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Sample records for radical reactions mechanistic

  1. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, F.P.

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  2. Mechanistic study of the radical SAM-dependent amine dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Liu, Wan-Qiu; Yuan, Shuguang; Yin, Yue; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-18

    The radical SAM enzyme NosL catalyzes the conversion of l-Trp to 3-methyl-2-indolic acid, and this reaction is initiated by the 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the l-Trp amino group. We demonstrate here that when d-Trp was used in the NosL reaction, hydrogen abstraction occurs promiscuously at both the amino group and Cα of d-Trp. These results inspired us to establish the detailed mechanism of l-Trp amine dehydrogenation catalyzed by a NosL mutant, and to engineer a novel radical SAM-dependent l-Tyr amine dehydrogenase from the thiamine biosynthesis enzyme ThiH. PMID:27492649

  3. Atmospheric chemical reactions of monoethanolamine initiated by OH radical: mechanistic and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bin; Li, Chao; He, Ning; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Shaowen; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) is a benchmark and widely utilized solvent in amine-based postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC), a leading technology for reducing CO2 emission from fossil fuel power plants. The large-scale implementation of PCCC would lead to inevitable discharges of amines to the atmosphere. Therefore, understanding the kinetics and mechanisms of the transformation of representative amine MEA in the atmosphere is of great significance for risk assessment of the amine-based PCCC. In this study, the H-abstraction reaction of MEA with ·OH, and ensuing reactions of produced MEA-radicals, including isomerization, dissociation, and bimolecular reaction MEA-radicals+O2, were investigated by quantum chemical calculation [M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p)] and kinetic modeling. The calculated overall rate constant [(7.27 × 10(-11)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)] for H-abstraction is in excellent agreement with the experimental value [(7.02 ± 0.46) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)]. The results show that the product branching ratio of NH2CH2 · CHOH (MEA-β) (43%) is higher than that of NH2 · CHCH2OH (MEA-α) (39%), clarifying that MEA-α is not an exclusive product. On the basis of the unveiled reaction mechanisms of MEA-radicals + O2, the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry signal (m/z 60.044), not recognized in the experiment, was identified.

  4. Atmospheric chemical reactions of monoethanolamine initiated by OH radical: mechanistic and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bin; Li, Chao; He, Ning; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Shaowen; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) is a benchmark and widely utilized solvent in amine-based postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC), a leading technology for reducing CO2 emission from fossil fuel power plants. The large-scale implementation of PCCC would lead to inevitable discharges of amines to the atmosphere. Therefore, understanding the kinetics and mechanisms of the transformation of representative amine MEA in the atmosphere is of great significance for risk assessment of the amine-based PCCC. In this study, the H-abstraction reaction of MEA with ·OH, and ensuing reactions of produced MEA-radicals, including isomerization, dissociation, and bimolecular reaction MEA-radicals+O2, were investigated by quantum chemical calculation [M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p)] and kinetic modeling. The calculated overall rate constant [(7.27 × 10(-11)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)] for H-abstraction is in excellent agreement with the experimental value [(7.02 ± 0.46) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)]. The results show that the product branching ratio of NH2CH2 · CHOH (MEA-β) (43%) is higher than that of NH2 · CHCH2OH (MEA-α) (39%), clarifying that MEA-α is not an exclusive product. On the basis of the unveiled reaction mechanisms of MEA-radicals + O2, the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry signal (m/z 60.044), not recognized in the experiment, was identified. PMID:24438015

  5. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  6. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  7. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  8. Spectroscopic, steady-state kinetic, and mechanistic characterization of the radical SAM enzyme QueE, which catalyzes a complex cyclization reaction in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurines.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Reid M; Krebs, Carsten; Bandarian, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes the complex heterocyclic radical-mediated conversion of 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH(4)) to CDG in the third step of the biosynthetic pathway to all 7-deazapurines. Here we present a detailed characterization of QueE from Bacillus subtilis to delineate the mechanism of conversion of CPH(4) to CDG. QueE is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily, all of which use a bound [4Fe-4S](+) cluster to catalyze the reductive cleavage of the SAM cofactor to generate methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical (5'-dAdo(•)), which initiates enzymatic transformations requiring hydrogen atom abstraction. The ultraviolet-visible, electron paramagnetic resonance, and Mössbauer spectroscopic features of the homodimeric QueE point to the presence of a single [4Fe-4S] cluster per monomer. Steady-state kinetic experiments indicate a K(m) of 20 ± 7 μM for CPH(4) and a k(cat) of 5.4 ± 1.2 min(-1) for the overall transformation. The kinetically determined K(app) for SAM is 45 ± 1 μM. QueE is also magnesium-dependent and exhibits a K(app) for the divalent metal ion of 0.21 ± 0.03 mM. The SAM cofactor supports multiple turnovers, indicating that it is regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle. The mechanism of rearrangement of QueE was probed with CPH(4) isotopologs containing deuterium at C-6 or the two prochiral positions at C-7. These studies implicate 5'-dAdo(•) as the initiator of the ring contraction reaction catalyzed by QueE by abstraction of the H atom from C-6 of CPH(4).

  9. Spectroscopic, steady-state kinetic, and mechanistic characterization of the radical SAM enzyme QueE, which catalyzes a complex cyclization reaction in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurines

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Reid M.; Krebs, Carsten; Bandarian, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes the complex heterocyclic radical-mediated conversion of 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4) to CDG in the third step of the biosynthetic pathway to all 7-deazapurines. Here we present a detailed characterization of QueE from Bacillus subtilis to delineate the mechanism of conversion of CPH4 to CDG. QueE is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily, all of which use a bound [4Fe-4S]+ cluster to catalyze the reductive cleavage of SAM cofactor to generate methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dAdo•), which initiates enzymatic transformations requiring H-atom abstraction. The UV-visible, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopic features of the homodimeric QueE point to the presence of a single [4Fe-4S] cluster per monomer. Steady-state kinetic experiments indicate a Km of 20 ± 7 μM for CPH4 and kcat of 5.4 ± 1.2 min-1 for the overall transformation. The kinetically determined Kapp for SAM is 45 ± 1 μM. QueE is also magnesium-dependent and exhibits a Kapp for the divalent metal ion of 0.21 ± 0.03 mM. The SAM cofactor supports multiple turnovers, indicating that it is regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle. The mechanism of rearrangement of QueE was probed with CPH4 isotopologs containing deuterium at C-6 or the two prochiral positions at C-7. These studies implicate 5′-dAdo• as initiating the ring contraction reaction catalyzed by QueE by abstraction of the H-atom from C-6 of CPH4. PMID:23194065

  10. Anion radical [2 + 2] cycloaddition as a mechanistic probe: stoichiometry- and concentration-dependent partitioning of electron-transfer and alkylation pathways in the reaction of the Gilman reagent Me2CuLi.LiI with bis(enones).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingkui; Cauble, David F; Berro, Adam J; Bauld, Nathan L; Krische, Michael J

    2004-11-12

    Exposure of easily reduced aromatic bis(enones) 1a-1e to the methyl Gilman reagent Me(2)CuLi.LiI at 0 degrees C in tetrahydrofuran solvent provides the products of tandem conjugate addition-Michael cyclization, 2a-2e, along with the products of [2 + 2] cycloaddition, 3a-3e. Complete partitioning of the Gilman alkylation and [2 + 2] cycloaddition pathways may be achieved by adjusting the loading of the Gilman reagent, the rate of addition of the Gilman reagent, and the concentration of the reaction mixture. The Gilman alkylation manifold is favored by the rapid addition of excess Gilman reagent at higher substrate concentrations, while the [2 + 2] cycloaddition manifold is favored by slow addition of the same Gilman reagent at lower concentrations and loadings. Notably, [2 + 2] cycloaddition to form 3a-3e is catalytic in Gilman reagent. Kinetic data reveal that the ratio of 2a and 3a changes such that the cycloaddition pathway becomes dominant upon increased consumption of Gilman reagent. These data suggest a concentration-dependent speciation of the Gilman reagent and differential reactivity of the aggregates present at higher and lower concentrations. While the species present at higher concentration induce Gilman alkylation en route to products 2a-2e, the species present at lower concentration provide products of catalytic [2 + 2] cycloaddition, 3a-3e. Moreover, upon electrochemical reduction of the bis(enones) 1a-1e, or chemically induced single-electron transfer from arene anion radicals, the very same [2 + 2] cycloadducts 3a-3e are formed. The collective data suggest that [2 + 2] cycloadducts 3a-3e arising under Gilman conditions may be products of anion radical chain cyclobutanation that derive via electron transfer (ET) from the Me(2)CuLi.LiI aggregate(s) present at low concentration. These observations provide a link between the Gilman alkylation reaction and related ET chemistry and suggest these reaction paths are mechanistically distinct. This analysis

  11. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  12. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  13. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions. PMID:27573794

  14. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions.

  15. The methylthiolation reaction mediated by the Radical-SAM enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Mohamed; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Mulliez, Etienne; Hunt, John F.; Luff, Jon D.; Forouhar, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanistic enzymology of the Radical-SAM enzymes. It is now clear that these enzymes appear to be involved in a remarkably wide range of chemically challenging reactions. This review article highlights mechanistic and structural aspects of the methylthiotransferases (MTTases) sub-class of the Radical-SAM enzymes. The mechanism of methylthio insertion, now observed to be performed by three different enzymes is an exciting unsolved problem. PMID:22178611

  16. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-01

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples.

  17. The unusual reaction of semiquinone radicals with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Valgimigli, Luca; Amorati, Riccardo; Fumo, Maria Grazia; DiLabio, Gino A; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Ingold, Keith U; Pratt, Derek A

    2008-03-01

    Hydroquinones (benzene-1,4-diols) are naturally occurring chain-breaking antioxidants, whose reactions with peroxyl radicals yield 1,4-semiquinone radicals. Unlike the 1,2-semiquinone radicals derived from catechols (benzene-1,2-diols), the 1,4-semiquinone radicals do not always trap another peroxyl radical, and instead the stoichiometric factor of hydroquinones varies widely between 0 and 2 as a function of ring-substitution and reaction conditions. This variable antioxidant behavior has been attributed to the competing reaction of the 1,4-semiquinone radical with molecular oxygen. Herein we report the results of experiments and theoretical calculations focused on understanding this key reaction. Our experiments, which include detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations by laser flash photolysis and inhibited autoxidation studies, and our theoretical calculations, which include detailed studies of the reactions of both 1,4-semiquinones and 1,2-semiquinones with O2, provide many important insights. They show that the reaction of O2 with 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-semiquinone radical (used as model compound) has a rate constant of 2.4 +/- 0.9 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 in acetonitrile and as high as 2.0 +/- 0.9 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 in chlorobenzene, i.e., similar to that previously reported in water at pH approximately 7. These results, considered alongside our theoretical calculations, suggest that the reaction occurs by an unusual hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism, taking place in a two-step process consisting first of addition of O2 to the semiquinone radical and second an intramolecular H-atom transfer concerted with elimination of hydroperoxyl to yield the quinone. This reaction appears to be much more facile for 1,4-semiquinones than for their 1,2-isomers. PMID:18260673

  18. Towards mechanistic representations of SOA from BVOC + NO3 reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monoterpene reaction with nitrate radicals is a significant source of organic aerosol in the southeast United States. This source of organic aerosol represents an anthropogenic control on biogenic organic aerosol since nitrate radicals result from NOx emissions and are generally ...

  19. Physiological aspects of free-radical reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, I; Tamura, M; Nakajima, R; Nakamura, M

    1985-01-01

    Enzymes which catalyze the formation of free radicals in vitro will catalyze similar reactions in vivo. We believe that the formation of some kinds of free radicals has definite physiological meanings in metabolism. In this sense, the enzymes forming such free radicals are concluded to be in evolutionally advanced states. Elaborated structure and function of enzymes such as horseradish peroxidase and microsomal flavoproteins support the idea. Deleterious and side reactions caused by free radicals are assumed to be minimized in vivo by localizing the reactions, but this assumption should be verified by future studies. PMID:3007098

  20. Hydroxyl radical induced oxidation of theophylline in water: a kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Sunil Paul, M M; Aravind, U K; Pramod, G; Saha, A; Aravindakumar, C T

    2014-08-14

    Oxidative destruction and mineralization of emerging organic pollutants by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH) is a well established area of research. The possibility of generating hazardous by-products in the case of ˙OH reaction demands extensive investigations on the degradation mechanism. A combination of pulse radiolysis and steady state photolysis (H2O2/UV photolysis) followed by high resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) analysis have been employed to explicate the kinetic and mechanistic features of the destruction of theophylline, a model pharmaceutical compound and an identified pollutant, by ˙OH in the present study. The oxidative destruction of this molecule, for intermediate product studies, was initially achieved by H2O2/UV photolysis. The transient absorption spectrum corresponding to the reaction of ˙OH with theophylline at pH 6, primarily caused by the generation of (T8-OH)˙, was characterised by an absorption band at 330 nm (k2 = (8.22 ± 0.03) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)). A significantly different spectrum (λmax: 340 nm) was observed at highly alkaline pH (10.2) due to the deprotonation of this radical (pKa∼ 10.0). Specific one electron oxidants such as sulphate radical anions (SO4˙(-)) and azide radicals (N3˙) produce the deprotonated form (T(-H)˙) of the radical cation (T˙(+)) of theophylline (pKa 3.1) with k2 values of (7.51 ± 0.04) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and (7.61 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) respectively. Conversely, oxide radicals (O˙(-)) react with theophylline via a hydrogen abstraction protocol with a rather slow k2 value of (1.95 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The transient spectral studies were complemented by the end product profile acquired by HRMS analysis. Various transformation products of theophylline induced by ˙OH were identified by this technique which include derivatives of uric acids (i, iv & v) and xanthines (ii, iii & vi). Further breakdown of the early formed product due to ˙OH attack leads to

  1. Radical Cation/Radical Reactions: A Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Study of Allyl Radical Reacting with Aromatic Radical Cations

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Amber L.; Rohrs, Henry W.; Read, David; Giblin, Daryl E.; Gaspar, Peter P.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the study of reactions of open-shell neutrals (radicals) and radical cations is described. Pyrolysis (25–1500 °C) of thermally labile compounds, such as, 1,5-hexadiene via a Chen nozzle yields a seeded beam of reactive species in helium. The pyrolysis products are then analyzed by electron ionization (EI) or reacted with stored ions. Electron ionization of the pyrolysis products of 1,5-hexadiene shows that both the allyl radical and allene are generated. Reactions of benzene radical cations and the pyrolysis products of 1,5-hexadiene result in carbon-carbon bond formation. Those reactions of allyl radical with the benzene radical cation yield the C7H7+ ion of m/z 91, permitting an unusual entry into arenium ions. The reaction of allene with benzene radical cation in contrast yields C9H10+. and C9H9+. PMID:20401179

  2. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  3. Unimolecular reaction dynamics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Terry A. Miller

    2006-09-01

    Free radical reactions are of crucial importance in combustion and in atmospheric chemistry. Reliable theoretical models for predicting the rates and products of these reactions are required for modeling combustion and atmospheric chemistry systems. Unimolecular reactions frequently play a crucial role in determining final products. The dissociations of vinyl, CH2= CH, and methoxy, CH3O, have low barriers, about 13,000 cm-1 and 8,000 cm-1, respectively. Since barriers of this magnitude are typical of free radicals these molecules should serve as benchmarks for this important class of reactions. To achieve this goal, a detailed understanding of the vinyl and methoxy radicals is required. Results for dissociation dynamics of vinyl and selectively deuterated vinyl radical are reported. Significantly, H-atom scrambling is shown not to occur in this reaction. A large number of spectroscopic experiments for CH3O and CHD2O have been performed. Spectra recorded include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), laser excited dispersed fluorescence (LEDF), fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) and stimulated emission pumping (SEP). Such results are critical for implementing dynamics experiments involving the dissociation of methoxy.

  4. Deuterium Substitution used as a Tool for Investigating Mechanisms of Gas-Phase Free-Radical Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Hynes, A. J.; Nicovich, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented and discussed for a number of gas phase free radical reactions where H/D isotope effects provide valuable mechanistic insights. The cases considered are (1) the reactions of OH, NO3, and Cl with atmospheric reduced sulfur compounds, (2) the reactions of OH and OD with CH3CN and CD3CN, and (3) the reactions of alkyl radicals with HBr and DBr.

  5. Inhibition of hydroxyl radical reaction with aromatics by dissolved natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, M.E.; Tarr, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compound molecules bound to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H2O2 + Fe2+ ??? Fe3+ + HO- + HO??). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanism for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical formation occurs in microenvironmental sites remote from the aromatic compounds. In addition to changes in kinetics, pyrene hydroxyl radical reaction also exhibited a mechanistic change in the presence of fulvic acid. The mechanism changed from a reaction that was apparently firstorder in pyrene to one that was apparently secondorder in pyrene, indicating that pyrene self-reaction may have become the dominant mechanism in the presence of fulvic acid. Dissolved NOM causes significant changes in the rate and mechanism of hydroxyl radical degradation of aromatic compounds. Consequently, literature rate constants measured in pure water will not be useful for predicting the degradation of pollutants in environmental systems. The kinetic and mechanistic information in this study will be useful for developing improved degradation methods involving Fenton chemistry.Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compounds molecules bounds to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H2O2 + Fe2+ ??? Fe3+ + HO- + HO??). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanisms for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical

  6. Radical addition-initiated domino reactions of conjugated oxime ethers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The application of conjugated oxime ethers to the synthesis of complex chemical scaffolds using domino radical reactions has been described in detail. The triethylborane-mediated hydroxysulfenylation reaction allows for the regioselective construction of a carbon-sulfur bond and a carbon-oxygen bond in a single operation for the formation of β-hydroxy sulfides. This reaction proceeds via a radical pathway involving regioselective thiyl addition and the subsequent trapping of the resulting α-imino radical with O₂, where the imino group enhances the stability of the intermediate radical. Hydroxyalkylation reactions that occur via a carbon radical addition reaction followed by the hydroxylation of the resulting N-borylenamine with O₂ have also been developed. We investigated sequential radical addition aldol-type reactions in detail to explore the novel domino reactions that occur via the generation of N-borylenamine. The radical reaction of a conjugated oxime ether with triethylborane in the presence of an aldehyde affords γ-butyrolactone via sequential processes including ethyl radical addition, the generation of N-borylenamine, an aldol-type reaction with an aldehyde, and a lactonization reaction. A novel domino reaction has also been developed involving the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of N-boryl-N-phenoxyenamine. The triethylborane-mediated domino reactions of O-phenyl-conjugated oxime ethers afforded the corresponding benzofuro[2,3-b]pyrrol-2-ones via a radical addition/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement/cyclization/lactamization cascade.

  7. Mechanistic Insight into the Photoredox Catalysis of Anti-Markovnikov Alkene Hydrofunctionalization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe our efforts to understand the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions using 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium (Mes-Acr+) as a photoredox catalyst. Importantly, we are able to detect alkene cation radical intermediates, and confirm that phenylthiyl radical is capable of oxidizing the persistent acridinyl radical in a fast process that unites the catalytic activity of the photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) manifolds. Additionally, we present evidence that diphenyl disulfide ((PhS)2) operates on a common catalytic cycle with thiophenol (PhSH) by way of photolytic cleaveage of the disulfide bond. Transition structure analysis of the HAT step using DFT reveals that the activation barrier for H atom donation from PhSH is significantly lower than 2-phenylmalononitrile (PMN) due to structural reorganization. In the early stages of the reaction, Mes-Acr+ is observed to engage in off-cycle adduct formation, presumably as buildup of PhS− becomes significant. The kinetic differences between PhSH and (PhS)2 as HAT catalysts indicate that the proton transfer step may have significant rate limiting influence. PMID:25390821

  8. Grignard Reaction of an Epoxide: A Mechanistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaccio, James A.; Volpi, Sabrina; Clarke, Ransford

    1996-12-01

    Addition of PhMgBr to styrene oxide (1) affords a mixture of 2,2-diphenylethanol (3) and 1,2-diphenylethanol (6) (3:6 = 1:3); reversing the order of addition inverts the ratio of 3 to 6 formed (3:6 = 2:1). Students identify 3 and 6 by TLC comparison with authentic samples which they prepare by independent synthesis (hydride reduction of the corresponding carbonyl compounds), and establish the ratios of 3 to 6 by a combination of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. This undergraduate experiment serves as an interesting alternative to more traditional Grignard experiments and is an excellent vehicle for a "discovery-based" experiment in which students are introduced to epoxide chemistry, share their laboratory data and make mechanistic conclusions from their experimental results. Unlike most undergraduate Grignard experiments which are performed merely for the sake of illustrating a textbook reaction, this Grignard synthesis is performed to probe the reactivity of styrene oxide. Students are required to analyze their products by TLC and NMR spectroscopy (instead of just submitting them for a grade) in order to obtain the data necessary for making mechanistic conclusions.

  9. Insights into gas-phase reaction mechanisms of small carbon radicals using isomer-resolved product detection.

    PubMed

    Trevitt, Adam J; Goulay, Fabien

    2016-02-17

    For reactive gas-phase environments, including combustion, extraterrestrials atmospheres and our Earth's atmosphere, the availability of quality chemical data is essential for predictive chemical models. These data include reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions. This perspective overviews recent isomer-resolved production detection experiments for reactions of two of the most reactive gas phase radicals, the CN and CH radicals, with a suite of small hydrocarbons. A particular focus is given to flow-tube experiments using synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Coupled with computational studies and other experiment techniques, flow tube isomer-resolved product detection have provided significant mechanistic details of these radical + neutral reactions with some general patterns emerging.

  10. Carbonylation reactions of alkyl iodides through the interplay of carbon radicals and Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Shuhei; Fusano, Akira; Fukuyama, Takahide; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2014-05-20

    Numerous methods for transition metal catalyzed carbonylation reactions have been established. Examples that start from aryl, vinyl, allyl, and benzyl halides to give the corresponding carboxylic acid derivatives have all been well documented. In contrast, the corresponding alkyl halides often encounter difficulty. This is inherent to the relatively slow oxidative addition step onto the metal center and subsequent β-hydride elimination which causes isomerization of the alkyl metal species. Radical carbonylation reactions can override such problems of reactivity; however, carbonylation coupled to iodine atom transfer (atom transfer carbonylation), though useful, often suffers from a slow iodine atom transfer step that affects the outcome of the reaction. We found that atom transfer carbonylation of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides was efficiently accelerated by the addition of a palladium catalyst under light irradiation. Stereochemical studies support a mechanistic pathway based on the synergic interplay of radical and Pd-catalyzed reaction steps which ultimately lead to an acylpalladium species. The radical/Pd-combined reaction system has a wide range of applications, including the synthesis of carboxylic acid esters, lactones, amides, lactams, and unsymmetrical ketones such as alkyl alkynyl and alkyl aryl ketones. The design of unique multicomponent carbonylation reactions involving vicinal C-functionalization of alkenes, double and triple carbonylation reactions, in tandem with radical cyclization reactions, has also been achieved. Thus, the radical/Pd-combined strategy provides a solution to a longstanding problem of reactivity involving the carbonylation of alkyl halides. This novel methodology expands the breadth and utility of carbonylation chemistry over either the original radical carbonylation reactions or metal-catalyzed carbonylation reactions.

  11. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  12. Mechanistic Studies of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII with TDP-d-Fucose**

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yeonjin; Ruszczycky, Mark W.; Choi, Sei-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    DesII is a radical SAM enzyme that catalyzes the C4-deamination of TDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose via a C3 radical intermediate. However, if the C4 amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl (TDP-quinovose), the hydroxyl at C3 is oxidized to a ketone with no C4-dehydration. It is hypothesized that hyperconjugation between the C4 C–N/O bond and the partially filled p-orbital at C3 of the radical intermediate modulates the degree to which elimination competes with dehydrogenation. To investigate this hypothesis, the reaction of DesII with the C4-epimer of TDP-quinovose (TDP-fucose) was examined. The majority of the reaction results in the formation of TDP-6-deoxygulose and likely regeneration of TDP-fucose. The remainder of the substrate radical partitions roughly equally between C3-dehydrogenation and C4-dehydration. Thus, changing the stereochemistry at C4 permits a more balanced competition between elimination and dehydrogenation. PMID:25418063

  13. Reactions of allylic radicals that impact molecular weight growth kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-03-01

    The reactions of allylic radicals have the potential to play a critical role in molecular weight growth (MWG) kinetics during hydrocarbon oxidation and/or pyrolysis. Due to their stability (when compared to alkyl radicals), they can accumulate to relatively high concentrations. Thus, even though the rate coefficients for their various reactions are small, the rates of these reactions may be significant. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations to examine the recombination, addition, and abstraction reactions of allylic radicals. For the recombination reaction of allyl radicals, we assign a high pressure rate rule that is based on experimental data. Once formed, the recombination product can potentially undergo an H-atom abstraction reaction followed by unimolecular cyclization and β-scission reactions. Depending upon the conditions (e.g., higher pressures) these pathways can lead to the formation of stable MWG species. The addition of allylic radicals to olefins can also lead to MWG species formation. Once again, cyclization of the adduct followed by β-scission is an important energy accessible route. Since the recombination and addition reactions produce chemically-activated adducts, we have explored the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the overall rate constants as well as that for the multiple product channels. We describe a strategy for estimating these pressure-dependencies for systems where detailed electronic structure information is not available. We also derive generic rate rules for hydrogen abstraction reactions from olefins and diolefins by methyl and allyl radicals.

  14. Oxysterols from Free Radical Chain Oxidation of 7-Dehydrocholesterol: Product and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Libin; Korade, Zeljka; Porter, Ned A.

    2010-01-01

    Free radical chain oxidation of highly oxidizable 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) initiated by 2,2′-azobis(4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) was carried out at 37°C in benzene for 24 hours. Fifteen oxysterols derived from 7-DHC were isolated and characterized with 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. A mechanism that involves abstraction of hydrogen atoms at C-9 and/or C-14 is proposed to account for the formation of all of the oxysterols and the reaction progress profile. In either the H-9 or H-14 mechanism, a pentadienyl radical intermediate is formed after abstraction of H-9 or H-14 by a peroxyl radical. This step is followed by the well-precedented transformations observed in peroxidation reactions of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as oxygen addition, peroxyl radical 5-exo cyclization, and SHi carbon radical attack on the peroxide bond. The mechanism for peroxidation of 7-DHC also accounts for the formation of numerous oxysterol natural products isolated from fungal species, marine sponges, and cactaceous species. In a cell viability test, the oxysterol mixture from 7-DHC peroxidation was found to be cytotoxic to Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells in the micromolar concentration range. We propose that the high reactivity of 7-DHC and the oxysterols generated from its peroxidation may play important roles in the pathogenesis of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2), and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), all of these being metabolic disorders having an elevated level of 7-DHC. PMID:20121089

  15. Bimetallic oxidative addition involving radical intermediates in nickel-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, Jan; Ruiz, Jesus; Wodrich, Matthew D; Hu, Xile

    2013-08-14

    Many nickel-based catalysts have been reported for cross-coupling reactions of nonactivated alkyl halides. The mechanistic understanding of these reactions is still primitive. Here we report a mechanistic study of alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling catalyzed by a preformed nickel(II) pincer complex ([(N2N)Ni-Cl]). The coupling proceeds through a radical process, involving two nickel centers for the oxidative addition of alkyl halide. The catalysis is second-order in Grignard reagent, first-order in catalyst, and zero-order in alkyl halide. A transient species, [(N2N)Ni-alkyl(2)](alkyl(2)-MgCl), is identified as the key intermediate responsible for the activation of alkyl halide, the formation of which is the turnover-determining step of the catalysis.

  16. Bimetallic oxidative addition involving radical intermediates in nickel-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, Jan; Ruiz, Jesus; Wodrich, Matthew D; Hu, Xile

    2013-08-14

    Many nickel-based catalysts have been reported for cross-coupling reactions of nonactivated alkyl halides. The mechanistic understanding of these reactions is still primitive. Here we report a mechanistic study of alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling catalyzed by a preformed nickel(II) pincer complex ([(N2N)Ni-Cl]). The coupling proceeds through a radical process, involving two nickel centers for the oxidative addition of alkyl halide. The catalysis is second-order in Grignard reagent, first-order in catalyst, and zero-order in alkyl halide. A transient species, [(N2N)Ni-alkyl(2)](alkyl(2)-MgCl), is identified as the key intermediate responsible for the activation of alkyl halide, the formation of which is the turnover-determining step of the catalysis. PMID:23865460

  17. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  18. Characteristics of Radical Reactions, Spin Rules, and a Suggestion for the Consistent Use of a Dot on Radical Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojnarovits, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    In many chemical reactions, reactive radicals have been shown to be transient intermediates. The free radical character of a chemical species is often, but not always, indicated by adding a superscript dot to the chemical formula. A consistent use of this radical symbol on all species that have radical character is suggested. Free radicals have a…

  19. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex.

  20. Probing Complex Free-Radical Reaction Pathways of Fuel Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan III, A C; Kidder, Michelle; Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F

    2012-01-01

    Fossil (e.g. coal) and renewable (e.g. woody biomass) organic energy resources have received considerable attention as possible sources of liquid transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Knowledge of the reactivity of these complex materials has been advanced through fundamental studies of organic compounds that model constituent substructures. In particular, an improved understanding of thermochemical reaction pathways involving free-radical intermediates has arisen from detailed experimental kinetic studies and, more recently, advanced computational investigations. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent investigations of the fundamental pyrolysis pathways of model compounds that represent key substructures in the lignin component of woody biomass with a focus on molecules representative of the dominant beta-O-4 aryl ether linkages. Additional mechanistic insights gleaned from DFT calculations on the kinetics of key elementary reaction steps will also be presented, as well as a few thoughts on the significant contributions of Jim Franz to this area of free radical chemistry.

  1. Kinetics and mechanistic study of the gas-phase reaction of ozone with methylbutenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawatsch-Carrasco, N.; Doussin, J. F.; Rea, G.; Wenger, J.; Carlier, P.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) account for around 90% of hydrocarbon emissions into the Earth's atmosphere ([1], [2]). Several thousand different BVOCs have been identified, the most well known being unsaturated hydrocarbons. However, over the last ten years an increasing number of oxygenated BVOCs, such as methylbutenol (MBO), have also been detected in field measurement campaigns and plant emission studies ([3], [4]). In order to determine the environmental impact of BVOCs, a thorough knowledge of the rates and mechanisms for their atmospheric degradation is required. The major atmospheric degradation processes for BVOCs are gas-phase reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals (NO_3) and ozone (O_3). These reactions produce oxidised hydrocarbons, ozone and secondary organic aerosol and, as a result, exert a strong influence on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Very few studies are available concerning the reactivity of MBO. To extend the available database on the atmospheric chemistry of biogenic compounds, the reaction of O_3 with MBO at 296(±2) K has been investigated in atmospheric simulation chambers at LISA in Créteil (France) and CRAC in Cork (Ireland), using complementary techniques such as FTIR spectroscopy, PFBHA derivatization with GC-MS detection and a particle sizer and counter. The rate constant for the reaction was determined using an absolute rate technique, yielding a value of (8.3±0.9)× 10-18 cm^3 molecule-1s-1. Mechanistic studies of the reaction lead to the following observations: a primary formation of only three carbonyl compounds, formaldehyde (yield=0.40±0.03), acetone (yield=0.27±0.02) and 2-methyl-2-hydroxy-propanal. In addition, there is a noticeable formation of aerosols at the very beginning of the reaction that seemed to depend on the relative humidity. References: [1] Wayne, R. P. (2000). 3rd edition. Oxford university press inc. Edition. [2] Finlayson-Pitts, B. and Pitts Jr, J. N. ( 2000

  2. Tropospheric reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from hydroxyl radical reaction with a series of alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Roger

    1990-01-01

    In the present assessment, the hydrogen containing halocarbons being considered as alternatives to the the presently used chlorofluorocarbons are the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 123 (CF3CHCl2), 141b (CFCl2CH3), 142b (CF2ClCH3), 22 (CHF2Cl) and 124 (CF3CHFCl) and the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 134a (CF3CH2F), 152a (CHF2CH3) and 125 (CF3CHF2). All of these HCFCs and HFCs will react with the hydroxyl (OH) radical in the troposphere, giving rise to haloalkyl radicals which then undergo a complex series of reactions in the troposphere. These reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from the initial OH radical reactions with the HCFCs and HFCs under tropospheric conditions are the focus here.

  3. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  4. Roaming dynamics in radical addition-elimination reactions.

    PubMed

    Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Suits, Arthur G; Mebel, Alexander M

    2014-06-06

    Radical addition-elimination reactions are a major pathway for transformation of unsaturated hydrocarbons. In the gas phase, these reactions involve formation of a transient strongly bound intermediate. However, the detailed mechanism and dynamics for these reactions remain unclear. Here we show, for reaction of chlorine atoms with butenes, that the Cl addition-HCl elimination pathway occurs from an abstraction-like Cl-H-C geometry rather than a conventional three-centre or four-centre transition state. Furthermore, access to this geometry is attained by roaming excursions of the Cl atom from the initially formed adduct. In effect, the alkene π cloud serves to capture the Cl atom and hold it, allowing many subsequent opportunities for the energized intermediate to find a suitable approach to the abstraction geometry. These bimolecular roaming reactions are closely related to the roaming radical dynamics recently discovered to play an important role in unimolecular reactions.

  5. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with tert-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džeba, Iva; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Mihaljević, Branka

    2012-09-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of t-butoxyl radicals with resveratrol was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The rate constant was determined by measuring the phenoxyl radical formation rate at 390 nm as function of resveratrol concentration in acetonitrile. The rate constant was determined to be 6.5×108 M-1s-1. This high value indicates the high reactivity consistent with the strong antioxidant activity of resveratrol.

  6. Stereoselective cyclization reactions of IBX-generated alkoxyamidyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Janza, Birgit; Studer, Armido

    2005-08-19

    In this paper, a method for the generation of alkoxyamidyl radicals is presented. These N-centered radicals can efficiently be formed starting from the corresponding acylated alkoxyamines using IBX as an oxidant. Stereoselective 5-exo and 6-exo reactions with these N-heteroatom-centered radicals leading to isoxazolidines and [1,2]oxazinanes are discussed. The N-O bond in the heterocycles can readily be cleaved with SmI(2) to provide N-acylated 1,3-amino alcohols.

  7. Free-radical reactions of glycerolipids and sphingolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkova, I. L.

    2012-02-01

    Free-radical reactions of glycero- and sphingolipids occurring in their polar moiety (fragmentation) and in their hydrophobic residue (peroxidation) under the action of reactive oxygen species are considered. The main attention is focused on free-radical fragmentation; its mechanism and regularities are discussed. Lipid peroxidation has been shown to modify the residues of polyunsaturated fatty acids, while the free-radical fragmentation results in the cleavage of ester, O-glycosidic and amide bonds in lipid molecules to give glycerophosphatides, ceramides and fatty acid amides functioning as secondary messengers in biosystems. The bibliography includes 132 references.

  8. *H atom and *OH radical reactions with 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Grand, A; Morell, C; Labet, V; Cadet, J; Eriksson, L A

    2007-09-20

    The reactions between either a hydrogen atom or a hydroxyl radical and 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) are studied by using the hybrid kinetic energy meta-GGA functional MPW1B95. *H atom and *OH radical addition to positions C5 and C6 of 5-MeCyt, or *OH radical induced H-abstraction from the C5 methyl group, are explored. All systems are optimized in bulk solvent. The data presented show that the barriers to reaction are very low: ca. 7 kcal/mol for the *H atom additions and 1 kcal/mol for the reactions involving the *OH radical. Thermodynamically, the two C6 radical adducts and the *H-abstraction product are the most stable ones. The proton hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC), computed at the IEFPCM/MPW1B95/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, agree well with B3LYP results and available experimental and theoretical data on related thymine and cytosine radicals.

  9. Mechanistic and computational studies of the atom transfer radical addition of CCl4 to styrene catalyzed by copper homoscorpionate complexes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Molina, José María; Sameera, W M C; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Maseras, Feliu; Belderrain, Tomás R; Pérez, Pedro J

    2011-03-21

    Experimental as well as theoretical studies have been carried out with the aim of elucidating the mechanism of the atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) of styrene and carbon tetrachloride with a Tp(x)Cu(NCMe) complex as the catalyst precursor (Tp(x) = hydrotrispyrazolyl-borate ligand). The studies shown herein demonstrate the effect of different variables in the kinetic behavior. A mechanistic proposal consistent with theoretical and experimental data is presented.

  10. Oxygen switch in visible-light photoredox catalysis: radical additions and cyclizations and unexpected C-C-bond cleavage reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaoqun; Das, Arindam; Bui, Lan; Zhou, Hanjun; Curran, Dennis P; Rueping, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    Visible light photoredox catalyzed inter- and intramolecular C-H functionalization reactions of tertiary amines have been developed. Oxygen was found to act as chemical switch to trigger two different reaction pathways and to obtain two different types of products from the same starting material. In the absence of oxygen, the intermolecular addition of N,N-dimethyl-anilines to electron-deficient alkenes provided γ-amino nitriles in good to high yields. In the presence of oxygen, a radical addition/cyclization reaction occurred which resulted in the formation of tetrahydroquinoline derivatives in good yields under mild reaction conditions. The intramolecular version of the radical addition led to the unexpected formation of indole-3-carboxaldehyde derivatives. Mechanistic investigations of this reaction cascade uncovered a new photoredox catalyzed C-C bond cleavage reaction.

  11. Mechanistic insights into nickamine-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, Jan; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Within the last decades the transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling of non-activated alkyl halides has significantly progressed. Within the context of alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling, first row transition metals spanning from iron, over cobalt, nickel, to copper have been successfully applied to catalyze this difficult reaction. The mechanistic understanding of these reactions is still in its infancy. Herein we outline our latest mechanistic studies that explain the efficiency of nickel, in particular nickamine-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions.

  12. Vibrationally Driven Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction by Bromine Radical in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Shalowski, Michael A.; Crim, F. Fleming

    2013-06-01

    Previously, we have shown that preparing reactants in specific vibrational states can affect the product state distribution and branching ratios in gas phase reactions. In the solution phase, however, no vibrational mediation study has been reported to date. In this work, we present our first attempt of vibrationally mediated bimolecular reaction in solution. Hydrogen abstraction from a solvent by a bromine radical can be a good candidate to test the effect of vibrational excitation on reaction dynamics because this reaction is highly endothermic and thus we can suppress any thermally initiated reaction in our experiment. Br radical quickly forms CT (charge transfer) complex with solvent molecule once it is generated from photolysis of a bromine source. The CT complex strongly absorbs visible light, which allows us to use electronic transient absorption for tracking Br radical population. For this experiment, we photolyze bromoform solution in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent with 267 nm to generate Br radical and excite the C-H stretch overtone of DMSO with 1700 nm a few hundred femtoseconds after the photolysis. Then, we monitor the population of Br-DMSO complex with 400 nm as a function of delay time between two pump beams and probe beam. As a preliminary result, we observed the enhancement of loss of Br-DMSO complex population due to the vibrational excitation. We think that increased loss of Br-DMSO complex is attributed to more loss of Br radical that abstracts hydrogen from DMSO and it is the vibrational excitation that promotes the reaction. To make a clear conclusion, we will next utilize infrared probing to directly detect HBr product formation.

  13. How Well Can New-Generation Density Functionals Describe the Energetics of Bond-Dissociation Reactions Producing Radicals?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-02-14

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The performance of various density functionals has been tested for three sets of reaction energies involving radicals. It is shown that two recently designed functionals, M05-2X and M06-2X, provide the best performance. These functionals provide useful and affordable methods for future mechanistic studies involving organic radicals.

  14. Generation Mechanism of Deferoxamine Radical by Tyrosine-Tyrosinase Reaction.

    PubMed

    Tada, Mika; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide radical formations of deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) that is used clinically to treat iron-overload patients was examined by a tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction system as models of the H-atom transfer or proton-coupled electron transfer. When DFX was exposed to the tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction, nine-line ESR spectrum (g = 2.0063, hfcc; aN = 0.78 mT, aH(2) = 0.63 mT) was detected, indicating that the oxidation of DFX leads to a nitroxide radical. The signal intensity of the DFX radical increased dependently on the concentrations of tyrosine and tyrosinase. The amounts of DMPO-OH spin adducts via the tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction declined with DFX. Furthermore, mass spectra of an extra removed from the tyrosine-tyrosinase reaction mixture showed that the enzyme reactions might not be degradations of DFX. Therefore, there might be two types of DFX reaction passways, which could be through an internal electron transfer from tyrosine and hydrogen absorptions by ·OH directly.

  15. Bromine radical-mediated sequential radical rearrangement and addition reaction of alkylidenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Kippo, Takashi; Hamaoka, Kanako; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2013-01-16

    Bromine radical-mediated cyclopropylcarbinyl-homoallyl rearrangement of alkylidenecyclopropanes was effectively accomplished by C-C bond formation with allylic bromides, which led to the syntheses of 2-bromo-1,6-dienes. A three-component coupling reaction comprising alkylidenecyclopropanes, allylic bromides, and carbon monoxide also proceeded well to give 2-bromo-1,7-dien-5-ones in good yield.

  16. Modeling of the Reaction Mechanism of Enzymatic Radical C-C Coupling by Benzylsuccinate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Szaleniec, Maciej; Heider, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques and density functional theory calculations were performed to study the mechanism of enzymatic radical C-C coupling catalyzed by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS). BSS has been identified as a glycyl radical enzyme that catalyzes the enantiospecific fumarate addition to toluene initiating its anaerobic metabolism in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica, and this reaction represents the general mechanism of toluene degradation in all known anaerobic degraders. In this work docking calculations, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and DFT+D2 cluster modeling was employed to address the following questions: (i) What mechanistic details of the BSS reaction yield the most probable molecular model? (ii) What is the molecular basis of enantiospecificity of BSS? (iii) Is the proposed mechanism consistent with experimental observations, such as an inversion of the stereochemistry of the benzylic protons, syn addition of toluene to fumarate, exclusive production of (R)-benzylsuccinate as a product and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) ranging between 2 and 4? The quantum mechanics (QM) modeling confirms that the previously proposed hypothetical mechanism is the most probable among several variants considered, although C-H activation and not C-C coupling turns out to be the rate limiting step. The enantiospecificity of the enzyme seems to be enforced by a thermodynamic preference for binding of fumarate in the pro(R) orientation and reverse preference of benzyl radical attack on fumarate in pro(S) pathway which results with prohibitively high energy barrier of the radical quenching. Finally, the proposed mechanism agrees with most of the experimental observations, although the calculated intrinsic KIE from the model (6.5) is still higher than the experimentally observed values (4.0) which suggests that both C-H activation and radical quenching may jointly be involved in the kinetic control of the reaction. PMID:27070573

  17. Modeling of the Reaction Mechanism of Enzymatic Radical C–C Coupling by Benzylsuccinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Szaleniec, Maciej; Heider, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques and density functional theory calculations were performed to study the mechanism of enzymatic radical C–C coupling catalyzed by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS). BSS has been identified as a glycyl radical enzyme that catalyzes the enantiospecific fumarate addition to toluene initiating its anaerobic metabolism in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica, and this reaction represents the general mechanism of toluene degradation in all known anaerobic degraders. In this work docking calculations, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and DFT+D2 cluster modeling was employed to address the following questions: (i) What mechanistic details of the BSS reaction yield the most probable molecular model? (ii) What is the molecular basis of enantiospecificity of BSS? (iii) Is the proposed mechanism consistent with experimental observations, such as an inversion of the stereochemistry of the benzylic protons, syn addition of toluene to fumarate, exclusive production of (R)-benzylsuccinate as a product and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) ranging between 2 and 4? The quantum mechanics (QM) modeling confirms that the previously proposed hypothetical mechanism is the most probable among several variants considered, although C–H activation and not C–C coupling turns out to be the rate limiting step. The enantiospecificity of the enzyme seems to be enforced by a thermodynamic preference for binding of fumarate in the pro(R) orientation and reverse preference of benzyl radical attack on fumarate in pro(S) pathway which results with prohibitively high energy barrier of the radical quenching. Finally, the proposed mechanism agrees with most of the experimental observations, although the calculated intrinsic KIE from the model (6.5) is still higher than the experimentally observed values (4.0) which suggests that both C–H activation and radical quenching may jointly be involved in the kinetic control of the reaction. PMID:27070573

  18. MICROWAVE EFFECTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: MECHANISTIC AND REACTION MEDIUM CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The scope of applications of microwave irradiation relates to a wide spectrum of organic syntheses with numerous benefits (reduction in reaction times, improved purity of products and better yields) encompassing advantages of both thermal and (or) specific non-purely thermal effe...

  19. Selective free radical reactions using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Philip J; Clarke, Ryan M; McFadden, Ryan M L; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2014-02-12

    We report herein a means to modify the reactivity of alkenes, and particularly to modify their selectivity toward reactions with nonpolar reactants (e.g., nonpolar free radicals) in supercritical carbon dioxide near the critical point. Rate constants for free radical addition of the light hydrogen isotope muonium to ethylene, vinylidene fluoride, and vinylidene chloride in supercritical carbon dioxide are compared over a range of pressures and temperatures. Near carbon dioxide's critical point, the addition to ethylene exhibits critical speeding up, while the halogenated analogues display critical slowing. This suggests that supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent may be used to tune alkene chemistry in near-critical conditions.

  20. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex. PMID:27186790

  1. Binuclear metallohydrolases: complex mechanistic strategies for a simple chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Gerhard; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; McGeary, Ross P; Guddat, Luke W

    2012-09-18

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large family of enzymes that require two closely spaced transition metal ions to carry out a plethora of hydrolytic reactions. Representatives include purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), enzymes that play a role in bone metabolism and are the only member of this family with a heterovalent binuclear center in the active form (Fe(3+)-M(2+), M = Fe, Zn, Mn). Other members of this family are urease, which contains a di-Ni(2+) center and catalyzes the breakdown of urea, arginase, which contains a di-Mn(2+) center and catalyzes the final step in the urea cycle, and the metallo-β-lactamases, which contain a di-Zn(2+) center and are virulence factors contributing to the spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Binuclear metallohydrolases catalyze numerous vital reactions and are potential targets of drugs against a wide variety of human disorders including osteoporosis, various cancers, antibiotic resistance, and erectile dysfunctions. These enzymes also tend to catalyze more than one reaction. An example is an organophosphate (OP)-degrading enzyme from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ). Although GpdQ is part of a pathway that is used by bacteria to degrade glycerolphosphoesters, it hydrolyzes a variety of other phosphodiesters and displays low levels of activity against phosphomono- and triesters. Such a promiscuous nature may have assisted the apparent recent evolution of some binuclear metallohydrolases to deal with situations created by human intervention such as OP pesticides in the environment. OP pesticides were first used approximately 70 years ago, and therefore the enzymes that bacteria use to degrade them must have evolved very quickly on the evolutionary time scale. The promiscuous nature of enzymes such as GpdQ makes them ideal candidates for the application of directed evolution to produce new enzymes that can be used in bioremediation and against chemical warfare. In this Account, we review the mechanisms employed by binuclear

  2. Radical reactions of thiamin pyrophosphate in 2-oxoacid oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Reed, George H; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Mansoorabadi, Steven O

    2012-11-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential in carbohydrate metabolism in all forms of life. TPP-dependent decarboxylation reactions of 2-oxo-acid substrates result in enamine adducts between the thiazolium moiety of the coenzyme and decarboxylated substrate. These central enamine intermediates experience different fates from protonation in pyruvate decarboxylase to oxidation by the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, the pyruvate oxidases, and 2-oxoacid oxidoreductases. Virtually all of the TPP-dependent enzymes, including pyruvate decarboxylase, can be assayed by 1-electron redox reactions linked to ferricyanide. Oxidation of the enamines is thought to occur via a 2-electron process in the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, wherein acyl group transfer is associated with reduction of the disulfide of the lipoamide moiety. However, discrete 1-electron steps occur in the oxidoreductases, where one or more [4Fe-4S] clusters mediate the electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors. These radical intermediates can be detected in the absence of the acyl-group acceptor, coenzyme A (CoASH). The π-electron system of the thiazolium ring stabilizes the radical. The extensively delocalized character of the radical is evidenced by quantitative analysis of nuclear hyperfine splitting tensors as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and by electronic structure calculations. The second electron transfer step is markedly accelerated by the presence of CoASH. While details of the second electron transfer step and its facilitation by CoASH remain elusive, expected redox properties of potential intermediates limit possible scenarios. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology.

  3. An improved semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulos, D E; Hore, P J

    2013-09-28

    We present a practical semiclassical method for computing the electron spin dynamics of a radical in which the electron spin is hyperfine coupled to a large number of nuclear spins. This can be used to calculate the singlet and triplet survival probabilities and quantum yields of radical recombination reactions in the presence of magnetic fields. Our method differs from the early semiclassical theory of Schulten and Wolynes [J. Chem. Phys. 68, 3292 (1978)] in allowing each individual nuclear spin to precess around the electron spin, rather than assuming that the hyperfine coupling-weighted sum of nuclear spin vectors is fixed in space. The downside of removing this assumption is that one can no longer obtain a simple closed-form expression for the electron spin correlation tensor: our method requires a numerical calculation. However, the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of nuclear spins, rather than exponentially as in an exact quantum mechanical calculation. The method is therefore applicable to arbitrarily large radicals. Moreover, it approaches quantitative agreement with quantum mechanics as the number of nuclear spins increases and the environment of the electron spin becomes more complex, owing to the rapid quantum decoherence in complex systems. Unlike the Schulten-Wolynes theory, the present semiclassical theory predicts the correct long-time behaviour of the electron spin correlation tensor, and it therefore correctly captures the low magnetic field effect in the singlet yield of a radical recombination reaction with a slow recombination rate. PMID:24089749

  4. Kinetics and products of the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with selected volatile organic compounds, including oxygenated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethel, Heidi Lynn

    -initiated reactions of 2-methyl-2-pentanol and 4-methyl-2-pentanol. These compounds were studied in order to investigate the formation of alkoxy radicals (RO•) and their subsequent reactions through isomerization, decomposition or reaction with O2 . Experiments of the type detailed here allow the determination of kinetics and products of the atmospheric reactions of VOCs and provide input for mechanistic models of photochemical smog formation.

  5. Free radical reactions of monochloramine and hydroxylamine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Heather D.; Cooper, William J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Bartels, David M.

    2002-11-01

    The use of Advanced Oxidation Technologies to destroy organic contaminants in drinking water may be impacted by the presence of disinfection chemicals such as monochloramine (NH 2Cl). To allow a quantitative evaluation of the effect of NH 2Cl on the destruction of organics in water rate constants for its reaction with the hydrated electron, the hydroxyl radical and the hydrogen atom were determined in this study. The corresponding values of (2.2±0.2)×10 10, (2.8±0.2)×10 9, and (1.2±0.1)×10 9 M -1 s -1, respectively, were incorporated into a kinetic computer model whose predictions were in good agreement with experimental chloramine removal under large scale, steady-state electron-beam irradiation conditions. Rate constants were also determined for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom with the chloramine hydration product hydroxylamine to supplement established literature data. Hydroxyl radical rate constants for the basic (NH 2OH) and acidic (NH 3OH +) forms were determined as (8.5±0.4)×10 9 and ⩽5×10 7 M -1 s -1, respectively, while for hydrogen atom reaction, corresponding rate constants of (4.5±0.1)×10 7 and (3.6±1.5)×10 5 M -1 s -1 were found.

  6. Parameterization of phosphine ligands reveals mechanistic pathways and predicts reaction outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Zachary L.; Milo, Anat; Hickey, David P.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic foundation behind the identity of a phosphine ligand that best promotes a desired reaction outcome is often non-intuitive, and thus has been addressed in numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this work, multivariate correlations of reaction outcomes using 38 different phosphine ligands were combined with classic potentiometric analyses to study a Suzuki reaction, for which the site selectivity of oxidative addition is highly dependent on the nature of the phosphine. These studies shed light on the generality of hypotheses regarding the structural influence of different classes of phosphine ligands on the reaction mechanism(s), and deliver a methodology that should prove useful in future studies of phosphine ligands.

  7. Channeling the SmI₂ reactions to the radical path: radicals resisting reduction by SmI₂.

    PubMed

    Yella, Ramesh; Hoz, Shmaryahu

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the reaction of 4-(2,2-diphenylvinyl)pyridine with SmI2 revealed that the intermediate radical strongly resists further reduction to the corresponding anion. The resistance of the radical to accepting another electron is traced to its stabilization by the nitrogen lone pair. The literature suggests that oxygen may also play a role similar to that of nitrogen in directing the course of the reaction toward radical rather than to anionic chemistry.

  8. Radical Intermediates in Monooxygenase Reactions of Rieske Dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Sarmistha; Austin, Rachel N.; Deng, Dayi; Groves, John T.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Rieske dioxygenases catalyze the cis-dihydroxylation of a wide range of aromatic compounds to initiate their biodegradation. The archetypal Rieske dioxygenase naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (NDOS) catalyzes dioxygenation of naphthalene to form (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. NDOS is composed of three proteins: a reductase, a ferredoxin, and an α3β3 oxygenase (NDO). In each α subunit, NDO contains a Rieske Fe2S2 cluster and a mononuclear iron site where substrate dihydroxylation occurs. NDOS also catalyzes monooxygenase reactions for many substrates. The mechanism of the reaction is unknown for either the mono- or di-oxygenase reactions, but has been postulated to involve either direct reaction of a structurally characterized Fe(III)-hydroperoxy intermediate or the electronically equivalent Fe(V)-oxo-hydroxo intermediate formed by O-O bond cleavage before reaction with substrate. The reaction for the former intermediate is expected to proceed through cationic intermediates while the latter is anticipated to initially form a radical intermediate. Here the monooxygenation reactions of the diagnostic probe molecules norcarane and bicyclohexane are investigated. In each case, a significant amount of the rearrangement product derived from a radical intermediate (lifetime of 11–18 ns) is observed while little or no ring expansion product from a cationic intermediate is formed. Thus, monooxygenation of these molecules appears to proceed via the Fe(V)-oxo-hydroxo intermediate. The formation of this high-valent intermediate shows that it must also be considered as a possible participant in the dioxygenation reaction, in contrast to computational studies but in accord with previous biomimetic studies. PMID:17341076

  9. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600–1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  10. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  11. Solution-phase mechanistic study and solid-state structure of a tris(bipyridinium radical cation) inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Barnes, Jonathan C; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Li, Hao; Coskun, Ali; Gassensmith, Jeremiah J; Liu, Zhichang; Benítez, Diego; Trabolsi, Ali; Goddard, William A; Elhabiri, Mourad; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-02-15

    The ability of the diradical dicationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(2(•+))) ring to form inclusion complexes with 1,1'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium radical cationic (BIPY(•+)) guests has been investigated mechanistically and quantitatively. Two BIPY(•+) radical cations, methyl viologen (MV(•+)) and a dibutynyl derivative (V(•+)), were investigated as guests for the CBPQT(2(•+)) ring. Both guests form trisradical complexes, namely, CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) and CBPQT(2(•+))⊂V(•+), respectively. The structural details of the CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) complex, which were ascertained by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, reveal that MV(•+) is located inside the cavity of the ring in a centrosymmetric fashion: the 1:1 complexes pack in continuous radical cation stacks. A similar solid-state packing was observed in the case of CBPQT(2(•+)) by itself. Quantum mechanical calculations agree well with the superstructure revealed by X-ray crystallography for CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) and further suggest an electronic asymmetry in the SOMO caused by radical-pairing interactions. The electronic asymmetry is maintained in solution. The thermodynamic stability of the CBPQT(2(•+))⊂MV(•+) complex was probed by both isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV/vis spectroscopy, leading to binding constants of (5.0 ± 0.6) × 10(4) M(-1) and (7.9 ± 5.5) × 10(4) M(-1), respectively. The kinetics of association and dissociation were determined by stopped-flow spectroscopy, yielding a k(f) and k(b) of (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and 250 ± 50 s(-1), respectively. The electrochemical mechanistic details were studied by variable scan rate cyclic voltammetry (CV), and the experimental data were compared digitally with simulated data, modeled on the proposed mechanism using the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters obtained from ITC, UV/vis, and stopped-flow spectroscopy. In particular, the electrochemical mechanism of association

  12. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  13. Studies on the interaction of isocyanides with imines: reaction scope and mechanistic variations

    PubMed Central

    Ghashghaei, Ouldouz; Manna, Consiglia Annamaria; Vicente-García, Esther; Revés, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Summary The interaction of imines with isocyanides has been studied. The main product results from a sequential process involving the attack of two units of isocyanide, under Lewis acid catalysis, upon the carbon–nitrogen double bond of the imine to form the 4-membered ring system. The scope of the reaction regarding the imine and isocyanide ranges has been determined, and also some mechanistic variations and structural features have been described. PMID:24454559

  14. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kiminori; Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  15. Kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Watson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive study was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in a laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence system. A 266 nm laser was used to photolyze HNO3 in the temperature range 225-415 K at pressures of 20-300 torr. A temperature dependence was detected below room temperature, with a leveling off at 298 K and a wide spread in the rate constants. A pressure dependence was observed over the entire range and was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The results are noted to be in agreement with those of previous investigations. However, the wide range of rate constants are suggested to be a problem for stratospheric HO(x) modeling for anthropogenic effects. No explanation could be given of the varying results obtained by other investigators regarding the kinetics of the reactions.

