyl-coenzyme A (L-CoA), luciferyl-coenzyme A (LH(2)-CoA), and fatty acyl-CoAs. Moreover luciferase catalyzes the synthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates from nucleosides with at least a 3'-phosphate chain plus an intact terminal pyrophosphate moiety. The LH(2) stereospecificity is a particular feature of the bioluminescent reaction where each isomer, D-LH(2) or L-LH(2), has a specific function. Practical applications of the luciferase system, either in its native form or with engineered proteins, encloses the analytical assay of metabolites like ATP and molecular biology studies with luc as a reporter gene, including the most recent and increasing field of bioimaging.

  6. MICROWAVE EFFECTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: MECHANISTIC AND REACTION MEDIUM CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The scope of applications of microwave irradiation relates to a wide spectrum of organic syntheses with numerous benefits (reduction in reaction times, improved purity of products and better yields) encompassing advantages of both thermal and (or) specific non-purely thermal effe...

  7. Hydroxyl radical reactions and the radical scavenging activity of β-carboline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Galisteo, Juan

    2015-04-01

    β-Carbolines are bioactive pyridoindole alkaloids occurring in foods, plants and the human body. Their activity as hydroxyl radical (OH) scavengers is reported here by using three different methods: deoxyribose degradation, hydroxylation of benzoate and hydroxylation of 2'-deoxyguanosine to give 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as assessed by RP-HPLC (MS). Fenton reactions (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) plus H2O2) were used for OH generation, and the radical increased in the presence of ascorbic acid or 6-hydroxydopamine as pro-oxidants. β-Carbolines were scavengers of OH in the three assays and in the presence of pro-oxidants. Tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acids were active against the hydroxylation of 2'-deoxyguanosine. β-Carbolines reacted with hydroxyl radicals (OH) affording hydroxy-β-carbolines, whereas tetrahydro-β-carbolines gave oxidative and degradation products. On the basis of IC50 and reaction rates (k), β-carbolines (norharman and harman), and tetrahydro-β-carbolines (tetrahydro-β-carboline, 1-methyltetrahydro-β-carboline and pinoline) were good OH radical scavengers and their activity was comparable to that of the indole, melatonin, which is an effective hydroxyl radical scavenger and antioxidant.

  8. Heterogeneous oxidation of folpet and dimethomorph by OH radicals: A kinetic and mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rashidi, M.; Chakir, A.; Roth, E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous OH oxidation of folpet and dimethomorph, two fungicides identified in the atmosphere of the Champagne-Ardenne region. Kinetic experiments were conducted in the relative mode, using terbuthylazine as a reference compound. The experimental method employed makes use of a simulation chamber coupled to a GC/MS analytical system. Meanwhile, the identification of (4-chlorophenyl)(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methanone (CPMPM), a degradation product of the OH oxidation of dimethomorph, is achieved using SPME/GC/MS. Moreover, a degradation mechanism of dimethomorph is proposed, and the heterogeneous OH reactivity of CPMPM is evaluated. The obtained OH reaction rate constants (cm3 molecule-1 s-1) are: kZ-dimethomorph = (2.0 ± 1.2) 10-14, kE-dimethomorph = (1.7 ± 1.2) 10-14, kFolpet = (1.6 ± 0.9) 10-13 and kCPMPM = (1.9 ± 1.0) 10-12. The implicated tropospheric life-times are up to 2 months, which shows that the investigated pesticides are relatively persistent towards oxidation removal processes. CPMPM, the identified product of OH oxidation of dimethomorph, is less persistent with a life time of only 6 days relative to heterogeneous oxidation by OH radicals.

  9. Binuclear metallohydrolases: complex mechanistic strategies for a simple chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Gerhard; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; McGeary, Ross P; Guddat, Luke W

    2012-09-18

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large family of enzymes that require two closely spaced transition metal ions to carry out a plethora of hydrolytic reactions. Representatives include purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), enzymes that play a role in bone metabolism and are the only member of this family with a heterovalent binuclear center in the active form (Fe(3+)-M(2+), M = Fe, Zn, Mn). Other members of this family are urease, which contains a di-Ni(2+) center and catalyzes the breakdown of urea, arginase, which contains a di-Mn(2+) center and catalyzes the final step in the urea cycle, and the metallo-β-lactamases, which contain a di-Zn(2+) center and are virulence factors contributing to the spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Binuclear metallohydrolases catalyze numerous vital reactions and are potential targets of drugs against a wide variety of human disorders including osteoporosis, various cancers, antibiotic resistance, and erectile dysfunctions. These enzymes also tend to catalyze more than one reaction. An example is an organophosphate (OP)-degrading enzyme from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ). Although GpdQ is part of a pathway that is used by bacteria to degrade glycerolphosphoesters, it hydrolyzes a variety of other phosphodiesters and displays low levels of activity against phosphomono- and triesters. Such a promiscuous nature may have assisted the apparent recent evolution of some binuclear metallohydrolases to deal with situations created by human intervention such as OP pesticides in the environment. OP pesticides were first used approximately 70 years ago, and therefore the enzymes that bacteria use to degrade them must have evolved very quickly on the evolutionary time scale. The promiscuous nature of enzymes such as GpdQ makes them ideal candidates for the application of directed evolution to produce new enzymes that can be used in bioremediation and against chemical warfare. In this Account, we review the mechanisms employed by binuclear

  10. Hypersensitive radical probe studies of chloroperoxidase-catalyzed hydroxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Hager, L P

    1998-07-01

    The oxidation of hypersensitive radical probes by chloroperoxidase from Caldariomyces fumago (CPO) was studied in an attempt to "time" a putative radical intermediate. Oxidation of (trans-2-phenylcyclopropyl)methane, previously studied by Zaks and Dodds [Zaks, A., and Dodds, D. R. (1995) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115, 10419-10424] was reinvestigated. Unrearranged oxidation products were found as previously reported, and control experiments demonstrated that the cyclic alcohol from oxidation at the cyclopropylcarbinyl position, while subject to further oxidation, survives CPO oxidation as detectable species. However, in contrast to the report by Zaks and Dodds, the rearranged alcohol product expected from ring opening of a cyclopropylcarbinyl radical intermediate was shown to be unstable toward the enzyme oxidation reaction. Because of this instability, two new hypersensitive radical probes, (trans-2-phenylcyclopropyl)ethane and 2-(trans-2-phenylcyclopropyl)propane, and their potential cyclic and acyclic products from oxidation at the cyclopropylcarbinyl position were synthesized and tested. Oxidation of both of these probes at the cyclopropylcarbinyl position by CPO gave unrearranged alcohol products only, but control experiments again demonstrated that the rearranged alcohol products were unstable toward CPO oxidation conditions. From the combination of the probe and control studies, the lifetime of a putative radical intermediate must be less than 3 ps. Whereas the results are consistent with an insertion mechanism for production of alcohol product, they do not exclude a very short-lived intermediate.

  11. Toluene combustion: reaction paths, thermochemical properties, and kinetic analysis for the methylphenyl radical + O2 reaction.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel; Chen, Chiung-Chu; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2007-09-06

    Aromatic compounds such as toluene and xylene are major components of many fuels. Accurate kinetic mechanisms for the combustion of toluene are, however, incomplete, as they do not accurately model experimental results such as strain rates and ignition times and consistently underpredict conversion. Current kinetic mechanisms for toluene combustion neglect the reactions of the methylphenyl radicals, and we believe that this is responsible, in part, for the shortcomings of these models. We also demonstrate how methylphenyl radical formation is important in the combustion and pyrolysis of other alkyl-substituted aromatic compounds such as xylene and trimethylbenzene. We have studied the oxidation reactions of the methylphenyl radicals with O2 using computational ab initio and density functional theory methods. A detailed reaction submechanism is presented for the 2-methylphenyl radical + O2 system, with 16 intermediates and products. For each species, enthalpies of formation are calculated using the computational methods G3 and G3B3, with isodesmic work reactions used to minimize computational errors. Transition states are calculated at the G3B3 level, yielding high-pressure limit elementary rate constants as a function of temperature. For the barrierless methylphenyl + O2 and methylphenoxy + O association reactions, rate constants are determined from variational transition state theory. Multichannel, multifrequency quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (qRRK) theory, with master equation analysis for falloff, provides rate constants as a function of temperature and pressure from 800 to 2400 K and 1 x 10(-4) to 1 x 10(3) atm. Analysis of our results shows that the dominant pathways for reaction of the three isomeric methylphenyl radicals is formation of methyloxepinoxy radicals and subsequent ring opening to methyl-dioxo-hexadienyl radicals. The next most important reaction pathway involves formation of methylphenoxy radicals + O in a chain branching process. At lower

  12. Free radical reactions of monochloramine and hydroxylamine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Heather D.; Cooper, William J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Bartels, David M.

    2002-11-01

    The use of Advanced Oxidation Technologies to destroy organic contaminants in drinking water may be impacted by the presence of disinfection chemicals such as monochloramine (NH 2Cl). To allow a quantitative evaluation of the effect of NH 2Cl on the destruction of organics in water rate constants for its reaction with the hydrated electron, the hydroxyl radical and the hydrogen atom were determined in this study. The corresponding values of (2.2±0.2)×10 10, (2.8±0.2)×10 9, and (1.2±0.1)×10 9 M -1 s -1, respectively, were incorporated into a kinetic computer model whose predictions were in good agreement with experimental chloramine removal under large scale, steady-state electron-beam irradiation conditions. Rate constants were also determined for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom with the chloramine hydration product hydroxylamine to supplement established literature data. Hydroxyl radical rate constants for the basic (NH 2OH) and acidic (NH 3OH +) forms were determined as (8.5±0.4)×10 9 and ⩽5×10 7 M -1 s -1, respectively, while for hydrogen atom reaction, corresponding rate constants of (4.5±0.1)×10 7 and (3.6±1.5)×10 5 M -1 s -1 were found.

  13. Parameterization of phosphine ligands reveals mechanistic pathways and predicts reaction outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Zachary L.; Milo, Anat; Hickey, David P.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic foundation behind the identity of a phosphine ligand that best promotes a desired reaction outcome is often non-intuitive, and thus has been addressed in numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this work, multivariate correlations of reaction outcomes using 38 different phosphine ligands were combined with classic potentiometric analyses to study a Suzuki reaction, for which the site selectivity of oxidative addition is highly dependent on the nature of the phosphine. These studies shed light on the generality of hypotheses regarding the structural influence of different classes of phosphine ligands on the reaction mechanism(s), and deliver a methodology that should prove useful in future studies of phosphine ligands.

  14. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600–1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  15. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; ...

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  16. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  17. Influence of restricted diffusion on retrogressive free-radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C.; Britt, P.F. III; Thomas, K.B.

    1993-07-01

    The effects of restricted mass transport on retrogressive reaction pathways can be probed through the study of model compounds immobilized on silica surfaces. Silica-immobilized bibenzyl undergoes a free radical chain rearrangement reaction that converts the thermally labile bibenzylic linkage into a more refractory diphenylmethane-type linkage. The efficiency of this process was found to be quite sensitive to the structure of neighboring molecules on the surface. Co-immobilized naphthalene was more effective that co-immobilized tetralin (a hydrogen donor) in inhibiting the process, apparently by retarding the key hydrogen atom transfer step. The effect of the co-attached molecules on the retrogressive cyclization-dehydrogenation path as well as other reaction pathways for this complex system remain under investigation.

  18. Solution-phase mechanistic study and solid-state structure of a tris(bipyridinium radical cation) inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Barnes, Jonathan C; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Li, Hao; Coskun, Ali; Gassensmith, Jeremiah J; Liu, Zhichang; Benítez, Diego; Trabolsi, Ali; Goddard, William A; Elhabiri, Mourad; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-02-15

    The ability of the diradical dicationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(2(•+))) ring to form inclusion complexes with 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium radical cationic (BIPY(•+)) guests has been investigated mechanistically and quantitatively. Two BIPY(•+) radical cations, methyl viologen (MV(•+)) and a dibutynyl derivative (V(•+)), were investigated as guests for the CBPQT(2(•+)) ring. Both guests form trisradical complexes, namely, CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) and CBPQT(2(•+))⊂V(•+), respectively. The structural details of the CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) complex, which were ascertained by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, reveal that MV(•+) is located inside the cavity of the ring in a centrosymmetric fashion: the 1:1 complexes pack in continuous radical cation stacks. A similar solid-state packing was observed in the case of CBPQT(2(•+)) by itself. Quantum mechanical calculations agree well with the superstructure revealed by X-ray crystallography for CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) and further suggest an electronic asymmetry in the SOMO caused by radical-pairing interactions. The electronic asymmetry is maintained in solution. The thermodynamic stability of the CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) complex was probed by both isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV/vis spectroscopy, leading to binding constants of (5.0 ± 0.6) × 10(4) M(-1) and (7.9 ± 5.5) × 10(4) M(-1), respectively. The kinetics of association and dissociation were determined by stopped-flow spectroscopy, yielding a k(f) and k(b) of (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and 250 ± 50 s(-1), respectively. The electrochemical mechanistic details were studied by variable scan rate cyclic voltammetry (CV), and the experimental data were compared digitally with simulated data, modeled on the proposed mechanism using the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters obtained from ITC, UV/vis, and stopped-flow spectroscopy. In particular, the electrochemical mechanism of association

  19. Branching ratios for the reaction of selected carbonyl-containing peroxy radicals with hydroperoxy radicals.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Alam S; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Orlando, John J; Singh, Sukhdeep; Hernandez, Samuel Q; Campbell, Sean; Ibarra, Yesenia

    2012-06-21

    An important chemical sink for organic peroxy radicals (RO(2)) in the troposphere is reaction with hydroperoxy radicals (HO(2)). Although this reaction is typically assumed to form hydroperoxides as the major products (R1a), acetyl peroxy radicals and acetonyl peroxy radicals have been shown to undergo other reactions (R1b) and (R1c) with substantial branching ratios: RO(2) + HO(2) → ROOH + O(2) (R1a), RO(2) + HO(2) → ROH + O(3) (R1b), RO(2) + HO(2) → RO + OH + O(2) (R1c). Theoretical work suggests that reactions (R1b) and (R1c) may be a general feature of acyl peroxy and α-carbonyl peroxy radicals. In this work, branching ratios for R1a-R1c were derived for six carbonyl-containing peroxy radicals: C(2)H(5)C(O)O(2), C(3)H(7)C(O)O(2), CH(3)C(O)CH(2)O(2), CH(3)C(O)CH(O(2))CH(3), CH(2)ClCH(O(2))C(O)CH(3), and CH(2)ClC(CH(3))(O(2))CHO. Branching ratios for reactions of Cl-atoms with butanal, butanone, methacrolein, and methyl vinyl ketone were also measured as a part of this work. Product yields were determined using a combination of long path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection, gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The following branching ratios were determined: C(2)H(5)C(O)O(2), Y(R1a) = 0.35 ± 0.1, Y(R1b) = 0.25 ± 0.1, and Y(R1c) = 0.4 ± 0.1; C(3)H(7)C(O)O(2), Y(R1a) = 0.24 ± 0.15, Y(R1b) = 0.29 ± 0.1, and Y(R1c) = 0.47 ± 0.15; CH(3)C(O)CH(2)O(2), Y(R1a) = 0.75 ± 0.13, Y(R1b) = 0, and Y(R1c) = 0.25 ± 0.13; CH(3)C(O)CH(O(2))CH(3), Y(R1a) = 0.42 ± 0.1, Y(R1b) = 0, and Y(R1c) = 0.58 ± 0.1; CH(2)ClC(CH(3))(O(2))CHO, Y(R1a) = 0.2 ± 0.2, Y(R1b) = 0, and Y(R1c) = 0.8 ± 0.2; and CH(2)ClCH(O(2))C(O)CH(3), Y(R1a) = 0.2 ± 0.1, Y(R1b) = 0, and Y(R1c) = 0.8 ± 0.2. The results give insights into possible mechanisms for cycling of OH radicals in the atmosphere.

  20. Mechanistic investigation of the reaction of epoxides with heterocumulenes catalysed by a bimetallic aluminium salen complex.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Christopher; North, Michael

    2014-06-23

    The bimetallic aluminium(salen) complex [(Al(salen))2O] is known to catalyse the reaction between epoxides and heterocumulenes (carbon dioxide, carbon disulfide and isocyanates) leading to five-membered ring heterocycles. Despite their apparent similarities, these three reactions have very different mechanistic features, and a kinetic study of oxazolidinone synthesis combined with previous kinetic work on cyclic carbonate and cyclic dithiocarbonate synthesis showed that all three reactions follow different rate equations. An NMR study of [Al(salen)]2O and phenylisocyanate provided evidence for an interaction between them, consistent with the rate equation data. A variable-temperature kinetics study on all three reactions showed that cyclic carbonate synthesis had a lower enthalpy of activation and a more negative entropy of activation than the other two heterocycle syntheses. The kinetic study was extended to oxazolidinone synthesis catalysed by the monometallic complex Al(salen)Cl, and this reaction was found to have a much less negative entropy of activation than any reaction catalysed by [Al(salen)]2O, a result that can be explained by the partial dissociation of an oligomeric Al(salen)Cl complex. A mechanistic rationale for all of the results is presented in terms of [Al(salen)]2O being able to function as a Lewis acid and/or a Lewis base, depending upon the susceptibility of the heterocumulene to reaction with nucleophiles.

  1. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  2. An efficient quantum mechanical method for radical pair recombination reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alan M.; Fay, Thomas P.; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2016-12-01

    The standard quantum mechanical expressions for the singlet and triplet survival probabilities and product yields of a radical pair recombination reaction involve a trace over the states in a combined electronic and nuclear spin Hilbert space. If this trace is evaluated deterministically, by performing a separate time-dependent wavepacket calculation for each initial state in the Hilbert space, the computational effort scales as O (Z2log ⁡Z ) , where Z is the total number of nuclear spin states. Here we show that the trace can also be evaluated stochastically, by exploiting the properties of spin coherent states. This results in a computational effort of O (M Z log ⁡Z ) , where M is the number of Monte Carlo samples needed for convergence. Example calculations on a strongly coupled radical pair with Z >106 show that the singlet yield can be converged to graphical accuracy using just M =200 samples, resulting in a speed up by a factor of >5000 over a standard deterministic calculation. We expect that this factor will greatly facilitate future quantum mechanical simulations of a wide variety of radical pairs of interest in chemistry and biology.

  3. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kiminori; Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  4. Reaction of Phenyl Radical with O2: Thermodynamic Properties, Important Reaction Paths and Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzelli, J; Sebbar, N; Pitz, W; Bockhorn, H

    2001-04-12

    The Phenyl + O{sub 2} association results in a chemically activated phenyl-peroxy radical which can dissociate to phenoxy radical + O, undergo intramolecular addition of the peroxy radical to several unsaturated carbon sites or react back to phenyl + O{sub 2}. The intramolecular addition channels further react through several paths to ring opening (unsaturated + carbonyl moieties) as well as cyclopentadieny radical + CO{sub 2}. Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub f(298)}{sup o}), Entropy (S{sub 298}), and heat capacities Cp(T) for species in the decomposition of the ring are evaluated using density functional and ab initio calculations and by comparisons to vinyl + O{sub 2} data of Mebel et al, and phenyl + O{sub 2} data of Hadad et al. Isodesmic reaction analysis is used to estimate enthalpy values of the intermediates and well depths of the adducts. High Pressure limit kinetic parameters are obtained from the calculation results using canonical Transition State Theory. Quantum RRK analysis is utilized to obtain k(E) and modified strong collision or master equation analysis is used for evaluation of pressure fall-off in this complex bimolecular, chemical activation, reaction system. Uncertainty in key barriers is discussed, resulting variations in important reaction product ratios are illustrated, and changes in these branching ratios are evaluated with a detailed reaction mechanism.

  5. Radical Reaction Control in the AdoMet Radical Enzyme CDG Synthase (QueE): Consolidate, Destabilize, Accelerate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controlling radical intermediates and thus catalysing and directing complex radical reactions is a central feature of S‐adensosylmethionine (SAM)‐dependent radical enzymes. We report ab initio and DFT calculations highlighting the specific influence of ion complexation, including Mg2+, identified as a key catalytic component on radical stability and reaction control in 7‐carboxy‐7‐deazaguanine synthase (QueE). Radical stabilisation energies (RSEs) of key intermediates and radical clock‐like model systems of the enzyme‐catalysed rearrangement of 6‐carboxytetrahydropterin (CPH4), reveals a directing role of Mg2+ in destabilising both the substrate‐derived radical and corresponding side reactions, with the effect that the experimentally‐observed rearrangement becomes dominant over possible alternatives. Importantly, this is achieved with minimal disruption of the thermodynamics of the substrate itself, affording a novel mechanism for an enzyme to both maintain binding potential and accelerate the rearrangement step. Other mono and divalent ions were probed with only dicationic species achieving the necessary radical conformation to facilitate the reaction. PMID:27859789

  6. Kinetics of the C-C bond beta scission reactions in alkyl radical reaction class.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, Artur; Truong, Thanh N

    2012-06-28

    Kinetics of the β-scission in alkyl radical reaction class was studied using the reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) combined with the linear energy relationship (LER) and the barrier height grouping (BHG) approach. All necessary parameters were derived from first-principle density functional calculations for a representative set of 21 reactions. Different error analyses and comparisons with available literature data were made. Direct comparison with available experimental data indicates that the RC-TST/LER, where only reaction energy is needed, can predict rate constants for any reaction in this reaction class with excellent accuracy. Specifically for this reaction class, the RC-TST/LER method has less than 60% systematic errors on average in the predicted rate constants when compared to explicit rate calculations.

  7. Reaction Path Bifurcation in an Electrocyclic Reaction: Ring-Opening of the Cyclopropyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-06-25

    Following previous work [J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 139, 154108] on a simple model of a reaction with a post-transition state valley ridge inflection point, we study the chemically important example of the electrocyclic cyclopropyl radical ring-opening reaction using direct dynamics and a reduced dimensional potential energy surface. The overall reaction requires con- or disrotation of the methylenes, but the initial stage of the ring-opening involves substantial internal rotation of only one methylene. The reaction path bifurcation is then associated with the relative sense of rotation of the second methylene. Clear deviations of reactive trajectories from the disrotatory intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) for the ring-opening are observed and the dynamical mechanism is discussed. Several features observed in the model system are found to be preserved in the more complex and higher dimensional ring-opening reaction. Most notable is the sensitivity of the reaction mechanism to the shape of the potential manifested as a Newtonian kinetic isotope effect upon deuterium substitution of one of the methylene hydrogens. Dependence of the product yield on frictional dissipation representing external environmental effects is also presented. The dynamics of the post-transition state cyclopropyl radical ring-opening are discussed in detail, and the use of low dimensional models as tools to analyze complicated organic reaction mechanisms is assessed in the context of this reaction.

  8. Carbenic vs. ionic mechanistic pathway in reaction of cyclohexanone with bromoform.

    PubMed

    Vitnik, Vesna D; Vitnik, Zeljko J; Juranić, Ivan O

    2012-10-01

    The extensive computation study was done to elucidate the mechanism of formation dibromoepoxide from cyclohexanone and bromoform. In this reaction, the formation of dihaloepoxide 2 is postulated as a key step that determines the distribution and stereochemistry of products. Two mechanistic paths of reaction were investigated: the addition of dibromocarbene to carbonyl group of ketone, and the addition of tribromomethyl carbanion to the same (C=O) group. The mechanisms for the addition reactions of dibromocarbenes and tribromomethyl carbanions with cyclohexanone have been investigated using ab initio HF/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311+G* level of theory. Solvent effects on these reactions have been explored by calculations which included a continuum polarizable conductor model (CPCM) for the solvent (H₂O). The calculations showed that both mechanisms are possible and are exothermic, but have markedly different activation energies.

  9. A radical process towards the development of transition-metal-free aromatic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tek Long; Wu, Yinuo; Choy, Pui Ying; Kwong, Fuk Yee

    2013-11-18

    Transition-metal-free cross-coupling reactions have been a hot topic in recent years. With the aid of a radical initiator, a number of unactivated arene C-H bonds can be directly arylated/functionalized by using aryl halides through homolytic aromatic substitution. Commercially available or specially designed promoters (e.g. diamines, diols, and amino alcohols) have been used to make this synthetically attractive method viable. This protocol offers an inexpensive, yet efficient route to aromatic C-C bond formations since transition metal catalysts and impurities can be avoided by using this reaction system. In this article, we focus on the significance of the reaction conditions (e.g. bases and promoters), which allow this type of reaction to proceed smoothly. Substrate scope limitations and challenges, as well as mechanistic discussion are also included.

  10. Maclurin protects against hydroxyl radical-induced damages to mesenchymal stem cells: antioxidant evaluation and mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Li, Xican; Gao, Yaoxiang; Li, Fei; Liang, Aifeng; Xu, Zhiming; Bai, Ye; Mai, Wenqiong; Han, Lu; Chen, Dongfeng

    2014-08-05

    Maclurin, an exceptional member of phytophenol family, was found to effectively protect against mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) oxidative damage induced by hydroxyl radical (OH) at 62.1-310.5 μM. Antioxidant assays indicated that maclurin could efficiently protect DNA from OH-induced damage at 114.6-382.2 μM, and scavenge OH, DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical), ABTS(+) (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical), and bind Cu(2+) (IC50 values were respectively 122.87 ± 10.14, 10.15 ± 0.85, 0.97 ± 0.07, and 133.95 ± 11.92 μM). HPLC-DAD and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses of the end-product of maclurin reaction with DPPH clearly suggested that maclurin (m/z = 261.12 [M-H](-)) donated two hydrogen atoms to DPPH (m/z = 394.06 [M](+)) to form ortho-benzoquinone moiety (λmax = 364 nm; m/z = 259.06 [M-H](-), loss of m/z = 28) and DPPH2 molecule (m/z = 395.03, 396.01), via hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) or sequential electron (e) proton transfer (SEPT), not radical adduct formation (RAF) mechanisms. Therefore, we concluded that: (i) maclurin can effectively protect against OH-induced damages to DNA and MSCs, thereby it may have a therapeutic potential in prevention of many diseases or MSCs transplantation; (ii) a possible mechanism for maclurin to protect against oxidative damages is OH radical-scavenging; (iii) maclurin scavenges OH possibly through metal-chelating, and direct radical-scavenging which is mainly via HAT or SEPT mechanisms; and (iv) the protective and antioxidant effects of maclurin can be primarily attributed to ortho-dihydroxyl groups, and ultimately to the relative stability of the ortho-benzoquinone form.

  11. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N2O2-) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N3O3-)

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) species are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that: (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON=NO{sub 2}{sup -}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON=NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON=NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high due to the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the UV spectrum of ON=NO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer is the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes little to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a re-interpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism, according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant Khom = 2.2 - 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis of UV spectra.

  12. Heterogeneous Reaction of HO2 Radical with Dicarboxylic Acid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.

    2010-12-01

    HOx(OH+ HO2) radical plays a central role in the tropospheric chemistry. Recently, the heterogeneous loss of HO2 by aerosol particles is a potentially important HOx sink in the troposphere suggested from observation study. However, there have been few studies for loss of HO2 by aerosols. In this study, we measured the HO2 uptake coefficients for four dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid) aerosol particles under ambient conditions (760Torr and 296K) using an aerosol flow tube(AFT) coupled with a chemical conversion /laser-induced fluorescence(CC/LIF) technique. The CC/LIF technique enabled experiments to be performed at almost the same HO2 radical concentration as that in the atmosphere(-10^8 molecules/cm^3). In this system, the effect of the self-reaction of HO2 in the gas phase can be neglected. HO2 radicals were injected into the AFT through a vertically movable Pyrex tube. Injector position dependent profiles of LIF intensity were measured as a function of aerosol concentration at 30% and 70% of relative humilities (RH). Determined HO2 uptake coefficients by succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid aerosol particles at 30% RH were 0.05 +/- 0.02, 0.07 +/- 0.03, 0.02 +/- 0.01, and 0.06 +/- 0.03, respectively, while the uptake coefficients by those particles at 70% RH were 0.13 +/- 0.05, 0.13 +/- 0.03, 0.06 +/- 0.01, and 0.11 +/- 0.03, respectively. These results suggest that compositions and relative humidity are significant to the HO2 uptake. We will discuss the potential HO2 loss processes.

  13. E.s.r. of spin-trapped radicals in aqueous solutions of peptides. Reactions of the hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Rustgi, S; Moss, H; Riesz, P

    1978-03-01

    The reactions of hydroxyl radicals with 30 dipeptides and several larger peptides were studied in aqueous solutions. The OH radicals were generated by U.V. photolysis of H2O2. The short-lived peptide radicals were spin-trapped using t-nitrosobutane and identified by e.s.r. For dipeptides containing the amino terminal residues glycine, alanine and phenylalanine, abstraction of the hydrogen from the carbon adjacent to the peptide nitrogen was the major process leading to the spin-adducts. Such radicals will be referred to as backbone radicals. Dipeptides with a carbonyl terminal serine residue and also glycylglutamic acid form both backbone and side-chain radicals, with the latter being formed in larger quantities. For dipeptides, side-chain radicals were detected on either the carboxyl or amino terminal residues of both. The effect of pD on the e.s.r. sectrum of the spin-adducts of glycylglycine was studied and the pK of the carboxyl group of this radical was determined to be 2.5. For (Ala)3 and (Ala)n, with an average value of n = 1800, backbone and minor side-chain radicals were observed. For ribonucleases-S-peptide, containing 20 amino acid residues, both backbone and side-chain radicals were detected.

  14. ARTICLE Mechanistic Investigation on the Reaction of O- with CH3CN Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feng; Wu, Li-xia; Zhou, Xiao-guo; Liu, Shi-lin

    2010-12-01

    The potential energy profile of the reaction between the atomic oxygen radical anion and acetonitrile has been mapped at the G3MP2B3 level of theory. Geometries of the reactants, products, intermediate complexes, and transition states involved in this reaction have been optimized at the (U)B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, and then their accurate relative energies have been improved using the G3MP2B3 method. The potential energy profile is confirmed via intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of transition states. Four possible production channels are examined respectively, as H+ transfer, H-atom transfer, H2+ transfer, and bi-molecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction pathways. Based on present calculations, the H2+ transfer reaction is major among these four channels, which agrees with previous experimental conclusions.

  15. Synthetic and Mechanistic Studies of Strained Heterocycle Opening Reactions Mediated by Zirconium(IV) Imido Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Suzanne A.; Rivera, Vicki A.; Ruck, Rebecca T.; Michael, Forrest E.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The reactions of the bis(cyclopentadienyl)(tert-butylimido)zirconium complex (Cp2Zr=N-t-Bu)(THF) (1) with epoxides, aziridines, and episulfides were investigated. Heterocycles without accessible β-hydrogens undergo insertion/protonation of the C–X bond to produce 1,2-amino alcohols (X = O) and 1,2-diamines (X = NR), whereas heterocycles with accessible β-hydrogens undergo elimination/protonation to produce allylic alcohols (X = O) and allylic sulfides (X = S). Mechanistic investigations support a stepwise pathway with zwitterionic intermediates for the first reaction class and a concerted pathway for the second reaction class. Additionally, the feasibility of chirality transfer from the planar-chiral ebthi (ebthi = ethylenebis(tetrahydroindenyl)) ligand was demonstrated with a chiral analogue, (ebthi)-Zr=NAr(THF) (Ar = 2,6-dimethylphenyl), 2, through the diastereoselective ring opening of meso epoxides. PMID:16508693

  16. Thermochemistry, reaction paths, and kinetics on the tert-isooctane radical reaction with O2.

    PubMed

    Snitsiriwat, Suarwee; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2014-07-03

    Thermochemical properties of tert-isooctane hydroperoxide and its radicals are determined by computational chemistry. Enthalpies are determined using isodesmic reactions with B3LYP density function and CBS QB3 methods. Application of group additivity with comparison to calculated values is illustrated. Entropy and heat capacities are determined using geometric parameters and frequencies from the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations for the lowest energy conformer. Internal rotor potentials are determined for the tert-isooctane hydroperoxide and its radicals in order to identify isomer energies. Recommended values derived from the most stable conformers of tert-isooctane hydroperoxide of are -77.85 ± 0.44 kcal mol(-1). Isooctane is a highly branched molecule, and its structure has a significant effect on its thermochemistry and reaction barriers. Intramolecular interactions are shown to have a significant effect on the enthalpy of the isooctane parent and its radicals on peroxy/peroxide systems, the R• + O2 well depths and unimolecular reaction barriers. Bond dissociation energies and well depths, for tert-isooctane hydroperoxide → R• + O2 are 33.5 kcal mol(-1) compared to values of ∼38 to 40 kcal mol(-1) for the smaller tert-butyl-O2 → R• + O2. Transition states and kinetic parameters for intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer and molecular elimination channels are characterized to evaluate reaction paths and kinetics. Kinetic parameters are determined versus pressure and temperature for the chemically activated formation and unimolecular dissociation of the peroxide adducts. Multifrequency quantum RRK (QRRK) analysis is used for k(E) with master equation analysis for falloff. The major reaction paths at 1000 K are formation of isooctane plus HO2 followed by cyclic ether plus OH. Stabilization of the tert-isooctane hydroperoxy radical becomes important at lower temperatures.

  17. OH Production from Reactions of Organic Peroxy Radicals with HO2 : Recent Studies on Ether-Derived Peroxy Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Kegley Owen, C. S.; Reynoldson, N.

    2013-12-01

    There is now ample evidence supporting significant formation of OH radicals in the reaction of HO2 with certain organic peroxy radicals (RO2). These reaction channels serve to promote radical propagation, and thus have the potential to alter HOx budgets and partitioning and hence tropospheric oxidative capacity. While much focus has been placed on OH production from reactions involving carbonyl-containing RO2 species, it is also the case that other oxygen- substituted peroxy species (e.g., CH3OCH2OO, HOCH2OO) likely generate OH in their reactions with HO2 (see ref. 1 and refs therein). In this work, the Cl-atom-initiated oxidation of two ethers, diethyl and diisopropyl ether, is investigated over ranges of conditions in an environmental chamber, using both FTIR and GC-FID methods for product quantification. Preliminary analysis suggests that significant OH production is occurring in the reaction of HO2 with CH3CH2OCH(OO)CH3, and also provides evidence for a rapid unimolecular reaction of diisopropyl ether-derived peroxy radicals. Details of these and other results will be described. 1. Orlando, J. J., and G. S. Tyndall, 2012: Laboratory studies of organic peroxy radical chemistry: an overview with emphasis on recent issues of atmospheric significance, Chemical Society Reviews, 41, 6294-6317, doi: 10.1039/C2CS35166H.

  18. Reaction Profiles and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cyanide Radical Reactions Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinidad Pérez-Rivera, Danilo; Romani, Paul N.; Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is arguably the atmosphere of greatest interest that we have an abundance of data for from both ground based and spacecraft observations. As we have learned more about Titan's atmospheric composition, the presence of pre-biotic molecules in its atmosphere has generated more and more fascination about the photochemical process and pathways it its atmosphere. Our computational laboratory has been extensively working throughout the past year characterizing nitrile synthesis reactions, making significant progress on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions of .CN with the hydrocarbons acetylene (C2H2), propylene (CH3CCH), and benzene (C6H6), developing a clear picture of the mechanistic aspects through which these three reactions proceed. Specifically, first principles calculations of the reaction profiles and molecular dynamics studies for gas-phase reactions of .CN and C2H2, .CN and CH3CCH, and .CN and C6H6 have been carried out. A very accurate determination of potential energy surfaces of these reactions will allow us to compute the reaction rates which are indispensable for photochemical modeling of Titan's atmosphere.The work at University of Puerto Rico at Cayey was supported by Puerto Rico NASA EPSCoR IDEAS-ER program (2015-2016) and DTPR was sponsored by the Puerto Rico NASA Space Grant Consortium Fellowship. *E-mail: juan.lopez15@upr.edu

  19. The Prowess of Photogenerated Amine Radical Cations in Cascade Reactions: From Carbocycles to Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott A; Wang, Jiang; Zheng, Nan

    2016-09-20

    Cascade reactions represent a class of ideal organic reactions because they empower efficiency, elegance, and novelty. However, development of cascade reactions remains a daunting task for synthetic chemists. Radicals are known to be well suited for cascade reactions. Compared with widely used carbon-based radicals, nitrogen-based radicals, such as neutral aminyl radicals and protonated aminyl radicals (amine radical cations), are underutilized, although they are behind some notable synthetic methods such as the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction. The constraint on their usage is generally attributed to the limited number of available stable precursors. Since amine radical cations offer increased reactivity and selectivity in chemical transformations compared with neutral aminyl radicals, their generation is of utmost importance. Recently, a surge of reports has been revealed using visible light photoredox catalysis. It has been demonstrated that amines can act as an electron donor in a reductive quenching cycle while the amine itself is oxidized to the amine radical cation. Although a number of methods exist to generate amine radical cations, the photochemical formation of these species offers many practical advantages. In this Account, we discuss our journey to the development of annulation reactions with various π-bonds and electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes using photogenerated amine radical cations. Various carbocycles and heterocycles are produced by these reactions. In our annulation work, we first show that single electron photooxidation of cyclopropylanilines to the amine radical cations triggers ring opening of the strained carbocycle, producing distonic radical cations. These odd-electron species are shown to react with alkenes and alkynes to yield the corresponding cyclopentanes and cyclopentenes in an overall redox neutral process. Further development of this annulation reaction allows us to achieve the [4 + 2] annulation of cyclobutylanilines

  20. Free radical reactions of isoxazole and pyrazole derivatives of hispolon: kinetics correlated with molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Shaukat Ali M; Barik, Atanu; Singh, Beena G; Modukuri, Ramani V; Balaji, Neduri V; Subbaraju, Gottumukkala V; Naik, Devidas B; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-12-01

    Hispolon (HS), a natural polyphenol found in medicinal mushrooms, and its isoxazole (HI) and pyrazole (HP) derivatives have been examined for free radical reactions and in vitro antioxidant activity. Reaction of these compounds with one-electron oxidant, azide radicals ([Formula: see text]) and trichloromethyl peroxyl radicals ([Formula: see text]), model peroxyl radicals, studied by nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique, indicated formation of phenoxyl radicals absorbing at 420 nm with half life of few hundred microseconds (μs). The formation of phenoxyl radicals confirmed that the phenolic OH is the active centre for free radical reactions. Rate constant for the reaction of these radicals with these compounds were in the order kHI ≅ kHP > kHS. Further the compounds were examined for their ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation in model membranes and also for the scavenging of 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and superoxide ([Formula: see text]) radicals. The results suggested that HP and HI are less efficient than HS towards these radical reactions. Quantum chemical calculations were performed on these compounds to understand the mechanism of reaction with different radicals. Lower values of adiabatic ionization potential (AIP) and elevated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for HI and HP compared with HS controlled their activity towards [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] radicals, whereas the contribution of overall anion concentration was responsible for higher activity of HS for DPPH, [Formula: see text], and lipid peroxyl radical. The results confirm the role of different structural moieties on the antioxidant activity of hispolon derivatives.

  1. Mechanistic and comparative studies of melatonin and classic antioxidants in terms of their interactions with the ABTS cation radical.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dun-xian; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Manchester, Lucien C; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Lopez-Burillo, Silvia; Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M; Reiter, Russel J

    2003-05-01

    Melatonin and classic antioxidants possess the capacity to scavenge ABTSb+ with IC50s of 4, 11, 15.5, 15.5, 17 and 21 microm for melatonin, glutathione, vitamin C, trolox, NADH and NADPH, respectively. In terms of scavenging ABTSb+, melatonin exhibits a different profile than that of the classic antioxidants. Classic antioxidants scavenge one or less ABTSb+, while each melatonin molecule can scavenge more than one ABTSb+, probably with a maximum of four. Classic antioxidants do not synergize when combined in terms of scavenging ABTSb+. However, a synergistic action is observed when melatonin is combined with any of the classic antioxidants. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that melatonin donates an electron at the potential of 715 mV. The scavenging mechanism of melatonin on ABTSb+ may involve multiple-electron donations via intermediates through a stepwise process. Intermediates including the melatoninyl cation radical, the melatoninyl neutral radical and cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin (cyclic 3-OHM) and N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) seem to participate in these reactions. More interestingly, the pH of the solution dramatically modifies the ABTSb+ scavenging capacity of melatonin while pH changes have no measurable influence on the scavenging activity of classic antioxidants. An acidic pH markedly reduces the ABTSb+ scavenging capacity of melatonin while an increased pH promotes the interaction of melatonin and ABTSb+. The major melatonin metabolites that develop when melatonin interacts with ABTSb+ are cyclic 3-OHM and AFMK. Cyclic 3-OHM is the intermediate between melatonin and AFMK, and cyclic 3-OHM also has the ability to scavenge ABTSb+. Melatonin and the metabolites which are generated via the interaction of melatonin with ABTSb+, i.e. the melatoninyl cation radical, melatoninyl neutral radical and cyclic 3-OHM, all scavenge ABTSb+. This unique cascade action of melatonin, in terms of scavenging, increases its efficiency to neutralized ABTSb+; this

  2. Hydrogen atom abstraction selectivity in the reactions of alkylamines with the benzyloxyl and cumyloxyl radicals. The importance of structure and of substrate radical hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-10-19

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the hydrogen abstraction reactions from a series of primary and secondary amines by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. The results were compared with those obtained previously for the corresponding reactions with tertiary amines. Very different hydrogen abstraction rate constants (k(H)) and intermolecular selectivities were observed for the reactions of the two radicals. With CumO(•), k(H) was observed to decrease on going from the tertiary to the secondary and primary amines. The lowest k(H) values were measured for the reactions with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TMP) and tert-octylamine (TOA), substrates that can only undergo N-H abstraction. The opposite behavior was observed for the reactions of BnO(•), where the k(H) values increased in the order tertiary < secondary < primary. The k(H) values for the reactions of BnO(•) were in all cases significantly higher than those measured for the corresponding reactions of CumO(•), and no significant difference in reactivity was observed between structurally related substrates that could undergo exclusive α-C-H and N-H abstraction. This different behavior is evidenced by the k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios that range from 55-85 and 267-673 for secondary and primary alkylamines up to 1182 and 3388 for TMP and TOA. The reactions of CumO(•) were described in all cases as direct hydrogen atom abstractions. With BnO(•) the results were interpreted in terms of the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the radical α-C-H and the amine lone pair wherein hydrogen abstraction occurs. Steric effects and amine HBA ability play a major role, whereas the strength of the substrate α-C-H and N-H bonds involved appears to be relatively unimportant. The implications of these different mechanistic pictures are discussed.

  3. Organic radicals for the enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction in Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Tesio, A Y; Blasi, D; Olivares-Marín, M; Ratera, I; Tonti, D; Veciana, J

    2015-12-25

    We examine for the first time the ability of inert carbon free-radicals as soluble redox mediators to catalyze and enhance the oxygen reduction reaction in a (TEGDME)-based electrolyte. We demonstrate that the tris(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)methyl (TTM) radical is capable of chemically favoring the oxygen reduction reaction improving significantly the Li-O2 battery performance.

  4. Study of elementary reactions and energy transfer processes involving the NH and CN free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Alexander, Millard H.

    1991-06-01

    Collaborative theoretical and experimental studies of a variety of elementary chemical reactions and collisional energy transfer processes involving small molecular free radicals, with particular emphasis on the NH and CN molecules, have been carried out. Specific topics studied include: molecular free radicals, collisional energy transfer, chemical reactions, excited states, and molecular decomposition.

  5. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(═O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)═O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ΔfH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)═O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products.

  6. Unusually high reactivity of apolipoprotein B-100 among proteins to radical reactions induced in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Narita, S; Yamada, Y; Tanaka, K; Kojo, S

    2000-01-17

    Relative reactivities of proteins to radical reactions caused in human plasma were studied for the first time utilizing an immunoblotting assay. When radical reactions were caused by Cu(2+), apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) underwent extensive fragmentation concurrently with the decrease in alpha-tocopherol, while human serum albumin (HSA) and transferrin (TF) were not decreased at all. When radical reactions were initiated by Cu(2+) with hydrogen peroxide or 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), alpha-tocopherol and apoB were also decreased steadily but HSA and TF were not decreased. These observations indicate that apoB is extremely reactive, even comparable to alpha-tocopherol, towards radical reactions. These results also suggest that the radical reaction of apoB is a possible process in vivo and it is involved in atherogenesis along with low density lipoprotein lipid peroxidation, which has been studied extensively.

  7. Reactions of Hydroxyalkyl Radicals with Cysteinyl Peptides in a NanoESI Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Craig A.; Xia, Yu

    2014-07-01

    In biological systems, carbon-centered small molecule radicals are primarily formed via external radiation or internal radical reactions. These radical species can react with a variety of biomolecules, most notably nucleic acids, the consequence of which has possible links to gene mutation and cancer. Sulfur-containing peptides and proteins are reactive toward a variety of radical species and many of them behave as radical scavengers. In this study, the reactions between alkyl alcohol carbon-centered radicals (e.g., •CH2OH for methanol) and cysteinyl peptides within a nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) plume were explored. The reaction system involved ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of a nanoESI plume using a low pressure mercury lamp consisting of 185 and 254 nm emission bands. The alkyl alcohol was added as solvent into the nanoESI solution and served as the precursor of hydroxyalkyl radicals upon UV irradiation. The hydroxyalkyl radicals subsequently reacted with cysteinyl peptides either containing a disulfide linkage or free thiol, which led to the formation of peptide- S-hydroxyalkyl product. This radical reaction coupled with subsequent MS/MS was shown to have analytical potential by cleaving intrachain disulfide linked peptides prior to CID to enhance sequence information. Tandem mass spectrometry via collision-induced dissociation (CID), stable isotope labeling, and accurate mass measurement were employed to verify the identities of the reaction products.

  8. Helical-Peptide-Catalyzed Enantioselective Michael Addition Reactions and Their Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Umeno, Tomohiro; Doi, Mitsunobu; Akagawa, Kengo; Kudo, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-08-05

    Helical peptide foldamer catalyzed Michael addition reactions of nitroalkane or dialkyl malonate to α,β-unsaturated ketones are reported along with the mechanistic considerations of the enantio-induction. A wide variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones, including β-aryl, β-alkyl enones, and cyclic enones, were found to be catalyzed by the helical peptide to give Michael adducts with high enantioselectivities (up to 99%). On the basis of X-ray crystallographic analysis and depsipeptide study, the amide protons, N(2)-H and N(3)-H, at the N terminus in the α-helical peptide catalyst were crucial for activating Michael donors, while the N-terminal primary amine activated Michael acceptors through the formation of iminium ion intermediates.

  9. Estimating biofilm reaction kinetics using hybrid mechanistic-neural network rate function model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2012-01-01

    This work describes an alternative method for estimation of reaction rate of a biofilm process without using a model equation. A first principles model of the biofilm process is integrated with artificial neural networks to derive a hybrid mechanistic-neural network rate function model (HMNNRFM), and this combined model structure is used to estimate the complex kinetics of the biofilm process as a consequence of the validation of its steady state solution. The performance of the proposed methodology is studied with the aid of the experimental data of an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. The statistical significance of the method is also analyzed by means of the coefficient of determination (R2) and model efficiency (ME). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of HMNNRFM for estimating the complex kinetics of the biofilm process involved in the treatment of industry wastewater.

  10. Development of linear free energy relationships for aqueous phase radical-involved chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Mezyk, Stephen P; Jones, Jace W; Daws, Brittany R; Crittenden, John C

    2014-12-02

    Aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) produce hydroxyl radicals (HO•) which can completely oxidize electron rich organic compounds. The proper design and operation of AOPs require that we predict the formation and fate of the byproducts and their associated toxicity. Accordingly, there is a need to develop a first-principles kinetic model that can predict the dominant reaction pathways that potentially produce toxic byproducts. We have published some of our efforts on predicting the elementary reaction pathways and the HO• rate constants. Here we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) that predict the rate constants for aqueous phase radical reactions. The LFERs relate experimentally obtained kinetic rate constants to quantum mechanically calculated aqueous phase free energies of activation. The LFERs have been applied to 101 reactions, including (1) HO• addition to 15 aromatic compounds; (2) addition of molecular oxygen to 65 carbon-centered aliphatic and cyclohexadienyl radicals; (3) disproportionation of 10 peroxyl radicals, and (4) unimolecular decay of nine peroxyl radicals. The LFERs correlations predict the rate constants within a factor of 2 from the experimental values for HO• reactions and molecular oxygen addition, and a factor of 5 for peroxyl radical reactions. The LFERs and the elementary reaction pathways will enable us to predict the formation and initial fate of the byproducts in AOPs. Furthermore, our methodology can be applied to other environmental processes in which aqueous phase radical-involved reactions occur.

  11. Quantum trajectory tests of radical-pair quantum dynamics in CIDNP measurements of photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsampourakis, K.; Kominis, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization is a ubiquitous phenomenon in photosynthetic reaction centers. The relevant nuclear spin observables are a direct manifestation of the radical-pair mechanism. We here use quantum trajectories to describe the time evolution of radical-pairs, and compare their prediction of nuclear spin observables to the one derived from the radical-pair master equation. While our approach provides a consistent description, we unravel a major inconsistency within the conventional theory, thus challenging the theoretical interpretation of numerous CIDNP experiments sensitive to radical-pair reaction kinetics.

  12. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N(2)O(2)(-)) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N(3)O(3)(-))

    SciTech Connect

    Lymar S. V.; Valiev M.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON{double_bond}NO{sup 2-}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high because of the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the calculations confirm that the UV spectrum of ONNO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work, and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes insignificantly to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a reinterpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition, but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant K{sub hom} = 2.2 x 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis on the basis of the electronic spectra of aqueous transients.