  16. Pressure Effects on Product Channels of Hydrocarbon Radical-Radical Reactions; Implications for Modelling of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, A.; Halpern, J.; N'doumi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Previously we had studied the kinetics and product channels of small unsaturated hydrocarbon radical (C2 and C3s) reactions relevant to planetary atmospheric modelling. Reactions of C2 radicals (such as vinyl, H2CCH and ethynyl C2H) and C3 radicals (such as propargyl, HCCCH2 and allyl, H2CCCH3) can affect the abundances of a large number of stable observable C3, C4, C5, C6 and larger molecules, including linear, aromatic and even poly aromatic molecules. We have experimentally determined pressuredependent product yields for self- and cross-radical reactions performed at 298 K and at selected pressures between ~4 Torr (0.5 kPa) and 760 Torr (101 kPa). Final products were determined by gas chromatograph with mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC/MS/FID). In some cases complementary computational studies extended the pressure and temperature range of the observations and provided valuable information on complex reaction mechanisms. These studies provide a systematic framework so that important energetic and structural parameters for radical-radical reactions can be assessed. Here we report a compilation of our earlier results relevant to planetary atmospheres in addition to recent ones for allyl radical (H2CCCH3) reactions.

  17. Steric Effects in the Reaction of Aryl Radicals on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Combellas, Catherine; Jiang, Deen; Kanoufi, Frederic; Pinson, Jean; Podvorica, Fetah

    2009-01-01

    Steric effects are investigated in the reaction of aryl radicals with surfaces. The electrochemical reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-methyl, 2-methoxy, 2-ethyl, 2,6-, 2,4-, and 3,5-dimethyl, 4-tert-butyl, 3,5-bis-tert-butyl benzenediazonium, 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl), and pentafluoro benzenediazonium tetrafluoroborates is examined in acetonitrile solutions. It leads to the formation of grafted layers only if the steric hindrance at the 2- or 2,6-position(s) is small. When the 3,5-positions are crowded with tert-butyl groups, the growth of the organic layer is limited by steric effects and a monolayer is formed. The efficiency of the grafting process is assessed by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, and ellipsometry. These experiments, together with density functional computations of bonding energies of substituted phenyl groups on a copper surface, are discussed in terms of the reactivity of aryl radicals in the electrografting reaction and in the growth of the polyaryl layer.

  18. Mechanistic studies of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme DesII with TDP-D-fucose.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeonjin; Ruszczycky, Mark W; Choi, Sei-Hyun; Liu, Hung-wen

    2015-01-12

    DesII is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme that catalyzes the C4-deamination of TDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose through a C3 radical intermediate. However, if the C4 amino group is replaced with a hydroxy group (to give TDP-quinovose), the hydroxy group at C3 is oxidized to a ketone with no C4-dehydration. It is hypothesized that hyperconjugation between the C4 C-N/O bond and the partially filled p orbital at C3 of the radical intermediate modulates the degree to which elimination competes with dehydrogenation. To investigate this hypothesis, the reaction of DesII with the C4-epimer of TDP-quinovose (TDP-fucose) was examined. The reaction primarily results in the formation of TDP-6-deoxygulose and likely regeneration of TDP-fucose. The remainder of the substrate radical partitions roughly equally between C3-dehydrogenation and C4-dehydration. Thus, changing the stereochemistry at C4 permits a more balanced competition between elimination and dehydrogenation. PMID:25418063

  19. Betacyanins as phenol antioxidants. Chemistry and mechanistic aspects of the lipoperoxyl radical-scavenging activity in solution and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Tesoriere, L; Allegra, M; Gentile, C; Livrea, M A

    2009-08-01

    Reaction kinetics of betanin and its aglycone betanidin towards peroxyl radicals generated from the azo-initiated oxidation of methyl linoleate in methanol and of a heterogeneous aqueous/soybean phosphatidylcholine liposomal system were studied by monitoring formation of linoleic acid hydroperoxides and consumption of the pigments. Betanin was a weak retarder in methanol and an effective chain breaking antioxidant in the liposomal model, indicating that kinetic solvent effects and partition in lipid bilayers may affect its activity. Betanidin behaved as a chain terminating antioxidant in both models. Kinetic parameters characterizing peroxyl radical-scavenging activity showed that betanidin was more effective than betanin, in terms of both radical-scavenging rate constant and stoichiometric factor, with effectiveness of the same order as vitamin E under comparable conditions. Products identified by spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques indicated reaction of the glucose-substituted monophenol and ortho-diphenol moieties of betanin and betanidin, respectively, and suggested mechanisms of the antioxidant activity. Either betanin or betanidin incorporated in liposomes with alpha-tocopherol had additive effects, supporting partition of the pigments in the bilayer and lipoperoxyl radical reduction.

  20. Engaging unactivated alkyl, alkenyl and aryl iodides in visible-light-mediated free radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, John D; D'Amato, Erica M; Narayanam, Jagan M R; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2012-10-01

    Radical reactions are a powerful class of chemical transformations. However, the formation of radical species to initiate these reactions has often required the use of stoichiometric amounts of toxic reagents, such as tributyltin hydride. Recently, the use of visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis to generate radical species has become popular, but the scope of these radical precursors has been limited. Here, we describe the identification of reaction conditions under which photocatalysts such as fac-Ir(ppy)3 can be utilized to form radicals from unactivated alkyl, alkenyl and aryl iodides. The generated radicals undergo reduction via hydrogen atom abstraction or reductive cyclization. The reaction protocol utilizes only inexpensive reagents, occurs under mild reaction conditions, and shows exceptional functional group tolerance. Reaction efficiency is maintained upon scale-up and decreased catalyst loading, and the reaction time can be significantly shortened when the reaction is performed in a flow reactor.

  1. Reaction of Phenyl Radical with O2: Thermodynamic Properties, Important Reaction Paths and Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzelli, J; Sebbar, N; Pitz, W; Bockhorn, H

    2001-04-12

    The Phenyl + O{sub 2} association results in a chemically activated phenyl-peroxy radical which can dissociate to phenoxy radical + O, undergo intramolecular addition of the peroxy radical to several unsaturated carbon sites or react back to phenyl + O{sub 2}. The intramolecular addition channels further react through several paths to ring opening (unsaturated + carbonyl moieties) as well as cyclopentadieny radical + CO{sub 2}. Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub f(298)}{sup o}), Entropy (S{sub 298}), and heat capacities Cp(T) for species in the decomposition of the ring are evaluated using density functional and ab initio calculations and by comparisons to vinyl + O{sub 2} data of Mebel et al, and phenyl + O{sub 2} data of Hadad et al. Isodesmic reaction analysis is used to estimate enthalpy values of the intermediates and well depths of the adducts. High Pressure limit kinetic parameters are obtained from the calculation results using canonical Transition State Theory. Quantum RRK analysis is utilized to obtain k(E) and modified strong collision or master equation analysis is used for evaluation of pressure fall-off in this complex bimolecular, chemical activation, reaction system. Uncertainty in key barriers is discussed, resulting variations in important reaction product ratios are illustrated, and changes in these branching ratios are evaluated with a detailed reaction mechanism.

  2. Carbenic vs. ionic mechanistic pathway in reaction of cyclohexanone with bromoform.

    PubMed

    Vitnik, Vesna D; Vitnik, Zeljko J; Juranić, Ivan O

    2012-10-01

    The extensive computation study was done to elucidate the mechanism of formation dibromoepoxide from cyclohexanone and bromoform. In this reaction, the formation of dihaloepoxide 2 is postulated as a key step that determines the distribution and stereochemistry of products. Two mechanistic paths of reaction were investigated: the addition of dibromocarbene to carbonyl group of ketone, and the addition of tribromomethyl carbanion to the same (C=O) group. The mechanisms for the addition reactions of dibromocarbenes and tribromomethyl carbanions with cyclohexanone have been investigated using ab initio HF/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311+G* level of theory. Solvent effects on these reactions have been explored by calculations which included a continuum polarizable conductor model (CPCM) for the solvent (H₂O). The calculations showed that both mechanisms are possible and are exothermic, but have markedly different activation energies.

  3. New aspects in the reaction mechanism of phenol with peroxynitrite: the role of phenoxy radicals.

    PubMed

    Daiber, A; Mehl, M; Ullrich, V

    1998-01-01

    The decomposition of peroxynitrite (PON) in aqueous solutions was investigated by monitoring the release of dioxygen as a function of pH together with the various reaction products generated from phenol. This substrate was used as a mechanistic model for tyrosine nitration in prostacyclin synthase for which we have reported a highly efficient nitration and inhibition by PON (Zou, M., Martin, C., and Ullrich, V. (1997) Biol Chem. 378, 707-713). Nitrite as a contaminant and product of PON generated 4-nitrosophenol and some nitrophenols in the acidic pH range. In the alkaline range high amounts of 4-nitrosophenol originated from the disproportionation of PON yielding dioxygen and NOx species. The hydroxylation of phenol occurred between pH 3 and 8 with a maximum at 4.5. The nitration by PON also required a pH between 4 and 8 but had a second maximum between 10 and 12, suggesting that in this pH range phenolate was the reacting species. All isomeric biphenols were found as dimerization products as well as 4-phenoxyphenol (4-hydroxydiphenyl ether), indicating phenoxy radicals as intermediates. Since anisol when incubated under the same conditions yielded only hydroxylation but virtually no nitration products, it was concluded that nitration of phenolic compounds requires a one-electron oxidation as a primary step, followed by addition of the nitrogen dioxide radical. PMID:9851367

  4. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N2O2-) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N3O3-)

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) species are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that: (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON=NO{sub 2}{sup -}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON=NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON=NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high due to the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the UV spectrum of ON=NO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer is the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes little to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a re-interpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism, according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant Khom = 2.2 - 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis of UV spectra.

  5. The kinetics and mechanism of an aqueous phase isoprene reaction with hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhao, Y.; Shen, X. L.

    2011-08-01

    Aqueous phase chemical processes of organic compounds in the atmosphere have received increasing attention, partly due to their potential contribution to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Here, we analyzed the aqueous OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene and its reaction products including carbonyl compounds and organic acids, regarding the acidity and temperature as in-cloudy conditions. We also performed a laboratory simulation to improve our understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms for the products of aqueous isoprene oxidation that are significant precursors of SOA; these included methacrolein (MACR), methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), methyl glyoxal (MG), and glyoxal (GL). We used a novel chemical titration method to monitor the concentration of isoprene in the aqueous phase. We used a box model to interpret the mechanistic differences between aqueous and gas phase OH radical-initiated isoprene oxidations. Our results were the first demonstration of the rate constant for the reaction between isoprene and OH radical in water, 1.2 ± 0.4) × 1010 M-1 s-1 at 283 K. Molar yields were determined based on consumed isoprene. Of note, the ratio of the yields of MVK (24.1 ± 0.8 %) to MACR (10.9 ± 1.1%) in the aqueous phase isoprene oxidation was approximately double that observed for the corresponding gas phase reaction. We hypothesized that this might be explained by a water-induced enhancement in the self-reaction of a hydroxy isoprene peroxyl radical (HOCH2C(CH3)(O2)CH = CH2) produced in the aqueous reaction. The observed yields for MG and GL were 11.4 ± 0.3 % and 3.8 ± 0.1 %, respectively. Model simulations indicated that several potential pathways may contribute to the formation of MG and GL. Finally, oxalic acid increased steadily throughout the course of the study, even after isoprene was consumed completely. The observed yield of oxalic acid was 26.2 ± 0.8 % at 6 h. The observed carbon balance accounted for ~50 % of the consumed isoprene. The

  6. The kinetics and mechanism of an aqueous phase isoprene reaction with hydroxy radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhao, Y.; Shen, X. L.

    2011-03-01

    Aqueous phase chemical processes of organic compounds in the atmosphere have received increasing attention, partly due to their potential contribution to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Here, we analyzed the aqueous oxidation of isoprene in clouds and its reaction products, including carbonyl compounds and organic acids. We also performed a laboratory simulation to improve our understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms for the products of aqueous isoprene oxidation that are significant precursors of SOA; these included methacrolein (MACR), methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), methyl glyoxal (MG), and glyoxal (GL). We used a novel chemical titration method to monitor the concentration of isoprene in the aqueous phase. We used a box model to interpret the mechanistic differences between aqueous- and gas-phase OH radical-initiated isoprene oxidations. Our results were the first demonstration of the rate constant for the reaction between isoprene and OH radical in water, 3.50 (± 0.98) × 109 M-1 s-1 at 283 K. Molar yields were determined based on consumed isoprene. Of note, the ratio of the yields of MVK (18.9 ± 0.8%) to MACR (9.0 ± 1.1%) in the aqueous phase isoprene oxidation was approximately double that observed for the corresponding gas phase reaction. We hypothesized that this might be explained by a water-induced enhancement in the self-reaction of a hydroxy isoprene peroxyl radical (HOCH2C(CH3)(O2)CH = CH2) produced in the aqueous reaction. The observed yields for MG and GL were 11.4 ± 0.3% and 3.8 ± 0.1%, respectively. Model simulations indicated that several potential pathways may contribute to the formation of MG and GL. Finally, oxalic acid increased steadily throughout the course of the study, even after isoprene was consumed completely. The observed yield of oxalic acid was 26.2 ± 0.8% at 6 h. The observed carbon balance accounted for ~50% of the consumed isoprene. The presence of high-molecular-weight compounds may have accounted for a

  7. Computational mechanistic study of the Julia-Kocieński reaction.

    PubMed

    Legnani, Laura; Porta, Alessio; Caramella, Pierluigi; Toma, Lucio; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Vidari, Giovanni

    2015-03-20

    This paper describes the first detailed computational mechanistic study of the Julia-Kocieński olefination between acetaldehyde (1) and ethyl 1-phenyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl sulfone (2), considered a paradigmatic example of the reaction between unsubstituted alkyl PT sulfones and linear aliphatic aldehydes. The theoretical study was performed within the density functional approach through calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for all atoms except sulfur for which the 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set was used. All the different intermediates and transition states encountered along the reaction pathways leading to final E and Z olefins have been located and the relative energies calculated, both for the reactions with potassium- and lithium-metalated sulfones, in THF and toluene, respectively. We have essentially confirmed the complex multistep mechanistic manifold proposed by others; however, the formation of a spirocyclic intermediate in the Smiles rearrangement was excluded. Instead, we found that this step involves a concerted, though asynchronous, mechanism. Moreover, our calculations nicely fit with the diastereoselectivities observed experimentally for potassium- and lithium-metalated sulfones, in THF and toluene, respectively.

  8. OH Production from Reactions of Organic Peroxy Radicals with HO2 : Recent Studies on Ether-Derived Peroxy Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Kegley Owen, C. S.; Reynoldson, N.

    2013-12-01

    There is now ample evidence supporting significant formation of OH radicals in the reaction of HO2 with certain organic peroxy radicals (RO2). These reaction channels serve to promote radical propagation, and thus have the potential to alter HOx budgets and partitioning and hence tropospheric oxidative capacity. While much focus has been placed on OH production from reactions involving carbonyl-containing RO2 species, it is also the case that other oxygen- substituted peroxy species (e.g., CH3OCH2OO, HOCH2OO) likely generate OH in their reactions with HO2 (see ref. 1 and refs therein). In this work, the Cl-atom-initiated oxidation of two ethers, diethyl and diisopropyl ether, is investigated over ranges of conditions in an environmental chamber, using both FTIR and GC-FID methods for product quantification. Preliminary analysis suggests that significant OH production is occurring in the reaction of HO2 with CH3CH2OCH(OO)CH3, and also provides evidence for a rapid unimolecular reaction of diisopropyl ether-derived peroxy radicals. Details of these and other results will be described. 1. Orlando, J. J., and G. S. Tyndall, 2012: Laboratory studies of organic peroxy radical chemistry: an overview with emphasis on recent issues of atmospheric significance, Chemical Society Reviews, 41, 6294-6317, doi: 10.1039/C2CS35166H.

  9. Reaction Profiles and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cyanide Radical Reactions Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinidad Pérez-Rivera, Danilo; Romani, Paul N.; Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is arguably the atmosphere of greatest interest that we have an abundance of data for from both ground based and spacecraft observations. As we have learned more about Titan's atmospheric composition, the presence of pre-biotic molecules in its atmosphere has generated more and more fascination about the photochemical process and pathways it its atmosphere. Our computational laboratory has been extensively working throughout the past year characterizing nitrile synthesis reactions, making significant progress on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions of .CN with the hydrocarbons acetylene (C2H2), propylene (CH3CCH), and benzene (C6H6), developing a clear picture of the mechanistic aspects through which these three reactions proceed. Specifically, first principles calculations of the reaction profiles and molecular dynamics studies for gas-phase reactions of .CN and C2H2, .CN and CH3CCH, and .CN and C6H6 have been carried out. A very accurate determination of potential energy surfaces of these reactions will allow us to compute the reaction rates which are indispensable for photochemical modeling of Titan's atmosphere.The work at University of Puerto Rico at Cayey was supported by Puerto Rico NASA EPSCoR IDEAS-ER program (2015-2016) and DTPR was sponsored by the Puerto Rico NASA Space Grant Consortium Fellowship. *E-mail: juan.lopez15@upr.edu

  10. Reactions of flavosemiquinone radicals in the presence of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkhun, V. I.; Sivko, A. N.; Porkhun, E. V.; Rakhimov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The rate constants of disproportionation of flavosemiquinone radicals were obtained by pulsed spectroscopy. The yield of the flavosemiquinone radical increased when Mohr's salt was introduced in the aqueous solutions of riboflavin. The spectral kinetic characteristics of complexes of flavosemiquinone radical anions with Zn2+ and Cd2+ ions were determined.

  11. The Prowess of Photogenerated Amine Radical Cations in Cascade Reactions: From Carbocycles to Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott A; Wang, Jiang; Zheng, Nan

    2016-09-20

    Cascade reactions represent a class of ideal organic reactions because they empower efficiency, elegance, and novelty. However, development of cascade reactions remains a daunting task for synthetic chemists. Radicals are known to be well suited for cascade reactions. Compared with widely used carbon-based radicals, nitrogen-based radicals, such as neutral aminyl radicals and protonated aminyl radicals (amine radical cations), are underutilized, although they are behind some notable synthetic methods such as the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction. The constraint on their usage is generally attributed to the limited number of available stable precursors. Since amine radical cations offer increased reactivity and selectivity in chemical transformations compared with neutral aminyl radicals, their generation is of utmost importance. Recently, a surge of reports has been revealed using visible light photoredox catalysis. It has been demonstrated that amines can act as an electron donor in a reductive quenching cycle while the amine itself is oxidized to the amine radical cation. Although a number of methods exist to generate amine radical cations, the photochemical formation of these species offers many practical advantages. In this Account, we discuss our journey to the development of annulation reactions with various π-bonds and electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes using photogenerated amine radical cations. Various carbocycles and heterocycles are produced by these reactions. In our annulation work, we first show that single electron photooxidation of cyclopropylanilines to the amine radical cations triggers ring opening of the strained carbocycle, producing distonic radical cations. These odd-electron species are shown to react with alkenes and alkynes to yield the corresponding cyclopentanes and cyclopentenes in an overall redox neutral process. Further development of this annulation reaction allows us to achieve the [4 + 2] annulation of cyclobutylanilines

  12. The Prowess of Photogenerated Amine Radical Cations in Cascade Reactions: From Carbocycles to Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott A; Wang, Jiang; Zheng, Nan

    2016-09-20

    Cascade reactions represent a class of ideal organic reactions because they empower efficiency, elegance, and novelty. However, development of cascade reactions remains a daunting task for synthetic chemists. Radicals are known to be well suited for cascade reactions. Compared with widely used carbon-based radicals, nitrogen-based radicals, such as neutral aminyl radicals and protonated aminyl radicals (amine radical cations), are underutilized, although they are behind some notable synthetic methods such as the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction. The constraint on their usage is generally attributed to the limited number of available stable precursors. Since amine radical cations offer increased reactivity and selectivity in chemical transformations compared with neutral aminyl radicals, their generation is of utmost importance. Recently, a surge of reports has been revealed using visible light photoredox catalysis. It has been demonstrated that amines can act as an electron donor in a reductive quenching cycle while the amine itself is oxidized to the amine radical cation. Although a number of methods exist to generate amine radical cations, the photochemical formation of these species offers many practical advantages. In this Account, we discuss our journey to the development of annulation reactions with various π-bonds and electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes using photogenerated amine radical cations. Various carbocycles and heterocycles are produced by these reactions. In our annulation work, we first show that single electron photooxidation of cyclopropylanilines to the amine radical cations triggers ring opening of the strained carbocycle, producing distonic radical cations. These odd-electron species are shown to react with alkenes and alkynes to yield the corresponding cyclopentanes and cyclopentenes in an overall redox neutral process. Further development of this annulation reaction allows us to achieve the [4 + 2] annulation of cyclobutylanilines

  13. Electron spin resonance spectroscopic studies of radical cation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, S.

    1990-01-01

    A spin Hamiltonian suitable for theoretical analyses of ESR spectra is derived using the general effective Hamiltonian theory in the usual Schroedinger representation. The Permutation Indices method is extended to obtain the dynamic exchange equations used in ESR lineshape simulation. The correlation between [beta]-hydrogen coupling constants and their geometric orientations are derived using a perturbation method. The three electron bond model is extended to rationalize unimolecular rearrangements of radical cations. The ring-closed radical cations of 9,10-octalin oxide and synsesquinorbornene oxide have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy in the CFCl[sub 3] matrix at low temperature. The self-electron-transfer rate constants between the methyl viologen dication and cation have been determined by dynamic ESR lineshape simulations at room temperature in allyl alcohol, water, methanol and propargyl alcohol solvents. The radical cation formed by the radiolytic oxidation of allylamine in Freon matrices at 77 K is the 3-iminiopropyl distonic species(3-iminium-1-propyl radical). The nucleophilic endocylization of the but-3-en-1-ol radical cation to the protonated tetrahydrofuran-3-yl radical was observed in the radiolytic oxidation of but-3-en-1-ol in Freon matrices. ESR studies of the radiolytic oxidation of 1,5-hexdiyne have resulted in characterization the 1,5-hexadiyne radical cation isomerizing to the 1,2,4,5-hexatetraene radical cation. The symmetric (C[sub 2v]) bicyclo[3.3.0]-octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl(a bridged 1,4-bishomobenzene species) radical cation is produced by the radiolytic oxidation of semibullvalene in Freon matrices. The ring-opening 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation to 1,2,4,5-hexatetraene radical cation was observed in the photolysis of 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation. The cyclooctatetraene radical cation generated by radiolytic oxidation photoisomerizes to bicyclo[3.3.0]octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl radical cation.

  14. Effect of substituents on different channels of rad OH radical reaction with substituted organic sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Hari; Mittal, Jai P.

    2005-10-01

    Pulse radiolysis technique has been employed to study the nature of rad OH radical reaction in aqueous solutions of substituted organic sulfides. The transient absorption band at 345 nm observed on reaction of rad OH radicals in neutral aqueous solution of 3,3'-thiodipropionitrile is assigned to OH-adduct at sulfur. OH-adduct is observed to have high reactivity with oxygen ( k=8.8×10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1). The reaction of rad OH radicals in neutral aqueous solution of methyl propyl sulfide has shown the formation of sulfur-centered dimer radical cation with a small fraction (˜10%) of α-(alkylthio)alkyl radicals. The reaction of rad OH radicals with thiodiglycolic acid showed an absorption band at 285 nm, which is assigned to α -(alkylthio)alkyl radicals. The reaction of rad OH radicals with dimethyl 2,2'-thiodiethanoic acid has been assigned to OH-adduct at sulfur, whereas the transient absorption band at 390 observed with 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid is assigned to intra-molecular radical cation formed on p-orbital overlap of oxidized sulfur with oxygen. In acidic solutions, sulfur-centered dimer radical cation is the only transient species observed with substituted alkyl sulfides. The concentration of acid required to observe the formation of dimer radical cation is found to depend on the electron-withdrawing power of the substituted group. The reaction of rad OH radicals in neutral aqueous solution of substituted aryl sulfides has shown the formation of monomer radical cation and OH-adduct at benzene ring. Sulfur-centered dimer radical cations are not observed even in acidic conditions.

  15. Reaction of iodine atoms with submicrometer squalane and squalene droplets: mechanistic insights into heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R

    2014-11-13

    The gas-phase reaction of iodine atoms with hydrocarbon molecules is energetically unfavorable, and there is no direct evidence for iodinated product formation by either H abstraction or I addition reactions at ambient temperature. Here we consider the possible heterogeneous reaction of I atoms with submicrometer droplets composed of a saturated alkane, squalane (Sq), and an unsaturated alkene, squalene (Sqe). The investigations are performed in an atmospheric pressure photochemical flow tube reactor in conjunction with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle sizer. Squalane, a branched alkane, is unreactive toward I atoms within the signal-to-noise, and an upper limit of the effective reactive uptake coefficient is estimated to be γI(Sq) ≤ 8.58 × 10(–7). In contrast, the reaction of I atoms with unsaturated submicrometer squalene droplets results in observable iodinated squalene products. The effective reactive uptake coefficient of I atom with squalene particles is determined to be γI(Sqe) = (1.20 ± 0.52) × 10(–4) at an average I concentration of 1.5 × 10(14) molecules·cm(–3).

  16. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(═O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)═O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ΔfH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)═O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products.

  17. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  18. Mechanistic insights into a BINOL-derived phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric Pictet-Spengler reaction.

    PubMed

    Overvoorde, Lois M; Grayson, Matthew N; Luo, Yi; Goodman, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    The reaction of tryptamine and (2-oxocyclohexyl)acetic acid can be catalyzed by 3,3'-bis(triphenylsilyl)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol phosphoric acid to give an asymmetric β-carboline. This reaction was first studied by Holloway et al. ( Org. Lett. 2010 , 12 , 4720 - 4723 ), but their mechanistic work did not explain the high stereoselectivity achieved. This study uses density functional theory and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations to investigate this reaction and provide a model to explain its outcome. The step leading to diastereo- and enantioselectivity is an asymmetric Pictet-Spengler reaction involving an N-acyliminium ion bound to the catalyst in a bidentate fashion. This interaction occurs via hydrogen bonds between the two terminal oxygen atoms of the catalyst phosphate group and the hydrogen atoms at N and C2 of the substrate indole group. These bonds hold the transition structure rigidly and thus allow the catalyst triphenylsilyl groups to influence the enantioselectivity. PMID:25654215

  19. Palladium(0)/NHC-Catalyzed Reductive Heck Reaction of Enones: A Detailed Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Mannathan, Subramaniyan; Minnaard, Adriaan J; de Vries, Johannes G; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-12-14

    We have studied the mechanism of the palladium-catalyzed reductive Heck reaction of para-substituted enones with 4-iodoanisole by using N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA) as the reductant. Kinetic studies and in situ spectroscopic analysis have provided a detailed insight into the reaction. Progress kinetic analysis demonstrated that neither catalyst decomposition nor product inhibition occurred during the catalysis. The reaction is first order in the palladium and aryl iodide, and zero order in the activated alkene, N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand, and DIPEA. The experiments with deuterated solvent ([D7]DMF) and deuterated base ([D15]Et3N) supported the role of the amine as a reductant in the reaction. The palladium complex [Pd(0)(NHC)(1)] has been identified as the resting state. The kinetic experiments by stopped-flow UV/Vis also revealed that the presence of the second substrate, benzylideneacetone 1, slows down the oxidative addition of 4-iodoanisole through its competing coordination to the palladium center. The kinetic and mechanistic studies indicated that the oxidative addition of the aryl iodide is the rate-determining step. Various scenarios for the oxidative addition step have been analyzed by using DFT calculations (bp86/def2-TZVP) that supported the inhibiting effect of substrate 1 by formation of resting state [Pd(0)(NHC)(1)] species at the cost of further increase in the energy barrier of the oxidative addition step. PMID:26561034

  20. Reactivity-Structure-Based Rate Estimation Rules for Alkyl Radical H Atom Shift and Alkenyl Radical Cycloaddition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-07-16

    Intramolecular H atom shift reactions of alkyl radicals and cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl radicals are two important reaction classes in hydrocarbon combustion and pyrolysis. In this work, we derive high-pressure rate estimation rules that are based on the results of electronic structure calculations at the CBS-QB3 level of theory combined with transition state theory calculations. The rules for the H atom shift reactions of alkyl radicals cover the 1,2- up to the 1,7-H shifts. The rules for the cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl radicals are for both the endo- and exo-cycloaddition and include the formation of three- to seven-member ring products. The results are in good agreement with available experiment measurements and other theoretical studies. Both types of reactions proceed via cyclic transition state structures. The impact of ring size and substituent groups on pre-exponential factors and activation energies are discussed in the context of a Benson-type structure-reactivity relationship. Similar relationships between the pre-exponential factors and the number of internal rotors lost in formation of the transition state are derived for both H-shift and cycloaddition reactions. The activation energies are found to be more complicated. The ring strain contribution to the barrier is much lower for the exo-cycloaddition reactions than it is for the other two investigated reaction systems. The ring strains for the H-shift and endo-cycloaddition are similar to one another and are comparable to that of cycloalkanes for three- to six-member rings, but are significantly lower for the larger rings. The results suggest that the 1,6-H shift and 1,7-endo-cycloaddition reactions might be faster than previous estimates. PMID:25563061

  1. Theoretical study of isocyanoacetylene and the isocyanoethynyl radical. [interstellar reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations, using the matrix Hartree-Fock model, have been performed to obtain estimates of the rotation constants of the isocyanoacetylene molecule and the isocyanoethynyl radical which may be detectable in space. A rotation constant of 5076 MHz is calculated for HC2NC, while for the radical C2NC the value 5458 MHz is obtained.

  2. Reactions of Hydroxyalkyl Radicals with Cysteinyl Peptides in a NanoESI Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Craig A.; Xia, Yu

    2014-07-01

    In biological systems, carbon-centered small molecule radicals are primarily formed via external radiation or internal radical reactions. These radical species can react with a variety of biomolecules, most notably nucleic acids, the consequence of which has possible links to gene mutation and cancer. Sulfur-containing peptides and proteins are reactive toward a variety of radical species and many of them behave as radical scavengers. In this study, the reactions between alkyl alcohol carbon-centered radicals (e.g., •CH2OH for methanol) and cysteinyl peptides within a nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) plume were explored. The reaction system involved ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of a nanoESI plume using a low pressure mercury lamp consisting of 185 and 254 nm emission bands. The alkyl alcohol was added as solvent into the nanoESI solution and served as the precursor of hydroxyalkyl radicals upon UV irradiation. The hydroxyalkyl radicals subsequently reacted with cysteinyl peptides either containing a disulfide linkage or free thiol, which led to the formation of peptide- S-hydroxyalkyl product. This radical reaction coupled with subsequent MS/MS was shown to have analytical potential by cleaving intrachain disulfide linked peptides prior to CID to enhance sequence information. Tandem mass spectrometry via collision-induced dissociation (CID), stable isotope labeling, and accurate mass measurement were employed to verify the identities of the reaction products.

  3. Reactions of Co(III)–Nitrosyl Complexes with Superoxide and Their Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Lee, Yong-Min; Park, Young Jun; Siegler, Maxime A.; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-01-01

    New CoIII-nitrosyl complexes bearing N-tetramethylated cyclam (TMC) ligands, [(12-TMC)CoIII(NO)]2+ (1) and [(13-TMC)CoIII(NO)]2+ (2), were synthesized via [(TMC)CoII(CH3CN)]2+ plus NO(g) reactions. Spectroscopic and structural characterization shows that these compounds bind the nitrosyl moiety in a bent end-on fashion. The CoIII-nitrosyl complexes, (1) and (2), reacted with KO2/2.2.2-Cryptand and produced [(12-TMC)CoII(NO2)]+ (3) and [(13-TMC)CoII(NO2)]+ (4), respectively; these possess O,O’-chelated nitrito ligands. Mechanistic studies using 18O-labeled superoxide (18O2•−) demonstrate that one oxygen atom in the nitrito ligand derives from superoxide and dioxygen produced comes from the other superoxide oxygen atom. Evidence supporting the formation of a Co-peroxynitrite intermediate is also presented. PMID:25793706

  4. Helical-Peptide-Catalyzed Enantioselective Michael Addition Reactions and Their Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Umeno, Tomohiro; Doi, Mitsunobu; Akagawa, Kengo; Kudo, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-08-01

    Helical peptide foldamer catalyzed Michael addition reactions of nitroalkane or dialkyl malonate to α,β-unsaturated ketones are reported along with the mechanistic considerations of the enantio-induction. A wide variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones, including β-aryl, β-alkyl enones, and cyclic enones, were found to be catalyzed by the helical peptide to give Michael adducts with high enantioselectivities (up to 99%). On the basis of X-ray crystallographic analysis and depsipeptide study, the amide protons, N(2)-H and N(3)-H, at the N terminus in the α-helical peptide catalyst were crucial for activating Michael donors, while the N-terminal primary amine activated Michael acceptors through the formation of iminium ion intermediates.

  5. Development of linear free energy relationships for aqueous phase radical-involved chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Mezyk, Stephen P; Jones, Jace W; Daws, Brittany R; Crittenden, John C

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) produce hydroxyl radicals (HO•) which can completely oxidize electron rich organic compounds. The proper design and operation of AOPs require that we predict the formation and fate of the byproducts and their associated toxicity. Accordingly, there is a need to develop a first-principles kinetic model that can predict the dominant reaction pathways that potentially produce toxic byproducts. We have published some of our efforts on predicting the elementary reaction pathways and the HO• rate constants. Here we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) that predict the rate constants for aqueous phase radical reactions. The LFERs relate experimentally obtained kinetic rate constants to quantum mechanically calculated aqueous phase free energies of activation. The LFERs have been applied to 101 reactions, including (1) HO• addition to 15 aromatic compounds; (2) addition of molecular oxygen to 65 carbon-centered aliphatic and cyclohexadienyl radicals; (3) disproportionation of 10 peroxyl radicals, and (4) unimolecular decay of nine peroxyl radicals. The LFERs correlations predict the rate constants within a factor of 2 from the experimental values for HO• reactions and molecular oxygen addition, and a factor of 5 for peroxyl radical reactions. The LFERs and the elementary reaction pathways will enable us to predict the formation and initial fate of the byproducts in AOPs. Furthermore, our methodology can be applied to other environmental processes in which aqueous phase radical-involved reactions occur. PMID:25368975

  6. Development of linear free energy relationships for aqueous phase radical-involved chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Mezyk, Stephen P; Jones, Jace W; Daws, Brittany R; Crittenden, John C

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) produce hydroxyl radicals (HO•) which can completely oxidize electron rich organic compounds. The proper design and operation of AOPs require that we predict the formation and fate of the byproducts and their associated toxicity. Accordingly, there is a need to develop a first-principles kinetic model that can predict the dominant reaction pathways that potentially produce toxic byproducts. We have published some of our efforts on predicting the elementary reaction pathways and the HO• rate constants. Here we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) that predict the rate constants for aqueous phase radical reactions. The LFERs relate experimentally obtained kinetic rate constants to quantum mechanically calculated aqueous phase free energies of activation. The LFERs have been applied to 101 reactions, including (1) HO• addition to 15 aromatic compounds; (2) addition of molecular oxygen to 65 carbon-centered aliphatic and cyclohexadienyl radicals; (3) disproportionation of 10 peroxyl radicals, and (4) unimolecular decay of nine peroxyl radicals. The LFERs correlations predict the rate constants within a factor of 2 from the experimental values for HO• reactions and molecular oxygen addition, and a factor of 5 for peroxyl radical reactions. The LFERs and the elementary reaction pathways will enable us to predict the formation and initial fate of the byproducts in AOPs. Furthermore, our methodology can be applied to other environmental processes in which aqueous phase radical-involved reactions occur.

  7. Structural and Mechanistic Analysis through Electronic Spectra: Aqueous Hyponitrite Radical (N(2)O(2)(-)) and Nitrosyl Hyponitrite Anion (N(3)O(3)(-))

    SciTech Connect

    Lymar S. V.; Valiev M.

    2011-11-03

    Aqueous hyponitrite radical (N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrosyl hyponitrite anion (N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}) are important intermediates in the reductive chemistry of NO. The structures and absorption spectra of various hydrated isomers of these compounds were investigated in this work using high-level quantum mechanical calculations combined with the explicit classical description of the aqueous environment. For N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -}, comparison of the calculated spectra and energetics with the experimental data reveals that (1) upon the one-electron oxidation of trans-hyponitrite (ON{double_bond}NO{sup 2-}), the trans configuration of the resulting ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} radical is preserved; (2) although cis- and trans-ON{double_bond}NO{sup -} are energetically nearly equivalent, the barrier for the trans-cis isomerization is prohibitively high because of the partial double character of the NN bond; (3) the calculations confirm that the UV spectrum of ONNO{sup -} was misinterpreted in the earlier pulse radiolysis work, and its more recent revision has been justified. For the N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} ion, the symmetric isomer the dominant observable species, and the asymmetric isomer contributes insignificantly to the experimental spectrum. Coherent analysis of the calculated and experimental data suggests a reinterpretation of the N{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup -} + NO reaction mechanism according to which the reaction evenly bifurcates to yield both the symmetric and asymmetric isomers of N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}. While the latter isomer rapidly decomposes to the final NO{sub 2}{sup -} + N{sub 2}O products, the former isomer is stable toward this decomposition, but its formation is reversible with the homolysis equilibrium constant K{sub hom} = 2.2 x 10{sup -7} M. Collectively, these results demonstrate that advanced theoretical modeling can be of significant benefit in structural and mechanistic analysis on the basis of the electronic spectra of aqueous transients.

  8. Mechanistic insights on platinum- and palladium-pincer catalyzed coupling and cyclopropanation reactions between olefins.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-07-21

    The mechanism of M(II)-PNP-pincer catalyzed reaction between (i) ethene, (ii) trans-butene with 2-methylbut-2-ene, 2,3-dimethylbut-2-ene and tert-butylbutene is examined by using density functional theory methods (where M = Pt or Pd). All key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction are precisely located on the respective potential energy surfaces using the popular DFT functionals such as mPW1K, M06-2X, and B3LYP in conjunction with the 6-31+G** basis set. The reaction between these olefins can lead to a linear coupling product or a substituted cyclopropane. The energetic comparison between coupling as well as cyclopropanation pathways involving four pairs of olefins for both platinum (1-4) and palladium (5-8) catalyzed reactions is performed. The key events in the lower energy pathway in the mechanistic course involves (i) a C-C bond formation between the metal bound olefin (ethene or trans-butene) and a free olefin, and (ii) two successive [1,2] hydrogen migrations in the ensuing carbocationic intermediates (1c-4c, and 1d-4d), toward the formation of the coupling product. The computed barriers for these steps in the reaction of metal bound ethene to free tert-butylbutene (or other butenes) are found to be much lower than the corresponding steps when trans-butene is bound to the metal pincer. The Gibbs free energy differences between the transition states leading to the coupling product (TS(d-e)) and that responsible for cyclopropanated product (TS(d-g)) are found to be diminishingly closer in the case of the platinum pincer as compared to that in the palladium system. The computed energetics indicate that the coupled product prefers to remain as a metal olefin complex, consistent with the earlier experimental reports.

  9. An electron spin resonance study of the reactions of lipid peroxyl radicals with antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Johnson, W.J.; Sevilla, C.L.; Herrington, J.W.; Sevilla, M.D. )

    1990-09-06

    The reactions of lipid carbon-centered radicals and their corresponding peroxyl radicals (RO{sub 2}{sup {sm bullet}}, LO{sub 2}{sup {sm bullet}}) with five phenolic antioxidants (BHT, BHA, PG, TBHQ, and vitamin E) in frozen saturated and unsaturated lipids at low temperatures have been elucidated through electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The lipid radicals are formed after the {gamma} or UV irradiation of the lipid matrices in the absence or presence of oxygen at 77 K. Upon warming oxygenated samples to 135 K, molecular oxygen adds to the carbon radicals forming peroxyl radicals. At 170 K peroxyl radicals in tributyrin react with added antioxidants (AH) to form antioxidant radicals (A{sup {sm bullet}}). The relative rates of reactions of these five antioxidants with the peroxyl radical of tributyrin decrease in the order BHT > TBHQ > E {>=} PG > BHA. For the reactions with triolein and trilinolein peroxyl radicals, the order of reactivity is BHT > E > BHA > TBHQ. This difference in reaction order of antioxidants in tributyrin and unsaturated lipids is explained by a dispersion model of antioxidants in lipid matrices.

  10. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: “free” (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and “solvated” CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 1010 M–1 s–1 and transient vibrational spectra in the C=N and C=O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 109 M–1 s–1 obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C=N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN–CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  11. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Greg T; Preston, Thomas J; Greaves, Stuart J; Greetham, Gregory M; Clark, Ian P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-12-17

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: "free" (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and "solvated" CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) and transient vibrational spectra in the C═N and C═O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C═N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN-CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  12. Reaction of bovine cytochrome c oxidase with hydrogen peroxide produces a tryptophan cation radical and a porphyrin cation radical.

    PubMed

    Rigby, S E; Jünemann, S; Rich, P R; Heathcote, P

    2000-05-23

    Oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase reacts with hydrogen peroxide to generate two electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) free radical signals (Fabian, M., and Palmer, G. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 13802-13810). These radicals are associated with the binuclear center and give rise to two overlapped EPR signals, one signal being narrower in line width (DeltaHptp = 12 G) than the other (DeltaHptp = 45 G). We have used electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectrometry to identify the two different chemical species giving rise to these two EPR signals. Comparison of the ENDOR spectrum associated with the narrow signal with that of compound I of horseradish peroxidase (formed by reaction of that enzyme with hydrogen peroxide) demonstrates that the two species are virtually identical. The chemical species giving rise to the narrow signal is therefore identified as an exchange-coupled porphyrin cation radical similar to that formed in horseradish peroxidase compound I. Comparison of the ENDOR spectrum of compound ES (formed by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with cytochrome c peroxidase) with that of the broad signal indicates that the chemical species giving rise to the broad EPR signal in cytochrome c oxidase is probably an exchange coupled tryptophan cation radical. This is substantiated using H(2)O/D(2)O solvent exchange experiments where the ENDOR difference spectrum of the broad EPR signal of cytochrome c oxidase shows a feature consistent with hyperfine coupling to the exchangeable N(1) proton of a tryptophan cation radical.

  13. Exploiting time-resolved magnetic field effects for determining radical ion reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmertnykh, A. O.; Borovkov, V. I.; Bagryansky, V. A.; Molin, Yu N.

    2016-07-01

    The capabilities of the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in determining the rates of charge transfer reactions between radical ions and molecules on a nanosecond time scale have been investigated. The approach relies on the electron spin coherence in radical pair's partners generated by ionizing radiation. The spin evolution of the pair is sensitive to the reaction since the latter results in changing magnetic interactions of the unpaired electron. This process can be monitored by magnetic-field-sensitive fluorescence from an irradiated sample that is illustrated using reactions involving alkane radical cations. The accuracy and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  14. Time-resolved FTIR emission studies of laser photofragmentation and radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.R.

    1993-12-01

    Recent studies have focused specifically on collision processes, such as single collision energy transfer, reaction dynamics, and radical reactions. The authors employ novel FTIR techniques in the study of single collision energy transfer processes using translationally fast H atom, as well as radical-radical reactions, e.g. CH{sub 3} + O, CF{sub 3} + H(D), and Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}. The fast atoms permit unique high energy regions of certain transition states of combustion species to be probed for the first time.

  15. Radical-ion-pair reactions are the biochemical equivalent of the optical double-slit experiment.

    PubMed

    Kominis, Iannis K

    2011-05-01

    Radical-ion-pair reactions were recently shown to represent a rich biophysical laboratory for the application of quantum measurement theory methods and concepts. Here we show that radical-ion-pair reactions essentially form a nonlinear biochemical double-slit interferometer. Quantum coherence effects are visible when "which-path" information is limited, and the incoherent limit is approached when measurement-induced decoherence sets in. Based on this analogy with the optical double-slit experiment we derive and elaborate on the fundamental master equation of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions that covers the continuous range from complete incoherence to maximum singlet-triplet coherence.

  16. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  17. A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals from gas phase oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Marco; Wilson, Karen; Chechik, Victor

    2010-10-01

    A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals originating from gas phase catalytic reactions is described and discussed. Radical trapping and identification were initially carried out using a known radical generator such as dicumyl peroxide. The trapping of radicals was further demonstrated by investigating genuine radical oxidation processes, e.g., benzaldehyde oxidation over manganese and cobalt salts. The efficiency of the reactor was finally proven by the partial oxidation of cyclohexane over MoO3, Cr2O3, and WO3, which allowed the identification of all the radical intermediates responsible for the formation of the products cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Assignment of the trapped radicals was carried out using spin trapping technique and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  18. Kinetic analysis of free-radical reactions in the low-temperature autoxidation of triglycerides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jingmin; Sevilla, M.D. )

    1990-02-22

    The kinetics of the low-temperature autoxidation of triglycerides has been investigated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. After initial radical production, four reaction stages are found in the overall autoxidation of unsaturated lipids: (1) formation of peroxyl radicals by addition of molecular oxygen to the initial carbon radicals, (2) consumption of oxygen in the autoxidation cycle, (3) decay of the lipid peroxyl radical into allylic and pentadienyl radicals, and (4) recombination of the carbon-centered radicals. Peroxyl radical decay in saturated lipids follows second-order kinetics with an apparent activation energy of ca. 50 kJ/mol. The authors find that, for polyunsaturated lipids, even at quite low temperatures (120 K), the autoxidation process occurs readily and must be considered in the storage of biological samples.

  19. Reactions of methyl radicals with silica supported silver nanoparticles in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidki, Tomer; Hänel, Andreas; Bar-Ziv, Ronen

    2016-07-01

    Silica supported silver nanoparticles (Ag°-SiO2-NCs, NCs=nanocomposites) suspended in aqueous solutions are efficient catalysts for the dimerization of methyl radicals to produce ethane, while bare silica is quite inert towards the interaction with methyl radicals. In the presence of small amounts of ethanol adsorbed on the SiO2 surface, the reaction path with methyl radicals is changed and methane is formed as the major product.

  20. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Chia, A; Tan, K C; Pawela, Ł; Kurzyński, P; Paterek, T; Kaszlikowski, D

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013)], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  1. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer involving Os-centered radicals: evidence for tunneling.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Grills, David C; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os(•) and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•) radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons are in the range 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.7 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.8 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 °C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies (E(D) - E(H)) and the pre-exponential factor ratio (A(H)/A(D)). For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•), the (E(D) - E(H)) = 3.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) and A(H)/A(D) = 0.06 ± 0.02 values suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism.

  2. The tricarbonylchromium template for stereocontrol in radical reactions of arenes.

    PubMed

    Merlic, C A; Walsh, J C

    2001-04-01

    Chromium tricarbonyl complexed aryl aldeyhydes and ketones underwent Sm(II)-promoted radical lactone formation in the presence of alpha,beta-unsaturated esters to produce diastereomerically pure lactones in good yields. The completely diastereoselective lactone formation involves capture of the benzylic ketyl radical by the ester anti to the chromium tricarbonyl moiety. The relative stereochemistry of the lactone and chromium tricarbonyl moieties was proven by X-ray crystallography and supports the proposed mechanism. Enantiopure chromium tricarbonyl complexed arenes afforded single enantiomers when subjected to Sm(II)-promoted radical lactone formation condiditions. The enantio- and diastereomerically pure chromium tricarbonyl complexed lactones were subsequently treated with BF3.OEt2 to generate a mixture of diastereomers via Lewis acid promoted chromium tricabonyl directed cationic rearrangement. The diastereomers were separated and individually decomplexed with I2 to afford both of the corresponding chromium-free enantiomerically pure lactones starting from a single enantiomerically pure chromium tricarbonyl complex. PMID:11281765

  3. Standard Gibbs free energies of reactions of ozone with free radicals in aqueous solution: quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Sergej; von Sonntag, Clemens

    2011-11-01

    Free radicals are common intermediates in the chemistry of ozone in aqueous solution. Their reactions with ozone have been probed by calculating the standard Gibbs free energies of such reactions using density functional theory (Jaguar 7.6 program). O(2) reacts fast and irreversibly only with simple carbon-centered radicals. In contrast, ozone also reacts irreversibly with conjugated carbon-centered radicals such as bisallylic (hydroxycylohexadienyl) radicals, with conjugated carbon/oxygen-centered radicals such as phenoxyl radicals, and even with nitrogen- oxygen-, sulfur-, and halogen-centered radicals. In these reactions, further ozone-reactive radicals are generated. Chain reactions may destroy ozone without giving rise to products other than O(2). This may be of importance when ozonation is used in pollution control, and reactions of free radicals with ozone have to be taken into account in modeling such processes.

  4. Radical coupling reactions in lignin synthesis: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Parks, Jerry M; Standaert, Robert F; Ziebell, Angela; Davis, Mark; Smith, Jeremy C

    2012-04-26

    Lignin is a complex, heterogeneous polymer in plant cell walls that provides mechanical strength to the plant stem and confers resistance to degrading microbes, enzymes, and chemicals. Lignin synthesis initiates through oxidative radical-radical coupling of monolignols, the most common of which are p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols. Here, we use density functional theory to characterize radical-radical coupling reactions involved in monolignol dimerization. We compute reaction enthalpies for the initial self- and cross-coupling reactions of these monolignol radicals to form dimeric intermediates via six major linkages observed in natural lignin. The 8-O-4, 8-8, and 8-5 coupling are computed to be the most favorable, whereas the 5-O-4, 5-5, and 8-1 linkages are less favorable. Overall, p-coumaryl self- and cross-coupling reactions are calculated to be the most favorable. For cross-coupling reactions, in which each radical can couple via either of the two sites involved in dimer formation, the more reactive of the two radicals is found to undergo coupling at its site with the highest spin density.

  5. Reaction mechanisms of secondary and tertiary amines with OH and NO3 radicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of aliphatic amines are common near agricultural facilities such as animal feed lots. Determining the reactions of these amines with common atmospheric radicals is important to understanding both daytime and nighttime atmospheric chemistry. Several smog chamber experiments were conducted ...

  6. Strategies for generating peptide radical cations via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Fisher, Christine M; Bu, Jiexun; Prentice, Boone M; Redwine, James G; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    Several approaches for the generation of peptide radical cations using ion/ion reactions coupled with either collision induced dissociation (CID) or ultraviolet photo dissociation (UVPD) are described here. Ion/ion reactions are used to generate electrostatic or covalent complexes comprised of a peptide and a radical reagent. The radical site of the reagent can be generated multiple ways. Reagents containing a carbon-iodine (C-I) bond are subjected to UVPD with 266-nm photons, which selectively cleaves the C-I bond homolytically. Alternatively, reagents containing azo functionalities are collisionally activated to yield radical sites on either side of the azo group. Both of these methods generate an initial radical site on the reagent, which then abstracts a hydrogen from the peptide while the peptide and reagent are held together by either electrostatic interactions or a covalent linkage. These methods are demonstrated via ion/ion reactions between the model peptide RARARAA (doubly protonated) and various distonic anionic radical reagents. The radical site abstracts a hydrogen atom from the peptide, while the charge site abstracts a proton. The net result is the conversion of a doubly protonated peptide to a peptide radical cation. The peptide radical cations have been fragmented via CID and the resulting product ion mass spectra are compared to the control CID spectrum of the singly protonated, even-electron species. This work is then extended to bradykinin, a more broadly studied peptide, for comparison with other radical peptide generation methods. The work presented here provides novel methods for generating peptide radical cations in the gas phase through ion/ion reaction complexes that do not require modification of the peptide in solution or generation of non-covalent complexes in the electrospray process.

  7. Mn-, Fe-, and Co-Catalyzed Radical Hydrofunctionalizations of Olefins.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Steven W M; Obradors, Carla; Martinez, Ruben M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2016-08-10

    Cofactor-mimetic aerobic oxidation has conceptually merged with catalysis of syngas reactions to form a wide range of Markovnikov-selective olefin radical hydrofunctionalizations. We cover the development of the field and review contributions to reaction invention, mechanism, and application to complex molecule synthesis. We also provide a mechanistic framework for understanding this compendium of radical reactions. PMID:27461578

  8. Organic radicals for the enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction in Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Tesio, A Y; Blasi, D; Olivares-Marín, M; Ratera, I; Tonti, D; Veciana, J

    2015-12-25

    We examine for the first time the ability of inert carbon free-radicals as soluble redox mediators to catalyze and enhance the oxygen reduction reaction in a (TEGDME)-based electrolyte. We demonstrate that the tris(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)methyl (TTM) radical is capable of chemically favoring the oxygen reduction reaction improving significantly the Li-O2 battery performance. PMID:26488114

  9. Reactions of charged phenyl radicals with aliphatic amino acids in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiqun; Guler, Leo; Heidbrink, Jenny; Kenttämaa, Hilkka

    2005-03-23

    Gas-phase reactivity of five differently substituted positively charged phenyl radicals was examined toward six amino acids by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR). The reactivity of the radicals studied was determined by the electrophilicity of the radical, which can be characterized by the radical's electron affinity (EA). The larger the electron affinity of the radical, the higher the overall reaction rate. In addition to the expected H-atom abstraction, several unprecedented reaction pathways were observed, including NH2 abstraction, SH abstraction, and SCH3 abstraction. These reaction pathways dominate for the most electrophilic radicals, and they may not follow radical but rather nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanisms. Hydrogen abstraction from glycine was also investigated theoretically. The results indicate that hydrogen abstraction from alphaC of glycine is both kinetically and thermodynamically favored over the NH2 group. The ordering of transition state energies for hydrogen abstraction from the alphaC and NH2 groups was found to reflect the radicals' EA ordering.

  10. PRODUCTS OF THE GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF THE OH RADICAL WITH N-BUTYL METHYL ETHER AND 2-ISOPROPOXYETHANOL: REACTIONS OF ROC(O)< RADICALS. (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The products of the gas-phase reactions of the OH radical with n-butyl methyl ether and 2-isopropoxyethanol in the presence of NO have been investigated at 298 ? 2 K and 740 Torr total pressure of air by gas chromatography and in situ atmospheric pressure ionization...

  11. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(═O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)═O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ΔfH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)═O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products. PMID:21942384

  12. [Yield of pigment cation-radicals in the reaction of quinone photooxidation of chlorophyll].

    PubMed

    Kostikov, A P; Sadovnikova, N A; Evstigneev, V B

    1976-01-01

    Photoinduced transfer of electrons in alkohol solutions of chlorophyll and its deuterated analog, deuterochlorophyll containing the quinoses: p-benzoquinone, chloranyl, duroquinone, 1,4-naftoquinone and ubiquinone (coenzyme Q6) is studied. It is shown that pigment cation-radical and quinone anion-radical are the primary products of photoreaction. A relationship between stationary concentrations of deuterochlorophyll and p-benzoquinone radicals and quinone concentration in solution is obtained. The reaction mechanism and causes of other authors' (G. Tollin et al.) failure in finding pigment cation-radicals which are formed in the reaction of the latter with quinoses are discussed. It is shown that optimal conditions for accumulating photoinduced cation-radicals of the pigment in pigment solutions of chlorophyll with quinones are lowered temperature, high viscosity of the solvent, low pH of the solution, careful purification of the quinone from hydroquinone admixture.

  13. Reactions between the SO4*(-) radical and some common anions in atmospheric aqueous droplets.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Bin; Fang, Hao-jie; Zhu, Cheng-zhu; Dong, Wen-bo; Hou, Hui-qi

    2005-01-01

    The rate constants of reactions between the SO4*(-) radical and some common anions in atmospheric aqueous droplets e.g. Cl-, NO3-, HSO3- and HCO3- were determined using the laser flash photolysis technique. Absorption spectra of SO4*(-) and the product radicals were also reported. The chloride ion was evaluated among all the anions to be the most efficient scavenger of SO4*(-). The results may supply useful information for a better understanding of the vigorous radical-initiated reactions in atmospheric aqueous droplets such as clouds, rains or fogs.

  14. Reaction of diethyl maleate and diethyl fumarate with hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bíró, Á.; Wojnárovits, L.

    1996-03-01

    In dilute aqueous solution diethyl maleate (DEM) and diethyl fumarate (DEF) scavenge hydrated electrons with a rate constant of 2.2·10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1. DEM - reversibly protonates with pK a = 5.2. The pK a of DEF - is below 4. The electron adducts decay in second order reactions. The OH radicals add to the double bonds with 5.9·10 9 mol -1 dm 3 s -1. In the reaction α-carboxyalkyl radicals are produced. In disproportionation of radicals oxalacetic acid ethylester forms that in alkaline solution leads to strong permanent absorbency in the UV.

  15. Borohydride-mediated radical addition reactions of organic iodides to electron-deficient alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Takuji; Uehara, Shohei; Hirao, Hidefumi; Fukuyama, Takahide; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2014-05-01

    Cyanoborohydrides are efficient reagents in the reductive addition reactions of alkyl iodides and electron-deficient olefins. In contrast to using tin reagents, the reaction took place chemoselectively at the carbon-iodine bond but not at the carbon-bromine or carbon-chlorine bond. The reaction system was successfully applied to three-component reactions, including radical carbonylation. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction of a primary alkyl radical from tetrabutylammonium cyanoborohydride was estimated to be <1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C by a kinetic competition method. This value is 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of tributyltin hydride.

  16. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the dynamics of radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R. G.

    2008-01-01

    There is very little information available about the dynamics of radical+radical interactions. These processes are important in combustion being chain termination steps as well as generating new molecular species. To study these processes, a new experimental apparatus has been constructed to investigate radical-radical dynamics. The first radical or atomic species is produced with a known concentration in a microwave discharge flow system. The second is produced by pulsed laser photolysis of a suitable photolyte. The time dependence of individual rovibrational states of the product is followed by absorption of a continuous infrared laser. This approach will allow the reaction of interest to be differentiated from other radical reactions occurring simultaneously. The experimental approach is highly versatile, being able to detect a number of molecular species of particular interest to combustion processes such as water, methane, acetylene etc. at the state specific level. State specific infrared absorption coefficients of radicals can be measured in situ allowing for the determination of the absolute concentrations and hence branching ratios for reactions having multiple reaction pathways.

  17. Thermochemistry and Kinetic Analysis of the Unimolecular Oxiranyl Radical Dissociation Reaction: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-07-01

    Oxirane structures are important in organic synthesis, and they are important initial products in the oxidation reactions of alkyl radicals. The thermochemical properties (enthalpy of formation, entropy, and heat capacity) for the reaction steps of the unimolecular oxiranyl radical dissociation reaction are determined and compared with the available literature. The overall ring opening and subsequent steps involve four types of reactions: β-scission ring opening, intramolecular hydrogen transfer, β-scission hydrogen elimination, and β-scission methyl radical elimination. The enthalpies of formation of the transition states are determined and evaluated using six popular Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation methods (B3LYP, B2PLYP, M06, M06-2X, ωB97X, ωB97XD), each combined with three different basis sets. The DFT enthalpy values are compared with five composite calculation methods (G3, G4, CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, W1U), and by CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ. Kinetic parameters are determined versus pressure and temperature for the unimolecular dissociation pathways of an oxiranyl radical, which include the chemical activation reactions of the ring-opened oxiranyl radical relative to the ring-opening barrier. Multifrequency quantum Rice Ramsperger Kassel (QRRK) analysis is used to determine k(E) with master equation analysis for falloff. The major overall reaction pathway at lower combustion temperatures is oxiranyl radical dissociation to a methyl radical and carbon monoxide. Oxiranyl radical dissociation to a ketene and hydrogen atom is the key reaction path above 700 K. PMID:26990491

  18. Thermochemistry and Kinetic Analysis of the Unimolecular Oxiranyl Radical Dissociation Reaction: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-07-01

    Oxirane structures are important in organic synthesis, and they are important initial products in the oxidation reactions of alkyl radicals. The thermochemical properties (enthalpy of formation, entropy, and heat capacity) for the reaction steps of the unimolecular oxiranyl radical dissociation reaction are determined and compared with the available literature. The overall ring opening and subsequent steps involve four types of reactions: β-scission ring opening, intramolecular hydrogen transfer, β-scission hydrogen elimination, and β-scission methyl radical elimination. The enthalpies of formation of the transition states are determined and evaluated using six popular Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation methods (B3LYP, B2PLYP, M06, M06-2X, ωB97X, ωB97XD), each combined with three different basis sets. The DFT enthalpy values are compared with five composite calculation methods (G3, G4, CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, W1U), and by CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ. Kinetic parameters are determined versus pressure and temperature for the unimolecular dissociation pathways of an oxiranyl radical, which include the chemical activation reactions of the ring-opened oxiranyl radical relative to the ring-opening barrier. Multifrequency quantum Rice Ramsperger Kassel (QRRK) analysis is used to determine k(E) with master equation analysis for falloff. The major overall reaction pathway at lower combustion temperatures is oxiranyl radical dissociation to a methyl radical and carbon monoxide. Oxiranyl radical dissociation to a ketene and hydrogen atom is the key reaction path above 700 K.

  19. Effects of electron acceptors and radical scavengers on nonchain radical nucleophilic substitution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xianman Zhang; Dilun Yang; Youcheng Liu )

    1993-01-01

    The yields of reaction products from thermal nucleophilic substitution reactions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) of six o- and p-nitrohalobenzenes with the sodium salt of ethyl [alpha]-cyanoacetate carbanion [Na[sup +][sup [minus

  20. Reactions of a persistent phosphinyl radical/diphosphine with heteroallenes.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Nick A; Hendsbee, Arthur D; Masuda, Jason D

    2016-08-01

    The persistent phosphinyl radical, (H2C)2(NDipp)2P˙, formed upon dissolution from the homolytic cleavage of the P-P bond in the diphosphane [(H2C)2(NDipp)2P]2, was reacted with carbon disulfide, phenyl isocyanate, and phenyl isothiocyanate. The phosphinyl fragments add across the C[double bond, length as m-dash]S or C[double bond, length as m-dash]O double bond to give neutral, diamagnetic species. PMID:27443569

  1. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. A Device to Study Gas-Phase Ion Reactions of Organic Radicals and Diradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Kato, Shuji

    2004-03-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry uses ion reactions to monitor the atmospheric chemistry complex molecules. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is now a common method to monitor a large number of volatile organic compounds. Recent studies have shown that ion chemistry can be used to detect organic radicals. We have built an experiment to study the reactions of ions (both positive and negative) with complex organic radicals and diradicals. A supersonic pyrolysis nozzle produced a clean and intense stream of hydrocarbon radicals/diradicals which were studied with a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument. Reactions of a simple radical, allyl (CH2CHCH2), and a diradical, ortho-benzyne (o-C6H4), with the hydronium (H3O+) and hydroxide (HO-) ions were examined at thermal energy (roughly 300 K).

  3. Reaction mechanism between carbonyl oxide and hydroxyl radical: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Mansergas, Alex; Anglada, Josep M

    2006-03-23

    The reaction mechanism of carbonyl oxide with hydroxyl radical was investigated by using CASSCF, B3LYP, QCISD, CASPT2, and CCSD(T) theoretical approaches with the 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311+G(2df, 2p), and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. This reaction involves the formation of H2CO + HO2 radical in a process that is computed to be exothermic by 57 kcal/mol. However, the reaction mechanism is very complex and begins with the formation of a pre-reactive hydrogen-bonded complex and follows by the addition of HO radical to the carbon atom of H2COO, forming the intermediate peroxy-radical H2C(OO)OH before producing formaldehyde and hydroperoxy radical. Our calculations predict that both the pre-reactive hydrogen-bonded complex and the transition state of the addition process lie energetically below the enthalpy of the separate reactants (DeltaH(298K) = -6.1 and -2.5 kcal/mol, respectively) and the formation of the H2C(OO)OH adduct is exothermic by about 74 kcal/mol. Beyond this addition process, further reaction mechanisms have also been investigated, which involve the abstraction of a hydrogen of carbonyl oxide by HO radical, but the computed activation barriers suggest that they will not contribute to the gas-phase reaction of H2COO + HO.

  4. Gas-phase reactivity of peptide thiyl (RS•), perthiyl (RSS•), and sulfinyl (RSO•) radical ions formed from atmospheric pressure ion/radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS•) and thiyl (RS•) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO•) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (•SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS•) > perthiyl (RSS•) > sulfinyl (RSO•). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  5. Visible Light Photocatalytic Radical-Radical Cross-Coupling Reactions of Amines and Carbonyls: A Route to 1,2-Amino Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Liu, Jing; Liu, Dan; Song, Hai-Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-08-19

    An intermolecular radical-radical cross-coupling reaction of secondary and tertiary amines with aryl ketones and aldehydes has been developed using visible light photoredox catalysis. This reaction provides an efficient and straightforward approach to some useful 1,2-amino alcohols in moderate to good yields under mild conditions.

  6. ESR evidence for radical production from the reaction of ozone with unsaturated lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.F.; McAdams, M.L..; Pryor, W.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors report electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping evidence for radical production by the reaction of ozone with unsaturated compounds. Soy and egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes, fatty acid emulsions, and homogeneous aqueous solutions of 3-hexenoic acid were treated with ozone in the presence of the spin trap {alpha}-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN). Under these conditions, they observe spin adducts resulting from the trapping of both organic carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals. When the lipid-soluble antioxidant alpha-tocopherol is included in the liposomal systems, the formation of spin adducts is completely inhibited. The authors suggest that radicals giving rise to these spin adducts arise form the rapid decomposition of the 1,2,3-trioxolane intermediate that is initially formed when ozone reacts with the carbon-carbon double bonds of the substrates. These free radicals are not formed by the decomposition of the Criegee ozonide, since little of the ozonide is formed in the presence of water. Although hydrogen peroxide is the predominate peroxidic product of the ozone/alkene reaction, its decomposition is not responsible for the observed radical production since neither catalase nor iron chelators significantly affect the spin adduct yield. The radical yield is approximately 1%. Since a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) such as linoleic acid produces much higher concentrations of spin trappable radicals than does the monounsaturated fatty oleic acid, the results also suggest that sites in the lung containing higher levels of PUFA may be an important target for radical formation.

  7. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  8. The hydroperoxyl radical in atmospheric chemical dynamics - Reaction with carbon monoxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of laboratory measurements which indicate that the reaction of the thermalized HO(2) radical with CO is exceedingly slow and that this reaction should not, therefore, be of any significance in atmospheric chemistry. The large discrepancy between the new results and data obtained earlier by Westenberg and de Haas (1972) is explained in terms of the reacting hydroperoxyl radical being in a non-Boltzmann distribution in the former study. It appears that the most important reactions of thermalized HO(2) in the atmosphere are those involving the trace gases of NO and sulfur dioxide.

  9. The reaction of methyl peroxy and hydroxyl radicals as a major source of atmospheric methanol

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jean-François; Liu, Zhen; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Peeters, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Methyl peroxy, a key radical in tropospheric chemistry, was recently shown to react with the hydroxyl radical at an unexpectedly high rate. Here, the molecular reaction mechanisms are elucidated using high-level quantum chemical methodologies and statistical rate theory. Formation of activated methylhydrotrioxide, followed by dissociation into methoxy and hydroperoxy radicals, is found to be the main reaction pathway, whereas methylhydrotrioxide stabilization and methanol formation (from activated and stabilized methylhydrotrioxide) are viable minor channels. Criegee intermediate formation is found to be negligible. Given the theoretical uncertainties, useful constraints on the yields are provided by atmospheric methanol measurements. Using a global chemistry-transport model, we show that the only explanation for the high observed methanol abundances over remote oceans is the title reaction with an overall methanol yield of ∼30%, consistent with the theoretical estimates given their uncertainties. This makes the title reaction a major methanol source (115 Tg per year), comparable to global terrestrial emissions. PMID:27748363

  10. Revealing atom-radical reactivity at low temperature through the N + OH reaction.

    PubMed

    Daranlot, Julien; Jorfi, Mohamed; Xie, Changjian; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Caubet, Philippe; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua; Honvault, Pascal; Hickson, Kevin M

    2011-12-16

    More than 100 reactions between stable molecules and free radicals have been shown to remain rapid at low temperatures. In contrast, reactions between two unstable radicals have received much less attention due to the added complexity of producing and measuring excess radical concentrations. We performed kinetic experiments on the barrierless N((4)S) + OH((2)Π) → H((2)S) + NO((2)Π) reaction in a supersonic flow (Laval nozzle) reactor. We used a microwave-discharge method to generate atomic nitrogen and a relative-rate method to follow the reaction kinetics. The measured rates agreed well with the results of exact and approximate quantum mechanical calculations. These results also provide insight into the gas-phase formation mechanisms of molecular nitrogen in interstellar clouds.

  11. The reaction of methyl peroxy and hydroxyl radicals as a major source of atmospheric methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-François; Liu, Zhen; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Peeters, Jozef

    2016-10-01

    Methyl peroxy, a key radical in tropospheric chemistry, was recently shown to react with the hydroxyl radical at an unexpectedly high rate. Here, the molecular reaction mechanisms are elucidated using high-level quantum chemical methodologies and statistical rate theory. Formation of activated methylhydrotrioxide, followed by dissociation into methoxy and hydroperoxy radicals, is found to be the main reaction pathway, whereas methylhydrotrioxide stabilization and methanol formation (from activated and stabilized methylhydrotrioxide) are viable minor channels. Criegee intermediate formation is found to be negligible. Given the theoretical uncertainties, useful constraints on the yields are provided by atmospheric methanol measurements. Using a global chemistry-transport model, we show that the only explanation for the high observed methanol abundances over remote oceans is the title reaction with an overall methanol yield of ~30%, consistent with the theoretical estimates given their uncertainties. This makes the title reaction a major methanol source (115 Tg per year), comparable to global terrestrial emissions.

  12. Theoretical study on the mechanism and kinetics of acetaldehyde and hydroperoxyl radical: An important atmospheric reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnia, Solaleh; Vahedpour, Morteza; Abedi, Mostafa; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-09-01

    A systematic theoretical study was performed on the mechanism and kinetics of the atmospheric reaction of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the gas phase. The DFT-B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) methods were employed for calculations. Based on the calculations, this reaction leads to four different products through radical addition and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms which are very important in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The favorable reaction paths begin with α-hydroxyethylperoxy radical, CH3CH(OO)OH, in a exothermic process and finally leads to the product P1 (CH3COOH + OH). The overall rate constants for favorite reaction paths have been calculated at different temperatures (200-2500 K).

  13. Formation of environmentally persistent free radicals from the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Borrowman, Cuyler K; Zhou, Shouming; Burrow, Timothy E; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-01-01

    In the 1980s long-lived radical species were identified in cigarette tar. Since then, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been observed in ambient particulate matter, and have been generated in particulate matter generated from internal combustion engines. For the first time, we measure in situ the formation and decay of EPFRs through the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and several polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC). Solid anthracene (ANT), pyrene (PY), benzo[a]pyrene (BAP), benzo[ghi]perylene (BGHIP), 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4NQ), and 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) were reacted with gas-phase ozone in a flow system placed in the active cavity of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer, and the formation of radicals was measured on the timescale of tens of minutes at ambient levels of ozone down to 30 ppb. For most substrates the net radical production is initially rapid, slows at intermediate times, and is followed by a slow decay. For oxidized solid BAP, radical signal persists for many days in the absence of ozone. To evaluate the effect of substrate phase, the solid PAHs were also dissolved in squalane, an organic oil inert to ozone, which yielded a much higher maximum radical concentration and faster radical decay when exposed to ozone. With higher mobility, reactants were apparently able to more easily diffuse and react with each other, yielding the higher radical concentrations. The EPR spectra exhibit three radicals types, two of which have been assigned to semiquinone species and one to a PAH-derived, carbon-centered radical. Although our system uses levels of PAC not typically found in the environment it is worth noting that the amounts of radical formed, on the order of 10(18) radicals per g, are comparable to those observed in ambient particulate matter.

  14. Formation of environmentally persistent free radicals from the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Borrowman, Cuyler K; Zhou, Shouming; Burrow, Timothy E; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-01-01

    In the 1980s long-lived radical species were identified in cigarette tar. Since then, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been observed in ambient particulate matter, and have been generated in particulate matter generated from internal combustion engines. For the first time, we measure in situ the formation and decay of EPFRs through the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and several polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC). Solid anthracene (ANT), pyrene (PY), benzo[a]pyrene (BAP), benzo[ghi]perylene (BGHIP), 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4NQ), and 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) were reacted with gas-phase ozone in a flow system placed in the active cavity of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer, and the formation of radicals was measured on the timescale of tens of minutes at ambient levels of ozone down to 30 ppb. For most substrates the net radical production is initially rapid, slows at intermediate times, and is followed by a slow decay. For oxidized solid BAP, radical signal persists for many days in the absence of ozone. To evaluate the effect of substrate phase, the solid PAHs were also dissolved in squalane, an organic oil inert to ozone, which yielded a much higher maximum radical concentration and faster radical decay when exposed to ozone. With higher mobility, reactants were apparently able to more easily diffuse and react with each other, yielding the higher radical concentrations. The EPR spectra exhibit three radicals types, two of which have been assigned to semiquinone species and one to a PAH-derived, carbon-centered radical. Although our system uses levels of PAC not typically found in the environment it is worth noting that the amounts of radical formed, on the order of 10(18) radicals per g, are comparable to those observed in ambient particulate matter. PMID:26603953

  15. CO sub 2 ter dot minus radical induced cleavage of disulfide bonds in proteins. A gamma-ray and pulse radiolysis mechanistic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Favaudon, V.; Tourbez, H.; Lhoste, J-M. ); Houee-Levin, C. )

    1990-12-01

    Disulfide bond reduction by the CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} radical was investigated in aponeocarzinostatin, aporiboflavin-binding protein, and bovine immunoglobulin. Protein-bound cysteine free thiols were formed under {gamma}-ray irradiation in the course of a pH-dependent and protein concentration dependent chain reaction. The chain efficiency increased upon acidification of the medium, with an apparent pK{sub a} around 5, and decreased abruptly below pH 3.6. It decreased also at neutral pH as cysteine accumulated. From pulse radiolysis analysis, CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} proved able to induce rapid one-electron oxidation of thiols and of tyrosine phenolic groups in addition to one-electron donation to exposed disulfide bonds. The bulk rate constant of CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} uptake by the native proteins was 5{minus} to 10-fold faster at pH 3 than at pH 8, and the protonated form of the disulfide radical anion, appeared to be the major protein radical species formed under acidic conditions. Formation of the disulfide radical cation, phenoxyl radical Tyr-O{sup {center dot}} disproportionation, and phenoxyl radical induced oxidation of preformed thiol groups should also be taken into consideration to explain the fate of the oxygen-centered phenoxyl radical.

  16. Pulse radiolysis studies on reactions of hydroxyl radicals with selenocystine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Kumbhare, L B; Jain, V K; Priyadarsini, K I

    2008-04-10

    Reactions of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) with selenocystine (SeCys) and two of its analogues, diselenodipropionic acid (SeP) and selenocystamine (SeA), have been studied in aqueous solutions at pHs of 1, 7, and 10 using the pulse radiolysis technique coupled with absorption detection. All of these diselenides react with *OH radicals with rate constants of approximately 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), producing diselenide radical cations ( approximately 1-5 micros after the pulse), with an absorption maximum at 560 nm, by elimination of H(2)O or OH(-) from hydroxyl radical adducts. Assignment of the 560 nm band to the diselenide radical cation was made by comparing the transient spectra with those produced upon reaction of diselenides with specific one-electron oxidants, Cl(2)(*-) (pH 1) and Br(2)(*-) radicals (pHs of 7 and 10). SeP having a carboxylic acid functionality showed quantitative conversion of hydroxyl radical adducts to radical cations. The compounds SeCys and SeA, having an amino functional group, in addition to the radical cations, produced a new transient with lambda(max) at 460 nm, at later time scales ( approximately 20-40 micros after the pulse). The rate and yield of formation of the 460 nm band increased with increasing concentrations of either SeCys or SeA. In analogy with similar studies reported for analogous disulfides, the 460 nm transient absorption band has been assigned to a triselenide radical adduct. The one-electron reduction potentials of the compounds were estimated to be 0.96, 1.3, and 1.6 V versus NHE, respectively, for SeP, SeCys, and SeA at pH 7. From these studies, it has been concluded that the electron-donating carboxylic acid group decreases the reduction potential and facilitates quantitative conversion of hydroxyl radical adducts to radical cations, while the electron-withdrawing NH(3)(+) group not only increases the reduction potential but also leads to fragmentation of the hydroxyl radical adduct to selenyl radicals, which are converted

  17. EPR and DFT Study of the Polycyclic Aromatic Radical Cations from Friedel-Crafts Alkylation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, An-an; Gao, Li-guo; Wang, Han-qing

    2009-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, with m-xylene, or p-xylene and alkyl chloride. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to polycyclic aromatic radicals formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl self-condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl3. The identification of observed two radicals 2,6-dimethylanthracene and 1,4,5,8-tetramethylanthracene were supported by density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) approach. The theoretical coupling constants support the experimental assignment of the observed radicals.

  18. Oxidant activity of tris(2,4,6-trichloro-3,5-dinitrophenyl)methyl radical with catechol and pyrogallol. Mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Carreras, Anna; Esparbé, Isaac; Brillas, Enric; Rius, Jordi; Torres, Josep Lluís; Julià, Luis

    2009-03-20

    The reducing activity of simple polyphenols (PhOH), catechol and pyrogallol, is tested in different solvents in front of tris(2,4,6-trichloro-3,5-dinitrophenyl)methyl (HNTTM) radical, a stable organic free radical of the TTM series. HNTTM radical is very active in electron-transfer reactions to give a very stable anion. The standard potential for the reduction of HNTTM radical by cyclic voltammetry in different solvents is E(o) = 0.60 +/- 5 V vs SCE. In hydroxylic solvents, the electron transfer is a very rapid process and the electron-donating species is the ionized PhO(-), whereas in nonpolar solvents, it is suggested that the electron transfer is facilitated by the formation of an intermediate complex between HNTTM and PhOH.

  19. Polar transition states in reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons with hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Vysotskaya, N.A.; Rekasheva, A.F.; Bortun, L.N.

    1986-07-01

    The mechanism of formation of radical adducts in the radical hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbons has been investigated. The analysis of correlations between the logarithms of the rate constants of the radical hydroxylation of substituted benzenes, naphthalenes, and condensed hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions and the sigma/sup +/ constants of the substituents, the ionization potentials, the localization energies of the arenes, and also the quantum-chemical calculations of the surfaces of potential energies of the hydroxylation of benzene and naphthalene leads to the conclusion that an ion pair in the excited state, formed by the cation radical of the hydrocarbon and the hydroxyl anion, can serve as the model for the transition states of the above-mentioned reactions. A decrease in the ionization potential of the arene leads to an increase in the coulombic interaction in this pair, to its stabilization, and to an increase in the reaction rate.

  20. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  1. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  2. Rate constants for the reactions of free radicals with oxygen in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Maillard, B.; Ingold, K.U.; Scaiano, J.C.

    1983-07-27

    The kinetics of the rections of several free radicals with oxygen have been examined in solution at 300 K using laser flash photolysis techniques. The reactions of resonance-stabilized radicals are only slightly slower than those of nonstabilized radicals: for example, for tert-butyl (in cyclohexane), 4.93 x 10/sup 9/; benzyl, 2.36 x 10/sup 9/ (in cyclohexane); cyclohexadienyl (in benzene), 1.64 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. The reaction of butyl-tin (n-Bu/sub 3/Sn.) radicals is unusually fast (7.5 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/), a fact that has been tentatively attributed to a relaxation of spin selection rules due to heavy atom effects. 1 table.

  3. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  4. Branching ratios between the abstraction and addition channels in the reactions of OH radicals with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, C.; Loison, J. C.; Caralp, F.; Flaud, P. M.; Villenave, E.

    2009-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere is described as a mass transfer of volatile organic compound oxidation products with low vapour pressures in particular phases. Among the different aerosol components, the SOA represent an important fraction, but, the fundamental processes governing their physics and chemistry in the atmosphere are poorly understood. So it is important to characterize and understand the mechanisms of their formation. It is well-known that atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes is an important process in tropospheric SOA formation. Consequently, the identification and quantification of reaction products from the oxidation of monoterpenes in the gas phase have been receiving great attention over the past years. However, the atmospheric degradation leads to the formation of a plethora of reaction products and proceeds through a very complex mechanism that is still not fully characterised. In our study, we have focused on SOA formation from OH + monoterpene reactions and more precisely on the primary oxidation steps of γ-terpinene and d-limonene by OH radicals. Indeed, the primary reaction of monoterpenes with hydroxyl radicals can in principle occur by two reaction pathways: OH-addition and H-abstraction. In this work, we have determined branching ratios of these reactions. Although there seems to be a consensus in the literature that OH-monoterpene reactions proceed almost exclusively by addition, several measurements have shown that in some case H-abstraction can represent up to 30% of the total reaction rate constant. Therefore it is necessary to determine this branching ratio in order to know, in particular, the main peroxy radicals formed and propose a mechanism for the gas phase oxidation of terpene by hydroxyl radicals. (γ-terpinene + OH) and (d-limonene + OH) reactions have been studied i) at atmospheric pressure, using laser photolysis coupled with UV absorption radical detection, and ii) at low pressure, using

  5. Total synthesis of cephalosporolide E via a tandem radical/polar crossover reaction. The use of the radical cations under nonoxidative conditions in total synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cortezano-Arellano, Omar; Quintero, Leticia; Sartillo-Piscil, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    The present work reports the first example of the use of the chemistry of radical cations under nonoxidative conditions in total synthesis. Using a late-stage tandem radical/polar crossover reaction, a highly stereoselective total synthesis of cephalosporolide E (which is typically obtained admixed with cephalosporolide F) was accomplished. The reaction of a phthalimido derivative with triphenyltin radical in refluxing toluene engenders a contact ion-pair (radical cation) that leads, in the first instance, to the cephalosporolide F, which is transformed into the cephalosporolide E via a stereocontrolled spiroketal isomerization promoted by the diphenylphosphate acid that is formed during the tandem transformation.

  6. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, M.I.

    1993-12-01

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  7. Reactions and structural investigation of chlorpromazine radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Ghanty, Tapan K.; Mukherjee, T.

    2008-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to understand pro-oxidant behaviour of chlorpromazine radical cation (CPZ rad + ). Pulse radiolysis studies have shown that CPZ rad + oxidizes physiological antioxidants (uric acid and bilirubin), and biomolecules like, tyrosine and proteins (bovine serum albumin and casein), thereby acting as a pro-oxidant. Ab-initio quantum chemical calculations suggest structural and electronic changes on oxidation of CPZ. The calculations with Hartree-Fock and density functional methods show that ring nitrogen atom is the site of electron removal from CPZ and sulfur atom is the site of maximum spin in CPZ rad + . The calculations also suggest that oxidation of CPZ leads to increase in planarity of the tricyclic ring as well as tilting of alkyl side chain towards chlorine containing ring. The structural changes on oxidation of CPZ and spin delocalization in CPZ rad + fairly explain the pro-oxidant activity of CPZ.

  8. N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalytic reductive β,β-coupling reactions of nitroalkenes via radical intermediates.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Wang, Yuhuang; Li, Xin; Shao, Yaling; Li, Guohui; Webster, Richard D; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2014-11-01

    An unprecedented N-heterocyclic carbene catalytic reductive β,β-carbon coupling of α,β-nitroalkenes, by using an organic substrate to mimic the one-electron oxidation role of the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) in living systems, has been developed. The reaction goes through a radical anion intermediate generated under a catalytic redox process. For the first time, the presence of radical anion intermediate in NHC organocatalysis is observed and clearly verified. PMID:25343564

  9. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments.

  10. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments. PMID:26471460

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of hydroxyl radical and OH-adduct radical reactions with nitroxides and with their hydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Samuni, Amram; Goldstein, Sara; Russo, Angelo; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C; Neta, Pedatsur

    2002-07-24

    Stable nitroxide radicals are potent antioxidants and are among the most effective non-thiol radioprotectants, although they react with hydroxyl radicals more slowly than typical phenolic antioxidants or thiols. Surprisingly, the reduced forms of cyclic nitroxides, cyclic hydroxylamines, are better reductants yet have no radioprotective activity. To clarify the reason for this difference, we studied the kinetics and mechanisms of the reactions of nitroxides and their hydroxylamines with (*)OH radicals and with OH-adducts by using pulse radiolysis, fluorimetric determination of phenolic radiation products, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometric determination of nitroxide concentrations following radiolysis. Competition kinetics with phenylalanine as a reference compound in pulse radiolysis experiments yielded rate constants of (4.5 +/- 0.4) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of (*)OH radical with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TPO), 4-hydroxy-TPO (4-OH-TPO), and 4-oxo-TPO (4-O-TPO), (3.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for deuterated 4-O-TPO, and (1.0 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydroxylamine 4-OH-TPO-H. The kinetic isotope effect suggests the occurrence of both (*)OH addition to the aminoxyl moiety of 4-O-TPO and H-atom abstraction from the 2- or 6-methyl groups or from the 3- and 5-methylene positions. This conclusion was further supported by final product analysis, which demonstrated that (*)OH partially oxidizes 4-O-TPO to the corresponding oxoammonium cation. The rate constants for the reactions of the nitroxides with the OH-adducts of phenylalanine and terephthalate have been determined to be near 4 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), whereas the hydroxylamine reacted at least 50 times slower, if at all. These findings indicate that the reactivity toward (*)OH does not explain the differences between the radioprotective activities of nitroxides and hydroxylamines. Instead, the radioprotective activity of nitroxides, but not of hydroxylamines, can be

  12. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  13. Reaction kinetics of the CN radical with methyl bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodny, Michael; Hershberger, John F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of the CN + CH3Br reaction were studied using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy to detect CN reactants and HCN products. This reaction has a rate constant of k = (2.20 ± 0.6) × 10-12 exp (453 ± 98/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the range 298-523 K. Hydrogen abstraction to produce HCN + CH2Br is only a minor reaction product, with a branching fraction of 0.12 ± 0.02. Other product channels, including BrCN + CH3, CH2CN + HBr, CH3CN + Br are likely. An upper limit of 0.01 was established for the HBr yield. These results are in qualitative agreement with recent ab initio calculations.

  14. Accurate thermochemistry of hydrocarbon radicals via an extended generalized bond separation reaction scheme.

    PubMed

    Wodrich, Matthew D; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Wheeler, Steven E

    2012-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry is critical for understanding diverse chemical phenomena, ranging from combustion processes to organic reaction mechanisms. Unfortunately, experimental thermochemical data for many radical species tend to have large errors or are lacking entirely. Here we develop procedures for deriving high-quality thermochemical data for hydrocarbon radicals by extending Wheeler et al.'s "generalized bond separation reaction" (GBSR) scheme (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 2547). Moreover, we show that the existing definition of hyperhomodesmotic reactions is flawed. This is because transformation reactions, in which one molecule each from the predefined sets of products and reactants can be converted to a different product and reactant molecule, are currently allowed. This problem is corrected via a refined definition of hyperhomodesmotic reactions in which there are equal numbers of carbon-carbon bond types inclusive of carbon hybridization and number of hydrogens attached. Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) computations using the expanded GBSRs are applied to a newly derived test set of 27 hydrocarbon radicals (HCR27). Greatly reduced errors in computed reaction enthalpies are seen for hyperhomodesmotic and other highly balanced reactions classes, which benefit from increased matching of hybridization and bonding requirements. The best performing DFT methods for hyperhomodesmotic reactions, M06-2X and B97-dDsC, give average deviations from benchmark computations of only 0.31 and 0.44 (±0.90 and ±1.56 at the 95% confidence level) kcal/mol, respectively, over the test set. By exploiting the high degree of error cancellation provided by hyperhomodesmotic reactions, accurate thermochemical data for hydrocarbon radicals (e.g., enthalpies of formation) can be computed using relatively inexpensive computational methods.

  15. Reaction dynamics of phenyl radicals in extreme environments: a crossed molecular beam study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xibin; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2009-02-17

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)organic compounds that consist of fused benzene ringsand their hydrogen-deficient precursors have attracted extensive interest from combustion scientists, organic chemists, astronomers, and planetary scientists. On Earth, PAHs are toxic combustion products and a source of air pollution. In the interstellar medium, research suggests that PAHs play a role in unidentified infrared emission bands, diffuse interstellar bands, and the synthesis of precursor molecules to life. To build clean combustion devices and to understand the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, it will be critical to understand the elementary reaction mechanisms under single collision conditions by which these molecules form in the gas phase. Until recently, this work had been hampered by the difficulty in preparing a large concentration of phenyl radicals, but the phenyl radical represents one of the most important radical species to trigger PAH formation in high-temperature environments. However, we have developed a method for producing these radical species and have undertaken a systematic experimental investigation. In this Account, we report on the chemical dynamics of the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5)) reactions with the unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene (C(2)H(2)), ethylene (C(2)H(4)), methylacetylene (CH(3)CCH), allene (H(2)CCCH(2)), propylene (CH(3)CHCH(2)), and benzene (C(6)H(6)) utilizing the crossed molecular beams approach. For nonsymmetric reactants such as methylacetylene and propylene, steric effects and the larger cones of acceptance drive the addition of the phenyl radical to the nonsubstituted carbon atom of the hydrocarbon reactant. Reaction intermediates decomposed via atomic hydrogen loss pathways. In the phenyl-propylene system, the longer lifetime of the reaction intermediate yielded a more efficient energy randomization compared with the phenyl-methylacetylene system. Therefore, two reaction channels were open: hydrogen

  16. [Riboflavin-radical formation by mechanochemical solid-state reaction using stainless steel vessel].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Furuta, Youji; Okita, Shintarou; Sasai, Yasushi; Aramaki, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masayuki

    2004-03-01

    The mechanochemical reaction of free riboflavin (FR) due to vibratory ball milling was carried out in a stainless steel vessel at room temperature under anaerobic conditions. The ESR of the fractured sample showed a broad single-line spectrum. It is suggested that the solid-state single-electron transfer (SSET) reaction from the surface of the stainless steel vessel to FR proceeded during the vibratory milling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding anion radicals. When the mechanochemical reaction of FR in the presence of calcium pantothenate (PC) was carried out, the radical concentration increased with the increasing PC content. It was shown that the anion radical in the metal complex was stable for a lengthy period of time even in highly humid air. PMID:15049132

  17. Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in low-temperature solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Takada, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Lund, Anders

    2001-06-01

    Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in 77 K solids were studied by the ESR method. 1-(Dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl is converted to 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentyl radical with photoirradiation of 254 nm light. A hydrogen atom of methyl groups can hence directly transfer to the radical site at a carbon atom other than an adjacent one in the photoinduced reactions of alkyl radicals. Cyclohexyl radical is converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical with irradiation of 254 nm light. The photolysis of cyclohexyl radical causes C-C bond scission, and results in the formation of 5-hexenyl radical. It is then converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical through intramolecular rearrangement.

  18. Reaction of haem containing proteins and enzymes with hydroperoxides: the radical view.

    PubMed

    Svistunenko, Dimitri A

    2005-02-25

    The reaction between hydroperoxides and the haem group of proteins and enzymes is important for the function of many enzymes but has also been implicated in a number of pathological conditions where oxygen binding proteins interact with hydrogen peroxide or other peroxides. The haem group in the oxidized Fe3+ (ferric) state reacts with hydroperoxides with a formation of the Fe4+=O (oxoferryl) haem state and a free radical primarily located on the pi-system of the haem. The radical is then transferred to an amino acid residue of the protein and undergoes further transfer and transformation processes. The free radicals formed in this reaction are reviewed for a number of proteins and enzymes. Their previously published EPR spectra are analysed in a comparative way. The radicals directly detected in most systems are tyrosyl radicals and the peroxyl radicals formed on tryptophan and possibly cysteine. The locations of the radicals in the proteins have been reported as follows: Tyr133 in soybean leghaemoglobin; alphaTyr42, alphaTrp14, betaTrp15, betaCys93, (alphaTyr24-alphaHis20), all in the alpha- and beta-subunits of human haemoglobin; Tyr103, Tyr151 and Trp14 in sperm whale myoglobin; Tyr103, Tyr146 and Trp14 in horse myoglobin; Trp14, Tyr103 and Cys110 in human Mb. The sequence of events leading to radical formation, transformation and transfer, both intra- and intermolecularly, is considered. The free radicals induced by peroxides in the enzymes are reviewed. Those include: lignin peroxidase, cytochrome c peroxidase, cytochrome c oxidase, turnip isoperoxidase 7, bovine catalase, two isoforms of prostaglandin H synthase, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Synechocystis PCC6803 catalase-peroxidases. PMID:15721611

  19. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding 'greener' sources of commodity chemicals and fuels. High-valent Chromium from Hydroperoxido-Chromium(III). The decomposition of pentaaquahydroperoxido chromium(III) ion (hereafter Cr aqOOH2+) in acidic aqueous solutions is kinetically complex and generates mixtures of products (Craq3+, HCrO 4-, H2O2, and O2). The yield of high-valent chromium products (known carcinogens) increased from a few percent at pH 1 to 70 % at pH 5.5 (near biological pH). Yields of H 2O2 increased with acid concentration. The reproducibility of the kinetic data was poor, but became simplified in the presence of H2O2 or 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) dianion (ABTS2-). Both are capable of scavenging strongly oxidizing intermediates). The observed rate constants (pH 1, [O2] ≤ 0.03 mM) in the presence of these scavengers are independent of [scavenger] and within the error are the same (k,ABTS2- = (4.9 +/- 0.2) x 10-4 s-1 and kH2O2 = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 s-1); indicating involvement of the scavengers in post-rate determining steps. In the presence of either scavenger, decomposition of CrOOH2+ obeyed a two-term rate law, k obs / s-1 = (6.7 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 + (7.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-4 [H+]. Effect of [H+] on the kinetics and the product distribution, cleaner kinetics in the presence of scavengers, and independence of kobs on [scavenger] suggest a dual-pathway mechanism for the decay of Craq OOH2+. The H+-catalyzed path

  20. Catechols as Sources of Hydrogen Atoms in Radical Deiodination and Related Reactions.

    PubMed

    Povie, Guillaume; Ford, Leigh; Pozzi, Davide; Soulard, Valentin; Villa, Giorgio; Renaud, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    When used with trialkylboranes, catechol derivatives, which are low-cost and low toxicity, are valuable hydrogen atom donors for radical chain reactions involving alkyl iodides and related radical precursors. The system 4-tert-butylcatechol/triethylborane has been used to reduce a series of secondary and tertiary iodides, a xanthate, and a thiohydroxamate ester. Catechol derivatives are right in the optimal kinetic window for synthetic applications, as demonstrated by highly efficient radical cyclizations. Cyclizations leading to the formation of quaternary centers can be performed in an all-at-once process (no slow addition of the hydrogen atom donor) at standard concentrations. The H-donor properties of catechol derivatives can be fine-tuned by changing their substitution pattern. In slow radical cyclization processes, an enhanced ratio of cyclized/uncyclized products was obtained by using 3-methoxycatechol instead of 4-tert-butylcatechol.

  1. Gas-phase reactions of aryl radicals with 2-butyne: experimental and theoretical investigation employing the N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl radical cation.

    PubMed

    Lam, A K Y; Li, C; Khairallah, G; Kirk, B B; Blanksby, S J; Trevitt, A J; Wille, U; O'Hair, R A J; da Silva, G

    2012-02-21

    Aromatic radicals form in a variety of reacting gas-phase systems, where their molecular weight growth reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons are of considerable importance. We have investigated the ion-molecule reaction of the aromatic distonic N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl (NMP) radical cation with 2-butyne (CH(3)C≡CCH(3)) using ion trap mass spectrometry. Comparison is made to high-level ab initio energy surfaces for the reaction of NMP and for the neutral phenyl radical system. The NMP radical cation reacts rapidly with 2-butyne at ambient temperature, due to the apparent absence of any barrier. The activated vinyl radical adduct predominantly dissociates via loss of a H atom, with lesser amounts of CH(3) loss. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry allows us to identify small quantities of the collisionally deactivated reaction adduct. Statistical reaction rate theory calculations (master equation/RRKM theory) on the NMP+2-butyne system support our experimental findings, and indicate a mechanism that predominantly involves an allylic resonance-stabilized radical formed via H atom shuttling between the aromatic ring and the C(4) side-chain, followed by cyclization and/or low-energy H atom β-scission reactions. A similar mechanism is demonstrated for the neutral phenyl radical (Ph˙)+2-butyne reaction, forming products that include 3-methylindene. The collisionally deactivated reaction adduct is predicted to be quenched in the form of a resonance-stabilized methylphenylallyl radical. Experiments using a 2,5-dichloro substituted methyl-pyridiniumyl radical cation revealed that in this case CH(3) loss from the 2-butyne adduct is favoured over H atom loss, verifying the key role of ortho H atoms, and the shuttling mechanism, in the reactions of aromatic radicals with alkynes. As well as being useful phenyl radical analogues, pyridiniumyl radical cations may form in the ionosphere of Titan, where they could undergo rapid

  2. Oxidative dimers produced from protocatechuic and gallic esters in the DPPH radical scavenging reaction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Jun; Okamoto, Yasuko; Kodama, Asuka; Makimoto, Terumasa; Kasai, Takanori

    2002-09-11

    DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging reactions of protocatechuic and gallic acids, and their methyl esters, have been investigated by NMR. In acetone, methyl protocatechuate was gradually converted to a Diels-Alder adduct of two molecules of the intermediate quinone in the reaction with DPPH radical, whereas methyl gallate rapidly gave a symmetrical dimer via a putative quinone precursor. Both dimers are rather unstable and their structures have been deduced by in situ NMR measurements of the reaction mixtures. Gallic acid also gave a corresponding symmetrical dimer in the same reaction as methyl gallate, although protocatechuquinone produced from protocatechuic acid did not yield a Diels-Alder adduct, unlike its methyl ester. Interestingly, these dimer formations were not observed in methanol solution.

  3. Atmospheric Reactions of a Series of Hexenols with OH Radical and Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yanbo; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Qiao; Yang, Chengqiang; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-04-01

    C6 hexenols are one of the most significant groups of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Because of their antibacterial properties, C6 hexenols can be emitted by a wide number of plants in response to changes in the ambient environment. The oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere is involved in the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), thus causing significant effects on atmospheric chemistry and the climate. The lack of corresponding kinetic parameters and product information of their oxidation reactions will result in incomplete atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. In this paper, we will overview our recent research progress on the study of the atmospheric reactions of a series of C6 hexenols with OH radicals and ozone. A series of studies were conducted using both experimental and theoretical methods. Corresponding rate constants were obtained, and reaction mechanisms were also analyzed. It could be concluded that both the nature of the substituent and its position play a fundamental role in the reactivity of the C6 hexenols toward OH radicals and O3. An activating effect of the -OH group in OH radical reactions was found, thus making the H-abstraction channel non-negligible in reactions of these unsaturated alcohols with OH radicals. The removal of these C6 hexenols by ozone also showed great importance and could be competitive with the major recognized sinks by OH radicals. These studies are of great significance for understanding the mechanism of atmospheric chemical reactions of hexenols and improving the atmospheric chemistry model. Experimental detail and corresponding results will be presented. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21307137, 41575125 and 91544228), and the Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province (1508085J03).

  4. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  5. Synthesis of Tetrahydronaphthyridines from Aldehydes and HARP Reagents via Radical Pictet-Spengler Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jackl, Moritz K; Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-15

    The combination of aldehydes with newly designed HARP (halogen amine radical protocol) reagents gives access to α-substituted tetrahydronaphthyridines. By using different HARP reagents, various regioisomeric structures can be prepared in a single operation. These products, which are of high value in medicinal chemistry, are formed in a predictable manner via a formal Pictet-Spengler reaction of electron-poor pyridines that would not participate in the corresponding polar reactions. PMID:27026179

  6. Radical formation in the [MeReO3]-catalyzed aqueous peroxidative oxidation of alkanes: a theoretical mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2009-01-01

    Plausible mechanisms of radical formation in the catalytic system [MeReO(3)]/H(2)O(2)/H(2)O-CH(3)CN for the oxidation of alkanes to alcohols and ketones, via radical pathways, are investigated extensively at the density functional theory level. The most favorable route is based on the monoperoxo complex [MeReO(2)(O(2))(H(2)O)] and includes the formation of an H(2)O(2) adduct, water-assisted H-transfer from H(2)O(2) to the peroxo ligand, and generation of HOO(*). The thus formed reduced Re(VI) complex [MeReO(2)(OOH)(H(2)O)] reacts with H(2)O(2), resulting, upon water-assisted H-transfer and O-OH bond homolysis, in the regeneration of the oxo-Re(VII) catalyst and formation of the HO(*) radical that reacts further with the alkane. Water plays a crucial role by (i) stabilizing transition states for the proton migrations and providing easy intramolecular H-transfers in the absence of any N,O-ligands and (ii) saturating the Re coordination sphere what leads to a decrease of the activation barrier for the formation of HOO(*). The activation energy of the radical formation calculated for [MeReO(3)] (17.7 kcal/mol) is compatible with that determined experimentally [Shul'pin et al. J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2 2001, 1351 .] for oxo-V-based catalytic systems (17 +/- 2 kcal/mol), and the overall type of mechanism proposed for such V catalysts is also effective for [MeReO(3)]. PMID:19049432

  7. Markovnikov free radical addition reactions, a sleeping beauty kissed to life.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Reinhard W

    2016-02-01

    This review covers free radical additions, which are initiated by the formal addition of a hydrogen atom to a C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond. These reactions originated in the realms of inorganic chemistry, polymer chemistry, and organic chemistry, whereby barriers between these disciplines impeded the rapid implementation of the findings.

  8. Temperature-dependent kinetics of the vinyl radical (C2H3) self-reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Taatjes, Craig A.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Knepp, Adam M.; Ismail, Huzeifa; Green, William H.; Abel, Paul R.; Fahr, Askar; Osborn, David L

    2008-10-01

    The rate coefficient for the self-reaction of vinyl radicals has been measured by two independent methods. The rate constant as a function of temperature at 20 Torr has been determined by a laser-photolysis/laser absorption technique. Vinyl iodide is photolyzed at 266 nm, and both the vinyl radical and the iodine atom photolysis products are monitored by laser absorption. The vinyl radical concentration is derived from the initial iodine atom concentration, which is determined by using the known absorption cross section of the iodine atomic transition to relate the observed absorption to concentration. The measured rate constant for the self-reaction at room temperature is approximately a factor of 2 lower than literature recommendations. The reaction displays a slightly negative temperature dependence, which can be represented by a negative activation energy, (E{sub a}/R) = -400 K. The laser absorption results are supported by independent experiments at 298 K and 4 Torr using time-resolved synchrotron-photoionization mass-spectrometric detection of the products of divinyl ketone and methyl vinyl ketone photolysis. The photoionization mass spectrometry experiments additionally show that methyl + propargyl are formed in the vinyl radical self-reaction, with an estimated branching fraction of 0.5 at 298 K and 4 Torr.

  9. Markovnikov free radical addition reactions, a sleeping beauty kissed to life.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Reinhard W

    2016-02-01

    This review covers free radical additions, which are initiated by the formal addition of a hydrogen atom to a C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond. These reactions originated in the realms of inorganic chemistry, polymer chemistry, and organic chemistry, whereby barriers between these disciplines impeded the rapid implementation of the findings. PMID:26753913

  10. Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalytic Initiation of Radical Thiol-Ene Reactions Using Bismuth Oxide.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi O; Mousseau, James J; Feng, Yiqing; Allais, Christophe; Nuhant, Philippe; Chen, Ming Z; Pierce, Betsy; Robinson, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    A nontoxic and inexpensive photocatalytic initiation of anti-Markovnikov hydrothiolation of olefins using visible light is reported. This method is characterized by low catalyst loading, thereby enabling a mild and selective method for radical initiation in thiol-ene reactions between a wide scope of olefins and thiols. PMID:26572219

  11. Computational Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory: A Mechanistic Study of the Wittig Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The Wittig reaction is one of the most useful reactions in organic chemistry. Despite its prominence early in the organic chemistry curriculum, the exact mechanism of this reaction is still under debate, and this controversy is often neglected in the classroom. Introducing a simple computational study of the Wittig reaction illustrates the…

  12. Mechanistic diversity of the van Leusen reaction applied to 6-ketomorphinans and synthetic potential of the resulting acrylonitrile substructures.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Johannes; Windisch, Petra; Kristeva, Elka; Wurst, Klaus; Ongania, Karl-Hans; Horvath, Ulrike E I; Schottenberger, Herwig; Laus, Gerhard; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2005-06-24

    Tosylmethyl isocyanide was used to convert 7,8-didehydro-6-ketomorphinans to 6,7-didehydromorphinan-6-carbonitriles with retainment of the 4,5-epoxy ring. However, ring opening occurred in the presence of NaH giving 5,6,7,8-tetradehydromorphinan-6-carbonitriles. Addition of nucleophiles such as Li diisopropylamide or Grignard reagents to the acrylonitrile substructure yielded ring-opened 5,6-didehydro products. Seven products were characterized by X-ray crystal structure analysis and revealed insight into the mechanistic diversity of the van Leusen reaction.

  13. Cyclopentadienone Oxidation Reaction Kinetics and Thermochemistry for the Alcohols, Hydroperoxides, and Vinylic, Alkoxy, and Alkylperoxy Radicals.

    PubMed

    Yommee, Suriyakit; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-01-28

    Cyclopentadienone has one carbonyl and two olefin groups resulting in 4n + 2 π-electrons in a cyclic five-membered ring structure. Thermochemical and kinetic parameters for the initial reactions of cyclopentadienone radicals with O2 and the thermochemical properties for cyclopentadienone-hydroperoxides, alcohols, and alkenyl, alkoxy, and peroxy radicals were determined by use of computational chemistry. The CBS-QB3 composite and B3LYP density functional theory methods were used to determine the enthalpies of formation (ΔfH°298) using the isodesmic reaction schemes with several work reactions for each species. Entropy and heat capacity, S°(T) and Cp°(T) (50 K ≤ T ≤ 5000 K) are determined using geometric parameters, internal rotor potentials, and frequencies from B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations. Standard enthalpies of formation are reported for parent molecules as cyclopentadienone, cyclopentadienone with alcohol, hydroperoxide substituents, and the cyclopentadienone-yl vinylic, alkoxy, and peroxy radicals corresponding to loss of a hydrogen atom from the carbon and oxygen sites. Entropy and heat capacity vs temperature also are reported for the parent molecules and for radicals. The thermochemical analysis shows The R(•) + O2 well depths are deep, on the order of 50 kcal mol(-1), and the R(•) + O2 reactions to RO + O (chain branching products) for cyclopentadienone-2-yl and cyclopentadienone-3-yl have unusually low reaction (ΔHrxn) enthalpies, some 20 or so kcal/mol below the entrance channels. Chemical activation kinetics using quantum RRK analysis for k(E) and master equation for falloff are used to show that significant chain branching as a function of temperature and pressure can occur when these vinylic radicals are formed. PMID:26784854

  14. Kinetics and products of the OH radical-initiated reaction of 3-methyl-2-butenal.

    PubMed

    Tuazon, Ernesto C; Aschmann, Sara M; Nishino, Noriko; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    2005-06-01

    Kinetics and products of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with 3-methyl-2-butenal [(CH3)2C=CHCHO] have been investigated at room temperature and atmospheric pressure of air. Using a relative rate method with methacrolein as the reference compound, a rate constant for the reaction of OH radicals with 3-methyl-2-butenal of (6.21 +/- 0.18) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at 296 +/- 2 K was measured, where the indicated error does not include the uncertainty in the rate constant for the methacrolein reference compound. Products of this reaction were investigated using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers coated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine for on-fiber derivatization of carbonyl compounds, with subsequent thermal desorption and analysis by gas chromatography. The products observed and the molar formation yields were: glyoxal, 40 +/- 3%; acetone, 74 +/- 6%; 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanal, 4.6 +/- 0.7%; CO2, 39% initially, decreasing to 30% at greater extents of reaction; peroxyacyl nitrate(s) [RC(O)OONO2], 5-8%, increasing with the extent of reaction and with the sum of the CO2 and RC(O)OONO2 yields being 38 +/- 6%; and organic nitrates [RONO2], 8.5 +/- 2.3%. The formation of these products is readily explained by a reaction mechanism based on those previously formulated for the corresponding reactions of the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes acrolein, crotonaldehyde and methacrolein. Based on the mechanism proposed, at room temperature H-atom abstraction from the CHO group accounts for 40 +/- 6% of the overall reaction, and OH radical addition to the carbon atoms of the C=C bond accounts for 53 +/- 4% of the overall reaction. Hence 93 +/- 8% of the reaction products and pathways are accounted for.

  15. Exploring water catalysis in the reaction of thioformic acid with hydroxyl radical: a global reaction route mapping perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Vikas

    2014-06-12

    Hydrogen abstraction pathways, in the gas-phase reaction of tautomers of thioformic acid (TFA), TFA(thiol), and TFA(thione), with hydroxyl radical in the presence and absence of single water molecule acting as a catalyst, is investigated with high-level quantum mechanical calculations at CCSD(T)/6-311++G(2d,2p)//MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p), CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)//DFT/BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p), and DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p) levels of the theory. A systematic and automated search of the potential energy surface (PES) for the reaction pathways is performed using the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) method that employs an uphill walking technique to search prereaction complexes and transition states. The computations reveal significant lowering of the PES and substantial reduction in the activation energy for the hydrogen abstraction pathway in the presence of water, thereby proving water as an efficient catalyst in the reaction of both the TFA tautomers with OH radical. The hydrogen-bonding interactions are observed to be responsible for the large catalytic effect of water. Notably, in the case of TFA(thiol), formyl hydrogen abstraction is observed to be kinetically more favorable, while acidic hydrogen abstraction is observed to be thermodynamically more feasible. Interestingly, in the case of TFA(thione), reaction pathways involving only formyl hydrogen abstraction were observed to be feasible. The water-catalyzed hydrogen abstraction reaction of TFA with hydroxyl radical, investigated in this work, can provide significant insights into the corresponding reaction in the biological systems.

  16. Mechanistic investigation of the uncatalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and acid halides with methanol: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Monsurat M; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2016-10-01

    Implementation of catalysts to drive reactions from reactants to products remains a burden to synthetic and organic chemists. In spite of investigations into the kinetics and mechanism of catalyzed esterification reactions, less effort has been made to explore the possibility of an uncatalyzed esterification process. Therefore, a comprehensive mechanistic perspective for the uncatalyzed mechanism at the molecular level is presented. Herein, we describe the non-catalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and its halide derivatives (XAc, where X= OH, F, Cl, Br, I) with methanol (MeOH) through a concerted process. The reaction in vacuum and methanol was performed using the density functional theory (DFT) method at M06-2X level with def2-TZVP basis set after a careful literature survey and computations. Esterification through cyclic 4- or 6-membered transition state structures in one- or two-step concerted mechanisms were investigated. The present study outlines the possible cyclic geometry conformations that may occur during experiments at simple ratio of reactants. The free energy of activation for acetic acid and acetyl chloride are 36 kcal mol(-1) and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These are in good agreement with available experimental results from the literature. The selected quantum chemical descriptors proved to be useful tools in chemical reactivity prediction for the reaction mechanism. This quantum mechanics study can serve as a necessary step towards revisiting uncatalyzed reaction mechanisms in some classical organic reactions. PMID:27604278

  17. Laser flash photolysis studies of radical-radical reaction kinetics: The HO{sub 2} + IO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkhite, J.M.; Stickel, R.E.; Nicovich, J.M.; Wine, P.H.

    1999-04-29

    Reactive iodine as a potential tropospheric O{sub 3} sink has received considerable attention recently. Laser flash photolysis of Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}OH/O{sub 2}/I{sub 2}/NO{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}N{sub 2} mixtures at 308 nm has been coupled with simultaneous time-resolved detection of HO{sub 2} (by infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) and IO (by visible absorption spectroscopy) to investigate the kinetics of the atmospherically important reaction HO{sub 2} + IO {r_arrow} products over the temperature range 274--373 K in N{sub 2} buffer gas at pressures of 12 and 25 Torr. All experiments were performed under near pseudo-first-order conditions with HO{sub 2} in excess over IO. At 298 K, the rate coefficient was determined to be (9.7 {+-} 2.9) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}, with the primary source of uncertainty being knowledge of the infrared line strength(s) required to convert measured HO{sub 2} absorbances to absolute concentrations. The temperature dependence of the HO{sub 2} + IO rate coefficient was found to be adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k = 9.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp(680/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The results reported in this study are compared with other recent studies of HO{sub 2} + IO kinetics, and the potential roles of this reaction in atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  18. Addition reaction of alkyl radical to C60 fullerene: Density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Functionalized fullerenes are known as a high-performance molecules. In this study, the alkyl-functionalized fullerenes (denoted by R-C60) have been investigated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) method to elucidate the effects of functionalization on the electronic states of fullerene. Also, the reaction mechanism of alkyl radicals with C60 was investigated. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl radicals (denoted by n = 1-4, where n means the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radical) were examined as alkyl radicals. The DFT calculation showed that the alkyl radical binds to the carbon atom of C60 at the on-top site, and a strong C-C single bond is formed. The binding energies of alkyl radicals to C60 were distributed in the range of 31.8-35.1 kcal mol-1 at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. It was found that the activation barrier exists before alkyl addition, the barrier heights were calculated to be 2.1-2.8 kcal mol-1. The electronic states of R-C60 complexes were discussed on the basis of the theoretical results.