  13. Mechanistic insights on platinum- and palladium-pincer catalyzed coupling and cyclopropanation reactions between olefins.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-07-21

    The mechanism of M(II)-PNP-pincer catalyzed reaction between (i) ethene, (ii) trans-butene with 2-methylbut-2-ene, 2,3-dimethylbut-2-ene and tert-butylbutene is examined by using density functional theory methods (where M = Pt or Pd). All key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction are precisely located on the respective potential energy surfaces using the popular DFT functionals such as mPW1K, M06-2X, and B3LYP in conjunction with the 6-31+G** basis set. The reaction between these olefins can lead to a linear coupling product or a substituted cyclopropane. The energetic comparison between coupling as well as cyclopropanation pathways involving four pairs of olefins for both platinum (1-4) and palladium (5-8) catalyzed reactions is performed. The key events in the lower energy pathway in the mechanistic course involves (i) a C-C bond formation between the metal bound olefin (ethene or trans-butene) and a free olefin, and (ii) two successive [1,2] hydrogen migrations in the ensuing carbocationic intermediates (1c-4c, and 1d-4d), toward the formation of the coupling product. The computed barriers for these steps in the reaction of metal bound ethene to free tert-butylbutene (or other butenes) are found to be much lower than the corresponding steps when trans-butene is bound to the metal pincer. The Gibbs free energy differences between the transition states leading to the coupling product (TS(d-e)) and that responsible for cyclopropanated product (TS(d-g)) are found to be diminishingly closer in the case of the platinum pincer as compared to that in the palladium system. The computed energetics indicate that the coupled product prefers to remain as a metal olefin complex, consistent with the earlier experimental reports.

  14. Formation of {beta}-hydroxycarbonyls from the OH radical-initiated reactions of selected alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Aschmann, S.M.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.

    2000-05-01

    {beta}-Hydroxycarbonyls can be formed from the gas-phase reactions of alkenes with the OH radical, both in the presence and in the absence of NO. To date, because of analytical difficulties, few data have been reported for the formation of this class of compound from the reactions of the OH radical with alkenes. The authors have determined that {beta}-hydroxy-ketones can be readily analyzed by gas chromatography, and in this work they have shown that in 1 atm of air the {beta}-hydroxyalkoxy radicals formed in the reactions of the OH radical with trans-2-butene, trans-3-hexene, 1-butene, and {alpha}-pinene in the presence of NO primarily decompose rather than react with O{sub 2}. Rate constant ratios k{sub d}/k{sub 0{sub 2}} (or lower limits thereof), where k{sub d} and k{sub 0{sub 2}} are respectively the rate constants for the decomposition and the reaction with 0{sub 2} of the intermediate {beta}-hydroxyalkoxy radicals, have been obtained for the reactions of the CH{sub 3}CH(O)CH-(OH)CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH(O)CH{sub 2}OH, and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH(O)CH(OH)CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 3} radicals at 296 {+-} 2 K and atmospheric pressure. Using the O{sub 3} reactions with the alkenes to generate OH radicals, the reactions of the OH radical to generate OH radicals, the reactions of the OH radical with trans-2-butene, trans-3-hexene, and {alpha}-pinene in the absence of NO lead to the formation of the expected {beta}-hydroxycarbonyls and (at least for trans-2-butene) the {alpha},{beta}-diol.

  15. Detection of radicals produced by reaction of hydroperoxides with rat liver microsomal fractions.

    PubMed

    Greenley, T L; Davies, M J

    1992-04-22

    EPR spin trapping using the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulphonic acid (DBNBS) has been employed to examine the generation of radicals produced on reaction of a number of primary, secondary and lipid hydroperoxides with rat liver microsomal fractions in both the presence and absence of reducing equivalents. Two major mechanisms of radical generation have been elucidated. In the absence of NADPH or NADH, oxidative degradation of the hydroperoxide occurs to give initially a peroxyl radical which in the majority of cases can be detected as a spin adduct to DMPO; these radicals can undergo further reactions which result in the generation of alkoxyl and carbon-centered radicals. In the presence of NADPH (and to a lesser extent NADH) alkoxyl radicals are generated directly via reductive cleavage of the hydroperoxide. These alkoxyl radicals undergo further fragmentation and rearrangement reactions to give carbon-centered species which can be identified by trapping with DBNBS. The type of transformation that occurs is highly dependent on the structure of the alkoxyl radical with species arising from beta-scission, 1,2-hydrogen shifts and ring closure reactions being identified; these processes are in accord with previous chemical studies and are characteristic of alkoxyl radicals present in free solution. Studies using specific enzyme inhibitors and metal-ion chelators suggest that most of the radical generation occurs via a catalytic process involving haem proteins and in particular cytochrome P-450. An unusual species (an acyl radical) is observed with lipid hydroperoxides; this is believed to arise via a cage reaction after beta-scission of an initial alkoxyl radical.

  16. Hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from tertiary amines by benzyloxyl and cumyloxyl radicals: influence of structure on the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-08-05

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from a series of tertiary amines by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. With the sterically hindered triisobutylamine, comparable hydrogen atom abstraction rate constants (k(H)) were measured for the two radicals (k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) = 2.8), and the reactions were described as direct hydrogen atom abstractions. With the other amines, increases in k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios of 13 to 2027 times were observed. k(H) approaches the diffusion limit in the reactions between BnO(•) and unhindered cyclic and bicyiclic amines, whereas a decrease in reactivity is observed with acyclic amines and with the hindered cyclic amine 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethylpiperidine. These results provide additional support to our hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through the rate-determining formation of a C-H/N hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the benzyloxyl α-C-H and the nitrogen lone pair wherein hydrogen atom abstraction occurs, and demonstrate the important role of amine structure on the overall reaction mechanism. Additional mechanistic information in support of this picture is obtained from the study of the reactions of the amines with a deuterated benzyloxyl radical (PhCD(2)O(•), BnO(•)-d(2)) and the 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyloxyl radical.

  17. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: “free” (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and “solvated” CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 1010 M–1 s–1 and transient vibrational spectra in the C=N and C=O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 109 M–1 s–1 obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C=N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN–CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  18. Contrasting reactions of hydrated electron and formate radical with 2-thio analogues of cytosine and uracil.

    PubMed

    Prasanthkumar, Kavanal P; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan R; Kumar, Pavitra V; Singh, Beena G; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-10-19

    2-Thiocytosine (TC) and 2-thiouracil (TU) were subjected to hydrated electron (eaq(-)), formate radical (CO2˙(-)) and 2-hydroxypropan-2-yl radical ((CH3)2˙COH) reactions in aqueous medium. Transients were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and the experimental findings were rationalized by DFT calculations at LC-ωPBE and M06-2X levels using a 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and SMD solvation. In eaq(-) reactions, a ring N-atom protonated radical of TC and an exocyclic O-atom protonated radical of TU were observed via addition of eaq(-) and subsequent protonation by solvent molecules. However, two competing but simultaneous mechanisms are operative in CO2˙(-) reactions with TC and TU. The first one corresponds to formations of N(O)-atom protonated radicals (similar to eaq(-) reactions); the second mechanism led to 2 center-3 electron, sulfur-sulfur bonded neutral dimer radicals, TCdim˙ and TUdim˙. DFT calculations demonstrated that H-abstraction by CO2˙(-) from TC(TU) results in S-centered radical which upon combination with TC(TU) provide the dimer radical. In some cases, DFT energy profiles were further validated by CBS-QB3//M06-2X calculations. This is the first time report for a contradictory behavior in the mechanisms of eaq(-) and CO2˙(-) reactions with any pyrimidines or their thio analogues.

  19. Time-resolved FTIR emission studies of laser photofragmentation and radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.R.

    1993-12-01

    Recent studies have focused specifically on collision processes, such as single collision energy transfer, reaction dynamics, and radical reactions. The authors employ novel FTIR techniques in the study of single collision energy transfer processes using translationally fast H atom, as well as radical-radical reactions, e.g. CH{sub 3} + O, CF{sub 3} + H(D), and Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}. The fast atoms permit unique high energy regions of certain transition states of combustion species to be probed for the first time.

  20. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  1. A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals from gas phase oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Marco; Wilson, Karen; Chechik, Victor

    2010-10-01

    A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals originating from gas phase catalytic reactions is described and discussed. Radical trapping and identification were initially carried out using a known radical generator such as dicumyl peroxide. The trapping of radicals was further demonstrated by investigating genuine radical oxidation processes, e.g., benzaldehyde oxidation over manganese and cobalt salts. The efficiency of the reactor was finally proven by the partial oxidation of cyclohexane over MoO3, Cr2O3, and WO3, which allowed the identification of all the radical intermediates responsible for the formation of the products cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Assignment of the trapped radicals was carried out using spin trapping technique and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  2. Reactions of methyl radicals with silica supported silver nanoparticles in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidki, Tomer; Hänel, Andreas; Bar-Ziv, Ronen

    2016-07-01

    Silica supported silver nanoparticles (Ag°-SiO2-NCs, NCs=nanocomposites) suspended in aqueous solutions are efficient catalysts for the dimerization of methyl radicals to produce ethane, while bare silica is quite inert towards the interaction with methyl radicals. In the presence of small amounts of ethanol adsorbed on the SiO2 surface, the reaction path with methyl radicals is changed and methane is formed as the major product.

  3. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Chia, A; Tan, K C; Pawela, Ł; Kurzyński, P; Paterek, T; Kaszlikowski, D

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013)], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  4. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A.; Tan, K. C.; Pawela, Ł.; Kurzyński, P.; Paterek, T.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013), 10.1063/1.4844355], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010), 10.1016/j.cplett.2010.01.063]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  5. Rate constant and reaction channels for the reaction of atomic nitrogen with the ethyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Stief, L.J.; Nesbitt, F.L.; Payne, W.A. ); Kuo, S.C.; Tao, W.; Klemm, R.B. )

    1995-04-01

    The absolute rate constant and primary reaction products have been determined at [ital T]=298 K for the atom--radical reaction N([sup 4][ital S])+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] in a discharge flow system with collision-free sampling to a mass spectrometer. The rate constant measurements employed low energy electron impact ionization while the product study used dispersed synchrotron radiation as the photoionization source. The rate constant was determined under pseudo-first-order conditions by monitoring the decay of C[sub 2]H[sub 5] or C[sub 2]D[sub 5] as a function of time in the presence of excess N atoms. The result is [ital k]=(1.1[plus minus]0.3)[times]10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1]. For the reaction product experiments using photoionization mass spectrometry, products observed at 114 nm (10.9 eV) were CD[sub 3], D[sub 2]CN and C[sub 2]D[sub 4] for the N+C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reaction. The product identification is based on the unambiguous combination of product [ital m]/[ital z] values, the shift of the [ital m]/[ital z] peaks observed for the N+C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reaction products with respect to the N+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reaction products and the photoionization threshold measured for the major products. The observed products are consistent with the occurrence of the reaction channels D[sub 2]CN+CD[sub 3](2a) and C[sub 2]D[sub 4]+ND(2c). Formation of C[sub 2]D[sub 4] product via channel (2c) accounts for approximately 65% of the C[sub 2]D[sub 5] reacted. Most, if not all, of the remaining 35% is probably accounted for by channel (2a). These rate constant and product results are compared with those for the N+CH[sub 3] reaction as well as other atom+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reactions. The role of the N+C[sub 2]H[sub 5] reaction in the formation of HCN in the atmospheres of Titan and Neptune is briefly considered. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. TiCl4-promoted Baylis-Hillman reaction: mechanistic rationale toward product distribution and stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chandan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2010-01-15

    The mechanism of TiCl(4)-promoted Baylis-Hillman reaction between methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and acetaldehyde, in the absence of any base, is studied using the mPW1K density functional theory. The study focuses on several mechanistic intricacies as well as selectivity issues at each step of the reaction. The minimum energy pathway for this reaction involves three major steps such as a chloride transfer resulting in a chloro-enolate, titanium-mediated aldol reaction, and elimination of HCl or HOTiCl(3). Both s-cis and s-trans conformers of MVK are considered along with various modes of chloride transfer involving different complexes between TiCl(4), aldehyde, and MVK. Chloride transfer is found to be kinetically more favored for s-cis-MVK than for s-trans-MVK. The diastereoselectivity in the next step, i.e., Ti-mediated aldol reaction between the enolate and aldehyde, is found to be dependent on the geometry of the enolate, wherein anti and syn BH products are predicted for Z and E enolates, respectively. An interesting secondary orbital interaction between the oxygen atoms of the enolate and aldehyde moieties in the transition states for the C-C bond formation is identified as one of the contributing factors toward the predicted diastereoselectivity in the formation of the alpha-chloromethyl aldol product (P2). It has earlier been reported that under different experimental conditions, any of the three products such as (i) a normal BH product (P1), (ii) 2-(chloromethyl)vinyl ketones (P3), and (iii) alpha-chloro methyl aldol could be generated (Scheme 1 ). The present study offers valuable insights toward rationalizing the observed product distribution as well as diastereoselectivity in TiCl(4)-promoted BH reaction under base-free conditions. The computed energetics indicate that when MVK is employed as the Michael acceptor, the formation of 2-(choromethyl)vinyl ketone is the preferred product rather than the corresponding normal BH product, consistent with the known

  7. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.

    1994-09-01

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph, or {approx}DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 {degrees}C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  8. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  9. Standard Gibbs free energies of reactions of ozone with free radicals in aqueous solution: quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Sergej; von Sonntag, Clemens

    2011-11-01

    Free radicals are common intermediates in the chemistry of ozone in aqueous solution. Their reactions with ozone have been probed by calculating the standard Gibbs free energies of such reactions using density functional theory (Jaguar 7.6 program). O(2) reacts fast and irreversibly only with simple carbon-centered radicals. In contrast, ozone also reacts irreversibly with conjugated carbon-centered radicals such as bisallylic (hydroxycylohexadienyl) radicals, with conjugated carbon/oxygen-centered radicals such as phenoxyl radicals, and even with nitrogen- oxygen-, sulfur-, and halogen-centered radicals. In these reactions, further ozone-reactive radicals are generated. Chain reactions may destroy ozone without giving rise to products other than O(2). This may be of importance when ozonation is used in pollution control, and reactions of free radicals with ozone have to be taken into account in modeling such processes.

  10. Reaction mechanisms of secondary and tertiary amines with OH and NO3 radicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of aliphatic amines are common near agricultural facilities such as animal feed lots. Determining the reactions of these amines with common atmospheric radicals is important to understanding both daytime and nighttime atmospheric chemistry. Several smog chamber experiments were conducted ...

  11. Reactions of hydroxyl radicals with alkenes in low-temperature matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltham, Emma J.; Almond, Matthew J.; Marston, George; Wiltshire, Karen S.; Goldberg, Nicola

    2000-11-01

    The reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a number of stable alkenes have been studied in low-temperature matrices. The reactions were initiated by broad band UV-visible irradiation of matrices containing H 2O 2 and the alkene under investigation. The hydroxyalkyl radical products were identified principally by comparison of their spectra with the spectra of corresponding stable alcohols. Accordingly, IR spectra were recorded for the following series of alcohols isolated in argon matrices — methanol, ethanol, ethanol- d6, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, butan-2-ol, 2-methylpropan-1-ol ( iso-butyl alcohol), 2-methylpropan-2-ol ( tert-butyl alcohol), 2-methylbutan-2-ol ( tert-amyl alcohol), 3-methylbutan-2-ol and 2,3-dimethylbutan-2-ol. The hydroxyalkyl radicals, which appear to be formed from the alkenes studied were as follows — from ethene, 2-hydroxyethyl radical; from cis- or trans-but-2-ene, 1-methyl-2-hydroxypropyl radical; from propene, 1-methyl-2-hydroxyethyl and 2-hydroxypropyl radicals; from but-1-ene, 1-hydroxymethylpropyl and 2-hydroxybutyl radicals; from 2-methylpropene ( iso-butene), 1,1-dimethyl-2-hydroxyethyl and 2-methyl-2-hydroxypropyl radicals; the radical products from buta-1,3-diene and isoprene could not be identified. In the cases, where two radical products were possible, i.e. when propene, but-1-ene or 2-methylpropene were the substrates, it was found that the concentration of the secondary or tertiary radical always exceeded that of the primary radical. However, the relative concentration of these radicals appears to be determined by subsequent photolysis to give carbonyl compounds. There seems, therefore, to be little preference for the secondary and tertiary radicals over the primary radicals in the primary addition process. Comments on the mechanism of the transformation from radical to carbonyl compound based upon identification of intermediates within the matrix and isotopic substitution experiments are made. The characterisation of the 2

  12. PRODUCTS OF THE GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF THE OH RADICAL WITH N-BUTYL METHYL ETHER AND 2-ISOPROPOXYETHANOL: REACTIONS OF ROC(O)< RADICALS. (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The products of the gas-phase reactions of the OH radical with n-butyl methyl ether and 2-isopropoxyethanol in the presence of NO have been investigated at 298 ? 2 K and 740 Torr total pressure of air by gas chromatography and in situ atmospheric pressure ionization...

  13. Borohydride-mediated radical addition reactions of organic iodides to electron-deficient alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Takuji; Uehara, Shohei; Hirao, Hidefumi; Fukuyama, Takahide; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2014-05-02

    Cyanoborohydrides are efficient reagents in the reductive addition reactions of alkyl iodides and electron-deficient olefins. In contrast to using tin reagents, the reaction took place chemoselectively at the carbon-iodine bond but not at the carbon-bromine or carbon-chlorine bond. The reaction system was successfully applied to three-component reactions, including radical carbonylation. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction of a primary alkyl radical from tetrabutylammonium cyanoborohydride was estimated to be <1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C by a kinetic competition method. This value is 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of tributyltin hydride.

  14. Thermochemistry and Kinetic Analysis of the Unimolecular Oxiranyl Radical Dissociation Reaction: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-07-04

    Oxirane structures are important in organic synthesis, and they are important initial products in the oxidation reactions of alkyl radicals. The thermochemical properties (enthalpy of formation, entropy, and heat capacity) for the reaction steps of the unimolecular oxiranyl radical dissociation reaction are determined and compared with the available literature. The overall ring opening and subsequent steps involve four types of reactions: β-scission ring opening, intramolecular hydrogen transfer, β-scission hydrogen elimination, and β-scission methyl radical elimination. The enthalpies of formation of the transition states are determined and evaluated using six popular Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation methods (B3LYP, B2PLYP, M06, M06-2X, ωB97X, ωB97XD), each combined with three different basis sets. The DFT enthalpy values are compared with five composite calculation methods (G3, G4, CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, W1U), and by CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ. Kinetic parameters are determined versus pressure and temperature for the unimolecular dissociation pathways of an oxiranyl radical, which include the chemical activation reactions of the ring-opened oxiranyl radical relative to the ring-opening barrier. Multifrequency quantum Rice Ramsperger Kassel (QRRK) analysis is used to determine k(E) with master equation analysis for falloff. The major overall reaction pathway at lower combustion temperatures is oxiranyl radical dissociation to a methyl radical and carbon monoxide. Oxiranyl radical dissociation to a ketene and hydrogen atom is the key reaction path above 700 K.

  15. Mechanistic insight into the reaction catalysed by bacterial type II dehydroquinases.

    PubMed

    Coderch, Claire; Lence, Emilio; Peón, Antonio; Lamb, Heather; Hawkins, Alastair R; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-03-15

    DHQ2 (type II dehydroquinase), which is an essential enzyme in Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and does not have any counterpart in humans, is recognized to be an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. Computational and biochemical studies that help understand in atomic detail the catalytic mechanism of these bacterial enzymes are reported in the present paper. A previously unknown key role of certain conserved residues of these enzymes, as well as the structural changes responsible for triggering the release of the product from the active site, were identified. Asp89*/Asp88* from a neighbouring enzyme subunit proved to be the residue responsible for the deprotonation of the essential tyrosine to afford the catalytic tyrosinate, which triggers the enzymatic process. The essentiality of this residue is supported by results from site-directed mutagenesis. For H. pylori DHQ2, this reaction takes place through the assistance of a water molecule, whereas for M. tuberculosis DHQ2, the tyrosine is directly deprotonated by the aspartate residue. The participation of a water molecule in this deprotonation reaction is supported by solvent isotope effects and proton inventory studies. MD simulation studies provide details of the required motions for the catalytic turnover, which provides a complete overview of the catalytic cycle. The product is expelled from the active site by the essential arginine residue and after a large conformational change of a loop containing two conserved arginine residues (Arg109/Arg108 and Arg113/Arg112), which reveals a previously unknown key role for these residues. The present study highlights the key role of the aspartate residue whose blockage could be useful in the rational design of inhibitors and the mechanistic differences between both enzymes.

  16. Effects of electron acceptors and radical scavengers on nonchain radical nucleophilic substitution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xianman Zhang; Dilun Yang; Youcheng Liu )

    1993-01-01

    The yields of reaction products from thermal nucleophilic substitution reactions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) of six o- and p-nitrohalobenzenes with the sodium salt of ethyl [alpha]-cyanoacetate carbanion [Na[sup +][sup [minus

  17. Crossed-beam dynamics studies of the radical-radical combustion reaction O((3)P) + CH3 (methyl).

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Leonori, Francesca; Bergeat, Astrid; Petrucci, Raffaele; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2011-05-14

    The dynamics of the radical-radical reaction O((3)P) + CH(3), a prototypical case for the reactions of atomic oxygen with alkyl radicals of great relevance in combustion chemistry, has been investigated by means of the crossed molecular beam technique with mass spectrometric detection at a collision energy of 55.9 kJ mol(-1). The results have been examined in the light of previous kinetic and theoretical work. From product angular and velocity distribution measurements, the dynamics of the predominant H-displacement channel leading to formaldehyde formation has been characterized. This channel has been found to proceed via the formation of an osculating complex; a significant coupling between the product centre-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions has been noted. Experimental attempts to characterize the dynamics of the channel leading to HCO + H(2) have failed and it remains unclear whether HCO is formed by the reaction and/or, if formed, a part of HCO does not dissociate quickly into CO + H.

  18. Reaction Of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes With Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, A. S.; Solomentsev, V. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Shchegolikhin, A. N.; Sokolov, V. I.

    2004-09-01

    A method for functionalizing the sidewalls of HiPco SWNT via interaction with carbon- and metal-centered radicals is presented. A number of methods: UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, TEM and Raman spectroscopy provided a direct evidence of a chemical attachment of functional groups to the tubes. Functionalization was shown to be reversible: a thermal treatment led to the recovering of pristine structure of SWNT.

  19. Secondary organic aerosol formation from reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erupe, M. E.; Price, D. J.; Silva, P. J.; Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, L.; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2008-09-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical was investigated in an indoor environmental chamber. Particle chemistry was monitored using a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer while gas-phase species were detected using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. Trimethylamine, triethylamine and tributylamine were studied. Results indicate that tributylamine forms the most aerosol mass followed by trimethylamine and triethylamine respectively. Spectra from the aerosol mass spectrometer indicate the formation of complex non-salt aerosol products. We propose a reaction mechanism that proceeds via abstraction of a proton by nitrate radical followed by RO2 chemistry. Rearrangement of the aminyl alkoxy radical through hydrogen shift leads to the formation of hydroxylated amides, which explain most of the higher mass ions in the mass spectra. These experiments show that oxidation of tertiary amines by nitrate radical may be an important night-time source of secondary organic aerosol.

  20. Radical ring expansion reactions of methylenecyclopropane derivatives: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Diego; Sordo, Tomas L

    2006-06-23

    The evolution of the primary radicals from 1-(3-bromopropyl)-2-ethyl-3-methylenecyclopropane, 1-(3-bromopropyl)-1-trimethylsilyl-2-methylenecyclopropane, 1-(3-bromobutyl)-2-ethyl-3-methylenecyclopropane, and 1-(3-bromobutyl)-1-trimethylsilyl-2-methylenecyclopropane was theoretically studied at the ROMP2/6-311++G(d,p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d,p) theory level taking into account the effect of solvent through a PCM-UAHF model. For the propyl-substituted radicals, the attack of the radical center on the double bond takes place most favorably in an exo fashion. The subsequent ring expansions yield the product corresponding to the rupture of the endo C-C bond as the most favorable one in accordance with the experimental results. In the case of 1-(3-bromobutyl)-2-ethyl-3-methylenecyclopropane, the Gibbs energy barriers for the endo and exo attacks are the same, and the subsequent reversible evolution yields the product corresponding to the rupture of the exo C-C bond as the most favorable one through thermodynamic control in agreement with experiment. Finally, for 1-(3-bromobutyl)-1-trimethylsilyl-2-methylenecyclopropane, our calculations predict that the endo attack is 0.8 kcal/mol more favorable than the exo one. In the subsequent reversible ring expansion, the product corresponding to the rupture of the endo C-C bond is kinetically the most favored one in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Free radical reaction characteristics of coal low-temperature oxidation and its inhibition method.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenghua; Kong, Biao; Wei, Aizhu; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Yinbo; Zhang, Lanzhun

    2016-12-01

    Study on the mechanism of coal spontaneous combustion is significant for controlling fire disasters due to coal spontaneous combustion. The free radical reactions can explain the chemical process of coal at low-temperature oxidation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to measure the change rules of the different sorts and different granularity of coal directly; ESR spectroscopy chart of free radicals following the changes of temperatures was compared by the coal samples applying air and blowing nitrogen, original coal samples, dry coal samples, and demineralized coal samples. The fragmentation process was the key factor of producing and initiating free radical reactions. Oxygen, moisture, and mineral accelerated the free radical reactions. Combination of the free radical reaction mechanism, the mechanical fragmentation leaded to the elevated CO concentration, fracturing of coal pillar was more prone to spontaneous combustion, and spontaneous combustion in goaf accounted for a large proportion of the fire in the mine were explained. The method of added diphenylamine can inhibit the self-oxidation of coal effectively, the action mechanism of diphenylamine was analyzed by free radical chain reaction, and this research can offer new method for the development of new flame retardant.

  2. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Gas-phase reactivity of peptide thiyl (RS•), perthiyl (RSS•), and sulfinyl (RSO•) radical ions formed from atmospheric pressure ion/radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS•) and thiyl (RS•) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO•) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (•SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS•) > perthiyl (RSS•) > sulfinyl (RSO•). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  4. ESR evidence for radical production from the reaction of ozone with unsaturated lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.F.; McAdams, M.L..; Pryor, W.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors report electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping evidence for radical production by the reaction of ozone with unsaturated compounds. Soy and egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes, fatty acid emulsions, and homogeneous aqueous solutions of 3-hexenoic acid were treated with ozone in the presence of the spin trap {alpha}-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN). Under these conditions, they observe spin adducts resulting from the trapping of both organic carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals. When the lipid-soluble antioxidant alpha-tocopherol is included in the liposomal systems, the formation of spin adducts is completely inhibited. The authors suggest that radicals giving rise to these spin adducts arise form the rapid decomposition of the 1,2,3-trioxolane intermediate that is initially formed when ozone reacts with the carbon-carbon double bonds of the substrates. These free radicals are not formed by the decomposition of the Criegee ozonide, since little of the ozonide is formed in the presence of water. Although hydrogen peroxide is the predominate peroxidic product of the ozone/alkene reaction, its decomposition is not responsible for the observed radical production since neither catalase nor iron chelators significantly affect the spin adduct yield. The radical yield is approximately 1%. Since a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) such as linoleic acid produces much higher concentrations of spin trappable radicals than does the monounsaturated fatty oleic acid, the results also suggest that sites in the lung containing higher levels of PUFA may be an important target for radical formation.

  5. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  6. Observation of multiple radical pair states in photosystem 2 reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Booth, P J; Crystall, B; Ahmad, I; Barber, J; Porter, G; Klug, D R

    1991-07-30

    Charge recombination of the primary radical pair in D1/D2 reaction centers from photosystem 2 has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The kinetics of the primary radical pair are multiexponential and exhibit at least two lifetimes of 20 and 52 ns. In addition, a third lifetime of approximately 500 ps also appears to be present. These multiexponential charge-recombination kinetics reflect either different conformational states of D1/D2 reaction centers, with the different conformers exhibiting different radical pair lifetimes, or relaxations in the free energy of the radical pair state. Whichever model is invoked, the free energies of formation of the different radical pair states exhibit a linear temperature dependence from 100 to 220 K, indicating that they are dominated by entropy with negligible enthalpy contributions. These results are in agreement with previous determinations of the thermodynamics that govern primary charge separation in both D1/D2 reaction centers [Booth, P.J., Crystall, B., Giorgi, L. B., Barber, J., Klug, D.R., & Porter, G. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1016, 141-152] and reaction centers of purple bacteria [Woodbury, N.W.T., & Parson, W.W. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 767, 345-361]. It is possible that these observations reflect structural changes that accompanying primary charge separation and assist in stabilization of the radical pair state thus optimizing the efficiency of primary electron transfer.

  7. The reaction of methyl peroxy and hydroxyl radicals as a major source of atmospheric methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-François; Liu, Zhen; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Peeters, Jozef

    2016-10-01

    Methyl peroxy, a key radical in tropospheric chemistry, was recently shown to react with the hydroxyl radical at an unexpectedly high rate. Here, the molecular reaction mechanisms are elucidated using high-level quantum chemical methodologies and statistical rate theory. Formation of activated methylhydrotrioxide, followed by dissociation into methoxy and hydroperoxy radicals, is found to be the main reaction pathway, whereas methylhydrotrioxide stabilization and methanol formation (from activated and stabilized methylhydrotrioxide) are viable minor channels. Criegee intermediate formation is found to be negligible. Given the theoretical uncertainties, useful constraints on the yields are provided by atmospheric methanol measurements. Using a global chemistry-transport model, we show that the only explanation for the high observed methanol abundances over remote oceans is the title reaction with an overall methanol yield of ~30%, consistent with the theoretical estimates given their uncertainties. This makes the title reaction a major methanol source (115 Tg per year), comparable to global terrestrial emissions.

  8. The reaction of methyl peroxy and hydroxyl radicals as a major source of atmospheric methanol.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jean-François; Liu, Zhen; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Harvey, Jeremy N; Peeters, Jozef

    2016-10-17

    Methyl peroxy, a key radical in tropospheric chemistry, was recently shown to react with the hydroxyl radical at an unexpectedly high rate. Here, the molecular reaction mechanisms are elucidated using high-level quantum chemical methodologies and statistical rate theory. Formation of activated methylhydrotrioxide, followed by dissociation into methoxy and hydroperoxy radicals, is found to be the main reaction pathway, whereas methylhydrotrioxide stabilization and methanol formation (from activated and stabilized methylhydrotrioxide) are viable minor channels. Criegee intermediate formation is found to be negligible. Given the theoretical uncertainties, useful constraints on the yields are provided by atmospheric methanol measurements. Using a global chemistry-transport model, we show that the only explanation for the high observed methanol abundances over remote oceans is the title reaction with an overall methanol yield of ∼30%, consistent with the theoretical estimates given their uncertainties. This makes the title reaction a major methanol source (115 Tg per year), comparable to global terrestrial emissions.

  9. The reaction of methyl peroxy and hydroxyl radicals as a major source of atmospheric methanol

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jean-François; Liu, Zhen; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Peeters, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Methyl peroxy, a key radical in tropospheric chemistry, was recently shown to react with the hydroxyl radical at an unexpectedly high rate. Here, the molecular reaction mechanisms are elucidated using high-level quantum chemical methodologies and statistical rate theory. Formation of activated methylhydrotrioxide, followed by dissociation into methoxy and hydroperoxy radicals, is found to be the main reaction pathway, whereas methylhydrotrioxide stabilization and methanol formation (from activated and stabilized methylhydrotrioxide) are viable minor channels. Criegee intermediate formation is found to be negligible. Given the theoretical uncertainties, useful constraints on the yields are provided by atmospheric methanol measurements. Using a global chemistry-transport model, we show that the only explanation for the high observed methanol abundances over remote oceans is the title reaction with an overall methanol yield of ∼30%, consistent with the theoretical estimates given their uncertainties. This makes the title reaction a major methanol source (115 Tg per year), comparable to global terrestrial emissions. PMID:27748363

  10. Theoretical study on the mechanism and kinetics of acetaldehyde and hydroperoxyl radical: An important atmospheric reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnia, Solaleh; Vahedpour, Morteza; Abedi, Mostafa; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-09-01

    A systematic theoretical study was performed on the mechanism and kinetics of the atmospheric reaction of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the gas phase. The DFT-B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) methods were employed for calculations. Based on the calculations, this reaction leads to four different products through radical addition and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms which are very important in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The favorable reaction paths begin with α-hydroxyethylperoxy radical, CH3CH(OO)OH, in a exothermic process and finally leads to the product P1 (CH3COOH + OH). The overall rate constants for favorite reaction paths have been calculated at different temperatures (200-2500 K).

  11. Radical scavenging reaction kinetics with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruoka, Shuji; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Koyama, Kenichi; Akiba, Eiji; Yanagisawa, Takashi; Cassee, Flemming R.; Saito, Naoto; Usui, Yuki; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Porter, Dale W.; Castranova, Vincent; Endo, Morinobu

    2016-01-01

    Progress in the development of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has stimulated great interest among industries providing new applications. Meanwhile, toxicological evaluations on nanomaterials are advancing leading to a predictive exposure limit for CNTs, which implies the possibility of designing safer CNTs. To pursue safety by design, the redox potential in reactions with CNTs has been contemplated recently. However, the chemical reactivity of CNTs has not been explored kinetically, so that there is no scheme to express a redox reaction with CNTs, though it has been investigated and reported. In addition, the reactivity of CNTs is discussed with regard to impurities that consist of transition metals in CNTs, which obfuscates the contribution of CNTs to the reaction. The present work aimed at modeling CNT scavenging in aqueous solution using a kinetic approach and a simple first-order reaction scheme. The results show that CNTs follow the redox reaction assumption in a simple chemical system. As a result, the reaction with multiwalled CNTs is semi-quantitatively denoted as redox potential, which suggests that their biological reactions may also be evaluated using a redox potential scheme. PMID:27030782

  12. Hydroxyl radical generation by a light-dependent Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Van der Zee, J; Krootjes, B B; Chignell, C F; Dubbelman, T M; Van Steveninck, J

    1993-02-01

    Illumination of Fe3+, with light of a wavelength varying from 250 to 450 nm, in the presence of the iron chelators ethylenediamine N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)N,N,N',N'-tetraacet ic acid (EGTA), diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N',N'-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), or citrate resulted in the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+. Fe2+ formation was measured by the formation of its complex with bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid. In all cases Fe2+ formation was completely dependent on the presence of the iron chelator and on the wavelength used for illumination. A correlation was found between the absorption spectrum of the iron-chelator complex and the amount of Fe3+ reduced, suggesting that the absorption of light induced an electron transfer from the chelator to the iron ion. Exposure to oxygen, either during or after illumination, resulted in degradation of the chelator molecule. Illumination of the Fe(3+)-chelator complexes in the presence of H2O2 resulted in the formation of hydroxyl radicals, which could be determined by the formation of the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO)-hydroxyl radical adduct, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Formation of the spin adduct was inhibited by addition of catalase, mannitol, ethanol, or formate, whereas superoxide dismutase had no effect.

  13. Determination of the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of incompletely coupled fluxes. Stoichiometry of incompletely coupled reactions.

    PubMed

    Beavis, A D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-07-15

    A rationale is formulated for the design of experiments to determine the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of any two incompletely coupled fluxes J1 and J2. Incomplete coupling results when there is a branch at some point in the sequence of reactions or processes coupling the two fluxes. The upper limit of the mechanistic stoichiometry is given by the minimum value of dJ2/dJ1 obtained when the fluxes are systematically varied by changes in steps after the branch point. The lower limit is given by the maximum value of dJ2/dJ1 obtained when the fluxes are varied by changes in steps prior to the branch point. The rationale for determining these limits is developed from both a simple kinetic model and from a linear nonequilibrium thermodynamic treatment of coupled fluxes, using the mechanistic approach [Westerhoff, H. V. & van Dam, K. (1979) Curr. Top. Bioenerg. 9, 1-62]. The phenomenological stoichiometry, the flux ratio at level flow and the affinity ratio at static head of incompletely coupled fluxes are defined in terms of mechanistic conductances and their relationship to the mechanistic stoichiometry is discussed. From the rationale developed, experimental approaches to determine the mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are outlined. The principles employed do not require knowledge of the pathway or the rate of transmembrane leaks or slippage and may also be applied to analysis of the stoichiometry of other incompletely coupled systems, including vectorial H+/O and K+/O translocation coupled to mitochondrial electron transport.

  14. EPR and DFT Study of the Polycyclic Aromatic Radical Cations from Friedel-Crafts Alkylation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, An-an; Gao, Li-guo; Wang, Han-qing

    2009-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, with m-xylene, or p-xylene and alkyl chloride. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to polycyclic aromatic radicals formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl self-condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl3. The identification of observed two radicals 2,6-dimethylanthracene and 1,4,5,8-tetramethylanthracene were supported by density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) approach. The theoretical coupling constants support the experimental assignment of the observed radicals.

  15. Reactions of oxygen radicals with the quinone ring of coenzyme Q.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, D; Cabrini, L; Sechi, A M; Landi, L

    1991-01-01

    Coenzyme Q, besides its role in electron transfer reactions, may act as a radical scavenger. The effect of oxygen radicals produced by ultrasonic irradiation on the quinone ring was investigated. Aqueous solutions of a Q homologue, completely lacking the side chain, were irradiated and the modifications were spectrophotometrically followed. The experimental results show that both degradation and reduction of the benzoquinone ring took place when the irradiation was performed in water. Data obtained when ultrasonic irradiation was carried out in the presence of OH. scavengers, as formate, organic and inorganic buffers, suggest: a) the responsible species for most the ubiquinol generated by sonication appeared to be the superoxide radical b) addition reactions of OH. radicals with the aromatic ring led probably to the degradation of Coenzyme Q molecules.

  16. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  17. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; ...

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  18. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  19. Branching ratios between the abstraction and addition channels in the reactions of OH radicals with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, C.; Loison, J. C.; Caralp, F.; Flaud, P. M.; Villenave, E.

    2009-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere is described as a mass transfer of volatile organic compound oxidation products with low vapour pressures in particular phases. Among the different aerosol components, the SOA represent an important fraction, but, the fundamental processes governing their physics and chemistry in the atmosphere are poorly understood. So it is important to characterize and understand the mechanisms of their formation. It is well-known that atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes is an important process in tropospheric SOA formation. Consequently, the identification and quantification of reaction products from the oxidation of monoterpenes in the gas phase have been receiving great attention over the past years. However, the atmospheric degradation leads to the formation of a plethora of reaction products and proceeds through a very complex mechanism that is still not fully characterised. In our study, we have focused on SOA formation from OH + monoterpene reactions and more precisely on the primary oxidation steps of γ-terpinene and d-limonene by OH radicals. Indeed, the primary reaction of monoterpenes with hydroxyl radicals can in principle occur by two reaction pathways: OH-addition and H-abstraction. In this work, we have determined branching ratios of these reactions. Although there seems to be a consensus in the literature that OH-monoterpene reactions proceed almost exclusively by addition, several measurements have shown that in some case H-abstraction can represent up to 30% of the total reaction rate constant. Therefore it is necessary to determine this branching ratio in order to know, in particular, the main peroxy radicals formed and propose a mechanism for the gas phase oxidation of terpene by hydroxyl radicals. (γ-terpinene + OH) and (d-limonene + OH) reactions have been studied i) at atmospheric pressure, using laser photolysis coupled with UV absorption radical detection, and ii) at low pressure, using

  20. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments.

  1. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, M.I.

    1993-12-01

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  2. Reactions and structural investigation of chlorpromazine radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Ghanty, Tapan K.; Mukherjee, T.

    2008-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to understand pro-oxidant behaviour of chlorpromazine radical cation (CPZ rad + ). Pulse radiolysis studies have shown that CPZ rad + oxidizes physiological antioxidants (uric acid and bilirubin), and biomolecules like, tyrosine and proteins (bovine serum albumin and casein), thereby acting as a pro-oxidant. Ab-initio quantum chemical calculations suggest structural and electronic changes on oxidation of CPZ. The calculations with Hartree-Fock and density functional methods show that ring nitrogen atom is the site of electron removal from CPZ and sulfur atom is the site of maximum spin in CPZ rad + . The calculations also suggest that oxidation of CPZ leads to increase in planarity of the tricyclic ring as well as tilting of alkyl side chain towards chlorine containing ring. The structural changes on oxidation of CPZ and spin delocalization in CPZ rad + fairly explain the pro-oxidant activity of CPZ.

  3. Structure reactivity relationship in the reaction of DNA guanyl radicals with hydroxybenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Trinh T.; Tang, Vicky J.; Aguilera, Joseph A.; Milligan, Jamie R.

    2010-11-01

    In DNA, guanine bases are the sites from which electrons are most easily removed. As a result of hole migration to this stable location on guanine, guanyl radicals are major intermediates in DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself and not through the intermediacy of water radicals). We have modeled this process by employing gamma irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions, a method which also produces single electron oxidized guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA in aqueous solution. The stable products formed in DNA from these radicals are detected as strand breaks after incubation with the FPG protein. When a phenolic compound is present in the solution during gamma irradiation, the formation of guanyl radical species is decreased by electron donation from the phenol to the guanyl radical. We have quantified the rate of this reaction for four different phenolic compounds bearing carboxylate substituents as proton acceptors. A comparison of the rates of these reactions with the redox strengths of the phenolic compounds reveals that salicylate reacts ca. 10-fold faster than its structural analogs. This observation is consistent with a reaction mechanism involving a proton coupled electron transfer, because intra-molecular transfer of a proton from the phenolic hydroxyl group to the carboxylate group is possible only in salicylate, and is favored by the strong 6-membered ring intra-molecular hydrogen bond in this compound.

  4. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  5. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Cornett, K. D.; Murphy, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in the 225-443 K temperature range has been measured by means of the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Above 300 K, the rate constant levels off in a way that can only be explained by the occurrence of two reaction channels, of which one, operative at low temperatures, proceeds through the formation of an adduct intermediate. The implications of these rate constant values for stratospheric reaction constants is discussed.

  6. Reaction kinetics of the CN radical with methyl bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodny, Michael; Hershberger, John F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of the CN + CH3Br reaction were studied using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy to detect CN reactants and HCN products. This reaction has a rate constant of k = (2.20 ± 0.6) × 10-12 exp (453 ± 98/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the range 298-523 K. Hydrogen abstraction to produce HCN + CH2Br is only a minor reaction product, with a branching fraction of 0.12 ± 0.02. Other product channels, including BrCN + CH3, CH2CN + HBr, CH3CN + Br are likely. An upper limit of 0.01 was established for the HBr yield. These results are in qualitative agreement with recent ab initio calculations.

  7. Accurate thermochemistry of hydrocarbon radicals via an extended generalized bond separation reaction scheme.

    PubMed

    Wodrich, Matthew D; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Wheeler, Steven E

    2012-04-05

    Detailed knowledge of hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry is critical for understanding diverse chemical phenomena, ranging from combustion processes to organic reaction mechanisms. Unfortunately, experimental thermochemical data for many radical species tend to have large errors or are lacking entirely. Here we develop procedures for deriving high-quality thermochemical data for hydrocarbon radicals by extending Wheeler et al.'s "generalized bond separation reaction" (GBSR) scheme (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 2547). Moreover, we show that the existing definition of hyperhomodesmotic reactions is flawed. This is because transformation reactions, in which one molecule each from the predefined sets of products and reactants can be converted to a different product and reactant molecule, are currently allowed. This problem is corrected via a refined definition of hyperhomodesmotic reactions in which there are equal numbers of carbon-carbon bond types inclusive of carbon hybridization and number of hydrogens attached. Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) computations using the expanded GBSRs are applied to a newly derived test set of 27 hydrocarbon radicals (HCR27). Greatly reduced errors in computed reaction enthalpies are seen for hyperhomodesmotic and other highly balanced reactions classes, which benefit from increased matching of hybridization and bonding requirements. The best performing DFT methods for hyperhomodesmotic reactions, M06-2X and B97-dDsC, give average deviations from benchmark computations of only 0.31 and 0.44 (±0.90 and ±1.56 at the 95% confidence level) kcal/mol, respectively, over the test set. By exploiting the high degree of error cancellation provided by hyperhomodesmotic reactions, accurate thermochemical data for hydrocarbon radicals (e.g., enthalpies of formation) can be computed using relatively inexpensive computational methods.

  8. Recent advances in the synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles via radical cascade reactions using isonitriles as radical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Studer, Armido

    2015-06-07

    Nitrogen heterocycles belong to a highly important class of compounds which are found in various natural products, biologically active structures, and medicinally relevant compounds. Therefore, there is continuing interest in the development of novel synthetic methods for the construction of nitrogen containing heterocycles. Recently, radical insertion reactions into isonitriles have emerged as an efficient and powerful strategy for the construction of nitrogen heterocycles, such as phenanthridines, indoles, quinolines, quinoxalines, and isoquinolines. This review highlights recent advances in this fast growing research area and also includes important pioneering studies in this area.

  9. Computational Study of the Thermodynamics of Atmospheric Nitration of PAHs via OH-Radical-Initiated Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariyasopit, N.; Cheong, P.; Simonich, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) are an important class of PAH derivatives that are more toxic than their parent PAHs (1) and are emitted from direct emission and secondary emission to the atmosphere. The secondary emissions, particularly the OH-radical initiated and NO3-radical-initiated reactions, have been shown to influence the NPAH concentrations in the atmosphere. Gas-phase reactions are thought to be the major sources of NPAHs containing four or fewer rings (2). Besides NPAHs, PAHs lead to a number of other products including oxygenated, hydroxy substituted and ring-opened PAH derivatives (3). For some PAHs, the OH-initiated and NO3-initiated reactions result in the formation of different NPAH isomers, allowing the ratio of these isomers to be used in the determination of direct or secondary emission sources. Previous studies have shown that the PAH gas-phase reactions with OH radical is initiated by the addition of OH radical to the aromatic ring to form hydroxycyclohexadienyl radicals (4). In the presence of NO2, these reactive intermediates readily nitrate with the elimination of water (4). The hydroxycyclohexadienyl-type radical intermediates are also prone to react with other species in the atmosphere or revert back to the original compound (3). The objective of this study was to investigate the thermodynamics of PAH nitration through day-time OH-radical-initiated reactions. The theoretical investigation were carried out using Density Functioanl Theory (B3LYP) and the 6-31G(d) basis set, as implemented in Gaussian03. A number of different PAHs were studied including fluoranthene, pyrene, as well as the molecular weight 302 PAHs such as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene. Computations were also used to predict unknown NPAHs formed by OH-radical-initiated reaction. All intermediates for the OH-radical addition and the following nitration were computed. We have discovered that the thermodynamic stability of the intermediates involved in the PAH

  10. 1,4-Addition of TMSCCl₃ to nitroalkenes: efficient reaction conditions and mechanistic understanding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Na; Wahl, Benoit; Woodward, Simon; Lewis, William

    2014-06-16

    Improved synthetic conditions allow preparation of TMSCCl3 in good yield (70%) and excellent purity. Compounds of the type NBu4X [X=Ph3SiF2 (TBAT), F (tetrabutylammonium fluoride, TBAF), OAc, Cl and Br] act as catalytic promoters for 1,4-additions to a range of cyclic and acyclic nitroalkenes, in THF at 0-25 °C, typically in moderate to excellent yields (37-95%). TBAT is the most effective promoter and bromide the least effective. Multinuclear NMR studies ((1)H, (19)F, (13)C and (29)Si) under anaerobic conditions indicate that addition of TMSCCl3 to TBAT (both 0.13 M) at -20 °C, in the absence of nitroalkene, leads immediately to mixtures of Me3SiF, Ph3SiF and NBu4CCl3. The latter is stable to at least 0 °C and does not add nitroalkene from -20 to 0 °C, even after extended periods. Nitroalkene, in the presence of TMSCCl3 (both 0.13 M at -20 °C), when treated with TBAT, leads to immediate formation of the 1,4-addition product, suggesting the reaction proceeds via a transient [Me3Si(alkene)CCl3] species, in which (alkene) indicates an Si⋅⋅⋅O coordinated nitroalkene. The anaerobic catalytic chain is propagated through the kinetic nitronate anion resulting from 1,4 CCl3(-) addition to the nitroalkene. This is demonstrated by the fact that isolated NBu4[CH2=NO2] is an efficient promoter. Use of H2C=CH(CH2)2CH=CHNO2 in air affords radical-derived bicyclic products arising from aerobic oxidation.