  19. Multiple re-encounter approach to radical pair reactions and the role of nonlinear master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jens; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Tiersch, Markus; Briegel, Hans J.

    2014-08-01

    We formulate a multiple-encounter model of the radical pair mechanism that is based on a random coupling of the radical pair to a minimal model environment. These occasional pulse-like couplings correspond to the radical encounters and give rise to both dephasing and recombination. While this is in agreement with the original model of Haberkorn and its extensions that assume additional dephasing, we show how a nonlinear master equation may be constructed to describe the conditional evolution of the radical pairs prior to the detection of their recombination. We propose a nonlinear master equation for the evolution of an ensemble of independently evolving radical pairs whose nonlinearity depends on the record of the fluorescence signal. We also reformulate Haberkorn's original argument on the physicality of reaction operators using the terminology of quantum optics/open quantum systems. Our model allows one to describe multiple encounters within the exponential model and connects this with the master equation approach. We include hitherto neglected effects of the encounters, such as a separate dephasing in the triplet subspace, and predict potential new effects, such as Grover reflections of radical spins, that may be observed if the strength and time of the encounters can be experimentally controlled.

  20. Intramolecular radical rearrangement reactions of 2-methyleneaziridines: application to the synthesis of substituted piperidines, decahydroquinolines, and octahydroindolizines.

    PubMed

    Prévost, N; Shipman, M

    2001-07-26

    [reaction: see text] Intramolecular 5-exo cyclization of 3-(2-methyleneaziridin-1-yl)propyl radicals leads to the generation of a highly strained, bicyclic aziridinylcarbinyl radical that undergoes C-N bond fission to the ring-expanded aminyl radical. This methodology provides access to substituted 3-methylenepiperidines and, by combining it with an additional 5-exo-trig cyclization reaction, the octahydroindolizidine skeleton.

  1. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  2. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Kattnig, Daniel R; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R

    2016-08-28

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ∼500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes. PMID:27586950

  3. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Emrys W.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hore, P. J.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ˜500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes.

  4. Crossed beam study of the atom-radical reaction of ground state carbon atoms (C(3P)) with the vinyl radical (C2H3(X2A')).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Antony V; Parker, Dorian S N; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2012-01-14

    The atom-radical reaction of ground state carbon atoms (C((3)P)) with the vinyl radical (C(2)H(3)(X(2)A')) was conducted under single collision conditions at a collision energy of 32.3 ± 2.9 kJ mol(-1). The reaction dynamics were found to involve a complex forming reaction mechanism, which is initiated by the barrier-less addition of atomic carbon to the carbon-carbon-double bond of the vinyl radical forming a cyclic C(3)H(3) radical intermediate. The latter has a lifetime of at least 1.5 times its rotational period and decomposes via a tight exit transition state located about 45 kJ mol(-1) above the separated products through atomic hydrogen loss to the cyclopropenylidene isomer (c-C(3)H(2)) as detected toward cold molecular clouds and in star forming regions.

  5. Arrhenius parameter determination for the reaction of methyl radicals with iodine species in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mezyk, S.P.; Madden, K.P.

    1996-05-30

    The techniques of electron pulse radiolysis and direct ESR detection have been used to determine Arrhenius parameters for the recombination reaction of methyl radicals and methyl radical reaction with iodine in aqueous solution. At 22.8 {degree}C, rate constants of 2k{sub 7} = (1.77{+-}0.16) x 10{sup 9} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} and k{sub 1} = (2.75{+-}0.43) x 10{sup 9} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} with corresponding activation energies of 14.89{+-}0.87 and 13.10{+-}0.71 kJ mol{sup -1} (5.7-39.6 {degree}C), were obtained respectively for these two reactions. The analogous reaction of methyl radicals with iodide or iodate was found to be much slower, with the room temperature rate constant for both reactions estimated as k < 10{sup 6} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -}. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Determination of the rate constant of hydroperoxyl radical reaction with phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozmér, Zsuzsanna; Arany, Eszter; Alapi, Tünde; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László; Dombi, András

    2014-09-01

    The rate constant of HO2rad reaction with phenol (kHO2rad +phenol) was investigated. The primary radical set produced in water γ radiolysis (rad OH, eaq- and Hrad ) was transformed to HO2rad /O2rad - by using dissolved oxygen and formate anion (in the form of either formic acid or sodium formate). The concentration ratio of HO2rad /O2rad - was affected by the pH value of the solution: under acidic conditions (using HCOOH) almost all radicals were converted to HO2rad , while under alkaline conditions (using HCOONa) to O2rad -. The degradation rate of phenol was significantly higher using HCOOH. From the ratio of reaction rates under the two reaction conditions kHO2rad +phenol was estimated to be (2.7±1.2)×103 L mol-1 s-1.

  7. Reactions of the OOH radical with guanine: Mechanisms of formation of 8-oxoguanine and other products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    2010-09-01

    The mutagenic product 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is formed due to intermediacy of peroxyl (OOR) radicals in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation-induced DNA damage. The mechanisms of these reactions are not yet understood properly. Therefore, in the present study, the mechanisms of formation of 8-oxoGua and other related products due to the reaction of the guanine base of DNA with the hydroperoxyl radical (OOH) were investigated theoretically employing the B3LYP and BHandHLYP hybrid functionals of density functional theory and the polarizable continuum model for solvation. It is found that the reaction of the OOH radical with guanine can occur following seven different mechanisms leading to the formation of various products including 8-oxoGua, its radicals, 5-hydroxy-8-oxoguanine and CO 2. The mechanism that yields 8-oxoGua as an intermediate and 5-hydroxy-8-oxoGua as the final product was found to be energetically most favorable.

  8. Isomeric product detection in the heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals with aerosol composed of branched and linear unsaturated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Nah, Theodora; Zhang, Haofei; Worton, David R; Ruehl, Christopher R; Kirk, Benjamin B; Goldstein, Allen H; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2014-12-11

    The influence of molecular structure (branched vs linear) on product formation in the heterogeneous oxidation of unsaturated organic aerosol is investigated. Particle phase product isomers formed from the reaction of squalene (C30H50, a branched alkene with six C═C double bonds) and linolenic acid (C18H30O2, a linear carboxylic acid with three C═C double bonds) with OH radicals are identified and quantified using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The reactions are measured at low and high [O2] (∼1% vs 10% [O2]) to understand the roles of hydroxyalkyl and hydroxyperoxy radical intermediates in product formation. A key reaction step is OH addition to a C═C double bond to form a hydroxyalkyl radical. In addition, allylic alkyl radicals, formed from H atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyalkyl or OH radicals play important roles in the chemistry of product formation. Functionalization products dominate the squalene reaction at ∼1% [O2], with the total abundance of observed functionalization products being approximately equal to the fragmentation products at 10% [O2]. The large abundance of squalene fragmentation products at 10% [O2] is attributed to the formation and dissociation of tertiary hydroxyalkoxy radical intermediates. For linolenic acid aerosol, the formation of functionalization products dominates the reaction at both ∼1% and 10% [O2], suggesting that the formation and dissociation of secondary hydroxyalkoxy radicals are minor reaction channels for linear molecules. The distribution of linolenic acid functionalization products depends upon [O2], indicating that O2 controls the reaction pathways of the secondary hydroxyalkyl radical. For both reactions, alcohols are formed in favor of carbonyl functional groups, suggesting that there are some key differences between heterogeneous reactions involving allylic radical intermediates and those reactions of OH radicals with simple saturated hydrocarbons.

  9. Concerted effects in the reaction of rad OH radicals with aromatics: radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, G.; Schuler, R. H.

    2003-06-01

    Liquid chromatographic and capillary electrophoretic studies have been used to resolve the products produced in the radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution. These studies have shown that, as in the case of phenol, rad OH radicals preferentially add to the positions ortho and para to the OH substituent. However, in contrast to its reaction with phenol, addition at the ortho position is favored over addition at the para position. Because rad OH radical is a strong electrophile this difference suggests that the electron population at the ortho position in the salicylate anion is enhanced as a result of the hydrogen bonding in salicylic acid.

  10. Mechanistic insights into the cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) of vinyl acetate with cobalt(III) adducts as initiators.

    PubMed

    Debuigne, Antoine; Champouret, Yohan; Jérôme, Robert; Poli, Rinaldo; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) has proved efficient in controlling the radical polymerization of very reactive monomers, such as vinyl acetate (VAc). However, the reason for this success and the intimate mechanism remained basically speculative. Herein, two mechanisms are shown to coexist: the reversible termination of the growing poly(vinyl acetate) chains by the Co(acac)2 complex (acac: acetylacetonato), and a degenerative chain-transfer process. The importance of one contribution over the other strongly depends on the polymerization conditions, including complexation of cobalt by ligands, such as water and pyridine. This significant progress in the CMRP mechanism relies on the isolation and characterization of the very first cobalt adducts formed in the polymerization medium and their use as CMRP initiators. The structure proposed for these adducts was supported by DFT calculations. Beyond the control of the VAc polymerization, which is the best ever achieved by CMRP, extension to other monomers and substantial progress in macromolecular engineering are now realistic forecasts.

  11. Experimental study of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Braure, Tristan; Bedjanian, Yuri; Romanias, Manolis N; Morin, Julien; Riffault, Véronique; Tomas, Alexandre; Coddeville, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals has been studied using a low-pressure flow tube reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + C10H16 → products (1), OD + C10H16 → products (2). The rate constants of the title reactions were determined using four different approaches: either monitoring the kinetics of OH (OD) radicals or limonene consumption in excess of limonene or of the radicals, respectively (absolute method), and by the relative rate method using either the reaction OH (OD) + Br2 or OH (OD) + DMDS (dimethyl disulfide) as the reference one and following HOBr (DOBr) formation or DMDS and limonene consumption, respectively. As a result of the absolute and relative measurements, the overall rate coefficients, k1 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) exp((515 ± 50)/T) and k2 = (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(-11) exp((575 ± 60)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), were determined at a pressure of 1 Torr of helium over the temperature ranges 220-360 and 233-353 K, respectively. k1 was found to be pressure independent over the range 0.5-5 Torr. There are two possible pathways for the reaction between OH (OD) and limonene: addition of the radical to one of the limonene double bonds (reactions 1a and 2a ) and abstraction of a hydrogen atom (reactions 1b and 2b ), resulting in the formation of H2O (HOD). Measurements of the HOD yield as a function of temperature led to the following branching ratio of the H atom abstraction channel: k2b/k2 = (0.07 ± 0.03) × exp((460 ± 140)/T) for T = (253-355) K.

  12. Rate constant for reaction of vitamin C with protein radicals in γ-irradiated aqueous albumin solution at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Toru; Mita, Kazuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1995-02-01

    When an aqueous solution of albumin (0.1 kg dm -3) is irradiated by γ-rays at 295 K, albumin radicals with a long lifetime are observed by ESR. The reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals has been studied at 295 K in the albumin solution, which is considered as a model of cells. The rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals was measured as 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, which is much smaller than the reported rate constants (10 6-10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1) for the reaction of vitamin C with radicals in a dilute aqueous solution. The small rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C is ascribed to the reaction in polymer coils in the albumin solution, since vitamin C and albumin radicals diffuse very slowly in the coils.

  13. Kinetics of CH(X 2Pi) radical reactions with cyclopropane, cyclopentane, and cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabarnick, S.; Fleming, J. W.; Lin, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Rate constants have been obtained for CH(X 2Pi) radical reactions with cyclopropane, cyclopentane, and cyclohexane in order to establish the rate of CH insertion into secondary C-H bonds in alkanes. Data indicate that there is no measurable dependence on photolysis laser energy. The reactions all exhibited rate constants that decrease with increasing temperature. It is suggested that a possible set of pathways for the cycloalkane reactions is a ring-opening process where the excited adduct decomposes to a hydrogen atom and a diene.

  14. Role of oxygen radical reactions in the browning and cross-linking of lysozyme by glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, C.J.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    Lysozyme (LZM) was used as a model protein for studies on the effects of oxygen on the Maillard reaction. During a 4 wk incubation in 0.25 M glucose (0.2 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, 37/sup 0/C) the kinetics of glycation of LZM were similar under air and N/sub 2/, yielding approx.2 mol Lys modified per mol LZM. Fructoselysine (FL) was the major Lys derivative formed under air and N/sub 2/, while N/sup epsilon/-carboxymethyllysine (CML) accounted for approx.30% of FL formed at 4 wk under air. A loss of 1 mol Arg per mol LZM was also observed under both air and N/sub 2/, with greater loss from LZM dimer vs. monomer, suggesting a role for Arg in the crosslinking reaction. Dimer and monomer did not differ in content of Lys, FL or CML (under air), but dimer was 4 times as fluorescent as monomer, suggesting that crosslink structures are fluorescent. Despite significant differences in kinetics of crosslinking, browning and development of fluorescence of LZM under air vs. N/sub 2/, products formed had similar absorbance and fluorescence spectra. Based on inhibition by chelators and radical scavengers, the more rapid crosslinking and development of fluorescence under air was shown to result from oxygen radical reactions. These results indicate that both radical and non-radical processes may contribute to the Maillard reaction, but that the browning, fluorescence and crosslinking of protein may proceed in the absence of oxygen and oxygen radicals.

  15. Scavenging of free-radical metabolites of aniline xenobiotics and drugs by amino acid derivatives: toxicological implications of radical-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Michail, Karim; Baghdasarian, Argishti; Narwaley, Malyaj; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-12-16

    We investigated a novel scavenging mechanism of arylamine free radicals by poly- and monoaminocarboxylates. Free radicals of arylamine xenobiotics and drugs did not react with oxygen in peroxidase-catalyzed reactions; however, they showed marked oxygen uptake in the presence of an aminocarboxylate. These free-radical intermediates were identified using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), a polyaminocarboxylate, caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of N-centered radicals produced by the peroxidative metabolism of arylamines with the subsequent formation of secondary aliphatic carbon-centered radicals stemming from the cosubstrate molecule. Analogously, N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) and N-methyliminodiacetate (MIDA), but not iminodiacetic acid (IDA), demonstrated a similar scavenging effect of arylamine-derived free radicals in a horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 system. Using human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lysate as a model of human neutrophils, DTPA, MIDA, and DMG readily reduced anilinium cation radicals derived from the arylamines and gave rise to the corresponding carbon radicals. The rate of peroxidase-triggered polymerization of aniline was studied as a measure of nitrogen-radical scavenging. Although, IDA had no effect on the rate of aniline polymerization, this was almost nullified in the presence of DTPA and MIDA at half of the molar concentration of the aniline substrate, whereas a 20 molar excess of DMPO caused only a partial inhibition. Furthermore, the yield of formaldehyde, a specific reaction endproduct of the oxidation of aminocarboxylates by aniline free-radical metabolites, was quantitatively determined. Azobenzene, a specific reaction product of peroxidase-catalyzed free-radical dimerization of aniline, was fully abrogated in the presence of DTPA, as confirmed by GC/MS. Under aerobic conditions, a radical-transfer reaction

  16. Gas-phase reactions of charged phenyl radicals with neutral biomolecules evaporated by laser-induced acoustic desorption.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christopher J; Ramírez-Arizmendi, Luis E; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Pérez, James; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2002-02-01

    A generally applicable method for the study of phenyl radicals' reactions with neutral biomolecules in the gas phase is demonstrated. Neutral biomolecules were evaporated into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and subsequently reacted with trapped charged phenyl radicals. The structural integrity of the evaporated alanylalanine molecules was verified by reaction with dichlorophosphenium ions. Examination of the reactions of charged phenyl radicals with alanylalanine and thymidine evaporated via LIAD revealed hydrogen atom abstraction for both alanylalanine and thymidine as well as an addition/elimination product for the reaction with thymidine. These reactions are consistent with the results obtained by others in solution. Further, a previously unstudied reaction of the nucleotide of thymine (T1) with charged phenyl radical was found to yield analogous products as the reaction with thymidine.

  17. Production of sulfate radical and hydroxyl radical by reaction of ozone with peroxymonosulfate: a novel advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Jiang, Jin; Lu, Xinglin; Ma, Jun; Liu, Yongze

    2015-06-16

    In this work, simultaneous generation of hydroxyl radical (•OH) and sulfate radical (SO4•−) by the reaction of ozone (O3) with peroxymonosulfate (PMS; HSO5−) has been proposed and experimentally verified. We demonstrate that the reaction between the anion of PMS (i.e.,SO52−) and O3 is primarily responsible for driving O3 consumption with a measured second order rate constant of (2.12 ± 0.03) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). The formation of both •OH and SO4•− from the reaction between SO52− and O3 is confirmed by chemical probes (i.e., nitrobenzene for •OH and atrazine forb oth •OH and SO4•−). The yields of •OH and SO4•− are determined to be 0.43 ± 0.1 and 0.45 ± 0.1 per mol of O3 consumption, respectively. An adduct,−O3SOO− + O3 → −O3SO5−, is assumed as the first step, which further decomposes into SO5•− and O3•−. The subsequent reaction of SO5•− with O3is proposed to generate SO4•−, while O3•− converts to •OH. A definition of R(ct,•OH) and R(ct,SO4•−) (i.e., respective ratios of •OH and SO4•− exposures to O3 exposure) is adopted to quantify relative contributions of •OH and SO4•−. Increasing pH leads to increases in both values of R(ct,•OH) and R(ct,SO4•−) but does not significantly affect the ratio of R(ct,SO4•−) to R(ct,•OH) (i.e., R(ct,SO4•−)/R(ct,•OH)), which represents the relative formation of SO4•− to •OH. The presence of bicarbonate appreciably inhibits the degradation of probes and fairly decreases the relative contribution of •OH for their degradation, which may be attributed to the conversion of both •OH and SO4•− to the more selective carbonate radical (CO3•−).Humic acid promotes O3 consumption to generate •OH and thus leads to an increase in the R(ct,•OH) value in the O3/PMS process,w hile humic acid has negligible influence on the R(ct,SO4•−) value. This discrepancy is reasonably explained by the negligible effect of humic acid on SO

  18. Synthesis of propionate motifs: diastereoselective tandem reactions involving anionic and free radical based processes.

    PubMed

    Guindon, Y; Houde, K; Prévost, M; Cardinal-David, B; Landry, S R; Daoust, B; Bencheqroun, M; Guérin, B

    2001-09-01

    Reported herein is a strategy employing a Mukaiyama reaction in tandem with a hydrogen transfer reaction for the elaboration of propionate motifs. The nature of the protecting groups on the chiral beta-alkoxy aldehyde and the type of Lewis acid used are varied to modulate the stereochemical outcome of the tandem reactions. The mode of complexation is thus controlled (monodentate or chelate) for the Mukaiyama reaction to give access to either syn or anti aldol products, precursors of the free radical reduction reaction. The endocyclic effect is subsequently capitalized upon to control the hydrogen transfer step so that the syn-reduced product may be achieved. Proceeding with excellent yield and diastereoselectivity, the synthetic sequence proposed gives access to syn-syn and syn-anti propionate motifs. Also considered is a complementary approach using a chelation-controlled Mukaiyama reaction in tandem with a free radical allylation reaction under the control of the endocyclic effect that leads to the anti-anti product.

  19. The role of alkoxy radicals in the heterogeneous reaction of two structural isomers of dimethylsuccinic acid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiu Tung; Chan, Man Nin; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-10-14

    A key challenge in understanding the transformation chemistry of organic aerosols is to quantify how changes in molecular structure alter heterogeneous reaction mechanisms. Here we use two model systems to investigate how the relative locations of branched methyl groups control the heterogeneous reaction of OH with two isomers of dimethylsuccinic acid (C6H10O4). 2,2-Dimethylsuccinic acid (2,2-DMSA) and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,3-DMSA) differ only in the location of the two branched methyl groups, thus enabling a closer inspection of how the distribution of carbon reaction sites impacts the chemical evolution of the aerosol. The heterogeneous reaction of OH with 2,3-DMSA (reactive OH uptake coefficient, γ = 0.99 ± 0.16) is found to be ∼2 times faster than that of 2,2-DMSA (γ = 0.41 ± 0.07), which is attributed to the larger stability of the tertiary alkyl radical produced by the initial OH abstraction reaction. While changes in the average aerosol oxidation state (OSC) and the carbon number (NC) are similar for both isomers upon reaction, significant differences are observed in the underlying molecular distribution of reaction products. The reaction of OH with the 2,3-DMSA isomer produces two major reaction products: a product containing a new alcohol functional group (C6H10O5) formed by intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and a C5 compound formed via carbon-carbon (C-C) bond scission. Both of these reaction products are explained by the formation and subsequent reaction of a tertiary alkoxy radical. In contrast, the OH reaction with the 2,2-DMSA isomer forms four dominant reaction products, the majority of which are C5 scission products. The difference in the quantity of C-C bond scission products for these two isomers is unexpected since decomposition is assumed to be favored for the isomer with the most tertiary carbon sites (i.e. 2,3-DMSA). For both isomers, there is a much larger abundance of C6 alcohol relative to C6 ketone products, which suggests

  20. Disinfection of Water Containing Natural Organic Matter by Using Ozone-Initiated Radical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min; Chung, Hyenmi; Yoon, Jeyong

    2003-01-01

    Ozone is widely used to disinfect drinking water and wastewater due to its strong biocidal oxidizing properties. Recently, it was reported that hydroxyl radicals (·OH), resulting from ozone decomposition, play a significant role in microbial inactivation when Bacillus subtilis endospores were used as the test microorganisms in pH controlled distilled water. However, it is not yet known how natural organic matter (NOM), which is ubiquitous in sources of drinking water, affects this process of disinfection by ozone-initiated radical reactions. Two types of water matrix were considered for this study. One is water containing humic acid, which is commercially available. The other is water from the Han River. This study reported that hydroxyl radicals, initiated by the ozone chain reaction, were significantly effective at B. subtilis endospore inactivation in water containing NOM, as well as in pH-controlled distilled water. The type of NOM and the pH have a considerable effect on the percentage of disinfection by hydroxyl radicals, which ranged from 20 to 50%. In addition, the theoretical \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{C}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}T value of hydroxyl radicals for 2-log B. subtilis removal was estimated to be about 2.4 × 104 times smaller than that of ozone, assuming that there is no synergistic activity between ozone and hydroxyl radicals. PMID:12676711

  1. Reactions of CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2 radicals with O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ozone was photolyzed at 253.7 nm at 25 and -52 degrees in the presence of CH4 and O2 to measure the reactions of O3 with CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2. The O(1D) atoms produced in the primary photochemical act react with CH4 to give CH3 radicals which in turn can react with O2 to give CH3O2 and CH3O radicals. At very high O2 to O3 concentration ratios, the quantum yield of O3 disappearance approached 1.0, indicating that O3 reactions with CH3O2 and CH3O are slow. Upper limits to the rate coefficients at 25 degrees were computed. At lower values of the concentration ratio, chain decomposition of O3 occurred which could be explained by the reaction of O3 with CH3 radicals to produce CH2O, O2, and H atoms all the time. The two routes to these products are considered, and the preferred reaction channel is found.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of (CF3)2CHOCH3 reaction with OH radicals in an environmental reaction chamber.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Kutsuna, S; Tokuhashi, K; Sekiya, A; Tamai, R; Hibino, Y

    2005-06-01

    The atmospheric chemistry of (CF3)2CHOCH3, a possible HCFC/HFC alternative, was studied using a smog chamber/FT-IR technique. OH radicals were prepared by the photolysis of ozone in a 200-Torr H2O/O3/O2 gas mixture held in an 11.5-dm3 temperature-controlled chamber. The rate constant, k1, for the reaction of (CF3)2CHOCH3 with OH radicals was determined to be (1.40 +/- 0.28) x 10(-12) exp[(-550 +/- 60)/T] cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) by means of a relative rate method at 253-328 K. The value of k1 at 298 K was (2.25 +/- 0.04) x 10(-13) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The random errors are reported with +/-2 standard deviations, and potential systematic errors of 15% could increase k(1). In considering OH-radical reactions, we estimated the tropospheric lifetime of (CF3)2CHOCH3 to be 2.0 months using the rate constant at 288 K. The degradation mechanism of (CF3)2CHOCH3 initiated by OH radicals was also investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy at 298 K. Products (CF3)2CHOC(O)H, CF3C(OH)2CF3, CF3C(O)OCH3, and COF(2) were identified and quantified. The branching ratio, k1a/k1b, was estimated to be 2.1:1 for reactions (CF3)2CHOCH3 + OH --> (CF3)2CHOCH2*+ H2O (k1a) and (CF3)2CHOCH3 + OH --> (CF3)2C*OCH3 + H2O (k1b). PMID:16833819

  3. Hydrogen bonding constrains free radical reaction dynamics at serine and threonine residues in peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel A; Sohn, Chang Ho; Gao, Jinshan; Beauchamp, J L

    2014-09-18

    Free radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry derives advantage from the introduction of highly selective low-energy dissociation pathways in target peptides. An acetyl radical, formed at the peptide N-terminus via collisional activation and subsequent dissociation of a covalently attached radical precursor, abstracts a hydrogen atom from diverse sites on the peptide, yielding sequence information through backbone cleavage as well as side-chain loss. Unique free-radical-initiated dissociation pathways observed at serine and threonine residues lead to cleavage of the neighboring N-terminal Cα-C or N-Cα bond rather than the typical Cα-C bond cleavage observed with other amino acids. These reactions were investigated by FRIPS of model peptides of the form AARAAAXAA, where X is the amino acid of interest. In combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the experiments indicate the strong influence of hydrogen bonding at serine or threonine on the observed free radical chemistry. Hydrogen bonding of the side-chain hydroxyl group with a backbone carbonyl oxygen aligns the singly occupied π orbital on the β-carbon and the N-Cα bond, leading to low-barrier β-cleavage of the N-Cα bond. Interaction with the N-terminal carbonyl favors a hydrogen-atom transfer process to yield stable c and z(•) ions, whereas C-terminal interaction leads to effective cleavage of the Cα-C bond through rapid loss of isocyanic acid. Dissociation of the Cα-C bond may also occur via water loss followed by β-cleavage from a nitrogen-centered radical. These competitive dissociation pathways from a single residue illustrate the sensitivity of gas-phase free radical chemistry to subtle factors such as hydrogen bonding that affect the potential energy surface for these low-barrier processes.

  4. Electronic nonadiabatic effects in low temperature radical-radical reactions. I. C(3P) + OH(2Π).

    PubMed

    Maergoiz, A I; Nikitin, E E; Troe, J

    2014-07-28

    The formation of collision complexes, as a first step towards reaction, in collisions between two open-electronic shell radicals is treated within an adiabatic channel approach. Adiabatic channel potentials are constructed on the basis of asymptotic electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions, accounting for spin-orbit coupling within the multitude of electronic states arising from the separated reactants. Suitable coupling schemes (such as rotational + electronic) are designed to secure maximum adiabaticity of the channels. The reaction between C((3)P) and OH((2)Π) is treated as a representative example. The results show that the low temperature association rate coefficients in general cannot be represented by results obtained with a single (generally the lowest) potential energy surface of the adduct, asymptotically reaching the lowest fine-structure states of the reactants, and a factor accounting for the thermal population of the latter states. Instead, the influence of non-Born-Oppenheimer couplings within the multitude of electronic states arising during the encounter markedly increases the capture rates. This effect extends up to temperatures of several hundred K.

  5. Electronic nonadiabatic effects in low temperature radical-radical reactions. I. C(3P) + OH(2Π).

    PubMed

    Maergoiz, A I; Nikitin, E E; Troe, J

    2014-07-28

    The formation of collision complexes, as a first step towards reaction, in collisions between two open-electronic shell radicals is treated within an adiabatic channel approach. Adiabatic channel potentials are constructed on the basis of asymptotic electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions, accounting for spin-orbit coupling within the multitude of electronic states arising from the separated reactants. Suitable coupling schemes (such as rotational + electronic) are designed to secure maximum adiabaticity of the channels. The reaction between C((3)P) and OH((2)Π) is treated as a representative example. The results show that the low temperature association rate coefficients in general cannot be represented by results obtained with a single (generally the lowest) potential energy surface of the adduct, asymptotically reaching the lowest fine-structure states of the reactants, and a factor accounting for the thermal population of the latter states. Instead, the influence of non-Born-Oppenheimer couplings within the multitude of electronic states arising during the encounter markedly increases the capture rates. This effect extends up to temperatures of several hundred K. PMID:25084905

  6. Concerted effects of substituents in the reaction of •OH radicals with aromatics: The hydroxybenzaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, Guadalupe; Mendoza, Edith; Schuler, Robert H.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we have examined the distribution of products in the radiolytic hydroxylation of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde to obtain information on the concerted effect of the -CHO and -OH groups at the addition site of •OH radicals. The •OH radical was found to selectively add to the free positions of the aromatic ring. Furthermore, the •OH radical reacts by substitution at the ipso position followed by elimination of the substituent, producing dihydroxybenzene compounds. Additionally, the formation of carboxylic acids as an initial product has been conclusively identified by retention times and UV and mass spectra. These acids are formed as a result of the radiolytic oxidation of the initial radical formed by the addition reaction of the •OH radicals to the meso position (exocyclic carbon). The identification of the products, dihydroxybenzaldehydes, dihydroxybenzenes and hydroxybenzoic acids and calculation of their yields were achieved through HPLC. The G values of each product are given, which reflect the charge distributions in the hydroxybenzaldehydes, such that the formyl group modifies the ortho-para directing effect of the -OH substituent. The 3 and 5 positions in 2- and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde showed increased the electronic density compared to that of phenol, indicating that the formyl group has a significant effect on the electronic structure of those hydroxybenzaldehydes. In 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde, the -OH substituent had a dominant ortho-directing effect similar to that observed for phenol.

  7. Some reactions and properties of nitro radical-anions important in biology and medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, P

    1985-01-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds, ArNO2 have widespread actual or potential use in medicine and cancer therapy. There is direct proof that free-radical metabolites are involved in many applications, and an appreciation of the conceptual basis for their therapeutic differential; however, an understanding of the detailed mechanisms involved is lacking. Redox properties control most biological responses of nitro compounds, and the characteristics of the one-electron couple: ArNO2/ArNO2- are detailed. The "futile metabolism" of nitroaryl compounds characteristic of most aerobic nitroreductase systems reflects competition between natural radical-decay pathways and a one-electron transfer reaction to yield superoxide ion, O2-. Prototropic properties control the rate of radical decay, and redox properties control the rate of electron transfer to O2 or other acceptors. There are clear parallels in the chemistry of ArNO2- and O2-. While nitro radicals have frequently been invoked as damaging species, they are very unreactive (except as simple reductants). It seems likely that reductive metabolism of nitroaryl compounds, although generally involving nitro radical-anions as obligate intermediates (and this is required for therapeutic selectivity towards anaerobes), results in biological damage via reductive metabolites of higher reduction order than the one-electron product. PMID:3830700

  8. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  9. Hydroxyl radical scavenging effects of guaiacol used in traditional dental pulp sedation: reaction kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Mimurai, Toshio; Yazaki, Kinya; Sawaki, Kohei; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru

    2005-08-01

    Guaiacol, which is a phenolic compound with a methoxy group and used in traditional dental pulp sedation, has the property of inducing cell proliferation. To clarify these mechanisms of guaiacol, this study examined the hydroxyl radical (*OH) scavenging effects of guaiacol in vitro. Generation of *OH was carried out by the Fenton reaction using mixture of ascorbic acid, H2O2, and Fe(III)-EDTA, and *OH was detected by measuring the *OH-mediated production of degradation products of deoxyribose, which reacts with 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) and is relatively stable for a long time. At concentrations of 10(-10) M to 10(-3) M, guaiacol inhibited the TBA reactive substance (TBA-RS) formation in a dose-dependent manner. Phenol and formaldehyde were also found to inhibit the TBA-RS formation, but their inhibitory activities were lower than that of guaiacol. The concentrations of guaiacol, phenol, and formaldehyde needed to cause 50% inhibition of TBA-RS formation were approximately 5 x 10(-6), 5 x 10(-5), and 2 x 10(-3) M, respectively. In this reaction system, guaiacol showed no chelating reaction with ferrous ion and did not directly react with H2O2. Guaiacol also exhibited radical scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) stable free radical, but its scavenging activity was lower than that toward *OH. These results suggest that guaiacol is a potent scavenger of reactive oxygen radicals and that its radical scavenging activity may be associated with its effect on cell proliferation.

  10. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  11. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  12. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bimolecular reactions of phenyl radicals at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Constantinidis, P; Schmitt, H-C; Fischer, I; Yan, B; Rijs, A M

    2015-11-21

    The self-reaction of the phenyl radical is one of the key reactions in combustion chemistry. Here we study this reaction in a high-temperature flow reactor by IR/UV ion dip spectroscopy, using free electron laser radiation as mid-infrared source. We identified several major reaction products based on their infrared spectra, among them indene, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, naphthalene, biphenyl and para-terphenyl. Due to the structural sensitivity of the method, the reaction products were identified isomer-selectively. The work shows that the formation of indene and naphthalene, which was previously considered to be evidence for the HACA (hydrogen abstraction C2H2 addition) mechanism in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot can also be understood in a phenyl addition model.

  13. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bimolecular reactions of phenyl radicals at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Constantinidis, P; Schmitt, H-C; Fischer, I; Yan, B; Rijs, A M

    2015-11-21

    The self-reaction of the phenyl radical is one of the key reactions in combustion chemistry. Here we study this reaction in a high-temperature flow reactor by IR/UV ion dip spectroscopy, using free electron laser radiation as mid-infrared source. We identified several major reaction products based on their infrared spectra, among them indene, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, naphthalene, biphenyl and para-terphenyl. Due to the structural sensitivity of the method, the reaction products were identified isomer-selectively. The work shows that the formation of indene and naphthalene, which was previously considered to be evidence for the HACA (hydrogen abstraction C2H2 addition) mechanism in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot can also be understood in a phenyl addition model. PMID:26457393

  14. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-05-21

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an S{sub N}2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the S{sub N}2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the S{sub N}2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  15. Accessing N-Stereogenicity through a Double Aza-Michael Reaction: Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Sonja; Santschi, Nico; Cvengroš, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Further development of the chemistry and applications of chiral compounds that possess configurationally stable stereogenic nitrogen atoms is hampered by the lack of efficient strategies to access such compounds in an enantiomerically pure form. Esters of propiolic acid and chiral alcohols were evaluated as cheap and readily available Michael acceptors in a diastereoselective synthesis of N-stereogenic compounds by means of a double aza-Michael conjugate addition. Diastereomeric ratios of up to 74:26 and high yields were achieved with (-)-menthyl propiolate as a substrate. Furthermore, a detailed mechanistic investigation was undertaken to shed some light on the course of this domino transformation. Kinetic studies revealed that the protic-solvent additive acts as a Brønsted acid and activates the ester toward the initial attack of the tetrahydrodiazocine partner. Conversely, acidic conditions proved unfavorable during the final cyclization step that provides the product.

  16. The role of carbon dioxide in free radical reactions of the organism.

    PubMed

    Veselá, A; Wilhelm, J

    2002-01-01

    Carbon dioxide interacts both with reactive nitrogen species and reactive oxygen species. In the presence of superoxide, NO reacts to form peroxynitrite that reacts with CO2 to give nitrosoperoxycarbonate. This compound rearranges to nitrocarbonate which is prone to further reactions. In an aqueous environment, the most probable reaction is hydrolysis producing carbonate and nitrate. Thus the net effect of CO2 is scavenging of peroxynitrite and prevention of nitration and oxidative damage. However, in a nonpolar environment of membranes, nitrocarbonate undergoes other reactions leading to nitration of proteins and oxidative damage. When NO reacts with oxygen in the absence of superoxide, a nitrating species N2O3 is formed. CO2 interacts with N2O3 to produce a nitrosyl compound that, under physiological pH, is hydrolyzed to nitrous and carbonic acid. In this way, CO2 also prevents nitration reactions. CO2 protects superoxide dismutase against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. However, in this reaction carbonate radicals are formed which can propagate the oxidative damage. It was found that hypercapnia in vivo protects against the damaging effects of ischemia or hypoxia. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the protective role of CO2 in vivo. The most significant appears to be stabilization of the iron-transferrin complex which prevents the involvement of iron ions in the initiation of free radical reactions. PMID:12449430

  17. A Metal and Base-Free Chemoselective Primary Amination of Boronic Acids Using Cyanamidyl/Arylcyanamidyl Radical as Aminating Species: Synthesis and Mechanistic Studies by Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nachiketa; Arfeen, Minhajul; Bharatam, Prasad V; Goswami, Avijit

    2016-06-17

    An efficient, metal and base-free, chemoselective synthesis of aryl-, heteroaryl-, and alkyl primary amines from the corresponding boronic acids has been achieved at ambient temperature mediated by [bis(trifluoroacetoxy)iodo]benzene (PIFA) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) using cyanamidyl/arylcyanamidyl radicals as the aminating species. The primary amine compounds were initially obtained as their corresponding ammonium trifluoroacetate salts which, on treatment with aq NaOH, provide the free amines. Finally, the primary amines were isolated through column chromatography over silica-gel using hexane-EtOAc solvent system as the eluent. The reactions are sufficiently fast, completing within 1 h. Quantum chemical calculations in combination with experimental observations validate that the ipso amination of substituted boronic acids involves the formation of cyanamidyl/arylcyanamidyl radical, followed by regiospecific interaction of its nitrile-N center with boron atom of the boronic acids, leading to chemoselective primary amination.

  18. Free radicals: how do we stand them? Anaerobic and aerobic free radical (chain) reactions involved in the use of fluorogenic probes and in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Liochev, Stefan I

    2014-01-01

    Biologically significant conclusions have been based on the use of fluorogenic and luminogenic probes for the detection of reactive species. The basic mechanisms of the processes involved have not been satisfactorily elucidated. In the present work, the mechanism of the enzyme and photosensitized oxidation of NAD(P)H by resorufin is analyzed and appears to involve both aerobic and anaerobic free radical chain reactions. There are two major fallouts of this analysis. Many of the conclusions about the participation of radicals based on the use of probes such as resorufin and Amplex red need reevaluation. It is also concluded that anaerobic free radical reactions may be biologically significant, and the possible existence of enzymatic systems to eliminate certain free radicals is discussed.

  19. A shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B.

    1993-12-01

    To extend the semi-empirical techniques of Benson and coworkers, and to extend the database of reliable high temperature measurements of OH radicals with hydrocarbons and other fuels and their decomposition products, the authors undertook a research program with both experimental and computational tasks. The experimental goal was to design a procedure for measuring, at combustion temperatures, the reaction rate coefficients of OH radicals with fuels and other species of importance in combustion or propulsion systems. The computational effort was intended to refine the semi-empirical transition-state-theory procedures for extrapolating rate coefficients of reactions of OH with combustion species of interest, for predicting rate coefficients for species not studied in the laboratory, and to examine the ability of the theory to predict rate coefficients for different pathways in the case the reagent possessed more than one nonequivalent H atoms.

  20. KINETIC STUDIES OF THE REACTION OF HYDROXYL RADICALS WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND TETRACHLOROETHYLENE. (R826169)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate coefficients are reported for the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with C2HCl3 (k1) and C2Cl4 (k2) over an extended temperature range at 740±10 Torr in a He bath gas. These...

  1. Explaining the atypical reaction profiles of heme enzymes with a novel mechanistic hypothesis and kinetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Baburaj, Arun; Ephraim, Binoy; Pappachan, Febin; Maviliparambathu, Pravitha Parapurathu; Vijayan, Umesh K; Narayanan, Sivaprasad Valiyaveettil; Periasamy, Kalaiselvi; George, Ebi Ashley; Mathew, Lazar T

    2010-01-01

    Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP), uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation) of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model) was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the "steady state kinetics" of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates) is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s) affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of "the product of interest" in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of "substrate concentration at maximum observed rate". The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes. PMID:20498847

  2. Explaining the Atypical Reaction Profiles of Heme Enzymes with a Novel Mechanistic Hypothesis and Kinetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Baburaj, Arun; Ephraim, Binoy; Pappachan, Febin; Maviliparambathu, Pravitha Parapurathu; Vijayan, Umesh K.; Narayanan, Sivaprasad Valiyaveettil; Periasamy, Kalaiselvi; George, Ebi Ashley; Mathew, Lazar T.

    2010-01-01

    Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP), uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation) of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model) was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the “steady state kinetics” of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates) is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s) affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of “the product of interest” in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of “substrate concentration at maximum observed rate”. The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes. PMID:20498847

  3. Mechanism and stereoselectivity of biologically important oxygenation reactions of the 7-dehydrocholesterol radical.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2013-07-19

    The mechanism of free radical oxygenation of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), one of the biologically important sterols, is investigated by using density functional theory. The energetic origin of the product distribution and the stereoelectronic factors involved in various mechanistic pathways are delineated. The addition of triplet molecular oxygen to two types of conjugatively stabilized radicals, generated by the removal of the reactive allylic hydrogens from C9 or C14 positions, respectively denoted as H9 and H14 pathways, is studied. The distortion-interaction analysis of the C-O bond formation transition states suggests that the energetic preference toward the α prochiral face stems from reduced skeletal distortions of the cholesterol backbone as compared to that in the corresponding β prochiral face. This insight derived through a detailed quantitative analysis of the stereocontrolling transition states suggests that the commonly found interpretations solely based on steric interactions between the incoming oxygen and the protruding angular methyl groups (C10, C13 methyls) in the β face calls for adequate refinement. The relative energies of the transition states for molecular oxygen addition to C9, C5, and C14 (where spin densities are higher) and the ensuing products thereof are in agreement with the experimentally reported distribution of oxygenated 7-DHCs.

  4. Vitamin E analogue Trolox C. E.s.r. and pulse-radiolysis studies of free-radical reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M J; Forni, L G; Willson, R L

    1988-01-01

    The reactions between Trolox C, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, and several oxidizing free radicals including the hydroxyl radical and various peroxy radicals were examined by using the pulse-radiolysis technique. The results demonstrate that Trolox C may undergo rapid one-electron-transfer reactions as well as hydrogen-transfer processes; the resulting phenoxyl radical is shown to be relatively stable, in common with the phenoxyl radical derived from vitamin E. The reactions between the Trolox C phenoxyl radical and a variety of biologically relevant reducing compounds were examined by using both pulse radiolysis and e.s.r. The results demonstrate that the Trolox C phenoxyl radical is readily repaired by ascorbate (k = 8.3 x 10(6) dm3.mol-1.s-1) and certain thiols (k less than 10(5) dm3.mol-1.s-1) but not by urate, NADH or propyl gallate. Evidence from e.s.r. studies indicates that thiol-containing compounds may also enter into similar repair reactions with the alpha-tocopherol phenoxyl radical. Kinetic evidence is presented that suggests that Trolox C may 'repair' proteins that have been oxidized by free radicals. PMID:2849418

  5. Mechanistic features of the copper-free Sonogashira reaction from ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Zohrab; Yunker, Lars P E; Oliver, Allen G; McIndoe, J Scott

    2015-12-21

    The mechanism of the Sonogashira reaction in methanol was studied in detail using pressurized sample infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PSI-ESI-MS). Several key intermediates were identified and their structures were assigned by MS/MS studies. Cationic and anionic charged-tagged substrates were employed to look into the mechanism of this reaction from variety of angles. A reverse kinetic isotope effect was observed in which the reaction rate is accelerated in deuterated solvents (kH/kD = 0.6). The reaction was found to be zero order with respect to the aryl iodide and first order with respect to the phenylacetylene. A Hammett parameter of ρ = 1.4 indicates that the reaction is more favorable for aryl iodides with para EWGs. No evidence of product inhibition, dimerization of palladium catalyst, or agglomeration were observed. However, catalyst decomposition was inferred from a non-zero intercept in the plot of catalyst loading versus reaction rate. Monitoring the reaction by PSI-ESI-(-)MS on neutral and negatively charged substrates at variety of concentrations and conditions did not reveal any detectable anionic palladium complexes. Likewise no evidence of carbopalladation and relevant intermediates in the absence of a base was observed.

  6. Mechanistic features of the copper-free Sonogashira reaction from ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Zohrab; Yunker, Lars P E; Oliver, Allen G; McIndoe, J Scott

    2015-12-21

    The mechanism of the Sonogashira reaction in methanol was studied in detail using pressurized sample infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PSI-ESI-MS). Several key intermediates were identified and their structures were assigned by MS/MS studies. Cationic and anionic charged-tagged substrates were employed to look into the mechanism of this reaction from variety of angles. A reverse kinetic isotope effect was observed in which the reaction rate is accelerated in deuterated solvents (kH/kD = 0.6). The reaction was found to be zero order with respect to the aryl iodide and first order with respect to the phenylacetylene. A Hammett parameter of ρ = 1.4 indicates that the reaction is more favorable for aryl iodides with para EWGs. No evidence of product inhibition, dimerization of palladium catalyst, or agglomeration were observed. However, catalyst decomposition was inferred from a non-zero intercept in the plot of catalyst loading versus reaction rate. Monitoring the reaction by PSI-ESI-(-)MS on neutral and negatively charged substrates at variety of concentrations and conditions did not reveal any detectable anionic palladium complexes. Likewise no evidence of carbopalladation and relevant intermediates in the absence of a base was observed. PMID:26469767

  7. Methylidyne radical reactions with hydrocarbons: kinetics at low temperature and product branching ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeat, Astrid; Caubert, Philippe; Costes, Michel; Daugey, Nicolas; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    CH radical reactions with hydrocarbons could play a role in the atmospheres of Titan, Pluto or Triton as well as in interstellar clouds (ISCs), where the hydrocarbon compounds were detected and the temperatures are very low, i.e. ~ 95 K down to ~ 38 K at the surface of these satellites and planet and from 50 K down to 10 K in ISCs. In fact, in modelling the processes occurring in these low-temperature environments, researchers generally still have to extrapolate the high-temperature kinetic data mainly obtained in the temperature range above 300 K. However, for many neutral-neutral reactions studied, the rate constants exhibit essentially non-Arrhenius behaviour at low temperatures. The temperature dependences of the methylidyne radical reactions with methane, allene, methylacetylene and propene were studied in our new supersonic flow reactor coupled with pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques. Three Laval nozzles were designed to provide uniform supersonic expansions down to 77 K. The rate constants for the CH + CH4 reaction are in good agreement with the temperature dependence proposed by A. Canosa et al., i.e. 3.96 × 10-8 ×(T/K)-1.04 exp(-36.1K/T) in the range 23-298 K. The rate constants of the CH + C3H4 (allene), CH + C3H4 (methylacetylene) and CH + C3H6 (propene) reactions exhibit a small temperature dependence between 77 and 170 K, are close to the gas kinetic limit and could thus contribute to the chemistry in the dense molecular clouds or outer planets atmospheres (Titan, Pluto and Triton for example) rich in hydrocarbons. The reactions of CH radical with several saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons were studied, at room temperature, in a low-pressure fast-flow reactor. The absolute atomic hydrogen productions were determined at 300 K by V.U.V. resonance fluorescence, the reference used being the H production from the CH + CH4 and H2S reactions. Ab initio studies of the different stationary points relevant to some

  8. A temperature dependent kinetic study of the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with CH2Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Saini, Rameshwar D.; Kurylo, Michael; Huie, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Rate constants have been measured for the gas phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with CH3Br over the temperature range 250 to 400 K. The Arrhenius expression k = (5.79 x 10 exp -12) exp(-1560/T) cu cm/molecule per sec was derived from the kinetic data. From the rate constant at 277 K, the tropospheric lifetime of CH3Br with respect to reaction with OH is estimated to be 2.2 years and the overall atmospheric lifetime to be 2.1 years.

  9. Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Cycloalkenes: Formation of Highly Oxidized RO2 Radicals and Their Reactions with NO, NO2, SO2, and Other RO2 Radicals.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Torsten; Richters, Stefanie; Kaethner, Ralf; Voigtländer, Jens; Stratmann, Frank; Sipilä, Mikko; Kulmala, Markku; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-10-15

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with C5-C8 cycloalkenes has been investigated in a free-jet flow system at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 297 ± 1 K. Highly oxidized RO2 radicals bearing at least 5 O atoms in the molecule and their subsequent reaction products were detected in most cases by means of nitrate-CI-APi-TOF mass spectrometry. Starting from a Criegee intermediate after splitting-off an OH-radical, the formation of these RO2 radicals can be explained via an autoxidation mechanism, meaning RO2 isomerization (ROO → QOOH) and subsequently O2 addition (QOOH + O2 → R'OO). Time-dependent RO2 radical measurements concerning the ozonolysis of cyclohexene indicate rate coefficients of the intramolecular H-shifts, ROO → QOOH, higher than 1 s(-1). The total molar yield of highly oxidized products (predominantly RO2 radicals) from C5-C8 cycloalkenes in air is 4.8-6.0% affected with a calibration uncertainty by a factor of about two. For the most abundant RO2 radical from cyclohexene ozonolysis, O,O-C6H7(OOH)2O2 ("O,O" stands for two O atoms arising from the ozone attack), the determination of the rate coefficients of the reaction with NO2, NO, and SO2 yielded (1.6 ± 0.5) × 10(-12), (3.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-11), and <10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The reaction of highly oxidized RO2 radicals with other peroxy radicals (R'O2) leads to detectable accretion products, RO2 + R'O2 → ROOR' + O2, which allows to acquire information on peroxy radicals not directly measurable with the nitrate ionization technique applied here. Additional experiments using acetate as the charger ion confirm conclusively the existence of highly oxidized RO2 radicals and closed-shell products. Other reaction products, detectable with this ionization technique, give a deeper insight in the reaction mechanism of cyclohexene ozonolysis. PMID:26392132

  10. Mechanistic Insights into Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Tryptophan from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations and QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Moore, Jamie M; Wang, John; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-05-12

    An assessment of the mechanisms of (•)OH and (•)OOH radical-mediated oxidation of tryptophan was performed using density functional theory calculations and ab initio plane-wave Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored site with a barrierless reaction in the gas phase. The subsequent degradation of this adduct through a H atom transfer to water was intermittently observed in aqueous-phase molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OOH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored pathway, in contrast to the situation in the model system ethylene, where concerted addition to the double bond is preferred. From the (•)OOH position 2 adduct QM/MM simulations show that formation of oxy-3-indolanaline occurs readily in an aqueous environment. The observed transformation starts from an initial rupture of the O-O bond followed by a H atom transfer with the accompanying loss of an (•)OH radical to solution. Finally, classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to equate observed differential oxidation rates of various tryptophan residues in monoclonal antibody fragments. It was found that simple parameters derived from simulation correlate well with the experimental data. PMID:27082439

  11. Mechanistic and kinetic study on the reactions of coumaric acids with reactive oxygen species: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Andrés; Bravo, Iván; Barbero, Antonio J; Albaladejo, José

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of reactions between coumaric acids and a series of reactive oxygen species ((•)OX) was studied through the density functional theory (DFT). H atom abstraction from -OH and -COOH groups and addition to the nonaromatic double bond were the most representative reaction pathways chosen for which free energy barriers and rate constants were calculated within the transition state theory (TST) framework. From these calculations, it was estimated that (•)OH > (•)OCH3 > (•)OOH > (•)OOCH3 is the order of reactivity of (•)OX with any coumaric acid. The highest rate constant was estimated for p-coumaric acid + (•)OH reaction, whereas the rest of the (•)OX species are more reactive with o-coumaric acid. On the basis of the calculated rate constants, H abstraction from a -OH group should be the main mechanism for the reactions involving (•)OCH3, (•)OOH, and (•)OOCH3 radicals. Nevertheless, the addition mechanism, which sometimes is not considered in theoretical studies on reactions of phenolic compounds with electrophilic species, could play a relevant role in the global mechanism of coumaric acid + (•)OH reactions.

  12. Synchronous vs asynchronous diffusion-reaction processes involving geminate radical pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urie, Kristopher G.; Kozak, John J.; Abad, E.

    2010-10-01

    We report lattice Monte Carlo calculations to study the efficiency of diffusion-controlled reactive processes involving geminate radical pairs. Whereas our earlier study [J.J. Kozak, C. Nicolis, G. Nicolis, N.J. Turro, J. Phys. Chem. 105 (2001) 10949] focused on factors affecting the reaction efficiency when a pair of coreactants moved synchronously on a surface modeled as a d=2 dimensional square planar lattice subject to periodic boundary conditions, we document here differences in reaction efficiency when a pair of coreactants can move synchronously or asynchronously on surfaces which are topologically different but characterized by the same number N of sites. As before, the first surface is taken to be a d=2 square planar lattice; the second surface considered is a Cartesian shell, the bounded surface of a cube. When studied as a function of system size, we find that synchronous dynamics are more efficient than asynchronous dynamics in optimizing diffusion-reaction processes; and, reactions on planar, periodic surfaces are more efficient than on cubic shells. The relevance of these conclusions to experimental studies on two radiation-induced, radical decay reactions [the one cited above and A.J. Frank, M. Grätzel, J.J. Kozak, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 98 (1976) 3317] is noted and discussed.

  13. Rate constant calculations of H-atom abstraction reactions from ethers by HȮ2 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2014-02-27

    In this work, we detail hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from six ethers by the hydroperoxyl radical, including dimethyl ether, ethyl methyl ether, propyl methyl ether, isopropyl methyl ether, butyl methyl ether, and isobutyl methyl ether, in order to test the effect of the functional group on the rate constant calculations. The Møller-Plesset (MP2) method with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set has been employed in the geometry optimizations and frequency calculations of all of the species involved in the above reaction systems. The connections between each transition state and the corresponding local minima have been determined by intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Energies are reported at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory and include the zero-point energy corrections. As a benchmark in the electronic energy calculations, the CCSD(T)/CBS extrapolation was used for the reactions of dimethyl ether + HȮ2 radicals. A systematic calculation of the high-pressure limit rate constants has been performed using conventional transition-state theory, including asymmetric Eckart tunneling corrections, in the temperature range of 500-2000 K. The one dimensional hindrance potentials obtained at MP2/6-311G(d,p) for the reactants and transition states have been used to describe the low frequency torsional modes. Herein, we report the calculated individual, average, and total rate constants. A branching ratio analysis for every reaction site has also been performed. PMID:24483837

  14. [Reflections about allergic and crossed reactions to sulphonamides and drugs with radical-sulphonamide].

    PubMed

    Montes Montes, José; Alfonso Barrón, Enrique; Cruz Leyva, Jazmín del Alva; Flores Flores, José

    2004-01-01

    In the daily pharmacological therapy, some compounds may cause eventually allergic hypersensitivity reactions generating adverse effects. The objective of this study and its reflections has been to recommend caution, being prudent when expressing an opinion on risks and benefits of drugs themselves or some of their radicals that may contain because this attitude might produce a unsuitable concern. Drugs hypersensitivity (an unexpected pharmacological effect) may resemble a true allergic reaction but without the implication of IgE immunoglobulin. Such reactions are result of effector systems drug activation, leading to direct proallergic or proinflammatory chemical mediators release from mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. Sulphonamides are an illustrative example because they possess a chemical core resembling that from other kind of drugs -furosemide, some COXIB and others- besides its haptenic capability (even though they have different chemical structure). Selective COX 2 inhibitors are considered an accepted symptomatic therapy in rheumatic diseases as well as some other conditions where pain and inflammation are present; based on its generalized use in such conditions, authors decided to perform this investigation in the allergy clinics of Hospital General de México and Hospital Español de México, looking for cases of true allergic, crossed or hypersensitivity reactions related to one COXIB that includes a sulphamidic radical in its chemical structure. No clinical significance was found concerning the above mentioned reactions and the antiinflammatory-analgesic compound (celecoxib).

  15. Formation and reaction of hydroxycarbonyls from the reaction of OH radicals with 1,3-butadiene and isoprene.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jillian; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    2005-06-01

    1,3-Butadiene and isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) are emitted into the atmosphere in vehicle exhaust and, in the case of isoprene, from vegetation. We have investigated the formation and further reaction of products of their hydroxyl radical-initiated reactions using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (API-MS) and solid-phase microextraction fibers precoated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine for on-fiber derivatization of carbonyl compounds, with subsequent analysis by thermal desorption and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (SPME/GC-FID) or MS detection. Products attributed as HOCH2CH=CHCHO and HOCH2CH=CHCH2ONO2 (and isomers) from 1,3-butadiene; HOCD2CD=CDCDO and HOCD2CD=CDCD2ONO2 (and isomers) from 1,3-butadiene-d6; HOCH2C(CH3)=CHCHO and/or HOCH2CH=C(CH3)CHO, and HOCH2C(CH3)=CHCH2ONO2 (and isomers) from isoprene; and HOCD2C(CD3)=CDCDO and/or HOCD2CD=C(CD3)CDO, and HOCD2C(CD3)=CDCD2ONO2 (and isomers) from isoprene-d8 were observed as their NO2- adducts in the API-MS analyses. The hydroxycarbonyls were observed from SPME/GC-FID analyses of the 1,3-butadiene and isoprene reactions as their oximes, together with acrolein, glycolaldehyde, and glyoxal from the 1,3-butadiene reaction. A rate constant for the reaction of OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butenal of (5.7 +/- 1.4) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298 +/- 2 K was derived, and formation yields of acrolein and 4-hydroxy-2-butenal from the 1,3-butadiene reaction of 58 +/- 10% and 25 (+15/-10)%, respectively, were determined. Analogous experiments showed that the two C5-hydroxycarbonyls formed from isoprene have rate constants for their reactions with OH radicals of (1.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) and (4 +/- 2) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) and a combined yield of approximately 15%, although isomer-specific identification of the hydroxycarbonyls was not achieved.

  16. UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lewei; Huang, Hongli; Yang, Chao; Xia, Wujiong

    2015-02-20

    UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through an aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift has been described. The resulted aroyl radical from a photocleavage reaction added to acrylamide compounds followed by cyclization led to the formation of oxindoles, whereas the addition to cinnamic amides aroused a unique 1,4-aryl shift reaction. Furthermore, the difunctionalization of alkenes of prop-2-en-1-ols was also achieved through aroyl radical addition and a sequential 1,2-aryl shift cascade reaction.

  17. A DFT Study Toward the Reaction Mechanisms of TNT With Hydroxyl Radicals for Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Zeng, Qun; Zhou, Yang; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wei, Xianfeng; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2016-05-26

    The degradation pathway of environmental contaminant 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was investigated computationally at the SMD(Pauling)/M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The dominant decomposition pathway of TNT → 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol → 4,6-dinitro-2-hydroxybenzylalcohol → 4,6-dinitro-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde was provided, and the corresponding predicted products and their distributions are in a good agreement with available experimental data on TNT degradation by Fenton reaction. It was shown that the mechanism of addition-elimination is crucial for this stage of the reaction. The reaction of H atom abstraction is a minor competing pathway. The details on transition states, intermediate radicals, and free energy surfaces for all proposed reactions are given and make up for a lack of experimental knowledge. PMID:27135259

  18. Mechanistic analysis of the hydrogen evolution and absorption reactions on iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Elhamid, Mahmoud Hassan

    2000-10-01

    The work in this thesis investigates the effect of additives on the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and hydrogen absorption reaction (HAR) on iron. The electrochemical hydrogen permeation cell has been used to collect data on both reactions in the absence and presence of the additives. The effect of two additives on the kinetics of both the HER and HAR on iron in acidic solutions was quantified. These two compounds have different behaviors towards both reactions. While benzotriazole (BTA) inhibits both reactions, iodide enhances hydrogen absorption while inhibiting the HER. Analysis of the results using the IPZ (Iyer, Pickering, Zamanzadeh) model shows that both compounds inhibit the HER by decreasing its discharge rate constant and hence the exchange current density. On the other hand, while BTA decreases the rate of hydrogen absorption by decreasing both the hydrogen surface coverage and the kinetic-diffusion constant, k (see chapter 5), iodide ions decrease the rate of hydrogen absorption by increasing the kinetic-diffusion constant, k, while decreasing the hydrogen surface coverage (see chapter 6). A separate study was devoted to investigate the effect of thiosulfate on the kinetics of the HER and HAR on iron (chapter 7). It was shown that thiosulfate enhances both reactions in acidic solutions. The promoting effect was mainly due to its decomposition product H2SO3 with a small contribution from the colloidal sulfur and/or the undecomposed thiosulfate. In chapter 8 it was shown that the polarization data of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) can be analyzed to calculate the hydrogen surface coverage and the rate constants of the hydrogen discharge and recombination reactions for metals which have very low permeabilities of hydrogen, and on which the HER proceeds through a coupled Volmer discharge-Tafel recombination mechanism. The analysis is applied to the results of the HER on copper and iron and the rate constants obtained using the

  19. Reactions of o-benzyne with propargyl and benzyl radicals: potential sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in combustion.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Miyoshi, Akira

    2012-07-21

    The kinetics and mechanisms of the reactions of o-benzyne with propargyl and benzyl radicals have been investigated computationally. The possible reaction pathways have been explored by quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level and the mechanisms have been investigated by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory/master-equation calculations. It was found that the o-benzyne associates with the propargyl and benzyl radicals without pronounced barriers and the activated adducts easily isomerize to five-membered ring species. Indenyl radical and fluorene + H were predicted to be dominantly produced by the reactions of o-benzyne with propargyl and benzyl radicals, respectively, with the rate constants close to the high-pressure limits at temperatures below 2000 K. The related reactions on the two potential energy surfaces, namely, the reaction between fulvenallenyl radical and acetylene and the decomposition reactions of indenyl and α-phenylbenzyl radicals were also investigated. The high reactivity of o-benzyne toward the resonance stabilized radicals suggested a potential role of o-benzyne as a precursor of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in combustion.

  20. Hydroxyl Radical Generation and DNA Nuclease Activity: A Mechanistic Study Based on a Surface-Immobilized Copper Thioether Clip-Phen Derivative.

    PubMed

    Romo, Adolfo I B; Abreu, Dieric S; de F Paulo, Tércio; Carepo, Marta S P; Sousa, Eduardo H S; Lemus, Luis; Aliaga, Carolina; Batista, Alzir A; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Abruña, Héctor D; Diógenes, Izaura C N

    2016-07-11

    Coordination compounds of copper have been invoked as major actors in processes involving the reduction of molecular oxygen, mostly with the generation of radical species the assignment for which has, so far, not been fully addressed. In the present work, we have carried out studies in solution and on surfaces to gain insights into the nature of the radical oxygen species (ROS) generated by a copper(II) coordination compound containing a thioether clip-phen derivative, 1,3-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-2-yloxy)-N-(4-(methylthio)benzylidene)propan-2-amine (2CP-Bz-SMe), enabling its adsorption/immobilization to gold surfaces. Whereas surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and electrochemistry of the adsorbed complex indicated the formation of a dimeric Cu(I) intermediate containing molecular oxygen as a bridging ligand, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and nuclease assays pointed to the generation of a ROS species. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reinforced such conclusions, indicating that radical production was dependent on the amount of oxygen and H2 O2 , thus pointing to a mechanism involving a Fenton-like reaction that results in the production of OH(.) .

  1. Hydroxyl Radical Generation and DNA Nuclease Activity: A Mechanistic Study Based on a Surface-Immobilized Copper Thioether Clip-Phen Derivative.

    PubMed

    Romo, Adolfo I B; Abreu, Dieric S; de F Paulo, Tércio; Carepo, Marta S P; Sousa, Eduardo H S; Lemus, Luis; Aliaga, Carolina; Batista, Alzir A; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Abruña, Héctor D; Diógenes, Izaura C N

    2016-07-11

    Coordination compounds of copper have been invoked as major actors in processes involving the reduction of molecular oxygen, mostly with the generation of radical species the assignment for which has, so far, not been fully addressed. In the present work, we have carried out studies in solution and on surfaces to gain insights into the nature of the radical oxygen species (ROS) generated by a copper(II) coordination compound containing a thioether clip-phen derivative, 1,3-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-2-yloxy)-N-(4-(methylthio)benzylidene)propan-2-amine (2CP-Bz-SMe), enabling its adsorption/immobilization to gold surfaces. Whereas surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and electrochemistry of the adsorbed complex indicated the formation of a dimeric Cu(I) intermediate containing molecular oxygen as a bridging ligand, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and nuclease assays pointed to the generation of a ROS species. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reinforced such conclusions, indicating that radical production was dependent on the amount of oxygen and H2 O2 , thus pointing to a mechanism involving a Fenton-like reaction that results in the production of OH(.) . PMID:27310653

  2. Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the formation and reactions of early-transition-metal-ketene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, J.M.; Bruno, J.W.; Hazin, P.N.; Folting, K.; Huffman, J.C.

    1988-05-01

    A series of complexes of vanadocene or molybdenocene with unsymmetrical ketenes were prepared, either by reaction of the various ketenes with vanadocene itself or by reaction with the molybdenocene phosphine complex (C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mo(PEt/sub 3/). All of the complexes exhibited the expected ketene C=O bonding mode, and all reactions were very specific in their formation of the facial isomer with metallocene fragment located on the side of the smaller ketene substituent. Kinetic studies were used to assess the sensitivity of the incoming vanadocene to steric and electronic effects, with the latter found to dominate. Kinetic studies and activation parameters for reaction of Cp/sub 2/Mo(PEt/sub 3/) with EtPhC=C=O indicated a second-order associative mechanism, proposed to involve a nucleophilic attack of the metal center on the ketene central carbon in the rate-limiting step. Lastly, reactions of the bound ketenes with nucleophiles (alkyllithiums or Grignard reagents) proceeded readily to either ketone or aldehyde enolates (the latter via transfer of a ..beta..-hydride from the alkyl); the clean production of only Z enolates from the unsymmetrical ketenes is indicate of a metal-mediated internal attack of nucleophile on the bound ketene.

  3. One-pot synthesis of (-)-oseltamivir and mechanistic insights into the organocatalyzed Michael reaction.

    PubMed

    Mukaiyama, Takasuke; Ishikawa, Hayato; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2013-12-23

    The one-pot sequential synthesis of (-)-oseltamivir has been achieved without evaporation or solvent exchange in 36% yield over seven reactions. The key step was the asymmetric Michael reaction of pentan-3-yloxyacetaldehyde with (Z)-N-2-nitroethenylacetamide, catalyzed by a diphenylprolinol silyl ether. The use of a bulky O-silyl-substituted diphenylprolinol catalyst, chlorobenzene as a solvent, and HCO2 H as an acid additive, were key to produce the first Michael adduct in both excellent yield and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. Investigation into the effect of acid demonstrated that an acid additive accelerates not only the E-Z isomerization of the enamines derived from pentan-3-yloxyacetaldehyde with diphenylprolinol silyl ether, but also ring opening of the cyclobutane intermediate and the addition reaction of the enamine to (Z)-N-2-nitroethenylacetamide. The transition-state model for the Michael reaction of pentan-3-yloxyacetaldehyde with (Z)-N-2-nitroethenylacetamide was proposed by consideration of the absolute configuration of the major and minor isomers of the Michael product with the results of the Michael reaction of pentan-3-yloxyacetaldehyde with phenylmaleimide and naphthoquinone.

  4. Enantioselective Visible-Light-Induced Radical-Addition Reactions to 3-Alkylidene Indolin-2-ones.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Dominik; Bauer, Andreas; Pöthig, Alexander; Bach, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    The title compounds underwent a facile and high-yielding addition reaction (19 examples, 66-99% yield) with various N-(trimethylsilyl)methyl-substituted amines upon irradiation with visible light and catalysis by a metal complex. If the alkylidene substituent is non-symmetric and if the reaction is performed in the presence of a chiral hydrogen-bonding template, products are obtained with significant enantioselectivity (58-72% ee) as a mixture of diastereoisomers. Mechanistic studies suggest a closed catalytic cycle for the photoactive metal complex. However, the silyl transfer from the amine occurs not only to the product, but also to the substrate, and interferes with the desired chirality transfer.

  5. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Alkylation Reactions: Catalyst Development, Substrate Scope, and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Behenna, Douglas C.; Mohr, Justin T.; Sherden, Nathaniel H.; Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Harned, Andrew M.; Tani, Kousuke; Seto, Masaki; Ma, Sandy; Novák, Zoltán; Krout, Michael R.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Roizen, Jennifer L.; Enquist, John A.; White, David E.; Levine, Samantha R.; Petrova, Krastina V.; Iwashita, Akihiko; Virgil, Scott C.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Quaternary ketones are accessed through novel enantioselective alkylations of allyl and propargyl electrophiles by unstabilized prochiral enolate nucleophiles in the presence of palladium complexes with various phosphinooxazoline (PHOX) ligands. Excellent yields and high enantiomeric excesses are obtained from three classes of enolate precursors: enol carbonates, enol silanes, and racemic β-ketoesters. Each of these substrate classes functions with nearly identical efficiency in terms of yield and enantioselectivity. Catalyst discovery and development, the optimization of reaction conditions, the exploration of reaction scope, and applications in target-directed synthesis are reported. Experimental observations suggest that these alkylation reactions occur through an unusual inner-sphere mechanism involving binding of the prochiral enolate nucleophile directly to the palladium center. PMID:22083969

  6. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of a similar magnitude, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity-dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  7. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters, and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied with experimental methods. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of similar magnitudes, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  8. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect. PMID:23990024

  9. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect.

  10. Elusive Reaction Intermediates in Solution Explored by ESI-MS: Reverse Periscope for Mechanistic Investigations.

    PubMed

    Iacobucci, Claudio; Reale, Samantha; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-02-24

    Just as periscopes allow a submarine to visually search for objects above the surface of the sea, in a reversed periscope fashion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) can analyze the compounds at the gas phase/liquid phase interface for chemical entities which may exist in solution. The challenge is the identification and structural characterization of key elusive reaction intermediates in chemical transformations, intermediates which are able to explain how chemical processes occur. This Minireview summarizes recent selected publications on the use of ESI-MS techniques for studying solution intermediates of homogeneous chemical reactions. PMID:26799781

  11. Nickel-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation with Diarylmethane Pronucleophiles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sheng-Chun; Jiang, Hui; Mao, Jianyou; Bellomo, Ana; Jeong, Soo A; Walsh, Patrick J

    2016-01-18

    Palladium-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions are among the most efficient methods to construct C-C bonds between sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms. In contrast, much less work has been done with nickel catalysts, perhaps because of the different mechanisms of the allylic substitution reactions. Palladium catalysts generally undergo substitution by a "soft"-nucleophile pathway, wherein the nucleophile attacks the allyl group externally. Nickel catalysts are usually paired with "hard" nucleophiles, which attack the metal before C-C bond formation. Introduced herein is a rare nickel-based catalyst which promotes substitution with diarylmethane pronucleophiles by the soft-nucleophile pathway. Preliminary studies on the asymmetric allylic alkylation are promising.

  12. Empirical Force Fields for Mechanistic Studies of Chemical Reactions in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, A K; Meuwly, M

    2016-01-01

    Following chemical reactions in atomistic detail is one of the most challenging aspects of current computational approaches to chemistry. In this chapter the application of adiabatic reactive MD (ARMD) and its multistate version (MS-ARMD) are discussed. Both methods allow to study bond-breaking and bond-forming processes in chemical and biological processes. Particular emphasis is put on practical aspects for applying the methods to investigate the dynamics of chemical reactions. The chapter closes with an outlook of possible generalizations of the methods discussed.

  13. Empirical Force Fields for Mechanistic Studies of Chemical Reactions in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, A K; Meuwly, M

    2016-01-01

    Following chemical reactions in atomistic detail is one of the most challenging aspects of current computational approaches to chemistry. In this chapter the application of adiabatic reactive MD (ARMD) and its multistate version (MS-ARMD) are discussed. Both methods allow to study bond-breaking and bond-forming processes in chemical and biological processes. Particular emphasis is put on practical aspects for applying the methods to investigate the dynamics of chemical reactions. The chapter closes with an outlook of possible generalizations of the methods discussed. PMID:27498633

  14. Elusive Reaction Intermediates in Solution Explored by ESI-MS: Reverse Periscope for Mechanistic Investigations.

    PubMed

    Iacobucci, Claudio; Reale, Samantha; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-02-24

    Just as periscopes allow a submarine to visually search for objects above the surface of the sea, in a reversed periscope fashion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) can analyze the compounds at the gas phase/liquid phase interface for chemical entities which may exist in solution. The challenge is the identification and structural characterization of key elusive reaction intermediates in chemical transformations, intermediates which are able to explain how chemical processes occur. This Minireview summarizes recent selected publications on the use of ESI-MS techniques for studying solution intermediates of homogeneous chemical reactions.

  15. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespade, Laure

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car-Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  17. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  18. Gas-Phase Reaction of Hydroxyl Radical with p-Cymene over an Extended Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Bedjanian, Yuri; Morin, Julien; Romanias, Manolis N

    2015-11-12

    The kinetics of the reaction of OH radicals with p-cymene has been studied in the temperature range of 243-898 K using a flow reactor combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + p-cymene → products. The reaction rate constant was determined as a result of absolute measurements, from OH decay kinetics in excess of p-cymene and employing the relative rate method with OH reactions with n-pentane, n-heptane,1,3-dioxane, HBr, and Br2 as the reference ones. For the rate coefficient of the H atom abstraction channel, the expression k1b = (3.70 ± 0.42) × 10(-11) exp[-(772 ± 72)/T] was obtained over the temperature range of 381-898 K. The total rate constant (addition + abstraction) determined at T = 243-320 K was k1 = (1.82 ± 0.48) × 10(-12) exp[(607 ± 70)/T] or, in a biexponential form, k1 = k1a + k1b = 3.7 × 10(-11) exp(-772/T) + 6.3 × 10(-13) exp(856/T), independent of the pressure between 1 and 5 Torr of helium. In addition, our results indicate that the reaction pathway involving alkyl radical elimination upon initial addition of OH to p-cymene is most probably unimportant. PMID:26473634

  19. Gas-phase reactions of organic radicals and diradicals with ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Kato, Shuji

    2004-02-01

    Reactions of polyatomic organic radicals with gas phase ions have been studied at thermal energy using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument. A supersonic pyrolysis nozzle produces allyl radical (CH2CHCH2) and ortho-benzyne diradical (o-C6H4) for reaction with ions. We have observed: [CH2CHCH2+H3O+→C3H6++H2O], [CH2CHCH2+HO-→no ion products], [o-C6H4+H3O+→C6H5++H2O], and [o-C6H4+HO-→C6H3-+H2O]. The proton transfer reactions with H3O+ occur at nearly every collision (kII≅10-9 cm3s-1). The exothermic proton abstraction for o-C6H4+HO- is unexpectedly slow (kII≅10-10 cm3s-1). This has been rationalized by competing associative detachment: o-C6H4+HO-→C6H5O+e-. The allyl+HO- reaction proceeds presumably via similar detachment pathways.

  20. Low-temperature rate coefficients for the reaction of ethynyl radical (C2H) with benzene.

    PubMed

    Goulay, Fabien; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-02-01

    The reaction of the C2H radical with benzene is studied at low temperature using a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. The C2H radical is prepared by 193-nm photolysis of acetylene, and the C2H concentration is monitored using CH(A2Delta) chemiluminescence from the C2H + O2 reaction. Measurements at very low photolysis energy are performed using CF3C2H as the C2H precursor to study the influence of benzene photodissociation on the rate coefficient. Rate coefficients are obtained over a temperature range between 105 and 298 K. The average rate coefficient is found to be five times greater than the estimated value presently used in the photochemical modeling of Titan's atmosphere. The reaction exhibits a slight negative temperature dependence which can be fitted to the expression k(cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) = 3.28(+/-1.0) x 10(-10) (T/298)(-0.18(+/-0.18)). The results show that this reaction has no barrier and may play an important role in the formation of large molecules and aerosols at low temperature. Our results are consistent with the formation of a short lifetime intermediate that decomposes to give the final products.

  1. Gas-Phase Reaction of Hydroxyl Radical with p-Cymene over an Extended Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Bedjanian, Yuri; Morin, Julien; Romanias, Manolis N

    2015-11-12

    The kinetics of the reaction of OH radicals with p-cymene has been studied in the temperature range of 243-898 K using a flow reactor combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + p-cymene → products. The reaction rate constant was determined as a result of absolute measurements, from OH decay kinetics in excess of p-cymene and employing the relative rate method with OH reactions with n-pentane, n-heptane,1,3-dioxane, HBr, and Br2 as the reference ones. For the rate coefficient of the H atom abstraction channel, the expression k1b = (3.70 ± 0.42) × 10(-11) exp[-(772 ± 72)/T] was obtained over the temperature range of 381-898 K. The total rate constant (addition + abstraction) determined at T = 243-320 K was k1 = (1.82 ± 0.48) × 10(-12) exp[(607 ± 70)/T] or, in a biexponential form, k1 = k1a + k1b = 3.7 × 10(-11) exp(-772/T) + 6.3 × 10(-13) exp(856/T), independent of the pressure between 1 and 5 Torr of helium. In addition, our results indicate that the reaction pathway involving alkyl radical elimination upon initial addition of OH to p-cymene is most probably unimportant.

  2. Hydroxyl radical reactions with adenine: reactant complexes, transition states, and product complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qianyi; Gu, Jiande; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-10-18

    In order to address problems such as aging, cell death, and cancer, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind reactions causing DNA damage. One specific reaction implicated in DNA oxidative damage is hydroxyl free-radical attack on adenine (A) and other nucleic acid bases. The adenine reaction has been studied experimentally, but there are few theoretical results. In the present study, adenine dehydrogenation at various sites, and the potential-energy surfaces for these reactions, are investigated theoretically. Four reactant complexes [A···OH]* have been found, with binding energies relative to A+OH* of 32.8, 11.4, 10.7, and 10.1 kcal mol(-1). These four reactant complexes lead to six transition states, which in turn lie +4.3, -5.4, (-3.7 and +0.8), and (-2.3 and +0.8) kcal mol(-1) below A+OH*, respectively. Thus the lowest lying [A···OH]* complex faces the highest local barrier to formation of the product (A-H)*+H(2)O. Between the transition states and the products lie six product complexes. Adopting the same order as the reactant complexes, the product complexes [(A-H)···H(2)O]* lie at -10.9, -22.4, (-24.2 and -18.7), and (-20.5 and -17.5) kcal mol(-1), respectively, again relative to separated A+OH*. All six A+OH* → (A-H)*+H(2)O pathways are exothermic, by -0.3, -14.7, (-17.4 and -7.8), and (-13.7 and -7.8) kcal mol(-1), respectively. The transition state for dehydrogenation at N(6) lies at the lowest energy (-5.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to A+OH*), and thus reaction is likely to occur at this site. This theoretical prediction dovetails with the observed high reactivity of OH radicals with the NH(2) group of aromatic amines. However, the high barrier (37.1 kcal mol(-1)) for reaction at the C(8) site makes C(8) dehydrogenation unlikely. This last result is consistent with experimental observation of the imidazole ring opening upon OH radical addition to C(8). In addition, TD-DFT computed electronic transitions of the N(6) product around 420 nm

  3. INTERACTIONS OF LIGHT AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN THE AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT: KINETIC AND MECHANISTIC ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that reaches the surface of aquatic environments. Recent studies have demonstrated that these UV increases cause changes in photochemical reactions that affect the...

  4. Kinetic and mechanistic study of the atmospheric reaction of MBO331 with Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Diana; Rodríguez, Ana; Garzón, Andrés; Granadino-Roldán, José M.; Soto, Amparo; Aranda, Alfonso; Notario, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    The present work deals with the reaction of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (MBO331) with Cl atoms, which has been investigated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) at atmospheric pressure in N2 or air, using the relative rate technique. The rate constant reaction at 298 ± 1 K was found to be (5.01 ± 0.70) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, using cyclohexane, octane and 1-butene as a reference compounds. The temperature dependence for the reaction was studied within the 298-333 K range. Additionally, a product identification under atmospheric conditions has been performed for the first time by GC-MS, with 3-methyl-3-butenal, methacrolein and chloroacetone being observed as degradation products. A theoretical study on the reaction at the QCISD(T)/6-311G**//MP2/6-311G** level was also carried out to obtain more information on the mechanism. From the theoretical study it can be predicted that Cl addition to the double bond proceeds through lower energy barriers than H-abstraction pathways and therefore is energetically favoured. Finally, atmospheric implications of the results obtained are discussed.

  5. Kinetic and mechanistic study of reaction between sulfide and sulfite in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, T.; Jia, C.Q.

    1999-10-01

    The reaction between sulfide and sulfite in neutral to weak alkaline aqueous solutions was studied by following thiosulfate and sulfite concentrations using ion chromatography. The thiosulfate formation rate from the reaction 2HS{sup {minus}} + 4HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} {yields} 3S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} + 3H{sub 2}O at pH 8 to 9 was found to be d[S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}]/dt = k{sub A}[HS{sup {minus}}][HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]{sup 2}, where k{sub A} = 1.1 x 10{sup 12} exp({minus}48000/RT) M{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. A mechanism for this reaction has been proposed with disulfite (S{sub 2}O{sub 5}{sup 2{minus}}) and HSO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} intermediates. The measured rate of sulfite disappearance was higher than that calculated from the stoichiometry of the above reaction. This phenomenon is attributed to other reactions, that consume sulfite and form other sulfur compounds such as polythionates, polysulfides, and elemental sulfur. These reactions were treated as a single reaction, whose rate was found to be ({minus}d[HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]/dt){sub B} = k{sub B}[H{sup +}]{sup {minus}0.6}[HS{sup {minus}}]{sup 0.7}[HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]{sup 1.5}, where k{sub B} = 5 x 10{sup {minus}5} M{sup {minus}0.6} s{sup {minus}1} at 20 C. A kinetic model was established on the basis of the kinetic data obtained in this and a previous work. The experimental data at pH 7 agreed with the model prediction in a satisfactory manner. The biphasic behavior of thiosulfate is considered to be critical in developing a new sulfur-producing flue gas desulfurization (SP-FGD) process based on sulfur dioxide absorption using sodium sulfide solution.

  6. Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J.; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Vereecken, Luc; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-12-05

    The reactions of the methylidyne radical (CH) with ethylene, acetylene, allene, and methylacetylene are studied at room temperature using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and time-resolved mass spectrometry. The CH radicals are prepared by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr3 at 298 K and react with the selected hydrocarbon in a helium gas flow. Analysis of photoionization efficiency versus VUV photon wavelength permits isomer-specific detection of the reaction products and allows estimation of the reaction product branching ratios. The reactions proceed by either CH insertion or addition followed by H atom elimination from the intermediate adduct. In the CH + C2H4 reaction the C3H5 intermediate decays by H atom loss to yield 70(+-8)percent allene, 30(+-8)percent methylacetylene and less than 10percent cyclopropene, in agreement with previous RRKM results. In the CH + acetylene reaction, detection of mainly the cyclic C3H2 isomer is contrary to a previous RRKM calculation that predicted linear triplet propargylene to be 90percent of the total H-atom co-products. High-level CBS-APNO quantum calculations and RRKM calculation for the CH + C2H2 reaction presented in this manuscript predict a higher contribution of the cyclic C3H2 (27.0percent) versus triplet propargylene (63.5percent) than these earlier predictions. Extensive calculations on the C3H3 and C3H2D system combined with experimental isotope ratios for the CD + C2H2 reaction indicate that H-atom assisted isomerization in the present experiments is responsible for the discrepancy between the RRKM calculations and the experimental results. Cyclic isomers are also found to represent 30(+-6)percent of the detected products in the case of CH + methylacetylene, together with 33(+-6)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 37(+-6)percent vinylacetylene. The CH + allene reaction gives 23(+-5)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 77(+-5)percent vinylacetylene, whereas cyclic isomers are produced below the detection limit

  7. On the reaction of lupulones, hops β-acids, with 1-hydroxyethyl radical.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Natália E C; do Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2012-10-24

    Lupulones, hops β-acids, are one of the main constituents of the hops resin and have an important contribution to the overall bacteriostatic activity of hops during beer brewing. The use of lupulones as natural alternatives to antibiotics is increasing in the food industry and also in bioethanol production. However, lupulones are easy oxidizable and have been shown to be very reactive toward 1-hydroxyethyl radical with apparent bimolecular rate constants close to diffusion control k = 2.9 × 10(8) and 2.6 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1) at 25.0 ± 0.2 °C in ethanol-water solution (10% of ethanol (v/v)) as probed by EPR and ESI-IT-MS/MS spin-trapping competitive kinetics, respectively. The free energy change for an electron-transfer mechanism is ΔG° = 106 kJ/mol as calculated from the oxidation peak potential experimentally determined for lupulones (1.1 V vs NHE) by cyclic voltammetry and the reported reduction potential for 1-hydroxyethyl radical. The major reaction products identified by LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS and ultrahigh-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (orbitrap FT-MS) are hydroxylated lupulone derivatives and 1-hydroxyethyl radical adducts. The lack of pH dependence for the reaction rate constant, the calculated free energy change for electron transfer, and the main reaction products strongly suggest the prenyl side chains at the hops β-acids as the reaction centers rather than the β,β'-triketone moiety.

  8. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics of the iminovinylidene radical with NO: Ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Ming-Kai; Chung, Yi-Hua; Hung, Yu-Ming; Chen, Hui-Lung

    2014-05-28

    The nitric oxide (NO) is a notorious compound for polluting environment. Recent year, removing nitric oxide from the atmosphere becomes a focus of the investigation. In our work, we study the iminovinylidene (HNCC) radical reacted with NO molecule. The mechanism and kinetic for reaction of the HNCC radical with the NO molecule is investigated via considering the possible channels of the N and O atoms of NO attacking the N and C atoms of the HNCC based on the high level ab initio molecular orbital calculations in conjunction with variational TST and RRKM calculations. The species involved have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level and their single-point energies are refined by the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-PVQZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) method. The calculated potential energy surfaces indicated that energetically the most favorable channel for the HNCC + NO reaction was predicted to be the formation of HNC+CNO (P8) product via the addition reaction of the C atom of HNCC radical and the N atom of NO with the head to head orientation. To rationalize the scenario of the calculated results, we also employ the Fukui functions and HSAB theory to seek for a possible explanation. In addition, the reaction rate constants were calculated using VariFlex code, and the results show that the total rate coefficient, k{sub total}, at Ar pressure 760 Torr can be represented with an equation: k{sub total} = 6.433 × 10{sup −11} T {sup 0.100} exp(0.275 kcal mol{sup −1}/RT) at T = 298–3000 K, in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  9. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a "proof of principle" for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C.+PF.- radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical.

  10. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alan M; Manolopoulos, David E; Hore, P J

    2014-07-28

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a "proof of principle" for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C(·+)PF(·-) radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical. PMID:25084885

  11. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-07-28

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a “proof of principle” for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C{sup ·+}PF{sup ·−} radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical.

  12. Theoretical study on reaction mechanism of isocyanate radical NCO with ethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jing-Lin; Xie, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Shao-Wen; Ding, Yi-Hong; Tang, Ao-Qing

    The NCO + C2H4 reaction is simple and prototype for reaction of the NCO radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons, and it is considered to be important in fuel-rich combustion. In this article, we for the first time perform detailed theoretical investigations for its reaction mechanism based on Gaussian-3//B3LYP scheme covering various entrance and decomposition channels. The most favorable channel is firstly the NCO and C2H4 approach each other, forming a weakly-bound complex L1 OCN···C2H4, followed by the formation of isomer L2 OCNCH2CH2 via a small barrier of 1.3 kcal/mol. Transition states of any decomposable or isomeric channels for L2 in energy are much higher than reactants, which indicate that adduct L2 has stabilization effect in this NCO + C2H4 reaction. The direct H-abstraction channel leading to P1 HNCO + C2H3, might have an important contribution to the eventual products in high temperature. These results can well explain available kinetic experiment. Moreover, reaction mechanism for the title reaction is significantly different from the NCO + C2H2 reaction which proceeds on most favorably to generate the products HCN + HCCO and OCCHCN + H via a four-membered ring intermediate.

  13. CN radical reactions with hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen - Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, D. L.; Yu, T.; Lin, M. C.; Melius, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The method of laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence is used to obtain absolute rate constants for CN radical reactions with HCN and C2N2. The rate constants were found to be temperature-dependent in the range 300-740 K and pressure independent in the range 100-600 Torr. Rice-Remsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory for both reactions employing the transition state parameters obtained by the BAC-MP4 method are made. These calculations yielded reasonable results for the CN + HCN reaction, predicting both the temperature dependence and pressure independence. No pressure effect was observed in the pressure range 100-1000 Torr at temperatures below 900 K, confirming the experimental results.

  14. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of allyl chloride with hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunju; Chao, Kai; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Wanqiao; Shi, Haijie; Yao, Cen; Su, Zhongmin; Pan, Xiumei; Zhang, Jingping; Wang, Rongshun

    2014-02-28

    The reaction of allyl chloride with the hydroxyl radical has been investigated on a sound theoretical basis. This is the first time to gain a conclusive insight into the reaction mechanism and kinetics for important pathways in detail. The reaction mechanism confirms that OH addition to the C=C double bond forms the chemically activated adducts, IM1 (CH2CHOHCH2Cl) and IM2 (CH2OHCHCH2Cl) via low barriers, and direct H-abstraction paths may also occur. Variational transition state model and multichannel RRKM theory are employed to calculate the temperature-, pressure-dependent rate constants. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with the experimental data. At 100 Torr with He as bath gas, IM6 formed by collisional stabilization is the major products in the temperature range 200-600 K; the production of CH2CHCHCl via hydrogen abstractions becomes dominant at high temperatures (600-3000 K). PMID:24588171

  15. Mechanistic study of the deamination reaction of guanine: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Kabir M; Almatarneh, Mansour H; Shaw, Dawn M; Poirier, Raymond A

    2011-03-17

    The mechanism for the deamination of guanine with H(2)O, OH(-), H(2)O/OH(-) and for GuaH(+) with H(2)O has been investigated using ab initio calculations. Optimized geometries of the reactants, transition states, intermediates, and products were determined at RHF/6-31G(d), MP2/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31G(d), and B3LYP/6-31+G(d) levels of theory. Energies were also determined at G3MP2, G3MP2B3, G4MP2, and CBS-QB3 levels of theory. Intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) calculations were performed to characterize the transition states on the potential energy surface. Thermodynamic properties (ΔE, ΔH, and ΔG), activation energies, enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies of activation were also calculated for each reaction investigated. All pathways yield an initial tetrahedral intermediate and an intermediate in the last step that dissociates to products via a 1,3-proton shift. At the G3MP2 level of theory, deamination with OH(-) was found to have an activation energy barrier of 155 kJ mol(-1) compared to 187 kJ mol(-1) for the reaction with H(2)O and 243 kJ mol(-1) for GuaH(+) with H(2)O. The lowest overall activation energy, 144 kJ mol(-1) at the G3MP2 level, was obtained for the deamination of guanine with H(2)O/OH(-). Due to a lack of experimental results for guanine deamination, a comparison is made with those of cytosine, whose deamination reaction parallels that of guanine.

  16. Mechanistic Studies of the Solvolyses of Carbamoyl Chlorides and Related Reactions

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Malcolm J.; Kevill, Dennis N.

    2016-01-01

    Carbamoyl chlorides are important intermediates, both in the research laboratory and in industrial scale syntheses. The most studied and used are the disubstituted derivatives, incorporating either aryl or alkyl groups (Ar2NCOCl or R2NCOCl). Sometimes, the groups are tied back to give a ring and piperidino- and morpholino-derivatives are commonly encountered. Some studies have been made with two different groups attached. Solvolyses tend to occur at the carbonyl carbon, with replacement of the chloride ion. Studies of both rate and products are reviewed and the solvolysis reactions are usually SN1, although addition of an amine leads to a superimposable bimolecular component. Many of the studies under solvolytic conditions include the application of the extended Grunwald–Winstein equation. The monosubstituted derivatives (ArNHCOCl or RNHCOCl) are less studied. They are readily prepared by the addition of HCl to an isocyanate. In acetonitrile, they decompose to set up and reach equilibrium with the isocyanate (ArNCO or RNCO) and HCl. Considering that the structurally related formyl chloride (HOCOCl) is highly unstable (with formation of HCl + CO2), the unsubstituted carbamoyl chloride (H2NCOCl) is remarkably stable. Recommended synthetic procedures require it to survive reaction temperatures in the 300–400 °C range. There has been very little study of its reactions. PMID:26784185

  17. Mechanistic insights into RNA transphosphorylation from kinetic isotope effects and linear free energy relationships of model reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haoyuan; Giese, Timothy J; Huang, Ming; Wong, Kin-Yiu; Harris, Michael E; York, Darrin M

    2014-10-27

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology and the understanding of the mechanisms whereby these reactions are catalyzed by protein and RNA enzymes is central to reveal design principles for new therapeutics. Two of the most powerful experimental probes of chemical mechanism involve the analysis of linear free energy relations (LFERs) and the measurement of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). These experimental data report directly on differences in bonding between the ground state and the rate-controlling transition state, which is the most critical point along the reaction free energy pathway. However, interpretation of LFER and KIE data in terms of transition-state structure and bonding optimally requires the use of theoretical models. In this work, we apply density-functional calculations to determine KIEs for a series of phosphoryl transfer reactions of direct relevance to the 2'-O-transphosphorylation that leads to cleavage of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA. We first examine a well-studied series of phosphate and phosphorothioate mono-, di- and triesters that are useful as mechanistic probes and for which KIEs have been measured. Close agreement is demonstrated between the calculated and measured KIEs, establishing the reliability of our quantum model calculations. Next, we examine a series of RNA transesterification model reactions with a wide range of leaving groups in order to provide a direct connection between observed Brønsted coefficients and KIEs with the structure and bonding in the transition state. These relations can be used for prediction or to aid in the interpretation of experimental data for similar non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions. Finally, we apply these relations to RNA phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ribonuclease A, and demonstrate the reaction coordinate-KIE correlation is reasonably preserved. A prediction of the secondary deuterium KIE in this reaction is also provided. These results demonstrate the utility of

  18. Mechanistic Insights into RNA Transphosphorylation from Kinetic Isotope Effects and Linear Free Energy Relationships of Model Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyuan; Giese, Timothy J.; Huang, Ming; Wong, Kin-Yiu; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology, and the understanding of the mechanisms whereby these reactions are catalyzed by protein and RNA enzymes is central to reveal design principles for new therapeutics. Two of the most powerful experimental probes of chemical mechanism involve the analysis of linear free energy relations (LFERs) and the measurement of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). These experimental data report directly on differences in bonding between the ground state and the rate-controlling transition state, which is the most critical point along the reaction free energy pathway. However, interpretation of LFER and KIE data in terms of transition state structure and bonding optimally requires the use of theoretical models. In this work, we apply density-functional calculations to determine KIEs for a series of phosphoryl transfer reactions of direct relevance to the 2’-O-transphosphorylation that leads to cleavage of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA. We first examine a well-studied series of phosphate and phosphorothioate mono-, di- and triesters that are useful as mechanistic probes and for which KIEs have been measured. Close agreement is demonstrated between the calculated and measured KIEs, establishing the reliability of our quantum model calculations. Next, we examine a series of RNA transesterification model reactions with a wide range of leaving groups in order to provide a direct connection between observed Brønsted coefficients and KIEs with the structure and bonding in the transition state. These relations can be used for prediction or to aid in the interpretation of experimental data for similar non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions. Finally, we apply these relations to RNA phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ribonuclease A, and demonstrate the reaction coordinate-KIE correlation is reasonably preserved. A prediction of the secondary deuterium KIE in this reaction is also provided. These results demonstrate the utility of

  19. Reaction-induced fracturing during olivine serpentinization: A mechanistic investigation at the interface scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, O.; Røyne, A.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; King, H. E.; Jamtveit, B.

    2012-04-01

    Serpentinization of the Earth's impermeable upper mantle is one of the most fundamental metamorphic hydration reactions. It governs lithospheric weakening, geochemical subduction zone input and possibly even the formation of life-essential building blocks. Serpentinization relies on fluid pathway generation due to low initial permeability and the large positive solid volume change associated with hydration. Although these pathways can be produced as a tectonic stress response, there is substantial evidence that the volume increase during olivine serpentinization itself generates stresses sufficient to fracture the rock. Nonetheless, the actual fracturing mechanism during olivine serpentinization is largely unexplored. Unconstrained batch experiments (Okamoto et al. 2011, this study) produce comparable hierachial fracture patterns to those found in natural samples demonstrating that no external forces (e.g., tensile stress) are required for fracturing to take place. Combining this with the observation that fluid-mediated mineral replacement advances via an interface-coupled dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism (e.g., Putnis 2009) without solid-state diffusion into the dissolving mineral indicates that classical (stress) corrosion cracking mechanisms cannot describe fracturing during olivine serpentinization. By uniting micro- and nanostructural characteristics ubiquitous to serpentinized olivine grains with a coupled diffusion-reaction-deformation model and crack growth theory this study explores the sub-critical fracturing mechanism at the interfacial scale. We present a new multistep reaction process and test the feasibility of a molecular wedge-assisted fracturing mechanism based on the following ubiquitously identified features: (1) no rotation of grain domains during fragmentation, (2) isotropic fracture orientation distribution with a uniform average width of individual finite length serpentine veins, (3) cumulative fragment area distribution with a log

  20. Theoretical study on the reaction of ground state cyano radical with propylene in Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Kaiser, R I; Chang, A H H

    2009-11-12

    The bimolecular reaction of ground state cyano radical with propylene under the condition of single collision is investigated by combining ab initio electronic structure calculations for predicting reaction paths and RRKM theory to yield rate constant for each path. The isomerization and dissociation channels for each of the seven collision complexes are characterized by utilizing the unrestricted B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory and the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ calculations. Sifting with the facilitation of RRKM rate constants through web of ab initio paths composed of 8 collision complexes, 37 intermediates, and 12 H-, 23 H(2)-, 3 HCN-, and 4 CH(3)-dissociated products, we identify the most probable paths down to 7-9 species at collisions energies of 0 and 5 kcal/mol as the reaction mechanisms. The rate equations of the reaction mechanisms are solved numerically such that the concentration evolutions for all species involved are obtained. This study predicts that CN + C(2)H(3)CH(3) reaction via any of the seven collision complex, c1-c5, c7, and c8, would produce p1(CH(3)CHCHCN) + H, p2(CH(2)CHCH(2)CN) + H, and mostly p43(vinyl cyanide) + CH(3) for collision energy within 0-5 kcal/mol. In addition to the insertion mechanism through collision complex, the direct H-abstraction of propylene by CN radical might occur. Our investigation indicates that the barrierless and exoergic CN(X(2)Sigma(+)) + C(2)H(3)CH(3)(X(1)A') reaction would be an efficient route for the p1, p2, and p43, and likely HCN formation in cold molecular clouds and in the atmosphere of Saturn's satellite Titan.

  1. Low-temperature Kinetic Studies of OH Radical Reactions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, T. M.; Antiñolo, M.; Ballesteros, B.; Jimenez, E.; Canosa, A.

    2011-05-01

    In the solar system, the temperature (T) of the atmosphere of giant planets or their satellites is only several tens of Kelvin (K). The temperature of the tropopause of Titan (satellite of Saturn) and the surface of Mars is 70 K and 210 K, respectively. In the Earth's atmosphere, T decreases from 298 K (surface) to 210 K close to the T-inversion region (tropopause). The principal oxidants in the Earth's lower atmosphere are ozone, the hydroxyl (OH) radical and hydrogen peroxide. A number of critical atmospheric chemical problems depend on the Earth's oxidising capacity, which is essentially the global burden of these oxidants. In the interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes, OH radicals have also been detected. As the chemistry of atmospheres is highly influenced by temperature, the knowledge of the T-dependence of the rate coefficients for OH-reactions (k) is the key to understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms. In general, these reactions take place on a short temporal scale. Therefore, a detection technique with high temporal resolution is required. Measurements of k at low temperatures can be achieved by maintaining a thermalised environment using either cryogenic cooling (T>200 K) or supersonic gas expansion with a Laval nozzle (several tens of K). The pulsed laser photolysis technique coupled with laser induced fluorescence detection has been widely used in our laboratory to determine the rate coefficients of OH-reactions with different volatile organic compounds, such as alcohols (1), saturated and unsaturated aliphatic aldehydes (2), linear ketones (3), as a function of temperature (260 350 K). An experimental system based on the CRESU (Cinetique de Reaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in a Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique is currently under construction. This technique will allow the performance of kinetic studies of OH-reactions of astrophysical interest at temperatures lower than 200 K.

  2. Laser Flash Photolysis Studies of Radical-Radical Reaction Kinetics: The O((sup 3)P(sub J)) + BrO Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, R. P.; Cronkhite, J. M.; Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A novel dual laser flash photolysis-long path absorption-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction 0((sup 3)P(sub j)) + Br yields(k1) BrO((sup 2)P(sub J)) + O2 as a function of temperature (231-328 K) and pressure (25-150 Torr) in N2 buffer gas. The experimental approach preserves the principal advantages of the flash photolysis method, i.e., complete absence of surface reactions and a wide range of accessible pressures, but also employs techniques which are characteristic of the discharge flow method, namely chemical titration as a means for deducing the absolute concentration of a radical reactant and use of multiple detection axes. We find that k1 is independent of pressure, and that the temperature dependence of k1 is adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k1(T) = 1.91 x 10(exp -11)(230/J) cu cm/ molecule.s; the absolute accuracy of measured values for k1 is estimated to vary from +/- 20 percent at at T approximately 230 K to +/- 30 percent at T approximately 330 K. Our results demonstrate that the O((sup 3)P(sub j)) + BrO rate coefficient is significantly faster than previously 'guesstimated,' and suggest that the catalytic cycle with the O((sup 3)P(sub j)) + BrO reaction as its rate-limiting step is the dominant stratospheric BrO(x), odd-oxygen destruction cycle at altitudes above 24 km.

  3. Mechanistic study of chemoselectivity in Ni-catalyzed coupling reactions between azoles and aryl carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qianqian; Yu, Haizhu; Fu, Yao

    2014-06-11

    Itami et al. recently reported the C-O electrophile-controlled chemoselectivity of Ni-catalyzed coupling reactions between azoles and esters: the decarbonylative C-H coupling product was generated with the aryl ester substrates, while C-H/C-O coupling product was generated with the phenol derivative substrates (such as phenyl pivalate). With the aid of DFT calculations (M06L/6-311+G(2d,p)-SDD//B3LYP/6-31G(d)-LANL2DZ), the present study systematically investigated the mechanism of the aforementioned chemoselective reactions. The decarbonylative C-H coupling mechanism involves oxidative addition of C(acyl)-O bond, base-promoted C-H activation of azole, CO migration, and reductive elimination steps (C-H/Decar mechanism). This mechanism is partially different from Itami's previous proposal (Decar/C-H mechanism) because the C-H activation step is unlikely to occur after the CO migration step. Meanwhile, C-H/C-O coupling reaction proceeds through oxidative addition of C(phenyl)-O bond, base-promoted C-H activation, and reductive elimination steps. It was found that the C-O electrophile significantly influences the overall energy demand of the decarbonylative C-H coupling mechanism, because the rate-determining step (i.e., CO migration) is sensitive to the steric effect of the acyl substituent. In contrast, in the C-H/C-O coupling mechanism, the release of the carboxylates occurs before the rate-determining step (i.e., base-promoted C-H activation), and thus the overall energy demand is almost independent of the acyl substituent. Accordingly, the decarbonylative C-H coupling product is favored for less-bulky group substituted C-O electrophiles (such as aryl ester), while C-H/C-O coupling product is predominant for bulky group substituted C-O electrophiles (such as phenyl pivalate). PMID:24823646

  4. Reaction mechanism of naphthyl radicals with molecular oxygen. 1. Theoretical study of the potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Kislov, Vadim V; Mebel, Alexander M

    2012-02-16

    Potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the reactions of 1- and 2-naphthyl radicals with molecular oxygen have been investigated at the G3(MP2,CC)//B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. Both reactions are shown to be initiated by barrierless addition of O(2) to the respective radical sites of C(10)H(7). The end-on O(2) addition leading to 1- and 2-naphthylperoxy radicals exothermic by 45-46 kcal/mol is found to be more preferable thermodynamically than the side-on addition. At the subsequent reaction step, the chemically activated 1- and 2-C(10)H(7)OO adducts can eliminate an oxygen atom leading to the formation of 1- and 2-naphthoxy radical products, respectively, which in turn can undergo unimolecular decomposition producing indenyl radical + CO via the barriers of 57.8 and 48.3 kcal/mol and with total reaction endothermicities of 14.5 and 10.2 kcal/mol, respectively. Alternatively, the initial reaction adducts can feature an oxygen atom insertion into the attacked C(6) ring leading to bicyclic intermediates a10 and a10' (from 1-naphthyl + O(2)) or b10 and b10' (from 2-naphthyl + O(2)) composed from two fused six-member C(6) and seven-member C(6)O rings. Next, a10 and a10' are predicted to decompose to C(9)H(7) (indenyl) + CO(2), 1,2-C(10)H(6)O(2) (1,2-naphthoquinone) + H, and 1-C(9)H(7)O (1-benzopyranyl) + CO, whereas b10 and b10' would dissociate to C(9)H(7) (indenyl) + CO(2), 2-C(9)H(7)O (2-benzopyranyl) + CO, and 1,2-C(10)H(6)O(2) (1,2-naphthoquinone) + H. On the basis of this, the 1-naphthyl + O(2) reaction is concluded to form the following products (with the overall reaction energies given in parentheses): 1-naphthoxy + O (-15.5 kcal/mol), indenyl + CO(2) (-123.9 kcal/mol), 1-benzopyranyl + CO (-97.2 kcal/mol), and 1,2-naphthoquinone + H (-63.5 kcal/mol). The 2-naphthyl + O(2) reaction is predicted to produce 2-naphthoxy + O (-10.9 kcal/mol), indenyl + CO(2) (-123.7 kcal/mol), 2-benzopyranyl + CO (-90.7 kcal/mol), and 1,2-naphthoquinone + H (-63.2 kcal

  5. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the -OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  6. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  7. Products of the OH radical-initiated reactions of 2- and 3-hexyl nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschmann, Sara M.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Products of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with 2-hexyl nitrate (containing 13% 3-hexyl nitrate) have been investigated by gas chromatography with mass spectral and flame ionization detection, and by direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The products identified and quantified from 2-hexyl nitrate were: 2-hexanone (8.6 ± 1.3%), propanal (3.4 ± 0.8%), butanal (2.3 ± 0.6%) and 5-hydroxy-2-hexanone (25%), where the molar yields are given in parentheses. 3-Hexanone was observed from the 3-hexyl nitrate reaction, with a molar formation yield of 9.5 ± 2.1%. Organic nitrates of molecular weight 133, 161, 177 and 208 were also observed, and these are attributed to C 4-carbonyl nitrate(s), C 6-carbonyl-nitrates, C 6-hydroxycarbonyl-nitrates and C 6-dinitrates, respectively, and are expected to account for all or most of the non-quantified reaction products from OH + 2- and 3-hexyl nitrate. 5-Hydroxy-2-hexanone formation indicates that the CH 3CH(ONO 2)CH 2CH 2CH(O rad )CH 3 alkoxy radical dominantly reacts by isomerization.

  8. The role of radical and molecular reactions in the processes of ozonization of aqueous solutions of non-dissociating compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'ev, A. N.; Pryakhin, A. N.; Lunin, V. V.

    2010-04-01

    A theoretical approach to determining regions where ozonation proceeds by radical and molecular mechanisms is proposed. Ozonation of aqueous solutions of non-dissociating substances in open and closed reactors is considered. The effect of the values of the rate constants of reactions between the substrate and ozone, OH radicals, and O- ions, as well as that of the conditions of ozonation (pH of the solution, concentration of the reagents, and so on) on the role of radical and molecular reactions in the ozonation of chemical compounds is analyzed.

  9. Mechanistic studies of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase: characterization of an unusual pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent reaction.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2011-03-22

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase (ACCD) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that cleaves the cyclopropane ring of ACC, to give α-ketobutyric acid and ammonia as products. The cleavage of the C(α)-C(β) bond of an amino acid substrate is a rare event in PLP-dependent enzyme catalysis. Potential chemical mechanisms involving nucleophile- or acid-catalyzed cyclopropane ring opening have been proposed for the unusual transformation catalyzed by ACCD, but the actual mode of cyclopropane ring cleavage remains obscure. In this report, we aim to elucidate the mechanistic features of ACCD catalysis by investigating the kinetic properties of ACCD from Pseudomonas sp. ACP and several of its mutant enzymes. Our studies suggest that the pK(a) of the conserved active site residue, Tyr294, is lowered by a hydrogen bonding interaction with a second conserved residue, Tyr268. This allows Tyr294 to deprotonate the incoming amino group of ACC to initiate the aldimine exchange reaction between ACC and the PLP coenzyme and also likely helps to activate Tyr294 for a role as a nucleophile to attack and cleave the cyclopropane ring of the substrate. In addition, solvent kinetic isotope effect (KIE), proton inventory, and (13)C KIE studies of the wild type enzyme suggest that the C(α)-C(β) bond cleavage step in the chemical mechanism is at least partially rate-limiting under k(cat)/K(m) conditions and is likely preceded in the mechanism by a partially rate-limiting step involving the conversion of a stable gem-diamine intermediate into a reactive external aldimine intermediate that is poised for cyclopropane ring cleavage. When viewed within the context of previous mechanistic and structural studies of ACCD enzymes, our studies are most consistent with a mode of cyclopropane ring cleavage involving nucleophilic catalysis by Tyr294.

  10. Mechanistic Insight into the Nitric Oxide Dioxygenation Reaction of Nonheme Iron(III)-Superoxo and Manganese(IV)-Peroxo Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seungwoo; Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-09-26

    Reactions of nonheme Fe(III) -superoxo and Mn(IV) -peroxo complexes bearing a common tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (TAML), namely [(TAML)Fe(III) (O2 )](2-) and [(TAML)Mn(IV) (O2 )](2-) , with nitric oxide (NO) afford the Fe(III) -NO3 complex [(TAML)Fe(III) (NO3 )](2-) and the Mn(V) -oxo complex [(TAML)Mn(V) (O)](-) plus NO2 (-) , respectively. Mechanistic studies, including density functional theory (DFT) calculations, reveal that M(III) -peroxynitrite (M=Fe and Mn) species, generated in the reactions of [(TAML)Fe(III) (O2 )](2-) and [(TAML)Mn(IV) (O2 )](2-) with NO, are converted into M(IV) (O) and (.) NO2 species through O-O bond homolysis of the peroxynitrite ligand. Then, a rebound of Fe(IV) (O) with (.) NO2 affords [(TAML)Fe(III) (NO3 )](2-) , whereas electron transfer from Mn(IV) (O) to (.) NO2 yields [(TAML)Mn(V) (O)](-) plus NO2 (-) .

  11. Mechanistic Insight into the Nitric Oxide Dioxygenation Reaction of Nonheme Iron(III)-Superoxo and Manganese(IV)-Peroxo Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seungwoo; Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-09-26

    Reactions of nonheme Fe(III) -superoxo and Mn(IV) -peroxo complexes bearing a common tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (TAML), namely [(TAML)Fe(III) (O2 )](2-) and [(TAML)Mn(IV) (O2 )](2-) , with nitric oxide (NO) afford the Fe(III) -NO3 complex [(TAML)Fe(III) (NO3 )](2-) and the Mn(V) -oxo complex [(TAML)Mn(V) (O)](-) plus NO2 (-) , respectively. Mechanistic studies, including density functional theory (DFT) calculations, reveal that M(III) -peroxynitrite (M=Fe and Mn) species, generated in the reactions of [(TAML)Fe(III) (O2 )](2-) and [(TAML)Mn(IV) (O2 )](2-) with NO, are converted into M(IV) (O) and (.) NO2 species through O-O bond homolysis of the peroxynitrite ligand. Then, a rebound of Fe(IV) (O) with (.) NO2 affords [(TAML)Fe(III) (NO3 )](2-) , whereas electron transfer from Mn(IV) (O) to (.) NO2 yields [(TAML)Mn(V) (O)](-) plus NO2 (-) . PMID:27593390

  12. Theoretical investigation on H abstraction reaction mechanisms and rate constants of Isoflurane with the OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongjiang; Li, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of H abstraction reactions for Isoflurane with the OH radical was investigated using density functional theory and G3(MP2) duel theory methods. The geometrical structures of all the species were fully optimised at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Thermochemistry data were obtained by utilising the high accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2) combined with the standard statistical thermodynamic calculations. Gibbs free energies were used for the reaction channels analysis. All the reaction channels were confirmed throughout the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis. The results show that two channels were obtained, which correspond to P(1) and P(2) with the respective activation barriers of 63.03 and 54.82 kJ/mol. The rate constants for the two channels over a wide temperature range of 298.15-2000 K were predicted and the calculated data are in agreement with the experimental one. The results show that P(2) is the dominant reaction channel under 800 K and above 800 K, it can be found that P(1) will be more preferable reaction channel.

  13. Rapid reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with superoxide radical in seawater and simulated freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansard, S.P.; Easter, H.D.; Voelker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide radical (O2-) has been proposed to be an important participant in oxidation-reduction reactions of metal ions in natural waters. Here, we studied the reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with O 2- in seawater and simulated freshwater, using chemiluminescence detection of O2- to quantify the effect of Mn(II) on the decay kinetics of O2-. With 3-24 nM added [Mn(II)] and <0.7 nM [O2-], we observed effective second-order rate constants for the reaction of Mn(II) with O2- of 6 ?? 106 to 1 ?? 107 M -1???s-1 in various seawater samples. In simulated freshwater (pH 8.6), the effective rate constant of Mn(II) reaction with O 2- was somewhat lower, 1.6 ?? 106 M -1???s-1. With higher initial [O2-], in excess of added [Mn(II)], catalytic decay of O 2- by Mn was observed, implying that a Mn(II/III) redox cycle occurred. Our results show that reactions with nanomolar Mn(II) could be an important sink of O2- in natural waters. In addition, reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide could maintain a significant fraction of dissolved Mn in the +III oxidation state. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Controllable Chemoselectivity in Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Four Diverse Aerobic Radical Cascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfei; Ye, Xinyi; Bureš, Filip; Liu, Hongjun; Jiang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-21

    Reported is the controllable selectivity syntheses of four distinct products from the same starting materials by visible-light photoredox catalysis. By employing a dicyanopyrazine-derived chromophore (DPZ) as photoredox catalyst, an aerobic radical mechanism has been developed, and allows the reactions of N-tetrahydroisoquinolines (THIQs) with N-itaconimides to through four different pathways, including addition-cyclization, addition-elimination, addition-coupling, and addition-protonation, with satisfactory chemoselectivity. The current strategy provide straightforward access to four different but valuable N-heterocyclic adducts in moderate to excellent yields.