  11. 1,4-Addition of TMSCCl3 to Nitroalkenes: Efficient Reaction Conditions and Mechanistic Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Na; Wahl, Benoit; Woodward, Simon; Lewis, William

    2014-01-01

    Improved synthetic conditions allow preparation of TMSCCl3 in good yield (70 %) and excellent purity. Compounds of the type NBu4X [X=Ph3SiF2 (TBAT), F (tetrabutylammonium fluoride, TBAF), OAc, Cl and Br] act as catalytic promoters for 1,4-additions to a range of cyclic and acyclic nitroalkenes, in THF at 0–25 °C, typically in moderate to excellent yields (37–95 %). TBAT is the most effective promoter and bromide the least effective. Multinuclear NMR studies (1H, 19F, 13C and 29Si) under anaerobic conditions indicate that addition of TMSCCl3 to TBAT (both 0.13 M) at −20 °C, in the absence of nitroalkene, leads immediately to mixtures of Me3SiF, Ph3SiF and NBu4CCl3. The latter is stable to at least 0 °C and does not add nitroalkene from −20 to 0 °C, even after extended periods. Nitroalkene, in the presence of TMSCCl3 (both 0.13 M at −20 °C), when treated with TBAT, leads to immediate formation of the 1,4-addition product, suggesting the reaction proceeds via a transient [Me3Si(alkene)CCl3] species, in which (alkene) indicates an Si⋅⋅⋅O coordinated nitroalkene. The anaerobic catalytic chain is propagated through the kinetic nitronate anion resulting from 1,4 CCl3− addition to the nitroalkene. This is demonstrated by the fact that isolated NBu4[CH2−NO2] is an efficient promoter. Use of H2C−CH(CH2)2CH−CHNO2 in air affords radical-derived bicyclic products arising from aerobic oxidation. PMID:24849249

  12. The reaction of methionine with hydroxyl radical: reactive intermediates and methanethiol production.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Ivan; Bogdanović Pristov, Jelena; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Spasić, Mihajlo

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of reaction of methionine with hydroxyl radical are not fully understood. Here, we unequivocally show using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and GC-FID and GC-MS, the presence of specific carbon-, nitrogen- and sulfur-centered radicals as intermediates of this reaction, as well as the liberation of methanethiol as a gaseous end product. Taking into account the many roles that methionine has in eco- and biosystems, our results may elucidate redox chemistry of this amino acid and processes that methionine is involved in.

  13. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding 'greener' sources of commodity chemicals and fuels. High-valent Chromium from Hydroperoxido-Chromium(III). The decomposition of pentaaquahydroperoxido chromium(III) ion (hereafter Cr aqOOH2+) in acidic aqueous solutions is kinetically complex and generates mixtures of products (Craq3+, HCrO 4-, H2O2, and O2). The yield of high-valent chromium products (known carcinogens) increased from a few percent at pH 1 to 70 % at pH 5.5 (near biological pH). Yields of H 2O2 increased with acid concentration. The reproducibility of the kinetic data was poor, but became simplified in the presence of H2O2 or 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) dianion (ABTS2-). Both are capable of scavenging strongly oxidizing intermediates). The observed rate constants (pH 1, [O2] ≤ 0.03 mM) in the presence of these scavengers are independent of [scavenger] and within the error are the same (k,ABTS2- = (4.9 +/- 0.2) x 10-4 s-1 and kH2O2 = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 s-1); indicating involvement of the scavengers in post-rate determining steps. In the presence of either scavenger, decomposition of CrOOH2+ obeyed a two-term rate law, k obs / s-1 = (6.7 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 + (7.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-4 [H+]. Effect of [H+] on the kinetics and the product distribution, cleaner kinetics in the presence of scavengers, and independence of kobs on [scavenger] suggest a dual-pathway mechanism for the decay of Craq OOH2+. The H+-catalyzed path

  14. Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions (I): The NO2 + N2H3 System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    the potential energy surface for the NO2 + N2H3 system and have established the most likely reaction mechanism. The technique of laser photolysis...configuration interactions and coupled-cluster theories with single and double excitations, and correction for triple excitations. Specifically, the...differentially pumped chamber containing an electron impact ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer. 4. Results and Discussion To our knowledge

  15. Disinfection of water containing natural organic matter by using ozone-initiated radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min; Chung, Hyenmi; Yoon, Jeyong

    2003-04-01

    Ozone is widely used to disinfect drinking water and wastewater due to its strong biocidal oxidizing properties. Recently, it was reported that hydroxyl radicals ((.)OH), resulting from ozone decomposition, play a significant role in microbial inactivation when Bacillus subtilis endospores were used as the test microorganisms in pH controlled distilled water. However, it is not yet known how natural organic matter (NOM), which is ubiquitous in sources of drinking water, affects this process of disinfection by ozone-initiated radical reactions. Two types of water matrix were considered for this study. One is water containing humic acid, which is commercially available. The other is water from the Han River. This study reported that hydroxyl radicals, initiated by the ozone chain reaction, were significantly effective at B. subtilis endospore inactivation in water containing NOM, as well as in pH-controlled distilled water. The type of NOM and the pH have a considerable effect on the percentage of disinfection by hydroxyl radicals, which ranged from 20 to 50%. In addition, the theoretical T value of hydroxyl radicals for 2-log B. subtilis removal was estimated to be about 2.4 x 10(4) times smaller than that of ozone, assuming that there is no synergistic activity between ozone and hydroxyl radicals.

  16. Free Radical Chemistry of Disinfection Byproducts 1: Kinetics of Hydrated Electron and Hydroxyl Radical Reactions with Halonitromethanes in Water

    SciTech Connect

    B. J. Mincher; R. V. Fox; S. P. Mezyk; T. Helgeson; S. K. Cole; W. J. Cooper; P. R. Gardinali

    2006-01-01

    Halonitromethanes are disinfection-byproducts formed during ozonation and chlorine/chloramine treatment of waters that contain bromide ion and natural organic matter. In this study, the chemical kinetics of the free-radical-induced degradations of a series of halonitromethanes were determined. Absolute rate constants for hydroxyl radical, OH, and hydrated electron, eaq-, reaction with both chlorinated and brominated halonitromethanes were measured using the techniques of electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. The bimolecular rate constants obtained, k (M-1 s-1), for eaq-/OH, respectively, were the following: chloronitromethane (3.01 ± 0.40) × 1010/(1.94 ± 0.32) × 108; dichloronitromethane (3.21 ± 0.17) × 1010/(5.12 ± 0.77) × 108; bromonitromethane (3.13 ± 0.06) × 1010/(8.36 ± 0.57) × 107; dibromonitromethane (3.07 ± 0.40) × 1010/(4.75 ± 0.98) × 108; tribromonitromethane (2.29 ± 0.39) × 1010/(3.25 ± 0.67) × 108; bromochloronitromethane (2.93 ± 0.47) × 1010/(4.2 ± 1.1) × 108; bromodichloronitromethane (2.68 ± 0.13) × 1010/(1.02 ± 0.15) × 108; and dibromochloronitromethane (2.95 ± 0.43) × 1010 / (1.80 ± 0.31) × 108 at room temperature and pH ~7. Comparison data were also obtained for hydroxyl radical reaction with bromoform (1.50 ± 0.05) × 108, bromodichloromethane (7.11 ± 0.26) × 107, and chlorodibromomethane (8.31 ± 0.25) × 107 M-1 s-1, respectively. These rate constants are compared to recently obtained data for trichloronitromethane and bromonitromethane, as well as to other established literature data for analogous compounds.

  17. Hydrogen migrations in alkylcycloalkyl radicals: implications for chain-branching reactions in fuels.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander C; Tangprasertchai, Narin; Francisco, Joseph S

    2012-09-03

    A thorough understanding of the oxidation chemistry of cycloalkanes is integral to the development of alternative fuels and improving current fuel performance. An important class of reactions essential to this chemistry is the hydrogen migration; however, they have largely been omitted from the literature for cycloalkanes. The present work investigates all of the hydrogen migration reactions available to methylcyclopentane, ethylcyclopentane, methylcyclohexane, and ethylcyclohexane. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters have been studied by a combination of computational methods and compared to their corresponding n-alkyl and methylalkyl counterparts to determine the effect that the cycloalkane ring has on these reactions. In particular, although the alkylcycloalkyl activation energies for the dominant 1,4, 1,5, and 1,6 H-migration are higher than in n-alkyl and methylalkyl radicals, because several of the rotors needed to form the transition state are locked into place as part of the cycloalkane ring, the A-factors are higher for the alkylcycloalkyl reactions, making the rates closer to the noncyclic systems, at higher temperatures. The results presented here suggest that the relative importance of each H-migration pathway differs from the trends predicted by either the n-alkyl or methylalkyl radical systems. Of particular interest is the observation that since the barrier height of the 1,4 H-migration is only 3-5 kcal mol(-1) higher than the 1,5 H-migration in the methyl and ethylcycloalkyl radicals, compared to a difference of roughly 7 kcal mol(-1) in similar reactions for both the n-alkyl and methylalkyl radicals, the 1,4 H-migrations in alkylcycloalkyl radicals will be more important in the overall mechanism than would be predicted based on the n-alkyl and methylalkyl radicals. These results have important combustion model implications, particularly for fuels with high cycloalkane content.

  18. Laser-Initiated Free Radical Chain Reactions: Synthesis Of Hydroperoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, R. G.; Chou, M. S.

    1984-05-01

    We have investigated the advantages of using laser-initiation for the synthesis of cumenehydroperoxide and t-butylhydroperoxide. Laser-initiation significantly improves the oxidation rates of cumene in the liquid phase and iso-butane in the vapor phase (using HBr promoters) with moderate photoefficiencies (418 and 490 respectively). The primary effect of laser-initiation is to reduce the induction period of the reaction. For the oxidation of cumene the beneficial effect of laser initiation is strongly dependent on laser wavelength, alternately enhancing (at 351 nm) or inhibiting (at 249 nm) the oxidation rate. For isobutane oxidation, laser-initiation also minimizes the HBr depletion rate relative to oxidation rate.

  19. EPR Spin Trapping of an Oxalate-Derived Free Radical in the Oxalate Decarboxylase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Imaram, Witcha; Saylor, Benjamin T.; Centonze, Christopher P.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    EPR spin trapping experiments on bacterial oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis under turn-over conditions are described. The use of doubly 13C-labeled oxalate leads to a characteristic splitting of the observed radical adducts using the spin trap N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone linking them directly to the substrate. The radical was identified as the carbon dioxide radical anion which is a key intermediate in the hypothetical reaction mechanism of both decarboxylase and oxidase activities. X-ray crystallography had identified a flexible loop, SENS161-4, which acts as a lid to the putative active site. Site directed mutagenesis of the hinge amino acids, S161 and T165 was explored and showed increased radical trapping yields compared to the wild type. In particular, T165V shows approximately ten times higher radical yields while at the same time its decarboxylase activity was reduced by about a factor of ten. This mutant lacks a critical H-bond between T165 and R92 resulting in compromised control over its radical chemistry allowing the radical intermediate to leak into the surrounding solution. PMID:21277974

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-21

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations.

  1. Atmospheric Reactions of a Series of Hexenols with OH Radical and Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yanbo; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Qiao; Yang, Chengqiang; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-04-01

    C6 hexenols are one of the most significant groups of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Because of their antibacterial properties, C6 hexenols can be emitted by a wide number of plants in response to changes in the ambient environment. The oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere is involved in the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), thus causing significant effects on atmospheric chemistry and the climate. The lack of corresponding kinetic parameters and product information of their oxidation reactions will result in incomplete atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. In this paper, we will overview our recent research progress on the study of the atmospheric reactions of a series of C6 hexenols with OH radicals and ozone. A series of studies were conducted using both experimental and theoretical methods. Corresponding rate constants were obtained, and reaction mechanisms were also analyzed. It could be concluded that both the nature of the substituent and its position play a fundamental role in the reactivity of the C6 hexenols toward OH radicals and O3. An activating effect of the -OH group in OH radical reactions was found, thus making the H-abstraction channel non-negligible in reactions of these unsaturated alcohols with OH radicals. The removal of these C6 hexenols by ozone also showed great importance and could be competitive with the major recognized sinks by OH radicals. These studies are of great significance for understanding the mechanism of atmospheric chemical reactions of hexenols and improving the atmospheric chemistry model. Experimental detail and corresponding results will be presented. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21307137, 41575125 and 91544228), and the Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province (1508085J03).

  2. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  3. Structural effects on the beta-scission reaction of alkoxyl radicals. Direct measurement of the absolute rate constants for ring opening of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] The absolute rate constants for beta-scission of a series of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals and of the 2-(4-methylphenyl)-2-butoxyl radical have been measured directly by laser flash photolysis. The benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals undergo ring opening with rates which parallel the ring strain of the corresponding cycloalkanes. In the 1-X-indan-1-oxyl radical series, ring opening is observed when X = H, Me, whereas exclusive C-X bond cleavage occurs when X = Et. The factors governing the fragmentation regioselectivity are discussed.

  4. Synthesis of α-Benzyloxyamino-γ-butyrolactones via a Polar Radical Crossover Cycloaddition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Cortney L; Nicewicz, David A

    2015-12-18

    A direct catalytic synthesis of substituted α-benzyloxyamino-γ-butyrolactones is reported, starting from simple oxime acids and alkenes. The substituted O-benzyloxime acid starting materials are cyclized with oxidizable alkenes, via Polar Radical Crossover Cycloaddition (PRCC) reactions. The catalytic reaction is carried out using the Fukuzumi acridinium photooxidant and substoichiometric amounts of a redox-active cocatalyst. The utility of this method has been demonstrated through the use of 3 oxime acids and 19 oxidizable olefins.

  5. Kinetics and products of the reaction of OH radicals with 3-methoxy-3-methyl-1-butanol.

    PubMed

    Aschmann, Sara M; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    2011-08-15

    3-Methoxy-3-methyl-1-butanol [CH(3)OC(CH(3))(2)CH(2)CH(2)OH] is used as a solvent for paints, inks, and fragrances and as a raw material for the production of industrial detergents. A rate constant of (1.64 ± 0.18) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of 3-methoxy-3-methyl-1-butanol with OH radicals has been measured at 296 ± 2 K using a relative rate method, where the indicated error is the estimated overall uncertainty. Acetone, methyl acetate, glycolaldehyde, and 3-methoxy-3-methylbutanal were identified as products of the OH radical-initiated reaction, with molar formation yields of 3 ± 1%, 35 ± 9%, 13 ± 3%, and 33 ± 7%, respectively, at an average NO concentration of 1.3 × 10(14) molecules cm(-3). Using a 12-h average daytime OH radical concentration of 2 × 10(6) molecules cm(-3), the calculated lifetime of 3-methoxy-3-methyl-1-butanol with respect to reaction with OH radicals is 8.5 h. Potential reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Markovnikov free radical addition reactions, a sleeping beauty kissed to life.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Reinhard W

    2016-02-07

    This review covers free radical additions, which are initiated by the formal addition of a hydrogen atom to a C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond. These reactions originated in the realms of inorganic chemistry, polymer chemistry, and organic chemistry, whereby barriers between these disciplines impeded the rapid implementation of the findings.

  7. Mechanistic studies on the reactions of platinum(II) complexes with nitrogen- and sulfur-donor biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Bugarčić, Živadin D; Bogojeski, Jovana; Petrović, Biljana; Hochreuther, Stephanie; van Eldik, Rudi

    2012-10-28

    A brief overview of mechanistic studies on the reactions of different Pt(II) complexes with nitrogen- and sulfur-donor biomolecules is presented. The first part describes the results obtained for substitution reactions of mono-functional Pt(II) complexes with different biomolecules, under various experimental conditions (temperature, pH and ionic strength). In addition, an overview of the results obtained for the substitution reactions of bi-functional Pt(II) complexes, analogous to cisplatin, with biomolecules is given. The last part of this report deals with different polynuclear Pt(II) complexes and their substitution behaviour with different biomolecules. The purpose of this perspective is to improve the understanding of the mechanism of action of Pt(II) complexes as potential anti-tumour drugs in the human body.

  8. Kinetics of 1,5-hydrogen migration in alkyl radical reaction class.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, Artur; Bankiewicz, Barbara

    2012-01-12

    Kinetics of the 1,5-intramolecular hydrogen migration in the alkyl radicals reaction class has been studied using the reaction class transition state theory combined with the linear energy relationship (LER) and the barrier height grouping (BHG) approach. The high pressure limits of the rate constants for the reference reaction of 1-pentyl → 1-pentyl, calculated by the Canonical Variational Transition State Theory (CVT) with the Small Curvature Tunneling (SCT), are taken from the literature. Direct comparison with available experimental data indicates that the RC-TST/LER, where only reaction energy is needed, can predict rate constants for any reaction in this reaction class with excellent accuracy. Specifically for this reaction class, the RC-TST/LER method has less than 65% systematic errors in the predicted rate constants when compared to explicit rate calculations.

  9. Computational Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory: A Mechanistic Study of the Wittig Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The Wittig reaction is one of the most useful reactions in organic chemistry. Despite its prominence early in the organic chemistry curriculum, the exact mechanism of this reaction is still under debate, and this controversy is often neglected in the classroom. Introducing a simple computational study of the Wittig reaction illustrates the…

  10. Cyclopentadienone Oxidation Reaction Kinetics and Thermochemistry for the Alcohols, Hydroperoxides, and Vinylic, Alkoxy, and Alkylperoxy Radicals.

    PubMed

    Yommee, Suriyakit; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-01-28

    Cyclopentadienone has one carbonyl and two olefin groups resulting in 4n + 2 π-electrons in a cyclic five-membered ring structure. Thermochemical and kinetic parameters for the initial reactions of cyclopentadienone radicals with O2 and the thermochemical properties for cyclopentadienone-hydroperoxides, alcohols, and alkenyl, alkoxy, and peroxy radicals were determined by use of computational chemistry. The CBS-QB3 composite and B3LYP density functional theory methods were used to determine the enthalpies of formation (ΔfH°298) using the isodesmic reaction schemes with several work reactions for each species. Entropy and heat capacity, S°(T) and Cp°(T) (50 K ≤ T ≤ 5000 K) are determined using geometric parameters, internal rotor potentials, and frequencies from B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations. Standard enthalpies of formation are reported for parent molecules as cyclopentadienone, cyclopentadienone with alcohol, hydroperoxide substituents, and the cyclopentadienone-yl vinylic, alkoxy, and peroxy radicals corresponding to loss of a hydrogen atom from the carbon and oxygen sites. Entropy and heat capacity vs temperature also are reported for the parent molecules and for radicals. The thermochemical analysis shows The R(•) + O2 well depths are deep, on the order of 50 kcal mol(-1), and the R(•) + O2 reactions to RO + O (chain branching products) for cyclopentadienone-2-yl and cyclopentadienone-3-yl have unusually low reaction (ΔHrxn) enthalpies, some 20 or so kcal/mol below the entrance channels. Chemical activation kinetics using quantum RRK analysis for k(E) and master equation for falloff are used to show that significant chain branching as a function of temperature and pressure can occur when these vinylic radicals are formed.

  11. Kinetics and products of the OH radical-initiated reaction of 3-methyl-2-butenal.

    PubMed

    Tuazon, Ernesto C; Aschmann, Sara M; Nishino, Noriko; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    2005-06-07

    Kinetics and products of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with 3-methyl-2-butenal [(CH3)2C=CHCHO] have been investigated at room temperature and atmospheric pressure of air. Using a relative rate method with methacrolein as the reference compound, a rate constant for the reaction of OH radicals with 3-methyl-2-butenal of (6.21 +/- 0.18) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at 296 +/- 2 K was measured, where the indicated error does not include the uncertainty in the rate constant for the methacrolein reference compound. Products of this reaction were investigated using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers coated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine for on-fiber derivatization of carbonyl compounds, with subsequent thermal desorption and analysis by gas chromatography. The products observed and the molar formation yields were: glyoxal, 40 +/- 3%; acetone, 74 +/- 6%; 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanal, 4.6 +/- 0.7%; CO2, 39% initially, decreasing to 30% at greater extents of reaction; peroxyacyl nitrate(s) [RC(O)OONO2], 5-8%, increasing with the extent of reaction and with the sum of the CO2 and RC(O)OONO2 yields being 38 +/- 6%; and organic nitrates [RONO2], 8.5 +/- 2.3%. The formation of these products is readily explained by a reaction mechanism based on those previously formulated for the corresponding reactions of the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes acrolein, crotonaldehyde and methacrolein. Based on the mechanism proposed, at room temperature H-atom abstraction from the CHO group accounts for 40 +/- 6% of the overall reaction, and OH radical addition to the carbon atoms of the C=C bond accounts for 53 +/- 4% of the overall reaction. Hence 93 +/- 8% of the reaction products and pathways are accounted for.

  12. Concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids with orthoesters: A useful reaction with interesting mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Sarah; Romero, Dickie; Jacobs, Hollie K.; Gopalan, Aravamudan S.

    2010-01-01

    The concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids has been studied with triethyl orthoacetate (TEOA) and triethyl orthoformate (TEOF). In a surprising finding, only one equivalent of TEOA in refluxing toluene was necessary to convert L-proline and L-phenylalanine to the corresponding N-acetyl ethyl esters in good yield. The same transformation using TEOF was not effective. Stereochemical outcome and stoichiometric studies as well as structural variation of the amino acids in this reaction provided unexpected mechanistic insight. PMID:21286246

  13. Laser flash photolysis studies of radical-radical reaction kinetics: The HO{sub 2} + IO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkhite, J.M.; Stickel, R.E.; Nicovich, J.M.; Wine, P.H.

    1999-04-29

    Reactive iodine as a potential tropospheric O{sub 3} sink has received considerable attention recently. Laser flash photolysis of Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}OH/O{sub 2}/I{sub 2}/NO{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}N{sub 2} mixtures at 308 nm has been coupled with simultaneous time-resolved detection of HO{sub 2} (by infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) and IO (by visible absorption spectroscopy) to investigate the kinetics of the atmospherically important reaction HO{sub 2} + IO {r_arrow} products over the temperature range 274--373 K in N{sub 2} buffer gas at pressures of 12 and 25 Torr. All experiments were performed under near pseudo-first-order conditions with HO{sub 2} in excess over IO. At 298 K, the rate coefficient was determined to be (9.7 {+-} 2.9) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}, with the primary source of uncertainty being knowledge of the infrared line strength(s) required to convert measured HO{sub 2} absorbances to absolute concentrations. The temperature dependence of the HO{sub 2} + IO rate coefficient was found to be adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k = 9.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp(680/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The results reported in this study are compared with other recent studies of HO{sub 2} + IO kinetics, and the potential roles of this reaction in atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  14. Insights into relevant mechanistic aspects about the induction period of Cu(0)/Me(6)TREN-mediated reversible-deactivation radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongsheng; Zhao, Tianyu; Zhou, Dezhong; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2015-10-04

    There is a controversial debate about the mechanism of the Cu(0)-catalyzed radical polymerization. Herein, a comparative analysis of a series of reactions catalyzed by different valent copper shows that the induction period and the subsequent autoaccelerated polymerization of a Cu(0)/Me6TREN-catalyzed system originate from the accumulation of soluble copper species, and Cu(I) is still a powerful activator under its disproportionation favored conditions.

  15. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Emrys W.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hore, P. J.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ˜500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes.

  16. A theoretical investigation on kinetics, mechanism, and thermochemistry of the gas-phase reactions of methyl fluoroacetate with OH radicals and fate of alkoxy radical.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Bhupesh Kumar; Deka, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-09-25

    We theoretically investigated OH-initiated hydrogen abstraction reactions of methyl fluoroacetate (MFA) CH2FC(O)OCH3 at the MPWB1K level of theory in conjunction with the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Thermodynamic and kinetic data are computed using the comparatively accurate G2(MP2) method. Two most stable conformers of MFA are identified, and the energy difference between them is found to be only 0.32 kcal mol(-1). Both of them are considered for rate coefficient calculations, and the contribution from each of the conformers is found to be quite significant. We propose an indirect mechanism due to validation of pre- and post-reactive complexes. The rate parameters are determined using canonical transition state theory and energetics at the G2(MP2) level. The temperature dependence of the rate constant can be described by the Arrhenius expressions: k = 8.79 × 10(-13) exp[(-377.27 ± 64)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) over a temperature range of 250-450 K. The ΔfH°298 for CH2FC(O)OCH3, CH2FC(O)OC(•)H2, and C(•)HFC(O)OCH3 are also computed using an isodesmic procedure. The OH-driven atmospheric lifetime of MFA was estimated to be 24 days. A mechanistic study to shed light on the atmospheric degradation and the sole fate for the consumption of CH2FC(O)OCH2O(•) radical has also been reported.

  17. Mechanistic examination of Cβ-Cγ bond cleavages of tryptophan residues during dissociations of molecular peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [G(n)W](•+) (n = 2-4) and [GXW](•+) (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO(2)](•+)) can generate [M - CO(2) - 116](+), [M - CO(2) - 117](•+), and [1H-indole](•+) (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO(2) - 116](+) and [1H-indole](•+) systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2, the decarboxylated species that is active against C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage, can efficiently isomerize to form a more stable π-radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WG(n)R](•+) (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M - 116](+) product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted that the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol(-1) lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  18. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  19. Kinetic behavior of the reaction between hydroxyl radical and the SV40 minichromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, A.; Aguilera, J. A.; Milligan, J. R.

    2007-06-01

    Aqueous solutions containing the minichromosomal form of the virus SV40 and the radical scavenger DMSO were subjected to γ-irradiation, and the resulting formation of single-strand breaks (SSB) was quantified. Under the irradiation conditions, most SSBs were produced as a consequence of hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) reactions. By controlling the competition between DMSO and the viral DNA substrate for rad OH, we are able to estimate the rate coefficient for the reaction of rad OH with the SV40 minichromosome. The results cannot be described adequately by homogeneous competition kinetics, but it is possible to describe the rate coefficient for the reaction as a function of the scavenging capacity of the solution. The experimentally determined rate coefficient lies in the range 1×10 9-2×10 9 L mol -1 s -1 at 10 7 s -1, and increases with increasing scavenging capacity.

  20. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  1. A mechanistic study of manganese(iii) acetate-mediated phosphonyl group additions to [60]- and [70]-fullerenes: the oxidative-ion-transfer mechanism vs. free radical addition.

    PubMed

    Tumanskii, Boris L; Sabirov, Denis S; Lyakhovetsky, Yury I

    2016-11-14

    The phosphonylation of C60 with HP(O)(OAlk)2 and Mn(OAc)3·2H2O has been considered to occur via a free radical (FR) path involving intermediate radicals ˙P(O)(OAlk)2. The present study provides evidence in support of another mechanism for the reactions, oxidative-ion-transfer (OIT). The mechanism involves the change of an acetate group in Mn(OAc)3 for the phosphonate group and oxidation of C60 by the Mn(OAc)2P(O)(OAlk)2 formed to a pair: (C60˙(+), Mn(OAc)2P(O)(OAlk)2˙(-)) followed by the transfer of the phosphonate anion to give the monophposphonylfullerenyl radical. It undergoes reversible dimerization. The polyaddition occurs analogously. Moreover, the compounds Mn(OAc)2P(O)(OAlk)2 (Alk = Et and i-Pr) obtained make novel reagents for phosphonylation of fullerenes working by the OIT mechanism. The reactions of C60 in benzene with equimolar amounts of Mn(OAc)2P(O)(OPr-i)2 or Hg[P(O)(OPr-i)2]2 which is known as working by the FR mechanism since it produces radical ˙P(O)(OPr-i)2 under UV-irradiation, furnished the same radical ˙C60P(O)(OPr-i)2. However, at a 20-fold molar excess of the reagent toward C60, a single derivative C60[P(O)(OPr-i)2]4 and a mixture of derivatives bearing between two and eight phosphonyls were obtained in the former and latter cases, respectively. With C70, the change of the mechanism produced a change in the regioselectivity: 5 and 3 isomers of ˙C70P(O)(OPr-i)2 were obtained, respectively. DFT-calculations provided the hyperfine coupling (hfc) constants of the isomers and explained the regioselectivity change.

  2. Orientation dependence for Br formation in the reaction of oriented OH radical with HBr molecule.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Po-Yu; Che, Dock-Chil; Nakamura, Masaaki; Lin, King-Chuen; Kasai, Toshio

    2011-01-28

    The orientation dependence of Br-atom formation in the reaction of the oriented OH radical with the HBr molecule using the hexapole electrostatic field was studied. Experimental results for the orientation dependence in the reaction were analyzed using a Legendre polynomial fit. The results show two reactive sites. It was found that O-end attack is most favored for this reaction, and that H-end attack also shows a pronounced reactivity. The reactivity of the side-ways attack was found to be small. By comparing the results of the orientation dependence in the reaction with studies of inelastic collisions and theoretical calculations, two reaction pathways are proposed. Reaction by O-end attack is followed by a direct abstraction of the H-atom from the HBr molecule. The mechanism for H-end attack may have H-atom migration from HBr to form the water molecule.

  3. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  4. Lifetimes and reaction pathways of guanine radical cations and neutral guanine radicals in an oligonucleotide in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2012-03-14

    The exposure of guanine in the oligonucleotide 5'-d(TCGCT) to one-electron oxidants leads initially to the formation of the guanine radical cation G(•+), its deptotonation product G(-H)(•), and, ultimately, various two- and four-electron oxidation products via pathways that depend on the oxidants and reaction conditions. We utilized single or successive multiple laser pulses (308 nm, 1 Hz rate) to generate the oxidants CO(3)(•-) and SO(4)(•-) (via the photolysis of S(2)O(8)(2-) in aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, respectively) at concentrations/pulse that were ∼20-fold lower than the concentration of 5'-d(TCGCT). Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy measurements following single-pulse excitation show that the G(•+) radical (pK(a) = 3.9) can be observed only at low pH and is hydrated within 3 ms at pH 2.5, thus forming the two-electron oxidation product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoG). At neutral pH, and single pulse excitation, the principal reactive intermediate is G(-H)(•), which, at best, reacts only slowly with H(2)O and lives for ∼70 ms in the absence of oxidants/other radicals to form base sequence-dependent intrastrand cross-links via the nucleophilic addition of N3-thymidine to C8-guanine (5'-G*CT* and 5'-T*CG*). Alternatively, G(-H)(•) can be oxidized further by reaction with CO(3)(•-), generating the two-electron oxidation products 8-oxoG (C8 addition) and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih, by C5 addition). The four-electron oxidation products, guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), appear only after a second (or more) laser pulse. The levels of all products, except 8-oxoG, which remains at a low constant value, increase with the number of laser pulses.

  5. Temperature-dependent, relative-rate study of the reactions of 1- and 2-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Cassanelli, P.; Cox, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    Alkoxyl radicals (RO\\cdot) are important intermediates in the chains of free radical reactions that constitute the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Generally there are a number of different reaction pathways available to alkoxyl radicals and, depending on conditions of temperature and the structure of RO\\cdot, these may be in competition. The major reactions of RO\\cdot are (1) reaction with O_2 to yield a carbonyl product and a hydroperoxy, HO_2, radical, (2) decomposition to yield a carbonyl product and a radical fragment, and (3) isomerisation via a six-membered transition state to yield a d-hydroxylated radical species. Thus the chemistry of alkoxyl radicals determines the atmospheric impact of the oxidation of a given VOC, in terms of the immediate effects of closed-shell products, and as a result of the further chemistry of free radical products. HO_2 can react with NO to yield photolabile NO_2 (and hence contribute to photochemical ozone formation), and organic radical fragments act to propagate the oxidation chain of reactions. As ozone has been identified to be an important greenhouse gas in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region it is important to understand how temperature affects the relative rates of reactions (1) to (3), and thus how the presence of VOCs in the UTLS region affects the coupled chemistries of HO_x and O_3. In the present study, we have looked at the reactions of 1- and 2-butoxyl radicals (formed in the reaction of OH with butane) in terms of the relative rates of their bimolecular reactions with O_2 (1) and unimolecular processes (2,3). The two butoxyl radicals were studied separately and were formed directly from the photolysis of 1- or 2-butylnitrite. Experiments were carried out using a metre-long photochemical flow cell made of quartz. The temperature of the cell could be controlled and for the experiments carried out in the present study was operated between about 250 and 340 K. Reactant

  6. Contribution of the photo-Fenton reaction to hydroxyl radical formation rates in river and rain water samples.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Ueda, Marina; Shindo, Hirotaka; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH radical) formation rates from the photo-Fenton reaction in river and rain water samples were determined by using deferoxamine mesylate (DFOM), which makes a stable and strong complex with Fe(III), resulting in a suppression of the photo-Fenton reaction. The difference between the OH radical formation rates with and without added DFOM denotes the rate from the photo-Fenton reaction. The photoformation rates from the photo-Fenton reaction were in the range of 0.7 - 45.8 x 10(-12) and 2.7 - 32.3 x 10(-12) M s(-1) in river and rain water samples, respectively. A strong positive correlation between the OH radical formation rate from the photo-Fenton reaction and the amount of fluorescent matter in river water suggests that fluorescent matter, such as humic substances, plays an important role in the photo-Fenton reaction. In rain water, direct photolysis of hydrogen peroxide was an important source of OH radicals as well as the photo-Fenton reaction. The contributions of the photo-Fenton reaction to the OH radical photoformation rates in river and rain water samples were in the ranges of 2 - 29 and 5 - 38%, respectively. Taking into account the photo-Fenton reaction, 33 - 110 (mean: 80) and 42 - 110 (mean: 84)% of OH radical sources in river and rain water samples, respectively, collected in Hiroshima prefecture were elucidated.

  7. Production of sulfate radical and hydroxyl radical by reaction of ozone with peroxymonosulfate: a novel advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Jiang, Jin; Lu, Xinglin; Ma, Jun; Liu, Yongze

    2015-06-16

    In this work, simultaneous generation of hydroxyl radical (•OH) and sulfate radical (SO4•−) by the reaction of ozone (O3) with peroxymonosulfate (PMS; HSO5−) has been proposed and experimentally verified. We demonstrate that the reaction between the anion of PMS (i.e.,SO52−) and O3 is primarily responsible for driving O3 consumption with a measured second order rate constant of (2.12 ± 0.03) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). The formation of both •OH and SO4•− from the reaction between SO52− and O3 is confirmed by chemical probes (i.e., nitrobenzene for •OH and atrazine forb oth •OH and SO4•−). The yields of •OH and SO4•− are determined to be 0.43 ± 0.1 and 0.45 ± 0.1 per mol of O3 consumption, respectively. An adduct,−O3SOO− + O3 → −O3SO5−, is assumed as the first step, which further decomposes into SO5•− and O3•−. The subsequent reaction of SO5•− with O3is proposed to generate SO4•−, while O3•− converts to •OH. A definition of R(ct,•OH) and R(ct,SO4•−) (i.e., respective ratios of •OH and SO4•− exposures to O3 exposure) is adopted to quantify relative contributions of •OH and SO4•−. Increasing pH leads to increases in both values of R(ct,•OH) and R(ct,SO4•−) but does not significantly affect the ratio of R(ct,SO4•−) to R(ct,•OH) (i.e., R(ct,SO4•−)/R(ct,•OH)), which represents the relative formation of SO4•− to •OH. The presence of bicarbonate appreciably inhibits the degradation of probes and fairly decreases the relative contribution of •OH for their degradation, which may be attributed to the conversion of both •OH and SO4•− to the more selective carbonate radical (CO3•−).Humic acid promotes O3 consumption to generate •OH and thus leads to an increase in the R(ct,•OH) value in the O3/PMS process,w hile humic acid has negligible influence on the R(ct,SO4•−) value. This discrepancy is reasonably explained by the negligible effect of humic acid on SO

  8. A resistive pyrolytic radical source for gas-surface reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David Y.; Jobbins, Matthew M.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2012-04-01

    We describe a thermal gas cracker designed to produce low fluxes of gas-phase radicals for use in radical-surface reaction studies. A resistively heated thin piece of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is used as the pyrolysis filament, with the major advantage that this material remains inert at high temperatures. The instrument is built within an existing titanium sublimation pump, which simplifies construction and allows for self-pumping of the radical source. Thermal generation of Cl atoms from Cl2 was chosen to test the effectiveness of the instrument. 35Cl and 37Cl were generated with a concomitant decrease in parent 70Cl2 and 72Cl2 species, as monitored by a residual gas analyzer. The cracking fraction of Cl2 as a function of cell temperature is reported, with nearly full conversion achieved at high temperature.

  9. Atmospheric reactions of gaseous mercury with ozone and hydroxyl radical: Kinetics and product studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswajit, P.; Parisa, A. A.

    2003-05-01

    The dominant form of mercury in the atmosphere is Hg^0. The oxidation processes are of great importance since oxidized mercury undergoes deposition and can become subject to bioaccumulation. Experimental data on the gaseous reactions of elemental mercury are very limited with compare to the reactions of Hg^0 in solutions. We herein carried out kinetic and product studies on the reactions of gaseous Hg^0 with O3 and hydroxyl radical (HO) under near atmospheric pressure (750 ± 1 Torr) and room temperature (298 ± 1 K) in air and N2. O3 was produced in a silent discharge generator (OL 100/SB). Hydroxyl radicals were produced from the photolysis of isopropyl nitrite in the presence of NO. Kinetics of the reactions with O3/HO was studied using absolute and relative techniques by gas chromatography with mass spectroscopic detection (GCMS). The gas phase reaction between elemental Hg^0 with O3 has been studied in different surface-to-volume (s/v) ratios, and evidence for heterogeneous reactions was observed. Existence of mercuric oxide, Hg^0 by the reaction of atomic Hg^0 with O3 has been determined in the gas phase from the suspended aerosols using high temperature mass spectrometry.

  10. Reactions of CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2 radicals with O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ozone was photolyzed at 253.7 nm at 25 and -52 degrees in the presence of CH4 and O2 to measure the reactions of O3 with CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2. The O(1D) atoms produced in the primary photochemical act react with CH4 to give CH3 radicals which in turn can react with O2 to give CH3O2 and CH3O radicals. At very high O2 to O3 concentration ratios, the quantum yield of O3 disappearance approached 1.0, indicating that O3 reactions with CH3O2 and CH3O are slow. Upper limits to the rate coefficients at 25 degrees were computed. At lower values of the concentration ratio, chain decomposition of O3 occurred which could be explained by the reaction of O3 with CH3 radicals to produce CH2O, O2, and H atoms all the time. The two routes to these products are considered, and the preferred reaction channel is found.

  11. Electronic nonadiabatic effects in low temperature radical-radical reactions. I. C(3P) + OH(2Π).

    PubMed

    Maergoiz, A I; Nikitin, E E; Troe, J

    2014-07-28

    The formation of collision complexes, as a first step towards reaction, in collisions between two open-electronic shell radicals is treated within an adiabatic channel approach. Adiabatic channel potentials are constructed on the basis of asymptotic electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions, accounting for spin-orbit coupling within the multitude of electronic states arising from the separated reactants. Suitable coupling schemes (such as rotational + electronic) are designed to secure maximum adiabaticity of the channels. The reaction between C((3)P) and OH((2)Π) is treated as a representative example. The results show that the low temperature association rate coefficients in general cannot be represented by results obtained with a single (generally the lowest) potential energy surface of the adduct, asymptotically reaching the lowest fine-structure states of the reactants, and a factor accounting for the thermal population of the latter states. Instead, the influence of non-Born-Oppenheimer couplings within the multitude of electronic states arising during the encounter markedly increases the capture rates. This effect extends up to temperatures of several hundred K.

  12. Nonclassical aryl radicals: Intermediates or transition states for the hydrogen shift reactions?

    SciTech Connect

    Cioslowski, J.; Liu, G.; Moncrieff, D.

    1996-06-14

    Electronic properties of aryl radicals obtained by removing single hydrogen atoms from the sterically congested regions of benzo[c]phenanthrene, biphenyl, triphenylene, phenanthrene, and perylene are studied at the UBLYP/6-311G** level of theory. Two structures are considered by each radical, the classical one involving a C-H{hor_ellipsis}C arrangement of atoms and the nonclassical one possessing a three-center C-H-C linkage. The five nonclassical radicals under study are found to be transition states for degenerate 1,4- and 1,5-hydrogen shift reactions that interconvert the classical species. However, the results of the present calculations indicate that the nonclassical structures with the C-H distances in the C-H-C linkages shorter than 1.34 {angstrom} should be energy minima representing potentially observable chemical systems. The predicted energy barrier to the 1,5-hydrogen shift in the 1-benzo[c]phenanthrenyl radical is only 9.3 kcal/mol with the zero-point energies included, making the hydrogen migration in this system facile at relatively low temperatures. Rigorous analysis of the computed electronic wave functions provides a clear-cut picture of bonding in both the classical and nonclassical aryl radicals. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Concerted effects of substituents in the reaction of •OH radicals with aromatics: The hydroxybenzaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, Guadalupe; Mendoza, Edith; Schuler, Robert H.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we have examined the distribution of products in the radiolytic hydroxylation of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde to obtain information on the concerted effect of the -CHO and -OH groups at the addition site of •OH radicals. The •OH radical was found to selectively add to the free positions of the aromatic ring. Furthermore, the •OH radical reacts by substitution at the ipso position followed by elimination of the substituent, producing dihydroxybenzene compounds. Additionally, the formation of carboxylic acids as an initial product has been conclusively identified by retention times and UV and mass spectra. These acids are formed as a result of the radiolytic oxidation of the initial radical formed by the addition reaction of the •OH radicals to the meso position (exocyclic carbon). The identification of the products, dihydroxybenzaldehydes, dihydroxybenzenes and hydroxybenzoic acids and calculation of their yields were achieved through HPLC. The G values of each product are given, which reflect the charge distributions in the hydroxybenzaldehydes, such that the formyl group modifies the ortho-para directing effect of the -OH substituent. The 3 and 5 positions in 2- and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde showed increased the electronic density compared to that of phenol, indicating that the formyl group has a significant effect on the electronic structure of those hydroxybenzaldehydes. In 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde, the -OH substituent had a dominant ortho-directing effect similar to that observed for phenol.

  14. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C-H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2016-01-01

    Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C-H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C-H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C-H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C-H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied.

  15. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  16. Characterization of the reaction rate coefficient of DNA with the hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, J.R.; Ward, J.F.; Aguilera, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have measured the yield of single-strand breaks (SSBs) induced by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation in a variety of plasmid DNA substrates ranging in size from 2.7 kb to 38 kb irradiated in aerobic aqueous solution in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Under these conditions DNA SSBs are caused mainly by the hydroxyl radical. Using the competition between DMSO and DNA for the hydroxyl radical, we have estimated the rate coefficient for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with DNA. The results cannot be characterized by conventional steady-state competition kinetics. However, it is possible to describe the second-order rate constant for the reaction as a function of the scavenging capacity of the solution. The second-order rate constant increases with increasing scavenging capacity, rising from about 5x10{sup 8} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 10{sup 5} s{sup -1} to about 10{sup 10} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 10{sup 10} s{sup -1}. This dependence of the second-order rate constant on the scavenging capacity appears to be more pronounced for larger plasmids. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  17. A quantum chemical study on hydrogen radical reactions with methane and silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kota; Kojima, Kuniharu; Kawasaki, Masashi; Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Hirano, Tsuneo; Nakano, Masatake; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1989-03-01

    A quantum chemical study on the reaction of CH4 , CF4 , SiH4 , and SiF4 with a hydrogen radical is performed on the basis of an ab initio molecular orbital calculation to predict the photochemical reactivity of methane, silane, and their analogues. The transition state geometry of the reactions is determined by employing a 3-21G basis set. The total energies of reactant molecules at the initial, transition, and final states are calculated by employing a 6-31G** basis set. The exponential parts of the rate constants of these reactions determined from these energies on the basis of the transition state theory are in good agreement with the experimentally obtained relative rates of the reaction. The present calculation was consistent with the experimental results of photochemical reactions for methane and silane derivatives.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-05-21

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an S{sub N}2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the S{sub N}2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the S{sub N}2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  19. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-05-01

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an SN2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the SN2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the SN2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  20. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  1. Asymmetric Morita-Baylis-Hillman Reaction: Catalyst Development and Mechanistic Insights Based on Mass Spectrometric Back-Reaction Screening.

    PubMed

    Isenegger, Patrick G; Bächle, Florian; Pfaltz, Andreas

    2016-12-05

    An efficient protocol for the evaluation of catalysts for the asymmetric Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction was developed. By mass spectrometric back-reaction screening of quasi-enantiomeric MBH products, an efficient bifunctional phosphine catalyst was identified that outperforms literature-known catalysts in the MBH reaction of methyl acrylate with aldehydes. The close match between the selectivities measured for the forward and back reaction and kinetic measurements provided strong evidence that the aldol step and not the subsequent proton transfer is rate- and enantioselectivity-determining.

  2. Free radicals: how do we stand them? Anaerobic and aerobic free radical (chain) reactions involved in the use of fluorogenic probes and in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Liochev, Stefan I

    2014-01-01

    Biologically significant conclusions have been based on the use of fluorogenic and luminogenic probes for the detection of reactive species. The basic mechanisms of the processes involved have not been satisfactorily elucidated. In the present work, the mechanism of the enzyme and photosensitized oxidation of NAD(P)H by resorufin is analyzed and appears to involve both aerobic and anaerobic free radical chain reactions. There are two major fallouts of this analysis. Many of the conclusions about the participation of radicals based on the use of probes such as resorufin and Amplex red need reevaluation. It is also concluded that anaerobic free radical reactions may be biologically significant, and the possible existence of enzymatic systems to eliminate certain free radicals is discussed.

  3. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B.

    1993-12-01

    To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

  4. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  5. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species and pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1992-08-01

    To extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, we undertook, a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical thermochemical kinetics/ transition-state-theory (TK-TST) procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in cases where the reagent possessed nonequivalent H atoms.

  6. KINETIC STUDIES OF THE REACTION OF HYDROXYL RADICALS WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND TETRACHLOROETHYLENE. (R826169)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate coefficients are reported for the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with C2HCl3 (k1) and C2Cl4 (k2) over an extended temperature range at 740±10 Torr in a He bath gas. These...

  7. Comprehensive mechanistic study of ion pair SN2 reactions of lithium isocyanate and methyl halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying-Xin; Ren, Yi; Wong, Ning-Bew; Chu, San-Yan; Xue, Ying

    The anionic SN2 reactions NCO- + CH3X and ion pair SN2 reactions LiNCO + CH3X (X = F, Cl, Br, and I) at saturated carbon with inversion and retention mechanisms were investigated at the level of MP2/6-311+G(d,p). There are two possible reaction pathways in the anionic SN2 reactions, but eight in the ion pair SN2 reactions. Calculated results suggest that the previously reported T-shaped isomer of lithium isocyanate does not exist. All the retention pathways are not favorable based on the analysis of transition structures. Two possible competitive reaction pathways proceed via two six-member ring inversion transition structures. It is found that there are two steps in the most favorable pathway, in which less stable lithium cyanate should be formed through the isomerization of lithium isocyanate and nucleophilic site (N) subsequently attacks methyl halides from the backside. The thermodynamically and kinetically favorable methyl isocyanate is predicted as major product both in the gas phase anionic and the ion pair SN2 reactions. In addition, good correlations between the overall barriers relative to separated reactants, ?H?ovr , with geometrical looseness parameter %L? and the heterolytic cleavage energies of the C bond X and Li bond N (or Li bond O) bonds are observed for the anionic and ion pair SN2 reactions. The trend of variation of the overall barriers predicts the leaving ability of X increase in the order: F < Cl < Br < I. The polarized continuum model (PCM) has been used to evaluate the solvent effects on the two inversion pathways with six-member transition structures for the reactions of LiNCO + CH3X. The calculations in solution indicate that solvent effects will retard the rate of reactions and the predicted product, methyl isocyanate, is same as the one in the gas phase.

  8. Explaining the Atypical Reaction Profiles of Heme Enzymes with a Novel Mechanistic Hypothesis and Kinetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Baburaj, Arun; Ephraim, Binoy; Pappachan, Febin; Maviliparambathu, Pravitha Parapurathu; Vijayan, Umesh K.; Narayanan, Sivaprasad Valiyaveettil; Periasamy, Kalaiselvi; George, Ebi Ashley; Mathew, Lazar T.

    2010-01-01

    Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP), uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation) of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model) was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the “steady state kinetics” of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates) is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s) affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of “the product of interest” in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of “substrate concentration at maximum observed rate”. The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes. PMID:20498847

  9. Mechanism and stereoselectivity of biologically important oxygenation reactions of the 7-dehydrocholesterol radical.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2013-07-19

    The mechanism of free radical oxygenation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), one of the biologically important sterols, is investigated by using density functional theory. The energetic origin of the product distribution and the stereoelectronic factors involved in various mechanistic pathways are delineated. The addition of triplet molecular oxygen to two types of conjugatively stabilized radicals, generated by the removal of the reactive allylic hydrogens from C9 or C14 positions, respectively denoted as H9 and H14 pathways, is studied. The distortion-interaction analysis of the C-O bond formation transition states suggests that the energetic preference toward the α prochiral face stems from reduced skeletal distortions of the cholesterol backbone as compared to that in the corresponding β prochiral face. This insight derived through a detailed quantitative analysis of the stereocontrolling transition states suggests that the commonly found interpretations solely based on steric interactions between the incoming oxygen and the protruding angular methyl groups (C10, C13 methyls) in the β face calls for adequate refinement. The relative energies of the transition states for molecular oxygen addition to C9, C5, and C14 (where spin densities are higher) and the ensuing products thereof are in agreement with the experimentally reported distribution of oxygenated 7-DHCs.

  10. The Reaction between CH3O2 and OH Radicals: Product Yields and Atmospheric Implications.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Sheps, Leonid; Whalley, Lisa; Heard, Dwayne; Tomas, Alexandre; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2017-02-21

    The reaction between CH3O2 and OH radicals has been shown to be fast and to play an appreciable role for the removal of CH3O2 radials in remote environments such as the marine boundary layer. Two different experimental techniques have been used here to determine the products of this reaction. The HO2 yield has been obtained from simultaneous time-resolved measurements of the absolute concentration of CH3O2, OH, and HO2 radicals by cw-CRDS. The possible formation of a Criegee intermediate has been measured by broadband cavity enhanced UV absorption. A yield of ϕHO2 = (0.8 ± 0.2) and an upper limit for ϕCriegee = 0.05 has been determined for this reaction, suggesting a minor yield of methanol or stabilized trioxide as a product. The impact of this reaction on the composition of the remote marine boundary layer has been determined by implementing these findings into a box model utilizing the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2, and constraining the model for conditions found at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in the remote tropical Atlantic Ocean. Inclusion of the CH3O2+OH reaction into the model results in up to 30% decrease in the CH3O2 radical concentration while the HO2 concentration increased by up to 20%. Production and destruction of O3 are also influenced by these changes, and the model indicates that taking into account the reaction between CH3O2 and OH leads to a 6% decrease of O3.