  15. Direct gas-phase epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide through radical reactions: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Ali Can; Fellah, Mehmet Ferdi; Onal, Isik

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase radical chain reactions which utilize O 2 as the oxidant to produce propylene oxide (PO) are investigated through theoretical calculations. The transition states and energy profiles were obtained for each path. The rate constants were also calculated. The energetics for the competing pathways indicate that PO can be formed selectively due to its relatively low activation barrier (9.3 kcal/mol) which is in a good agreement with the experimental value (11 kcal/mol) of gas-phase propylene epoxidation. The formation of the acrolein and combustion products have relatively high activation barriers and are not favored. These results also support the recent experimental findings.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanistic Studies on the Reaction between Cytochrome c and Tea Catechins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Santos, Elizabeth; Schenk, Desiree; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is characterized by the presence of an abundance of polyphenolic compounds, also known as catechins, including epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin gallate (EGC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). In addition to being a popular beverage, tea consumption has been suggested as a mean of chemoprevention. However, its mode of action is unclear. It was discovered that tea catechins can react with cytochrome c. When oxidized cytochrome c was mixed with catechins commonly found in green tea under non-steady-state conditions, a reduction of cytochrome c was observed. The reaction rate of the catechins was dependent on the pH and the nature of the catechin. The pseudo-first order rate constant obtained increased in the order of EC < ECG < EGC < EGCG, which is consistent with previously reported superoxide reduction activities and Cu2+ reduction activities of tea catechins. PMID:26785071

  17. Growth of polyphenyls via ion-molecule reactions: an experimental and theoretical mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Aysina, Julia; Maranzana, Andrea; Tonachini, Glauco; Tosi, Paolo; Ascenzi, Daniela

    2013-05-28

    The reactivity of biphenylium cations C12H9(+) with benzene C6H6 is investigated in a joint experimental and theoretical approach. Experiments are performed by using a triple quadruple mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ion source to generate C12H9(+) via dissociative ionization of various isomers of the neutral precursor hydroxybiphenyl (C12H10O). C-C coupling reactions leading to hydrocarbon growth are observed. The most abundant ionic products are C18H15(+), C18H13(+), C17H12(+), and C8H7(+). The dependence of product ion yields on the kinetic energy of reagent ions, as well as further experiments performed using partial isotopic labelling of reagents, support the idea that the reaction proceeds via a long lived association product, presumably the covalently bound protonated terphenyl C18H15(+). Its formation is found to be exothermic and barrierless and, therefore, might occur under the low pressure and temperature conditions typical of planetary atmospheres and the interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations have focussed on the channel leading to C8H7(+) plus C10H8, identifying, as the most probable fragments, the phenylethen-1-ylium cation and naphthalene, thus suggesting that the pathway leading to them might be of particular interest for the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Both experiments and theory agree in finding this channel exoergic but hampered by small barriers of 2.7 and 3.7 kcal mol(-1) on the singlet potential energy surface. PMID:23742478

  18. Growth of polyphenyls via ion-molecule reactions: An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aysina, Julia; Tosi, Paolo; Ascenzi, Daniela; Maranzana, Andrea; Tonachini, Glauco

    2013-05-28

    The reactivity of biphenylium cations C{sub 12}H{sub 9}{sup +} with benzene C{sub 6}H{sub 6} is investigated in a joint experimental and theoretical approach. Experiments are performed by using a triple quadruple mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ion source to generate C{sub 12}H{sub 9}{sup +} via dissociative ionization of various isomers of the neutral precursor hydroxybiphenyl (C{sub 12}H{sub 10}O). C-C coupling reactions leading to hydrocarbon growth are observed. The most abundant ionic products are C{sub 18}H{sub 15}{sup +}, C{sub 18}H{sub 13}{sup +}, C{sub 17}H{sub 12}{sup +}, and C{sub 8}H{sub 7}{sup +}. The dependence of product ion yields on the kinetic energy of reagent ions, as well as further experiments performed using partial isotopic labelling of reagents, support the idea that the reaction proceeds via a long lived association product, presumably the covalently bound protonated terphenyl C{sub 18}H{sub 15}{sup +}. Its formation is found to be exothermic and barrierless and, therefore, might occur under the low pressure and temperature conditions typical of planetary atmospheres and the interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations have focussed on the channel leading to C{sub 8}H{sub 7}{sup +} plus C{sub 10}H{sub 8}, identifying, as the most probable fragments, the phenylethen-1-ylium cation and naphthalene, thus suggesting that the pathway leading to them might be of particular interest for the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Both experiments and theory agree in finding this channel exoergic but hampered by small barriers of 2.7 and 3.7 kcal mol{sup -1} on the singlet potential energy surface.

  19. An ab initio investigation of possible intermediates in the reaction of the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemical techniques are used to investigate covalently-bonded and hydrogen-bonded species that may be important intermediates in the reaction of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals. Stable structures of both types are identified. Basis sets of polarized double zeta quality and large scale configuration interaction wave functions are utilized. Based on electronic energies, the covalently bonded HOOOH species is 26.4 kcal/mol more stable than the OH and HO2 radicals. Similarly, the hydrogen bonded HO---HO2 species has an electronic energy 4.7 kcal/mol below that of the component radicals, after correction is made for the basis set superposition error. The hydrogen bonded form is planar, possesses one relatively normal hydrogen bond, and has the lowest energy 3A' and 1A' states that are essentially degenerate. The 1A" and 3A" excited states produced by rotation of the unpaired OH electron into the molecular plane are very slightly bound.

  20. An ab initio investigation of possible intermediates in the reaction of the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.; Phillips, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemical techniques have been used to investigate covalently-bonded and hydrogen-bonded species that may be important intermediates in the reaction of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals. Stable structures of both types were identified. Basic sets of polarized double-zeta quality and large scale configuration interaction wave functions have been utilized. Based upon electronic energies, the covalently-bonded HOOOH species is found to be 26.4 kcal/mol more stable than the OH and HO2 radicals. Similarly, the hydrogen-bonded HO-HO2 species is found to have an electronic energy 4.7 kcal/mol below that of the component radicals, after correction is made for the basis set superposition error. The hydrogen-bonded form is found to be planar, to possess one relatively 'normal' hydrogen bond, and to have lowest energy 3A-prime and 1A-prime states that are essentially degenerate. The 1A-double prime and 3A-double prime excited states produced by rotation of the unpaired OH electron into the molecular plane are found to be very slightly bound.

  1. Predicting the reaction rate constants of micropollutants with hydroxyl radicals in water using QSPR modeling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models which predict hydroxyl radical rate constants (kOH) for a wide range of emerging micropollutants are a cost effective approach to assess the susceptibility of these contaminants to advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). A QSPR model for the prediction of kOH of emerging micropollutants from their physico-chemical properties was developed with special attention to model validation, applicability domain and mechanistic interpretation. In this study, 118 emerging micropollutants including those experimentally determined by the author and data collected from the literature, were randomly divided into the training set (n=89) and validation set (n=29). 951 DRAGON molecular descriptors were calculated for model development. The QSPR model was calibrated by applying forward multiple linear regression to the training set. As a result, 7 DRAGON descriptors were found to be important in predicting the kOH values which related to the electronegativity, polarizability, and double bonds, etc. of the compounds. With outliers identified and removed, the final model fits the training set very well and shows good robustness and internal predictivity. The model was then externally validated with the validation set showing good predictive power. The applicability domain of the model was also assessed using the Williams plot approach. Overall, the developed QSPR model provides a valuable tool for an initial assessment of the susceptibility of micropollutants to AOPs.

  2. Predicting the reaction rate constants of micropollutants with hydroxyl radicals in water using QSPR modeling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models which predict hydroxyl radical rate constants (kOH) for a wide range of emerging micropollutants are a cost effective approach to assess the susceptibility of these contaminants to advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). A QSPR model for the prediction of kOH of emerging micropollutants from their physico-chemical properties was developed with special attention to model validation, applicability domain and mechanistic interpretation. In this study, 118 emerging micropollutants including those experimentally determined by the author and data collected from the literature, were randomly divided into the training set (n=89) and validation set (n=29). 951 DRAGON molecular descriptors were calculated for model development. The QSPR model was calibrated by applying forward multiple linear regression to the training set. As a result, 7 DRAGON descriptors were found to be important in predicting the kOH values which related to the electronegativity, polarizability, and double bonds, etc. of the compounds. With outliers identified and removed, the final model fits the training set very well and shows good robustness and internal predictivity. The model was then externally validated with the validation set showing good predictive power. The applicability domain of the model was also assessed using the Williams plot approach. Overall, the developed QSPR model provides a valuable tool for an initial assessment of the susceptibility of micropollutants to AOPs. PMID:26005810

  3. A mechanistic analysis of the Birch Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Howard E

    2012-02-21

    The Birch Reduction is one of the main reactions of organic chemistry. The reaction involves the reaction of dissolving metals in ammonia with aromatic compounds to produce 1,4-cyclohexadienes. Discovered by Arthur Birch in 1944, the reaction occupies 300 pages in Organic Reactions to describe its synthetic versatility. Thus, it is remarkable that the reaction mechanism has been so very controversial and only relatively recently has been firmly established. Perhaps this is not that surprising, since the reaction also has many unusual and esoteric mechanistic facets. Here, I provide a description of how I have applied ever-evolving levels of quantum mechanics and a novel experimental test to understand details of the mechanism and the origins of the selectivities observed in the Birch reduction. The reaction involves an initial radical anion resulting from introduction of an electron from the blue liquid ammonia solution of free electrons formed by the dissolution of Li or related metals. This radical anion is protonated by an alcohol and then further reduced to a carbanion. Finally, the carbanion is protonated using a second proton to afford a nonconjugated cyclohexadiene. The regiochemistry depends on substituents present. With 18 resonance structures in the case of anisole radical anion, prediction of the initial protonation site would seem difficult. Nevertheless, computational methods from Hückel theory through modern density functional calculations do correctly predict the site of protonation. An esoteric test established this mechanism experimentally. The nature of the carbanion also is of mechanistic interest, and the preponderance of the resonance structure shown was revealed from Hückel calculations involving variable bond orders. For the trianion from benzoic acid, parallel questions about structure are apparent, and have been answered. Some mechanistic questions are answered experimentally and some by modern computations. Recently, our mechanistic

  4. Products of the gas-phase reactions of 1,3-butadiene with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, E.C.; Alvarado, A.; Aschmann, S.M.; Atkinson, R.; Arey, J.

    1999-10-15

    1,3-Butadiene is emitted into the atmosphere from a number of sources including combustion sources and is listed in the US as a hazardous air pollutant. In the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene reacts with OH radicals, NO{sub 3} radicals, and O{sub 3} with the dominant tropospheric removal processes being daytime reaction with the OH radical and nighttime reaction with the NO{sub 3} radical. The authors have used gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy, and in situ atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (API-MS) to identify and quantify the products formed from the reactions of 1,3-butadiene with OH radicals (in the presence of NO) and NO{sub 3} radicals. Acrolein, formaldehyde, and furan were identified and quantified from the OH radical-initiated reaction, with formation yields of 0.58 {+-} 0.04, 0.62 {+-} 0.05, and 0.03--0.04, respectively. Organic nitrates were observed by FT-IR spectroscopy with an estimated yield of 0.07 {+-} 0.03, and the API-MS analyses indicated that these organic nitrates are mainly the hydroxynitrate HOCH{sub 2}CH=CHCH{sub 2}ONO{sub 2} and/or its isomers. API-MS analyses showed the formation of a hydroxycarbonyl with the formula C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}, attributed to HOCH{sub 2}CH=CHCHO and/or its isomers. The major products of the NO{sub 3} radical-initiated reaction were organic nitrates; the API-MS analyses indicated the formation of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene, and unsaturated C{sub 4}-hydroxycarbonyls, hydroxynitrates, carbonyl nitrates, and nitrooxyhydroperoxides. Acrolein, HCHO, and furan were again quantified by gas chromatographic and FT-IR analyses. The data is compared with previous literature studies, and detailed reaction mechanisms are presented and discussed.

  5. Modelling Population Dynamics in Realistic Landscapes with Linear Elements: A Mechanistic-Statistical Reaction-Diffusion Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We propose and develop a general approach based on reaction-diffusion equations for modelling a species dynamics in a realistic two-dimensional (2D) landscape crossed by linear one-dimensional (1D) corridors, such as roads, hedgerows or rivers. Our approach is based on a hybrid “2D/1D model”, i.e, a system of 2D and 1D reaction-diffusion equations with homogeneous coefficients, in which each equation describes the population dynamics in a given 2D or 1D element of the landscape. Using the example of the range expansion of the tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus in France and its main highways as 1D corridors, we show that the model can be fitted to realistic observation data. We develop a mechanistic-statistical approach, based on the coupling between a model of population dynamics and a probabilistic model of the observation process. This allows us to bridge the gap between the data (3 levels of infestation, at the scale of a French department) and the output of the model (population densities at each point of the landscape), and to estimate the model parameter values using a maximum-likelihood approach. Using classical model comparison criteria, we obtain a better fit and a better predictive power with the 2D/1D model than with a standard homogeneous reaction-diffusion model. This shows the potential importance of taking into account the effect of the corridors (highways in the present case) on species dynamics. With regard to the particular case of A. albopictus, the conclusion that highways played an important role in species range expansion in mainland France is consistent with recent findings from the literature. PMID:26986201

  6. Modelling Population Dynamics in Realistic Landscapes with Linear Elements: A Mechanistic-Statistical Reaction-Diffusion Approach.

    PubMed

    Roques, Lionel; Bonnefon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We propose and develop a general approach based on reaction-diffusion equations for modelling a species dynamics in a realistic two-dimensional (2D) landscape crossed by linear one-dimensional (1D) corridors, such as roads, hedgerows or rivers. Our approach is based on a hybrid "2D/1D model", i.e, a system of 2D and 1D reaction-diffusion equations with homogeneous coefficients, in which each equation describes the population dynamics in a given 2D or 1D element of the landscape. Using the example of the range expansion of the tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus in France and its main highways as 1D corridors, we show that the model can be fitted to realistic observation data. We develop a mechanistic-statistical approach, based on the coupling between a model of population dynamics and a probabilistic model of the observation process. This allows us to bridge the gap between the data (3 levels of infestation, at the scale of a French department) and the output of the model (population densities at each point of the landscape), and to estimate the model parameter values using a maximum-likelihood approach. Using classical model comparison criteria, we obtain a better fit and a better predictive power with the 2D/1D model than with a standard homogeneous reaction-diffusion model. This shows the potential importance of taking into account the effect of the corridors (highways in the present case) on species dynamics. With regard to the particular case of A. albopictus, the conclusion that highways played an important role in species range expansion in mainland France is consistent with recent findings from the literature. PMID:26986201

  7. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  8. Reactions of the CN radical with benzene and toluene: product detection and low-temperature kinetics.

    PubMed

    Trevitt, Adam J; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L; Leone, Stephen R

    2010-02-01

    Low-temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165, and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, (3.9-4.9) x 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 105 K. At room temperature, nonexponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C(6)H(5)CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C(6)H(5) + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC(6)H(4)CH(3)) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta, and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the approximately 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C(6)H(5)CH(2)) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn's moon Titan ( approximately 100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  9. A theoretical analysis of the reaction between CN radicals and NH3.

    PubMed

    Talbi, Dahbia; Smith, Ian W M

    2009-10-14

    The reaction between CN radicals and NH3 molecules has been studied experimentally over an unusually wide range of temperature (25-716 K). Below 295 K, the rate constant exhibits a strong negative dependence on temperature; that is, it increases sharply as the temperature is lowered. The present work analyses the kinetics of this reaction theoretically, both to explain this unusual temperature-dependence and to identify the major products of the reaction--which have not been well established by experiment. Quantum chemical calculations at the CCSD(T) theoretical level show that the minimum energy path for reaction proceeds: (a) first, via a potential well, which is 39.3 kJ mol(-1) below the energy of the separated reactants, when allowance is made for zero-point energies, corresponding to a quite strongly bound NC-NH3 complex, and (ii) then over a 'submerged' barrier with a crest 10.9 kJ mol(-1) below the energy of the reactants to the products HCN + NH2. These ab initio calculations also demonstrate that there is no low energy path to the products NCNH2 + H. The dynamics of the main reaction have been further investigated using the two transition state model of Klippenstein and co-workers, in which transition state theory is applied at the selected E, J microcanonical level. The rate constants calculated for temperatures between 25 and 200 K are in excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  10. Comparative study of kinetics and reactivity indices of free radical polymerization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Cauter, K.; Hemelsoet, K.; van Speybroeck, V.; Reyniers, M. F.; Waroquier, M.

    Density functional theory calculations are used to determine the kinetics and reactivity indices of the first propagation steps of the polyethylene and poly(vinyl chloride) polymerization. Transition state theory is applied to evaluate the rate coefficient from the microscopically determined energies and partition functions. A comparison with the experimental Arrhenius plots validates the level of theory. The ability of reactivity indices to predict certain aspects of the studied propagation reactions is tested. Global softnesses of the reactants give an indication of the relative energy barriers of subsequent monomer additions. The correlation between energy and hardness profiles along the reaction path confirm the principle of maximum hardness. Local indices predict the regioselectivity of the attack of the growing radical to vinyl chloride.

  11. Atmospheric degradation of pyridine: UV absorption spectrum and reaction with OH radicals and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errami, M.; El Dib, G.; Cazaunau, M.; Roth, E.; Salghi, R.; Mellouki, A.; Chakir, A.

    2016-10-01

    The UV absorption spectrum of pyridine and its gas phase reactions with OH radicals and O3 were investigated. UV absorption cross-sections were determined by using a D2-lamp system in the range 200-350 nm. The kinetic studies were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure of purified air. The rate coefficient for the reaction of pyridine with OH was determined relative to that with acetone while that with O3 was measured under pseudo first order conditions. The rate coefficients obtained are (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1): k(OH + pyridine) = (5.40 ± 0.80) × 10-13 and k(O3 + pyridine) = (3.28 ± 1.70) × 10-20.

  12. The direct observation of secondary radical chain chemistry in the heterogeneous reaction of chlorine atoms with submicron squalane droplets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Lin; Smith, Jared D; Che, Dung L; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-05-21

    The reaction of Cl atoms, in the presence of Cl(2) and O(2), with sub-micron squalane particles is used as a model system to explore how surface hydrogen abstraction reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. The heterogeneous reaction is measured in a photochemical flow tube reactor in which chlorine atoms are produced by the photolysis of Cl(2) at 365 nm. By monitoring the heterogeneous reaction, using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer, the effective reactive uptake coefficient and the distributions of both oxygenated and chlorinated reaction products are measured and found to depend sensitively upon O(2), Cl(2), and Cl concentrations in the flow reactor. In the absence of O(2), the effective reactive uptake coefficient monotonically increases with Cl(2) concentration to a value of ∼3, clearly indicating the presence of secondary chain chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. The effective uptake coefficient decreases with increasing O(2) approaching a diffusion corrected value of 0.65 ± 0.07, when 20% of the total nitrogen flow rate in the reactor is replaced with O(2). Using a kinetic model it is found that the amount of secondary chemistry and the product distributions in the aerosol phase are controlled by the competitive reaction rates of O(2) and Cl(2) with alkyl radicals. The role that a heterogeneous pathway might play in the reaction of alkyl radicals with O(2) and Cl(2) is investigated within a reasonable range of reaction parameters. These results show, more generally, that for heterogeneous reactions involving secondary chain chemistry, time and radical concentration are not interchangeable kinetic quantities, but rather the observed reaction rate and product formation chemistry depends sensitively upon the concentrations and time evolution of radical initiators and those species that propagate or terminate free radical chain reactions.

  13. Atmospheric chemistry of benzyl alcohol: kinetics and mechanism of reaction with OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Bernard, François; Magneron, Isabelle; Eyglunent, Grégory; Daële, Véronique; Wallington, Timothy J; Hurley, Michael D; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of benzyl alcohol has been investigated using smog chambers at ICARE, FORD, and EUPHORE. The rate coefficient for reaction with OH radicals was measured and an upper limit for the reaction with ozone was established; kOH = (2.8 ± 0.4) × 10(-11) at 297 ± 3 K (averaged value including results from Harrison and Wells) and kO(3) < 2 × 10(-19) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 299 K. The products of the OH radical initiated oxidation of benzyl alcohol in the presence of NOX were studied. Benzaldehyde, originating from H-abstraction from the -CH(2)OH group, was identified using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, HPLC-UV/FID, and GC-PID and quantified in a yield of (24 ± 5) %. Ring retaining products originating from OH-addition to the aromatic ring such as o-hydroxybenzylalcohol and o-dihydroxybenzene as well as ring-cleavage products such as glyoxal were also identified and quantified with molar yields of (22 ± 2)%, (10 ± 3)%, and (2.7 ± 0.7)%, respectively. Formaldehyde was observed with a molar yield of (27 ± 10)%. The results are discussed with respect to previous studies and the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of benzyl alcohol.

  14. Mechanism and kinetic study on the gas-phase reactions of OH radical with carbamate insecticide isoprocarb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenxi; Yang, Wenbo; Bai, Jing; Zhao, Yuyang; Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2012-12-01

    As one of the most important carbamate insecticides, isoprocarb [2-(1-methylethyl) phenyl methylcarbamate, MIPC] is widely used in agricultural and cotton spraying. The atmospheric chemical reaction mechanism and kinetics of MIPC with OH radical have been researched using the density functional theory in this paper. The study shows that OH radical is more easily added to the C atoms of aromatic ring than to carbon-oxygen double bond, while the H atom is abstracted more difficulty from -CONH- group and aromatic ring than from the -CH3- group and the -CH- group. At room temperature, the total rate constant of MIPC with OH radical is about 5.1 × 10-12 cm3 molecule-l s-l. OH radical addition reaction and H atom abstraction reaction are both important for the OH-initiated reaction of MIPC. The energy-rich adducts (MIPC-OH) and the MIPC's radical isomers are open-shell activated radicals and can be further oxidized in the atmosphere.

  15. In situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance investigations of multi-electron redox reaction for organic radical cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qian; Walter, Eric D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

    2016-02-01

    The multi-electron redox reaction of an organic radical based composite cathode comprised of poly(2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidinyloxy-4-yl methacrylate) (PTMA)-Ketjenblack is investigated using an in situ electrochemical-electron spin resonance (ESR) methodology. The experiments allow each electrochemical state to be associated with the chemical state (or environment) of the radical species upon the cell cycling. In situ ESR spectra of the composite cathode demonstrate a two-electron redox reaction of PTMA that is from an aminoxy anion (n-type, at 2.5-2.6 V vs. Li/Li+) via a radical (at 3.2-3.5 V vs. Li/Li+) to an oxoammonium cation (p-type, at 3.7-4.0 V vs. Li/Li+). In particular, an adjustable n-type doping process of PTMA is first observed during the discharging process. Moreover, two different local environments of radical species are found in the PTMA-Ketjenblack composite electrode that includes both concentrated and isolated radicals. These two types of radical species, showing similarities during the redox reaction process while behaving quite different in the non-faradic reaction of ion sorption/desorption on the electrode surface, govern the electrochemical behavior of PTMA based composite electrode.

  16. A mechanistic model for hydrogen activation, spillover, and its chemical reaction in a zeolite-encapsulated Pt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Choi, Minkee; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-03-14

    The hydrogen (H) spillover phenomenon has attracted considerable attention in the catalysis field. Many researchers have focused on the phenomenon itself, as well as its applications for advanced catalytic systems. In particular, H spillover on non-reducible materials, such as alumina, silica, and zeolites, is a controversial issue owing to the lack of understanding regarding its mechanistic properties. In this study, we use density functional theory calculations to propose the entire mechanism of H spillover from H2 activation on a platinum to its participation in chemical reactions on the external surface of a zeolite. We determined that surface hydroxyl groups of the zeolites, such as Brønsted acid sites, play a role in initiating H spillover, and the Lewis acid sites facilitate the entire process by allowing H to be transferred as a H(+)/e(-) charge pair, as well as providing good binding sites for organic reactants. Theoretical results explain the key experimental features, and we expect that this work will help to elucidate the H spillover phenomenon on non-reducible support materials and to utilize it for catalytic systems. PMID:26735140

  17. LED based NMR illumination device for mechanistic studies on photochemical reactions - Versatile and simple, yet surprisingly powerful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, C.; Bartling, H.; Riedle, E.; Gschwind, R. M.

    2013-07-01

    An LED based illumination device for mechanistic studies on photochemical reactions by means of NMR spectroscopy is presented. The LEDs are directly switched by the NMR spectrometer with the help of a one-stage electronic circuit. This allows for continuous or alternatively pulsed operation of the LEDs. Continuous operation provides direct comparability with conditions in synthetic chemistry, in pulsed operation the short time light power can be enhanced ninefold. The LEDs are efficiently coupled to a 1000 μm core optical fiber guiding the light into the spectrometer by simply bringing it in close contact to the fiber. The tip of the fiber is roughened by sandblasting and thus emits light in a uniform and efficient way over the full length of the receiver coil. The combination of these techniques tremendously increases the amount of light brought into the NMR sample and makes LEDs an easy, versatile and handy light source for the in situ illumination of NMR samples allowing even for single millisecond time resolved Photo-CIDNP spectroscopy.

  18. Hydroxyl Radical (OH•) Reaction with Guanine in an Aqueous Environment: A DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH•) with DNA accounts for about half of radiation-induced DNA damage in living systems. Previous literature reports point out that the reaction of OH• with DNA proceeds mainly through the addition of OH• to the C=C bond of the DNA bases. However, recently it has been reported that the principal reaction of OH• with dGuo (deoxyguanosine) is the direct hydrogen atom abstraction from its exocyclic amine group rather than addition of OH• to the C=C bond. In the present work, these two reaction pathways of OH• attack on guanine (G) in the presence of water molecules (aqueous environment) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-31G* and 6-31++G** basis sets. The calculations show that the initial addition of the OH• at C4=C5 double bond of guanine is barrier free and the adduct radical (G-OH•) has only a small activation barrier of ca. 1 – 6 kcal/mol leading to the formation of a metastable ion-pair intermediate (G•+---OH−). The formation of ion-pair is a result of the highly oxidizing nature of the OH• in aqueous media. The resulting ion-pair (G•+---OH−) deprotonates to form H2O and neutral G radicals favoring G(N1-H)• with an activation barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol. The overall process from the G(C4)-OH• (adduct) to G(N1-H)• and water is found to be exothermic in nature by more than 13 kcal/mol. (G-OH•), (G•+---OH−), and G(N1-H)• were further characterized by the CAM-B3LYP calculations of their UV-visible spectra and good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. Our calculations for the direct hydrogen abstraction pathway from N1 and N2 sites of guanine by the OH• show that this is also a competitive route to produce G(N2-H)•, G(N1-H)• and H2O. PMID:22050033

  19. Hydroxyl radical (OH•) reaction with guanine in an aqueous environment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Sevilla, Michael D

    2011-12-22

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) with DNA accounts for about half of radiation-induced DNA damage in living systems. Previous literature reports point out that the reaction of OH(•) with DNA proceeds mainly through the addition of OH(•) to the C═C bonds of the DNA bases. However, recently it has been reported that the principal reaction of OH(•) with dGuo (deoxyguanosine) is the direct hydrogen atom abstraction from its exocyclic amine group rather than addition of OH(•) to the C═C bonds. In the present work, these two reaction pathways of OH(•) attack on guanine (G) in the presence of water molecules (aqueous environment) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-31G* and 6-31++G** basis sets. The calculations show that the initial addition of the OH(•) at C(4)═C(5) double bond of guanine is barrier free and the adduct radical (G-OH(•)) has only a small activation barrier of ca. 1-6 kcal/mol leading to the formation of a metastable ion-pair intermediate (G(•+)---OH(-)). The formation of ion-pair is a result of the highly oxidizing nature of the OH(•) in aqueous media. The resulting ion-pair (G(•+)---OH(-)) deprotonates to form H(2)O and neutral G radicals favoring G(N(1)-H)(•) with an activation barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol. The overall process from the G(C(4))-OH(•) (adduct) to G(N(1)-H)(•) and water is found to be exothermic in nature by more than 13 kcal/mol. (G-OH(•)), (G(•+)---OH(-)), and G(N(1)-H)(•) were further characterized by the CAM-B3LYP calculations of their UV-vis spectra and good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. Our calculations for the direct hydrogen abstraction pathway from N(1) and N(2) sites of guanine by the OH(•) show that this is also a competitive route to produce G(N(2)-H)(•), G(N(1)-H)(•) and H(2)O.

  20. Fine-tuning of a radical-based reaction by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase.

    PubMed

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Zeppieri, Laura; Amara, Patricia; Martin, Lydie; Barra, Anne-Laure; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Gambarelli, Serge; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-03-18

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase NosL converts L-tryptophan into 3-methylindolic acid, which is a precursor in the synthesis of the thiopeptide antibiotic nosiheptide. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and multiple L-tryptophan isotopologues, we trapped and characterized radical intermediates that indicate a carboxyl fragment migration mechanism for NosL. This is in contrast to a proposed fragmentation-recombination mechanism that implied Cα-Cβ bond cleavage of L-tryptophan. Although NosL resembles related tyrosine lyases, subtle substrate motions in its active site are responsible for a fine-tuned radical chemistry, which selects the Cα-C bond for disruption. This mechanism highlights evolutionary adaptation to structural constraints in proteins as a route to alternative enzyme function.

  1. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions by hydroperoxyl radical from 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Harish Kumar; Fernandes, Ravi X

    2013-06-20

    Highly accurate rate parameters for H-abstraction reactions by HO2 radicals are needed for development of predictive chemical kinetic models for ignition. In this article, we report the rate coefficients for reaction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) and 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran (DMTHF) computed employing CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the temperature range of 500-2000 K. Conventional transition state theory (CTST) with hindered rotor approximation for low frequency torsional modes and RRHO (rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator) approximation for all other vibrational modes is employed to evaluate the high pressure rate constants as a function of temperature. Rate constant of each individual hydrogen abstraction channel is taken into account to calculate the overall rate constant. Three-parameter Arrhenius expressions have been obtained by fitting to the computed rate constants of all abstraction channels between 500 and 2000 K. Eight transition states have been identified for MTHF and four for slightly more stable trans-DMTHF. Intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) calculations were performed to verify the connectivity of all the transition states (TSs) with reactants and products. One dimensional Eckart's asymmetrical method has been used to calculate quantum mechanical tunneling effect. Results of the theoretically calculated rate coefficients indicate that the hydrogen abstraction by HO2 from the C2 carbon of both MTHF and DMTHF is the most dominant path among all reaction pathways attributed to its lowest barrier height. The total rate coefficients of the MTHF and DMTHF with HO2 at CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory are k(T) = 8.60T(3.54) exp(-8.92/RT) and k(T)= 3.17T(3.63) exp(-6.59/RT) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), respectively. At both the level of theories, the predicted total abstraction rate constant for DMTHF is found to be higher as compared to that of MTHF over an entire temperature range

  2. Chain-amplified photochemical fragmentation of N-alkoxypyridinium salts: proposed reaction of alkoxyl radicals with pyridine bases to give pyridinyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Deepak; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Ahearn, Wendy G; Dinnocenzo, Joseph P; Farid, Samir

    2013-03-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer to N-alkoxypyridiniums, which leads to N–O bond cleavage and alkoxyl radical formation, is highly chain amplified in the presence of a pyridine base such as lutidine. Density functional theory calculations support a mechanism in which the alkoxyl radicals react with lutidine via proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) to produce lutidinyl radicals (BH•). A strong electron donor, BH• is proposed to reduce another alkoxypyridinium cation, leading to chain amplification, with quantum yields approaching 200. Kinetic data and calculations support the formation of a second, stronger reducing agent: a hydrogen-bonded complex between BH• and another base molecule (BH•···B). Global fitting of the quantum yield data for the reactions of four pyridinium salts (4-phenyl and 4-cyano with N-methoxy and N-ethoxy substituents) led to a consistent set of kinetic parameters. The chain nature of the reaction allowed rate constants to be determined from steady-state kinetics and independently determined chain-termination rate constants. The rate constant of the reaction of CH3O• with lutidine to form BH•, k1, is ~6 × 10(6) M(–1) s(–1); that of CH3CH2O• is ~9 times larger. Reaction of CD3O• showed a deuterium isotope effect of ~6.5. Replacing lutidine by 3-chloropyridine, a weaker base, decreases k1 by a factor of ~400.

  3. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jian-Bo; Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  4. Kinetics of the Reactions of IO Radicals with NO and NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daykin, E. P.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-long path absorption technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reactions of IO radicals with NO and NO2 as a function of temperature and pressure. The IO and NO rate coefficient is independent of pressure over the range 40-200 Torr of N2, and its temperature dependence over the range 242-359 K is adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 1) = (6.9 +/- 1.7) x 10(exp -12) exp[(328 +/- 71)/T] cu cm/(molecule.s) (errors are 2 sigma, precision only). These Arrhenius parameters are similar to those determined previously for the ClO + NO and BrO + NO reactions. The IO and NO2 association reaction is found to be in the falloff regime over the temperature and pressure ranges investigated (254-354 K and 40-750 Torr of N2). Assuming F(sub c) = 0.4 independent of temperature, a physically reasonable set of falloff parameters which adequately describe the data are k(sub 0) = 7.7 x 10(exp -31)(T/300)(exp -5.0) cm(exp 6)/(molecule(exp 2).s) and k(sub infinity) = 1.55 x 10(exp -11)cu cm/(molecule.s) independent of temperature. The IO + NO2 rate coefficients determined in this study are about a factor of 2 faster than those reported in the only previous study of this reaction.

  5. Pressure dependence of butyl nitrate formation in the reaction of butylperoxy radicals with nitrogen oxide.

    PubMed

    Butkovskaya, N I; Kukui, A; Le Bras, G; Rayez, M-T; Rayez, J-C

    2015-05-14

    The yield of 1- and 2-butyl nitrates in the gas-phase reactions of NO with n-C4H9O2 and sec-C4H9O2, obtained from the reaction of F atoms with n-butane in the presence of O2, was determined over the pressure range of 100-600 Torr at 298 K using a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor coupled with a chemical ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer. The yield of butyl nitrates was found to increase linearly with pressure from about 3% at 100 Torr to about 8% at 600 Torr. The results obtained are compared with the available data concerning nitrate formation from NO reaction with other small alkylperoxy radicals. These results are also discussed through the topology of the lowest potential energy surface mainly obtained from DFT(B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ) calculations of the RO2 + NO reaction paths. The formation of alkyl nitrates, due essentially to collision processes, is analyzed through a model that points out the pertinent physical parameters of this system. PMID:25380343

  6. Kinetics and product yields of the acetyl peroxy + HO2 radical reaction studied by photoionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, L. G.; Shen, L.; Savee, J. D.; Eddingsaas, N. C.; Welz, O.; Taatjes, C. A.; Osborn, D. L.; Sander, S. P.; Okumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    The acetyl peroxy radical (CH3C(O)O2) is a key intermediate in the oxidation of carbonyl-containing hydrocarbons in the troposphere. Reaction of acetyl peroxy radicals with HO2 has been suggested as a source of OH radicals in low-NOx environments. Previous work on this reaction observed only two product channels forming (1) peracetic acid and (2) acetic acid. Recent experiments have shown that there is a third channel that generates the radicals OH and acetoxy: CH3C(O)O2 + HO2 → (1) CH3C(O)OOH + O2 (2) CH3C(O)OH + O3 (3) CH3C(O)O + O2 + OH This last pathway to OH formation would then contribute to the apparent isoprene OH recycling suggested by discrepancies between atmospheric models and field observations of OH. There have, however, been significant disagreements among experiments on the yield of OH from reaction of acetyl peroxy radicals with HO2. We report our preliminary studies of acetyl peroxy self-reaction and its reaction with HO2 at 298 K and 8 Torr. Experiments were conducted at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron at the Lawerence Berkeley National Laboratory using tunable VUV ionizing radiation coupled to the Sandia National Laboratory pulsed-laser-photolysis multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometer to detect the time- and isomer-resolved formation of radical intermediates and products. From these results, we report new branching fractions of the three product channels in the acetyl peroxy + HO2 radical reaction.

  7. Activity of key enzymes in microsomal and mitochondrial membranes depends on the redox reactions involving lipid radicals.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, L F

    2001-07-01

    The work reviews membrane processes, such as monooxygenase reaction and oxidative phosphorylation with special reference to hydroxylation of a xenobiotic benzo(a)pyrene and the effects of the radical scavenger propyl gallate and radical generator Fe2+ ions on the reaction kinetics. A possibility is discussed that tocopherol provides for the activity of the lipid-radical cycles involving cytochrome b5. The lipid-radical cycles protect membrane lipids from oxidation and control the kinetics of membrane processes. The NADPH oxidation energy is transformed into the energy of lipid pulsations and this energy is used for activation of membrane enzymes. To account for the role of lipid pulsations in membrane processes, a new parameter is introduced - the internal temperature. It is supposed that there should be the equilibrium between the pro- and antioxidant factors in the membranes, and the presence of exogenous antioxidants (propyl gallate etc.) should be considered as a negative factor. PMID:11699868

  8. Products and Mechanism of the Reaction of 1-Pentadecene with NO3 Radicals and the Effect of a -ONO2 Group on Alkoxy Radical Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Geoffrey K; Claflin, Megan S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2015-10-29

    The linear C15 alkene, 1-pentadecene, was reacted with NO3 radicals in a Teflon environmental chamber and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and particulate β-hydroxynitrates, β-carbonylnitrates, and organic peroxides (β-nitrooxyhydroperoxides + dinitrooxyperoxides) were quantified using a variety of methods. Reaction occurs almost solely by addition of NO3 to the C═C double bond and measured yields of β-hydroxynitrate isomers indicate that 92% of addition occurs at the terminal carbon. Molar yields of reaction products determined from measurements, a proposed reaction mechanism, and mass-balance considerations were 0.065 for β-hydroxynitrates (0.060 and 0.005 for 1-nitrooxy-2-hydroxypentadecane and 1-hydroxy-2-nitrooxypentadecane isomers), 0.102 for β-carbonylnitrates, 0.017 for organic peroxides, 0.232 for β-nitrooxyalkoxy radical isomerization products, and 0.584 for tetradecanal and formaldehyde, the volatile C14 and C1 products of β-nitrooxyalkoxy radical decomposition. Branching ratios for decomposition and isomerization of β-nitrooxyalkoxy radicals were 0.716 and 0.284 and should be similar for other linear 1-alkenes ≥ C6 whose alkyl chains are long enough to allow for isomerization to occur. These branching ratios have not been measured previously, and they differ significantly from those estimated using structure-activity relationships, which predict >99% isomerization. It appears that the presence of a -ONO2 group adjacent to an alkoxy radical site greatly enhances the rate of decomposition relative to isomerization, which is otherwise negligible, and that the effect is similar to that of a -OH group. The results provide insight into the effects of molecular structure on mechanisms of oxidation of volatile organic compounds and should be useful for improving structure-activity relationships that are widely used to predict the fate of these compounds in the atmosphere and for modeling SOA formation and aging.

  9. Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes in Cofactor Biosynthesis: A Treasure Trove of Complex Organic Radical Rearrangement Reactions*

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Angad P.; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Mahanta, Nilkamal; Fedoseyenko, Dmytro; Philmus, Benjamin; Cooper, Lisa E.; Liu, Yiquan; Jhulki, Isita; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2015-01-01

    In this minireview, we describe the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin, menaquinone, molybdopterin, coenzyme F420, and heme. Our focus is on the remarkably complex organic rearrangements involved, many of which have no precedent in organic or biological chemistry. PMID:25477515

  10. Lamb shift in radical-ion pairs produces a singlet-triplet energy splitting in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitalis, K. M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2014-09-01

    Radical-ion pairs, fundamental for understanding photosynthesis and the avian magnetic compass, were recently shown to be biological open quantum systems. We here show that the coupling of the radical-pair spin degrees of freedom to its decohering vibrational reservoir leads to a shift of the radical-pair magnetic energy levels. The Lamb shift Hamiltonian is diagonal in the singlet-triplet basis, and results in a singlet-triplet energy splitting physically indistinguishable from an exchange interaction. This could have significant implications for understanding the energy level structure and the dynamics of photosynthetic reaction centers.

  11. OH radical formation from the gas-phase reactions of O 3 with a series of terpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschmann, Sara M.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    The yields of OH radicals from the gas-phase reactions of O 3 with a series of C 10 terpenes have been measured at 296±2 K and atmospheric pressure of air, using 2-butanol to scavenge the OH radicals formed and measuring the amount of 2-butanone produced. The measured molar OH radical yields are: 2-carene, 0.81±0.11; 3-carene, 0.86±0.11; limonene, 0.67±0.10; myrcene, 0.63±0.09; ocimene ( cis-/ trans- mixture), 0.55±0.09; α-terpinene, 0.38±0.05; γ-terpinene, 0.81±0.11; terpinolene, 0.74±0.10; and linalool, 0.66±0.10. These OH radical yields are independent of water vapor concentration over the range (0.34-2.7)×10 17 molecule cm -3 (5-40% relative humidity). Together with previous measurements in this laboratory of the OH radical yields from the reactions of O 3 with α-pinene and sabinene, a consistent data set of OH radical formation yields from the reactions of O 3 with monoterpenes are available for atmospheric conditions.

  12. A combined EPR and DFT study of the overcrowded aromatic radical cations from Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu Ming; Wu, Yi Fang

    2011-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance methods were used to study the polycyclic aromatic radical cations produced in a Friedel-Crafts alkylating system, and the following radical cations were indentified: 3,6,11,14-tetramethyl dibenzo (a, c) triphylene and 2,6-dimethyl-9,10-di(p-methylbenzyl) anthracene radical cations. The results indicate that the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are due to overcrowded polycyclic aromatic radical cations formed from the parent hydrocarbons. It is suggested that benzyl halides produced in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reactions undergo Scholl condensation to give polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are converted into corresponding polycyclic aromatic radical cations in the presence of AlCl 3. We carried out the theoretical calculation of the isotropic 1H hyperfine coupling constants for studied both PAHs radical cations. The results indicate that the IEFPCM-DFT calculation at B3LYP level with 6-31++G(d,p), EPRII and EPRIII basis sets could well support the experimental hfcc assignment of the observed radicals. Optimized geometry indicates that the aromatic rings in both PAHs radical cations twisted significantly out of co-planarity.

  13. Reaction dynamics of carbon-bearing radicals in circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xibin; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Fangtong; Mebel, Alexander M; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2006-01-01

    Crossed molecular beams experiments on dicarbon molecules, C2(X1sigmag+/a3piu), with unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene (C2H2(X1sigmag+), ethylene (C2H4(X1Ag)), methylacetylene (CH3CCH(X1A1)), and allene (H2CCCH2 (X1A1)) were carried out at 18 collision energies between 10.6 and 50.3 kJ mol(-1) utilizing a universal crossed beams machine to untangle the reaction dynamics forming hydrogen deficient hydrocarbon radicals in circumstellar envelopes of carbons stars and in cold molecular clouds. We find that all reactions proceed without the entrance barrier through indirect (complex forming) scattering dynamics. Each bimolecular collision is initiated by an addition of the dicarbon molecule to the pi bond of the unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule yielding initially acyclic (triplet) and three- or four-membered cyclic collision complexes (triplet and singlet surface). On the singlet surface, the cyclic structures isomerize to form eventually diacetylene (HCCCCH; C2/C2H2), butatriene (H2CCCCH2; C2/C2H4), methyldiacetylene (CH3CCCCH; C2/CH3CCH), and pentatetraene (H2CCCCCH2; C2/H2CCCH2) intermediates. The latter were found to decompose via atomic hydrogen loss yielding the buta-1,3-diynyl [C4H(X2sigma+) HCCCC], 1-butene-3-yne-2-yl [i-C4H3(X2A') H2CCCCH], penta-2,4-diynyl-1 [C5H3(X2B1) HCCCCCH2], and penta-1,4-diynyl-3 radical [C5H3(X2B1) HCCCHCCH] under single collision conditions. The underlying characteristics of these dicarbon versus atomic hydrogen replacement pathways (indirect scattering dynamics; no entrance barrier; isomerization barriers below the energy of the separated reactants; exoergic reactions) suggest the enormous potential of the dicarbon plus unsaturated hydrocarbon reaction class to form highly hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous molecules in cold molecular clouds and in circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars. The studies therefore present an important advancement in establishing a comprehensive database of reaction intermediates and products involved in

  14. Predicting reaction rate constants of ozone with organic compounds from radical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinliang; Yi, Bing; Wang, Xueye; Chen, Jianfang

    2012-05-01

    The reaction rate constants of ozone with organic compounds in the atmosphere were predicted by a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, for the first time, were carried out on the radicals from organic compounds, at the UB3LYP level of theory with 6-31G(d) basis set. A set of quantum chemical descriptors calculated from the radicals, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital of beta spin states (EβHOMO), the molecular average polarizability (α), and the total energy (ET), were used to build the general QSAR model for aliphatic compounds, applying the genetic algorithm (GA) technique and support vector machine (SVM) regression. The root mean square errors (RMSE) are 0.680 for the training set (68 compounds), 0.777 for the validation set (36 compounds) and 0.709 for the test set (35 compounds). Investigated results indicate that the SVM model given here has good predictivity for aliphatic compounds.

  15. Pressure and Temperature Dependence of the Reaction of Vinyl Radical with Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Huzeifa; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Abel, Paul R.; Howe, Pui-Teng; Fahr, Askar; Halpern, Joshua B.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Georgievskii, Yuri; Taatjes, Craig A.; Green, William H.

    2007-01-01

    This work reports measurements of absolute rate coefficients and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) master equation simulations of the C2H3 + C2H4 reaction. Direct kinetic studies were performed over a temperature range of 300-700 K and pressures of 20 and 133 mbar. Vinyl radicals (H2C=CH) were generated by laser photolysis of vinyl iodide (C2H31) at 266 nm, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy was used to probe vinyl radicals through absorption at 423.2 nm. Measurements at 20 mbar are in good agreement with previous determinations at higher temperature. A weighted three-parameter Arrhenius fit to the experimental rate constant at 133 mbar, with the temperature exponent fixed, gives k = (7 +/- 1) x 10(exp -l4) cu cm/molecule/s (T/298 K)(exp 2) exp[-(1430 +/- 70) K/T]. RRKM master equation simulations, based on G3 calculations of stationary points on the C4H7 potential energy surface, were carried out to predict rate coefficients and product branching fractions. The predicted branching to 1-methylallyl product is relatively small under the conditions of the present experiments but increases as the pressure is lowered. Analysis of end products of 248 nm photolysis of vinyl iodide/ethylene mixtures at total pressures between 27 and 933 mbar provides no direct evidence for participation of I -methylallyl.

  16. Mechanistic Significance of the Si–O–Pd Bond in the Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of Arylsilanolates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Through the combination of reaction kinetics (both stoichiometric and catalytic), solution- and solid-state characterization of arylpalladium(II) arylsilanolates, and computational analysis, the intermediacy of covalent adducts containing Si–O–Pd linkages in the cross-coupling reactions of arylsilanolates has been unambiguously established. Two mechanistically distinct pathways have been demonstrated: (1) transmetalation via a neutral 8-Si-4 intermediate that dominates in the absence of free silanolate (i.e., stoichiometric reactions of arylpalladium(II) arylsilanolate complexes), and (2) transmetalation via an anionic 10-Si-5 intermediate that dominates in the cross-coupling under catalytic conditions (i.e., in the presence of free silanolate). Arylpalladium(II) arylsilanolate complexes bearing various phosphine ligands have been isolated, fully characterized, and evaluated for their kinetic competence under thermal (stoichiometric) and anionic (catalytic) conditions. Comparison of the rates for thermal and anionic activation suggested, but did not prove, that intermediates containing the Si–O–Pd linkage were involved in the cross-coupling process. The isolation of a coordinatively unsaturated, T-shaped arylpalladium(II) arylsilanolate complex ligated with t-Bu3P allowed the unambiguous demonstration of the operation of both pathways involving 8-Si-4 and 10-Si-5 intermediates. Three kinetic regimes were identified: (1) with 0.5–1.0 equiv of added silanolate (with respect to arylpalladium bromide), thermal transmetalation via a neutral 8-Si-4 intermediate; (2) with 1.0–5.0 equiv of added silanolate, activated transmetalation via an anionic 10-Si-5 intermediate; and (3) with >5.0 equiv of added silanolate, concentration-independent (saturation) activated transmetalation via an anionic 10-Si-5 intermediate. Transition states for the intramolecular transmetalation of neutral (8-Si-4) and anionic (10-Si-5) intermediates have been located computationally

  17. Kinetics of nitrosamine and amine reactions with NO3 radical and ozone related to aqueous particle and cloud droplet chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous phase reactivity experiments with the amines dimethylamine (DMA), diethanolamine (DEA) and pyrrolidine (PYL) and their corresponding nitrosamines nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), nitrosodiethanolamine (NDEA) and nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYL) have been performed. NO3 radical reaction rate coefficients for DMA, DEA and PYL were measured for the first time and are 3.7 × 105, 8.2 × 105 and 8.7 × 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. Rate coefficients for NO3 + NDMA, NDEA and NPYL are 1.2 × 108, 2.3 × 108 and 2.4 × 108 M-1 s-1. Compared to OH radical rate coefficients for reactions with amines, the NO3 radical will most likely not be an important oxidant but it is a potential nighttime oxidant for nitrosamines in cloud droplets or deliquescent particles. Ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines and upper limits of rate coefficients suggest that aqueous ozone reactions are not important in atmospheric waters.

  18. A crossed beams and ab initio investigation on the formation of cyanodiacetylene in the reaction of cyano radicals with diacetylene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangtong; Kim, Seol; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M

    2009-06-21

    The crossed molecular beams reaction of ground state cyano radicals (CN) with diacetylene (HCCCCH) was studied in the laboratory under single collision conditions. Combining the derived center-of-mass translational energy and angular distributions with novel electronic structure calculations, we show that the linear cyanodiacetylene molecule (HCCCCCN) is the sole reaction product. Our study provided no substantiation of two alternative products which have been suggested previously: cyanoacetylene (HCCCN), speculated to be synthesized via the exchange of the ethynyl by the cyano group, and the 1,3-butadiynyl radical (HCCCC), thought to be formed via hydrogen abstraction. The unambiguous identification of cyanodiacetylene formed in an exoergic, barrierless bimolecular reaction of the cyano radical with diacetylene strongly suggests that cyanodiacetylene can be also synthesized via this process in the interstellar medium (cold molecular clouds) and in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan.

  19. Theoretical investigations of the gas phase reaction of limonene (C10H16) with OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Dash, Manas; Rajakumar, B.

    2015-11-01

    The rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical (OH) reaction with limonene were computed using canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunnelling between 275 and 400 K. The geometries and frequencies of all the stationary points are calculated using hybrid density functional theory methods M06-2X and MPWB1K with 6-31+G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p), and 6-311+G(2df,2p) basis sets. Both addition and abstraction channels of the title reaction were explored. The rate coefficients obtained over the temperature range of 275-400 K were used to derive the Arrhenius expressions: k(T) = 4.06×10-34 T7.07 exp[4515/T] and k(T) = 7.37×10-25 T3.9 exp[3169/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at M06-2X/6-311+G(2df,2p) and MPWB1K/6-311+G(2df,2p) levels of theory, respectively. Kinetic study indicated that addition reactions are major contributors to the total reaction in the studied temperature range. The atmospheric lifetime (τ) of limonene due to its reactions with various tropospheric oxidants was calculated and concluded that limonene is lost in the atmosphere within a few hours after it is released. The ozone production potential of limonene was computed to be (14-18) ppm, which indicated that degradation of limonene would lead to a significant amount of ozone production in the troposphere.

  20. Gas-phase rate constants for the reaction of NO 3 radicals with selected oxiranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, I.; Berndt, T.; Böge, O.; Rolle, W.

    1996-01-01

    The gas-phase reaction of NO 3 radicals with selected oxiranes has been studied in a flow system at T = 295 ± 2 K in the pressure range 3.4-50 mbar musing N 2 as carrier gas. The analysis of the organics was performed by means of on-line connected GC-FID. Rate constantswere obtained with the relative rate method: 3,4-epoxy-cyclohexene: (2.70 ± 0.18) × 10 -3; 2,2-dimethyl-vinyl)-oxirane; (4.74 ± 0.54) × 10 -12; 2-methyl-2-1(1-methyl-vinyl)-oxirane : (1.55 ± 0.12) × 10 -13; 2-methyl-2-vinyloxirane; (9.40 ± 2.62) × 10 -15; tetramethyloxirane: <5 × 10 -15; and cis-2,3-dimethyloxirane: <5 × 10 -15 cm -3 molecule -1 s -1.

  1. Water mediated hydrogen abstraction mechanism in the radical reaction between HOSO and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesar, Antonija; Tušar, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The effect of water molecules on the direct hydrogen abstraction from HOSO by NO2 was investigated for the first time. Stationary points were located at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) and CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory whereas energetics was further improved by CBS-QB3 and G4 composite methods. The fractions of hydrated radical complexes were estimated in order to assess atmospheric relevance of the title reaction. The energy barrier of the water mediated process becomes negligible. The formations of post-reactive complexes from pre-reactive complexes are energetically very favorable and the processes are spontaneous suggesting that they should be very feasible under atmospheric conditions.

  2. Investigating Arctic Tropospheric Ozone Depletion Through a Flowing Chemical Reaction Method of Halogen Free Radical Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, P. J.; Shepson, P. B.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Steffen, A.

    2008-12-01

    Arctic tropospheric halogen chemistry has been investigated through the measurement of halogen free radicals, ozone, and gaseous elemental mercury in the lower Arctic troposphere during spring 2008 in a unique sea ice surface environment onboard the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen. Low-level ozone depletion events were observed beginning in early March, with more extensive events occurring later in the month. Bromine monoxide measurements were conducted using a new, flowing chemical reaction method in addition to established DOAS techniques, and was observed with good agreement at concentrations approaching 40 ppt during periods of significant ozone and mercury depletion. Air mass history was observed for the periods leading to depletion, suggesting a dependence on sea ice contact and ambient temperatures below -22 °C as necessary elements for the onset of halogen-induced tropospheric ozone depletion. Here we discuss our data further with the aim of better understanding how ozone depletion events are triggered.

  3. Atmospheric Degradation of CH2═C(CH3)C(O)OCH3 Initiated by OH Radicals: Mechanistic Study and Quantification of CH3C(O)C(O)OCH3 in NOx Free Air.

    PubMed

    Gibilisco, Rodrigo G; Uranga, Jorge G; Santiago, Ana N; Teruel, Mariano A

    2015-08-20

    The product distribution of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with methyl methacrylate (CH2═C(CH3)C(O)OCH3, MMA) in the absence of NOx was studied at 298 K and atmospheric pressure of air. The experiments were performed in a Teflon chamber using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with GC-MS and GC-FID for product identification and quantification, respectively. In the absence of NOx, methyl pyruvate (CH3C(O)C(O)OCH3) was identified with a yield of 76 ± 13% in accordance with the decomposition of the 1,2-hydroxyalkoxy radicals formed. In addition, a detailed quantum chemical study of the degradation of MMA was performed by density functional theory (DFT) methods using the MPWB1K functional. This calculation suggests that formation of methyl pyruvate, from C1-C2 scission of 1,2-hydroxyalkoxy radical, is kinetically and thermodynamically the most favorable reaction path taking into account the electronic properties of reaction intermediates and transition states. The difference observed on the degradation mechanism of MMA in the presence and absence of NOx was explained in terms of the associated thermochemistry. Furthermore, this study propose that reaction between peroxy radical (RO2(•)) and hydroxyl radical (OH) became relevant at NOx-free environments. This statement is in agreement with recent studies concerning small peroxy radicals such as CH3OO(•).

  4. Atmospheric Degradation of CH2═C(CH3)C(O)OCH3 Initiated by OH Radicals: Mechanistic Study and Quantification of CH3C(O)C(O)OCH3 in NOx Free Air.