  11. A QSAR for the hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant: validation, domain of application, and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Tomas

    A large number of anthropogenic organic chemicals are emitted into the troposphere. Reactions with the hydroxyl radical are a dominant removal pathway for most organic compounds, but experimentally determined gas-phase reaction rate constants are only available for about 750 compounds. The lack of experimental data increases the importance of applying quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) to evaluate and predict reactivities. It is generally acknowledged that these empirical relationships are valid only within the same domain for which they were developed. However, model validation is sometimes neglected and the application domain is not always well defined. The purpose of this paper is to outline how validation and domain definition can facilitate the modeling and prediction of the hydroxyl radical reaction rates for a large database. A substantial number of theoretical descriptors (867) were generated from 2D molecular structures for compounds present in the Syracuse Research Corporation's PhysProp Database. A QSAR model was developed for the hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant using a projection-based regression technique, partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model was subsequently validated with an external test set. The main factors of variation could be attributed to two reaction pathways, hydrogen atom abstraction and addition to double bonds or aromatic systems. A set of 17 293 compounds, drawn from the PhysProp Database, was projected onto the PLSR model and 74% were inside the applicability domain. The predicted hydroxyl reaction rates for 25% of these compounds were slow or negligible, with atmospheric half-lives in the range from days to years. Finally, the list of persistent organic compounds was matched against the OECD list of high production volume chemicals (HPVC). Together with the experimental data, nearly three hundred compounds were identified as both persistent and in high volume production.

  12. The reaction between CH3O2 and OH radicals: Product yields and atmospheric implications

    DOE PAGES

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Sheps, Leonid; Whalley, Lisa; ...

    2017-01-25

    The reaction between CH3O2 and OH radicals has been shown to be fast and to play an appreciable role for the removal of CH3O2 radials in remote environments such as the marine boundary layer. Two different experimental techniques have been used here to determine the products of this reaction. The HO2 yield has been obtained from simultaneous time-resolved measurements of the absolute concentration of CH3O2, OH, and HO2 radicals by cw-CRDS. The possible formation of a Criegee intermediate has been measured by broadband cavity enhanced UV absorption. A yield of ΦHO2 = (0.8 ± 0.2) and an upper limit formore » ΦCriegee = 0.05 has been determined for this reaction, suggesting a minor yield of methanol or stabilized trioxide as a product. The impact of this reaction on the composition of the remote marine boundary layer has been determined by implementing these findings into a box model utilizing the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2, and constraining the model for conditions found at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in the remote tropical Atlantic Ocean. Inclusion of the CH3O2+OH reaction into the model results in up to 30% decrease in the CH3O2 radical concentration while the HO2 concentration increased by up to 20%. Finally, production and destruction of O3 are also influenced by these changes, and the model indicates that taking into account the reaction between CH3O2 and OH leads to a 6% decrease of O3.« less

  13. [Spectroscopic measurement of intermediate free radicals of n-heptane in the combustion reaction].

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Chang-hua; Wang, Li-dong; Tang, Hong-chang; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2012-04-01

    Using an intensified spectroscopic detector CCD and a chemical shock tube, transient emission spectra of n-heptane during the reaction process of combustion were measured, with exposure time of 6 micros and a spectral range of 200 - 850 nm Experiments were conducted at an ignition temperature of 1 408 K and pressure of 2.0 atmos, with an initial fuel mole fraction of 1.0% and an equivalence ratio of 1.0. Measured emission bands were determined to be produced by OH, CH and C2 free radicals, which reveals that small OH, CH and C2 radicals are important intermediate products in the combustion process of n-heptane. Time-resolved spectra indicate that radical concentrations of OH, CH and C2 reached their peaks sharply; however, CH and C2 reduced and disappeared rapidly while the duration of OH was much longer in the reaction. This work provides experimental data for understanding the microscopic process and validating the mechanism of n-heptane combustion reaction.

  14. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions.

  15. Reaction between radicals and N-alkoxyamines As coordinated cleavage with fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, E. T.; Shestakov, A. F.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of the enthalpy and activation energy of two reactions with MeO{2/⊙} attacking the CH- and CH2-groups of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidineoxy-2'-butane are performed. It is shown that the cleavage of hydrogen atoms is accompanied by coordinated breaking of N-O-bonds in the former case and C-O-bonds in the latter. Based on the obtained results, a new scheme is proposed for the cyclic mechanism behind the cleavage of chains on nitroxyl radicals in oxidizing hydrocarbons and polymers that agrees with experimental data. At the center of this cyclic mechanism lies the fast exothermic reaction between peroxyl radicals and N-alkoxyamine with the cleavage of H atoms and the coordinated fragmentation of molecules. Using the model of intersecting parabolas, an algorithm for calculating the enthalpies, activation energies, and rate constants of these reactions with the participation of alkyl, alkoxy, aminyl, peroxyl, phenoxyl, thiyl, and hydroxyl radicals is proposed.

  16. Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Cycloalkenes: Formation of Highly Oxidized RO2 Radicals and Their Reactions with NO, NO2, SO2, and Other RO2 Radicals.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Torsten; Richters, Stefanie; Kaethner, Ralf; Voigtländer, Jens; Stratmann, Frank; Sipilä, Mikko; Kulmala, Markku; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-10-15

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with C5-C8 cycloalkenes has been investigated in a free-jet flow system at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 297 ± 1 K. Highly oxidized RO2 radicals bearing at least 5 O atoms in the molecule and their subsequent reaction products were detected in most cases by means of nitrate-CI-APi-TOF mass spectrometry. Starting from a Criegee intermediate after splitting-off an OH-radical, the formation of these RO2 radicals can be explained via an autoxidation mechanism, meaning RO2 isomerization (ROO → QOOH) and subsequently O2 addition (QOOH + O2 → R'OO). Time-dependent RO2 radical measurements concerning the ozonolysis of cyclohexene indicate rate coefficients of the intramolecular H-shifts, ROO → QOOH, higher than 1 s(-1). The total molar yield of highly oxidized products (predominantly RO2 radicals) from C5-C8 cycloalkenes in air is 4.8-6.0% affected with a calibration uncertainty by a factor of about two. For the most abundant RO2 radical from cyclohexene ozonolysis, O,O-C6H7(OOH)2O2 ("O,O" stands for two O atoms arising from the ozone attack), the determination of the rate coefficients of the reaction with NO2, NO, and SO2 yielded (1.6 ± 0.5) × 10(-12), (3.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-11), and <10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The reaction of highly oxidized RO2 radicals with other peroxy radicals (R'O2) leads to detectable accretion products, RO2 + R'O2 → ROOR' + O2, which allows to acquire information on peroxy radicals not directly measurable with the nitrate ionization technique applied here. Additional experiments using acetate as the charger ion confirm conclusively the existence of highly oxidized RO2 radicals and closed-shell products. Other reaction products, detectable with this ionization technique, give a deeper insight in the reaction mechanism of cyclohexene ozonolysis.

  17. Histidinyl radical formation in the self-peroxidation reaction of bovine copper-zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Michael R; Peters, J Andrew; Sivaneri, Meena K

    2002-03-15

    In the absence of suitable oxidizable substrates, the peroxidase reaction of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD) oxidizes SOD itself, ultimately resulting in its inactivation. A SOD-centered free radical adduct of 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) was detected upon incubation of SOD with the spin trap and a hydroperoxide (either H(2)O(2) or peracetic acid). Proteolysis by Pronase converted the anisotropic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of MNP/(center dot)SOD to a nearly isotropic spectrum with resolved hyperfine couplings to several atoms with non-zero nuclear spin. Authentic histidinyl radical (from histidine + HO(center dot)) formed a MNP adduct with a very similar EPR spectrum to that of the Pronase-treated MNP/(center dot)SOD, suggesting that the latter was centered on a histidine residue. An additional hyperfine coupling was detected when histidine specifically (13)C-labeled at C-2 of the imidazole ring was used, providing evidence for trapping at that atom. All of the experimental spectra were convincingly simulated assuming hyperfine couplings to 2 nearly equivalent nitrogen atoms and 2 different protons, also consistent with trapping at C-2 of the imidazole ring. Free histidinyl radical consumed oxygen, implying peroxyl radical formation. MNP-inhibitable oxygen consumption was also observed when cuprous SOD but not cupric SOD was added to a H(2)O(2) solution. Formation of 2-oxohistidine, the stable product of the SOD-hydroperoxide reaction, required oxygen and was inhibited by MNP. These results support formation of a transient SOD-peroxyl radical.

  18. Intramolecular Oxyl Radical Coupling Promotes O-O Bond Formation in a Homogeneous Mononuclear Mn-based Water Oxidation Catalyst: A Computational Mechanistic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Crandell, Douglas W; Xu, Song; Smith, Jeremy M; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2017-04-04

    The mechanism of water oxidation performed by a recently discovered manganese pyridinophane catalyst [Mn(Py2N(t)Bu2)(H2O)2](2+) is studied using density functional theory methods. A complete catalytic cycle is constructed and the catalytically active species is identified to consist of a Mn(V)-bis(oxo) moiety that is generated from the resting state by a series of proton-coupled electron transfer reactions. Whereas the electronic ground state of this key intermediate is found to be a triplet, the most favorable pathway for O-O bond formation is found on the quintet potential energy surface and involves an intramolecular coupling of two oxyl radicals with opposite spins bound to the Mn-center that adopts an electronic structure most consistent formally with a high-spin Mn(III) ion. Therefore, the thermally accessible high-spin quintet state that constitutes a typical and innate property of a first-row transition metal center plays a critical role for catalysis. It enables facile electron transfer between the oxo moieties and the Mn-center and promotes O-O bond formation via a radical coupling reaction with a calculated reaction barrier of only 14.7 kcal mol(-1). This mechanism of O-O coupling is unprecedented and provides a novel possible pathway to coupling two oxygen atoms bound to a single metal site.

  19. Reaction of peroxide radicals with methane on the titanium oxide surface: Effects of the composition of the initial mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, H. A.; Manucharova, L. A.; Tsarukyan, S. V.; Vardanyan, I. A.

    2011-03-01

    The reaction of TiO2-adsorbed methyl peroxide radicals with methane, accompanied by transfer of the products into the gas phase at ˜20°C, was studied by the kinetic methods and EPR spectroscopy. In a definite range of methane concentrations, the reaction was accompanied by an increase in the total concentration of free radicals; i.e., these active species became not only regenerated, but also multiplied. The increase in the number of peroxide radicals was explained by the chain consumption of methane initiated by the reaction being studied.

  20. UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lewei; Huang, Hongli; Yang, Chao; Xia, Wujiong

    2015-02-20

    UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through an aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift has been described. The resulted aroyl radical from a photocleavage reaction added to acrylamide compounds followed by cyclization led to the formation of oxindoles, whereas the addition to cinnamic amides aroused a unique 1,4-aryl shift reaction. Furthermore, the difunctionalization of alkenes of prop-2-en-1-ols was also achieved through aroyl radical addition and a sequential 1,2-aryl shift cascade reaction.

  1. Water-catalyzed gas-phase reaction of formic acid with hydroxyl radical: A computational investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Maeda, Satoshi; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-02-01

    The reaction of formic acid with hydroxyl radical, which is considered to be relevant to atmospheric chemistry, has been extensively studied. A water-catalyzed process of this reaction is computationally studied here for the first time. The scaled hypersphere search method was used for global exploration of pre-reaction complexes. Calculations were performed at high level of theory, such as CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-311+G(2df, 2p) and CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ. It is found that the water-catalyzed process of this reaction is more kinetically favorable than its non-catalytic process. Such catalytic process may also be of interest for atmospheric chemistry, like the non-catalytic one.

  2. Kinetics of the C-C bond beta scission reactions in alkyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, Artur

    2011-09-07

    High pressure limits of thermal rate constants of four C-C bond beta scission reactions of propyl, 1-butyl, 2-butyl and isobutyl radicals were calculated using the canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with a multi-dimensional small-curvature tunneling (SCT) correction over the temperature range of 300-3000 K. The CCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ//BH&HLYP/cc-pVDZ method was used to provide necessary potential energy surface information. Rate constants for these reactions were used to extrapolate rate constants for reactions in larger alkyls where experimental data are available using the Reaction Class Transition State Theory (RC-TST). Excellent agreement with experimental data confirms the validity of the RC-TST methodology and the accuracy of the calculated kinetic data in this study.

  3. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Alkylation Reactions: Catalyst Development, Substrate Scope, and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Behenna, Douglas C.; Mohr, Justin T.; Sherden, Nathaniel H.; Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Harned, Andrew M.; Tani, Kousuke; Seto, Masaki; Ma, Sandy; Novák, Zoltán; Krout, Michael R.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Roizen, Jennifer L.; Enquist, John A.; White, David E.; Levine, Samantha R.; Petrova, Krastina V.; Iwashita, Akihiko; Virgil, Scott C.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Quaternary ketones are accessed through novel enantioselective alkylations of allyl and propargyl electrophiles by unstabilized prochiral enolate nucleophiles in the presence of palladium complexes with various phosphinooxazoline (PHOX) ligands. Excellent yields and high enantiomeric excesses are obtained from three classes of enolate precursors: enol carbonates, enol silanes, and racemic β-ketoesters. Each of these substrate classes functions with nearly identical efficiency in terms of yield and enantioselectivity. Catalyst discovery and development, the optimization of reaction conditions, the exploration of reaction scope, and applications in target-directed synthesis are reported. Experimental observations suggest that these alkylation reactions occur through an unusual inner-sphere mechanism involving binding of the prochiral enolate nucleophile directly to the palladium center. PMID:22083969

  4. Atmospheric chemistry of hydrazoic acid (HN3): UV absorption spectrum, HO reaction rate, and reactions of the N3 radical.

    PubMed

    Orlando, John J; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Betterton, Eric A; Lowry, Joe; Stegall, Steve T

    2005-03-15

    Processes related to the tropospheric lifetime and fate of hydrazoic acid, HN3, have been studied. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HN3 is shown to possess a maximum near 262 nm with a tail extending to at least 360 nm. The photolysis quantum yield for HN3 is shown to be approximately 1 at 351 nm. Using the measured spectrum and assuming unity quantum yield throughout the actinic region, a diurnally averaged photolysis lifetime near the earth's surface of 2-3 days is estimated. Using a relative rate method, the rate coefficient for reaction of HO with HN3 was found to be (3.9 +/-0.8) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), substantially larger than the only previous measurement. The atmospheric HN3 lifetime with respect to HO oxidation is thus about 2-3 days, assuming a diurnally averaged [HO] of 10(6) molecule cm(-3). Reactions of N3, the product of the reaction of HO with HN3, were studied in an environmental chamber using an FTIR spectrometer for end-product analysis. The N3 radical reacts efficiently with NO, producing N2O with 100% yield. Reaction of N3 with NO2 appears to generate both NO and N2O, although the rate coefficient for this reaction is slower than that for reaction with NO. No evidence for reaction of N3 with CO was observed, in contrast to previous literature data. Reaction of N3 with O2 was found to be extremely slow, k < 6 x 10(-20) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), although this upper limit does not necessarily rule out its occurrence in the atmosphere. Finally, the rate coefficient for reaction of Cl with HN3 was measured using a relative rate method, k = (1.0+/-0.2) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1).

  5. Enantioselective Visible-Light-Induced Radical-Addition Reactions to 3-Alkylidene Indolin-2-ones.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Dominik; Bauer, Andreas; Pöthig, Alexander; Bach, Thorsten

    2016-05-04

    The title compounds underwent a facile and high-yielding addition reaction (19 examples, 66-99% yield) with various N-(trimethylsilyl)methyl-substituted amines upon irradiation with visible light and catalysis by a metal complex. If the alkylidene substituent is non-symmetric and if the reaction is performed in the presence of a chiral hydrogen-bonding template, products are obtained with significant enantioselectivity (58-72% ee) as a mixture of diastereoisomers. Mechanistic studies suggest a closed catalytic cycle for the photoactive metal complex. However, the silyl transfer from the amine occurs not only to the product, but also to the substrate, and interferes with the desired chirality transfer.

  6. Nickel-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation with Diarylmethane Pronucleophiles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sheng-Chun; Jiang, Hui; Mao, Jianyou; Bellomo, Ana; Jeong, Soo A; Walsh, Patrick J

    2016-01-18

    Palladium-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions are among the most efficient methods to construct C-C bonds between sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms. In contrast, much less work has been done with nickel catalysts, perhaps because of the different mechanisms of the allylic substitution reactions. Palladium catalysts generally undergo substitution by a "soft"-nucleophile pathway, wherein the nucleophile attacks the allyl group externally. Nickel catalysts are usually paired with "hard" nucleophiles, which attack the metal before C-C bond formation. Introduced herein is a rare nickel-based catalyst which promotes substitution with diarylmethane pronucleophiles by the soft-nucleophile pathway. Preliminary studies on the asymmetric allylic alkylation are promising.

  7. Empirical Force Fields for Mechanistic Studies of Chemical Reactions in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, A K; Meuwly, M

    2016-01-01

    Following chemical reactions in atomistic detail is one of the most challenging aspects of current computational approaches to chemistry. In this chapter the application of adiabatic reactive MD (ARMD) and its multistate version (MS-ARMD) are discussed. Both methods allow to study bond-breaking and bond-forming processes in chemical and biological processes. Particular emphasis is put on practical aspects for applying the methods to investigate the dynamics of chemical reactions. The chapter closes with an outlook of possible generalizations of the methods discussed.

  8. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  9. Proton-electron transfer pathways in the reactions of peroxyl and dpph˙ radicals with hydrogen-bonded phenols.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Menichetti, Stefano; Viglianisi, Caterina; Foti, Mario C

    2012-12-18

    The kinetics of the reaction of peroxyl and dpph˙ radicals with phenols H-bonded to N-bases have been studied for the first time. Electron-transfer processes are observed in MeCN but only with the dpph˙ radical.

  10. Lewis acid-Lewis acid heterobimetallic cooperative catalysis: mechanistic studies and application in enantioselective aza-Michael reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Noriyuki; Qin, Hongbo; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2005-09-28

    The full details of a catalytic asymmetric aza-Michael reaction of methoxylamine promoted by rare earth-alkali metal heterobimetallic complexes are described, demonstrating the effectiveness of Lewis acid-Lewis acid cooperative catalysis. First, enones were used as substrates, and the 1,4-adducts were obtained in good yield (57-98%) and high ee (81-96%). Catalyst loading was successfully reduced to 0.3-3 mol % with enones. To broaden the substrate scope of the reaction to carboxylic acid derivatives, alpha,beta-unsaturated N-acylpyrroles were used as monodentate, carboxylic acid derivatives. With beta-alkyl-substituted N-acylpyrroles, the reaction proceeded smoothly and the products were obtained in high yield and good ee. Transformation of the 1,4-adducts from enones and alpha,beta-unsaturated N-acylpyrroles afforded corresponding chiral aziridines and beta-amino acids. Detailed mechanistic studies, including kinetics, NMR analysis, nonlinear effects, and rare earth metal effects, are also described. The Lewis acid-Lewis acid cooperative mechanism, including the substrate coordination mode, is discussed in detail.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespade, Laure

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car-Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  12. Kinetics and products study of the reaction of BrO radicals with gaseous mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raofie, F.; Ariya, P. A.

    2003-05-01

    Bro reactions of elemental mercury was as a major candidate for near complete depletion of elemental mercury in polar region. The kinetics of the reaction between BrO radicals with gaseous mercury was identified using relative rate method by Gas Chromatography with Mass spectroscopic Detection (GC-MS) at room temperature (298±1 K) and at atmospheric pressure 760 ± 1 Torr in the N_2 diluent. Propane, DMS and butane were used as reference molecules. The upper and lower limits rate constant for reaction of Hg^0 with BrO was estimated to be 1.0 × 10^{-13} and 1.0 × 10^{15} cm^3 molecules^{-1} s^{-1}, respectively. BrO radicals were produced from the photolysis of bromine and dibromomethane in presence of ozone and detected by MS at m/e = 95 or 97. Ozone was produced in a Silent discharged generator. Reaction products were identified using direct mass spectrometer with chemical ionization ion source.

  13. Gas-Phase Reaction of Hydroxyl Radical with p-Cymene over an Extended Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Bedjanian, Yuri; Morin, Julien; Romanias, Manolis N

    2015-11-12

    The kinetics of the reaction of OH radicals with p-cymene has been studied in the temperature range of 243-898 K using a flow reactor combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + p-cymene → products. The reaction rate constant was determined as a result of absolute measurements, from OH decay kinetics in excess of p-cymene and employing the relative rate method with OH reactions with n-pentane, n-heptane,1,3-dioxane, HBr, and Br2 as the reference ones. For the rate coefficient of the H atom abstraction channel, the expression k1b = (3.70 ± 0.42) × 10(-11) exp[-(772 ± 72)/T] was obtained over the temperature range of 381-898 K. The total rate constant (addition + abstraction) determined at T = 243-320 K was k1 = (1.82 ± 0.48) × 10(-12) exp[(607 ± 70)/T] or, in a biexponential form, k1 = k1a + k1b = 3.7 × 10(-11) exp(-772/T) + 6.3 × 10(-13) exp(856/T), independent of the pressure between 1 and 5 Torr of helium. In addition, our results indicate that the reaction pathway involving alkyl radical elimination upon initial addition of OH to p-cymene is most probably unimportant.

  14. Gas-phase reactions of organic radicals and diradicals with ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Bierbaum, Veronica M; Ellison, G Barney; Kato, Shuji

    2004-02-22

    Reactions of polyatomic organic radicals with gas phase ions have been studied at thermal energy using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument. A supersonic pyrolysis nozzle produces allyl radical (CH2CHCH2) and ortho-benzyne diradical (o-C6H4) for reaction with ions. We have observed: [CH2CHCH2 + H3O+ --> C3H6+ + H2O], [CH2CHCH2 + HO- --> no ion products], [o-C6H4 + H3O+ --> C6H5+ + H2O], and [o-C6H4 + HO- --> C6H3- + H2O]. The proton transfer reactions with H3O+ occur at nearly every collision (kII approximately with 10(-9) cm3 s(-1)). The exothermic proton abstraction for o-C6H4 + HO- is unexpectedly slow (kII approximately with 10(-10) cm3 s(-1)). This has been rationalized by competing associative detachment: o-C6H4 + HO- --> C6H5O + e-. The allyl + HO- reaction proceeds presumably via similar detachment pathways.

  15. Investigation of terpinolene + ozone or terpinolene + nitrate radical reaction products using denuder/filter apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Joel C.; Wells, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Terpinolene’s (1-methyl-4-(propan-2-ylidene)cyclohexene) reaction with ozone or the nitrate radical was investigated using a denuder/filter apparatus in order to characterize gas-phase and particulate reaction products. Identification of the reaction products (i.e., aldehydes, ketones, dicarbonyls and carboxylic acids) was made using two derivatization methods; O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) to derivatize the carbonyl products or 3-Ethyl-1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine hydrochloride (TFEA) to derivatize the carboxylic acid products. Proposed carbonyl products for ozonolysis of terpinolene are: 4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, 2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, 3-oxobutanal, and 6-oxo-3-(propan-2-ylidene)heptanal. Proposed carbonyl products for nitrate radical reaction of terpinolene are: 2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, and 4-oxopentanal. No carboxylic acid products were detected with either oxidizing reactant. PMID:26527171

  16. Investigation of terpinolene + ozone or terpinolene + nitrate radical reaction products using denuder/filter apparatus.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joel C; Wells, J R

    2013-12-01

    Terpinolene's (1-methyl-4-(propan-2-ylidene)cyclohexene) reaction with ozone or the nitrate radical was investigated using a denuder/filter apparatus in order to characterize gas-phase and particulate reaction products. Identification of the reaction products (i.e., aldehydes, ketones, dicarbonyls and carboxylic acids) was made using two derivatization methods; O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) to derivatize the carbonyl products or 3-Ethyl-1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine hydrochloride (TFEA) to derivatize the carboxylic acid products. Proposed carbonyl products for ozonolysis of terpinolene are: 4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, 2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, 3-oxobutanal, and 6-oxo-3-(propan-2-ylidene)heptanal. Proposed carbonyl products for nitrate radical reaction of terpinolene are: 2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, and 4-oxopentanal. No carboxylic acid products were detected with either oxidizing reactant.

  17. Investigation of terpinolene + ozone or terpinolene + nitrate radical reaction products using denuder/filter apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Joel C.; Wells, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Terpinolene's (1-methyl-4-(propan-2-ylidene)cyclohexene) reaction with ozone or the nitrate radical was investigated using a denuder/filter apparatus in order to characterize gas-phase and particulate reaction products. Identification of the reaction products (i.e., aldehydes, ketones, dicarbonyls and carboxylic acids) was made using two derivatization methods; O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) to derivatize the carbonyl products or 3-Ethyl-1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine hydrochloride (TFEA) to derivatize the carboxylic acid products. Proposed carbonyl products for ozonolysis of terpinolene are: 4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, 2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, 3-oxobutanal, and 6-oxo-3-(propan-2-ylidene)heptanal. Proposed carbonyl products for nitrate radical reaction of terpinolene are: 2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, and 4-oxopentanal. No carboxylic acid products were detected with either oxidizing reactant.

  18. Mechanistic study on the replacement reaction between silver nanostructures and chloroauric acid in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang; Xia, Younan

    2004-03-31

    The replacement reaction between silver nanostructures and an aqueous HAuCl(4) solution has recently been demonstrated as a versatile method for generating metal nanostructures with hollow interiors. Here we describe the results of a systematic study detailing the morphological, structural, compositional, and spectral changes involved in such a heterogeneous reaction on the nanoscale. Two distinctive steps have been resolved through a combination of microscopic and spectroscopic methods. In the first step, silver nanostructure (i.e., the template) is dissolved to generate gold atoms that are deposited epitaxially on the surface of each template. Silver atoms also diffuse into the gold shell (or sheath) to form a seamless, hollow nanostructure with its wall made of Au-Ag alloys. The second step involves dealloying, a process that selectively removes silver atoms from the alloyed wall, induces morphological reconstruction, and finally leads to the formation of pinholes in the walls. Reaction temperature was found to play an important role in the replacement reaction because the solubility constant of AgCl and the diffusion coefficients of Ag and Au atoms were both strongly dependent on this parameter. This work has enabled us to prepare metal nanostructures with controllable geometric shapes and structures, and thus optical properties (for example, the surface plasmon resonance peaks could be readily shifted from 500 to 1200 nm by controlling the ratio between Ag and HAuCl(4)).

  19. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase. Mechanistic studies of the 1'-4 coupling reaction with 2-fluorogeranyl pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Poulter, C D; Argyle, J C; Mash, E A

    1978-10-25

    The mechanism of the 1'-4 coupling reaction between isopentenyl pyrophosphate and geranyl pyrophosphate catalyzed by farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase from porcine liver was studied with the allylic substrate analogue 2-fluorogeranyl pyrophosphate. 2-Fluorogeranyl pyrophosphate is an alternate substrate for the enzyme, yielding 6-fluorofarnesyl pyrophosphate upon condensation with isopentenyl pyrophosphate. The Michaelis constant for the fluoroanalogue, Km = 1.1 micron, is similar to that measured for geranyl pyrophosphate, Km = 0.7 micron. However, the rate of condensation with the fluoroanalogue was only 8.4 X 10(-4) that of the normal reaction. A similar rate of depression (4.4 X 10(-3)) was found for solvolysis of geranyl methanesulfonate and the corresponding 2-fluoro derivative, reactions known to proceed via cationic intermediates. In contrast, displacement of chlorine from geranyl chloride and 2-fluorogeranyl chloride by cyanide showed a small (2-fold) rate enhancement for the fluoro compound. Finally, 2-fluorogeranyl pyrophosphate is a competitive inhibitor against geranyl pyrophosphate. These data are interpreted in terms of an ionization-condensation-elimination mechanism for the 1'-4 coupling reaction.

  20. Kinetic and mechanistic study of the atmospheric reaction of MBO331 with Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Diana; Rodríguez, Ana; Garzón, Andrés; Granadino-Roldán, José M.; Soto, Amparo; Aranda, Alfonso; Notario, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    The present work deals with the reaction of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (MBO331) with Cl atoms, which has been investigated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) at atmospheric pressure in N2 or air, using the relative rate technique. The rate constant reaction at 298 ± 1 K was found to be (5.01 ± 0.70) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, using cyclohexane, octane and 1-butene as a reference compounds. The temperature dependence for the reaction was studied within the 298-333 K range. Additionally, a product identification under atmospheric conditions has been performed for the first time by GC-MS, with 3-methyl-3-butenal, methacrolein and chloroacetone being observed as degradation products. A theoretical study on the reaction at the QCISD(T)/6-311G**//MP2/6-311G** level was also carried out to obtain more information on the mechanism. From the theoretical study it can be predicted that Cl addition to the double bond proceeds through lower energy barriers than H-abstraction pathways and therefore is energetically favoured. Finally, atmospheric implications of the results obtained are discussed.

  1. INTERACTIONS OF LIGHT AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN THE AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT: KINETIC AND MECHANISTIC ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that reaches the surface of aquatic environments. Recent studies have demonstrated that these UV increases cause changes in photochemical reactions that affect the...

  2. Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J.; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Vereecken, Luc; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-12-05

    The reactions of the methylidyne radical (CH) with ethylene, acetylene, allene, and methylacetylene are studied at room temperature using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and time-resolved mass spectrometry. The CH radicals are prepared by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr3 at 298 K and react with the selected hydrocarbon in a helium gas flow. Analysis of photoionization efficiency versus VUV photon wavelength permits isomer-specific detection of the reaction products and allows estimation of the reaction product branching ratios. The reactions proceed by either CH insertion or addition followed by H atom elimination from the intermediate adduct. In the CH + C2H4 reaction the C3H5 intermediate decays by H atom loss to yield 70(+-8)percent allene, 30(+-8)percent methylacetylene and less than 10percent cyclopropene, in agreement with previous RRKM results. In the CH + acetylene reaction, detection of mainly the cyclic C3H2 isomer is contrary to a previous RRKM calculation that predicted linear triplet propargylene to be 90percent of the total H-atom co-products. High-level CBS-APNO quantum calculations and RRKM calculation for the CH + C2H2 reaction presented in this manuscript predict a higher contribution of the cyclic C3H2 (27.0percent) versus triplet propargylene (63.5percent) than these earlier predictions. Extensive calculations on the C3H3 and C3H2D system combined with experimental isotope ratios for the CD + C2H2 reaction indicate that H-atom assisted isomerization in the present experiments is responsible for the discrepancy between the RRKM calculations and the experimental results. Cyclic isomers are also found to represent 30(+-6)percent of the detected products in the case of CH + methylacetylene, together with 33(+-6)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 37(+-6)percent vinylacetylene. The CH + allene reaction gives 23(+-5)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 77(+-5)percent vinylacetylene, whereas cyclic isomers are produced below the detection limit

  3. On the reaction of lupulones, hops β-acids, with 1-hydroxyethyl radical.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Natália E C; do Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2012-10-24

    Lupulones, hops β-acids, are one of the main constituents of the hops resin and have an important contribution to the overall bacteriostatic activity of hops during beer brewing. The use of lupulones as natural alternatives to antibiotics is increasing in the food industry and also in bioethanol production. However, lupulones are easy oxidizable and have been shown to be very reactive toward 1-hydroxyethyl radical with apparent bimolecular rate constants close to diffusion control k = 2.9 × 10(8) and 2.6 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1) at 25.0 ± 0.2 °C in ethanol-water solution (10% of ethanol (v/v)) as probed by EPR and ESI-IT-MS/MS spin-trapping competitive kinetics, respectively. The free energy change for an electron-transfer mechanism is ΔG° = 106 kJ/mol as calculated from the oxidation peak potential experimentally determined for lupulones (1.1 V vs NHE) by cyclic voltammetry and the reported reduction potential for 1-hydroxyethyl radical. The major reaction products identified by LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS and ultrahigh-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (orbitrap FT-MS) are hydroxylated lupulone derivatives and 1-hydroxyethyl radical adducts. The lack of pH dependence for the reaction rate constant, the calculated free energy change for electron transfer, and the main reaction products strongly suggest the prenyl side chains at the hops β-acids as the reaction centers rather than the β,β'-triketone moiety.

  4. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics of the iminovinylidene radical with NO: Ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Ming-Kai; Chung, Yi-Hua; Hung, Yu-Ming; Chen, Hui-Lung

    2014-05-28

    The nitric oxide (NO) is a notorious compound for polluting environment. Recent year, removing nitric oxide from the atmosphere becomes a focus of the investigation. In our work, we study the iminovinylidene (HNCC) radical reacted with NO molecule. The mechanism and kinetic for reaction of the HNCC radical with the NO molecule is investigated via considering the possible channels of the N and O atoms of NO attacking the N and C atoms of the HNCC based on the high level ab initio molecular orbital calculations in conjunction with variational TST and RRKM calculations. The species involved have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level and their single-point energies are refined by the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-PVQZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) method. The calculated potential energy surfaces indicated that energetically the most favorable channel for the HNCC + NO reaction was predicted to be the formation of HNC+CNO (P8) product via the addition reaction of the C atom of HNCC radical and the N atom of NO with the head to head orientation. To rationalize the scenario of the calculated results, we also employ the Fukui functions and HSAB theory to seek for a possible explanation. In addition, the reaction rate constants were calculated using VariFlex code, and the results show that the total rate coefficient, k{sub total}, at Ar pressure 760 Torr can be represented with an equation: k{sub total} = 6.433 × 10{sup −11} T {sup 0.100} exp(0.275 kcal mol{sup −1}/RT) at T = 298–3000 K, in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  5. EPR and NMR detection of transient radicals and reaction products. [Radiolysis of methanol and aqueous potassium acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic resonance methods in radiation chemistry are illustrated. The most recent developments in pulsed EPR and NMR studies in pulse radiolysis are outlined with emphasis on the study of transient radicals and their reaction products. 12 figures.

  6. Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol (aqSOA) Formation By Radical Reactions: Model Studies Comparing the Role of OH Versus Organic Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Reed Harris, A.; Vaida, V.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical reactions in the aqueous phase are thought to significantly contribute to ambient aerosol mass under specific conditions. Results from many laboratory studies suggest that these reactions are efficiently initiated by the OH radical and lead to high molecular weight compounds (oligomers). Recent laboratory experiments have shown that methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) can form oligomers in high yield in aqueous solutions similar to aerosol water. Additional experiments have shown that the direct photolysis of pyruvic acid can generate organic radicals that initiate similar oligomer products upon oxidation of MVK (Renard et al., submitted). Sources of the OH radical in the aerosol aqueous phase include the direct uptake from the gas phase, Fenton reactions and, to a smaller extent, direct photolyses of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate. Recent model studies imply that under many conditions, aqSOA formation might be oxidant-limited since these OH(aq) sources are not sufficient to provide a continuous OH supply. This limitation can be (partially) removed if additional radical sources in the multiphase system are considered. Exemplary, we include the direct photolysis of aqueous pyruvic acid as a proxy for possible other radical sources. Model results will be shown and consequences for aqSOA formation and processing under ambient conditions will be discussed.

  7. Detection of free radicals from low temperature ozone-olefin reactions by ESR spin trapping: evidence that the radical precursor is a trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.; Prier, D.G.; Church, D.F.

    1983-05-04

    Free radicals are detected fom the low-temperature ozonation of a series of olefins by using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trap method. The technique involves ozonation at -78/sup 0/C in Freon-11, blowing out the ozone with an inert gas, adding the spin trap at -78/sup 0/C, and then warming the solution while in the probe of the ESR spectrometer. A series of small olefins was examined, and tetramethylethylene (TME) and 2-methyl-2-pentene (2-MP) gave the highest yield of radicals. However, even thse two olefins give yields of radicals that are less than 1% on the basis of ozone consumed. Thus, our data indicate that while the nonradical Criegee ozonation process is the principal reaction for monoolefins, radical production is a significant side reaction. The temperature dependence of the appearance of spin adducts from both TME and 2-MP shows that the radical precursor in this case is a trioxidic species; specifically, we suggest that it is an alkyl hydrotroxide, ROOOH. We propose the ROOOH is formed by allylic hydride abstraction from the olefin by ozone to give a pair of caged ions that combine to form the trioxide. (Benson has proposed a similar hydride abstraction for alkanes and several other types of compounds.) The reaction may proceed through a charge-transfer complex of the olefin and ozone as an intermediate.

  8. Kinetic and mechanistic study of the reaction of atomic chlorine with dimethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Stickel, R.E.; Nicovich, J.M.; Wang, S.; Zhao, Z.; Wine, P.H.

    1992-11-26

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of Cl({sup 2}P{sub J}) following 266-nm laser flash photolysis of Cl{sub 2}CO/CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 3}(DMS)/N{sub 2} mixtures has been employed to study the kinetics of the title reaction over the temperature and pressure ranges 240-421 K and 3-700 Torr. The reaction is found to be very fast, occurring on essentially every Cl({sup 2}P{sub J}) + DMS encounter. The reaction rate increases with decreasing temperature and shows a significant pressure dependence. At 297 K, for example, the rate coefficient increases from a low-pressure limit value of approximately 1.8 x 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} to a value of (3.3 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at P = 700 Torr. A few experiments were carried out with CD{sub 3}SCD{sub 3} or C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SC{sub 2}H{sub 5} replacing DMS as the sulfide reactant; within experimental uncertainty, no dependence of the rate coefficient on the identity of the sulfide reactant was observed. In a separate study, time-resolved tunable diode laser spectroscopic detection of HCl has been coupled with 248-nm laser flash photolysis of Cl{sub 2}CO/DMS/CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures to measure the HCl product yield from the title reaction as a function of pressure at T = 297 K. The HCl yield approaches unity as P {yields} 0 but decreases with increasing pressure to a value of {approximately}0.5 at P = 203 Torr. The yield experiments demonstrate that hydrogen abstraction is the dominant reaction mechanism in the low-pressure limit. With increasing pressure, stabilization of a (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SCl adduct apparently becomes competitive with the hydrogen abstraction pathway. The potential role of the title reaction in marine atmospheric chemistry is discussed. 59 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-07-28

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a “proof of principle” for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C{sup ·+}PF{sup ·−} radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical.

  10. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a "proof of principle" for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C.+PF.- radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical.

  11. Kinetics of 1,4-hydrogen migration in the alkyl radical reaction class.

    PubMed

    Bankiewicz, Barbara; Huynh, Lam K; Ratkiewicz, Artur; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-02-26

    The kinetics of the 1,4-intramolecular hydrogen migration in the alkyl radicals reaction class has been studied using reaction class transition-state theory combined with the linear energy relationship (LER) and barrier height grouping (BHG) approach. The rate constants for the reference reaction of n-C(4)H(9) were obtained by canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with the small curvature tunnelling (SCT) correction in the temperature range 300-3000 K with potential-energy surface information computed at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ//BH&HLYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory. Error analyses indicate that RC-TST/LER, where only reaction energy is needed, and RC-TST/BHG, where no other information is needed, can predict rate constants for any reaction in this reaction class with excellent accuracy. Specifically, for this reaction class the RC-TST/LER method has less than 65% systematic errors in the predicted rate constants, while the RC-TST/BHG method has less than 80% error when compared to explicit rate calculations.

  12. Partial reactions and chemical rescue of site-directed mutants of Rubisco as mechanistic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harpel, M.R.; Larimer, F.W.; Lee, E.H.; Mural, R.J.; Smith, H.B.; Soper, T.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    Given the current state of knowledge of the reaction pathways catalyzed by D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of several different forms of the enzyme, sit-directed mutagenesis offers the potential to decipher catalytic roles of active-site residues and to unravel the functional significance of various structural elements. Especially intriguing are intersubunit, electrostatic interactions at the active site between Glu48 and Lys168 of the nonactivated (noncarbamylated) enzyme and between Glu48 and Lys329 of the activated (carbamylated) enzyme. In this paper, we describe two approaches to address the roles of electrostatic interactions at the active site and the roles of the participant residues: (1) characterization of pertinent site-directed mutants, including their abilities to catalyze partial reactions and (2) subtle alteration of the active-site microenvironment by manipulation of these proteins with exogenous reagents.

  13. Partial reactions and chemical rescue of site-directed mutants of Rubisco as mechanistic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harpel, M.R.; Larimer, F.W.; Lee, E.H.; Mural, R.J.; Smith, H.B.; Soper, T.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1991-12-31

    Given the current state of knowledge of the reaction pathways catalyzed by D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of several different forms of the enzyme, sit-directed mutagenesis offers the potential to decipher catalytic roles of active-site residues and to unravel the functional significance of various structural elements. Especially intriguing are intersubunit, electrostatic interactions at the active site between Glu48 and Lys168 of the nonactivated (noncarbamylated) enzyme and between Glu48 and Lys329 of the activated (carbamylated) enzyme. In this paper, we describe two approaches to address the roles of electrostatic interactions at the active site and the roles of the participant residues: (1) characterization of pertinent site-directed mutants, including their abilities to catalyze partial reactions and (2) subtle alteration of the active-site microenvironment by manipulation of these proteins with exogenous reagents.

  14. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of allyl chloride with hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunju; Chao, Kai; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Wanqiao; Shi, Haijie; Yao, Cen; Su, Zhongmin; Pan, Xiumei; Zhang, Jingping; Wang, Rongshun

    2014-02-01

    The reaction of allyl chloride with the hydroxyl radical has been investigated on a sound theoretical basis. This is the first time to gain a conclusive insight into the reaction mechanism and kinetics for important pathways in detail. The reaction mechanism confirms that OH addition to the C=C double bond forms the chemically activated adducts, IM1 (CH2CHOHCH2Cl) and IM2 (CH2OHCHCH2Cl) via low barriers, and direct H-abstraction paths may also occur. Variational transition state model and multichannel RRKM theory are employed to calculate the temperature-, pressure-dependent rate constants. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with the experimental data. At 100 Torr with He as bath gas, IM6 formed by collisional stabilization is the major products in the temperature range 200-600 K; the production of CH2CHCHCl via hydrogen abstractions becomes dominant at high temperatures (600-3000 K).

  15. CN radical reactions with hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen - Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, D. L.; Yu, T.; Lin, M. C.; Melius, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The method of laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence is used to obtain absolute rate constants for CN radical reactions with HCN and C2N2. The rate constants were found to be temperature-dependent in the range 300-740 K and pressure independent in the range 100-600 Torr. Rice-Remsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory for both reactions employing the transition state parameters obtained by the BAC-MP4 method are made. These calculations yielded reasonable results for the CN + HCN reaction, predicting both the temperature dependence and pressure independence. No pressure effect was observed in the pressure range 100-1000 Torr at temperatures below 900 K, confirming the experimental results.

  16. Mechanistic Studies of the Solvolyses of Carbamoyl Chlorides and Related Reactions

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Malcolm J.; Kevill, Dennis N.

    2016-01-01

    Carbamoyl chlorides are important intermediates, both in the research laboratory and in industrial scale syntheses. The most studied and used are the disubstituted derivatives, incorporating either aryl or alkyl groups (Ar2NCOCl or R2NCOCl). Sometimes, the groups are tied back to give a ring and piperidino- and morpholino-derivatives are commonly encountered. Some studies have been made with two different groups attached. Solvolyses tend to occur at the carbonyl carbon, with replacement of the chloride ion. Studies of both rate and products are reviewed and the solvolysis reactions are usually SN1, although addition of an amine leads to a superimposable bimolecular component. Many of the studies under solvolytic conditions include the application of the extended Grunwald–Winstein equation. The monosubstituted derivatives (ArNHCOCl or RNHCOCl) are less studied. They are readily prepared by the addition of HCl to an isocyanate. In acetonitrile, they decompose to set up and reach equilibrium with the isocyanate (ArNCO or RNCO) and HCl. Considering that the structurally related formyl chloride (HOCOCl) is highly unstable (with formation of HCl + CO2), the unsubstituted carbamoyl chloride (H2NCOCl) is remarkably stable. Recommended synthetic procedures require it to survive reaction temperatures in the 300–400 °C range. There has been very little study of its reactions. PMID:26784185

  17. Low-temperature Kinetic Studies of OH Radical Reactions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, T. M.; Antiñolo, M.; Ballesteros, B.; Jimenez, E.; Canosa, A.

    2011-05-01

    In the solar system, the temperature (T) of the atmosphere of giant planets or their satellites is only several tens of Kelvin (K). The temperature of the tropopause of Titan (satellite of Saturn) and the surface of Mars is 70 K and 210 K, respectively. In the Earth's atmosphere, T decreases from 298 K (surface) to 210 K close to the T-inversion region (tropopause). The principal oxidants in the Earth's lower atmosphere are ozone, the hydroxyl (OH) radical and hydrogen peroxide. A number of critical atmospheric chemical problems depend on the Earth's oxidising capacity, which is essentially the global burden of these oxidants. In the interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes, OH radicals have also been detected. As the chemistry of atmospheres is highly influenced by temperature, the knowledge of the T-dependence of the rate coefficients for OH-reactions (k) is the key to understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms. In general, these reactions take place on a short temporal scale. Therefore, a detection technique with high temporal resolution is required. Measurements of k at low temperatures can be achieved by maintaining a thermalised environment using either cryogenic cooling (T>200 K) or supersonic gas expansion with a Laval nozzle (several tens of K). The pulsed laser photolysis technique coupled with laser induced fluorescence detection has been widely used in our laboratory to determine the rate coefficients of OH-reactions with different volatile organic compounds, such as alcohols (1), saturated and unsaturated aliphatic aldehydes (2), linear ketones (3), as a function of temperature (260 350 K). An experimental system based on the CRESU (Cinetique de Reaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in a Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique is currently under construction. This technique will allow the performance of kinetic studies of OH-reactions of astrophysical interest at temperatures lower than 200 K.

  18. Kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical. The importance of solvent hydrogen-bond interactions with the substrate and the abstracting radical.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Giammarioli, Ilaria; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-06-03

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from propanal (PA) and 2,2-dimethylpropanal (DMPA) by the cumyloxyl radical (CumO•) has been carried out in different solvents (benzene, PhCl, MeCN, t-BuOH, MeOH, and TFE). The corresponding reactions of the benzyloxyl radical (BnO•) have been studied in MeCN. The reaction of CumO• with 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD) also has been investigated in TFE solution. With CHD a 3-fold increase in rate constant (k(H)) has been observed on going from benzene, PhCl, and MeCN to TFE. This represents the first observation of a sizable kinetic solvent effect for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from hydrocarbons by alkoxyl radicals and indicates that strong HBD solvents influence the hydrogen abstraction reactivity of CumO•. With PA and DMPA a significant decrease in k(H) has been observed on going from benzene and PhCl to MeOH and TFE, indicative of hydrogen-bond interactions between the carbonyl lone pair and the solvent in the transition state. The similar k(H) values observed for the reactions of the aldehydes in MeOH and TFE point toward differential hydrogen bond interactions of the latter solvent with the substrate and the radical in the transition state. The small reactivity ratios observed for the reactions of CumO• and BnO• with PA and DMPA (k(H)(BnO•)/k(H)(CumO•) = 1.2 and 1.6, respectively) indicate that with these substrates alkoxyl radical sterics play a minor role.

  19. Laser Flash Photolysis Studies of Radical-Radical Reaction Kinetics: The O((sup 3)P(sub J)) + BrO Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, R. P.; Cronkhite, J. M.; Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A novel dual laser flash photolysis-long path absorption-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction 0((sup 3)P(sub j)) + Br yields(k1) BrO((sup 2)P(sub J)) + O2 as a function of temperature (231-328 K) and pressure (25-150 Torr) in N2 buffer gas. The experimental approach preserves the principal advantages of the flash photolysis method, i.e., complete absence of surface reactions and a wide range of accessible pressures, but also employs techniques which are characteristic of the discharge flow method, namely chemical titration as a means for deducing the absolute concentration of a radical reactant and use of multiple detection axes. We find that k1 is independent of pressure, and that the temperature dependence of k1 is adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k1(T) = 1.91 x 10(exp -11)(230/J) cu cm/ molecule.s; the absolute accuracy of measured values for k1 is estimated to vary from +/- 20 percent at at T approximately 230 K to +/- 30 percent at T approximately 330 K. Our results demonstrate that the O((sup 3)P(sub j)) + BrO rate coefficient is significantly faster than previously 'guesstimated,' and suggest that the catalytic cycle with the O((sup 3)P(sub j)) + BrO reaction as its rate-limiting step is the dominant stratospheric BrO(x), odd-oxygen destruction cycle at altitudes above 24 km.

  20. Mechanistic insights into the stepwise Diels-Alder reaction of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore

    2012-01-06

    The stepwise Diels-Alder reaction between 1-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-butadiene and 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan is explored using state-of-the-art computational methods. The results support a stepwise mechanism via a persistent intermediate, however, not the one previously reported (Lakhdar et al., Chem. Eur. J.2007, 16, 5681) but a heterocyclic adduct. The novel DFT functional M062X and the SCS-MP2 method were essential to reproduce a reasonable potential energy surface for this challenging system.