    PubMed

    Gibilisco, Rodrigo G; Uranga, Jorge G; Santiago, Ana N; Teruel, Mariano A

    2015-08-20

    The product distribution of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with methyl methacrylate (CH2═C(CH3)C(O)OCH3, MMA) in the absence of NOx was studied at 298 K and atmospheric pressure of air. The experiments were performed in a Teflon chamber using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with GC-MS and GC-FID for product identification and quantification, respectively. In the absence of NOx, methyl pyruvate (CH3C(O)C(O)OCH3) was identified with a yield of 76 ± 13% in accordance with the decomposition of the 1,2-hydroxyalkoxy radicals formed. In addition, a detailed quantum chemical study of the degradation of MMA was performed by density functional theory (DFT) methods using the MPWB1K functional. This calculation suggests that formation of methyl pyruvate, from C1-C2 scission of 1,2-hydroxyalkoxy radical, is kinetically and thermodynamically the most favorable reaction path taking into account the electronic properties of reaction intermediates and transition states. The difference observed on the degradation mechanism of MMA in the presence and absence of NOx was explained in terms of the associated thermochemistry. Furthermore, this study propose that reaction between peroxy radical (RO2(•)) and hydroxyl radical (OH) became relevant at NOx-free environments. This statement is in agreement with recent studies concerning small peroxy radicals such as CH3OO(•). PMID:26213280

  5. Reactions of the alkoxy radicals formed following OH-addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. C-C bond scission reactions.

    PubMed

    Dibble, T S

    2001-05-01

    The atmospheric degradation pathways of the atmospherically important terpenes alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are studied using density functional theory. We employ the correlation functional of Lee, Yang, and Parr and the three-parameter HF exchange functional of Becke (B3LYP) together with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The C-C bond scission reactions of the beta-hydroxyalkoxy radicals that are formed after OH addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are investigated. Both of the alkoxy radicals formed from the alpha-pinene-OH adduct possess a single favored C-C scission pathway with an extremely low barrier (approximately 3 kcal/mol) leading to the formation of pinonaldehyde. Neither of these pathways produces formaldehyde, and preliminary computational results offer some support for suggestions that 1,5 or 1,6 H-shift (isomerization) reactions of alkoxy radicals contribute to formaldehyde production. In the case of the alkoxy radical formed following OH addition to the methylene group of beta-pinene, there exists two C-C scission reactions with nearly identical barrier heights (approximately 7.5 kcal/mol); one leads to known products (nopinone and formaldehyde) but the ultimate products of the competing reaction are unknown. The single C-C scission pathway of the other alkoxy radical from beta-pinene possesses a very low (approximately 4 kcal/mol) barrier. The kinetically favored C-C scission reactions of all four alkoxy radicals appear to be far faster than expected rates of reaction with O2. The rearrangement of the alpha-pinene-OH adduct, a key step in the proposed mechanism of formation of acetone from alpha-pinene, is determined to possess a barrier of 11.6 kcal/mol. This value is consistent with another computational result and is broadly consistent with the modest acetone yields observed in product yield studies.

  6. Caffeoylquinic acid derived free radicals identified during antioxidant reactions of bitter tea (Ilex latifolia and Ilex kudincha).

    PubMed

    Pirker, Katharina Franziska; Goodman, Bernard Albert

    2010-12-01

    In order to provide some insight into the chemical basis for the antioxidant behaviour of bitter tea, the Chinese medicinal beverage derived from leaves of Ilex kudincha or Ilex latifolia, free radicals generated during the oxidation of aqueous extracts of dried leaves have been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. With both beverages, the major components in the EPR spectra after accelerated autoxidation under alkaline conditions or oxidation with the superoxide anion radical were comparable to those derived from reactions of caffeoylquinic acids. Thus these reaction products have sufficient stability for biological activity, and the present results suggest that such molecules contribute appreciably to the antioxidant chemistry of these beverages.

  7. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser induced fluorescence technique has been employed to determine absolute rate coefficients for the reaction OH + CH3CN (1) and its isotopic variants, OH + CD3CN (2), OD + CH3CN (3), and OD + CD3CN (4). Reactions 1 and 2 were studied as a function of pressure and temperature in N2, N2/O2, and He buffer gases. In the absence of O2 all four reactions displayed well-behaved kinetics with exponential OH decays and pseudo-first rate constants which were proportional to substrate concentration. Data obtained in N2 over the range 50-700 Torr at 298 K are consistent with k(sub 1), showing a small pressure dependence. The Arrhenius expression obtained by averaging data at all pressures in k(sub 1)(T) = (1.1(sup +0.5)/(sub -0.3)) x 10(exp -12) exp[(-1130 +/- 90)/T] cu cm /(molecule s). The kinetics of reaction 2 are found to be pressure dependent with k(sub 2) (298 K) increasing from (1.21 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -14) to (2.16 +/- 0.11) x 10(exp -14) cm(exp 3)/ (molecule s) over the pressure range 50-700 Torr of N2 at 298 K. Data at pressures greater than 600 Torr give k(sub 2)(T) = (9.4((sup +13.4)(sub -5.0))) x 10(exp -13) exp[(-1180 +/- 250)/T] cu cm/(molecule s). The rates of reactions 3 and 4 are found to be independent of pressure over the range 50-700 Torr of N2 with 298 K rate coefficient given by k(sub 3) =(3.18 +/- 0.40) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s) and k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/-0.28) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s). In the presence of O2 each reaction shows complex (non-pseudo-first-order) kinetic behavior and/or an apparent decrease in the observed rate constant with increasing [O2], indicating the presence of significant OH or OD regeneration. Observation of regeneration of OH in (2) and OD in (3) is indicative of a reaction channel which proceeds via addition followed by reaction of the adduct, or one of its decomposition products, with O2. The observed OH and OD decay profiles have been modeled by using a simple mechanistic

  8. Characterization of a Cross-Linked Protein-Nucleic Acid Substrate Radical in the Reaction Catalyzed by RlmN

    SciTech Connect

    Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Bauerle, Matthew R.; Green, Michael T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Boal, Amie K.; Booker, Squire J.

    2014-08-14

    RlmN and Cfr are methyltransferases/methylsynthases that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine superfamily of enzymes. RlmN catalyzes C2 methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) of 23S rRNA, while Cfr catalyzes C8 methylation of the exact same nucleotide, and will subsequently catalyze C2 methylation if the site is unmethylated. A key feature of the unusual mechanisms of catalysis proposed for these enzymes is the attack of a methylene radical, derived from a methylcysteine residue, onto the carbon center undergoing methylation to generate a paramagnetic protein–nucleic acid cross-linked species. This species has been thoroughly characterized during Cfr-dependent C8 methylation, but does not accumulate to detectible levels in RlmN-dependent C2 methylation. Herein, we show that inactive C118S/A variants of RlmN accumulate a substrate-derived paramagnetic species. Characterization of this species by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in concert with strategic isotopic labeling shows that the radical is delocalized throughout the adenine ring of A2503, although predominant spin density is on N1 and N3. Moreover, 13C hyperfine interactions between the radical and the methylene carbon of the formerly [methyl-13C]Cys355 residue show that the radical species exists in a covalent cross-link between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate. X-ray structures of RlmN C118A show that, in the presence of SAM, the substitution does not alter the active site structure compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Together, these findings have new mechanistic implications for the role(s) of C118 and its counterpart in Cfr (C105) in catalysis, and suggest involvement of the residue in resolution of the cross-linked species via a radical mediated process

  9. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-05-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O(3P)+C3H5→H(2S)+C3H4O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O(3P)] and allyl radicals (C3H5) were generated by the photolysis of NO2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O(3P) to C3H5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C3H4O. The major counterpart C3H4O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C3H4O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition.

  10. Development of a group contribution method to predict aqueous phase hydroxyl radical (HO*) reaction rate constants.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Li, Ke; Westerhoff, Paul; Crittenden, John

    2009-08-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO*) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites of organic compounds and initiates complex chain mechanisms. In order to help understand the reaction mechanisms, a rule-based model was previously developed to predict the reaction pathways. For a kinetic model, there is a need to develop a rate constant estimator that predicts the rate constants for a variety of organic compounds. In this study, a group contribution method (GCM) is developed to predict the aqueous phase HO* rate constants for the following reaction mechanisms: (1) H-atom abstraction, (2) HO* addition to alkenes, (3) HO* addition to aromatic compounds, and (4) HO* interaction with sulfur (S)-, nitrogen (N)-, or phosphorus (P)-atom-containing compounds. The GCM hypothesizes that an observed experimental rate constant for a given organic compound is the combined rate of all elementary reactions involving HO*, which can be estimated using the Arrhenius activation energy, E(a), and temperature. Each E(a) for those elementary reactions can be comprised of two parts: (1) a base part that includes a reactive bond in each reaction mechanism and (2) contributions from its neighboring functional groups. The GCM includes 66 group rate constants and 80 group contribution factors, which characterize each HO* reaction mechanism with steric effects of the chemical structure groups and impacts of the neighboring functional groups, respectively. Literature-reported experimental HO* rate constants for 310 and 124 compounds were used for calibration and prediction, respectively. The genetic algorithms were used to determine the group rate constants and group contribution factors. The group contribution factors for H-atom abstraction and HO* addition to the aromatic compounds were found to linearly correlate with the Taft constants, sigma*, and electrophilic substituent parameters, sigma+, respectively. The best calibrations for 83% (257 rate constants) and predictions for 62% (77

  11. Studies of reactions of importance in the stratosphere. III. Rate constant and products of the reaction between ClO and HO2 radicals at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leck, Thomas J.; Cook, Jac-E. L.; Birks, John W.

    1980-02-01

    The rate constant for the radical-radical reaction ClO+HO2→HOCl+O2 was measured at 298 K by the discharge flow technique using mass spectrometry for detection of the HOCl product at m/e=52. The ClO radical was generated by reacting ozone with chlorine atoms produced in a microwave discharge, and the concentration of ClO determined by measuring the decrease in ion current due to Cl2+ at m/e=70 upon activation of the discharge. This method was found to be in agreement with a nitric oxide titration of ClO and with the stochiometric conversion of ClO to NO2 by reaction with a large excess of NO followed by absolute calibration for NO2 at m/e=46. Two reactions were used to generate the hydroperoxyl radical: (1) H+O2+M→HO2+M, and (2) Cl+H2O2→HCl +HO2. The rate constant k1 was found to be independent of pressure over the range 2-6 Torr, the result being k1= (4.5±0.9) ×10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, where the error includes our estimate of the maximum possible systematic error. An upper limit of 2% for the branching ratio to the alternative products of this reaction, HCl+O3, was established by attempting to detect ozone as a reaction product. For these measurements the reactions Cl+ClOCl→Cl2+ClO and Cl+OClO →2ClO were used to generate the ClO radical in the absence of ozone. No other reaction products could be identified in the mass spectrum.

  12. Kinetic study of the gas phase reactions of a series of alcohols with the NO3 radical.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alberto; Salgado, M Sagrario; Martín, M Pilar; Martínez, Ernesto; Cabañas, Beatriz

    2012-10-25

    The rate coefficients for the reaction of NO(3) radical with 2-butanol, 3-methyl-2-butanol, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol were determined using relative rate technique in a 50 L glass pyrex photoreactor using in situ FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and a pressure of 350-670 Torr. The rate coefficient for the reaction of 2-methyl-2-butanol with NO(3) radical was also determined using, in this case, GC/MS. The rate coefficients calculated (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) were (2.51 ± 0.42) × 10(-15), (3.06 ± 0.52) × 10(-15), (2.67 ± 0.3) × 10(-15), and (1.57 ± 0.16) × 10(-15), respectively. Results indicate that the reaction occurs by an initial H-abstraction of the alcohols by the NO(3) radical and that NO(3) is more reactive toward a H atom attached to a tertiary carbon than that attached to a secondary or primary carbon. Results are also discussed as related to their homologous structural alkanes and in comparison with the reactivity of other atmospheric oxidants. Atmospheric relevance of the considered reactions is evaluated, concluding that they are potential ozone generators, they have no significant influence on global warming, and the dominant atmospheric loss process for these alcohols is their daytime reaction with OH radicals. PMID:23030849

  13. Bicarbonate and Alkyl Carbonate Radicals: Structural Integrity and Reactions with Lipid Components.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; DaBell, Peter; Manley, David W; McCaughan, Rory P; Walton, John C

    2015-12-30

    The elusive neutral bicarbonate radical and the carbonate radical anion form an acid/conjugate base pair. We now report experimental studies for a model of bicarbonate radical, namely, methyl carbonate (methoxycarbonyloxyl) radical, complemented by DFT computations at the CAM-B3LYP level applied to the bicarbonate radical itself. Methyl carbonate radicals were generated by UV irradiation of oxime carbonate precursors. Kinetic EPR was employed to measure rate constants and Arrhenius parameters for their dissociation to CO2 and methoxyl radicals. With oleate and cholesterol lipid components, methyl carbonate radicals preferentially added to their double bonds; with linoleate and linolenate substrates, abstraction of the bis-allylic H atoms competed with addition. This contrasts with the behavior of ROS such as hydroxyl radicals that selectively abstract allylic and/or bis-allylic H atoms. The thermodynamic and activation parameters for bicarbonate radical dissociation, obtained from DFT computations, predicted it would indeed have substantial lifetime in gas and nonpolar solvents. The acidity of bicarbonate radicals was also examined by DFT methods. A noteworthy linear relationship was discovered between the known pKa's of strong acids and the computed numbers of microsolvating water molecules needed to bring about their ionization. DFT computations with bicarbonate radicals, solvated with up to eight water molecules, predicted that only five water molecules were needed to bring about its complete ionization. On comparing with the correlation, this indicated a pKa of about -2 units. This marks the bicarbonate radical as the strongest known carboxylic acid.

  14. Solution phase and membrane immobilized iron-based free radical reactions: Fundamentals and applications for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Scott Romak

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. Reactive membranes synthesized through functionalization of the membrane pores offer enhanced reactivity due to increased surface area at the polymer-solution interface and low diffusion limitations. Oxidative techniques utilizing free radicals have proven effective for both the destruction of toxic organics and non-environmental applications. Most previous work focuses on reactions in the homogeneous phase; however, the immobilization of reactants in membrane pores offers several advantages. The use of polyanions immobilized in a membrane or chelates in solution prevents ferric hydroxide precipitation at near-neutral pH, a common limitation of iron(Fe(II/III))-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) decomposition. The objectives of this research are to develop a membrane-based platform for the generation of free radicals, degrade toxic organic compounds using this and similar solution-based reactions, degrade toxic organic compounds in droplet form, quantify hydroxyl radical production in these reactions, and develop kinetic models for both processes. In this study, a functionalized membrane containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to immobilize iron ions and conduct free radical reactions by permeating H2O2 through the membrane. The membrane's responsive behavior to pH and divalent cations was investigated and modeled. The conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the membrane and its effect on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were monitored and used to develop kinetic models for predicting H2O2 decomposition in these systems. The rate of hydroxyl radical production, and hence contaminant degradation can be varied by changing the residence time, H2O2 concentration, and/or iron loading. Using these membrane-immobilized systems, successful removal of toxic organic compounds, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), from water

  15. Two types of radicals in whole milk powder. Effect of lactose crystallization, lipid oxidation, and browning reactions.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marianne K; Lauridsen, Lene; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2005-03-01

    Whole milk powder was stored in closed vials at 60 degrees C to induce crystallization of lactose within a short time scale. After an induction period of 3-4 days simultaneous crystallization of lactose, increase of water activity, formation of browning products, and increase of radical content took place. Radicals detected before lactose crystallization were characterized by a narrow ESR spectrum (g = 2.006) and could be depleted by removal of oxygen and therefore were assigned to oxidation processes. Late-stage radicals present after crystallization of lactose gave much wider spectra (g = 2.0048) and were independent of oxygen availability and assigned to late-stage Maillard reaction products. The study indicates that the processes of lactose crystallization, browning, and formation of radical species (g = 2.0048) are strongly coupled, while lipid oxidation is less dependent on the other processes. PMID:15740077

  16. Reaction between CH3O2 and BrO radicals: a new source of upper troposphere lower stratosphere hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Dudley E; Leather, Kimberley E; Bacak, Asan; Xiao, Ping; Lee, Edmond P F; Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Dyke, John M; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P; Khan, M Anwar H; Percival, Carl J

    2015-05-14

    Over the last two decades it has emerged that measured hydroxyl radical levels in the upper troposphere are often underestimated by models, leading to the assertion that there are missing sources. Here we report laboratory studies of the kinetics and products of the reaction between CH3O2 and BrO radicals that shows that this could be an important new source of hydroxyl radicals:BrO + CH3O2 → products (1). The temperature dependent value in Arrhenius form of k(T) is k1 = (2.42–0.72+1.02) × 10–14 exp[(1617 ± 94)/T] cm3 molecule–1 s–1. In addition, CH2OO and HOBr are believed to be the major products. Global model results suggest that the decomposition of H2COO to form OH could lead to an enhancement in OH of up to 20% in mid-latitudes in the upper troposphere and in the lower stratosphere enhancements in OH of 2–9% are inferred from model integrations. In addition, reaction 1 aids conversion of BrO to HOBr and slows polar ozone loss in the lower stratosphere. PMID:25768043

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies on gas-phase reactions of NO3 radicals with three methoxyphenols: Guaiacol, creosol, and syringol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Haixu; Wang, Youfeng; Zhang, Peng; Shu, Jinian; Sun, Wanqi; Ma, Pengkun

    2016-01-01

    Methoxyphenols, lignin pyrolysis products, are major biomass combustion components and are considered potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. Their atmospheric reactivity, however, has not been well characterized. Guaiacol, creosol, and syringol are three typical methoxyphenols generated in relatively high concentrations in fresh wood smoke. In this study, the gas-phase reactions of NO3 radicals with these methoxyphenols were investigated using a laboratory-built vacuum ultraviolet photoionization gas time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-GTOFMS) and off-line GC-MS. By combining experimental and theoretical methods, 4-nitroguaiacol, 6-nitroguaiacol, and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol were determined as the primary degradation products for guaiacol; similarly, 6-nitrocreosol and 3-nitrosyringol were identified for creosol and syringol, respectively. Using the relative rate method, rate constants at 298 K and 1 atm for the gas-phase reactions of guaiacol, creosol, and syringol with NO3 radicals were measured to be 3.2 × 10-12, 2.4 × 10-13, and 4.0 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively. At a typical tropospheric concentration of NO3 radicals (5 × 108 molecule cm-3), atmospheric lifetimes for guaiacol, creosol, and syringol toward NO3 radicals were 0.2, 2.3, and 1.4 h, respectively. These results indicate that the reaction with NO3 radicals can be a major sink for methoxyphenols at night.

  18. Quenching and radical formation in the reaction of photoexcited benzophenone with thiols and thioethers (sulfides). Nanosecond flash studies

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Laser flash measurements have been made of rate constants and primary radical yields in the reactions of triplet benzophenone with aliphatic and aromatic thiols and with dialkyl and aryl alkyl sulfides. Reaction with n-pentylthiol in benzene leads mainly to quenching, with k/sub ir/ = 9 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and radical yield (ketyl) = 0.14; with mesitylene-2 thiol in benzene k/sub ir/ = 7 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and hydrogen transfer is efficient, radical yield (ketyl) approx. 1.0. In reactions with both p-chlorophenyl ethyl and diisopropyl sulfides, k/sub ir/ increases and radical yield (ketyl) decreases with increasing solvent polarity. Values of k/sub ir/ are higher and those of radical yield (ketyl) are lower for the dialkyl than for the aryl alkyl sulfide. Results are discussed in terms of rapid interaction of the triplet with S, followed by quenching and/or hydrogen transfer. Quenching without hydrogen transfer occurs to a much greater extent with sulfides and aliphatic thiols than with amines.

  19. Crossed-beam radical-radical reaction dynamics of O(3P)+C3H3-->H(2S)+C3H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Nam, Mi-Ja; Youn, Sung-Eui; Joo, Sun-Kyu; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2006-05-01

    The radical-radical oxidation reaction, O(P3)+C3H3(propargyl)→H(S2)+C3H2O (propynal), was investigated using vacuum-ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a crossed-beam configuration, together with ab initio and statistical calculations. The barrierless addition of O(P3) to C3H3 is calculated to form energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which subsequently undergo direct decomposition steps leading to the major reaction products, H +C3H2O (propynal). According to the nascent H-atom Doppler-profile analysis, the average translational energy of the products and the fraction of the average transitional energy to the total available energy were determined to be 5.09±0.36kcal/mol and 0.077, respectively. On the basis of a comparison with statistical prior calculations, the reaction mechanism and the significant internal excitation of the polyatomic propynal product can be rationalized in terms of the formation of highly activated, short-lived addition-complex intermediates and the adiabaticity of the excess available energy along the reaction coordinate.

  20. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  1. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2014-03-01

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

  2. Section i: Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrocarbon Radicals, Peroxy Hydrocarbon and Peroxy Chlorohydrocarbon Molecules and Radicals. Section II. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms For: (1) Chloroform Pyrolysis and Oxidation; (2) Benzene and Toluene Oxidation Under Atmospheric Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Tsan-Horng

    1995-01-01

    Alkyl radicals are important active intermediates in gas phase photochemistry and combustion reaction systems. With the exception of a limited number of the most elementary radicals, accurate thermodynamic properties of alkyl radicals are either not available or only rough estimations exist. An H atom Bond Increment approach is developed and a data base is derived, for accurately estimating thermodynamic properties (Delta H_{f }^circ298, S ^circ298 and Cp(T)) for generic classes of hydrocarbon radical species. Reactions of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen are one of the major reaction paths for these radicals in atmospheric photochemistry, oxidation of hydrocarbon liquids and combustion process. Alkyl hydroperoxides are subsequently formed through the alkyl peroxy radicals reactions with varied chemical species present in the reaction system. Thermodynamic properties of the alkyl hydroperoxides and related radicals are therefore frequently required in gas phase modeling and kinetic studies on these systems. The thermodynamic properties of alkyl hydroperoxides, alkyl peroxy radicals and hydroperoxyl-1-ethyl radicals including the species with fluorine and chlorine substituents on the alpha-carbon are evaluated using molecular orbital calculations. Chloroform is used as a model chlorocarbon system with high Cl/H ratio to investigate thermal decomposition processes of chlorocarbons in oxidative and pyrolytic reaction environments. A detailed reaction mechanism is developed to describe the important features of products and reagent loss and is shown to predict the experimental data well. Reaction pathways and rate constants are developed for CCl _3, CCl_2 and rm C_2Cl_3 radical addition to O_2 and combination with O, OH HO_2 and ClO. The reversible addition reaction of OH radical with benzene to form the hydroxyl-2,4-cyclohexadienyl (benzene -OH) adduct and the subsequent reactions of this benzene -OH adduct with O_2 are important initial steps for the

  3. Photochemistry and kinetics of gas phase reactions involving HO and Cl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.H.

    1980-11-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of the HO radical with HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the kinetics of Cl atom reactions with ClNO and ClNO/sub 2/, and the photochemistry of ClNO/sub 2/ and ClONO/sub 2/ were examined. The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of HNO/sub 3/ and ClNO/sub 2/ were also determined as part of the kinetics work. The rate constant for the reaction of HO with HNO/sub 3/ at room temperature was measured to be (8.2 +- 1.8) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, where the uncertainty reported here and in all cases reflects twice the experimental standard deviation plus an estimate of systematic errors. The rate constant for the reaction HO + H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was measured as (1.57 +- 0.23) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. This agrees well with the two latest determinations and serves as a calibration of the experimental apparatus used. The Cl + ClNO reaction rate constant was determined to be (1.65 +- 0.32) x 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. The rate constant for the reaction of Cl + ClNO/sub 2/ was found to be (5.05 +- 0.75) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. This is the first direct measurement of this rate constant. The photodissociation of ClNO/sub 2/ was studied in great detail. The absorption cross sections were measured in the ultraviolet and found to be substantially lower than the literature values in the Cl/sub 2/ absorption region (300 to 360 nm). Two product channels were investigated; products representative of the two channels were Cl and O atoms. Absolute calibration for the product detection systems was provided by Cl/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ photolysis respectively. The quantum uields measured for photolysis at 350 nm, calcualted using the absorption spectrum measured in this work, are: 0.93 +- 0.1 for Cl and less than or equal to 0.025 for O. An upper limit of 0.1 was measured for the O atom channel in ClOHO/sub 2/ photolysis.

  4. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs. PMID:21410278

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO{sub 2} FORMATION BY SURFACE REACTIONS OF NON-ENERGETIC OH RADICALS WITH CO MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira; Hama, Tetsuya; Pirronello, Valerio

    2010-04-01

    Surface reactions between carbon monoxide and non-energetic hydroxyl radicals were carried out at 10 K and 20 K in order to investigate possible reaction pathways to yield carbon dioxide in dense molecular clouds. Hydroxyl radicals, produced by dissociating water molecules in microwave-induced plasma, were cooled down to 100 K prior to the introduction of CO. The abundances of species were monitored in situ using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Formation of CO{sub 2} was clearly observed, even at 10 K, suggesting that reactions of CO with OH proceed with little or no activation barrier. The present results indicate that CO{sub 2} formation, due to reactions between CO and OH, occurs in tandem with H{sub 2}O formation, and this may lead to the formation of CO{sub 2} ice in polar environments, as typically observed in molecular clouds.

  6. Products of the OH radical-initiated gas-phase reaction of fluorene in the presence of NO x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger; Harger, William P.; McElroy, Patricia A.

    The products of the OH radical-initiated gas-phase reaction of fluorene in the presence of NO x were investigated in a 6400 ℓ all-Teflon chamber. Teh reaction products identified were fluorenone, 1-, 2-, 3- 4-nitrofluorene, three hydroxyfluorene isomers, three nitrofluorenone isomers and three hydroxynitrofluorene isomers. Of the reaction products identified, fluorenone was formed in the highest yield (9 ± 5%). The formation yields of the individual nitrofluorenes were in the order 3-nitrofluorene > 1- nitrofluorene > 4-nitrofluorene > 2-nitrofluorene, with the average 3-nitrofluorene yield being 1.4% and the total nitrofluorene yield being 2.5%. Diesel soot and ambient particulate matter showed relatively low concentrations of total nitrofluorenes when compared with the other nitro-PAH present. The measured ambient atmospheric concentrations of the nitrofluorenes were compared with levels expected on the basis of the nitrofluorene product yields from the OH radical-initiated reaction of fluorene.

  7. Rh-Catalyzed Decarbonylation of Conjugated Ynones via Carbon–Alkyne Bond Activation: Reaction Scope and Mechanistic Exploration via DFT Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dermenci, Alpay; Whittaker, Rachel E.; Gao, Yang; Cruz, Faben A.; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-01-01

    In this full article, detailed development of a catalytic decarbonylation of conjugated monoynones to synthesize disubstituted alkynes is described. The reaction scope and limitation has been thoroughly investigated, and a broad range of functional groups including heterocycles were compatible under the catalytic conditions. Mechanistic exploration via DFT calculations has also been executed. Through the computational study, a proposed catalytic mechanism has been carefully evaluated. These efforts are expected to serve as an important exploratory study for developing catalytic alkyne-transfer reactions via carbon−alkyne bond activation. PMID:26229587

  8. Calculational and Experimental Investigations of the Pressure Effects on Radical - Radical Cross Combinations Reactions: C2H5 + C2H3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, Askar; Halpern, Joshua B.; Tardy, Dwight C.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure-dependent product yields have been experimentally determined for the cross-radical reaction C2H5 + C2H3. These results have been extended by calculations. It is shown that the chemically activated combination adduct, 1-C4H8*, is either stabilized by bimolecular collisions or subject to a variety of unimolecular reactions including cyclizations and decompositions. Therefore the "apparent" combination/disproportionation ratio exhibits a complex pressure dependence. The experimental studies were performed at 298 K and at selected pressures between about 4 Torr (0.5 kPa) and 760 Torr (101 kPa). Ethyl and vinyl radicals were simultaneously produced by 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of C2H5COC2H3 or photolysis of C2H3Br and C2H5COC2H5. Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC/MS/FID) were used to identify and quantify the final reaction products. The major combination reactions at pressures between 500 (66.5 kPa) and 760 Torr are (1c) C2H5 + C2H3 yields 1-butene, (2c) C2H5 + C2H5 yields n-butane, and (3c) C2H3 + C2H3 yields 1,3-butadiene. The major products of the disproportionation reactions are ethane, ethylene, and acetylene. At moderate and lower pressures, secondary products, including propene, propane, isobutene, 2-butene (cis and trans), 1-pentene, 1,4-pentadiene, and 1,5-hexadiene are also observed. Two isomers of C4H6, cyclobutene and/or 1,2-butadiene, were also among the likely products. The pressure-dependent yield of the cross-combination product, 1-butene, was compared to the yield of n-butane, the combination product of reaction (2c), which was found to be independent of pressure over the range of this study. The [ 1-C4H8]/[C4H10] ratio was reduced from approx.1.2 at 760 Torr (101 kPa) to approx.0.5 at 100 Torr (13.3 kPa) and approx.0.1 at pressures lower than about 5 Torr (approx.0.7 kPa). Electronic structure and RRKM calculations were used to simulate both unimolecular and bimolecular processes. The relative importance

  9. Are HO radicals produced in the reaction of O(3P) with 1-C4H8 ?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luria, M.; Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reaction of O(3P) with 1-C4H8 was examined in the presence of CO which scavenges HO radicals to produce CO2. From the CO2 quantum yield, an upper limit to the efficiency of HO production in the reaction of O(3P) with 1-C4H8 was found to be 0.020 at both 298 and 473 K.

  10. POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS: GAS-PHASE HYDROXYL RADICAL REACTIONS AND RELATED ATMOSPHERIC REMOVAL. (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase reactions with the hydroxyl radical (OH) are
    expected to be an important removal pathway of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans
    (PCDD/F)
    in the atmosphere. Our laboratory recently developed
    a system to measure the rate constants of ...

  11. FORMATION OF BETA-HYDROXYCARBONYLS FROM THE OH RADICAL-INITIATED REACTIONS OF SELECTED ALKENES (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    -Hydroxycarbonyls can be formed from the gas-phase
    reactions of alkenes with the OH radical, both in the presence
    and in the absence of NO. To date, because of analytical
    difficulties, few data have been r...

  12. Proposed chemical mechanisms leading to secondary organic aerosol in the reactions of aliphatic amines with hydroxyl and nitrate radicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence and importance of amines in the atmosphere continues to gain more attention including aliphatic amines commonly associated with agricultural facilities. The atmospheric reaction mechanisms of these amines with key atmospheric radicals are important to predict both daytime and nighttime...

  13. Involvement of active oxygen in lipid peroxide radical reaction of epidermal homogenate following ultraviolet light exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, J.; Ogura, R.; Sugiyama, M.; Hidaka, T.; Kohno, M. )

    1991-07-01

    To elucidate the radical mechanism of lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study was made on epidermal homogenate prepared from albino rat skin. The exposure of the homogenate to UV light resulted in an increase in lipid peroxide content, which was proportional to the time of UV exposure. Using ESR spin trapping (dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, DMPO), the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals (L.) was measured following UV exposure (DMPO-L.:aN = 15.5 G, aH = 22.7 G), as was the spectrum of DMPO-hydroxyl radical (DMPO-OH, aN = aH = 15.5 G). In the presence of superoxide dismutase, the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals was found to be reduced remarkably. Therefore, it was shown that the generation of the lipid radicals partially involves superoxide anion radicals, in addition to hydroxyl radicals. In the ESR free-radical experiment, an ESR signal appeared at g = 2.0064 when the ESR tube filled with homogenate was exposed to UV light at -150 degrees C. The temperature-dependent change in the ESR free radical signal of homogenate exposed to UV light was observed at temperatures varying from -150 degrees C to room temperature. By using degassed samples, it was confirmed that oxygen is involved in the formation of the lipid peroxide radicals (LOO.) from the lipid radicals (L.).

  14. Hydroxy- and silyloxy-substituted TEMPO derivatives for the living free-radical polymerization of styrene and n-butyl acrylate: synthesis, kinetics, and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Christoph Alexander; Studer, Armido

    2003-12-31

    The synthesis of new 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) styryl derivatives as mediators for the living free-radical polymerization is described. Two of the alpha-methyl groups at the 2- and 6-position of the parent TEMPO styryl alkoxyamine have been replaced by hydroxymethyl and silyloxymethyl groups. To further increase the steric hindrance around the alkoxyamine oxygen atom, the remaining two methyl groups have been substituted with larger ethyl groups. Styrene polymerizations using hydroxy-substituted TEMPO derivatives are fast, but are not well-controlled. As previously shown for other OH-substituted alkoxyamines, intramolecular H-bonding leads to an acceleration of the C-O bond homolysis and, hence, to an acceleration of the polymerization process. However, the OH groups also increase the alkoxyamine decomposition rate constant. The kinetics of the C-O bond homolysis have been determined using EPR spectroscopy. Decomposition studies have been conducted with the aid of 1H NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to the OH-substituted alkoxyamines, highly hindered silyloxy-substituted TEMPO alkoxyamines turned out to be excellent mediator/initiators for the controlled styrene polymerization. Polystyrene with M(n) of up to 80 000 g/mol and narrow polydispersities (PDI) has been prepared using the new alkoxyamines. Reactions have been conducted at 105 degrees C; however, even at 90 degrees C controlled but slow polymerizations can be achieved. Furthermore, and more importantly, poly(n-butyl acrylates) with narrow PDIs (<1.15) have been prepared at 105 degrees C with the new alkoxyamines. Controlled acrylate polymerization can be conducted at temperatures as low as 90 degrees C. The silylated alkoxyamines presented belong to the most efficient initiator/mediators for the controlled acrylate polymerization known to date. The effect of the addition of free nitroxide on the acrylate polymerization is discussed. Moreover, the synthesis of diblock copolymers with narrow

  15. Preparation and use of samarium diiodide (SmI(2)) in organic synthesis: the mechanistic role of HMPA and Ni(II) salts in the samarium Barbier reaction.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Dhandapani V; Choquette, Kimberly A; Flowers, Robert A

    2013-02-04

    Although initially considered an esoteric reagent, SmI(2) has become a common tool for synthetic organic chemists. SmI(2) is generated through the addition of molecular iodine to samarium metal in THF.(1,2-3) It is a mild and selective single electron reductant and its versatility is a result of its ability to initiate a wide range of reductions including C-C bond-forming and cascade or sequential reactions. SmI(2) can reduce a variety of functional groups including sulfoxides and sulfones, phosphine oxides, epoxides, alkyl and aryl halides, carbonyls, and conjugated double bonds.(2-12) One of the fascinating features of SmI-(2)-mediated reactions is the ability to manipulate the outcome of reactions through the selective use of cosolvents or additives. In most instances, additives are essential in controlling the rate of reduction and the chemo- or stereoselectivity of reactions.(13-14) Additives commonly utilized to fine tune the reactivity of SmI(2) can be classified into three major groups: (1) Lewis bases (HMPA, other electron-donor ligands, chelating ethers, etc.), (2) proton sources (alcohols, water etc.), and (3) inorganic additives (Ni(acac)(2), FeCl(3), etc).(3) Understanding the mechanism of SmI(2) reactions and the role of the additives enables utilization of the full potential of the reagent in organic synthesis. The Sm-Barbier reaction is chosen to illustrate the synthetic importance and mechanistic role of two common additives: HMPA and Ni(II) in this reaction. The Sm-Barbier reaction is similar to the traditional Grignard reaction with the only difference being that the alkyl halide, carbonyl, and Sm reductant are mixed simultaneously in one pot.(1,15) Examples of Sm-mediated Barbier reactions with a range of coupling partners have been reported,(1,3,7,10,12) and have been utilized in key steps of the synthesis of large natural products.(16,17) Previous studies on the effect of additives on SmI(2) reactions have shown that HMPA enhances the

  16. Preparation and Use of Samarium Diiodide (SmI2) in Organic Synthesis: The Mechanistic Role of HMPA and Ni(II) Salts in the Samarium Barbier Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Dhandapani V.; Choquette, Kimberly A.; Flowers, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Although initially considered an esoteric reagent, SmI2 has become a common tool for synthetic organic chemists. SmI2 is generated through the addition of molecular iodine to samarium metal in THF.1,2-3 It is a mild and selective single electron reductant and its versatility is a result of its ability to initiate a wide range of reductions including C-C bond-forming and cascade or sequential reactions. SmI2 can reduce a variety of functional groups including sulfoxides and sulfones, phosphine oxides, epoxides, alkyl and aryl halides, carbonyls, and conjugated double bonds.2-12 One of the fascinating features of SmI-2-mediated reactions is the ability to manipulate the outcome of reactions through the selective use of cosolvents or additives. In most instances, additives are essential in controlling the rate of reduction and the chemo- or stereoselectivity of reactions.13-14 Additives commonly utilized to fine tune the reactivity of SmI2 can be classified into three major groups: (1) Lewis bases (HMPA, other electron-donor ligands, chelating ethers, etc.), (2) proton sources (alcohols, water etc.), and (3) inorganic additives (Ni(acac)2, FeCl3, etc).3 Understanding the mechanism of SmI2 reactions and the role of the additives enables utilization of the full potential of the reagent in organic synthesis. The Sm-Barbier reaction is chosen to illustrate the synthetic importance and mechanistic role of two common additives: HMPA and Ni(II) in this reaction. The Sm-Barbier reaction is similar to the traditional Grignard reaction with the only difference being that the alkyl halide, carbonyl, and Sm reductant are mixed simultaneously in one pot.1,15 Examples of Sm-mediated Barbier reactions with a range of coupling partners have been reported,1,3,7,10,12 and have been utilized in key steps of the synthesis of large natural products.16,17 Previous studies on the effect of additives on SmI2 reactions have shown that HMPA enhances the reduction potential of SmI2 by

  17. Reaction kinetics and efficiencies for the hydroxyl and sulfate radical based oxidation of artificial sweeteners in water.

    PubMed

    Toth, Janie E; Rickman, Kimberly A; Venter, Andre R; Kiddle, James J; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2012-10-11

    Over the past several decades, the increased use of artificial sweeteners as dietary supplements has resulted in rising concentrations of these contaminants being detected in influent waters entering treatment facilities. As conventional treatments may not quantitatively remove these sweeteners, radical-based advanced oxidation and reduction (AO/RP) treatments could be a viable alternative. In this study, we have established the reaction kinetics for both hydroxyl ((•)OH) and sulfate (SO(4)(•-)) radical reaction with five common artificial sweeteners, as well as their associated reaction efficiencies. Rate constants for acesulfame K, aspartame, rebaudioside A, saccharin, and sucralose were <2 × 10(7), (2.28 ± 0.02) × 10(9), (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10(8), <2 × 10(7), and (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) for the sulfate radical, and (3.80 ± 0.27) × 10(9), (6.06 ± 0.05) × 10(9), (9.97 ± 0.12) × 10(9), (1.85 ± 0.01) × 10(9), and (1.50 ± 0.01) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the hydroxyl radical, respectively. These latter values have to be combined with their corresponding reaction efficiencies of 67.9 ± 0.9, 52.2 ± 0.7, 43.0 ± 2.5, 52.7 ± 2.9, and 98.3 ± 3.5% to give effective rate constants for the hydroxyl radical reaction that can be used in the modeling of the AOP based removal of these contaminants.

  18. Reaction of long-lived radicals and vitamin C in γ-irradiated mammalian cells and their model system at 295 K. Tunneling reaction in biological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Yoshio; Kumada, Takayuki; Koyama, Sinji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1997-05-01

    When golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells or concentrated albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3) that is a model system of cells is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced can be observed by ESR. The organic radicals survive at both 295 and 310 K for such a long time as 20 h. The long-lived radicals in GHE cells and the albumin solution react with vitamin C by the rate constants of 0.007 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively. The long-lived radicals in human cells cause gene mutation, which is suppressed by addition of vitamin C. The isotope effect on the rate constant ( k) for the reaction of the long-lived radicals and vitamin C has been studied in the albumin solution by use of protonated vitamin C and deuterated vitamin C. The isotope effect ( kH/ kD) was more than 20 ≈ 50 and was interpreted in terms of tunneling reaction.

  19. Reactions of 2-(pyrrol-1-yl)benzyl radicals and related species under flash vacuum pyrolysis conditions.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, J I G; Clark, Bernard A J; Ford, Daniel; Macdonald, Ranald J; Macpherson, Andrew D; McNab, Hamish; Nicolson, Iain S; Reed, David; Sommerville, Craig C

    2009-12-21

    2-(Pyrrol-1-yl)phenoxyl, aminyl, thiophenoxyl and benzyl radicals 2a-2d, respectively, were generated in the gas-phase under flash vacuum pyrolysis conditions. In all cases except the phenoxyl, cyclisation took place providing acceptable synthetic routes to the fused heterocycles 11, 14 and 15, respectively. Only sigmatropic rearrangement products were isolated, in low yields, from the phenoxyl 2a. The pyrrolo[1,2-a]benzimidazole 11 adopts the 1H-tautomer exclusively in chloroform solution. Electrophilic substitution reactions of pyrrolo[2,1-b]benzothiophene 14 were studied, including protonation, deuterium exchange, Vilsmeier formylation and reaction with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate. 2-(2,5-Diarylpyrrol-1-yl)thiophenoxyl, phenoxyl and aminyl radicals 23a-f, were also generated in the gas-phase under similar conditions. The thiophenoxyls 23a/b gave extremely complex pyrolysate mixtures in which primary cyclisation products were formed by attack of the radical at the pyrrrole ring and attack at the ipso-, ortho- and meta- positions of the aryl ring. Secondary pyrolysis products were obtained by specific sigmatropic shifts of the N-aryl group. The 2,5-di(thien-2-yl)thiophenoxyl radical 23c gave the pyrrolobenzothiazole 31c as the only cyclisation product in low yield. FVP of the phenoxyl and aminyl radical generators 26d and 26f, respectively, gave 3-arylpyrrolo[1,2-f]phenanthridines 46d and 46f, respectively, by a hydrogen transfer-cyclisation mechanism.

  20. A time-domain EPR study of the SO - 3 combination reaction: Radical pair CIDEP without singlet-triplet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, D. M.; Lawler, R. G.

    1987-05-01

    The radical ion ṡSO-3 was studied by in situ pulsed radiolysis of aqueous alkaline sodium sulfite solutions in a pulsed EPR spectrometer. Initial radical concentrations on the order of 5×10-4 M were generated, and detailed measurements of the decay of ṡSO-3 magnetization were performed on the microsecond time scale. It was found that the second order decay of both longitudinal and transverse magnetization lags behind the second order decay of radical population when the reaction rate approaches the relaxation rates 1/T1,2. The observations may be explained in terms of the spin-pairing requirements for formation of a singlet reaction product. The spin pairing gives rise to a ``passive'' form of radical pair mechanism (RPM) chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) which has previously gone unrecognized. RPM polarization therefore occurs in ṡSO-3 encounters despite the lack of hyperfine dependent singlet-triplet mixing between radical reencounters, which is necessary for the accepted RPM mechanism. The implications of these observations for the interpretation of time-resolved EPR experiments are discussed.

  1. Kinetics of the radical-radical reaction, O(3P(J)) + OH(X2Pi omega) --> O2 + H, at temperatures down to 39 K.

    PubMed

    Carty, David; Goddard, Andrew; Köhler, Sven P K; Sims, Ian R; Smith, Ian W M

    2006-03-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between O atoms and OH radicals, both in their electronic ground state, have been investigated at temperatures down to ca. 39 K. The experiments employed a CRESU (Cinétique deRéaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme) apparatus to attain low temperatures. Both reagents were created using pulsed laser photolysis at 157.6 nm of mixtures containing H2O and O2 diluted in N2 carrier gas. OH radicals were formed by both direct photolysis of H2O and the reaction between O(1D) atoms and H2O. O(3P) atoms were formed both as a direct product of O2 photolysis and by the rapid quenching of O(1D) atoms formed in that photolysis by N2 and O2. The rates of removal of OH radicals were observed by laser-induced fluorescence, and concentrations of O atoms were estimated from a knowledge of the absorption cross-section for O2 at 157.6 nm and of the measured fluence from the F2 laser at this wavelength. To obtain a best estimate of the rate constants for the O + OH reaction, we had to correct the raw experimental data for the following: (a) the decrease in the laser fluence along the jet due to the absorption by O2 in the gas mixture, (b) the increase in temperature, and consequent decrease in gas density, as a result of energy released in the photochemical and chemical processes that occurred, and (c) the formation of OH(v = 0) as a result of relaxation, particularly by O2, of OH radicals formed in levels v > 0. Once these corrections were made, the rate constant for reaction between OH and O(3P) atoms showed little variation in the temperature range of 142 to 39 K and had a value of (3.5 +/- 1.0) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). It is recommended that this value is used in future chemical models of dense interstellar clouds.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of the 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) Radical Cation-Scavenging Reaction Products of Arbutin.

    PubMed

    Tai, Akihiro; Ohno, Asako; Ito, Hideyuki

    2016-09-28

    Arbutin, a glucoside of hydroquinone, has shown strong 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation-scavenging activity, especially in reaction stoichiometry. This study investigated the reaction mechanism of arbutin against ABTS radical cation that caused high stoichiometry of arbutin in an ABTS radical cation-scavenging assay. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture of arbutin and ABTS radical cation indicated the existence of two reaction products. The two reaction products were purified and identified to be a covalent adduct of arbutin with an ABTS degradation fragment and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. A time-course study of the radical-scavenging reactions of arbutin and the two reaction products suggested that one molecule of arbutin scavenges three ABTS radical cation molecules to generate an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct as a final reaction product. The results suggest that one molecule of arbutin reduced two ABTS radical cation molecules to ABTS and then cleaved the third ABTS radical cation molecule to generate two products, an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of the 2,2'-Azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) Radical Cation-Scavenging Reaction Products of Arbutin.

    PubMed

    Tai, Akihiro; Ohno, Asako; Ito, Hideyuki

    2016-09-28

    Arbutin, a glucoside of hydroquinone, has shown strong 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation-scavenging activity, especially in reaction stoichiometry. This study investigated the reaction mechanism of arbutin against ABTS radical cation that caused high stoichiometry of arbutin in an ABTS radical cation-scavenging assay. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture of arbutin and ABTS radical cation indicated the existence of two reaction products. The two reaction products were purified and identified to be a covalent adduct of arbutin with an ABTS degradation fragment and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. A time-course study of the radical-scavenging reactions of arbutin and the two reaction products suggested that one molecule of arbutin scavenges three ABTS radical cation molecules to generate an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct as a final reaction product. The results suggest that one molecule of arbutin reduced two ABTS radical cation molecules to ABTS and then cleaved the third ABTS radical cation molecule to generate two products, an arbutin-ABTS fragment adduct and 3-ethyl-6-sulfonate benzothiazolone. PMID:27607833

  4. Rapid syntheses of dehydrodiferulates via biomimetic radical coupling reactions of ethyl ferulate.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fachuang; Wei, Liping; Azarpira, Ali; Ralph, John

    2012-08-29

    Dehydrodimerization of ferulates in grass cell walls provides a pathway toward cross-linking polysaccharide chains limiting the digestibility of carbohydrates by ruminant bacteria and in general affecting the utilization of grass as a renewable bioresource. Analysis of dehydrodiferulates (henceforth termed diferulates) in plant cell walls is useful in the evaluation of the quality of dairy forages as animal feeds. Therefore, there has been considerable demand for quantities of diferulates as standards for such analyses. Described here are syntheses of diferulates from ethyl ferulate via biomimetic radical coupling reactions using the copper(II)-tetramethylethylenediamine [CuCl(OH)-TMEDA] complex as oxidant or catalyst. Although CuCl(OH)-TMEDA oxidation of ethyl ferulate in acetonitrile produced mixtures composed of 8-O-4-, 8-5-, 8-8- (cyclic and noncyclic), and 5-5-coupled diferulates, a catalyzed oxidation using CuCl(OH)-TMEDA as catalyst and oxygen as an oxidant resulted in better overall yields of such diferulates. Flash chromatographic fractionation allowed isolation of 8-8- and 5-5-coupled diferulates. 8-5-Diferulate coeluted with 8-O-4-diferulate but was separated from it via crystallization; the 8-O-4 diferulate left in the mother solution was isolated by rechromatography following a simple tetrabutylammonium fluoride treatment that converted 8-5-diferulate to another useful diferulate, 8-5-(noncyclic) diferulate. Therefore, six of the nine (5-5, 8-O-4, 8-5-c, 8-5-nc, 8-5-dc, 8-8-c, 8-8-nc, 8-8-THF, 4-O-5) diferulic acids that have to date been found in the alkaline hydrolysates of plant cell walls can be readily synthesized by the CuCl(OH)-TMEDA catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction and subsequent saponification described here. PMID:22846085

  5. Comprehensive theoretical studies on the reaction of 1-bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene with OH free radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Song, Ce; Tian, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The potential energy surfaces (PES) for the reaction of 1-bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (CF3CHCBrH) with hydroxyl (OH) free radicals is probed theoretically at the CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. All the possible stationary and first-order saddle points along the reaction paths were verified by the vibrational analysis. The calculations account for all the product channels. Based on the calculated CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ potential energy surface, the possible reaction mechanism is discussed. Six distinct reaction pathways of 1-bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (BTP) with OH are investigated. The geometries, reaction enthalpies and energy barriers are determined. Canonical transition-state theory with Wigner tunneling correction was used to predict the rate constants for the temperature range of 290-3,000 K without any artificial adjustment, and the computed rate constants for elementary channels can be accurately fitted with three-parameter Arrhenius expressions. OH addition reaction channel and the H atom abstraction channels related to the carbon-carbon double bond are found to be the main reaction channels for the reaction of 1-bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (CF3CHCBrH) with hydroxyl (OH) free radicals while the products leading to CF3CHCH + BrOH and COHF2CHCBrH + F play a negligible role. PMID:23884124

  6. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of allyl alcohol with hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunju; Chao, Kai; Sun, Jingyu; Su, Zhongmin; Pan, Xiumei; Zhang, Jingping; Wang, Rongshun

    2013-08-01

    The complex potential energy surface of allyl alcohol (CH2CHCH2OH) with hydroxyl radical (OH) has been investigated at the G3(MP2)//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. On the surface, two kinds of pathways are revealed, namely, direct hydrogen abstraction and addition/elimination. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and transition state theory are carried out to calculate the total and individual rate constants over a wide temperature and pressure region with tunneling correction. It is predicted that CH2CHOHCH2OH (IM1) formed by collisional stabilization is dominate in the temperature range (200-440 K) at atmospheric pressure with N2 (200-315 K at 10 Torr Ar and 100 Torr He). The production of CH2CHCHOH + H2O via direct hydrogen abstraction becomes dominate at higher temperature. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) has also been calculated for the title reaction. Moreover, the calculated rate constants and KIE are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zehr, Robert T.; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-04-01

    Using a variety of organic carbonyl molecules (R1C(O)R2) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that ejection of organic radicals from TiO2 surfaces is likely a prevalent reaction process occurring during heterogeneous photooxidationof organic molecules. Organic carbonyls react with coadsorbed oxygen species to form organic diolates which are more strongly bound to TiO2 than are the parent carbonyls. The parent carbonyls, when bound to TiO2(110) in an η1 configuration, are photo-inactive. However, the diolates are shown to photodecompose by ejection one of the two R substituents from the surface into the gas phase, leaving behind the carboxylate of the other R group. Theoretical calculations using DFT show that in most cases the choice of which R group is ejected can be predicted based on the C-R bond energies and, to a lesser extent, the stability of the ejected R group.

  8. Accelerated chemistry in the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and methanol at interstellar temperatures facilitated by tunnelling.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Robin J; Blitz, Mark A; Goddard, Andrew; Heard, Dwayne E

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the abundances of molecules in dense interstellar clouds requires knowledge of the rates of gas-phase reactions between uncharged species. However, because of the low temperatures within these clouds, reactions with an activation barrier were considered too slow to play an important role. Here we show that, despite the presence of a barrier, the rate coefficient for the reaction between the hydroxyl radical (OH) and methanol--one of the most abundant organic molecules in space--is almost two orders of magnitude larger at 63 K than previously measured at ∼200 K. We also observe the formation of the methoxy radical product, which was recently detected in space. These results are interpreted by the formation of a hydrogen-bonded complex that is sufficiently long-lived to undergo quantum-mechanical tunnelling to form products. We postulate that this tunnelling mechanism for the oxidation of organic molecules by OH is widespread in low-temperature interstellar environments.

  9. Verification of Radicals Formation in Ethanol-Water Mixture Based Solution Plasma and Their Relation to the Rate of Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sudare, Tomohito; Ueno, Tomonaga; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    Our previous research demonstrated that using ethanol-water mixture as a liquid medium for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the solution plasma process (SPP) could lead to an increment of the reaction rate of ∼35.2 times faster than that in pure water. This drastic change was observed when a small amount of ethanol, that is, at an ethanol mole fraction (χethanol) of 0.089, was added in the system. After this composition, the reaction rate decreased continuously. To better understand what happens in the ethanol-water mixture-based SPP, in this study, effect of the ethanol content on the radical formation in the system was verified. We focused on detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins using electron spin resonance spectroscopy to determine the type and quantity of the generated radicals at each χethanol. Results indicated that ethanol radicals were generated in the ethanol-water mixtures and exhibited maximum quantity at the xethanol of 0.089. Relationship between the ethanol radical yield and the rate of reaction, along with possible mechanism responsible for the observed phenomenon, is discussed in this paper.

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Reactions of OH Radicals with Hexenols: An Evaluation of the Relative Importance of the H-Abstraction Reaction Channel.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yanbo; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Qiao; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Zhao, Weixiong; Fang, Bo; Zhang, Weijun; Long, Bo; Long, Zhengwen

    2015-09-01

    C6 hexenols are one of the most significant groups of volatile organic compounds with biogenic emissions. The lack of corresponding kinetic parameters and product information on their oxidation reactions will result in incomplete atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. In this paper, experimental and theoretical studies are reported for the reactions of OH radicals with a series of C6 hexenols, (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-4-hexen-1-ol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, (E)-3-hexen-1-ol, and (E)-4-hexen-1-ol, at 298 K and 1.01 × 10(5) Pa. The corresponding rate constants were 8.53 ± 1.36, 10.1 ± 1.6, 7.86 ± 1.30, 8.08 ± 1.33, 9.10 ± 1.50, and 7.14 ± 1.20 (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)), respectively, measured by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID), using a relative technique. Theoretical calculations concerning the OH-addition and H-abstraction reaction channels were also performed for these reactions to further understand the reaction mechanism and the relative importance of the H-abstraction reaction. By contrast to previously reported results, the H-abstraction channel is a non-negligible reaction channel for reactions of OH radicals with these hexenols. The rate constants of the H-abstraction channel are comparable with those for the OH-addition channel and contribute >20% for most of the studied alcohols, even >50% for (E)-3-hexen-1-ol. Thus, H-abstraction channels may have an important role in the reactions of these alcohols with OH radicals and must be considered in certain atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. PMID:26274814

  11. New Evidence for Hydroxyalkyl Radicals and Light- and Thermally Induced Trapped Electron Reactions in Rhamnose.

    PubMed

    Aalbergsjø, Siv G; Sagstuen, Einar

    2015-08-01

    Radical formation and trapping of radicals in X-irradiated crystals of rhamnose at 6 K were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and ENDOR-induced EPR (EIE) techniques, complemented with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The two major radical species at 6 K were the O4-centered alkoxy radical and the intermolecularly trapped electron (IMTE), previously also detected by other authors. The current experimental results provided hyperfine coupling constants for these two species in good agreement with the previous data, thus providing a consistency check that improves their credibility. In addition to the O4-centered alkoxy radical and the IMTE, the C3-centered and C5-centered hydroxyalkyl radicals are the most prominent primary species at 6 K. The C3-centered radical appears in two slightly different conformations at 6 K, designated C and D. The C5-centered radical exhibits a coupling to a methyl group with tunneling rotation at 6 K, and analysis of one of the rotational substates (A) of the spin system yielded an understanding of the structure of this radical. Visible light bleaching of the IMTE at 6 K led to the C3-centered radical C, and thermal annealing above 6 K resulted in a conversion of the C to the D conformation. In addition, thermal annealing releases the IMTE, apparently resulting in the formation of the C2-centered radical. It is possible that the thermal decay of the IMTE also contributes to a small part of the C3-centered radical (D) population at 85 K. There are several other products trapped in rhamnose crystals directly after irradiation at 6 K, among which are resonance lines due to the C2 H-abstraction product. However, these other products are minority species and were not fully characterized in the current work.

  12. The effect of spin-orbit splitting on the association kinetics of barrierless halogen atom-hydrocarbon radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the geometry dependence of spin-orbit splitting on transition state theory (TST) predictions for radical-radical recombination rate coefficients is examined. The effects are illustrated with direct ab initio variable-reaction-coordinate (VRC)-TST calculations for the reactions of two types of hydrocarbon radicals (R = CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}) with three halogen atoms (X = F, Cl, and Br). These halogen atoms exhibit a range of spin-orbit interaction strengths, while their interactions with the two hydrocarbon radicals exhibit a range of attractiveness. The transition state dividing surfaces for these barrierless reactions occur over a range of R-X fragment separations ({approx}3-7 {angstrom}) where the magnitude of the spin-orbit splitting is strongly geometry dependent. Perturbative models for incorporating the energetic effect of spin-orbit splitting into barrierless kinetics are presented and tested. Simply neglecting the variation in the spin-orbit splitting is demonstrated to contribute an error of less than 15% to the predicted rate coefficients for all but the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, where its neglect increases the rate by up to a factor of 2. For the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, the effect of spin-orbit splitting is not perturbative and instead qualitatively changes the long-range interaction potential and association dynamics. The present theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental measurements and previous theoretical work. For the CH{sub 3} + F association reaction, the errors associated with limitations in the basis set and in the active space are studied, and a detailed comparison is made between VRC-TST and rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator variational TST.