  1. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  2. An electron spin resonance investigation of the structure and formation of sulfinyl radicals: Reaction of peroxyl radicals with thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Swarts, S.G.; Becker, D.; DeBolt, S.; Sevilla, M.D. )

    1989-01-12

    In this work we present an electron spin resonance investigation of the irradiation of the alkyl mercaptans methyl, n-butyl, and tert-butyl mercaptan and the radioprotective thiols cysteamine and dithiothreitol in a number of aqueous and organic matrices in the present of oxygen. Matrix peroxyl radicals (ROO*) are formed after the irradiation of organic matrices in the presence of oxygen at 77 K. Upon annealing, these react with added thiols to form sulfinyl radicals (RSO*). Evidence for a thiol peroxyl radical (RSOO*) intermediate is found. Hyperfine couplings and g values are reported for the sulfinyl radicals formed from the five thiols investigated. The incorporation of {sup 17}O-labeled oxygen into the RSO* radical confirms that molecular oxygen is the source of the oxygen atom in the radical. The isotropic and parallel anisotropic {sup 17}O couplings indicate slightly less than 0.5 spin density on the oxygen. The couplings and spin densities are compared to those predicted from ab inito molecular orbital calculations for CH{sub 3}SO*. Calculations for the sulfur-peroxyl intermediate, CH{sub 3}SOO*, predict that it will have similar ESR parameters as those predicted for the carbon-centered peroxyl radical, CH{sub 3}OO*.

  3. Mechanistic studies of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase: characterization of an unusual pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent reaction.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2011-03-22

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase (ACCD) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that cleaves the cyclopropane ring of ACC, to give α-ketobutyric acid and ammonia as products. The cleavage of the C(α)-C(β) bond of an amino acid substrate is a rare event in PLP-dependent enzyme catalysis. Potential chemical mechanisms involving nucleophile- or acid-catalyzed cyclopropane ring opening have been proposed for the unusual transformation catalyzed by ACCD, but the actual mode of cyclopropane ring cleavage remains obscure. In this report, we aim to elucidate the mechanistic features of ACCD catalysis by investigating the kinetic properties of ACCD from Pseudomonas sp. ACP and several of its mutant enzymes. Our studies suggest that the pK(a) of the conserved active site residue, Tyr294, is lowered by a hydrogen bonding interaction with a second conserved residue, Tyr268. This allows Tyr294 to deprotonate the incoming amino group of ACC to initiate the aldimine exchange reaction between ACC and the PLP coenzyme and also likely helps to activate Tyr294 for a role as a nucleophile to attack and cleave the cyclopropane ring of the substrate. In addition, solvent kinetic isotope effect (KIE), proton inventory, and (13)C KIE studies of the wild type enzyme suggest that the C(α)-C(β) bond cleavage step in the chemical mechanism is at least partially rate-limiting under k(cat)/K(m) conditions and is likely preceded in the mechanism by a partially rate-limiting step involving the conversion of a stable gem-diamine intermediate into a reactive external aldimine intermediate that is poised for cyclopropane ring cleavage. When viewed within the context of previous mechanistic and structural studies of ACCD enzymes, our studies are most consistent with a mode of cyclopropane ring cleavage involving nucleophilic catalysis by Tyr294.

  4. Rapid reaction of superoxide with insulin-tyrosyl radicals to generate a hydroperoxide with subsequent glutathione addition.

    PubMed

    Das, Andrew B; Nauser, Thomas; Koppenol, Willem H; Kettle, Anthony J; Winterbourn, Christine C; Nagy, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Tyrosine (Tyr) residues are major sites of radical generation during protein oxidation. We used insulin as a model to study the kinetics, mechanisms, and products of the reactions of radiation-induced or enzyme-generated protein-tyrosyl radicals with superoxide to demonstrate the feasibility of these reactions under oxidative stress conditions. We found that insulin-tyrosyl radicals combined to form dimers, mostly via the tyrosine at position 14 on the α chain (Tyr14). However, in the presence of superoxide, dimerization was largely outcompeted by the reaction of superoxide with insulin-tyrosyl radicals. Using pulse radiolysis, we measured a second-order rate constant for the latter reaction of (6±1) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.3, representing the first measured rate constant for a protein-tyrosyl radical with superoxide. Mass-spectrometry-based product analyses revealed the addition of superoxide to the insulin-Tyr14 radical to form the hydroperoxide. Glutathione efficiently reduced the hydroperoxide to the corresponding monoxide and also subsequently underwent Michael addition to the monoxide to give a diglutathionylated protein adduct. Although much slower, conjugation of the backbone amide group can form a bicyclic Tyr-monoxide derivative, allowing the addition of only one glutathione molecule. These findings suggest that Tyr-hydroperoxides should readily form on proteins under oxidative stress conditions where protein radicals and superoxide are both generated and that these should form addition products with thiol compounds such as glutathione.

  5. Mechanistic Analysis of an Isoxazole-Oxazole Photoisomerization Reaction Using a Conical Intersection.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Der

    2015-09-17

    The mechanisms of the three reaction pathways for the photochemical transformation of 3,5-dimethylisoxazole (1) in its first singlet excited state (π→ π*)1 have been determined using the CASSCF (11-orbital/14-electron active space) and MP2-CAS methods with the 6-311G(d) basis set. These three reaction pathways are denoted as (i) the internal cyclization-isomerization path (path A), (ii) the ring contraction-ring expansion path (path B), and (iii) the direct path (path C). This work provides the first theoretical examinations of mechanisms for such photochemical rearrangements. The present theoretical findings suggest that the photoisomerization of 1 via path C should be much more favorable then either path A or path B. Nevertheless, the theoretical observations reveal that path B, which consists of a sequence of small geometric rearrangements, should be energetically feasible as well. Accordingly, the fleeting intermediate, acetyl nitrile ylide (4), which arises from the mechanism of path B, can be detected experimentally.

  6. Ab initio study of the influence of resonance stabilization on intramolecular ring closure reactions of hydrocarbon radicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2016-03-28

    The intramolecular ring closure reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbon radicals potentially play an important role for the formation of molecular weight growth species, especially during the pyrolysis and oxidation of alkenes under low to intermediate temperatures. In this work we investigated a series of intramolecular cycloaddition reactions of both allylic- and alkyl-type dienyl radicals. In the first set of reactions, a resonant linear radical is converted into a non-resonant cyclic radical. In the second set, a non-resonant linear alkenyl radical isomerizes to either a resonant cyclic radical or a cyclic carbinyl radical. In both cases, three different reaction schemes are examined based on the location of the partially-formed resonance structure in the cyclic transition state. For each reaction scheme, both the endo- and exo-pathways were investigated. High pressure rate parameters are obtained from the results of CBS-QB3 electronic structure calculations combined with canonical transition state theory calculations. The results are discussed in the context of a Benson-type model to examine the impact of the partially-formed resonance stabilization on both the activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The results are compared to previously reported rate parameters for cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl radicals. The differences in the activation energies are primarily due to the bimolecular component of the activation energy. However, in some cases, the presence of the partial resonance structure significantly increases the strain energy for the ring that is formed in the transition state. The pre-exponential factors are also impacted by the formation of a partial resonance structure in the transition state. Lastly, the C6H9 potential energy surface is examined to show how the trends that are outlined here can be used to estimate rate parameters, which are needed to analyze pressure-dependent reaction systems.

  7. Rapid reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with superoxide radical in seawater and simulated freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansard, S.P.; Easter, H.D.; Voelker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide radical (O2-) has been proposed to be an important participant in oxidation-reduction reactions of metal ions in natural waters. Here, we studied the reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with O 2- in seawater and simulated freshwater, using chemiluminescence detection of O2- to quantify the effect of Mn(II) on the decay kinetics of O2-. With 3-24 nM added [Mn(II)] and <0.7 nM [O2-], we observed effective second-order rate constants for the reaction of Mn(II) with O2- of 6 ?? 106 to 1 ?? 107 M -1???s-1 in various seawater samples. In simulated freshwater (pH 8.6), the effective rate constant of Mn(II) reaction with O 2- was somewhat lower, 1.6 ?? 106 M -1???s-1. With higher initial [O2-], in excess of added [Mn(II)], catalytic decay of O 2- by Mn was observed, implying that a Mn(II/III) redox cycle occurred. Our results show that reactions with nanomolar Mn(II) could be an important sink of O2- in natural waters. In addition, reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide could maintain a significant fraction of dissolved Mn in the +III oxidation state. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Total synthesis of (±)-sacidumlignans D and A through Ueno-Stork radical cyclization reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Jian; Yan, Chang-Song; Peng, Yu; Luo, Zhen-Biao; Xu, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Ya-Wen

    2013-04-21

    Efficient synthesis of (±)-sacidumlignan D (4) has been successfully achieved employing Ueno-Stork radical cyclization of α-bromo acetal 21 as a key step. Two synthetic approaches for the symmetrical diaryl ketone 19 have been discussed in detail. Notably, sacidumlignan A (1) can be also efficiently synthesized in only 7 steps with 25% overall yield, where acid triggered tandem reaction starting from analogous Ueno-Stork cyclization product 27 played an important role. Moreover, potentially biomimetic conversion from (±)-sacidumlignan D (4) to sacidumlignan A (1) could be realized.

  9. Understanding kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Martella, Roberto; Salamone, Michela

    2011-11-18

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from tetrahydrofuran (THF) and cyclohexane (CHX) by the cumyloxyl radical was carried out in different solvents. With THF, a 4.5-fold decrease in rate constant (k(H)) was observed on going from isooctane to 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. An opposite behavior was observed with CHX, where k(H) increased by a factor 4 on going from isooctane to 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The important role of substrate structure and of the solvent hydrogen bond donor ability is discussed.

  10. Atmospheric degradation of saturated alcohols: Room temperature rate coefficients for NO3 radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Alberto; Salgado, Sagrario; Taccone, Raul; Martín, Pilar; Cabañas, Beatriz

    2014-10-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of NO3 radicals with a series of saturated alcohols are reported here using the relative rate technique. Experiments were performed using air as bath gas in a 50 L glass-pyrex reaction chamber at room temperature (298 ± 2) K with long-path FTIR spectroscopy used to monitor the reaction at atmospheric pressure (708 ± 8) Torr. The reference compounds used and their rate coefficients are: propanal kNO3 = (6.0 ± 0.6) × 10-15, methyl methacrylate kNO3 = (3.55 ± 0.62) × 10-15, acetaldehyde kNO3 = (2.62 ± 0.29) × 10-15 and propene kNO3 = (9.50 ± 1.9) × 10-15, in cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Rate coefficients obtained were (in units cm3 molecule-1 s-1): (1.87 ± 0.14) × 10-15, (2.39 ± 0.20) × 10-15, (2.28 ± 0.17) × 10-15, (1.80 ± 0.13) × 10-15 and (3.52 ± 0.19) × 10-15 for 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol and 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanol respectively. Reactivity trend can be explained in terms of the different types of hydrogen inside the hydrocarbon chain. The reaction occurs by an initial H-atom abstraction mainly from C-H groups of the alcohols by the NO3 radical being NO3 more reactive towards an H atom attached to a tertiary carbon than that attached to a secondary or primary carbon. Reactivity trend is compared with their similar structural 2-butanol and with the corresponding alkanes. Atmospheric implications are also discussed calculating lifetimes of the saturated alcohols studied here due to the reaction with NO3 radicals in comparison to their reactions with the other major atmospheric oxidants.

  11. Rates of primary electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centres and their mechanistic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. R.; Martin, J. L.; Breton, J.

    1988-05-01

    The conversion of light energy to chemical energy during photosyn-thesis involves the transfer of electrons between pigments embedded in a membrane protein. This process occurs with high quantum efficiency, the result of extremely fast electron transfer over a long distance preventing back transfer and energy loss. Recently the three-dimensional structures of the photosynthetic reaction centres of the bacteria Rhodopseudomonas viridis1 and Rhodobacter sphaeroides2 have been determined, allowing a molecular descrip-tion of the primary charge separation process. There are two symmetrically related branches of pigments in the structure (L and M), extending from the special pair of bacteriochlorophyll molecules (P) to the two bacteriopheophytins (HL and HM) via two bacteriochlorophylls (BLand BM). Many features of the electron transfer process are poorly understood, such as the nature of the excited states involved, the identity of the primary charge separation step and the roles of the protein and of B3-13. We have determined the rates of electron transfer in isolated reaction centre complexes of Rps. viridis and Rb. sphaeroides as a function of temperature. The rates increase as temperature is decreased, which may be due to either changes in electronic coupling of the pigments or changes in the population of coupled vibrational modes, or a combination of the two. We see no evidence of a B-L intermediate, which sets a lower limit on the rate of electron transfer from BL to HL. This is so high as to rule out transfer by two non-adiabatic steps.

  12. An ab initio investigation of possible intermediates in the reaction of the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemical techniques are used to investigate covalently-bonded and hydrogen-bonded species that may be important intermediates in the reaction of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals. Stable structures of both types are identified. Basis sets of polarized double zeta quality and large scale configuration interaction wave functions are utilized. Based on electronic energies, the covalently bonded HOOOH species is 26.4 kcal/mol more stable than the OH and HO2 radicals. Similarly, the hydrogen bonded HO---HO2 species has an electronic energy 4.7 kcal/mol below that of the component radicals, after correction is made for the basis set superposition error. The hydrogen bonded form is planar, possesses one relatively normal hydrogen bond, and has the lowest energy 3A' and 1A' states that are essentially degenerate. The 1A" and 3A" excited states produced by rotation of the unpaired OH electron into the molecular plane are very slightly bound.

  13. Monoascorbate free radical-dependent oxidation-reduction reactions of liver Golgi apparatus membranes.

    PubMed

    Navas, Placido; Sun, Iris; Crane, Frederick L; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2010-04-01

    Golgi apparatus from rat liver contain an ascorbate free radical oxidoreductase that oxidizes NADH at neutral pH with monodehydroascorbate as acceptor to generate a membrane potential. At pH 5.0, the reverse reaction occurs from NAD(+). The electron spin resonance signal of the ascorbate-free radical and its disappearance upon the addition of NADH (pH 7) or NAD(+) (pH 5.0) confirms monodehydroascorbate involvement. Location of monodehydroascorbate both external to and within Golgi apparatus compartments is suggested from energization provided by inward or outward flux of electrons across the Golgi apparatus membranes. The isolated membranes are sealed, oriented cytoplasmic side out and impermeable to NAD(+) and ascorbate. NAD(+) derived through the action of Golgi apparatus beta-NADP phosphohydrolase is simultaneously reduced to NADH with monodehydroascorbate present. The response of the NADH- (NAD(+)-) ascorbate free radical oxidoreductase system to pH in Golgi apparatus provides a simple regulatory mechanism to control vesicle acidification.

  14. Experimental evidence for a non-OH oxidant produced from the reaction of isoprene with OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Chen, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The OH radical initiated oxidation of alkenes is of great importance to air quality and atmospheric chemistry. Although the related mechanism is well studied over several decades, several intermediate steps, such as the recycling of OH radical, the reaction of intermediates, and the formation of peroxides, are unresolved. As we known, the traditional mechanism cannot reproduce the high measured OH radical level in the rural forests. Currently, the recycling of OH radical in the isoprene-OH reaction is considered to be a potential candidate for the explanation. Here, alternatively, we intend to know if a non-OH oxidant leads to the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH radical in the rural forest by reacting with plenty of oxygenated products of hydrocarbon compounds, sharing the 'oxidation responsibility' of OH radical, and consequently saving the OH radical. After mixing the products produced from the isoprene-OH reaction with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in a flow reactor in the absent of light, we found an immediate increase of the peroxy formic acid and peroxy acetic acid. Control experiment results indicated that these peroxy acids were the products of aldehyde reaction with some non-OH oxidant, which was produced from the isoprene-OH reaction. Unfortunately, we have not identified this unknown oxidant. However, based on the decrement of aldehyde during the process of mixing with isoprene products, we estimate the OH-equivalent concentration of this oxidant to be ~0.2 pptv, which is one fifth of the OH radical in the isoprene-OH reaction. This mechanism may contribute to explaining the maintenance of the oxidation capacity of the troposphere. Additionally, this mechanism might involve in the functionalization of oxygenated organic compounds and the formation of secondary organic aerosols.

  15. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation.

  16. Modelling Population Dynamics in Realistic Landscapes with Linear Elements: A Mechanistic-Statistical Reaction-Diffusion Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We propose and develop a general approach based on reaction-diffusion equations for modelling a species dynamics in a realistic two-dimensional (2D) landscape crossed by linear one-dimensional (1D) corridors, such as roads, hedgerows or rivers. Our approach is based on a hybrid “2D/1D model”, i.e, a system of 2D and 1D reaction-diffusion equations with homogeneous coefficients, in which each equation describes the population dynamics in a given 2D or 1D element of the landscape. Using the example of the range expansion of the tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus in France and its main highways as 1D corridors, we show that the model can be fitted to realistic observation data. We develop a mechanistic-statistical approach, based on the coupling between a model of population dynamics and a probabilistic model of the observation process. This allows us to bridge the gap between the data (3 levels of infestation, at the scale of a French department) and the output of the model (population densities at each point of the landscape), and to estimate the model parameter values using a maximum-likelihood approach. Using classical model comparison criteria, we obtain a better fit and a better predictive power with the 2D/1D model than with a standard homogeneous reaction-diffusion model. This shows the potential importance of taking into account the effect of the corridors (highways in the present case) on species dynamics. With regard to the particular case of A. albopictus, the conclusion that highways played an important role in species range expansion in mainland France is consistent with recent findings from the literature. PMID:26986201

  17. Some polyphenols inhibit the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical in the reaction mixture of linoleic acid hydroperoxide with ferrous ions.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-01-01

    Effects of some polyphenols and their related compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, quinic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, o-dihydroxybenzene, m-dihydroxybenzene, and p-dihydroxybenzene) on the formation of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic (13-HPODE) acid-derived radicals (pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical) were examined. The ESR spin trapping showed that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, and o-dihydroxybenzene inhibited the overall formation of 13-HPODE acid-derived radicals in the reaction mixture of 13-HPODE with ferrous ions. The ESR peak heights of alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN)/13-HPODE-derived radical adducts decreased to 46+/-4% (chlorogenic acid), 54+/-2% (caffeic acid), 49+/-2% (gallic acid), 55+/-1% [D-(+)-catechin], 60+/-3% [D-(-)-catechin], 42+/-1% (L-dopa), 30+/-2% (dopamine), 49+/-2% (L-adrenaline), 24+/-2% (L-noradrenaline), and 54+/-5% (o-dihydroxybenzene) of the control, respectively. The high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance (HPLC-ESR) and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometries (HPLC-ESR-MS) showed that caffeic acid inhibited the formation of octanoic acid radical and pentyl radical to 42+/-2% and 52+/-7% of the control, respectively. On the other hand, the polyphenols and their related compounds had few inhibitory effects on the radical formation in the presence of EDTA. Visible absorbance measurement revealed that all the polyphenols exhibiting the inhibitory effect chelate ferrous ions. Above results indicated that the chelation of ferrous ion is essential to the inhibitory effects of the polyphenols. PMID:10677343

  18. Thermochemical properties and bond dissociation energies of C3-C5 cycloalkyl hydroperoxides and peroxy radicals: cycloalkyl radical + (3)O2 reaction thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Auzmendi-Murua, Itsaso; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2012-07-19

    Cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons are major components in modern fuels; they can be present in the reactants, and they can be formed during the gas-phase oxidation processes. In combustion and thermal oxidation processes, these cyclics will form radicals that react with (3)O(2) to form peroxy radicals. In this study, density functional theory and higher level ab initio calculations are used to calculate thermochemical properties and bond dissociation energies of 3-5-membered cycloalkanes, corresponding hydroperoxides, hydroperoxycycloalkyl radicals, and cycloalkyl radicals that occur in these reaction systems. Geometries, vibration frequencies, and thermochemical properties, ΔH(f 298)°, are calculated with the B3LYP/6-31 g(d,p), B3LYP/6-31 g(2d,2p), composite CBS-QB3, and G3MP2B3 methods. Standard enthalpies of formation at 298 K are evaluated using isodesmic reaction schemes with several work reactions for each species. Group additivity contributions are developed, and application of group additivity with comparison to calculated values is illustrated. Entropy and heat capacities, S°(T) and C(p)°(T) (5 K ≤ T ≤ 5000), are determined using geometric parameters and frequencies from the B3LYP/6-31 g(d,p) calculations.

  19. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  20. Direct dynamics study on hydrogen abstraction reaction of CF 3CHOHCF 3 with OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2007-05-01

    Dual-level direct dynamics method is employed to investigate the H-abstraction reaction CF 3CHOHCF 3 with OH radical. Two hydrogen-abstraction reaction channels are possible: one from the methylene (-CH-) position and the other from the hydroxyl (-OH) position. The minimum energy path is calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, and the energetic information is further refined by a new powerful and inexpensive BMC-CCSD method. To testify the accuracy of the structures and the energies, the recently developed hybrid density functional theory BB1K and higher level MC-QCISD are applied to this system. Hydrogen-bonded complexes are presented at both reactants and products sides of these two channels, which indicating that the reaction may proceed via an indirect mechanism. The rate constants for each reaction channel are evaluated by canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with a small-curvature tunneling correction (SCT) over a wide range of temperatures from 200 to 2000 K. The calculated CVT/SCT rate constants are in good agreement with the available experimental values in the temperature region 250-430 K. The present results indicate that the two channels are competitive. At lower temperature, the reaction occurs mainly via the hydroxyl-H-abstraction channel, while the methylene-H-abstraction channel is preferred when the temperature is higher than 273 K.

  1. Heterogeneous reaction of particulate chlorpyrifos with NO3 radicals: Products, pathways, and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Bo; Shu, Jinian; Wang, Youfeng; Sun, Wanqi

    2014-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical chlorinated organophosphorus pesticide. The heterogeneous reaction of chlorpyrifos particles with NO3 radicals was investigated using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS) and a real-time atmospheric gas analysis mass spectrometer. Chlorpyrifos oxon, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, O,O-diethyl O-hydrogen phosphorothioate, O,O-diethyl ester thiophosphoric acid, diethyl hydrogen phosphate and a phosphinyl disulfide compound were identified as the main degradation products. The heterogeneous reaction pathways were proposed and their kinetic processes were investigated via a mixed-phase relative rate method. The observed effective rate constant is 3.4 ± 0.2 × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  2. In situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance investigations of multi-electron redox reaction for organic radical cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qian; Walter, Eric D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

    2016-02-29

    Organic radical batteries (ORBs) bearing robust radical polymers as energy storage species, are emerging promisingly with durable high energy and power characteristics by unique tunable redox properties. Here we report the development and application of in situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance (ESR) methodologies to identify the charge transfer mechanism of Poly(2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidinyloxy-4-yl methacrylate) (PTMA) based organic radical composite cathodes in the charge-discharge process of lithium half cells. The in situ experiments allow each electrochemical state to be associated with the chemical state (or environment) of the radical species upon the cell cycling. In situ ESR spectra of the composite cathode demonstrate a two-electron redox reaction of PTMA. Moreover, two different local environments of radical species are found in the composite electrode that includes both concentrated and isolated radicals. These two types of radicals show similarities during the redox reaction process while behave quite differently in the non-faradic reaction of ion sorption/desorption on the electrode surface.

  3. Study on the multiple mechanisms underlying the reaction between hydroxyl radical and phenolic compounds by qualitative structure and activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Ren, Jie; Li, Yuanzong; Chang, Wenbao; Chen, Zhida

    2002-12-01

    The activity-structure relationships (ASR) of phenolic compounds as hydroxyl-radical scavengers have mostly been studied and discussed with regard to their iron-chelating and hydrogen-donation properties in Fenton-type system, but extensive elucidation of multiple mechanisms underlying the hydroxyl radical scavenging reaction is out of obtaining up to now. In the present paper, a series of phenolic compounds was studied for their reactivity with hydroxyl radical by computed chemistry and deoxyribose degradation assay. The rate constant (K(S)), an index dependent markedly on the reaction mechanism and intrinsic reactivity of antioxidants, was found to have good correlation with hydroxyl O-H bond strength (DeltaH(f)), electron-donating ability (ionization potential approximated by HOMO energy level), enthalpy of single electron transfer (E(a)), and spin distribution of phenoxyl radicals (Ds(r)) after H-abstraction. Moreover, the theoretical parameters were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that multiple mechanisms co-exist in the hydroxyl-radical-scavenging reaction and interact with each other. Multi-linear regression analysis indicated that, in addition to H-atom transfer, electron transfer process and stability of the resulted phenoxyl radicals also significantly influence the reactivity of quenching hydroxyl radicals. The QSAR model so established here was based on the elucidation of the complex molecular mechanisms, and may reasonably predict the antioxidant activity using simple experimental and calculated parameters.

  4. In situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance investigations of multi-electron redox reaction for organic radical cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qian; Walter, Eric D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

    2016-02-01

    The multi-electron redox reaction of an organic radical based composite cathode comprised of poly(2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidinyloxy-4-yl methacrylate) (PTMA)-Ketjenblack is investigated using an in situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance (ESR) methodology. The experiments allow each electrochemical state to be associated with the chemical state (or environment) of the radical species upon the cell cycling. In situ ESR spectra of the composite cathode demonstrate a two-electron redox reaction of PTMA that is from an aminoxy anion (n-type, at 2.5-2.6 V vs. Li/Li+) via a radical (at 3.2-3.5 V vs. Li/Li+) to an oxoammonium cation (p-type, at 3.7-4.0 V vs. Li/Li+). In particular, an adjustable n-type doping process of PTMA is first observed during the discharging process. Moreover, two different local environments of radical species are found in the PTMA-Ketjenblack composite electrode that includes both concentrated and isolated radicals. These two types of radical species, showing similarities during the redox reaction process while behaving quite different in the non-faradic reaction of ion sorption/desorption on the electrode surface, govern the electrochemical behavior of PTMA based composite electrode.

  5. Gas phase kinetics and equilibrium of allyl radical reactions with NO and NO2.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Matti P; Amedro, Damien; Krasnoperov, Lev; Marshall, Paul; Timonen, Raimo S

    2013-02-07

    Allyl radical reactions with NO and NO(2) were studied in direct, time-resolved experiments in a temperature controlled tubular flow reactor connected to a laser photolysis/photoionization mass spectrometer (LP-PIMS). In the C(3)H(5) + NO reaction 1 , a dependence on the bath gas density was observed in the determined rate coefficients and pressure falloff parametrizations were performed. The obtained rate coefficients vary between 0.30-14.2 × 10(-12) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 188-363 K, p = 0.39-23.78 Torr He) and possess a negative temperature dependence. The rate coefficients of the C(3)H(5) + NO(2) reaction 2 did not show a dependence on the bath gas density in the range used (p = 0.47-3.38 Torr, T = 201-363 K), and they can be expressed as a function of temperature with k(C(3)H(5) + NO(2)) = (3.97 ± 0.84) × 10(-11) × (T/300 K) (-1.55±0.05) cm(3) s(-1). In the C(3)H(5) + NO reaction, above 410 K the observed C(3)H(5) radical signal did not decay to the signal background, indicating equilibrium between C(3)H(5) + NO and C(3)H(5)NO. This allowed the C(3)H(5) + NO ⇄ C(3)H(5)NO equilibrium to be studied and the equilibrium constants of the reaction between 414 and 500 K to be determined. With the standard second- and third-law analysis, the enthalpy and entropy of the C(3)H(5) + NO ⇄ C(3)H(5)NO reaction were obtained. Combined with the calculated standard entropy of reaction (ΔS°(298) = 137.2 J mol(-1)K(-1)), the third-law analysis resulted in ΔH°(298) = 102.4 ± 3.2 kJ mol(-1) for the C(3)H(5)-NO bond dissociation enthalpy.

  6. Hydrogen shift reactions in four methyl-buten-ol (MBO) peroxy radicals and their impact on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, Hasse C.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Jørgensen, Solvejg

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions in the peroxy radicals derived from four different methyl-buten-ol (MBO) molecules; 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232), 2-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (MBO231), 3-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO332) and 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (MBO331), with quantum mechanical calculations. The rate constants of the 1,5 H-shift reactions in all four MBO peroxy radicals are greater than the rate constants of the 1,4 or 1,6 H-shift reactions. The rate constants for the 1,5 H-shift reaction from either a CH group or an OH group are approximately 1 s-1 and 10-3 s-1, respectively. The atmospheric impact of the MBO232 oxidation is investigated with the global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The 1,4-CH and 1,5-OH H-shift reactions in the MBO232 peroxy radical play a minor role with a total yield of about 2%. The major atmospheric reactions of the MBO232 peroxy radical are the reactions with NO and HO2, with reaction yield of 85% and 13%, respectively.

  7. Rate constants and isotope effects for the reaction of H-atom abstraction from RH substrates by PINO radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opeida, I. A.; Litvinov, Yu. E.; Kushch, O. V.; Kompanets, M. A.; Shendrik, A. N.; Matvienko, A. G.; Novokhatko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen atom abstraction from the C-H bonds of substrates of different structures by phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals is studied. The rate constants of this reaction are measured and the kinetic isotope effects are determined. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic factor, Coulomb forces and donor-acceptor interactions affect the reaction between phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals and substrate molecules, altering the shape of the transition state. This favors the tunneling of hydrogen atoms and leads to a substantial reduction in the activation energy of the process.

  8. α-Terpineol reactions with the nitrate radical: Rate constant and gas-phase products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian T.; Ham, Jason E.

    The bimolecular rate constant of k rad +α-terpineol (16 ± 4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was measured using the relative rate technique for the reaction of the nitrate radical (NO 3rad ) with α-terpineol (2-(4-methyl-1-cyclohex-3-enyl)propan-2-ol) at 297 ± 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure. To more clearly define part of α-terpineol's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction were investigated. The identified reaction products were: acetone, glyoxal (HC( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H), and methylglyoxal (CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were used to propose the other major reaction products: 6-hydroxyhept-5-en-2-one, 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 5-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 1-formyl-5-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl)-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate, and 1,4-diformyl-5-hydroxy-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate. The elucidation of these products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound + NO 3rad gas-phase mechanisms. The additional gas-phase products (2,6,6-trimethyltetrahydro-2 H-pyran-2,5-dicarbaldehyde and 2,2-dimethylcyclohexane-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) are proposed to be the result of cyclization through a reaction intermediate.

  9. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions by hydroperoxyl radical from 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Harish Kumar; Fernandes, Ravi X

    2013-06-20

    Highly accurate rate parameters for H-abstraction reactions by HO2 radicals are needed for development of predictive chemical kinetic models for ignition. In this article, we report the rate coefficients for reaction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran (DMTHF) computed employing CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the temperature range of 500-2000 K. Conventional transition state theory (CTST) with hindered rotor approximation for low frequency torsional modes and RRHO (rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator) approximation for all other vibrational modes is employed to evaluate the high pressure rate constants as a function of temperature. Rate constant of each individual hydrogen abstraction channel is taken into account to calculate the overall rate constant. Three-parameter Arrhenius expressions have been obtained by fitting to the computed rate constants of all abstraction channels between 500 and 2000 K. Eight transition states have been identified for MTHF and four for slightly more stable trans-DMTHF. Intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) calculations were performed to verify the connectivity of all the transition states (TSs) with reactants and products. One dimensional Eckart's asymmetrical method has been used to calculate quantum mechanical tunneling effect. Results of the theoretically calculated rate coefficients indicate that the hydrogen abstraction by HO2 from the C2 carbon of both MTHF and DMTHF is the most dominant path among all reaction pathways attributed to its lowest barrier height. The total rate coefficients of the MTHF and DMTHF with HO2 at CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory are k(T) = 8.60T(3.54) exp(-8.92/RT) and k(T)= 3.17T(3.63) exp(-6.59/RT) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), respectively. At both the level of theories, the predicted total abstraction rate constant for DMTHF is found to be higher as compared to that of MTHF over an entire temperature range

  10. Hydroxyl Radical (OH•) Reaction with Guanine in an Aqueous Environment: A DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH•) with DNA accounts for about half of radiation-induced DNA damage in living systems. Previous literature reports point out that the reaction of OH• with DNA proceeds mainly through the addition of OH• to the C=C bond of the DNA bases. However, recently it has been reported that the principal reaction of OH• with dGuo (deoxyguanosine) is the direct hydrogen atom abstraction from its exocyclic amine group rather than addition of OH• to the C=C bond. In the present work, these two reaction pathways of OH• attack on guanine (G) in the presence of water molecules (aqueous environment) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-31G* and 6-31++G** basis sets. The calculations show that the initial addition of the OH• at C4=C5 double bond of guanine is barrier free and the adduct radical (G-OH•) has only a small activation barrier of ca. 1 – 6 kcal/mol leading to the formation of a metastable ion-pair intermediate (G•+---OH−). The formation of ion-pair is a result of the highly oxidizing nature of the OH• in aqueous media. The resulting ion-pair (G•+---OH−) deprotonates to form H2O and neutral G radicals favoring G(N1-H)• with an activation barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol. The overall process from the G(C4)-OH• (adduct) to G(N1-H)• and water is found to be exothermic in nature by more than 13 kcal/mol. (G-OH•), (G•+---OH−), and G(N1-H)• were further characterized by the CAM-B3LYP calculations of their UV-visible spectra and good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. Our calculations for the direct hydrogen abstraction pathway from N1 and N2 sites of guanine by the OH• show that this is also a competitive route to produce G(N2-H)•, G(N1-H)• and H2O. PMID:22050033

  11. Competition reactions of H2O•+ radical in concentrated Cl- aqueous solutions: picosecond pulse radiolysis study.

    PubMed

    El Omar, Abdel Karim; Schmidhammer, Uli; Rousseau, Bernard; LaVerne, Jay; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2012-11-29

    Picosecond pulse-probe radiolysis measurements of highly concentrated Cl(-) aqueous solutions are used to probe the oxidation mechanism of the Cl(-). The transient absorption spectra are measured from 340 to 710 nm in the picosecond range for the ultrafast electron pulse radiolysis of halide solutions at different concentrations up to 8 M. The amount of Cl(2)(•-) formation within the electron pulse increases notably with increasing Cl(-) concentration. Kinetic measurements reveal that the direct ionization of Cl(-) cannot solely explain the significant amount of fast Cl(2)(•-) formation within the electron pulse. The results suggest that Cl(-) reacts with the precursor of the OH(•) radical, i.e., H(2)O(•+) radical, to form Cl(•) atom within the electron pulse and the Cl(•) atom reacts subsequently with Cl(-) to form Cl(2)(•-) on very short time scales. The proton transfer reaction between H(2)O(•+) and the water molecule competes with the electron transfer reaction between Cl(-) and H(2)O(•+). Molecular dynamics simulations show that number of water molecules in close proximity decreases with increasing concentration of the salt (NaCl), confirming that for highly concentrated solutions the proton transfer reaction between H(2)O(•+) and a water molecule becomes less efficient. Diffusion-kinetic simulations of spur reactions including the direct ionization of Cl(-) and hole scavenging by Cl(-) show that up to 30% of the H(2)O(•+) produced by the irradiation could be scavenged for solutions containing 5.5 M Cl(-). This process decreases the yield of OH(•) radical in solution on the picosecond time scale. The experimental results for the same concentration of Cl(-) at a given absorbed dose show that the radiation energy absorbed by counterions is transferred to Cl(-) or water molecules and the effect of the countercation such as Li(+), K(+), Na(+), and Mg(2+) on the oxidation yield of Cl(-) is negligible.

  12. Quantitative characterization of hydroxyl radical generation in a goethite-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhi-Rong; Zhao, Ling; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2015-12-01

    In order to find out the truth of influence of solution chemistry on the oxidation efficiency of a goethite-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction, the amount of hydroxyl radicals (OH) was quantified by using coumarin as its trapping agent to produce the only fluorescent derivative 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC), because OH was the reactive species responsible for the oxidation activity of Fenton reactions. The concentration of OH achieved maximum at solution pH of 3 and decreased with an increase of solution pH value. However, considerable amount of OH can also generate at near neutral pH (i.e. pH 6 and 7). The concentration of OH was increased both with increasing of goethite and H2O2 dosages, but H2O2 could compete with coumarin to scavenge OH to reduce the formation of 7-HC when the concentration of H2O2 was too high. Anions inhibited OH generation followed an order of H2PO4(-)>SO4(2-)>Cl(-)>NO3(-)>ClO4(-). Higher concentrations of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) resulted in greater inhibition of OH generation. Results of this study demonstrated that the influence of solution chemistry on the oxidation efficiency of the goethite-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction was greatly attributed to the effect of solution chemistry on the amount of OH formed in the process of reaction.

  13. Pulse radiolysis of supercritical water II. Reaction of nitrobenzene with hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals.

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, T. W.; Cline, J. A.; Bartels, D. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Takahashi, K.; Chemistry; Hakkaido Univ.

    2003-12-26

    The rate constants for the reactions of nitrobenzene with the hydroxyl radical (OH{sup {sm_bullet}}) and hydrated electron ((e{sup -}){sub aq}) in water have been measured from room temperature to 400 {sup o}C using electron pulse radiolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy. The diffusion-limited reaction of nitrobenzene with (e{sup 0}){sub aq} exhibits temperature-insensitive activation energy up to 300 {sup o}C, indicating that the activation energy for electron diffusion remains high over this range. The (e{sup -}){sub aq} reactivity is explained as a long-range electron transfer, and the results are interpreted in terms of extended Marcus theory and Smoluchowski relationships. At 380 {sup o}C, the rate constant has a density dependence similar to that previously reported for other (e{sup -}){sub aq} scavenging reactions. The reaction rate of nitrobenzene with OH{sup {sm_bullet}} is very insensitive to temperature from room temperature up to 300 {sup o}C, in agreement with previous studies. Above 300 {sup o}C, the rate constant increases as the critical temperature is approached and exceeded. Time-resolved electronic absorption spectra of the nitrobenzene radiolysis transients reveal complex kinetics involving multiple absorbing species.

  14. Kinetics of Hydrogen Abstraction and Addition Reactions of 3-Hexene by ȮH Radicals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feiyu; Deng, Fuquan; Pan, Youshun; Zhang, Yingjia; Tang, Chenglong; Huang, Zuohua

    2017-03-09

    Rate coefficients of H atom abstraction and H atom addition reactions of 3-hexene by the hydroxyl radicals were determined using both conventional transition-state theory and canonical variational transition-state theory, with the potential energy surface (PES) evaluated at the CCSD(T)/CBS//BHandHLYP/6-311G(d,p) level and quantum mechanical effect corrected by the compounded methods including one-dimensional Wigner method, multidimensional zero-curvature tunneling method, and small-curvature tunneling method. Results reveal that accounting for approximate 70% of the overall H atom abstractions occur in the allylic site via both direct and indirect channels. The indirect channel containing two van der Waals prereactive complexes exhibits two times larger rate coefficient relative to the direct one. The OH addition reaction also contains two van der Waals complexes, and its submerged barrier results in a negative temperature coefficient behavior at low temperatures. In contrast, The OH addition pathway dominates only at temperatures below 450 K whereas the H atom abstraction reactions dominate overwhelmingly at temperature over 1000 K. All of the rate coefficients calculated with an uncertainty of a factor of 5 were fitted in a quasi-Arrhenius formula. Analyses on the PES, minimum reaction path and activation free Gibbs energy were also performed in this study.

  15. Kinetics of the Reactions of IO Radicals with NO and NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daykin, E. P.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-long path absorption technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reactions of IO radicals with NO and NO2 as a function of temperature and pressure. The IO and NO rate coefficient is independent of pressure over the range 40-200 Torr of N2, and its temperature dependence over the range 242-359 K is adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 1) = (6.9 +/- 1.7) x 10(exp -12) exp[(328 +/- 71)/T] cu cm/(molecule.s) (errors are 2 sigma, precision only). These Arrhenius parameters are similar to those determined previously for the ClO + NO and BrO + NO reactions. The IO and NO2 association reaction is found to be in the falloff regime over the temperature and pressure ranges investigated (254-354 K and 40-750 Torr of N2). Assuming F(sub c) = 0.4 independent of temperature, a physically reasonable set of falloff parameters which adequately describe the data are k(sub 0) = 7.7 x 10(exp -31)(T/300)(exp -5.0) cm(exp 6)/(molecule(exp 2).s) and k(sub infinity) = 1.55 x 10(exp -11)cu cm/(molecule.s) independent of temperature. The IO + NO2 rate coefficients determined in this study are about a factor of 2 faster than those reported in the only previous study of this reaction.

  16. Ambient reaction kinetics of atmospheric oxygenated organics with the OH radical: a computational methodology study.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Jørgensen, Solvejg; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2013-06-28

    The gas phase hydrogen abstraction reaction kinetics of short chained oxygenated hydrocarbons of atmospheric relevance has been studied using density functional theory, basis set extrapolation procedures, Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory and Coupled-Cluster Singles Doubles. The rate constants for the reaction of the OH radical with nine different oxygenated compounds: CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, H2CO, CH3CHO, CH3COCH3, CH3OCH3, HCOOH, CH3COOH, HCOOCH3 with a total of 18 individual hydrogen abstraction reactions have been computationally determined and compared to experimental data. The performance of DFT in predicting the imaginary vibrational frequency of the nuclear motion at the transition state has been evaluated to assess tunnelling effects using Wigner, Bell and Eckart tunnelling corrections. Several different hybrid methodologies utilizing DFT/MP2 structures, vibrational frequencies and explicitly correlated Coupled Cluster single point energy corrections have been investigated to identify an approach for obtaining reliable reaction kinetics. Our investigation shows that CCSD(T)-F12a/VTZ-F12//BH&HLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ using a Bell or Eckart tunnelling correction yields rate constants within a factor of ~3 of experimental data and branching ratios within experimental uncertainty for the test set of short chained oxygenated compounds of atmospheric relevance.

  17. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jian-Bo; Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  18. Kinetics and product yields of the acetyl peroxy + HO2 radical reaction studied by photoionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, L. G.; Shen, L.; Savee, J. D.; Eddingsaas, N. C.; Welz, O.; Taatjes, C. A.; Osborn, D. L.; Sander, S. P.; Okumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    The acetyl peroxy radical (CH3C(O)O2) is a key intermediate in the oxidation of carbonyl-containing hydrocarbons in the troposphere. Reaction of acetyl peroxy radicals with HO2 has been suggested as a source of OH radicals in low-NOx environments. Previous work on this reaction observed only two product channels forming (1) peracetic acid and (2) acetic acid. Recent experiments have shown that there is a third channel that generates the radicals OH and acetoxy: CH3C(O)O2 + HO2 → (1) CH3C(O)OOH + O2 (2) CH3C(O)OH + O3 (3) CH3C(O)O + O2 + OH This last pathway to OH formation would then contribute to the apparent isoprene OH recycling suggested by discrepancies between atmospheric models and field observations of OH. There have, however, been significant disagreements among experiments on the yield of OH from reaction of acetyl peroxy radicals with HO2. We report our preliminary studies of acetyl peroxy self-reaction and its reaction with HO2 at 298 K and 8 Torr. Experiments were conducted at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron at the Lawerence Berkeley National Laboratory using tunable VUV ionizing radiation coupled to the Sandia National Laboratory pulsed-laser-photolysis multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometer to detect the time- and isomer-resolved formation of radical intermediates and products. From these results, we report new branching fractions of the three product channels in the acetyl peroxy + HO2 radical reaction.

  19. Specific adducts formed through a radical reaction between peptides and contact allergenic hydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Redeby, Theres; Nilsson, Ulrika; Altamore, Timothy M; Ilag, Leopold; Ambrosi, Annalisa; Broo, Kerstin; Börje, Anna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2010-01-01

    The first step in the development of contact allergy (allergic contact dermatitis) includes the penetration of an allergy-causing chemical (hapten) into the skin, where it binds to macromolecules such as proteins. The protein-hapten adduct is then recognized by the immune system as foreign to the body. For hydroperoxides, no relevant hapten target proteins or protein-hapten adducts have so far been identified. In this work, bovine insulin and human angiotensin I were used as model peptides to investigate the haptenation mechanism of three hydroperoxide haptens: (5R)-5-isopropenyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexene-1-hydroperoxide (Lim-2-OOH), cumene hydroperoxide (CumOOH), and 1-(1-hydroperoxy-1-methylethyl) cyclohexene (CycHexOOH). These hydroperoxides are expected to react via a radical mechanism, for which 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine iron(III) chloride (Fe(III)TPPCl) was used as a radical initiator. The reactions were carried out in 1:1 ethanol/10 mM ammonium acetate buffer pH 7.4, for 3 h at 37 degrees C, and the reaction products were either enzymatically digested or analyzed directly by MALDI/TOF-MS, HPLC/MS/MS, and 2D gel electrophoresis. Both hydroperoxide-specific and unspecific reaction products were detected, but only in the presence of the iron catalyst. In the absence of catalyst, the hydroperoxides remained unreacted. This suggests that the hydroperoxides can enter into the skin and remain inert until activated. Through the detection of a Lim-2-OOH adduct bound at the first histidine (of two) of angiotensin I, it was confirmed that hydroperoxides have the potential to form specific antigens in contact allergy.

  20. A combined high-temperature experimental and theoretical kinetic study of the reaction of dimethyl carbonate with OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Fethi; Giri, Binod Raj; Szőri, Milán; Mai, Tam V-T; Huynh, Lam K; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-03-08

    The reaction kinetics of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and OH radicals were investigated behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 872-1295 K and at pressures near 1.5 atm. Reaction progress was monitored by detecting OH radicals at 306.69 nm using a UV laser absorption technique. The rate coefficients for the reaction of DMC with OH radicals were extracted using a detailed kinetic model developed by Glaude et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst. 2005, 30(1), 1111-1118). The experimental rate coefficients can be expressed in Arrhenius form as: kexpt'l = 5.15 × 10(13) exp(-2710.2/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). To explore the detailed chemistry of the DMC + OH reaction system, theoretical kinetic analyses were performed using high-level ab initio and master equation/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (ME/RRKM) calculations. Geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation level of theory using Dunning's augmented correlation consistent-polarized valence double-ζ basis set (aug-cc-pVDZ). The energy was extrapolated to the complete basis set using single point calculations performed at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory. For comparison purposes, additional ab initio calculations were also carried out using composite methods such as CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, G3 and G4. Our calculations revealed that the H-abstraction reaction of DMC by OH radicals proceeds via an addition elimination mechanism in an overall exothermic process, eventually forming dimethyl carbonate radicals and H2O. Theoretical rate coefficients were found to be in excellent agreement with those determined experimentally. Rate coefficients for the DMC + OH reaction were combined with literature rate coefficients of four straight chain methyl ester + OH reactions to extract site-specific rates of H-abstraction from methyl esters by OH radicals.

  1. A combined EPR and DFT study of the overcrowded aromatic radical cations from Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu Ming; Wu, Yi Fang

    2011-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, and the following radical cations were indentified: 3,6,11,14-tetramethyl dibenzo (a, c) triphylene and 2,6-dimethyl-9,10-di(p-methylbenzyl) anthracene radical cations. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to overcrowded polycyclic aromatic radical cations formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl 3. We carried out the theoretical calculation of the isotropic 1H hyperfine coupling constants for studied both PAHs radical cations. The results indicate that the IEFPCM-DFT calculation at B3LYP level with 6-31++G(d,p), EPRII and EPRIII basis sets could well support the experimental hfcc assignment of the observed radicals. Optimized geometry indicates that the aromatic rings in both PAHs radical cations twisted significantly out of co-planarity.

  2. Free radical depolymerization of hyaluronan by Maillard reaction products: role in liquefaction of aging vitreous.

    PubMed

    Deguine, V; Menasche, M; Ferrari, P; Fraisse, L; Pouliquen, Y; Robert, L

    1998-02-01

    The degradation of hyaluronan was followed by viscosimetry and by HPLC in order to study the possible role of Maillard products (lysine-glucose) on the alteration of the vitreous gel in aging and diabetes. Lysine-glucose generated Maillard products produced a decrease of viscosity and of the number average molecular weight (Mn) of hyaluronan during a 1 h incubation at 37 degrees C. This effect was comparable to that produced by 1 U/ml of testicular hyaluronidase but was weaker than the effect of a Fenton-type reagent (Udenfriend's reagent). The polydispersity of hyaluronan incubated with Maillard products appeared higher than with hyaluronidase suggesting a more random reaction. Antioxydant enzymes (SOD, catalase), the iron chelators (desferrioxamine, transferrin) and the free radical scavengers (uric acid, carnosine) inhibited the degradation by Maillard products confirming its free radical nature and the intervention of trace metals. Maillard products have been detected in diabetic vitreous and may play a role in its accelerated modifications (liquefaction) in diabetes as compared to normal aging.

  3. Pressure and Temperature Dependence of the Reaction of Vinyl Radical with Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Huzeifa; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Abel, Paul R.; Howe, Pui-Teng; Fahr, Askar; Halpern, Joshua B.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Georgievskii, Yuri; Taatjes, Craig A.; Green, William H.

    2007-01-01

    This work reports measurements of absolute rate coefficients and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) master equation simulations of the C2H3 + C2H4 reaction. Direct kinetic studies were performed over a temperature range of 300-700 K and pressures of 20 and 133 mbar. Vinyl radicals (H2C=CH) were generated by laser photolysis of vinyl iodide (C2H31) at 266 nm, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy was used to probe vinyl radicals through absorption at 423.2 nm. Measurements at 20 mbar are in good agreement with previous determinations at higher temperature. A weighted three-parameter Arrhenius fit to the experimental rate constant at 133 mbar, with the temperature exponent fixed, gives k = (7 +/- 1) x 10(exp -l4) cu cm/molecule/s (T/298 K)(exp 2) exp[-(1430 +/- 70) K/T]. RRKM master equation simulations, based on G3 calculations of stationary points on the C4H7 potential energy surface, were carried out to predict rate coefficients and product branching fractions. The predicted branching to 1-methylallyl product is relatively small under the conditions of the present experiments but increases as the pressure is lowered. Analysis of end products of 248 nm photolysis of vinyl iodide/ethylene mixtures at total pressures between 27 and 933 mbar provides no direct evidence for participation of I -methylallyl.

  4. Kinetics of nitrosamine and amine reactions with NO3 radical and ozone related to aqueous particle and cloud droplet chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous phase reactivity experiments with the amines dimethylamine (DMA), diethanolamine (DEA) and pyrrolidine (PYL) and their corresponding nitrosamines nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), nitrosodiethanolamine (NDEA) and nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYL) have been performed. NO3 radical reaction rate coefficients for DMA, DEA and PYL were measured for the first time and are 3.7 × 105, 8.2 × 105 and 8.7 × 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. Rate coefficients for NO3 + NDMA, NDEA and NPYL are 1.2 × 108, 2.3 × 108 and 2.4 × 108 M-1 s-1. Compared to OH radical rate coefficients for reactions with amines, the NO3 radical will most likely not be an important oxidant but it is a potential nighttime oxidant for nitrosamines in cloud droplets or deliquescent particles. Ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines and upper limits of rate coefficients suggest that aqueous ozone reactions are not important in atmospheric waters.

  5. Kinetics of the reactions of IO radicals with NO and NO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Daykin, E.P.; Wine, P.H. )

    1990-05-31

    A laser flash photolysis-long path absorption technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reactions of IO radicals with NO and NO{sub 2} as a function of temperature and pressure. The IO + NO rate coefficient is independent of pressure over the range 40-200 Torr of N{sub 2}, and its temperature dependence over the range 242-359 K is adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k{sub 1} = (6.9 {plus minus} 1.7) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp((328 {plus minus} 71)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} (errors are 2{sigma}, precision only). These Arrhenius parameters are similar to those determined previously for the ClO + NO and BrO + NO reactions. The IO + NO{sub 2} rate coefficients determined in this study are about a factor of 2 faster than those reported in the only previous study of this reaction.

  6. Water mediated hydrogen abstraction mechanism in the radical reaction between HOSO and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesar, Antonija; Tušar, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The effect of water molecules on the direct hydrogen abstraction from HOSO by NO2 was investigated for the first time. Stationary points were located at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) and CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory whereas energetics was further improved by CBS-QB3 and G4 composite methods. The fractions of hydrated radical complexes were estimated in order to assess atmospheric relevance of the title reaction. The energy barrier of the water mediated process becomes negligible. The formations of post-reactive complexes from pre-reactive complexes are energetically very favorable and the processes are spontaneous suggesting that they should be very feasible under atmospheric conditions.

  7. Ab Initio Study on the Mechanism of Tropospheric Reactions of the Nitrate Radical with Alkenes: Ethene.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Casany, M. Pilar; Nebot-Gil, Ignacio; Sánchez-Marín, José; Tomás-Vert, Francisco; Martínez-Ataz, Ernesto; Cabañas-Galán, Beatriz; Aranda-Rubio, Alfonso

    1998-10-02

    A mechanism for the reaction of the NO(3) radical with the simplest alkene, ethene, is proposed. The mechanism involves three paths leading to three main different products: oxirane, ethanal, and nitric acid. The three paths start from the same initial intermediate, an NO(3)-ethene adduct. The calculated energy barriers show that the oxirane is the product kinetically more favored. Initial analysis of the potential energy surface was made at AM1 level. Then, the geometries and characterization of the found stationary points on the surface were refined at ROHF level with a 6-31G basis set. Further refinement was carried out at CASSCF level with the same basis set, and an active space was built with five active electrons in six active orbitals.

  8. Reactions of the alkoxy radicals formed following OH-addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. C-C bond scission reactions.

    PubMed

    Dibble, T S

    2001-05-09

    The atmospheric degradation pathways of the atmospherically important terpenes alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are studied using density functional theory. We employ the correlation functional of Lee, Yang, and Parr and the three-parameter HF exchange functional of Becke (B3LYP) together with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The C-C bond scission reactions of the beta-hydroxyalkoxy radicals that are formed after OH addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are investigated. Both of the alkoxy radicals formed from the alpha-pinene-OH adduct possess a single favored C-C scission pathway with an extremely low barrier (approximately 3 kcal/mol) leading to the formation of pinonaldehyde. Neither of these pathways produces formaldehyde, and preliminary computational results offer some support for suggestions that 1,5 or 1,6 H-shift (isomerization) reactions of alkoxy radicals contribute to formaldehyde production. In the case of the alkoxy radical formed following OH addition to the methylene group of beta-pinene, there exists two C-C scission reactions with nearly identical barrier heights (approximately 7.5 kcal/mol); one leads to known products (nopinone and formaldehyde) but the ultimate products of the competing reaction are unknown. The single C-C scission pathway of the other alkoxy radical from beta-pinene possesses a very low (approximately 4 kcal/mol) barrier. The kinetically favored C-C scission reactions of all four alkoxy radicals appear to be far faster than expected rates of reaction with O2. The rearrangement of the alpha-pinene-OH adduct, a key step in the proposed mechanism of formation of acetone from alpha-pinene, is determined to possess a barrier of 11.6 kcal/mol. This value is consistent with another computational result and is broadly consistent with the modest acetone yields observed in product yield studies.

  9. Competitive reaction pathways for o-anilide aryl radicals: 1,5- or 1,6-hydrogen transfer versus nucleophilic coupling reactions. A novel rearrangement to afford an amidyl radical.

    PubMed

    Rey, Valentina; Pierini, Adriana B; Peñéñory, Alicia B

    2009-02-06

    The photoinduced reactions of o-iodoanilides (o-IC6H4N(Me)COR, 4a-d) with sulfur nucleophiles such as thiourea anion (1, -SCNH(NH2)), thioacetate anion (2, MeCOS-), and sulfide anion (3, S(2-)) follow different reaction channels, giving the sulfides by a radical nucleophilic substitution or the dehalogenated products by hydrogen atom transfer pathways. After an initial photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from 1 to iodide 4, the o-amide aryl radicals 12 are generated. These aryl radicals 12 afford alternative reaction pathways depending on the structure of the alpha-carbonyl moiety: (a) 12b (R = Me) adds to 1 to render the methylthio-substituted compounds by quenching the thiolate anion intermediate with MeI after irradiation; (b) 12c (R = -CH2Ph) follows a 1,5-hydrogen transfer to give a stabilized alpha-carbonyl radical (17); and (c) 12d (R = t-Bu) affords 1,6-hydrogen transfer, followed by a 1,4-aryl migration to render an amidyl radical (20), which is reduced to the N-benzyl-N,2-dimethylpropanamide (10). Together with this last rearranged product, the ipso substitution derivative was also observed. Similar results were obtained in the PET reactions of 4d (R = t-Bu) with anions 2 and 3 under entrainment conditions with the enolate anion from cyclohexenone (5) or the tert-butoxide anion (6). From this novel rearrangement, and only under reductive conditions by PET reaction with anion 5, iodide 4d (R = t-Bu) affords quantitatively the propanamide 10. The energetic of the intramolecular rearrangements followed by radicals 12b-d were rationalized by B3LYP/6-31+G* calculations.

  10. The reaction of singlet oxygen with enecarbamates: a mechanistic playground for investigating chemoselectivity, stereoselectivity, and vibratioselectivity of photooxidations.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, J; Solomon, Marissa R; Poon, Thomas; Jockusch, Steffen; Bosio, Sara G; Adam, Waldemar; Turro, Nicholas J

    2008-03-01

    Photochirogenesis, the control of chirality in photoreactions, is one of the most challenging problems in stereocontrolled photochemistry, in which the stereodifferentiation has to be imprinted within the short lifetime of the electronically excited state. Singlet oxygen (1O2), an electronically excited molecule that is known to be sensitive to vibrational deactivation, has been selected as a model case for testing stereoselective control by vibrational deactivation. The stereoselectivity in the reaction of 1O2 with E/Z enecarbamates 1, equipped with the oxazolidinone chiral auxiliary, has been examined for the mode selectivity ([2 + 2]-cycloaddition versus ene-reaction) and the stereoselectivity in the oxidative cleavage of the alkenyl functionality to the methyldesoxybenzoin (MDB) product. Through the appropriate choice of substituents in the enecarbamate, the mode selectivity (ene versus [2 + 2]), which depends on the alkene geometry (E or Z), the steric bulk of the oxazolidinone substituent at the C-4 position, and the C-3' configuration on the side chain, may be manipulated. Phenethyl substitution gives exclusively the [2 + 2]-cycloaddition product, irrespective of the alkene geometry. The stereoselection in the resulting methyldesoxybenzoin (MDB) product is examined in a variety of solvents as a function of temperature by using chiral GC analysis. The extent (% ee) as well as the sense (R versus S) of the stereoselectivity in the MDB formation for the E isomer depends significantly on solvent and temperature, whereas the corresponding Z isomers are not affected by such variations. The complex temperature and solvent effects are scrutinized in terms of the differential activation parameters (DeltaDeltaS++, DeltaDeltaH++) for the photooxygenation of E/Z-enecarbamates in various solvents at different temperatures. The enthalpy-entropy compensations provide a mechanistic understanding of the temperature dependence of the ee values for the MDB product and the

  11. Caffeoylquinic acid derived free radicals identified during antioxidant reactions of bitter tea (Ilex latifolia and Ilex kudincha).

    PubMed

    Pirker, Katharina Franziska; Goodman, Bernard Albert

    2010-12-01

    In order to provide some insight into the chemical basis for the antioxidant behaviour of bitter tea, the Chinese medicinal beverage derived from leaves of Ilex kudincha or Ilex latifolia, free radicals generated during the oxidation of aqueous extracts of dried leaves have been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. With both beverages, the major components in the EPR spectra after accelerated autoxidation under alkaline conditions or oxidation with the superoxide anion radical were comparable to those derived from reactions of caffeoylquinic acids. Thus these reaction products have sufficient stability for biological activity, and the present results suggest that such molecules contribute appreciably to the antioxidant chemistry of these beverages.

  12. Characterization of a Cross-Linked Protein-Nucleic Acid Substrate Radical in the Reaction Catalyzed by RlmN

    SciTech Connect

    Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Bauerle, Matthew R.; Green, Michael T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Boal, Amie K.; Booker, Squire J.

    2014-08-14

    RlmN and Cfr are methyltransferases/methylsynthases that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine superfamily of enzymes. RlmN catalyzes C2 methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) of 23S rRNA, while Cfr catalyzes C8 methylation of the exact same nucleotide, and will subsequently catalyze C2 methylation if the site is unmethylated. A key feature of the unusual mechanisms of catalysis proposed for these enzymes is the attack of a methylene radical, derived from a methylcysteine residue, onto the carbon center undergoing methylation to generate a paramagnetic protein–nucleic acid cross-linked species. This species has been thoroughly characterized during Cfr-dependent C8 methylation, but does not accumulate to detectible levels in RlmN-dependent C2 methylation. Herein, we show that inactive C118S/A variants of RlmN accumulate a substrate-derived paramagnetic species. Characterization of this species by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in concert with strategic isotopic labeling shows that the radical is delocalized throughout the adenine ring of A2503, although predominant spin density is on N1 and N3. Moreover, 13C hyperfine interactions between the radical and the methylene carbon of the formerly [methyl-13C]Cys355 residue show that the radical species exists in a covalent cross-link between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate. X-ray structures of RlmN C118A show that, in the presence of SAM, the substitution does not alter the active site structure compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Together, these findings have new mechanistic implications for the role(s) of C118 and its counterpart in Cfr (C105) in catalysis, and suggest involvement of the residue in resolution of the cross-linked species via a radical mediated process

  13. Characterization of a Cross-Linked Protein–Nucleic Acid Substrate Radical in the Reaction Catalyzed by RlmN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RlmN and Cfr are methyltransferases/methylsynthases that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine superfamily of enzymes. RlmN catalyzes C2 methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) of 23S rRNA, while Cfr catalyzes C8 methylation of the exact same nucleotide, and will subsequently catalyze C2 methylation if the site is unmethylated. A key feature of the unusual mechanisms of catalysis proposed for these enzymes is the attack of a methylene radical, derived from a methylcysteine residue, onto the carbon center undergoing methylation to generate a paramagnetic protein–nucleic acid cross-linked species. This species has been thoroughly characterized during Cfr-dependent C8 methylation, but does not accumulate to detectible levels in RlmN-dependent C2 methylation. Herein, we show that inactive C118S/A variants of RlmN accumulate a substrate-derived paramagnetic species. Characterization of this species by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in concert with strategic isotopic labeling shows that the radical is delocalized throughout the adenine ring of A2503, although predominant spin density is on N1 and N3. Moreover, 13C hyperfine interactions between the radical and the methylene carbon of the formerly [methyl-13C]Cys355 residue show that the radical species exists in a covalent cross-link between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate. X-ray structures of RlmN C118A show that, in the presence of SAM, the substitution does not alter the active site structure compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Together, these findings have new mechanistic implications for the role(s) of C118 and its counterpart in Cfr (C105) in catalysis, and suggest involvement of the residue in resolution of the cross-linked species via a radical mediated process. PMID:24806349

  14. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser induced fluorescence technique has been employed to determine absolute rate coefficients for the reaction OH + CH3CN (1) and its isotopic variants, OH + CD3CN (2), OD + CH3CN (3), and OD + CD3CN (4). Reactions 1 and 2 were studied as a function of pressure and temperature in N2, N2/O2, and He buffer gases. In the absence of O2 all four reactions displayed well-behaved kinetics with exponential OH decays and pseudo-first rate constants which were proportional to substrate concentration. Data obtained in N2 over the range 50-700 Torr at 298 K are consistent with k(sub 1), showing a small pressure dependence. The Arrhenius expression obtained by averaging data at all pressures in k(sub 1)(T) = (1.1(sup +0.5)/(sub -0.3)) x 10(exp -12) exp[(-1130 +/- 90)/T] cu cm /(molecule s). The kinetics of reaction 2 are found to be pressure dependent with k(sub 2) (298 K) increasing from (1.21 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -14) to (2.16 +/- 0.11) x 10(exp -14) cm(exp 3)/ (molecule s) over the pressure range 50-700 Torr of N2 at 298 K. Data at pressures greater than 600 Torr give k(sub 2)(T) = (9.4((sup +13.4)(sub -5.0))) x 10(exp -13) exp[(-1180 +/- 250)/T] cu cm/(molecule s). The rates of reactions 3 and 4 are found to be independent of pressure over the range 50-700 Torr of N2 with 298 K rate coefficient given by k(sub 3) =(3.18 +/- 0.40) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s) and k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/-0.28) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s). In the presence of O2 each reaction shows complex (non-pseudo-first-order) kinetic behavior and/or an apparent decrease in the observed rate constant with increasing [O2], indicating the presence of significant OH or OD regeneration. Observation of regeneration of OH in (2) and OD in (3) is indicative of a reaction channel which proceeds via addition followed by reaction of the adduct, or one of its decomposition products, with O2. The observed OH and OD decay profiles have been modeled by using a simple mechanistic

  15. Reactions of the cumyloxyl and benzyloxyl radicals with strong hydrogen bond acceptors. Large enhancements in hydrogen abstraction reactivity determined by substrate/radical hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2012-12-07

    A kinetic study on hydrogen abstraction from strong hydrogen bond acceptors such as DMSO, HMPA, and tributylphosphine oxide (TBPO) by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out in acetonitrile. The reactions with CumO(•) were described in terms of a direct hydrogen abstraction mechanism, in line with the kinetic deuterium isotope effects, k(H)/k(D), of 2.0 and 3.1 measured for reaction of this radical with DMSO/DMSO-d(6) and HMPA/HMPA-d(18). Very large increases in reactivity were observed on going from CumO(•) to BnO(•), as evidenced by k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios of 86, 4.8 × 10(3), and 1.6 × 10(4) for the reactions with HMPA, TBPO, and DMSO, respectively. The k(H)/k(D) of 0.91 and 1.0 measured for the reactions of BnO(•) with DMSO/DMSO-d(6) and HMPA/HMPA-d(18), together with the k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios, were explained on the basis of the formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the benzyloxyl α-C-H and the oxygen atom of the substrates followed by hydrogen abstraction. This is supported by theoretical calculations that show the formation of relatively strong prereaction complexes. These observations confirm that in alkoxyl radical reactions specific hydrogen bond interactions can dramatically influence the hydrogen abstraction reactivity, pointing toward the important role played by structural and electronic effects.

  16. Kinetics of the multichannel reaction of methanethiyl radical (CH3S*) with 3O2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2006-06-01

    The CH3S* + O2 reaction system is considered an important process in atmospheric chemistry and in combustion as a pathway for the exothermic conversion of methane-thiyl radical, CH3S*. Several density functional and ab initio computational methods are used in this study to determine thermochemical parameters, reaction paths, and kinetic barriers in the CH3S* + O2 reaction system. The data are also used to evaluate feasibility of the DFT methods for higher molecular weight oxy-sulfur hydrocarbons, where sulfur presents added complexity from its many valence states. The methods include: B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p), CCSD(T)/6-311G(d,p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p), B3P86/6-311G(2d,2p)//B3P86/6-31G(d), B3PW91/6-311++G(3df,2p), G3MP2, and CBS-QB3. The well depth for the CH3S* + 3O2 reaction to the syn-CH3SOO* adduct is found to be 9.7 kcal/mol. Low barrier exit channels from the syn-CH3SOO* adduct include: CH2S + HO2, (TS6, E(a) is 12.5 kcal/mol), CH3 + SO2 via CH3SO2 (TS2', E(a) is 17.8) and CH3SO + O (TS17, E(a) is 24.7) where the activation energy is relative to the syn-CH3SOO* stabilized adduct. The transition state (TS5) for formation of the CH3SOO adduct from CH3S* + O2 and the reverse dissociation of CH3SOO to CH3S* + O2 is relatively tight compared to typical association and simple bond dissociation reactions; this is a result of the very weak interaction. Reverse reaction is the dominant dissociation path due to enthalpy and entropy considerations. The rate constants from the chemical activation reaction and from the stabilized adduct to these products are estimated as functions of temperature and pressure. Our forward rate constant and CH3S loss profile are in agreement with the experiments under similar conditions. Of the methods above, the G3MP2 and CBS-QB3 composite methods are recommended for thermochemical determinations on these carbon-sulfur-oxygen systems, when they are feasible.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of 2-aminoethanol (MEA): reaction of the NH2(•)CHCH2OH radical with O2.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2012-11-15

    The alkanolamine 2-aminoethanol (NH(2)CH(2)CH(2)OH), otherwise known as monoethanolamine (MEA), is a widely used solvent for carbon capture, yet relatively little is known about its atmospheric chemistry. The hydroxyl radical initiated oxidation of MEA is thought to predominantly form the α-aminoalkyl radical NH(2)(•)CHCH(2)OH, which will subsequently react with O(2) in the atmosphere to produce a peroxyl radical. We have investigated the reaction of O(2) with the NH(2)(•)CHCH(2)OH radical using quantum chemical calculations and master equation kinetic modeling. This reaction is found to proceed predominantly via a chemically activated mechanism under tropospheric conditions to directly produce the imine 2-iminoethanol (NH═CHCH(2)OH) + HO(2)(•), with lesser amounts of the collisionally deactivated peroxyl radical NH(2)CH(O(2)(•))CH(2)OH. By largely bypassing a peroxyl radical intermediate, this process avoids ozone-promoting conversion of NO to NO(2) and makes the oxidation of MEA to 2-iminoethanol HO(x)-neutral overall. The imine product of MEA oxidation is proposed as an important intermediate in the formation of aerosols via uptake to water droplets and subsequent hydrolysis to ammonia and glycolaldehyde.

  18. Reaction of thiols and disulfides with phosphite radicals: a chain mechanism and RS. /PO/sub 3//sup 2/. equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1981-04-02

    Thiyl and phosphite radicals exist in equilibrium, PO/sub 3//sup 2/. + RSH reversible RS. + HPO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, with equilibrium constants of 800 where RSH is ethyl mercaptan and 1500 where RSH is penicillamine. Rate constants for the respective forward reactions are 3.0 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ for both compounds, and for the back reactions, 2.0 x 10/sup 5/ and 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/. In solutions containing both phosphite and disulfide an S/sub H/2 reaction, PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/. + RSSR ..-->.. RSPO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ + RS., yields phosphate thioester and thiyl radicals. At higher phosphite concentrations, a chain reaction mechanism is established, based on re-formation of PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/. radicals in the reverse reaction of the above equilibrium. G values of up to about 30 are observed for thiol formation and disulfide destruction in these systems. One of the factors controlling the extent of the chain mechanism seems to be the thiyl/phosphite radical equilibrium.

  19. Solution phase and membrane immobilized iron-based free radical reactions: Fundamentals and applications for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Scott Romak

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. Reactive membranes synthesized through functionalization of the membrane pores offer enhanced reactivity due to increased surface area at the polymer-solution interface and low diffusion limitations. Oxidative techniques utilizing free radicals have proven effective for both the destruction of toxic organics and non-environmental applications. Most previous work focuses on reactions in the homogeneous phase; however, the immobilization of reactants in membrane pores offers several advantages. The use of polyanions immobilized in a membrane or chelates in solution prevents ferric hydroxide precipitation at near-neutral pH, a common limitation of iron(Fe(II/III))-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) decomposition. The objectives of this research are to develop a membrane-based platform for the generation of free radicals, degrade toxic organic compounds using this and similar solution-based reactions, degrade toxic organic compounds in droplet form, quantify hydroxyl radical production in these reactions, and develop kinetic models for both processes. In this study, a functionalized membrane containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to immobilize iron ions and conduct free radical reactions by permeating H2O2 through the membrane. The membrane's responsive behavior to pH and divalent cations was investigated and modeled. The conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the membrane and its effect on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were monitored and used to develop kinetic models for predicting H2O2 decomposition in these systems. The rate of hydroxyl radical production, and hence contaminant degradation can be varied by changing the residence time, H2O2 concentration, and/or iron loading. Using these membrane-immobilized systems, successful removal of toxic organic compounds, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), from water

  20. Reaction between CH3O2 and BrO radicals: a new source of upper troposphere lower stratosphere hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Dudley E; Leather, Kimberley E; Bacak, Asan; Xiao, Ping; Lee, Edmond P F; Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Dyke, John M; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P; Khan, M Anwar H; Percival, Carl J

    2015-05-14

    Over the last two decades it has emerged that measured hydroxyl radical levels in the upper troposphere are often underestimated by models, leading to the assertion that there are missing sources. Here we report laboratory studies of the kinetics and products of the reaction between CH3O2 and BrO radicals that shows that this could be an important new source of hydroxyl radicals:BrO + CH3O2 → products (1). The temperature dependent value in Arrhenius form of k(T) is k1 = (2.42–0.72+1.02) × 10–14 exp[(1617 ± 94)/T] cm3 molecule–1 s–1. In addition, CH2OO and HOBr are believed to be the major products. Global model results suggest that the decomposition of H2COO to form OH could lead to an enhancement in OH of up to 20% in mid-latitudes in the upper troposphere and in the lower stratosphere enhancements in OH of 2–9% are inferred from model integrations. In addition, reaction 1 aids conversion of BrO to HOBr and slows polar ozone loss in the lower stratosphere.

  1. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  2. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2014-03-01

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

  3. A new paradigm for electrostatic catalysis of radical reactions in vitamin B12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaz K; Chu, Zhen T; Olsson, Mats H M; Warshel, Arieh

    2007-06-05

    The catalytic power of enzymes containing coenzyme B(12) cofactor has been, in some respects, the "last bastion" for the strain hypothesis. The present work explores the origin of this effect by using simulation methods that overcome the sampling difficulties of previous energy minimization studies. It is found that the major part of the catalytic effect is due to the electrostatic interaction between the ribose and the protein, and that the strain contribution is very small. Remarkably, enzymes can use electrostatic effects even in a radical process, when the charge distribution of the reacting fragments does not change significantly during the reaction. Electrostatic catalysis can, in such cases, be obtained by attaching a polar group to the leaving fragment and designing an active site that interacts more strongly with this group in the product state than in the reactant state. The finding that evolution had to use this trick provides further evidence to the observation that it is extremely hard to catalyze enzymatic reactions by nonelectrostatic factors. The trick used by B(12) enzymes may, in fact, be a very powerful new strategy in enzyme design.

  4. Electron transfer properties of alkoxyl radicals. A time-resolved kinetic study of the reactions of the tert-butoxyl, cumyloxyl, and benzyloxyl radicals with alkyl ferrocenes.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2010-09-03

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the reactions of the tert-butoxyl (t-BuO*), cumyloxyl (CumO*), and benzyloxyl (BnO*) radicals with alkylferrocenes has been carried out in MeCN solution. With all radicals, clear evidence for an electron transfer (ET) process has been obtained, and with the same ferrocene donor, the reactivity has been observed to increase in the order t-BuO* < CumO* < BnO*, with the difference in reactivity approaching 3 orders of magnitude on going from t-BuO* to BnO*. With BnO*, an excellent fit to the Marcus equation has been obtained, from which a value of the reduction potential of BnO* (E degrees(BnO*/BnO(-)) = 0.54 V/SCE) has been derived. The latter value appears, however, to be significantly higher than the previously determined reduction potential values for alkoxyl radicals and in contrast with the differences in the computed solution-phase electron affinities determined for t-BuO*, CumO*, and BnO*, indicating that the reaction of BnO* with ferrocene donors may not be described in terms of a straightforward outer sphere ET mechanism. From these data, and taking into account the available value of the reduction potential for CumO*, a value of E degrees (BnO*/BnO(-)) = -0.10 V/SCE has been estimated. On the basis of computational evidence for the formation of a pi-stacked prereaction complex in the reaction between BnO* and DcMFc, an alternative ET mechanism is proposed for the reactions of both CumO* and BnO*. In these cases, the delocalized nature of the unpaired electron allows for the aromatic ring to act as an electron relay by mediating the ET from the ferrocene donor to the formal oxygen radical center. This hypothesis is also in line with the observation that both BnO* and CumO* react with the ferrocene donors with rate constants that are in all cases at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than those measured for t-BuO*, wherein the radical is well-localized.

  5. Carbene radicals in cobalt(II)-porphyrin-catalysed carbene carbonylation reactions; a catalytic approach to ketenes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nanda D; Chirila, Andrei; Lu, Hongjian; Zhang, X Peter; de Bruin, Bas

    2013-09-23

    One-pot radicals: Cobalt(III)-carbene radicals, generated by metallo-radical activation of diazo compounds and N-tosylhydrazone sodium salts with cobalt(II) complexes of porphyrins, readily undergo radical addition to carbon monoxide, allowing the catalytic production of ketenes. These ketenes subsequently react with various amines, alcohols and imines in one-pot tandem transformations to produce differently substituted amides, esters and β-lactams in good isolated yields.

  6. Section i: Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrocarbon Radicals, Peroxy Hydrocarbon and Peroxy Chlorohydrocarbon Molecules and Radicals. Section II. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms For: (1) Chloroform Pyrolysis and Oxidation; (2) Benzene and Toluene Oxidation Under Atmospheric Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Tsan-Horng

    1995-01-01

    Alkyl radicals are important active intermediates in gas phase photochemistry and combustion reaction systems. With the exception of a limited number of the most elementary radicals, accurate thermodynamic properties of alkyl radicals are either not available or only rough estimations exist. An H atom Bond Increment approach is developed and a data base is derived, for accurately estimating thermodynamic properties (Delta H_{f }^circ298, S ^circ298 and Cp(T)) for generic classes of hydrocarbon radical species. Reactions of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen are one of the major reaction paths for these radicals in atmospheric photochemistry, oxidation of hydrocarbon liquids and combustion process. Alkyl hydroperoxides are subsequently formed through the alkyl peroxy radicals reactions with varied chemical species present in the reaction system. Thermodynamic properties of the alkyl hydroperoxides and related radicals are therefore frequently required in gas phase modeling and kinetic studies on these systems. The thermodynamic properties of alkyl hydroperoxides, alkyl peroxy radicals and hydroperoxyl-1-ethyl radicals including the species with fluorine and chlorine substituents on the alpha-carbon are evaluated using molecular orbital calculations. Chloroform is used as a model chlorocarbon system with high Cl/H ratio to investigate thermal decomposition processes of chlorocarbons in oxidative and pyrolytic reaction environments. A detailed reaction mechanism is developed to describe the important features of products and reagent loss and is shown to predict the experimental data well. Reaction pathways and rate constants are developed for CCl _3, CCl_2 and rm C_2Cl_3 radical addition to O_2 and combination with O, OH HO_2 and ClO. The reversible addition reaction of OH radical with benzene to form the hydroxyl-2,4-cyclohexadienyl (benzene -OH) adduct and the subsequent reactions of this benzene -OH adduct with O_2 are important initial steps for the

  7. Photochemistry and kinetics of gas phase reactions involving HO and Cl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.H.

    1980-11-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of the HO radical with HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the kinetics of Cl atom reactions with ClNO and ClNO/sub 2/, and the photochemistry of ClNO/sub 2/ and ClONO/sub 2/ were examined. The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of HNO/sub 3/ and ClNO/sub 2/ were also determined as part of the kinetics work. The rate constant for the reaction of HO with HNO/sub 3/ at room temperature was measured to be (8.2 +- 1.8) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, where the uncertainty reported here and in all cases reflects twice the experimental standard deviation plus an estimate of systematic errors. The rate constant for the reaction HO + H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was measured as (1.57 +- 0.23) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. This agrees well with the two latest determinations and serves as a calibration of the experimental apparatus used. The Cl + ClNO reaction rate constant was determined to be (1.65 +- 0.32) x 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. The rate constant for the reaction of Cl + ClNO/sub 2/ was found to be (5.05 +- 0.75) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. This is the first direct measurement of this rate constant. The photodissociation of ClNO/sub 2/ was studied in great detail. The absorption cross sections were measured in the ultraviolet and found to be substantially lower than the literature values in the Cl/sub 2/ absorption region (300 to 360 nm). Two product channels were investigated; products representative of the two channels were Cl and O atoms. Absolute calibration for the product detection systems was provided by Cl/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ photolysis respectively. The quantum uields measured for photolysis at 350 nm, calcualted using the absorption spectrum measured in this work, are: 0.93 +- 0.1 for Cl and less than or equal to 0.025 for O. An upper limit of 0.1 was measured for the O atom channel in ClOHO/sub 2/ photolysis.

  8. Photofragment imaging study of the CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate of the OH +allene reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Arjun S.; Justine Bell, M.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.

    2007-10-01

    These velocity map imaging experiments characterize the photolytic generation of one of the two radical intermediates formed when OH reacts via an addition mechanism with allene. The CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate is generated photolytically from the photodissociation of 2-chloro-2-propen-1-ol at 193nm. Detecting the Cl atoms using [2+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization evidences an isotropic angular distribution for the Cl +CH2CCH2OH photofragments, a spin-orbit branching ratio for Cl(P1/22):Cl(P3/22) of 0.28, and a bimodal recoil kinetic energy distribution. Conservation of momentum and energy allows us to determine from this data the internal energy distribution of the nascent CH2CCH2OH radical cofragment. To assess the possible subsequent decomposition pathways of this highly vibrationally excited radical intermediate, we include electronic structure calculations at the G3//B3LYP level of theory. They predict the isomerization and dissociation transition states en route from the initial CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate to the three most important product channels for the OH +allene reaction expected from this radical intermediate: formaldehyde+C2H3, H +acrolein, and ethene+CHO. We also calculate the intermediates and transition states en route from the other radical adduct, formed by addition of the OH to the center carbon of allene, to the ketene+CH3 product channel. We compare our results to a previous theoretical study of the O +allyl reaction conducted at the CBS-QB3 level of theory, as the two reactions include several common intermediates.

  9. Theoretical studies of the reactions of CF3CHCLOCHF2/CF3CHFOCHF2 with OH radical and Cl atom and their product radicals with OH.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Jing-Yao; Wan, Su-Qin; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms and dynamics studies of the OH radical and Cl atom with CF(3)CHClOCHF(2) and CF(3)CHFOCHF(2) have been carried out theoretically. The geometries and frequencies of all the stationary points are optimized at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, and the energy profiles are further refined by interpolated single-point energies (ISPE) method at the G3(MP2) level of theory. For each reaction, two H-abstraction channels are found and four products (CF(3)CHFOCF(2), CF(3)CFOCHF(2), and CF(3)CHClOCF(2), CF(3)CClOCHF(2)) are produced during the above processes. The rate constants for the CF(3)CHClOCHF(2)/CF(3)CHFOCHF(2) + OH/Cl reactions are calculated by canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) within 200-2000 K, and the small-curvature tunneling is included. The total rate constants calculated from the sum of the individual rate constants and the branching ratios are in good agreement with the experimental data. The Arrhenius expressions for the reactions are obtained. Our calculation shows that the substitution of Cl by F decreases the reactivity of CF(3)CHClOCHF(2) toward OH and Cl. In addition, the mechanisms of subsequent reactions of product radicals and OH radical are further investigated at the G3(MP2)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, and the main products are predicted in the this article.

  10. Rh-Catalyzed Decarbonylation of Conjugated Ynones via Carbon–Alkyne Bond Activation: Reaction Scope and Mechanistic Exploration via DFT Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dermenci, Alpay; Whittaker, Rachel E.; Gao, Yang; Cruz, Faben A.; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-01-01

    In this full article, detailed development of a catalytic decarbonylation of conjugated monoynones to synthesize disubstituted alkynes is described. The reaction scope and limitation has been thoroughly investigated, and a broad range of functional groups including heterocycles were compatible under the catalytic conditions. Mechanistic exploration via DFT calculations has also been executed. Through the computational study, a proposed catalytic mechanism has been carefully evaluated. These efforts are expected to serve as an important exploratory study for developing catalytic alkyne-transfer reactions via carbon−alkyne bond activation. PMID:26229587

  11. Theoretical studies of the reaction of hydroxyl radical with methyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Jing-yao; Li, Ze-sheng

    2008-07-17

    The mechanisms and the kinetics of the OH (OD) radicals with methyl acetate CH3C(O)OCH3 are investigated theoretically. The dual-level direct dynamics method is employed in the calculation of the rate constants. The optimized geometries and frequencies and the gradients of the stationary points are calculated at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) level. The energetic information of potential energy surfaces is further refined by the multicoefficient correlation method based on QCISD (MC-QCISD) using the MP2/6-311G(d,p) geometries. Four channels are found for the title reaction. The calculated results reveal that there exists an attractive well (reactant complex) in each entrance H-abstraction channel, that is, the H-abstraction reaction makes a stepwise mechanism. The rate constants are calculated by the canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with the interpolated single-point energies (ISPE) approach in the temperature range of 200-1200 K. The small-curvature tunneling effect (SCT) approximation is used to evaluate the transmission coefficient. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with the experimental ones in the measured temperature range. It is shown that the "out-of-plane hydrogen abstraction" from the methoxy end is the dominant channel at the lower temperatures, and the other two H-abstraction channels should be taken into account with the temperatures increasing. The kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the three H-abstraction channels and the total reaction are "inverse", and these theoretically calculated KIEs as a function of temperature are expected to be useful for the future laboratory investigation.

  12. Diode laser probes of tert-butyl radical reaction kinetics: Reaction of C(CH sub 3 ) sub 3 with HBr, DBr, and HI

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, P.D.; Ryther, R.J.; Weitz, E. )

    1990-05-03

    The rate constants for reaction of tert-butyl radical with HBr, DBr, and HI have been measured by use of a tunable infrared diode laser probe. The measured rate constants at room temperature are 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}, 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}, and 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reaction with HI exhibits a negative activation energy of 1.5 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}. The reaction rates of HBr and DBr with tert-butyl radical at elevated temperatures are also slower than the corresponding rates at room temperature. The rate constant for reaction of tert-butyl radicals with HBr is in excellent agreement with the faster of the two conflicting previously reported measurements for the tert-butyl-HBr system. From this study the heat of formation of the tert-butyl radical has been calculated to be 11.5 {plus minus} 0.8 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}.

  13. Orientation dependence in the four-atom reaction of OH + HBr using the single-state oriented OH radical beam.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Po-Yu; Che, Dock-Chil; Nakamura, Masaaki; Lin, King-Chuen; Kasai, Toshio

    2010-03-20

    The orientation dependence for the Br atom formation in the reaction of the oriented OH radicals with HBr molecules at 0.26 eV collision energy has been observed for the first time using the hexapole electric field, and we found that the reaction cross-section for O-end attack is more favorable than that for H-end attack by a factor of 3.4 +/- 2.3.

  14. Are HO radicals produced in the reaction of O(3P) with 1-C4H8 ?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luria, M.; Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reaction of O(3P) with 1-C4H8 was examined in the presence of CO which scavenges HO radicals to produce CO2. From the CO2 quantum yield, an upper limit to the efficiency of HO production in the reaction of O(3P) with 1-C4H8 was found to be 0.020 at both 298 and 473 K.

  15. Calculational and Experimental Investigations of the Pressure Effects on Radical - Radical Cross Combinations Reactions: C2H5 + C2H3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, Askar; Halpern, Joshua B.; Tardy, Dwight C.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure-dependent product yields have been experimentally determined for the cross-radical reaction C2H5 + C2H3. These results have been extended by calculations. It is shown that the chemically activated combination adduct, 1-C4H8*, is either stabilized by bimolecular collisions or subject to a variety of unimolecular reactions including cyclizations and decompositions. Therefore the "apparent" combination/disproportionation ratio exhibits a complex pressure dependence. The experimental studies were performed at 298 K and at selected pressures between about 4 Torr (0.5 kPa) and 760 Torr (101 kPa). Ethyl and vinyl radicals were simultaneously produced by 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of C2H5COC2H3 or photolysis of C2H3Br and C2H5COC2H5. Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC/MS/FID) were used to identify and quantify the final reaction products. The major combination reactions at pressures between 500 (66.5 kPa) and 760 Torr are (1c) C2H5 + C2H3 yields 1-butene, (2c) C2H5 + C2H5 yields n-butane, and (3c) C2H3 + C2H3 yields 1,3-butadiene. The major products of the disproportionation reactions are ethane, ethylene, and acetylene. At moderate and lower pressures, secondary products, including propene, propane, isobutene, 2-butene (cis and trans), 1-pentene, 1,4-pentadiene, and 1,5-hexadiene are also observed. Two isomers of C4H6, cyclobutene and/or 1,2-butadiene, were also among the likely products. The pressure-dependent yield of the cross-combination product, 1-butene, was compared to the yield of n-butane, the combination product of reaction (2c), which was found to be independent of pressure over the range of this study. The [ 1-C4H8]/[C4H10] ratio was reduced from approx.1.2 at 760 Torr (101 kPa) to approx.0.5 at 100 Torr (13.3 kPa) and approx.0.1 at pressures lower than about 5 Torr (approx.0.7 kPa). Electronic structure and RRKM calculations were used to simulate both unimolecular and bimolecular processes. The relative importance

  16. POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS: GAS-PHASE HYDROXYL RADICAL REACTIONS AND RELATED ATMOSPHERIC REMOVAL. (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase reactions with the hydroxyl radical (OH) are
    expected to be an important removal pathway of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans
    (PCDD/F)
    in the atmosphere. Our laboratory recently developed
    a system to measure the rate constants of ...

  17. Quantum chemistry and TST study of the mechanism and kinetics of the butadiene and isoprene reactions with mercapto radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco-Márquez, Misaela; Alvarez-Idaboy, J. Raul; Galano, Annia; Vivier-Bunge, Annik

    2008-03-01

    The reactions of isoprene and butadiene with SH rad radicals have been investigated by density functional theory and ab initio molecular orbital theories. We report the thermodynamics and kinetics of four different pathways, involving addition of SH rad radicals to all double-bonded carbon atoms. Calculations have been performed on all stationary points using BHandHLYP functional, Moller-Plesset perturbation theory to second-order (MP2) and the composite CBS-QB3 method at the MP2 optimized geometries and frequencies. Pre-reactive complexes have been identified. The apparent activation energies are negative for SH rad addition at the terminal carbon atoms and are slightly smaller than those for OH rad addition at the same positions. The calculated overall rate coefficient for butadiene + SH rad reaction at 298 K is in excellent agreement with the only available experimentally measured value. Activation energies and overall rate coefficients at different temperatures are predicted for the first time for butadiene + SH rad and isoprene + SH rad reactions. The reactions of butadiene and isoprene with SH rad radicals were found to be about four times faster than with OH rad radicals.

  18. Observation of a new channel, the production of CH3, in the abstraction reaction of OH radicals with acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Howes, Neil U M; Lockhart, James P A; Blitz, Mark A; Carr, Scott A; Baeza-Romero, Maria Teresa; Heard, Dwayne E; Shannon, Robin J; Seakins, Paul W; Varga, T

    2016-09-29

    Using laser flash photolysis coupled to photo-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PIMS), methyl radicals (CH3) have been detected as primary products from the reaction of OH radicals with acetaldehyde (ethanal, CH3CHO) with a yield of ∼15% at 1-2 Torr of helium bath gas. Supporting measurements based on laser induced fluorescence studies of OH recycling in the OH/CH3CHO/O2 system are consistent with the PIMS study. Master equation calculations suggest that the origin of the methyl radicals is from prompt dissociation of chemically activated acetyl products and hence is consistent with previous studies which have shown that abstraction, rather than addition/elimination, is the sole route for the OH + acetaldehyde reaction. However, the observation of a significant methyl product yield suggests that energy partitioning in the reaction is different from the typical early barrier mechanism where reaction exothermicity is channeled preferentially into the newly formed bond. The master equation calculations predict atmospheric yields of methyl radicals of ∼9%. The implications of the observations in atmospheric and combustion chemistry are briefly discussed.

  19. FORMATION OF BETA-HYDROXYCARBONYLS FROM THE OH RADICAL-INITIATED REACTIONS OF SELECTED ALKENES (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    -Hydroxycarbonyls can be formed from the gas-phase
    reactions of alkenes with the OH radical, both in the presence
    and in the absence of NO. To date, because of analytical
    difficulties, few data have been r...

  20. Dynamics of Radical Intermediates in Prostaglandin H Synthase-1 Cyclooxygenase Reactions is Modulated by Multiple Factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of PGG2 and PGH2, the precursor of all prostanoids, from arachidonic acid (AA). PGHS exhibits two enzymatic activities following a branched-chain radical mechanism: 1) a peroxidase activity (POX) that utilizes hydroperoxide through heme redox cycles to generate the critical Tyr385 tyrosyl radical for coupling both enzyme activities; 2) the cyclooxygenase (COX) activity inserting two oxygen molecules into AA to generate endoperoxide/hydroperoxide PGG2 through a series of radical intermediates. Upon the generation of Tyr385 radical, COX catalysis is initiated, with C13 pro-S hydrogen abstraction from AA by Tyr385 radical to generate arachidonyl substrate radical. Oxygen provides a large driving force for the subsequent fast steps leading to the formation of PGG2, including radical redistributions, ring formations, and rearrangements. On the other hand, if the supply of oxygen is severed, equilibrium between arachidonyl radical and tyrosyl radical(s) biases largely towards the latter. In this study, we demonstrate that such equilibrium is shifted by many factors, including temperature, chemical structures of fatty acid substrates and limited supply of oxygen. We also, for the first time, reveal that this equilibrium is significantly affected by co-substrates of POX. The presence of efficient POX co-substrates, which reduces heme to its ferric state, apparently biases the equilibrium towards arachidonyl radical. Therefore a dynamic interplay exists between the two activities of PGHS.

  1. Involvement of active oxygen in lipid peroxide radical reaction of epidermal homogenate following ultraviolet light exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, J.; Ogura, R.; Sugiyama, M.; Hidaka, T.; Kohno, M. )

    1991-07-01

    To elucidate the radical mechanism of lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study was made on epidermal homogenate prepared from albino rat skin. The exposure of the homogenate to UV light resulted in an increase in lipid peroxide content, which was proportional to the time of UV exposure. Using ESR spin trapping (dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, DMPO), the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals (L.) was measured following UV exposure (DMPO-L.:aN = 15.5 G, aH = 22.7 G), as was the spectrum of DMPO-hydroxyl radical (DMPO-OH, aN = aH = 15.5 G). In the presence of superoxide dismutase, the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals was found to be reduced remarkably. Therefore, it was shown that the generation of the lipid radicals partially involves superoxide anion radicals, in addition to hydroxyl radicals. In the ESR free-radical experiment, an ESR signal appeared at g = 2.0064 when the ESR tube filled with homogenate was exposed to UV light at -150 degrees C. The temperature-dependent change in the ESR free radical signal of homogenate exposed to UV light was observed at temperatures varying from -150 degrees C to room temperature. By using degassed samples, it was confirmed that oxygen is involved in the formation of the lipid peroxide radicals (LOO.) from the lipid radicals (L.).

  2. [3,3]-Sigmatropic Rearrangement vs. Carbene Formation in Gold-Catalyzed Transformations of Alkynyl Aryl Sulfoxides: Mechanistic Studies and Expanded Reaction Scope

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Biao; Li, Yuxue; Wang, Youliang; Aue, Donald H.; Luo, Yingdong; Zhang, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed intramolecular oxidation of terminal alkynes with an arenesulfinyl group as the tethered oxidant is a reaction in gold chemistry of high impact, as it introduced to the field the highly-valued concept of gold carbene generation via alkyne oxidation. The proposed intermediacy of α-oxo gold carbenes in these reactions, however, has never been substantiated. Detailed experimental studies suggest that the involvement of such reactive intermediates in the formation of dihydrobenzothiepinones is highly unlikely. Instead, a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of the initial cyclization intermediate offers a reaction path that can readily explain the high reaction efficiency and the lack of sulfonium formation. With internal alkyne substrates, however, the generation of a gold carbene species becomes competitive with the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement. This reactive intermediate, nevertheless, does not proceed to afford the Friedel-Crafts type cyclization product. Extensive Density Functional Theory studies support the mechanistic conclusion that the cyclized product is formed via an intramolecular [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement instead of the previously proposed Friedel-Crafts type cyclization. With the new mechanistic insight, the product scope of this versatile formation of mid-sized sulfur-containing cycloalkenones has been expanded readily to various dihydrobenzothiocinones, a tetrahydrobenzocyclononenone, and even those without the entanglement of a fused benzene ring. Besides gold, Hg(OTf)2 can be an effective catalyst, thereby offering a cheap alternative for this intramolecular redox reaction. PMID:23731178

  3. Reaction kinetics and efficiencies for the hydroxyl and sulfate radical based oxidation of artificial sweeteners in water.

    PubMed

    Toth, Janie E; Rickman, Kimberly A; Venter, Andre R; Kiddle, James J; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2012-10-11

    Over the past several decades, the increased use of artificial sweeteners as dietary supplements has resulted in rising concentrations of these contaminants being detected in influent waters entering treatment facilities. As conventional treatments may not quantitatively remove these sweeteners, radical-based advanced oxidation and reduction (AO/RP) treatments could be a viable alternative. In this study, we have established the reaction kinetics for both hydroxyl ((•)OH) and sulfate (SO(4)(•-)) radical reaction with five common artificial sweeteners, as well as their associated reaction efficiencies. Rate constants for acesulfame K, aspartame, rebaudioside A, saccharin, and sucralose were <2 × 10(7), (2.28 ± 0.02) × 10(9), (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10(8), <2 × 10(7), and (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) for the sulfate radical, and (3.80 ± 0.27) × 10(9), (6.06 ± 0.05) × 10(9), (9.97 ± 0.12) × 10(9), (1.85 ± 0.01) × 10(9), and (1.50 ± 0.01) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydroxyl radical, respectively. These latter values have to be combined with their corresponding reaction efficiencies of 67.9 ± 0.9, 52.2 ± 0.7, 43.0 ± 2.5, 52.7 ± 2.9, and 98.3 ± 3.5% to give effective rate constants for the hydroxyl radical reaction that can be used in the modeling of the AOP based removal of these contaminants.

  4. 222 nm Photo-induced radical reactions in silazanes. A combined laser photolysis, EPR, GC-MS and QC Study.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Wolfgang; Wennrich, Luise; Naumov, Sergej; Czihal, Konstanze; Prager, Lutz; Decker, Daniel; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2010-03-14

    The initiation mechanism of the VUV-induced conversion of polyorganosilazanes into methyl-Si-O-Si networks was studied by means of model disilazane compounds. A combined experimental approach was chosen to determine the primary radicals and their properties (lifetimes, spectra) as well as the major final products. It was verified that both Si-N and Si-CH(3) cleavage occur in the condensed phase, the former with higher yield. The lifetime of the primary Si- and N-centred radicals in de-oxygenated n-hexane solution is less than radicals transform into amines by H abstraction, the availability of weakly bonded H as in the case of tetramethyldisilazane accelerates the reaction considerably. In rigid matrix (frozen solutions) CH(3), silyl radicals and methylene radicals CH(2)R are trapped. In the presence of oxygen, peroxyl radicals are formed and serve as precursors of the subsequent oxidative conversion. Product analysis by GC-MS reveals linear R-(Si-O)(n)- chains rather than branched compounds as the initial products of the oxidative conversion of tetramethyldisilazane. It was shown that reactive silylene intermediates do not play a role in the conversion process. Quantum chemical calculations assist in the interpretation.

  5. Reactions of 1-Naphthyl Radicals with Acetylene. Single-Pulse Shock Tube Experiments and Quantum Chemical Calculations. Differences and Similarities in the Reaction with Ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, Assa; Tamburu, Carmen; Dubnikova, Faina

    2009-09-01

    The reactions of 1-naphthyl radicals with acetylene were studied behind reflected shock waves in a single-pulse shock tube, covering the temperature range 950-1200 K at overall densities behind the reflected shocks of ˜2.5 × 10-5 mol/cm3. 1-Iodonaphthalene served as the source for 1-naphthyl radicals. The [acetylene]/[1-iodonaphthalene] ratio in all of the experiments was ˜100 to channel the free radicals into reactions with acetylene rather than iodonaphthalene. Only two major products resulting from the reactions of 1-naphthyl radicals with acetylene and with hydrogen atoms were found in the post shock samples. They were acenaphthylene and naphthalene. Some low molecular weight aliphatic products at rather low concentrations, resulting from an attack of various free radicals on acetylene, were also found in the shocked samples. In view of the relatively low temperatures employed in the present experiments, the unimolecular decomposition rate of acetylene is negligible. One potential energy surface describes the production of acenaphthylene and 1-naphthyl acetylene, although the latter was not found experimentally due to the high barrier (calculated) required for its production. Using quantum chemical methods, the rate constants for three unimolecular elementary steps on the surface were calculated using transition state theory. A kinetics scheme containing 16 elementary steps was constructed, and computer modeling was performed. An excellent agreement between the experimental yields of the two major products and the calculated yields was obtained. Differences and similarities in the potential energy surfaces of 1-naphthyl radical + acetylene and those of ethylene are presented, and the kinetics mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Thermochemical properties, rotation barriers, and group additivity for unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbons and radicals resulting from reaction of vinyl and phenyl radical systems with O2.

    PubMed

    Sebbarand, Nadia; Bockhorn, Henning; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2005-03-17

    Oxidation of unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric and combustion processes results in formation of linear and cyclic unsaturated, oxygenated-hydrocarbon intermediates. The thermochemical parameters delatafH degrees 298, S degrees 298, and C(p)(f298)(T) for these intermediates are needed to understand their stability and reaction paths in further oxidation. These properties are not available for a majority of these unsaturated oxy-hydrocarbons and their corresponding radicals, even via group additivity methods. Enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity of a series of 40 oxygenated and non-oxygenated molecules, or radicals corresponding to hydrogen atom loss from the parent stable molecules are determined in this study. Enthalpy (delatafH degrees 298 in kcal mol(-1)) is derived from the density function calculations at the B3LYP/6-311g(d,p) calculated enthalpy of reaction (delatafH degrees rxn,298) and by use of isodesmic (work) reactions. Estimation of error in enthalpy delatafH degrees 298, from use of computational chemistry coupled with work reactions analysis, is presented using comparisons between the calculated and literature enthalpies of reaction. Entropies (S degrees 298) and heat capacities (C(p)(f298)(T)) were calculated using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) determined frequencies and geometries. Potential barriers for internal rotors in each molecule were determined and used (in place of torsion frequencies) to calculate contributions to S and C(p)(T) from the hindered rotors. Twenty-six groups for use in group additivity (GA) are also developed.

  7. A Reaction Valley Investigation of the Cycloaddition of 1,3-Dipoles with the Dipolarophiles Ethene and Acetylene - Solution of a Mechanistic Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Thomas M; Freindorf, Marek; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-10-03

    The reaction mechanism of the cycloaddition of ten 1,3-dipoles with the two dipolarphiles ethene and acetylene is investigated and compared using the unified reaction valley approach (URVA) in a new form, which is based on a dual level strategy, an accurate description of the reaction valley far out into the van der Waals region, and a comparative analysis of the electronic properties of the reaction complex. A detailed one-to-one compar- ison of 20 different 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions is carried out and so far unknown mechanistic features are revealed. There are significant differences in the reaction mechanisms for the two dipolarophiles that result from the van der Waals complex formation in the entrance channel of the cycloadditions. Hydrogen bonding between the 1,3-dipole and acetylene is generally stronger, which leads to higher reaction barriers in the acetylene case. Elementary differences are found with regard to charge transfer, charge polarization, rehybridization, and bond formation of the two dipolarophiles, which explain their different reaction energies. It is shown that similarities in the reaction barriers as determined by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc- pVTZ calculations are accidental because of a fortuitous cancellation of different electronic effects. In general, a caveat has to be made with regard to oversimplified descriptions of the reaction mechanism based on orbital theory or energy decomposition schemes.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with methyl ethyl ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimal, D.; Stevens, P. S.

    2007-12-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) or 2-butanone is a high-volume industrial solvent with a production rate greater than 70 million lbs yr-1. It is also a photo-oxidation product of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. MEK is removed from the atmosphere primarily by its reaction with hydroxyl (OH) radical. As a result, knowledge of the chemical mechanism and temperature dependence of this reaction is important as MEK may be transported to the upper troposphere and influence the chemistry of this region of the atmosphere. We present absolute measurements of the rate constant and the kinetic isotope effect for the reaction of MEK with OH radicals at low pressure and over the temperature range 263-388 K using a discharge-flow technique coupled with resonance fluorescence detection of OH radicals. Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface suggest that the reaction of MEK and OH proceeds by H-abstraction mediated by the formation of a 7- membered hydrogen-bonded complex. This mechanism is similar to that of several other atmospherically relevant oxygenated VOCs such as acetone, acetic acid and hydroxyacetone. The influence of the pre-reactive complex on the temperature dependence for this reaction will be discussed.

  9. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of sulfuric acid with hydroxyl radical in the presence of water.

    PubMed

    Long, Bo; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Tan, Xing-Feng; Long, Zheng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Bo; Ren, Da-Sen

    2011-03-03

    The reactions of H2SO4 with the OH radical without water and with water are investigated employing the quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) and MP2/aug-cc-pv(T+d)z levels of theory, respectively. The calculated results show that the reaction of H2SO4 with OH and H2O is a very complex mechanism because of the formation of the prereactive complex prior to the transition state and product. There are two prereactive complexes with stabilization energies being -20.28 and -20.67 kcal/mol, respectively. In addition, the single water can lower the energy barriers of the hydrogen abstraction and the proton transfer to 7.51 and 6.37 kcal/mol, respectively from 13.79 and 8.82 kcal/mol with respect to the corresponding prereactive complex. The computed rate constants indicate that the water-assisted reaction of sulfuric acid with OH radical is of greater importance than the reaction of the naked sulfuric acid with the OH radical because the rate constant of the water-assisted process is about 10(3) faster than that of the reaction sulfuric acid with OH. Therefore, the conclusion is obtained that the water-assisted process plays an important role in the sink for the gaseous sulfuric acid in the clean area.

  10. Assessing the contribution of free hydroxyl radical in organic matter-sensitized photohydroxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Page, Sarah E; Arnold, William A; McNeill, Kristopher

    2011-04-01

    Photochemical formation of reactive oxygen species from dissolved organic matter (DOM) is incompletely understood, especially in the case of hydroxyl radical (•OH) production. Many studies have used various probes to detect photochemically produced •OH from DOM, but the fundamental reactions of these probes are not necessarily specific for free •OH and may also detect lower-energy hydroxylation agents. In this study, two tests were applied that have previously been used as a diagnostic for the presence of free •OH: methane quenching of •OH and hydroxybenzoic acid (hBZA) product yields. Upon application of these two tests to a set of five DOM isolates, it was found that methane quenching and the hBZA ratio results were not necessarily consistent. Overall, the results provide compelling evidence that all isolates studied photochemically produce free •OH. The hydroxylating acitivity of Elliot Soil Humic Acid and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid, however, also had a significant contribution from a photochemically generated hydroxylating agent that is lower in energy than free •OH. Catalase quenching experiments were conducted to assess whether hydrogen peroxide was the immediate precursor to hydroxyl in these systems. In all cases, catalase addition slowed photohydroxylation of terephthalate, but the contribution of hydrogen peroxide photolysis was determined to be less than 50%.

  11. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zehr, Robert T.; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-04-01

    Using a variety of organic carbonyl molecules (R1C(O)R2) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that ejection of organic radicals from TiO2 surfaces is likely a prevalent reaction process occurring during heterogeneous photooxidationof organic molecules. Organic carbonyls react with coadsorbed oxygen species to form organic diolates which are more strongly bound to TiO2 than are the parent carbonyls. The parent carbonyls, when bound to TiO2(110) in an η1 configuration, are photo-inactive. However, the diolates are shown to photodecompose by ejection one of the two R substituents from the surface into the gas phase, leaving behind the carboxylate of the other R group. Theoretical calculations using DFT show that in most cases the choice of which R group is ejected can be predicted based on the C-R bond energies and, to a lesser extent, the stability of the ejected R group.

  12. Reaction of Cu(I) with dialkyl peroxides: Cu(II)-alkoxides, alkoxy radicals, and catalytic C-H etherification.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Raymond T; McMullin, Claire L; Sapiezynski, Nicholas G; Jang, Eun Sil; Aguila, Mae Joanne B; Cundari, Thomas R; Warren, Timothy H

    2012-10-24

    Kinetic analysis of the reaction of the copper(I) β-diketiminate [Cl(2)NN]Cu ([Cu(I)]) with (t)BuOO(t)Bu to give [Cu(II)]-O(t)Bu (1) reveals first-order behavior in each component implicating the formation of free (t)BuO(•) radicals. Added pyridine mildly inhibits this reaction indicating competition between (t)BuOO(t)Bu and py for coordination at [Cu(I)] prior to peroxide activation. Reaction of [Cu(I)] with dicumyl peroxide leads to [Cu(II)]-OCMe(2)Ph (3) and acetophenone suggesting the intermediacy of the PhMe(2)CO(•) radical. Computational methods provide insight into the activation of (t)BuOO(t)Bu at [Cu(I)]. The novel peroxide adduct [Cu(I)]((t)BuOO(t)Bu) (4) and the square planar [Cu(III)](O(t)Bu)(2) (5) were identified, each unstable toward loss of the (t)BuO(•) radical. Facile generation of the (t)BuO(•) radical is harnessed in the catalytic C-H etherification of cyclohexane with (t)BuOO(t)Bu at rt employing [Cu(I)] (5 mol %) to give the ether Cy-O(t)Bu in 60% yield.

  13. The effect of spin-orbit splitting on the association kinetics of barrierless halogen atom-hydrocarbon radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the geometry dependence of spin-orbit splitting on transition state theory (TST) predictions for radical-radical recombination rate coefficients is examined. The effects are illustrated with direct ab initio variable-reaction-coordinate (VRC)-TST calculations for the reactions of two types of hydrocarbon radicals (R = CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}) with three halogen atoms (X = F, Cl, and Br). These halogen atoms exhibit a range of spin-orbit interaction strengths, while their interactions with the two hydrocarbon radicals exhibit a range of attractiveness. The transition state dividing surfaces for these barrierless reactions occur over a range of R-X fragment separations ({approx}3-7 {angstrom}) where the magnitude of the spin-orbit splitting is strongly geometry dependent. Perturbative models for incorporating the energetic effect of spin-orbit splitting into barrierless kinetics are presented and tested. Simply neglecting the variation in the spin-orbit splitting is demonstrated to contribute an error of less than 15% to the predicted rate coefficients for all but the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, where its neglect increases the rate by up to a factor of 2. For the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, the effect of spin-orbit splitting is not perturbative and instead qualitatively changes the long-range interaction potential and association dynamics. The present theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental measurements and previous theoretical work. For the CH{sub 3} + F association reaction, the errors associated with limitations in the basis set and in the active space are studied, and a detailed comparison is made between VRC-TST and rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator variational TST.

  14. Theoretical studies on atmospheric chemistry of HFE-245mc and perfluoro-ethyl formate: Reaction with OH radicals, atmospheric fate of alkoxy radical and global warming potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lily, Makroni; Baidya, Bidisha; Chandra, Asit K.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical studies have been performed on the kinetics, mechanism and thermochemistry of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of CF3CF2OCH3 (HFE-245mc) and CF3CF2OCHO with OH radical using DFT based M06-2X method. IRC calculation shows that both hydrogen abstraction reactions proceed via weakly bound hydrogen-bonded complex preceding to the formation of transition state. The rate coefficients calculated by canonical transition state theory along with Eckart's tunnelling correction at 298 K: k1(CF3CF2OCH3 + OH) = 1.09 × 10-14 and k2(CF3CF2OCHO + OH) = 1.03 × 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 are in very good agreement with the experimental values. The atmospheric implications of CF3CF2OCH3 and CF3CF2OCHO are also discussed.

  15. Thermochemical properties and bond dissociation enthalpies of 3- to 5-member ring cyclic ether hydroperoxides, alcohols, and peroxy radicals: cyclic ether radical + (3)O(2) reaction thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Auzmendi-Murua, Itsaso; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2014-05-01

    The formation of cyclic ethers is a major product in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, and the oxidation of biomass derived alcohols. Cyclic ethers are formed in the initial reactions of alkyl radicals with dioxygen in combustion and precombustion processes that occur at moderate temperatures. They represent a significant part of the oxygenated pollutants found in the exhaust gases of engines. Cyclic ethers can also be formed from atmospheric reactions of olefins. Additionally, cyclic ethers have been linked to the formation of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. In combustion and thermal oxidation processes these cyclic ethers will form radicals that react with (3)O2 to form peroxy radicals. Density functional theory and higher level ab initio calculations are used to calculate thermochemical properties and bond dissociation enthalpies of 3 to 5 member ring cyclic ethers (oxirane, yC2O, oxetane, yC3O, and oxolane, yC4O), corresponding hydroperoxides, alcohols, hydroperoxy alkyl, and alkyl radicals which are formed in these oxidation reaction systems. Trends in carbon-hydrogen bond dissociation energies for the ring and hydroperoxide group relative to ring size and to distance from the ether group are determined. Bond dissociation energies are calculated for use in understanding effects of the ether oxygen in the cyclic ethers, their stability, and kinetic properties. Geometries, vibration frequencies, and enthalpies of formation, ΔH°f,298, are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31G(2d,2p), the composite CBS-QB3, and G3MP2B3 methods. Entropy and heat capacities, S°(T) and Cp°(T) (5 K ≤ T ≤ 5000), are determined using geometric parameters and frequencies from the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations. The strong effects of ring strain on the bond dissociation energies in these peroxy systems are also of fundamental interest. Oxetane and oxolane exhibit a significant stabilization, 10 kcal mol(-1), lower ΔfH°298 when an oxygen group is on

  16. Reactions of the cumyloxyl and benzyloxyl radicals with tertiary amides. Hydrogen abstraction selectivity and the role of specific substrate-radical hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2013-06-21

    A time-resolved kinetic study in acetonitrile and a theoretical investigation of hydrogen abstraction reactions from N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. CumO(•) reacts with both substrates by direct hydrogen abstraction. With DMF, abstraction occurs from the formyl and N-methyl C-H bonds, with the formyl being the preferred abstraction site, as indicated by the measured kH/kD ratios and by theory. With DMA, abstraction preferentially occurs from the N-methyl groups, whereas abstraction from the acetyl group represents a minor pathway, in line with the computed C-H BDEs and the kH/kD ratios. The reactions of BnO(•) with both substrates were best described by the rate-limiting formation of hydrogen-bonded prereaction complexes between the BnO(•) α-C-H and the amide oxygen, followed by intramolecular hydrogen abstraction. This mechanism is consistent with the very large increases in reactivity measured on going from CumO(•) to BnO(•) and with the observation of kH/kD ratios close to unity in the reactions of BnO(•). Our modeling supports the different mechanisms proposed for the reactions of CumO(•) and BnO(•) and the importance of specific substrate/radical hydrogen bond interactions, moreover providing information on the hydrogen abstraction selectivity.

  17. Direct ab initio dynamics studies of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of hydrogen atom with n-propyl radical and isopropyl radical.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Shu; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Shaowen

    2005-02-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of hydrogen atom with n-propyl radical and isopropyl radical were studied using the direct ab initio dynamics approach. BHandHLYP/cc-pVDZ method was employed to optimize the geometries of stationary points as well as the points on the minimum energy path (MEP). The energies of all the points for the two reactions were further refined at the QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory. No barrier was found at the QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ//BHandHLYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for both reactions. The forward and reverse rate constants were evaluated with both canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) and microcanonical variational transition state theory (mu VT) in the temperature range of 300-2,500 K. The fitted three-parameter Arrhenius expression of the calculated CVT rate constants at the QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ//BHandHLYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory are k(CVT) (n-C3H7) = 1.68 x 10(-14) T(0.84) e((319.5/T)) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(CVT) (iso-C3H7)=4.99 x 10(-14) T(0.90) e((159.5/T)) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) for reactions of n-C3H7 + H and iso-C3H7 + H, respectively, which are in good agreement with available literature data. The variational effects were analysed.

  18. The Tropospheric Lifetimes of Halocarbons and Their Reactions with OH Radicals: an Assessment Based on the Concentration of CO-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Volz-Thomas, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    Chemical reaction with hydroxyl radicals formed in the troposphere from ozone photolysis in the presence of methane, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides provides an important removal mechanism for halocarbons containing C-H and C = C double bonds. The isotropic distribution in atmospheric carbon monoxide was used to quantify the tropospheric hydroxyl radical distribution. Here, this methodology is reevaluated in the light of recent chemical kinetic data evaluations and new understandings gained in the life cycles of methane and carbon monoxide. None of these changes has forced a significant revision in the CO-14 approach. However, it is somewhat more clearly apparent how important basic chemical kinetic data are to the accurate establishment of the tropospheric hydroxyl radical distribution.

  19. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2008-08-01

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH2CHCH2, a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH2CHCH2 radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C3H4O (acrolein)+H, C2H4+HCO (formyl radical), and H2CO (formaldehyde)+C2H3. A small signal from C2H2O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C2H5+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to each of these product channels

  20. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  1. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with diethyl ethylphosphonate and triethyl phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laversin, H.; El Masri, A.; Al Rashidi, M.; Roth, E.; Chakir, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rate coefficients for the reaction of two organophosphorus compounds: Triethyl phosphate (TEP) and Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) with OH radicals and Cl atoms at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298-352 K. The following expressions (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP and TEP: kOH+DEEP = (7.84 ± 0.65) × 10-14exp((1866 ± 824)/T), kOH+TEP = (6.54 ± 0.42) × 10-14exp((1897 ± 626)/T), kCl+DEEP = (5.27 ± 0.80) × 10-11exp(765 ± 140/T) and kCl+TEP = (5.23 ± 0.80) × 10-11exp(736 ± 110/T). These results show that the reaction of the studied compounds with Cl atoms proceeds more rapidly than that with OH radicals. The related tropospheric lifetimes suggest that once emitted into the atmosphere, TEP and DEEP can be removed within a few hours in areas close to their emission sources. TEP and DEEP are principally removed by OH radicals. However, in coastal areas where the Cl atoms' concentration is higher, TEP and DEEP removal by reaction with Cl atoms could be a competitive process.

  2. Kinetic investigation of the reactions of NCO radicals with alkanes in the temperature range 294 to 1,113 K

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, A.; Volpp, H.R.; Wolfrum, J. . Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.)

    1994-12-01

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of NCO radicals with methane (k[sub 1]), ethane (k[sub 2]), and propane (k[sub 3]) were measured as a function of temperature in a heatable quartz reactor by means of the laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) pump-probe technique. NCO radicals were produced by the fast precursor reaction NH(a[sup 1] [Delta]) + HNCO [yields] NH[sub 2] + NCO, following the 193-nm photolysis of isocyanic acid. The measure rate coefficients can be described by the following expressions: k[sub 1](512 < T < 1,113 K) = 10[sup 12.99 [+-] 0.12] [times] exp(-34.0[+-]1.8 kJ/mol/RT) cm[sup 3]/mol s; k[sub 2](296 < T < 922 K) = 10[sup 8.21] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (6.89[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(12.2[+-]0.5 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s; and k[sub 3](300 < T < 849 K) = 10[sup 11.49] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (2.15[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(-1.8[+-]0.4 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s. A comparison with the corresponding reactions of CN, Cl, and OH radicals with alkanes suggests that all these title reactions also proceed predominantly via a hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism to form HNCO.

  3. Reaction of benzene with atomic carbon: pathways to fulvenallene and the fulvenallenyl radical in extraterrestrial atmospheres and the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2014-06-05

    The reaction of benzene with ground-state atomic carbon, C((3)P), has been investigated using the G3X-K composite quantum chemical method. A suite of novel energetically favorable pathways that lead to previously unconsidered products are identified. Reaction is initiated by barrierless C atom cycloaddition to benzene on the triplet surface, producing a vibrationally excited [C7H6]* adduct that can dissociate to the cycloheptatrienyl radical (+ H) via a relatively loose transition state 4.4 kcal mol(-1) below the reactant energies. This study also identifies that this reaction adduct can isomerize to generate five-membered ring intermediates that can further dissociate to the global C7H5 minima, the fulvenallenyl radical (+ H), or to c-C5H4 and acetylene, with limiting barriers around 20 and 10 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants, respectively. If intersystem crossing to the singlet surface occurs, isomerization pathways that are lower-yet in energy are available leading to the C7H6 minima fulvenallene, with all barriers over 40 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. From here further barrierless fragmentation to fulvenallenyl + H can proceed at ca. 25 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. In the reducing atmospheres of planets like Jupiter and satellites like Titan, where benzene and C((3)P) are both expected, it is proposed that fulvenallene and the fulvenallenyl radical would be the dominant products of the C6H6 + C((3)P) reaction. Fulvenallenyl may also be a significant reaction product under collision-free conditions representative of the interstellar medium, although further work is required here to confirm the identity of the C7H5 radical product.

  4. Correlation of hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for aryl radicals with their vertical electron affinities and the vertical ionization energies of the hydrogen-atom donors.

    PubMed

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2008-12-31

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropyl alcohol, were measured for 23 structurally different, positively charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for the reaction of three of the aryl radicals with isopropyl alcohol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of 15 different hydrogen-atom donors with two selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X-H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of 29 different aryl radicals and 18 different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be "tuned" by structural changes that influence either the vertical EA of the aryl radical or the vertical IE of the hydrogen atom donor.

  5. CN radical hydrogenation from solid H2 reactions, an alternative way of HCN formation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borget, Fabien; Müller, Sandra; Grote, Dirk; Theulé, Patrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Chiavassa, Thierry; Sander, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Context. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant molecule of the interstellar medium (ISM) in gas phase and it has been assumed to exist in solid state or as coating on grains. Aims: Our goal is to show that solid H2 can act as a hydrogenation agent, reacting with CN radicals to form HCN. Methods: In a H2 matrix, we studied the hydrogenation of the CN radical generated from the vacuum ultraviolet photolysis (VUV-photolysis) of C2N2 at 3.8 K. We modified the wavelengths and the host gas in order to be sure that CN radicals can abstract H from H2 molecules. Results: HCN monomers, dimers, and oligomers have been characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). H2CN as well as CN radicals have also been clearly observed during the photolysis performed at 3.8 K. Conclusions: H2 is a hydrogenation reagent towards CN radicals producing HCN. This type of reaction should be taken into account for the reactivity at low temperature in contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), H2 flakes or in the first sublayers of grains where solid H2 has accumulated.

  6. [Transient emission spectra from OH, CH and C2 free radicals in the combustion reaction of n-decane].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-dong; Li, Ping; Zhang, Chang-hua; Tang, Hong-chang; Ye, Bin; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2012-05-01

    Using an intensified spectroscopic detector CCD and a heated shock tube, transient emission spectra of n-decane in the combustion reaction were measured in a spectral range of 200-850 nm. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 1100-1600 K, a pressure of 2.0 atm, an initial fuel mole fraction of 1.0% and an equivalence ratio of 1.0. Results show that the main emission bands are attributed to OH, CH and C2 radicals produced during the combustion process of n-decane. Emission intensities of the three radicals reached their maximums only after 5 micros from the onset of their ignitions. After about 30 micros had passed, the band of OH radical was still observed, but the bands of CH and C2 radicals almost disappeared. Time histories of spectral emission intensities represent the time histories of concentrations of the three radicals during the process of combustion The emission peak ratio of OH (306.4 nm)/CH(431.4 nm) is approximately 27/100 in the combustion of n-decane, which is much greater than the corresponding ratio of about 7/100 in the combustion of n-heptane. This result reveals that the two fuels have different reaction mechanisms. High resolution characteristic spectra of CH and C2 were also acquired in the present experiment, the spectra show the rotational structures of the bands clearly. Current results are valuable for understanding the property and validating the mechanism of n-decane combustion reaction

  7. Combination reactions of superoxide with 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine radicals in DNA: kinetics and end products.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, Richard; Uvaydov, Yuriy; Crean, Conor; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2005-02-25

    One of the major biomarkers of oxidative stress and oxidative damage of cellular DNA is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), which is more easily oxidized than guanine to diverse oxidative products. In this work, we have investigated further oxidative transformations of 8-oxoGua in single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides to the dehydroguanidinohydantoin, oxaluric acid, and diastereomeric spiroiminodihydantoin lesions. The relative distributions of these end products were explored by a combined kinetic laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approach and are shown to depend markedly on the presence of superoxide radical anions. The 8-oxaGua radicals were produced by one-electron oxidation of 8-oxoGua by 2-aminopurine radicals generated by the two-photon ionization of 2-aminopurine residues site specifically positioned in 5'-d(CC[2-aminopurine]TC[8-oxoGua]CTACC). The hydrated electrons also formed in the photoionization process were trapped by dissolved molecular oxygen thus producing superoxide. A combination reaction between the 8-oxoGua and superoxide radicals occurs with the rate constant of (1.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(8) m(-1) s(-1) and (1.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(8) m(-1) s(-1) in single- and double-stranded DNA, respectively. The major end products of this reaction are the dehydroguanidinohydantoin lesions that slowly hydrolyze to oxaluric acid residues. In the presence of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, an enzyme that induces the rapid catalytic dismutation of superoxide to the less reactive H(2)O(2) and O(2), the yields of the dehydroguanidinohydantion lesions become negligible. Under these conditions, the 8-oxoGua radicals do not exhibit any observable reactivities with oxygen (k < 10(2) m(-1) s(-1)), decay on the time interval of several seconds, and the major reaction products are the spiroiminodihydantoin lesions. The possible biological implications of the 8-oxoGua oxidation are discussed.

  8. Radical-chain oxidative addition mechanism for the reaction of an [Re(CO)5]- anion with α-bromostilbene.

    PubMed

    Sazonov, Petr K; Ptushkin, Dmitry S; Khrustalev, Victor N; Kolotyrkina, Natal'ya G; Beletskaya, Irina P

    2013-03-28

    E-α-Bromostilbene spontaneously reacts with Na[Re(CO)(5)] at 22 °C in THF to give Na[ReBr(CO)(4){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}] and Na[Re(2)(CO)(9){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}] as the main products. Z-α-Bromostilbene is less reactive, but gives the same products. The reaction is stimulated by visible light or a source of solvated electrons (NaK(2.8)) and can be inhibited by a quinomethide radical trap. With an excess of Na[Re(CO)(5)] one can observe the initial formation of Na[ReBr(CO)(4){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}] and its complete transformation into Na[Re(2)(CO)(9){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}]. Treatment of Na[ReBr(CO)(4){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}] with CO almost quantitatively converts it to [Re(CO)(5){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}], the structure of which is established by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. A radical-chain mechanism is proposed for the reaction comprising the following steps: (a) coupling of a Vin˙ radical with Na[Re(CO)(5)], (b) CO-dissociation from the formed 19-electron radical-anion and (c) bromine atom abstraction by [Re(CO)(4){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}]˙(-) from α-bromostilbene. The mechanism is confirmed by the formation of the same Na[ReBr(CO)(4){Z-C(Ph)=CHPh}] product in the presence of NaI. When the radical-chain process is inhibited, a slow halogenophilic reaction is observed, mainly giving the Z and E-isomers of the acylrhenate Na[Re(2)(CO)(9){C(O)C(Ph)=CHPh}].

  9. Investigation of the formation of benzoyl peroxide, benzoic anhydride, and other potential aerosol products from gas-phase reactions of benzoylperoxy radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, Christen M.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products of the reaction of benzaldehyde with Cl atoms and with OH radicals in air in the absence of NOx were investigated in an environmental chamber in order to better understand the possible role of organic peroxy radical self-reactions in SOA formation. SOA products and authentic standards were analyzed using mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, and results show that the yields of benzoyl peroxide (C6H5C(O)OO(O)CC6H5) and benzoic anhydride (C6H5C(O)O(O)CC6H5), two potential products from the gas-phase self-reaction of benzoylperoxy radicals (C6H5C(O)OO·), were less than 0.1%. This is in contrast to results of recent studies that have shown that the gas-phase self-reactions of β-nitrooxyperoxy radicals formed from reactions of isoprene with NO3 radicals form dialkyl peroxides that contribute significantly to gas-phase and SOA products. Such reactions have also been proposed to explain the gas-phase formation of extremely low volatility dimers from autooxidation of terpenes. The results obtained here indicate that, at least for benzoylperoxy radicals, the self-reactions form only benzoyloxy radicals. Analyses of SOA composition and volatility were inconclusive, but it appears that the SOA may consist primarily of oligomers formed through heterogeneous/multiphase reactions possibly involving some combination of phenol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and peroxybenzoic acid.

  10. Temperature dependence of carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals under atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piansawan, Tammarat; Saccon, Marina; Laumer, Werner; Gensch, Iulia; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of the global distribution of atmospheric ethane sources and sinks by using the 13C isotopic composition requires accurate knowledge of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of its atmospheric removal reactions. The quantum mechanical prediction implies the necessity to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range by experiment. In this study, the KIE and its temperature dependence for ethane oxidation by OH radicals was investigated at ambient pressure in a temperature range of 243 K to 303 K. The chemical reactions were carried out in a 15 L PFE reaction chamber, suspended in a thermally controlled oven. The isotope ratios of the gas phase components during the course of the reactions were measured by Thermal Desorption -- Gas Chromatography -- Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). For each temperature, the KIE was derived from the temporal evolution of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of ethane using a method adapted from the relative reaction rate concept. The room temperature KIE of the ethane reaction with OH radicals was found to be 6.85 ± 0.32 ‰. This value is in agreement with the previously reported value of 8.57 ± 1.95 ‰ [Anderson et al. 2004] but has a substantially lower uncertainty. The experimental results will be discussed with the KIE temperature dependence predicted by quantum mechanical calculations. Reference: Rebecca S. Anderson, Lin Huang, Richard Iannone, Alexandra E. Thompson, and Jochen Rudolph (2004), Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase Reactions of Light Alkanes and Ethene with the OH Radical at 296 ± 4 K, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 11537--11544

  11. Gold-Catalyzed β-Regioselective Formal [3 + 2] Cycloaddition of Ynamides with Pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinghua; Chen, Gui; Zhu, Lei; Liao, Yun; Wu, Yufeng; Huang, Xueliang

    2016-09-16

    Here, we report an unprecedented gold(I)-induced β-site regioselective formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition of ynamides with pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles, giving 3-amido-7-(pyrid-2'-yl)indoles in good to excellent yields. A complex of gold(I) catalyst with ynamide was isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis for the first time. Mechanistic investigations suggest the reaction pathway involves a gold-stabilized carbocation intermediate, which in turn participated in sequential C-H bond functionalization of the ortho-position of the phenyl ring.

  12. A new insight of degradation reaction mechanism on desflurane radical with a catalyst of NO: A theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongjiang; Song, Jing; Li, Xiaojun; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    The degradation reaction mechanism of desflurane radical in the presence of NO were investigated using density functional theory. The geometries of all the species were optimized at B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ method. All the energy information are determined using configuration interaction method QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ. Six connected reactions were found, which are labeled as Reaction 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 with the Gibbs barriers of 9.37, 13.74, 26.62, 0.99, 19.49 and 120.36 kJ/mol, respectively. The corresponding rate constants were also evaluated. The detailed reaction mechanism were analyzed and the results show that the Reaction 6 is a rate-determining one of all.

  13. Sulfate radical-based degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls: effects of chloride ion and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guo-Dong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Wang, Yu; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2012-08-15

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radical (SO(4)(·-)) have been recently used for soil and groundwater remediation. The presence of chloride ion in natural or wastewater decreases the reactivity of sulfate radical system, but explanations for this behavior were inconsistent, and the mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, in this paper we investigated the effect of chloride ion on the degradation of 2,4,4'-CB (PCB28) and biphenyl (BP) by persulfate, based on the produced SO(4)(·-). The results showed that the presence of chloride ion greatly inhibited the transformation of PCB28 and BP. Transformation intermediates of BP were monitored, suggesting that the chloride ion can react with SO(4)(·-) to produce chlorine radical, which reacts with BP to generate chlorinated compounds. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these processes, a kinetic model was developed for predicting the effect of chloride ion on the types of radical species and their distributions. The results showed that chloride ion could influence the selectivity of radical species and their distribution, and increase the concentration of the sum of radical species. In addition, the second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined, and quantum-chemical descriptors were introduced to predict the rate constants of other PCBs based on our experimental data.

  14. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species and pollutants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1992-08-01

    To extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, we undertook, a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical thermochemical kinetics/ transition-state-theory (TK-TST) procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in cases where the reagent possessed nonequivalent H atoms.

  15. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  16. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  17. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: Branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Osborn, David L.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-07-16

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e. ˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (–H = 27%, –CH3 = 73%) and (–H = 14%, –CH3 = 86%), respectively. Altogether, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  18. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: Branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes

    DOE PAGES

    Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Trevitt, Adam J.; ...

    2015-07-16

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e. ˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙), a likely product from the high-energymore » photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (–H = 27%, –CH3 = 73%) and (–H = 14%, –CH3 = 86%), respectively. Altogether, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.« less

  19. Theoretical studies of nonadiabatic and spin-forbidden processes: Investigations of the reactions and spectroscopy of radical species relevant to combustion reactions and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yarkony, D.R.

    1993-12-01

    This research program focusses on studies of spin-forbidden and electronically nonadiabatic processes involving radical species relevant to combustion reactions and combustion diagnostics. To study the electronic structure aspects of these processes a unique and powerful system of electronic structure programs, developed over the past nine years, the BROOKLYN codes, is employed. These programs enable the authors to address questions basic to the understanding of elementary combustion processes not tractable using more standard quantum chemistry codes.

  20. Reaction of dimethyl ether with hydroxyl radicals: kinetic isotope effect and prereactive complex formation.

    PubMed

    Bänsch, Cornelie; Kiecherer, Johannes; Szöri, Milan; Olzmann, Matthias

    2013-09-05

    The kinetic isotope effect of the reactions OH + CH3OCH3 (DME) and OH + CD3OCD3 (DME-d6) was experimentally and theoretically studied. Experiments were carried out in a slow-flow reactor at pressures between 5 and 21 bar (helium as bath gas) with production of OH by laser flash photolysis of HNO3 and time-resolved detection of OH by laser-induced fluorescence. The temperature dependences of the rate coefficients obtained can be described by the following modified Arrhenius expressions: k(OH+DME) = (4.5 ± 1.3) × 10(-16) (T/K)(1.48) exp(66.6 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 292-650 K, P = 5.9-20.9 bar) and k(OH+DME-d6) = (7.3 ± 2.2) × 10(-23) (T/K)(3.57) exp(759.8 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 387-554 K, P = 13.0-20.4 bar). A pressure dependence of the rate coefficients was not observed. The agreement of our experimental results for k(OH+DME) with values from other authors is very good, and from a fit to all available literature data, we derived the following modified Arrhenius expression, which reproduces the values obtained in the temperature range T = 230-1500 K at pressures between 30 mbar and 21 bar to better than within ±20%: k(OH+DME) = 8.45 × 10(-18) (T/K)(2.07) exp(262.2 K/T) cm(3) s(-1). For k(OH+DME-d6), to the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental study. For the analysis of the reaction pathway and the kinetic isotope effect, potential energy diagrams were calculated by using three different quantum chemical methods: (I) CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//MP2/6-311G(d,p), (II) CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//CCSD/cc-pVDZ, and (III) CBS-QB3. In all three cases, the reaction is predicted to proceed via a prereaction OH-ether complex with subsequent intramolecular hydrogen abstraction and dissociation to give the methoxymethyl radical and water. Overall rate coefficients were calculated by assuming a thermal equilibrium between the reactants and the prereaction complex and by calculating the rate coefficients of the hydrogen abstraction step from canonical transition state theory

  1. Shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species and pollutants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B.

    1998-02-01

    Shock heating t-butyl hydroperoxide behind a reflected shock wave has proved to be as a convenient source of hydroxyl radicals at temperatures near 1000 K. We applied this technique to the measurement of reaction rate coefficients of OH with several species of interest in combustion chemistry, and developed a thermochemical kinetics/transition state theory (TK-TST) model for predicting the temperature dependence of OH rate coefficients.

  2. NO3 radical production from the reaction between the Criegee intermediate CH2OO and NO2.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Bin; McLeod, Matthew W; Jones, Roderic L; Bloss, William J

    2013-10-28

    Formation of the NO3 radical was observed following photolysis of the CH2I2 + O2 system at 248 nm under ambient atmospheric boundary layer conditions (~760 Torr and 297 K) in the presence of NO2. The Criegee intermediate (CI) CH2OO is believed to be responsible for the NO3 production. The potential of such reactions to enhance the rate of NO3 production in the atmosphere is discussed.

  3. Theoretical description of spin-selective reactions of radical pairs diffusing in spherical 2D and 3D microreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Konstantin L. Lukzen, Nikita N.; Sadovsky, Vladimir M.

    2015-08-28

    In this work, we treat spin-selective recombination of a geminate radical pair (RP) in a spherical “microreactor,” i.e., of a RP confined in a micelle, vesicle, or liposome. We consider the microreactor model proposed earlier, in which one of the radicals is located at the center of the micelle and the other one undergoes three-dimensional diffusion inside the micelle. In addition, we suggest a two-dimensional model, in which one of the radicals is located at the “pole” of the sphere, while the other one diffuses on the spherical surface. For this model, we have obtained a general analytical expression for the RP recombination yield in terms of the free Green function of two-dimensional diffusion motion. In turn, this Green function is expressed via the Legendre functions and thus takes account of diffusion over a restricted spherical surface and its curvature. The obtained expression allows one to calculate the RP recombination efficiency at an arbitrary magnetic field strength. We performed a comparison of the two models taking the same geometric parameters (i.e., the microreactor radius and the closest approach distance of the radicals), chemical reactivity, magnetic interactions in the RP and diffusion coefficient. Significant difference between the predictions of the two models is found, which is thus originating solely from the dimensionality effect: for different dimensionality of space, the statistics of diffusional contacts of radicals becomes different altering the reaction yield. We have calculated the magnetic field dependence of the RP reaction yield and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization of the reaction products at different sizes of the microreactor, exchange interaction, and spin relaxation rates. Interestingly, due to the intricate interplay of diffusional contacts of reactants and spin dynamics, the dependence of the reaction yield on the microreactor radius is non-monotonous. Our results are of importance for (i) interpreting

  4. Theoretical description of spin-selective reactions of radical pairs diffusing in spherical 2D and 3D microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Sadovsky, Vladimir M.; Lukzen, Nikita N.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we treat spin-selective recombination of a geminate radical pair (RP) in a spherical "microreactor," i.e., of a RP confined in a micelle, vesicle, or liposome. We consider the microreactor model proposed earlier, in which one of the radicals is located at the center of the micelle and the other one undergoes three-dimensional diffusion inside the micelle. In addition, we suggest a two-dimensional model, in which one of the radicals is located at the "pole" of the sphere, while the other one diffuses on the spherical surface. For this model, we have obtained a general analytical expression for the RP recombination yield in terms of the free Green function of two-dimensional diffusion motion. In turn, this Green function is expressed via the Legendre functions and thus takes account of diffusion over a restricted spherical surface and its curvature. The obtained expression allows one to calculate the RP recombination efficiency at an arbitrary magnetic field strength. We performed a comparison of the two models taking the same geometric parameters (i.e., the microreactor radius and the closest approach distance of the radicals), chemical reactivity, magnetic interactions in the RP and diffusion coefficient. Significant difference between the predictions of the two models is found, which is thus originating solely from the dimensionality effect: for different dimensionality of space, the statistics of diffusional contacts of radicals becomes different altering the reaction yield. We have calculated the magnetic field dependence of the RP reaction yield and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization of the reaction products at different sizes of the microreactor, exchange interaction, and spin relaxation rates. Interestingly, due to the intricate interplay of diffusional contacts of reactants and spin dynamics, the dependence of the reaction yield on the microreactor radius is non-monotonous. Our results are of importance for (i) interpreting

  5. Reactions of the tetraoxidosulfate(˙-) and hydroxyl radicals with poly(sodium α-methylstyrene sulfonate).

    PubMed

    Dockheer, Sindy M; Gubler, Lorenz; Koppenol, Willem H

    2013-04-14

    Poly(α-methylstyrene sulfonic acid) (PAMS) represents a class of polymers that can form the protogenic constituent in electrolyte membranes for fuel cells. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in the degradation of the fuel cell membranes. Having previously established that damage may be mediated via abstraction of a benzylic hydrogen, we examined model compounds similar to those used before, but with a methyl group at the α-position. We studied the reaction of HO˙ and SO4(˙-), generated by pulse radiolysis, with model compounds in aqueous solution, and measured k = (2 ± 0.5) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) and (2 - 3) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of HO˙ with PAMS with average molecular weights of 2640 Da (PAMS-2640) and 6440 Da (PAMS-6440), respectively, at room temperature. At low pH, the decay of the hydroxycyclohexadienyl radical thus formed is accompanied by the formation of an absorption band in the visible region of the spectrum, which we tentatively assign to the radical cation of PAMS-2640 and -6440. The radical cation of PAMS-2640, formed by the reaction of SO4(˙-) with k = (6 ± 1) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), has a local absorption maximum at 560 nm, with ε560 ≥ 1400 M(-1) cm(-1). For the reaction of HO˙ and SO4(˙-) with the model compound benzenesulfonate, we measured k = (4-5) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, while the reaction of SO4(˙-) with PAMS-6440 proceeds with (0.8-1) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The 4-sulfophenoxyl radical was generated via the reaction of N3˙ with 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate; ε410 ≥ 2300 M(-1) cm(-1). Not unexpectedly, the radical cation of PAMS is longer-lived than that of polystyrene sulfonic acid. Furthermore, fragmentation may result in desulfonation.

  6. Measuring Rate Constants for Reactions of the Simplest Criegee Intermediate CH_2OO by Monitoring the OH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingdi; Bayes, Kyle D.; Sander, Stanley P.

    2014-06-01

    Criegee radicals are important atmospheric intermediates formed from ozonolysis of alkenes. It potentially contributes to the atmospheric oxidation cycle mainly by generating OH radicals through unimolecular decomposition. In this work, we focus on studying the unimolecular decomposition reaction of the smallest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO), which was generated by reacting CH2I with O2. While generating the CH2OO molecule by reacting CH2I with O2, significant amounts of the OH radical were observed by laser-induced fluorescence. The addition of molecules known to react with CH2OO increased the observed decay rates of the OH signal. Using the OH signals as a proxy for the CH2OO concentration, the rate constant for the reaction of hexafluoroacetone with CH2OO was determined. The rate constant for the reaction of SO2 with CH2OO showed no pressure dependence over the range of 50 to 200 Torr. This work provides the direct experimental evidence for the unimolecular decomposition of CH2OO, and possible mechanisms of CH2OO have been investigated by this multidimensional study.

  7. Synchrotron Photoionization Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Kinetics and Product Formation in the Allyl Radical (H2CCHCH2)Self Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, Talitha M.; Melini, giovanni; Goulay, Fabien; Leone, Stephen R.; Fahr, Askar; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Product channels for the self-reaction of the resonance-stabilized allyl radical, C3H5 + C3H5, have been studied with isomeric specificity at temperatures from 300-600 K and pressures from 1-6 Torr using time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry. Under these conditions 1,5-hexadiene was the only C6H10 product isomer detected. The lack of isomerization of the C6H10 product is in marked contrast to the C6H6 product in the related C3H3 + C3H3 reaction, and is due to the more saturated electronic structure of the C6H10 system. The disproportionation product channel, yielding allene + propene, was also detected, with an upper limit on the branching fraction relative to recombination of 0.03. Analysis of the allyl radical decay at 298 K yielded a total rate coefficient of (2.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp -11) cu cm/molecule/s, in good agreement with pre.vious experimental measurements using ultraviolet kinetic absorption spectroscopy and a recent theoretical determination using variable reaction coordinate transition state theory. This result provides independent indirect support for the literature value of the allyl radical ultraviolet absorption cross-section near 223 nm.

  8. In Situ FTIR Spectroscopic Monitoring of Electrochemically Controlled Organic Reactions in a Recycle Reactor

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Alexander. G.; Luca, Oana. R.; Baran, Phil. S.

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical cell coupled with a recycle loop through a transmission FTIR cell is employed in studies of two free radical organic reactions, the oxidation of allylic alcohols and the trifluoromethylation of heteroarenes. Rapid mixing through the recycle loop allows continuous monitoring of reaction progress. Electrochemical generation of free radicals allows their controlled mediation into the reaction mixture for more efficient reaction. Kinetic profiles provide mechanistic insight into reactions under electrochemical control. PMID:27069673

  9. In Situ FTIR Spectroscopic Monitoring of Electrochemically Controlled Organic Reactions in a Recycle Reactor.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Alexander G; Luca, Oana R; Baran, Phil S; Blackmond, Donna G

    2016-02-01

    An electrochemical cell coupled with a recycle loop through a transmission FTIR cell is employed in studies of two free radical organic reactions, the oxidation of allylic alcohols and the trifluoromethylation of heteroarenes. Rapid mixing through the recycle loop allows continuous monitoring of reaction progress. Electrochemical generation of free radicals allows their controlled mediation into the reaction mixture for more efficient reaction. Kinetic profiles provide mechanistic insight into reactions under electrochemical control.

  10. A theoretical study on the reaction mechanism of O2 with C4H9• radical.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong-chen; Gong, Xue-dong

    2012-05-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed using the complete basis set model (CBS-QB3) to study the reaction mechanism of butane radical (C(4)H(9)•) with oxygen (O(2)). On the calculated potential energy surface, the addition of O(2) to C(4)H(9)• forms three intermediates barrierlessly, which can undergo subsequent isomerization or decomposition reaction leading to various products: HOO• + C(4)H(8), C(2)H(5)• + CH(2)CHOOH, OH• + C(3)H(7)CHO, OH• + cycle-C(4)H(8)O, CH(3)• + CH(3)CHCHOOH, CH(2)OOH• + C(3)H(6). Five pathways are supposed in this study. After taking into account the reaction barrier and enthalpy, the most possible reaction pathway is C(4)H(9)• + O(2) → IM1 → TS5 → IM3 → TS6 → IM4 → TS7 → OH• + cycle-C(4)H(8)O.

  11. Using reduced catalysts for oxidation reactions: mechanistic studies of the "Periana-Catalytica" system for CH4 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Oleg A; Bischof, Steven M; Konnick, Michael M; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Ziatdinov, Vadim R; Goddard, William A; Ahlquist, Mårten; Periana, Roy A

    2013-10-02

    Designing oxidation catalysts based on CH activation with reduced, low oxidation state species is a seeming dilemma given the proclivity for catalyst deactivation by overoxidation. This dilemma has been recognized in the Shilov system where reduced Pt(II) is used to catalyze methane functionalization. Thus, it is generally accepted that key to replacing Pt(IV) in that system with more practical oxidants is ensuring that the oxidant does not over-oxidize the reduced Pt(II) species. The "Periana-Catalytica" system, which utilizes (bpym)Pt(II)Cl2 in concentrated sulfuric acid solvent at 200 °C, is a highly stable catalyst for the selective, high yield oxy-functionalization of methane. In lieu of the over-oxidation dilemma, the high stability and observed rapid oxidation of (bpym)Pt(II)Cl2 to Pt(IV) in the absence of methane would seem to contradict the originally proposed mechanism involving CH activation by a reduced Pt(II) species. Mechanistic studies show that the originally proposed mechanism is incomplete and that while CH activation does proceed with Pt(II) there is a solution to the over-oxidation dilemma. Importantly, contrary to the accepted view to minimize Pt(II) overoxidation, these studies also show that increasing that rate could increase the rate of catalysis and catalyst stability. The mechanistic basis for this counterintuitive prediction could help to guide the design of new catalysts for alkane oxidation that operate by CH activation.

  12. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    Secondary organic aerosol formed during oxidation of different volatile organic compounds is composed from a number of final and intermediate reaction products. The final products include compounds in both low and high molecular weight range called also oligomer species. These compounds can be highly volatile, as well as being semi- or low-volatility compounds. This study characterized intermediate reactive radical products formed from previously often studied alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In order to passivate those radical species nitrone spin traps were used. 5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrole-N-oxide (DMPO), and 5-dietoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) traps were able to successfully trap oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals produced from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode with mass spectrometry (MS) detection was used to scan spectra of formed spin trap adducts and the tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) to elucidate its structures as well as structures of captured radicals. The same method was applied to analyze radical species present in ambient PM2.5 samples. Few carbon- (alkyl) and oxygen- (alkoxyl) centered radicals were captured with DMPO and DEPMPO traps. The second part of this study was focused on high molecular weight (high-MW) species formed from the same reaction (alpha-pinene/ozone), but found also in fine particulate matter fractions of ambient samples. LC/MS/MS analysis of dimer species from chamber study revealed fragments that can originate from peroxide structures. Proposed reaction for these peroxide dimer formation is self reaction of two peroxyl radicals, followed by the loss of oxygen molecule. These findings emphasize the role of peroxyl (ROO) radicals in formation of high-MW products and are in line with the high O:C ratio results reported in other studies. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) extracts of three size fractions of the ambient aerosol, PM1--2.5, PM0.1--1, and PM<0

  13. A VUV photoionization study of the multichannel reaction of phenyl radicals with 1,3-butadiene under combustion relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid; Mebel, Alexander M; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2013-01-07

    We studied the reaction of phenyl radicals (C(6)H(5)) with 1,3-butadiene (H(2)CCHCHCH(2)) exploiting a high temperature chemical reactor under combustion-like conditions (300 Torr, 873 K). The reaction products were probed in a supersonic beam by utilizing VUV radiation from the Advanced Light Source and by recording the experimental PIE curves at mass-to-charge ratios of m/z = 130 (C(10)H(10)(+)), 116 (C(9)H(8)(+)), and 104 (C(8)H(8)(+)). Our data suggest that the atomic hydrogen (H), methyl (CH(3)), and vinyl (C(2)H(3)) losses are open with estimated branching ratios of about 86 ± 4%, 8 ± 2%, and 6 ± 2%, respectively. The isomer distributions were probed further by fitting the experimentally recorded PIE curves with a linear combination of the PIE curves of individual C(10)H(10), C(9)H(8), and C(8)H(8) isomers. These fits indicate the formation of three C(10)H(10) isomers (trans-1,3-butadienylbenzene, 1,4-dihydronaphthalene, 1-methylindene), three C(9)H(8) isomers (indene, phenylallene, 1-phenyl-1-methylacetylene), and a C(8)H(8) isomer (styrene). A comparison with results from recent crossed molecular beam studies of the 1,3-butadiene-phenyl radical reaction and electronic structure calculations suggests that trans-1,3-butadienylbenzene (130 amu), 1,4-dihydronaphthalene (130 amu), and styrene (104 amu) are reaction products formed as a consequence of a bimolecular reaction between the phenyl radical and 1,3-butadiene. 1-Methylindene (130 amu), indene (116 amu), phenylallene (116 amu), and 1-phenyl-1-methylacetylene (116 amu) are synthesized upon reaction of the phenyl radical with three C(4)H(6) isomers: 1,2-butadiene (H(2)CCCH(CH(3))), 1-butyne (HCCC(2)H(5)), and 2-butyne (CH(3)CCCH(3)); these C(4)H(6) isomers can be formed from 1,3-butadiene via hydrogen atom assisted isomerization reactions or via thermal rearrangements of 1,3-butadiene involving hydrogen shifts in the high temperature chemical reactor.

  14. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 2. Infrared multiphoton dissociation and mechanistic studies of z-ions from pentapeptides.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Dissociations of z(4) ions from pentapeptides AAXAR where X=H, Y, F, W, and V produce dominant z(2) ions that account for >50 % of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z(4) ions proceed by amide trans→cis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable C(β) radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the C(α)-CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x(2) intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x(2) intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z(2) fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CID and IRMPD MS(4) experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x(2) ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate.

  15. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part2. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation and Mechanistic Studies of z-Ions from Pentapeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Dissociations of z4 ions from pentapeptides AAXAR, where X = H, Y, F, W, and V, produce dominant z2 ions that account for >50% of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z4 ions proceed by amide transcis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable Cβ radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the Cα—CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x2 intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x2 intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z2 fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CAD and IRMPD MS4 experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x2 ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate. PMID:22669762

  16. Free-radical events in chemical and biochemical reactions involving carcinogenic arylamines

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    The possible involvement of free radicals in the development of cancer has been investigated now for many years. Rather than investigating the overall relationship, most recent approaches have focused on free-radical involvement in the metabolism of chemicals known to produce tumors. Arylamine carcinogenesis is reviewed in detail. There appear to be at least two possible steps whereby free radicals are involved in arylamine carcinogen metabolism. The first involves oxidative activation of the N-hydroxylated arylamine carcinogen via a nitroxyl free-radical intermediate. This step is sensitive to antioxidants and is carried out by several heme compounds in combination with hydroperoxides including lipid hydroperoxides. The second step involves the addition of c-nitroso arylamine carcinogens to unsaturated membrane lipid components to form a nitroxyl-free-radical adduct. The nitrosofluorene-methyl oleate adduct is mutagenic in the Ames test; the possibility that the membrane lipid-c-nitroso arylamine carcinogen adducts are active forms of the carcinogens is being investigated.

  17. Highly Functionalized Cyclopentane Derivatives by Tandem Michael Addition/Radical Cyclization/Oxygenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Holan, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jones, Peter G; Jahn, Ullrich

    2015-06-26

    Densely functionalized cyclopentane derivatives with up to four consecutive stereocenters are assembled by a tandem Michael addition/single-electron transfer oxidation/radical cyclization/oxygenation strategy mediated by ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate, a recyclable, less toxic single-electron transfer oxidant. Ester enolates were coupled with α-benzylidene and α-alkylidene β-dicarbonyl compounds with switchable diastereoselectivity. This pivotal steering element subsequently controls the diastereoselectivity of the radical cyclization step. The substitution pattern of the radical cyclization acceptor enables a switch of the cyclization mode from a 5-exo pattern for terminally substituted olefin units to a 6-endo mode for internally substituted acceptors. The oxidative anionic/radical strategy also allows efficient termination by oxygenation with the free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl, and two C-C bonds and one C-O bond are thus formed in the sequence. A stereochemical model is proposed that accounts for all of the experimental results and allows the prediction of the stereochemical outcome. Further transformations of the synthesized cyclopentanes are reported.

  18. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  19. Hydration Leads to Efficient Reactions of the Carbonate Radical Anion with Hydrogen Chloride in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Kit; van der Linde, Christian; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2017-01-12

    The carbonate radical anion CO3(•-) is a key intermediate in tropospheric anion chemistry. Despite its radical character, only a small number of reactions have been reported in the literature. Here we investigate the gas-phase reactions of CO3(•-) and CO3(•-)(H2O) with HCl under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Bare CO3(•-) forms OHCl(•-) with a rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-12) cm(3) s(-1), which corresponds to an efficiency of only 0.4%. Hydration accelerates the reaction, and ligand exchange of H2O against HCl proceeds with a rate of 2.7 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). Quantum chemical calculations reveal that OHCl(•-) is best described as an OH(•) hydrogen bonded to Cl(-), while the ligand exchange product is Cl(-)(HCO3(•)). Under tropospheric conditions, where CO3(•-)(H2O) is the dominant species, Cl(-)(HCO3(•)) is efficiently formed. These reactions must be included in models of tropospheric anion chemistry.

  20. Reactivity of CHI3 with OH radicals: X-abstraction reaction pathways (X = H, I), atmospheric chemistry, and nuclear safety.

    PubMed

    Sudolská, Mária; Louis, Florent; Cernušák, Ivan

    2014-10-09

    The X-abstraction (X = H, I) pathways in the reaction of CHI3 with OH radical, a possible iodoform removal process relevant to the Earth's atmosphere and conditions prevailing in the case of a nuclear accident, have been studied applying highly correlated ab initio quantum chemistry methods and canonical transition-state theory to obtain reaction energy profiles and rate constants. Geometry optimizations of reactants, products, molecular complexes, and transition states determined at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory have been followed by DK-CCSD(T)/ANO-RCC single-point energy calculations. Further improvement of electronic energies has been achieved by applying spin-orbit coupling, corrections toward full configuration interaction, vibration contributions, and tunneling corrections. Calculated reaction enthalpies at 0 K are -108.2 and -5.1 kJ mol(-1) for the H- and I-abstraction pathways, respectively; the strongly exothermic H-abstraction pathway is energetically favored over the modestly exothermic I-abstraction one. The overall rate constant at 298 K based on our ab initio calculations is 4.90 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), with the I-abstraction pathway being the major channel over the temperature range of 250-2000 K. The CHI3 atmospheric lifetime with respect to the removal reaction with OH radical is predicted to be about 6 h, very short compared to that of other halomethanes.

  1. Reaction studies of hot silicon and germanium radicals. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1980-08-31

    The experimental approach to attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined and the progress made in the last year is reviewed in sections entitled: (a) primary steps in the reaction of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms and the identification of reactive intermediates in the recoil reactions; (b) thermally induced silylene and germylene reactions; (c) ion-molecule reaction studies.

  2. Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Ogilvie, William W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant redesign of the introductory organic chemistry curriculum at the authors' institution is described. There are two aspects that differ greatly from a typical functional group approach. First, organic reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism are taught before students have learned a single reaction. The conservation of…

  3. Differentiation of the pyridine radical cation from its distonic isomers by ion-molecule reactions with dioxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobst, Karl J.; de Winter, Julien; Flammang, Robert; Terlouw, Johan K.; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2009-09-01

    In a previous study on the pyridine ion (1) and the pyridine-2-ylid isomer (2), we reported that ions 2 readily react with H2O to produce 2-pyridone ions at m/z 95, by O-atom abstraction. The mechanism for this intriguing reaction, however, was not established. This prompted us to use model chemistry calculations (CBS-QB3) to probe various mechanistic scenarios and to perform complementary experiments with the new, more versatile, ion-molecule reaction chamber of the Mons Autospec 6F mass spectrometer. It appears that H2O is not reacting neutral that produces the 2-pyridone ion of the above reaction, but rather O2 from air co-introduced with the water vapour. Theory and experiment agree that the exothermic reaction of O2 with the pyridine-2-ylid ion leads to loss of 3O from a stable peroxide-type adduct ion at m/z 111. Similarly, pyridine-3-ylid ions (3) generate 3-pyridone ions, but the reaction in this case is thermoneutral. The m/z 111:95 peak intensity ratios in the spectra of the ion-molecule products from ions 2 and 3 may serve to differentiate the isomers.

  4. Photochemistry and radical chemistry under low intensity visible light sources: application to photopolymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Lalevée, Jacques; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Dietlin, Céline; Graff, Bernadette; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-18

    The search for radical initiators able to work under soft conditions is a great challenge, driven by the fact that the use of safe and cheap light sources is very attractive. In the present paper, a review of some recently reported photoinitiating systems for polymerization under soft conditions is provided. Different approaches based on multi-component systems (e.g., photoredox catalysis) or light harvesting photoinitiators are described and discussed. The chemical mechanisms associated with the production of free radicals usable as initiating species or mediators of cations are reported.

  5. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-08

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  6. Rate constants for the reactions of benzyl and methyl-substituted benzyl radicals with O 2 and NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebata, Takayuki; Obi, Kin-ichi; Tanaka, Ikuzo

    1981-02-01

    Rate constants for reactions of benzyl, o-niethylbenzyl and p-meihylbenzyl radicals with O 2 and NO have been measured at room temperature. The radicals were generated by UV flash photolysis and the time decay measured by absorption at ≈ 300 nm. The rate constants are: benzyl (0.99 ± 0.07 and 9.5 ± 1.2), o-methylbenzyl (1.2 ± 0.07 and 8.6 ± 0.8) and p-mithyl-benzyl (1.1= 0.10 and 8.9 = 0.9) for O 2 and NO respectively in units of 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1.

  7. Electronic nonadiabatic effects in low temperature radical-radical reactions. I. C({sup 3}P) + OH({sup 2}Π)

    SciTech Connect

    Maergoiz, A. I.; Nikitin, E. E.; Troe, J.

    2014-07-28

    The formation of collision complexes, as a first step towards reaction, in collisions between two open-electronic shell radicals is treated within an adiabatic channel approach. Adiabatic channel potentials are constructed on the basis of asymptotic electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions, accounting for spin-orbit coupling within the multitude of electronic states arising from the separated reactants. Suitable coupling schemes (such as rotational + electronic) are designed to secure maximum adiabaticity of the channels. The reaction between C({sup 3}P) and OH({sup 2}Π) is treated as a representative example. The results show that the low temperature association rate coefficients in general cannot be represented by results obtained with a single (generally the lowest) potential energy surface of the adduct, asymptotically reaching the lowest fine-structure states of the reactants, and a factor accounting for the thermal population of the latter states. Instead, the influence of non-Born–Oppenheimer couplings within the multitude of electronic states arising during the encounter markedly increases the capture rates. This effect extends up to temperatures of several hundred K.

  8. Adrenochrome reaction implicates oxygen radicals in metabolism of cyclosporine A and FK-506 in rat and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S S; Strobel, H W; Napoli, K L; Grevel, J

    1993-06-01

    The role of oxygen radicals in the metabolism of cyclosporine A (CyA), FR900506 (FK-506) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system was investigated in vitro in rat and human microsomal preparations. Varying concentrations of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4 (100 microM-1.0 mM) were added to microsomal preparations, and lipid peroxidation was measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) formation as detected by the thiobarbituric acid assay. The effects of oxygen radical scavengers [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)] and an antioxidant [glutathione (GLUT)] were tested on various incubations of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4 to assess the role of oxygen radicals in lipid peroxidation. CyA-dependent MDA formation was moderately inhibited by SOD in the rat model and increased by SOD in the human model. In both models, CAT slightly inhibited CyA-dependent MDA formation and GLUT significantly inhibited MDA formation. FK-506-dependent MDA formation, studied only in the rat model, paralleled CyA-induced MDA formation but showed greater inhibition with CAT and less inhibition with SOD or GLUT. In both models, CCl4-dependent MDA formation was significantly inhibited by GLUT and showed no sensitivity to SOD or CAT. In addition, the adrenochrome reaction, which measures the oxidation of epinephrine to adrenochrome, was used to measure the increased oxygen radical-flux resulting from the metabolism of CyA, FK-506 and CCl4. CyA with epinephrine showed the highest oxidative activity, followed by FK-506 and then CCl4, which showed the least formation of adrenochrome. These results indicated a role for oxygen radicals in CyA and FK-506 metabolism.

  9. Cyclofunctionalization and free-radical-based hydrogen-transfer reactions. An iterative reaction sequence applied to the synthesis of the C(7)-C(16) subunit of zincophorin.

    PubMed

    Guindon, Y; Murtagh, L; Caron, V; Landry, S R; Jung, G; Bencheqroun, M; Faucher, A M; Guérin, B

    2001-08-10

    The strategy considered herein features an iodocyclofunctionalization/hydrogen-transfer reaction sequence for the elaboration of propionate motifs. Proceeding with excellent yield and diastereoselectivity, the synthetic sequence proposed gives access to the anti-anti dipropionate motif when the reduction step is performed under the control of the exocyclic effect. The tandem sequence is applied successfully to the synthesis of the C(7)-C(16) subunit of zincophorin, and iteration of the process gives the desired anti-anti-anti-anti polypropionate stereopentad. Modifications of the reaction sequence--including phenylselenocyclofunctionalization, carbonate hydrolysis, and chelation-controlled radical reduction reactions--lead to the formation of the anti-syn dipropionate motif with remarkable diastereocontrol.

  10. Use of the Spin-Trapping method to establish the radical steps in the reactions of organic compounds of zinc, cadmium, and mercury with various peroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dodonov, V.A.; Grishin, D.F.

    1985-06-01

    This paper uses the spin trapping method to investigate the homolytic reactions of group II organometallic compounds (OMC) with organic and heteroorganic peroxides. The radical reactions of the OMC with peroxides was investigated and the reactivity of the spin traps was examined with respect to compounds of zinc, cadmium, and mercury. Phenyl-tert-butylnitron (I), 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (II), and tri-bromonitrobenzene (III) were chosen as spin traps. The radicals formed are aable to initiate the polymerization of vinyl monomers.

  11. Kinetics of the Reactions of Bromine Monoxide Radicals with Chlorine Monoxide and Bromine Monoxide, and the Chemiluminescent Reactions of Fluorine with Dimethyl Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnipseed, Andrew Allen

    1990-01-01

    The chemistry of BrO radicals has been investigated using the technique of discharge flow coupled to mass spectrometry. BrO radicals play an important role in bromine chemistry of the stratosphere where they are predicted to be one of the most predominant forms of bromine. The reactions of BrO + BrO and Bro + ClO are rate determining steps in two catalytic destruction cycles for ozone which do not involve O atoms and should be important in the lower stratosphere and in the recently discovered ozone "hole" in Antarctica. Up to 25% of the ozone depletion is thought to occur through the coupling of bromine and chlorine chemistry in the BrO + ClO reaction. The present study has investigated the reaction of BrO + BrO over the temperature range of 253-400 K and found that the rate coefficient can be fit with the Arrhenius expression k_7(T) = (1.06 +/- 0.20) times 10 ^{-12} exp((251 +/- 56)/T) cm^3 molec ^{-1} s^{-1 }. The reaction exhibits a small negative temperature dependence and is in good agreement with past measurements. Furthermore the branching ratio into the channel forming Br_2 has been measured to be 0.12 +/- 0.04 at room temperature. The rate coefficient for the BrO + ClO reaction has been found to fit the Arrhenius expression k_5(T) = (2.59 +/- 0.36) times 10^{-12} exp((445 +/- 50)/T) cm^3 molec^{-1} s^ {-1} over the temperature range 234-408 K. Three product channels have been identified and quantified: (a) ClOO + Br, (b) OClO + Br, and (c) BrCl + O _2 as a function of temperature. These measurements have shown that the BrO + ClO reaction does proceed at a fast enough rate at low temperatures to be a major factor in ozone destruction in the polar stratosphere. A third study completed was of the reaction of F_2 + dimethyl sulfide which produces intense chemiluminescence. This reaction was undertaken in order to understand the workings of the F_2 -induced chemiluminescence detector for gas chromatography developed in our laboratory. It was found that this

  12. A mechanistic insight into the effect of piperidine as an organocatalyst on the [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of benzalacetone with phenyl azide from a computational study.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, J; Bakavoli, M; Gholizadeh, M; Eshghi, H

    2016-07-26

    Several transition structures (TSs) for catalyst-free [3 + 2] cycloaddition and two plausible mechanistic pathways for the organocatalyzed [3 + 2] cycloaddition (32CA) between benzalacetone and phenyl azide were located by quantum chemistry methods. Calculations were carried out with B3LYP, MPWB1K and M06-2X functionals using 6-31G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets in gas and solvent phases. The calculated activation barriers imply that the lowest barrier pathway is the catalyzed process producing 3-regioisomers through the iminium intermediate and not through the dienamine route. Electronic displacements along the reaction path have been examined using a topological analysis of the electron-localization function (ELF). ELF topological analyses along the intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) of both catalyzed and uncatalyzed 32CA reactions indicated that while the first C1-N1 single bond is formed as a dative bond, the formation of the second C2-N3 bond takes place via a C-to-N coupling between the interacting centers of the reagents. Moreover, the ELF analyses imply that the reaction mechanism is a two-stage one-step process in the presence of a piperidine organocatalyst, while bond formation in an uncatalyzed process is almost synchronous.

  13. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  14. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  15. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8

  16. Mechanistic Studies Lead to Dramatically Improved Reaction Conditions for the Cu-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydroamination of Olefins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enantioselective copper(I) hydride (CuH)-catalyzed hydroamination has undergone significant development over the past several years. To gain a general understanding of the factors governing these reactions, kinetic and spectroscopic studies were performed on the CuH-catalyzed hydroamination of styrene. Reaction profile analysis, rate order assessment, and Hammett studies indicate that the turnover-limiting step is regeneration of the CuH catalyst by reaction with a silane, with a phosphine-ligated copper(I) benzoate as the catalyst resting state. Spectroscopic, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and nonlinear effect studies are consistent with a monomeric active catalyst. With this insight, targeted reagent optimization led to the development of an optimized protocol with an operationally simple setup (ligated copper(II) precatalyst, open to air) and short reaction times (<30 min). This improved protocol is amenable to a diverse range of alkene and alkyne substrate classes. PMID:26522837

  17. EPR characterization of ascorbyl and sulfur dioxide anion radicals trapped during the reaction of bovine Cytochrome c Oxidase with molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Michelle A.; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.; Gerfen, Gary J.

    2010-04-01

    The reaction intermediates of reduced bovine Cytochrome c Oxidase (CcO) were trapped following its reaction with oxygen at 50 μs-6 ms by innovative freeze-quenching methods and studied by EPR. When the enzyme was reduced with either ascorbate or dithionite, distinct radicals were generated; X-band (9 GHz) and D-band (130 GHz) CW-EPR measurements support the assignments of these radicals to ascorbyl and sulfur dioxide anion radical (SO2-rad), respectively. The X-band spectra show a linewidth of 12 G for the ascorbyl radical and 11 G for the SO2-rad radical and an isotropic g-value of 2.005 for both species. The D-band spectra reveal clear distinctions in the g-tensors and powder patterns of the two species. The ascorbyl radical spectrum displays approximate axial symmetry with g-values of gx = 2.0068, gy = 2.0066, and gz = 2.0023. The SO2-rad>/SUP> radical has rhombic symmetry with g-values of gx = 2.0089, gy = 2.0052, and gz = 2.0017. When the contributions from the ascorbyl and SO2-rad radicals were removed, no protein-based radical on CcO could be identified in the EPR spectra.

  18. Gas-phase reaction of methyl isothiocyanate and methyl isocyanate with hydroxyl radicals under static relative rate conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhou; Hebert, Vincent R; Miller, Glenn C

    2014-02-26

    Gaseous methyl isothiocyanate (MITC), the principal breakdown product of the soil fumigant metam sodium (sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate), is an inhalation exposure concern to persons living near treated areas. Inhalation exposure also involves gaseous methyl isocyanate (MIC), a highly reactive and toxic transformation product of MITC. In this work, gas-phase hydroxyl (OH) radical reaction rate constants of MITC and MIC have been determined using a static relative rate technique under controlled laboratory conditions. The rate constants obtained are 15.36 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MITC and 3.62 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MIC. The average half-lives of MITC and MIC in the atmosphere are estimated to be 15.7 and 66.5 h, respectively. The molar conversion of MITC to MIC for OH radical reactions is 67% ± 8%, which indicates that MIC is the primary product of the MITC-OH reaction in the gas phase.

  19. Measuring rate constants for reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) by monitoring the OH radical.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Bayes, Kyle D; Sander, Stanley P

    2014-01-30

    While generating the CH2OO molecule by reacting CH2I with O2, significant amounts of the OH radical were observed by laser-induced fluorescence. At least two different processes formed OH. A fast process was probably initiated by a reaction of vibrationally hot CH2I radicals. The second process appeared to be associated with the decay of the CH2OO molecule. The addition of molecules known to react with CH2OO increased the observed decay rates of the OH signal. Using the OH signals as a proxy for the CH2OO concentration, the rate constant for the reaction of hexafluoroacetone with CH2OO was determined to be (3.33 ± 0.27) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with the value measured by Taatjes et al.1 The rate constant for the reaction of SO2 with CH2OO, (3.53 ± 0.29) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), showed no pressure dependence over the range of 50-200 Torr and was in agreement with the value at 4 Torr reported by Welz et al.

  20. Temperature effect on back electron-transfer reactions within a geminate radical pair: The influence of the solvent on the adiabaticity of the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauthey, Eric; Suppan, Paul

    1989-12-01

    A study of the temperature dependence (from 233 to 353 K) of the rate of back electron-transfer reactions within geminate radical pairs by measurement of the free radical yield is reported. The radical pair is generated by photoinduced electron transfer with rhodamine 6G and oxazine 118 cations as electron acceptors and aromatic amines and methoxy-benzene derivatives as electron donors in acetonitrile, methanol and ethanol. In acetonitrile, the back electron transfer is non-adiabatic and apparent negative activation energies are observed for barrierless reactions. In alcohol solvents, an anomalously large temperature dependence is observed, which is attributed to a solvent-controlled adiabatic behaviour.

  1. Mechanistic insights and the role of cocatalysts in Aza-Morita-Baylis-hillman and Morita-Baylis-Hillman reactions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dipankar; Patel, Chandan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2009-09-18

    The mechanism of the trimethylamine or trimethylphosphine catalyzed aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction between acrolein and mesyl imine is investigated by using ab initio and density functional methods. All key transition states are located at the CBS-4M as well as at the mPW1K/6-31+G** levels of theories. To account for the experimentally known rate enhancements through the use of polar protic cocatalysts, transition state models with explicit cocatalysts are considered. Inclusion of polar protic cocatalysts is found to have a profound influence in decreasing the activation barriers associated with the key elementary steps. The protic cocatalysts such as water, methanol, and formic acid are identified as effective in promoting a relay proton transfer. Interestingly, the efficiency of the relay mechanism results in relatively better stabilization of the proton transfer transition state as compared to the addition of enolate to the electrophile (C-C bond formation). The cocatalyst bound models suggest that the proton transfer could become the rate-determining step in the aza-MBH reaction under polar protic conditions. A comparison of the aza-MBH reaction with the analogous MBH reaction is also attempted to bring out the subtle differences between these two reactions. Enhanced kinetic advantages arising from the nature of the activated electrophile are noticed for the aza-MBH reaction. The difference in the relative energies between the transition states for the proton transfer and the C-C bond formation steps with bound cocatalyst(s) is found to be more pronounced in the aza-MBH reaction. In general, the reported results underscore the importance of considering explicit solvents/cocatalysts in order to account for the likely role of the specific interactions between reactants and solvents/cocatalysts.

  2. Experimental measurements of low temperature rate coefficients for neutral-neutral reactions of interest for atmospheric chemistry of Titan, Pluto and Triton: reactions of the CN radical.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sébastien B; Le Picard, Sébastien D; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of cyano radical, CN (X2sigma+) with three hydrocarbons, propane (CH3CH2CH3), propene (CH3CH=CH2) and 1-butyne (CH[triple band]CCH2CH3) have been studied over the temperature range of 23-298 K using a CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) apparatus combined with the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. These reactions are of interest for the cold atmospheres of Titan, Pluto and Triton, as they might participate in the formation of nitrogen and carbon bearing molecules, including nitriles, that are thought to play an important role in the formation of hazes and biological molecules. All three reactions are rapid with rate coefficients in excess of 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at the lowest temperatures of this study and show behaviour characteristic of barrierless reactions. Temperature dependences, different for each reaction, are compared to those used in the most recent photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere.

  3. Kinetics of the hydrogen abstraction C2H3* + alkane --> C2H4 + alkyl radical reaction class.

    PubMed

    Muszyńska, Marta; Ratkiewicz, Artur; Huynh, Lam K; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-07-23

    This paper presents an application of the reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) to predict thermal rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions of the type C(2)H(3) + alkane --> C(2)H(4) + alkyl radical. The linear energy relationship (LER) was proven to hold for both noncyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons. We have derived all parameters for the RC-TST method from rate constants of 19 representative reactions, coupling with LER and the barrier height grouping (BHG) approach. Both the RC-TST/LER, where only reaction energy is needed, and the RC-TST/BHG, where no other information is needed, can predict rate constants for any reaction in this reaction class with satisfactory accuracy for combustion modeling. Our analysis indicates that less than 90% systematic errors on the average exist in the predicted rate constants using the RC-TST/LER or RC-TST/BHG method, while in comparison to explicit rate calculations, the differences are within a factor of 2 on the average.

  4. Recent developments in copper-catalyzed radical alkylations of electron-rich π-systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recently, a number of papers have emerged demonstrating copper-catalyzed alkylation reactions of electron-rich small molecules. The processes are generally thought to be related to long established atom-transfer radical reactions. However, unlike classical reactions, these new transformations lead to simple alkylation products. This short review will highlight recent advances in alkylations of nitronate anions, alkenes and alkynes, as well as discuss current mechanistic understanding of these novel reactions. PMID:26734076

  5. Synthesis of 19-oxygenated 4beta,5beta-epoxy derivatives of 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione as mechanistic and catalytic probes for aromatase reaction.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, M; Yoshimura, A

    2000-09-01

    4Beta,5beta-epoxy derivatives of 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (2), one of the natural substrates for aromatase, and its 19-oxygenated compounds 4 and 5 were synthesized as mechanistic and catalytic probes for the enzyme reaction. Treatment of 16alpha-bromoandrostenedione (13) or its 19-hydroxy analog 19 which was prepared from 3beta-hydroxy-19-(tert-butyldimethylsiloxy)androst-5-en-17-one (16) in three steps, with H2O2 and NaOH followed by controlled alkaline hydrolysis with NaOH in aqueous pyridine stereospecifically yielded 4beta,5beta-epoxy-16alpha-ol 15 or 4beta,5beta-epoxy-16alpha,19-diol 22, respectively. Oxidation of 16beta-bromo-4beta,5beta-epoxy-19-ol 21 with pyridinium dichromate followed by controlled alkaline hydrolysis produced 4beta,5beta-epoxy-16alpha-hydroxy-19-al 24.

  6. Kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical. The role of hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Salamone, Michela

    2010-08-20

    A kinetic study of the H-atom abstraction reactions from 1,4-cyclohexadiene and triethylamine by the cumyloxyl radical has been carried out in different solvents. Negligible effects are observed with 1,4-cyclohexadiene, whereas with triethylamine a significant decrease in rate constant (k(H)) is observed on going from benzene to MeOH. A good correlation between log k(H) and the solvent hydrogen bond donor parameter alpha is observed, indicative of an H-bonding interaction between the amine lone pair and the solvent.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry of propionaldehyde: kinetics and mechanisms of reactions with OH radicals and Cl atoms, UV spectrum, and self-reaction kinetics of CH3CH2C(O)O2 radicals at 298 K.

    PubMed

    Le Crâne, Jean-Paul; Villenave, Eric; Hurley, Michael D; Wallington, Timothy J; Ball, James C

    2005-12-29

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reactions of Cl atoms and OH radicals with CH3CH2CHO were investigated at room temperature using two complementary techniques: flash photolysis/UV absorption and continuous photolysis/FTIR smog chamber. Reaction with Cl atoms proceeds predominantly by abstraction of the aldehydic hydrogen atom to form acyl radicals. FTIR measurements indicated that the acyl forming channel accounts for (88 +/- 5)%, while UV measurements indicated that the acyl forming channel accounts for (88 +/- 3)%. Relative rate methods were used to measure: k(Cl + CH3CH2CHO) = (1.20 +/- 0.23) x 10(-10); k(OH + CH3CH2CHO) = (1.82 +/- 0.23) x 10(-11); and k(Cl + CH3CH2C(O)Cl) = (1.64 +/- 0.22) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The UV spectrum of CH3CH2C(O)O2, rate constant for self-reaction, and rate constant for cross-reaction with CH3CH2O2 were determined: sigma(207 nm) = (6.71 +/- 0.19) x 10(-18) cm2 molecule(-1), k(CH3CH2C(O)O2 + CH3CH2C(O)O2) = (1.68 +/- 0.08) x 10(-11), and k(CH3CH2C(O)O2 + CH3CH2O2) = (1.20 +/- 0.06) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), where quoted uncertainties only represent 2sigma statistical errors. The infrared spectrum of C2H5C(O)O2NO2 was recorded, and products of the Cl-initiated oxidation of CH3CH2CHO in the presence of O2 with, and without, NO(x) were identified. Results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of propionaldehyde.

  8. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions

    PubMed Central

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3•) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO3• at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50–500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500–2000 ml min−1) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO3• supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N2O5 and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO3• loss through the system, consistency of the NO3• concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h). PMID:22938328

  9. Extension of structure-reactivity correlations for the hydrogen abstraction reaction to methyl radical and comparison to chlorine atom, bromine atom, and hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2016-06-07

    In this study, we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by three electrophilic radicals (X + HCR3 → XH + CR3; X = Cl, HO, and Br); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett-Taft constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Here we present a parallel treatment for the less electronegative CH3. In spite of a limited and scattered data base, the resulting least-squares fit [log k437(CH3) = 0.0251(ΔrH) + 0.96(ΣF) 0.56(ΣR) – 19.15] was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. As expected, the polar effect appears to be minor and its directionality, i.e., the philicity of CH3, may depend on the nature of the substituents.

  10. Extension of structure-reactivity correlations for the hydrogen abstraction reaction to methyl radical and comparison to chlorine atom, bromine atom, and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGES

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2016-06-07

    In this study, we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by three electrophilic radicals (X• + HCR3 → XH + •CR3; X = Cl•, HO•, and Br); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett-Taft constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Here we present a parallel treatment for the less electronegative CH3•. In spite of a limited and scattered data base, the resulting least-squares fit [log k437(CH3•) = 0.0251(ΔrH) + 0.96(ΣF) 0.56(ΣR) – 19.15] was modestlymore » successful and useful for initial predictions. As expected, the polar effect appears to be minor and its directionality, i.e., the philicity of CH3, may depend on the nature of the substituents.« less

  11. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  12. Iridium-mediated C-S bond activation and transformation: organoiridium(III) thioether, thiolato, sulfinato and thiyl radical compounds. Synthesis, mechanistic, spectral, electrochemical and theoretical aspects.

    PubMed

    Das, Ujjwal; Ghorui, Tapas; Adhikari, Basab; Roy, Sima; Pramanik, Shuvam; Pramanik, Kausikisankar

    2015-05-14

    An attractive methodology, single-electron transfer (SET) reductive cleavage of the C-S bond mediated by a metal in the presence of the external stimuli PPh3, has been applied to the kinetically inert IrCl3 in order to synthesize the thiolato complex [Ir(III)(L(S))Cl(PPh3)2] 3 from precursor thioether complexes [Ir(III)(L(SR))Cl2(PPh3)] (R = alkyl) 2. The aforesaid cleavage process in association with (arene)C-H activation furnishes a new class of organosulfur compounds of iridium(III). The thiolato chelate 3 displays a reversible oxidative wave at 0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl signifying its remarkable nucleophilic character. The high electron density on the thiolato-S vis-à-vis superior nucleophilicity can be envisaged through the formation of a number of S-centered derivatives. This observation has been corroborated with the nature of HOMO in 3, which assumes 49% of S(3p). Notably, the facile oxidative nature of 3 makes it an apposite precursor for metal-stabilized thiyl radical species. Indeed, iridium(III)-stabilized 3˙(+) can be generated by chemical/electrochemical means. The axial EPR spectra with g ∼ 2.0 along with theoretical analysis of SOMO (S(3p) 24% + Ph(π) 43% + d(yz) 15%) and spin density (ρ(S) = +0.543, ρ(Ph) = +0.315, ρ(Ir) = +0.151) of one-electron oxidized 3˙(+) validate the iridium-stabilized thiyl radical description. This observation suggests that the CNS coordination mode in thiophenolato complex 3 is redox-active. Complex 3 is very prone to S-centered oxidation under normal aerobic conditions to yield metallosulfoxide [Ir(III)(L(SO2))Cl(PPh3)2] 4. The enhanced nucleophilicity of thiolato-S can also be manifested via the smooth S-C bond making process with alkyl halides (R'X, R' = Me and allyl; X = Br, I) and subsequent formation of thioether complexes of type [Ir(III)(L(SR'))ClX(PPh3)] 5. The organosulfur compounds of iridium(III) exhibit rich spectral properties including luminescence and the origin of these transitions is scrutinized with

  13. Computational Study of the Reactions of Methanol with the Hydroperoxyl and Methyl Radicals. Part I: Accurate Thermochemistry and Barrier Heights

    SciTech Connect

    Alecu, I. M.; Truhlar, D. G.

    2011-04-07

    The reactions of CH3OH with the HO2 and CH3 radicals are important in the combustion of methanol and are prototypes for reactions of heavier alcohols in biofuels. The reaction energies and barrier heights for these reaction systems are computed with CCSD(T) theory extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using correlation-consistent basis sets, both augmented and unaugmented, and further refined by including a fully coupled treatment of the connected triple excitations, a second-order perturbative treatment of quadruple excitations (by CCSDT(2)Q), core–valence corrections, and scalar relativistic effects. It is shown that the M08-HX and M08-SO hybrid meta-GGA density functionals can achieve sub-kcal mol-1 agreement with the high-level ab initio results, identifying these functionals as important potential candidates for direct dynamics studies on the rates of these and homologous reaction systems.

  14. Radical formation in the FMN-photosensitized reactions of unsaturated fatty acids bearing double bonds at different positions.

    PubMed

    Nishihama, Nao; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2016-08-15

    -carboxybutyl, 7-carboxyheptyl and 9-carboxynonyl radicals formed in the control reaction mixtures of (z)-6-octadecenoic acid, (z)-9-octadecenoic acid {or (z, z)-9,12-octadecadienoic acid} and (z)-11-octadecenoic acid, respectively. The 4-carboxybutyl, 7-carboxyheptyl and 9-carboxynonyl radicals are all generated through β-scission of alkoxy radicals formed on carboxyl ends of the double bonds of the unsaturated fatty acids. Thus, we could reveal reactive sites of unsaturated fatty acids in the photosensitized reaction of flavin mononucleotide with unsaturated fatty acids bearing a double bond at different positions.

  15. Synthetic scope and mechanistic studies of Ru(OH)x/Al2O3-catalyzed heterogeneous hydrogen-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Koike, Takeshi; Kotani, Miyuki; Matsushita, Mitsunori; Shinachi, Satoshi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2005-11-04

    Three kinds of hydrogen-transfer reactions, namely racemization of chiral secondary alcohols, reduction of carbonyl compounds to alcohols using 2-propanol as a hydrogen donor, and isomerization of allylic alcohols to saturated ketones, are efficiently promoted by the easily prepared and inexpensive supported ruthenium catalyst Ru(OH)x/Al2O3. A wide variety of substrates, such as aromatic, aliphatic, and heterocyclic alcohols or carbonyl compounds, can be converted into the desired products, under anaerobic conditions, in moderate to excellent yields and without the need for additives such as bases. A larger scale, solvent-free reaction is also demonstrated: the isomerization of 1-octen-3-ol with a substrate/catalyst ratio of 20,000/1 shows a very high turnover frequency (TOF) of 18,400 h(-1), with a turnover number (TON) that reaches 17,200. The catalysis for these reactions is intrinsically heterogeneous in nature, and the Ru(OH)x/Al2O3 recovered after the reactions can be reused without appreciable loss of catalytic performance. The reaction mechanism of the present Ru(OH)x/Al2O3-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions were examined with monodeuterated substrates. After the racemization of (S)-1-deuterio-1-phenylethanol in the presence of acetophenone was complete, the deuterium content at the alpha-position of the corresponding racemic alcohol was 91%, whereas no deuterium was incorporated into the alpha-position during the racemization of (S)-1-phenylethanol-OD. These results show that direct carbon-to-carbon hydrogen transfer occurs via a metal monohydride for the racemization of chiral secondary alcohols and reduction of carbonyl compounds to alcohols. For the isomerization, the alpha-deuterium of 3-deuterio-1-octen-3-ol was selectively relocated at the beta-position of the corresponding ketones (99% D at the beta-position), suggesting the involvement of a 1,4-addition of ruthenium monohydride species to the alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone intermediate. The

  16. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    PubMed

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  17. Opportunities and challenges in single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy for mechanistic studies of chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, Thorben; Blum, Suzanne A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a tool to investigate chemical systems. After an initial lag of over a decade with respect to biophysical studies, this powerful imaging technique is now revealing mechanisms of 'classical' organic reactions, spatial distribution of chemical reactivity on surfaces and the phase of active catalysts. The recent advance into commercial imaging systems obviates the need for home-built laser systems and thus opens this technique to traditionally trained synthetic chemists. We discuss the requisite photophysical and chemical properties of fluorescent reporters and highlight the main challenges in applying single-molecule techniques to chemical questions. The goal of this Perspective is to provide a snapshot of an emerging multidisciplinary field and to encourage broader use of this young experimental approach that aids the observation of chemical reactions as depicted in many textbooks: molecule by molecule.

  18. Opportunities and challenges in single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy for mechanistic studies of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Thorben; Blum, Suzanne A

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, single-molecule and single-particle fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a tool to investigate chemical systems. After an initial lag of over a decade with respect to biophysical studies, this powerful imaging technique is now revealing mechanisms of 'classical' organic reactions, spatial distribution of chemical reactivity on surfaces and the phase of active catalysts. The recent advance into commercial imaging systems obviates the need for home-built laser systems and thus opens this technique to traditionally trained synthetic chemists. We discuss the requisite photophysical and chemical properties of fluorescent reporters and highlight the main challenges in applying single-molecule techniques to chemical questions. The goal of this Perspective is to provide a snapshot of an emerging multidisciplinary field and to encourage broader use of this young experimental approach that aids the observation of chemical reactions as depicted in many textbooks: molecule by molecule.

  19. The ecology and evolution of temperature-dependent reaction norms for sex determination in reptiles: a mechanistic conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Pezaro, Nadav; Doody, J Sean; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-06-14

    Sex-determining mechanisms are broadly categorised as being based on either genetic or environmental factors. Vertebrate sex determination exhibits remarkable diversity but displays distinct phylogenetic patterns. While all eutherian mammals possess XY male heterogamety and female heterogamety (ZW) is ubiquitous in birds, poikilothermic vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) exhibit multiple genetic sex-determination (GSD) systems as well as environmental sex determination (ESD). Temperature is the factor controlling ESD in reptiles and temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) in reptiles has become a focal point in the study of this phenomenon. Current patterns of climate change may cause detrimental skews in the population sex ratios of reptiles exhibiting TSD. Understanding the patterns of variation, both within and among populations and linking such patterns with the selection processes they are associated with, is the central challenge of research aimed at predicting the capacity of populations to adapt to novel conditions. Here we present a conceptual model that innovates by defining an individual reaction norm for sex determination as a range of incubation temperatures. By deconstructing individual reaction norms for TSD and revealing their underlying interacting elements, we offer a conceptual solution that explains how variation among individual reaction norms can be inferred from the pattern of population reaction norms. The model also links environmental variation with the different patterns of TSD and describes the processes from which they may arise. Specific climate scenarios are singled out as eco-evolutionary traps that may lead to demographic extinction or a transition to either male or female heterogametic GSD. We describe how the conceptual principles can be applied to interpret TSD data and to explain the adaptive capacity of TSD to climate change as well as its limits and the potential applications for conservation and management

  20. Temperature Dual Enantioselective Control in a Rhodium-Catalyzed Michael-Type Friedel-Crafts Reaction: A Mechanistic Explanation.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Isabel; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Polo, Víctor; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Lahoz, Fernando J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Carmona, Daniel

    2016-07-25

    By changing the temperature from 283 to 233 K, the S (99 % ee) or R (96 % ee) enantiomer of the Friedel-Crafts (FC) adduct of the reaction between N-methyl-2-methylindole and trans-β-nitrostyrene can be obtained by using (SRh ,RC )-[(η(5) -C5 Me5 )Rh{(R)-Prophos}(H2 O)][SbF6 ]2 as the catalyst precursor. This catalytic system presents two other uncommon features: 1) The ee changes with reaction time showing trends that depend on the reaction temperature and 2) an increase in the catalyst loading results in a decrease in the ee of the S enantiomer. Detection and characterization of the intermediate metal-nitroalkene and metal-aci-nitro complexes, the free aci-nitro compound, and the FC adduct-complex, together with solution NMR measurements, theoretical calculations, and kinetic studies have allowed us to propose two plausible alternative catalytic cycles. On the basis of these cycles, all the above-mentioned observations can be rationalized. In particular, the reversibility of one of the cycles together with the kinetic resolution of the intermediate aci-nitro complexes account for the high ee values achieved in both antipodes. On the other hand, the results of kinetic measurements explain the unusual effect of the increment in catalyst loading.

  1. Free-radical reactions of 2-ethoxy-1,3-oxathiolane

    SciTech Connect

    Taganliev, A.; Pastushenko, E.V.; Rakhmankulov, D.L.; Rol'nik, L.Z.; Zlotskii, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Homolytic reactions of 2-ethoxy-1,3-oxathiolane in the presence of benzoyl peroxide and tert-butyl peroxide in chlorobenzene have been studied. The principal reaction products are diethyl monothiocarbonate and 1,3-oxathiolane-2-one. The yields and ratios of the products are temperature-dependent.

  2. Aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol via gas-phase OH radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Neil M; Henry, Kaytlin M; Mentel, Thomas F; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Spindler, Christian; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans P; Fuchs, Hendrik; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Saathoff, Harald; Naumann, Karl-Heinz; Möhler, Ottmar; Leisner, Thomas; Müller, Lars; Reinnig, Marc-Christopher; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Salo, Kent; Hallquist, Mattias; Frosch, Mia; Bilde, Merete; Tritscher, Torsten; Barmet, Peter; Praplan, Arnaud P; DeCarlo, Peter F; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, Andre S H; Baltensperger, Urs

    2012-08-21

    The Multiple Chamber Aerosol Chemical Aging Study (MUCHACHAS) tested the hypothesis that hydroxyl radical (OH) aging significantly increases the concentration of first-generation biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). OH is the dominant atmospheric oxidant, and MUCHACHAS employed environmental chambers of very different designs, using multiple OH sources to explore a range of chemical conditions and potential sources of systematic error. We isolated the effect of OH aging, confirming our hypothesis while observing corresponding changes in SOA properties. The mass increases are consistent with an existing gap between global SOA sources and those predicted in models, and can be described by a mechanism suitable for implementation in those models.

  3. Aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol via gas-phase OH radical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Neil M.; Henry, Kaytlin M.; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Spindler, Christian; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans P.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Saathoff, Harald; Naumann, Karl-Heinz; Möhler, Ottmar; Leisner, Thomas; Müller, Lars; Reinnig, Marc-Christopher; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Salo, Kent; Hallquist, Mattias; Frosch, Mia; Bilde, Merete; Tritscher, Torsten; Barmet, Peter; Praplan, Arnaud P.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, Andre S.H.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    The Multiple Chamber Aerosol Chemical Aging Study (MUCHACHAS) tested the hypothesis that hydroxyl radical (OH) aging significantly increases the concentration of first-generation biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). OH is the dominant atmospheric oxidant, and MUCHACHAS employed environmental chambers of very different designs, using multiple OH sources to explore a range of chemical conditions and potential sources of systematic error. We isolated the effect of OH aging, confirming our hypothesis while observing corresponding changes in SOA properties. The mass increases are consistent with an existing gap between global SOA sources and those predicted in models, and can be described by a mechanism suitable for implementation in those models. PMID:22869714

  4. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Reaction between the (•)OH Radical and Adenine: A Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Milhøj, Birgitte O; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-06-18

    The accessibility of all possible reaction paths for the reaction between the nucleobase adenine and the (•)OH radical is investigated through quantum chemical calculations of barrier heights and rate constants at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with Eckart tunneling corrections. First the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimized with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D), in combination with Pople and Dunning basis sets, all of which have been employed in similar investigations in the literature. Improved energies are obtained through single point calculations with CCSD(T) and the same basis sets, and reaction rate constants are calculated for all methods both without tunneling corrections and with the Wigner, Bell, and Eckart corrections. In comparison to CCSD(T)//BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ reference results, the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) method combined with Eckart tunneling corrections provides a sensible compromise between accuracy and time. Using this method, all subreactions of the reaction between adenine and the (•)OH radical are investigated. The total rate constants for hydrogen abstraction and addition for adenine are predicted with this method to be 1.06 × 10(-12) and 1.10 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), respectively. Abstractions of H61 and H62 contribute the most, while only addition to the C8 carbon is found to be of any significance, in contrast to previous claims that addition is the dominant reaction pathway. The overall rate constant for the complete reaction is found to be 2.17 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), which agrees exceptionally well with experimental results.

  5. Reactions of thiocarbamate, triazine and urea herbicides, RDX and benzenes on EPA Contaminant Candidate List with ozone and with hydroxyl radicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Second-order rate constants of the direct ozone reactions (kO3,M) and the indirect OH radical reactions (kOH,M) for nine chemicals on the US EPA’s Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) were studied during the ozonation and ozone/hydrogen peroxide a...

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of (Z)-CF3CH═CHCF3: OH radical reaction rate coefficient and global warming potential.

    PubMed

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Ravishankara, A R; Burkholder, James B

    2011-09-29

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) (cis-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene) were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions in OH using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) to produce OH and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to detect it. Rate coefficients were measured over a range of temperatures (212-374 K) and bath gas pressures (20-200 Torr; He, N(2)) and found to be independent of pressure over this range of conditions. The rate coefficient has a non-Arrhenius behavior that is well-described by the expression k(1)(T) = (5.73 ± 0.60) × 10(-19) × T(2) × exp[(678 ± 10)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) where k(1)(296 K) was measured to be (4.91 ± 0.50) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and the uncertainties are at the 2σ level and include estimated systematic errors. Rate coefficients for the analogous OD radical reaction were determined over a range of temperatures (262-374 K) at 100 Torr (He) to be k(2)(T) = (4.81 ± 0.20) × 10(-19) × T(2) × exp[(776 ± 15)/T], with k(2)(296 K) = (5.73 ± 0.50) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). OH radical rate coefficients were also measured at 296, 345, and 375 K using a relative rate technique and found to be in good agreement with the PLP-LIF results. A room-temperature rate coefficient for the O(3) + (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) reaction was measured using an absolute method with O(3) in excess to be <6 × 10(-21) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The atmospheric lifetime of (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) due to loss by OH reaction was