  13. The effect of spin-orbit splitting on the association kinetics of barrierless halogen atom-hydrocarbon radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Ahren W; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B

    2010-05-13

    The effect of the geometry dependence of spin-orbit splitting on transition state theory (TST) predictions for radical-radical recombination rate coefficients is examined. The effects are illustrated with direct ab initio variable-reaction-coordinate (VRC)-TST calculations for the reactions of two types of hydrocarbon radicals (R = CH(3) and CH(2)CHCH(2)) with three halogen atoms (X = F, Cl, and Br). These halogen atoms exhibit a range of spin-orbit interaction strengths, while their interactions with the two hydrocarbon radicals exhibit a range of attractiveness. The transition state dividing surfaces for these barrierless reactions occur over a range of R-X fragment separations ( approximately 3-7 A) where the magnitude of the spin-orbit splitting is strongly geometry dependent. Perturbative models for incorporating the energetic effect of spin-orbit splitting into barrierless kinetics are presented and tested. Simply neglecting the variation in the spin-orbit splitting is demonstrated to contribute an error of less than 15% to the predicted rate coefficients for all but the CH(2)CHCH(2) + Br reaction, where its neglect increases the rate by up to a factor of 2. For the CH(2)CHCH(2) + Br reaction, the effect of spin-orbit splitting is not perturbative and instead qualitatively changes the long-range interaction potential and association dynamics. The present theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental measurements and previous theoretical work. For the CH(3) + F association reaction, the errors associated with limitations in the basis set and in the active space are studied, and a detailed comparison is made between VRC-TST and rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator variational TST.

  14. Catalytic effect of water, formic acid, or sulfuric acid on the reaction of formaldehyde with OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weichao; Du, Benni; Qin, Zhenglong

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of HCHO by OH radicals assisted by water, formic acid, or sulfur acid, the possible reaction mechanisms and kinetics have been investigated theoretically using quantum chemistry methods and transition-state theory. The potential energy surfaces calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(df,pd)//MP2(full)/6-311++G(df,pd) levels of theory reveal that, due to the formation of strong hydrogen bond(s), the relative energies of the transition states involving catalyst are significantly reduced compared to that reaction without catalyst. However, the kinetics calculations show that the rate constants are smaller by about 3, 9, or 10 orders of magnitude for water, formic acid, or sulfur acid assisted reactions than that uncatalyzed reaction, respectively. Consequently, none of the water, formic acid, or sulfur acid can accelerate the title reaction in the atmosphere.

  15. Visible-Light-Mediated Generation of Nitrogen-Centered Radicals: Metal-Free Hydroimination and Iminohydroxylation Cyclization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jacob; Booth, Samuel G; Essafi, Stephanie; Dryfe, Robert A W; Leonori, Daniele

    2015-11-16

    The formation and use of iminyl radicals in novel and divergent hydroimination and iminohydroxylation cyclization reactions has been accomplished through the design of a new class of reactive O-aryl oximes. Owing to their low reduction potentials, the inexpensive organic dye eosin Y could be used as the photocatalyst of the organocatalytic hydroimination reaction. Furthermore, reaction conditions for a unique iminohydroxylation were identified; visible-light-mediated electron transfer from novel electron donor-acceptor complexes of the oximes and Et3N was proposed as a key step of this process.

  16. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of unsaturated C6 methyl esters with hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan-De; Ni, Zhong-Hai

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a systematic ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical (OH) on typical isomers of unsaturated C6 methyl esters at the CBS/QB3 level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants at different reaction sites for all the methyl esters in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K are calculated via transition-state theory with the Wigner method for quantum tunneling effect and fitted to the modified three parameters Arrhenius expression using least-squares regression. Further, a branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has been performed.

  17. Cross Section of OH Radical Overtone Transition near 7028 cm(-1) and Measurement of the Rate Constant of the Reaction of OH with HO2 Radicals.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Fittschen, Christa

    2016-09-15

    The absorption cross section of an overtone transition of OH radicals at 7028.831 cm(-1) has been measured using an improved experimental setup coupling laser photolysis to three individual time-resolved detection techniques. Time-resolved relative OH radical profiles were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and their absolute profiles have been obtained by cw-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). HO2 radicals were quantified simultaneously at the well-characterized absorption line at 6638.21 cm(-1) by a second cw-CRDS absorption path. Initial OH concentrations and thus their absorption cross sections have been deduced from experiments of 248 nm photolysis of H2O2: OH and HO2 profiles have been fitted to a simple kinetic model using well-known rate constants. The rate constant of the reaction between OH and HO2 radicals turned out to be sensitive to the deduction of the initial OH concentration and has been revisited in this work: OH decays have been observed in the presence of varying excess HO2 concentrations. A rate constant of (1.02 ± 0.06) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) has been obtained, in good agreement with previous measurements and recent recommendations. An absorption cross section of σOH = (1.54 ± 0.1) × 10(-19) cm(2) at a total pressure of 50 Torr helium has been obtained from consistent fitting of OH and HO2 profiles in a large range of concentrations.

  18. Cross Section of OH Radical Overtone Transition near 7028 cm(-1) and Measurement of the Rate Constant of the Reaction of OH with HO2 Radicals.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Fittschen, Christa

    2016-09-15

    The absorption cross section of an overtone transition of OH radicals at 7028.831 cm(-1) has been measured using an improved experimental setup coupling laser photolysis to three individual time-resolved detection techniques. Time-resolved relative OH radical profiles were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and their absolute profiles have been obtained by cw-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). HO2 radicals were quantified simultaneously at the well-characterized absorption line at 6638.21 cm(-1) by a second cw-CRDS absorption path. Initial OH concentrations and thus their absorption cross sections have been deduced from experiments of 248 nm photolysis of H2O2: OH and HO2 profiles have been fitted to a simple kinetic model using well-known rate constants. The rate constant of the reaction between OH and HO2 radicals turned out to be sensitive to the deduction of the initial OH concentration and has been revisited in this work: OH decays have been observed in the presence of varying excess HO2 concentrations. A rate constant of (1.02 ± 0.06) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) has been obtained, in good agreement with previous measurements and recent recommendations. An absorption cross section of σOH = (1.54 ± 0.1) × 10(-19) cm(2) at a total pressure of 50 Torr helium has been obtained from consistent fitting of OH and HO2 profiles in a large range of concentrations. PMID:27556141

  19. Dissection of the radical reactions linked to fetal hemoglobin reveals enhanced pseudoperoxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ratanasopa, Khuanpiroon; Strader, Michael Brad; Alayash, Abdu I.; Bulow, Leif

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of excess hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ferrous (Fe+2) human hemoglobin (Hb) (α2β2) undergoes a rapid conversion to a higher oxidation ferryl state (Fe+4) which rapidly autoreduces back to the ferric form (Fe+3) as H2O2 is consumed in the reaction. In the presence of additional H2O2 the ferric state can form both ferryl Hb and an associated protein radical in a pseudoperoxidative cycle that results in the loss of radicals and heme degradation. We examined whether adult HbA (β2α2) exhibits a different pseudoenzymatic activity than fetal Hb (γ2α2) due to the switch of γ to β subunits. Rapid mixing of the ferric forms of both proteins with excess H2O2 resulted in biphasic kinetic time courses that can be assigned to γ/β and α, respectively. Although there was a 1.5 fold increase in the fast reacting γ /β subunits the slower reacting phases (attributed to α subunits of both proteins) were essentially the same. However, the rate constant for the auto-reduction of ferryl back to ferric for both proteins was found to be 76% higher for HbF than HbA and in the presence of the mild reducing agent, ascorbate there was a 3-fold higher reduction rate in ferryl HbF as opposed to ferryl HbA. Using quantitative mass spectrometry in the presence of H2O2 we found oxidized γ/β Cys93, to be more abundantly present in HbA than HbF, whereas higher levels of nitrated β Tyr35 containing peptides were found in HbA samples treated with nitrite. The extraordinary stability of HbF reported here may explain the evolutionary advantage this protein may confer onto co-inherited hemoglobinopathies and can also be utilized in the engineering of oxidatively stable Hb-based oxygen carriers. PMID:25750627

  20. Theoretical derivation for reaction rate constants of H abstraction from thiophenol by the H/O radical pool

    PubMed Central

    Batiha, Marwan; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Al-Harahsheh, Mohammad; Altarawneh, Ibrahem; Rawadieh, Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Reaction and activation energy barriers are calculated for the H abstraction reactions (C6H5SH + X• → C6H5S + XH, X = H, OH and HO2) at the BB1K/GTLarge level of theory. The corresponding reactions with H2S and CH3SH are also investigated using the G3B3 and CBS-QB3 methods in order to demonstrate the accuracy of BB1K functional in finding activation barriers for hydrogen atom transfer reactions. Arrhenius parameters for the title reactions are fitted in the temperature range of 300 K–2000 K. The calculated reaction enthalpies are in good agreement with their corresponding experimental reaction enthalpies. It is found that H abstraction by OH radicals from the thiophenol molecule proceed in a much slower rate in reference to the analogous phenol molecule. ΔfH298o of thiophenoxy radical is calculated to be 63.3 kcal/mol. Kinetic parameters presented herein should be useful in describing the decomposition rate of thiophenol; i.e., one of the major aromatic sulfur carriers, at high temperatures. PMID:22485200

  1. The Tropospheric Lifetimes of Halocarbons and Their Reactions with OH Radicals: an Assessment Based on the Concentration of CO-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Volz-Thomas, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    Chemical reaction with hydroxyl radicals formed in the troposphere from ozone photolysis in the presence of methane, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides provides an important removal mechanism for halocarbons containing C-H and C = C double bonds. The isotropic distribution in atmospheric carbon monoxide was used to quantify the tropospheric hydroxyl radical distribution. Here, this methodology is reevaluated in the light of recent chemical kinetic data evaluations and new understandings gained in the life cycles of methane and carbon monoxide. None of these changes has forced a significant revision in the CO-14 approach. However, it is somewhat more clearly apparent how important basic chemical kinetic data are to the accurate establishment of the tropospheric hydroxyl radical distribution.

  2. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-08-28

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH(2)CHCH(2), a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH(2)CHCH(2) radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcalmol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C(3)H(4)O (acrolein)+H, C(2)H(4)+HCO (formyl radical), and H(2)CO (formaldehyde)+C(2)H(3). A small signal from C(2)H(2)O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at me=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C(2)H(5)+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to

  3. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  4. Kinetic investigation of the reactions of NCO radicals with alkanes in the temperature range 294 to 1,113 K

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, A.; Volpp, H.R.; Wolfrum, J. . Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.)

    1994-12-01

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of NCO radicals with methane (k[sub 1]), ethane (k[sub 2]), and propane (k[sub 3]) were measured as a function of temperature in a heatable quartz reactor by means of the laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) pump-probe technique. NCO radicals were produced by the fast precursor reaction NH(a[sup 1] [Delta]) + HNCO [yields] NH[sub 2] + NCO, following the 193-nm photolysis of isocyanic acid. The measure rate coefficients can be described by the following expressions: k[sub 1](512 < T < 1,113 K) = 10[sup 12.99 [+-] 0.12] [times] exp(-34.0[+-]1.8 kJ/mol/RT) cm[sup 3]/mol s; k[sub 2](296 < T < 922 K) = 10[sup 8.21] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (6.89[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(12.2[+-]0.5 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s; and k[sub 3](300 < T < 849 K) = 10[sup 11.49] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (2.15[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(-1.8[+-]0.4 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s. A comparison with the corresponding reactions of CN, Cl, and OH radicals with alkanes suggests that all these title reactions also proceed predominantly via a hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism to form HNCO.

  5. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with diethyl ethylphosphonate and triethyl phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laversin, H.; El Masri, A.; Al Rashidi, M.; Roth, E.; Chakir, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rate coefficients for the reaction of two organophosphorus compounds: Triethyl phosphate (TEP) and Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) with OH radicals and Cl atoms at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298-352 K. The following expressions (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP and TEP: kOH+DEEP = (7.84 ± 0.65) × 10-14exp((1866 ± 824)/T), kOH+TEP = (6.54 ± 0.42) × 10-14exp((1897 ± 626)/T), kCl+DEEP = (5.27 ± 0.80) × 10-11exp(765 ± 140/T) and kCl+TEP = (5.23 ± 0.80) × 10-11exp(736 ± 110/T). These results show that the reaction of the studied compounds with Cl atoms proceeds more rapidly than that with OH radicals. The related tropospheric lifetimes suggest that once emitted into the atmosphere, TEP and DEEP can be removed within a few hours in areas close to their emission sources. TEP and DEEP are principally removed by OH radicals. However, in coastal areas where the Cl atoms' concentration is higher, TEP and DEEP removal by reaction with Cl atoms could be a competitive process.

  6. Hydroxyalkoxy radicals: importance of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on chain branching reactions in the combustion and atmospheric decomposition of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander C; Francisco, Joseph S

    2014-11-20

    During both the atmospheric oxidation and combustion of volatile organic compounds, sequential addition of oxygen can lead to compounds that contain multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. The presence of two or more of these sites on a hydrocarbon introduces the possibility of intramolecular H-bonding, which can have a stabilizing effect on the reactants, products, and transition states of subsequent reactions. The present work compares the absolute energies of two sets of conformations, those that contain intramolecular H-bonds and those that lack intramolecular H-bonds, for each reactant, product, and transition state species in the 1,2 through 1,7 H-migrations and Cα-Cβ, Cα-H, and Cα-OH-bond scission reactions in the n-hydroxyeth-1-oxy through n-hydroxyhex-1-oxy radicals, for n ranging from 1 to 6. The difference in energy between the two conformations represents the balance between the stabilizing effects of H-bonds and the steric cost of bringing the two H-bonding sites together. The effect of intramolecular H-bonding and the OH group is assessed by comparing the net intramolecular H-bond stabilization energies, the reaction enthalpies, and barrier heights of the n-hydroxyalkoxy radical reactions with the corresponding alkoxy radicals values. The results suggest that there is a complex dependence on the location of the two H-bonding groups, the location of the abstraction or bond scission, and the shape of the transition state that dictates the extent to which intramolecular H-bonding effects the relative importance of H-migration and bond scission reactions for each n-hydroxyalkoxy radical. These findings have important implications for future studies on hydrocarbons with multiple H-bonding sites.

  7. Thiyl radical reaction with thymine: absolute rate constant for hydrogen abstraction and comparison to benzylic C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Nauser, Thomas; Schöneich, Christian

    2003-09-01

    Free radical damage of DNA is a well-known process affecting biological tissue under conditions of oxidative stress. Thiols can repair DNA-derived radicals. However, the product thiyl radicals may also cause biological damage. To obtain quantitative information on the potential reactivity with DNA components, we measured the rate constant for hydrogen abstraction by cysteamine thiyl radicals from thymine C5-CH(3), k = (1.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), and thymidine-5'-monophosphate, k = (0.9 +/- 0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Hence, the hydrogen abstraction from C5-CH(3) occurs with rate constants similar to the hydrogen abstraction from the carbohydrate moieties. Especially at low oxygen concentration such as that found in skeletal muscle, such hydrogen abstraction processes by thiyl radicals may well compete against other dioxygen-dependent reactions. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction at thymine C5-CH(3) were compared to those with benzylic substrates, toluenesulfonic acid, and benzyl alcohol.

  8. Effects of Vitamin E on the Oxidative Reaction of Free Radicals in Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Benjamin; Jahan, Muhammad

    2008-03-01

    Free radicals in gamma- or x-irradiated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are investigated as a function of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol (α-T)). α-T is mixed with UHMWPE (GUR 1020) powder (e-PE) before (premix) or after (post-mix) irradiation. Pre-mix powder is also compression-molded (CM) to solid pucks (1'' thick and 2.5'' dia.) at 200^oC under constant force of 20-40 kN. Free radicals are detected using an X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer, and oxidation index (OI) (1720 cm-1) by FTIR technique. As expected, no measurable OI is detected by FTIR and thus e-PE suffers no loss in its mechanical properties. ESR data, however, suggest that α-T quenches polyethylene radicals during and/or immediately after irradiation, but it does not have any effect on the long-term oxidative reaction. The difference between the pre- and post-mix powder is apparent only at the initial stage, and the terminal oxygen-induced radicals (OIR) are produced in all irradiated samples. Both pre- and post-mix powders are found to have equal amount of residual α-T radical (tocopheroxyl).

  9. Yields of beta-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of 2-methyl-1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Aiko; Ziemann, Paul J

    2010-04-13

    Yields of beta-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates, in particles formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of C(9)-C(15) 2-methyl-1-alkenes in the presence of NO(x) were measured by using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatograph with a UV-visible (UV-vis) detector. Yields of beta-hydroxynitrates and dihydroxynitrates increased with carbon number primarily due to enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning before reaching plateaus at approximately C(14)-C(15), where the compounds were essentially entirely in the particle phase. Plateau yields of beta-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates were 0.183 +/- 0.005, 0.045 +/- 0.005, and 0.034 +/- 0.005, and, after normalization for OH radical addition to the C = C double bond, were 0.225 +/- 0.007, 0.055 +/- 0.006, and 0.042 +/- 0.006. The fractions of 1-hydroxy and 2-hydroxy beta-hydroxynitrate isomers were 0.90/0.10. Yields measured here and in our previous study of reactions of linear internal alkenes and linear 1-alkenes indicate that, for these alkene classes, the relative branching ratios for forming tertiary, secondary, and primary beta-hydroxyalkyl radicals by OH radical addition to the C=C double bond are 4.3/1.9/1.0, and the branching ratios for forming beta-hydroxynitrates from reactions of tertiary, secondary, and primary beta-hydroxyperoxy radicals with NO are 0.25, 0.15, and 0.12. The effects of H(2)O vapor and NH(3) on yields were also explored.

  10. Investigation of the formation of benzoyl peroxide, benzoic anhydride, and other potential aerosol products from gas-phase reactions of benzoylperoxy radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, Christen M.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products of the reaction of benzaldehyde with Cl atoms and with OH radicals in air in the absence of NOx were investigated in an environmental chamber in order to better understand the possible role of organic peroxy radical self-reactions in SOA formation. SOA products and authentic standards were analyzed using mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, and results show that the yields of benzoyl peroxide (C6H5C(O)OO(O)CC6H5) and benzoic anhydride (C6H5C(O)O(O)CC6H5), two potential products from the gas-phase self-reaction of benzoylperoxy radicals (C6H5C(O)OO·), were less than 0.1%. This is in contrast to results of recent studies that have shown that the gas-phase self-reactions of β-nitrooxyperoxy radicals formed from reactions of isoprene with NO3 radicals form dialkyl peroxides that contribute significantly to gas-phase and SOA products. Such reactions have also been proposed to explain the gas-phase formation of extremely low volatility dimers from autooxidation of terpenes. The results obtained here indicate that, at least for benzoylperoxy radicals, the self-reactions form only benzoyloxy radicals. Analyses of SOA composition and volatility were inconclusive, but it appears that the SOA may consist primarily of oligomers formed through heterogeneous/multiphase reactions possibly involving some combination of phenol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and peroxybenzoic acid.

  11. Gold-Catalyzed β-Regioselective Formal [3 + 2] Cycloaddition of Ynamides with Pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinghua; Chen, Gui; Zhu, Lei; Liao, Yun; Wu, Yufeng; Huang, Xueliang

    2016-09-16

    Here, we report an unprecedented gold(I)-induced β-site regioselective formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition of ynamides with pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles, giving 3-amido-7-(pyrid-2'-yl)indoles in good to excellent yields. A complex of gold(I) catalyst with ynamide was isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis for the first time. Mechanistic investigations suggest the reaction pathway involves a gold-stabilized carbocation intermediate, which in turn participated in sequential C-H bond functionalization of the ortho-position of the phenyl ring. PMID:27569125

  12. A new insight of degradation reaction mechanism on desflurane radical with a catalyst of NO: A theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongjiang; Song, Jing; Li, Xiaojun; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    The degradation reaction mechanism of desflurane radical in the presence of NO were investigated using density functional theory. The geometries of all the species were optimized at B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ method. All the energy information are determined using configuration interaction method QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ. Six connected reactions were found, which are labeled as Reaction 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 with the Gibbs barriers of 9.37, 13.74, 26.62, 0.99, 19.49 and 120.36 kJ/mol, respectively. The corresponding rate constants were also evaluated. The detailed reaction mechanism were analyzed and the results show that the Reaction 6 is a rate-determining one of all.

  13. Computational study of the reactions of methanol with the hydroperoxyl and methyl radicals. 1. Accurate thermochemistry and barrier heights.

    PubMed

    Alecu, I M; Truhlar, Donald G

    2011-04-01

    The reactions of CH(3)OH with the HO(2) and CH(3) radicals are important in the combustion of methanol and are prototypes for reactions of heavier alcohols in biofuels. The reaction energies and barrier heights for these reaction systems are computed with CCSD(T) theory extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using correlation-consistent basis sets, both augmented and unaugmented, and further refined by including a fully coupled treatment of the connected triple excitations, a second-order perturbative treatment of quadruple excitations (by CCSDT(2)(Q)), core-valence corrections, and scalar relativistic effects. It is shown that the M08-HX and M08-SO hybrid meta-GGA density functionals can achieve sub-kcal mol(-1) agreement with the high-level ab initio results, identifying these functionals as important potential candidates for direct dynamics studies on the rates of these and homologous reaction systems. PMID:21405059

  14. Theoretical study on reaction mechanisms and kinetics of cyanomidyl radical with NO.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ruei-Ching; Tsai, Chiitang; Hsu, Ling-Chieh; Chen, Hui-Lung

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of the reaction of the cyanomidyl radical (HNCN) with the NO have been investigated by the high-level ab initio molecular orbital method in conjunction with VTST and RRKM theory. The species involved have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level and their single-point energies are refined by the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-PVQZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) method. Our calculated results indicate that the favorable pathways for the formation of several isomers of an HNCN-NO complex. Formations of HNC + N(2)O (P1) and HNCO + N(2) (P2) are also possible, although these two pathways involve little activation energy. Employing the Fukui functions and HSAB theory, we are able to rationalize the scenario of the calculated outcome. The predicted total rate constants, k(total), at a 760 Torr Ar pressure can be represented by the equations k(total) = 4.39 x 10(8) T(-7.30) exp(-1.76 kcal mol(-1)/RT) at T = 298-1000 K and 1.01 x 10(-32) T(5.32) exp(11.27 kcal mol(-1)/RT) at T = 1050-3000 K, respectively, in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). In addition, the rate constants for key individual product channels are provided in a table for different temperature and pressure conditions. These results are recommended for combustion modeling applications. PMID:20222667

  15. Sulfate radical-based degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls: effects of chloride ion and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guo-Dong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Wang, Yu; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2012-08-15

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radical (SO(4)(·-)) have been recently used for soil and groundwater remediation. The presence of chloride ion in natural or wastewater decreases the reactivity of sulfate radical system, but explanations for this behavior were inconsistent, and the mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, in this paper we investigated the effect of chloride ion on the degradation of 2,4,4'-CB (PCB28) and biphenyl (BP) by persulfate, based on the produced SO(4)(·-). The results showed that the presence of chloride ion greatly inhibited the transformation of PCB28 and BP. Transformation intermediates of BP were monitored, suggesting that the chloride ion can react with SO(4)(·-) to produce chlorine radical, which reacts with BP to generate chlorinated compounds. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these processes, a kinetic model was developed for predicting the effect of chloride ion on the types of radical species and their distributions. The results showed that chloride ion could influence the selectivity of radical species and their distribution, and increase the concentration of the sum of radical species. In addition, the second-order rate constants of sulfate radical with PCBs were determined, and quantum-chemical descriptors were introduced to predict the rate constants of other PCBs based on our experimental data.

  16. Rate constants for the gas phase reaction of OH radicals with peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) at 273 and 297 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallington, Timothy J.; Atkinson, Roger; Winer, Arthur M.

    1984-09-01

    Recently, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) has been postulated to be a potential tropospheric reservoir of oxides of nitrogen, and to be important in their long-range transport. To better assess its atmospheric chemistry, absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals with peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) have been determined using a flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Rate constants of (1.13 ± 0.06) × 10-13 cm³ molecule-1 s-1 and (1.37 ± 0.05) × 10-13 cm³ molecule-1 s-1, independent of total pressure over the range 25-100 torr of argon, were determined at 273 ± 2 and 297 ± 2 K, respectively. (The errors limits represent two standard deviations; systematic errors could contribute an additional ˜10% uncertainty.) These rate constants imply that reaction with the OH radical is the most important removal process for PAN in the upper troposphere.

  17. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  18. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: Branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes

    DOE PAGES

    Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Osborn, David L.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-07-16

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e. ˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙), a likely product from the high-energymore » photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (–H = 27%, –CH3 = 73%) and (–H = 14%, –CH3 = 86%), respectively. Altogether, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.« less

  19. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: Branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Osborn, David L.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2015-07-16

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e. ˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (–H = 27%, –CH3 = 73%) and (–H = 14%, –CH3 = 86%), respectively. Altogether, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  20. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions. PMID:26204935

  1. Theoretical studies of nonadiabatic and spin-forbidden processes: Investigations of the reactions and spectroscopy of radical species relevant to combustion reactions and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yarkony, D.R.

    1993-12-01

    This research program focusses on studies of spin-forbidden and electronically nonadiabatic processes involving radical species relevant to combustion reactions and combustion diagnostics. To study the electronic structure aspects of these processes a unique and powerful system of electronic structure programs, developed over the past nine years, the BROOKLYN codes, is employed. These programs enable the authors to address questions basic to the understanding of elementary combustion processes not tractable using more standard quantum chemistry codes.

  2. Shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species and pollutants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B.

    1998-02-01

    Shock heating t-butyl hydroperoxide behind a reflected shock wave has proved to be as a convenient source of hydroxyl radicals at temperatures near 1000 K. We applied this technique to the measurement of reaction rate coefficients of OH with several species of interest in combustion chemistry, and developed a thermochemical kinetics/transition state theory (TK-TST) model for predicting the temperature dependence of OH rate coefficients.

  3. Theoretical description of spin-selective reactions of radical pairs diffusing in spherical 2D and 3D microreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Konstantin L. Lukzen, Nikita N.; Sadovsky, Vladimir M.

    2015-08-28

    In this work, we treat spin-selective recombination of a geminate radical pair (RP) in a spherical “microreactor,” i.e., of a RP confined in a micelle, vesicle, or liposome. We consider the microreactor model proposed earlier, in which one of the radicals is located at the center of the micelle and the other one undergoes three-dimensional diffusion inside the micelle. In addition, we suggest a two-dimensional model, in which one of the radicals is located at the “pole” of the sphere, while the other one diffuses on the spherical surface. For this model, we have obtained a general analytical expression for the RP recombination yield in terms of the free Green function of two-dimensional diffusion motion. In turn, this Green function is expressed via the Legendre functions and thus takes account of diffusion over a restricted spherical surface and its curvature. The obtained expression allows one to calculate the RP recombination efficiency at an arbitrary magnetic field strength. We performed a comparison of the two models taking the same geometric parameters (i.e., the microreactor radius and the closest approach distance of the radicals), chemical reactivity, magnetic interactions in the RP and diffusion coefficient. Significant difference between the predictions of the two models is found, which is thus originating solely from the dimensionality effect: for different dimensionality of space, the statistics of diffusional contacts of radicals becomes different altering the reaction yield. We have calculated the magnetic field dependence of the RP reaction yield and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization of the reaction products at different sizes of the microreactor, exchange interaction, and spin relaxation rates. Interestingly, due to the intricate interplay of diffusional contacts of reactants and spin dynamics, the dependence of the reaction yield on the microreactor radius is non-monotonous. Our results are of importance for (i) interpreting

  4. Synchrotron Photoionization Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Kinetics and Product Formation in the Allyl Radical (H2CCHCH2)Self Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, Talitha M.; Melini, giovanni; Goulay, Fabien; Leone, Stephen R.; Fahr, Askar; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Product channels for the self-reaction of the resonance-stabilized allyl radical, C3H5 + C3H5, have been studied with isomeric specificity at temperatures from 300-600 K and pressures from 1-6 Torr using time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry. Under these conditions 1,5-hexadiene was the only C6H10 product isomer detected. The lack of isomerization of the C6H10 product is in marked contrast to the C6H6 product in the related C3H3 + C3H3 reaction, and is due to the more saturated electronic structure of the C6H10 system. The disproportionation product channel, yielding allene + propene, was also detected, with an upper limit on the branching fraction relative to recombination of 0.03. Analysis of the allyl radical decay at 298 K yielded a total rate coefficient of (2.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp -11) cu cm/molecule/s, in good agreement with pre.vious experimental measurements using ultraviolet kinetic absorption spectroscopy and a recent theoretical determination using variable reaction coordinate transition state theory. This result provides independent indirect support for the literature value of the allyl radical ultraviolet absorption cross-section near 223 nm.

  5. Radical Reaction of Sodium Hypophosphite with Terminal Alkynes: Synthesis of 1,1-bis-H-Phosphinates

    PubMed Central

    Gouault-Bironneau, Sonia; Deprèle, Sylvine; Sutor, Amber; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    The room temperature radical addition of sodium hypophosphite to terminal alkynes produces the previously unknown 1-alkyl-1,1-bis-H-phosphinates in moderate yield. The reaction is initiated by R3B and air and proceeds under mild conditions in an open container. The bis-sodium salts precipitate spontaneously from the reaction mixtures, thus providing a simple purification procedure and the opportunity for multigram synthesis. The 1,1-bis-H-phosphinate products are novel precursors of the biologically important 1,1-bisphosphonates. PMID:16354097

  6. Visible-Light-Mediated Synthesis of Amidyl Radicals: Transition-Metal-Free Hydroamination and N-Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jacob; Svejstrup, Thomas D; Fernandez Reina, Daniel; Sheikh, Nadeem S; Leonori, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The development of photoredox reactions of aryloxy-amides for the generation of amidyl radicals and their use in hydroamination-cyclization and N-arylation reactions is reported. Owing to the ease of single-electron-transfer reduction of the aryloxy-amides, the organic dye eosin Y was used as the photoredox catalyst, which results in fully transition-metal-free processes. These transformations exhibit a broad scope, are tolerant to several important functionalities, and have been used in the late-stage modification of complex and high-value N-containing molecules.

  7. Reactions of ethynyl radicals - Rate constants with CH4, C2H6, and C2D6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to measure ethynyl radical reactivity with other simple molecules is described. Flash photolysis of CF3C2H, a C2H precursor, was kinetically and spectroscopically analyzed for C2H reactions with CH4, C2H6, and C2D6 and rate constants for the abstraction reaction at room temperature were determined. The experimental apparatus is described, and the acetylene feedstock purification procedures are outlined. Rate constants are provided, and additional examination of the effects of added helium showed no alterations over the pressure range 20-700 torr.

  8. Mechanistic studies of the reactions of the reduced vitamin B12 derivatives with the HNO donor Piloty's acid: further evidence for oxidation of cob(I)alamin by (H)NO.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Harishchandra; Brasch, Nicola E

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the existence of HNO in biological systems. Compared with NO (˙NO), much less is known about the chemical and biochemical reactivity of HNO. Kinetic and mechanistic studies have been carried out on the reaction between the vitamin B12-derived radical complex cob(II)alamin (Cbl(II)˙, Cbl(II)) with the widely used HNO donor Piloty's acid (PA). A stoichiometry of 1 : 2 Cbl(II) : PA was obtained and PA decomposition to HNO and benzenesulfinate (C6H5SO2(-)) is the rate-determining step. No evidence was found for nitrite (Griess assay), ammonia (Nessler's test) or NH2OH (indooxine test) in the product solution, and it is likely that HNO is instead reduced to N2. A mechanism is proposed in which reduction of Cbl(II) by (H)NO results in formation of cob(I)alamin (Cbl(I)(-)) and ˙NO. The Cbl(I)(-) intermediate is subsequently oxidized back to Cbl(II) by a second (H)NO molecule, and Cbl(II) reacts rapidly with ˙NO to form nitroxylcobalamin (NOCbl). Separate studies on the reaction between Cbl(I)(-) and PA shows that this system involves an additional step in which Cbl(I)(-) is first oxidized by (H)NO to Cbl(II), which reacts further with (H)NO to form NOCbl, with an overall stoichiometry of 1 : 3 Cbl(I)(-) : PA. Experiments in the presence of nitrite for both systems support the involvement of a Cbl(I)(-) intermediate in the Cbl(II)/PA reaction. These systems provide the second example of oxidation of cob(I)alamin by (H)NO.

  9. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    Secondary organic aerosol formed during oxidation of different volatile organic compounds is composed from a number of final and intermediate reaction products. The final products include compounds in both low and high molecular weight range called also oligomer species. These compounds can be highly volatile, as well as being semi- or low-volatility compounds. This study characterized intermediate reactive radical products formed from previously often studied alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In order to passivate those radical species nitrone spin traps were used. 5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrole-N-oxide (DMPO), and 5-dietoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) traps were able to successfully trap oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals produced from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode with mass spectrometry (MS) detection was used to scan spectra of formed spin trap adducts and the tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) to elucidate its structures as well as structures of captured radicals. The same method was applied to analyze radical species present in ambient PM2.5 samples. Few carbon- (alkyl) and oxygen- (alkoxyl) centered radicals were captured with DMPO and DEPMPO traps. The second part of this study was focused on high molecular weight (high-MW) species formed from the same reaction (alpha-pinene/ozone), but found also in fine particulate matter fractions of ambient samples. LC/MS/MS analysis of dimer species from chamber study revealed fragments that can originate from peroxide structures. Proposed reaction for these peroxide dimer formation is self reaction of two peroxyl radicals, followed by the loss of oxygen molecule. These findings emphasize the role of peroxyl (ROO) radicals in formation of high-MW products and are in line with the high O:C ratio results reported in other studies. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) extracts of three size fractions of the ambient aerosol, PM1--2.5, PM0.1--1, and PM<0

  10. Radical-based dephosphorylation and organophosphonate biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.; Loo, S.; Cordeiro, M.L.; Li, D.

    1987-04-01

    Products resulting from the degradation of organophosphonates by Escherichia coli are identified and used as a basis for evaluating mechanisms which may be the chemical basis of the biodegradation. One mechanistic hypothesis which is consistent with the biodegradation products involves radical-based dephosphorylation. Chemical modeling of this process is achieved by the reaction of alkylphosphonic acids with lead(IV) tetraacetate and electrochemical oxidation at a platinum anode.

  11. Discovery and Mechanistic Studies of Facile N-Terminal Cα–C Bond Cleavages in the Dissociation of Tyrosine-Containing Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Xiaoyan; Song, Tao; Xu, Minjie; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K.

    2014-03-28

    Gas phase fragmentations of protein and peptide (M) ions in a mass spectrometer—induced by, for example, electron-capture dissociation1-2 and electron-transfer dissociation3-422 —form the foundation for top-down amino acid sequencing approaches for the rapid identification of protein components in complex biological samples. During these processes, protonated protein and peptide radicals ([M + nH]•(n – 1)+)5–8 are generated; their fragmentations are governed largely by the properties of the unpaired electron. Because of their importance in modern bioanalytical chemistry, considerable attention has been drawn recently toward understanding the radical cation chemistry behind the fragmentations of these odd-electron biomolecular ions in the gas phase.

  12. Oxidation of thioanisole and p-methoxythioanisole by lignin peroxidase: kinetic evidence of a direct reaction between compound II and a radical cation.

    PubMed Central

    Brück, Thomas B; Gerini, Maria Francesca; Baciocchi, Enrico; Harvey, Patricia J

    2003-01-01

    The reaction of H2O2 with thioanisole and p-methoxythioanisole catalysed by lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been studied spectrophotometrically under turnover and single turnover conditions with a stopped-flow apparatus. Pre-formed lignin peroxidase compounds I and II are each able to react with the sulphides to form a sulphide radical cation. The radical cation is then converted into the sulphoxide either by reaction with the medium or by reaction with compound II. This is the first report of a direct reaction between compound II and the substrate radical cation. With thioanisole, significant enantiomeric selectivity and high oxygen incorporation in the sulphoxide are obtained because compound II is preferentially reduced by the enzyme-bound thioanisole radical cation compared with the neutral substrate. By contrast, with p-methoxythioanisole, the data imply formation of an intermediate ternary complex comprising compound II, radical cation and neutral substrate, such that a chain of electron transfer reactions starting from neutral molecule and progressing to oxidized haem via substrate radical cation is facilitated, yielding the native enzyme and two molecules of p-methoxythioanisole radical cation as products. The reactions of compounds I and II with sulphides imply flexing of the apoprotein moiety during catalysis. PMID:12803544

  13. Regiochemical variations in reactions of methylcubane with tert-butoxyl radical, cytochrome P-450 enzymes, and a methane monooxygenase system

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.Y.; Hollenberg, P.F.; Newcomb, M.; Putt, D.A.; Eaton, P.E.; Upadhyaya, S.P.; Xiong, Y.; Liu, K.E.; Lippard, S.J.

    1996-07-17

    Reactions of methylcubane (1) with the tert-butoxyl radical (t-BuO{sup .}), with cytochrome P-450 enzymes, and with a methane monooxygenase (MMO) system have been studied. 2-Methylcubanecarboxylic acid (9b) is a new compound prepared from cubanecarboxylic acid. The key synthetic reactions were (1) metalation and subsequent iodination of the 2-position of (diisopropylcarbamoyl)cubane to effect the initial functionalization, (2) lithium-for-iodine exchange and methylation followed by reduction to give 2-methyl-l-[(diisopropylamino)methyl]-cubane, and (3) dimethyldioxirane oxidation of this amine to give 9b. Reaction of 1 with t-BuO{sup .} in the presence of 2,2,5,5-tetramethylisoindole-N-oxyl radical (TMIO{sup .}) at 40-55{degree}C gave mainly cube-substituted products in confirmation of the report that hydrogen atom abstraction by the electrophilic alkoxyl radical at low temperature occurs at the cubyl C-H positions. In a competition experiment at 42{degree}C, methylcubane was at least 3.5 times more reactive toward t-BuO{sup .} than cyclohexane, indicating that the cubyl positions in 1 are >= 40 times more reactive than the methyl positions in 1 (per hydrogen) toward the alkoxyl radical. Oxidation of 1 by enzymes gave alcohol products that were converted to their acetate derivatives for identification and quantitation. Microsomal cytochrome P-450 enzymes from rat and the rat purified P-450 isozyme CYP2B1 hydroxylated 1 at all positions, whereas the reconstituted MMO system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) hydroxylated l only at the methyl position. 78 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part2. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation and Mechanistic Studies of z-Ions from Pentapeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Dissociations of z4 ions from pentapeptides AAXAR, where X = H, Y, F, W, and V, produce dominant z2 ions that account for >50% of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z4 ions proceed by amide transcis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable Cβ radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the Cα—CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x2 intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x2 intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z2 fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CAD and IRMPD MS4 experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x2 ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate. PMID:22669762

  15. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 2. Infrared multiphoton dissociation and mechanistic studies of z-ions from pentapeptides.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Dissociations of z(4) ions from pentapeptides AAXAR where X=H, Y, F, W, and V produce dominant z(2) ions that account for >50 % of the fragment ion intensity. The dissociation has been studied in detail by experiment and theory and found to involve several isomerization and bond-breaking steps. Isomerizations in z(4) ions proceed by amide trans→cis rotations followed by radical-induced transfer of a β-hydrogen atom from the side chain, forming stable C(β) radical intermediates. These undergo rate-determining cleavage of the C(α)-CO bond at the X residue followed by loss of the neutral AX fragment, forming x(2) intermediates. The latter were detected by energy-resolved resonant excitation collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) experiments. The x(2) intermediates undergo facile loss of HNCO to form z(2) fragment ions, as also confirmed by energy-resolved CID and IRMPD MS(4) experiments. The loss of HNCO from the x(2) ion from AAHWR is kinetically hampered by the Trp residue that traps the OCNH radical group in a cyclic intermediate. PMID:22669762

  16. Manganese(III)-catalyzed free radical reactions on trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chunying; Cai, Ting; Xu, Liaosa; Zuo, Tianming; Reid, Jonathan; Harich, Kim; Dorn, Harry C; Gibson, Harry W

    2007-12-19

    The first reactions of trimetallic nitride templated endohedral metallofullerenes (TNT EMFs) with carbon radicals generated from diethyl malonate catalyzed by manganese(III) acetate are reported. Two methano monoadducts, Sc3N@C80-A and Sc3N@C80-B, were isolated and characterized. Sc3N@C80-A contains two ester moieties, whereas Sc3N@C80-B contains only one ester group and a hydrogen atom on the central carbon of the addend. NMR spectroscopy of the two monoadducts suggests that the addition occurs regioselectively at a 6,6-ring juncture on the surface of the icosahedrally (Ih) symmetric Sc3N@C80, forming the first 6,6-ring-bridged methano Ih Sc3N@C80 derivatives. The measured 1J(C,H) = 147 Hz for the methano carbon with its hydrogen in monoadduct Sc3N@C80-B nearly perfectly matches the data for pi-homoaromatic systems, indicating an open [6,6]-methano structure. Geometry optimization also found that the "closed" [6,6]-methano structures were energetically unstable and always led to the open forms. Thus, an "open" [6,6]-methanofulleride structure is proposed, which was induced by the norcaradiene rearrangement, resulting in the cleavage of the cyclopropane ring and the formation of energetically stable open cage fullerene derivatives. These are the first examples of thermodynamically stable adducts of the "open" type at the 6,6-ring juncture of Ih Sc3N@C80, differing greatly from the "closed" 5,6-ring juncture adducts reported previously. In addition, bis-, tri-, and up to octaadducts of Sc3N@C80 were detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry; this synthetic method was also applied to Lu3N@C80, producing adducts with up to 10 substituents on the carbon cage. These are the highest levels of substitution of TNT metallofullerenes reported so far.

  17. Non-photochemical Fluorescence Quenching in Photosystem II Antenna Complexes by the Reaction Center Cation Radical.

    PubMed

    Paschenko, V Z; Gorokhov, V V; Grishanova, N P; Korvatovskii, B N; Ivanov, M V; Maksimov, E G; Mamedov, M D

    2016-06-01

    In direct experiments, rate constants of photochemical (kP) and non-photochemical (kP(+)) fluorescence quenching were determined in membrane fragments of photosystem II (PSII), in oxygen-evolving PSII core particles, as well as in core particles deprived of the oxygen-evolving complex. For this purpose, a new approach to the pulse fluorometry method was implemented. In the "dark" reaction center (RC) state, antenna fluorescence decay kinetics were measured under low-intensity excitation (532 nm, pulse repetition rate 1 Hz), and the emission was registered by a streak camera. To create a "closed" [P680(+)QA(-)] RC state, a high-intensity pre-excitation pulse (pump pulse, 532 nm) of the sample was used. The time advance of the pump pulse against the measuring pulse was 8 ns. In this experimental configuration, under the pump pulse, the [P680(+)QA(-)] state was formed in RC, whereupon antenna fluorescence kinetics was measured using a weak testing picosecond pulsed excitation light applied to the sample 8 ns after the pump pulse. The data were fitted by a two-exponential approximation. Efficiency of antenna fluorescence quenching by the photoactive RC pigment in its oxidized (P680(+)) state was found to be ~1.5 times higher than that of the neutral (P680) RC state. To verify the data obtained with a streak camera, control measurements of PSII complex fluorescence decay kinetics by the single-photon counting technique were carried out. The results support the conclusions drawn from the measurements registered with the streak camera. In this case, the fitting of fluorescence kinetics was performed in three-exponential approximation, using the value of τ1 obtained by analyzing data registered by the streak camera. An additional third component obtained by modeling the data of single photon counting describes the P680(+)Pheo(-) charge recombination. Thus, for the first time the ratio of kP(+)/kP = 1.5 was determined in a direct experiment. The mechanisms of higher

  18. Mechanistic aspects of the ethanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Maria Cruz; Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Kondarides, Dimitris I; Verykios, Xenophon E; Fierro, Jose Luis G

    2010-03-25

    Mechanistic aspects of ethanol steam reforming on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al(2)O(3) are investigated from the analysis of adsorbed species and gas phase products formed on catalysts during temperature-programmed desorption of ethanol and during ethanol steam reforming reaction. DRIFTS-MS analyses of ethanol decomposition and ethanol steam reforming reactions show that PtNi and Ni catalysts are more stable than the Pt monometallic counterpart. Ethanol TPD results on Ni, Pt, and NiPt catalysts point to ethanol dehydrogenation and acetaldehyde decomposition as the first reaction pathways of ethanol steam reforming over the studied catalysts. The active sites responsible for the acetaldehyde decomposition are easily deactivated in the first minutes on-stream by carbon deposits. For Ni and PtNi catalysts, a second reaction pathway, consisting in the decomposition of acetate intermediates formed over the surface of alumina support, becomes the main reaction pathway operating in steam reforming of ethanol once the acetaldehyde decomposition pathway is deactivated. Taking into account the differences observed in the mechanism of ethanol decomposition, the better stability observed for PtNi catalyst is proposed to be related with a cooperative effect between Pt and Ni activities together with the enhanced ability of Ni to gasify the methyl groups formed by decomposition of acetate species. On the contrary, monometallic catalysts are believed to dehydrogenate these methyl groups forming coke that leads to deactivation of metal particles. PMID:19824680

  19. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) interaction'' of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  20. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) ``interaction`` of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  1. Citronellal reactions with ozone and OH radical: Rate constants and gas-phase products detected using PFBHA derivatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. C.; Ham, J. E.; Wells, J. R.

    The bimolecular rate constants, kOH+citronellal, (150±40)×10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and, k+citronellal, (3.5±1.2)×10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, were measured using the relative rate technique for the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O 3) with 3,7-dimethyl-6-octen-1-al ((R)-(+)-citronellal) at (297±3) K and 1 atm total pressure. To more clearly define part of citronellal's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of the citronellal+OH and citronellal+O 3 reactions were also investigated. The positively identified citronellal/OH and citronellal/O 3 reaction products were: 3-methylhexanedial HC( dbnd O)CH 2CH 2CH(CH 3)CH 2C( dbnd O)H and 2-oxopropanal (methylglyoxal, CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agent O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) was used to propose 3-methylhexanedial as a major citronellal/OH and citronellal/O 3 reaction product. The elucidation of this reaction product was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible citronellal/OH and citronellal/O 3 reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound/OH and volatile organic compound/O 3 gas-phase reaction mechanisms.

  2. Highly Functionalized Cyclopentane Derivatives by Tandem Michael Addition/Radical Cyclization/Oxygenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Holan, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jones, Peter G; Jahn, Ullrich

    2015-06-26

    Densely functionalized cyclopentane derivatives with up to four consecutive stereocenters are assembled by a tandem Michael addition/single-electron transfer oxidation/radical cyclization/oxygenation strategy mediated by ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate, a recyclable, less toxic single-electron transfer oxidant. Ester enolates were coupled with α-benzylidene and α-alkylidene β-dicarbonyl compounds with switchable diastereoselectivity. This pivotal steering element subsequently controls the diastereoselectivity of the radical cyclization step. The substitution pattern of the radical cyclization acceptor enables a switch of the cyclization mode from a 5-exo pattern for terminally substituted olefin units to a 6-endo mode for internally substituted acceptors. The oxidative anionic/radical strategy also allows efficient termination by oxygenation with the free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl, and two C-C bonds and one C-O bond are thus formed in the sequence. A stereochemical model is proposed that accounts for all of the experimental results and allows the prediction of the stereochemical outcome. Further transformations of the synthesized cyclopentanes are reported.

  3. Visible-Light-Promoted Dual C-C Bond Formations of Alkynoates via a Domino Radical Addition/Cyclization Reaction: A Synthesis of Coumarins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangbiao; Xie, Xingang; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Lin; Zhong, Zhuliang; Xu, Dengyu; She, Xuegong

    2016-08-01

    A visible-light-promoted, mild, and direct difunctionalization of alkynoates has been accomplished. This procedure provides a new strategy toward synthesis of the coumarin core structure by photoredox-mediated oxidation to generate the α-oxo radical, which supervenes a domino radical addition/cyclization reaction in moderate to good yields with high regioselectivity at ambient temperature.

  4. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  5. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of esters with H(O.)2 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2013-12-27

    This work details an ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by the hydroperoxyl radical (HȮ2) on the following esters: methyl ethanoate, methyl propanoate, methyl butanoate, methyl pentanoate, methyl isobutyrate, ethyl ethanoate, propyl ethanoate, and isopropyl ethanoate. Geometry optimizations and frequency calculations of all of the species involved, as well as the hindrance potential descriptions for reactants and transition states, have been performed with the Møller-Plesset (MP2) method using the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. A validation of all of the connections between transition states and local minima was performed by intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Electronic energies for all of the species are reported at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory in kcal mol(-1) with the zero-point energy corrections. The CCSD(T)/CBS (extrapolated from CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ, in which X = D, T, Q) was used for the reactions of methyl ethanoate + HȮ2 radicals as a benchmark in the electronic energy calculations. High-pressure limit rate constants, in the temperature range 500-2000 K, have been calculated for all of the reaction channels using conventional transition state theory with asymmetric Eckart tunneling corrections. The 1-D hindered rotor approximation has been used for the low frequency torsional modes in both reactants and transition states. The calculated individual and total rate constants are reported for all of the reaction channels in each reaction system. A branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has also been investigated for all of the esters studied in this work. PMID:24175616

  6. Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Alison B.; Ogilvie, William W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant redesign of the introductory organic chemistry curriculum at the authors' institution is described. There are two aspects that differ greatly from a typical functional group approach. First, organic reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism are taught before students have learned a single reaction. The conservation of…

  7. Products and mechanism of secondary organic aerosol formation from reactions of linear alkenes with NO3 radicals.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huiming; Matsunaga, Aiko; Ziemann, Paul J

    2005-05-19

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactions of linear alkenes with NO(3) radicals was investigated in an environmental chamber using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer for particle analysis. A general chemical mechanism was developed to explain the formation of the observed SOA products. The major first-generation SOA products were hydroxynitrates, carbonylnitrates, nitrooxy peroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and dihydroxy peroxynitrates. The major second-generation SOA products were hydroxy and oxo dinitrooxytetrahydrofurans, which have not been observed previously. The latter compounds were formed by a series of reactions in which delta-hydroxycarbonyls isomerize to cyclic hemiacetals, which then dehydrate to form substituted dihydrofurans (unsaturated compounds) that rapidly react with NO(3) radicals to form very low volatility products. For the approximately 1 ppmv alkene concentrations used here, aerosol formed only for alkenes C(7) or larger. SOA formed from C(7)-C(9) alkenes consisted only of second-generation products, whereas for larger alkenes first-generation products were also present and contributions increased with increasing carbon number apparently due to the formation of lower volatility products. The estimated mass fractions of first- and second-generation products were approximately 50:50, 30:70, 10:90, and 0:100, for 1-tetradecene, 1-dodecene, 1-decene, and 1-octene SOA, respectively. This study shows that delta-hydroxycarbonyls play a key role in the formation of SOA in alkene-NO(3) reactions and are likely to be important in other systems because delta-hydroxycarbonyls can also be formed from reactions of OH radicals and O(3) with hydrocarbons.

  8. Photochemistry and radical chemistry under low intensity visible light sources: application to photopolymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Lalevée, Jacques; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Dietlin, Céline; Graff, Bernadette; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-18

    The search for radical initiators able to work under soft conditions is a great challenge, driven by the fact that the use of safe and cheap light sources is very attractive. In the present paper, a review of some recently reported photoinitiating systems for polymerization under soft conditions is provided. Different approaches based on multi-component systems (e.g., photoredox catalysis) or light harvesting photoinitiators are described and discussed. The chemical mechanisms associated with the production of free radicals usable as initiating species or mediators of cations are reported.

  9. On the radical nature of iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Hedström, Anna; Izakian, Zakieh; Vreto, Irma; Wallentin, Carl-Johan; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2015-04-01

    The radical nature of iron-catalyzed cross-coupling between Grignard reagents and alkyl halides has been studied by using a combination of competitive kinetic experiments and DFT calculations. In contrast to the corresponding coupling with aryl halides, which commences through a classical two-electron oxidative addition/reductive elimination sequence, the presented data suggest that alkyl halides react through an atom-transfer-initiated radical pathway. Furthermore, a general iodine-based quenching methodology was developed to enable the determination of highly accurate concentrations of Grignard reagents, a capability that facilitates and increases the information output of kinetic investigations based on these substrates. PMID:25703202

  10. Aqueous-Medium Carbon-Carbon Bond-Forming Radical Reactions Catalyzed by Excited Rhodamine B as a Metal-Free Organic Dye under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Eito; Kohtani, Shigeru; Jichu, Takahisa; Fukazawa, Takuya; Nagai, Toyokazu; Kawashima, Akira; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Miyabe, Hideto

    2016-08-19

    The utility of rhodamine B as a water-soluble organic photocatalyst was studied in the cascade radical addition-cyclization-trapping reactions under visible light irradiation. In the presence of (i-Pr)2NEt, the electron transfer from the excited rhodamine B to perfluoroalkyl iodides proceeded smoothly to promote the carbon-carbon bond-forming radical reactions in aqueous media. When i-C3F7I was employed as a radical precursor, the aqueous-medium radical reactions proceeded even in the absence of (i-Pr)2NEt. In these reactions, the direct electron transfer from the excited singlet state of rhodamine B would take place. Furthermore, the cleavage of the C-I bond in less reactive i-PrI could be achieved by the reductive electron transfer from the excited rhodamine B, which was confirmed by the fluorescence quenching of rhodamine B with the addition of i-PrI.

  11. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  12. Rate Constant and Temperature Dependence for the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with 2-Flouropropane (FC-281ea) and Comparison with an Estimated Rate Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMore, W.; Wilson, E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiments were used to measure the rate constant and temperature dependence of the reaction of OH radicals with 2-fluoropropane (HFC-281ea), using ethane, propane, ethyl chloride as reference standards.

  13. Electronic nonadiabatic effects in low temperature radical-radical reactions. I. C({sup 3}P) + OH({sup 2}Π)

    SciTech Connect

    Maergoiz, A. I.; Nikitin, E. E.; Troe, J.

    2014-07-28

    The formation of collision complexes, as a first step towards reaction, in collisions between two open-electronic shell radicals is treated within an adiabatic channel approach. Adiabatic channel potentials are constructed on the basis of asymptotic electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions, accounting for spin-orbit coupling within the multitude of electronic states arising from the separated reactants. Suitable coupling schemes (such as rotational + electronic) are designed to secure maximum adiabaticity of the channels. The reaction between C({sup 3}P) and OH({sup 2}Π) is treated as a representative example. The results show that the low temperature association rate coefficients in general cannot be represented by results obtained with a single (generally the lowest) potential energy surface of the adduct, asymptotically reaching the lowest fine-structure states of the reactants, and a factor accounting for the thermal population of the latter states. Instead, the influence of non-Born–Oppenheimer couplings within the multitude of electronic states arising during the encounter markedly increases the capture rates. This effect extends up to temperatures of several hundred K.

  14. Scavenging mechanism of curcumin toward the hydroxyl radical: a theoretical study of reactions producing ferulic acid and vanillin.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Neha; Mishra, P C

    2011-12-15

    Curcumin is known to be an antioxidant, as it can scavenge free radicals from biological media. A sequence of H-abstraction and addition reactions involving up to eight OH radicals and curcumin or its degradation products leading to the formation of two other antioxidants, namely, ferulic acid and vanillin, was studied. Single electron transfer from curcumin to an OH radical was also studied. All relevant extrema on the potential energy surfaces were located by optimizing geometries of the reactant and product complexes, as well as those of the transition states, at the BHandHLYP/6-31G(d,p) level of density functional theory in the gas phase. Single-point energy calculations were also performed in the gas phase at the BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. Solvent effects in aqueous media were treated by performing single-point energy calculations at all of the above-mentioned levels of theory employing the polarizable continuum model and the geometries optimized at the BHandHLYP/6-31G(d,p) level in the gas phase. A few reaction steps were also studied by geometry optimization in aqueous media, and the thus-obtained Gibbs free energy barriers were similar to those obtained by corresponding single-point energy calculations. Our calculations show that the hydrogen atom of the OH group attached to the phenol moiety of curcumin would be most efficiently abstracted by an OH radical, in agreement with experimental observations. Further, our study shows that OH addition would be most favored at the C10 site of the heptadiene chain. It was found that curcumin can serve as an effective antioxidant.

  15. 4'-CyanoPLP presents better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic intermediate radical in the reaction of lysine 5,6-aminomutase.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu

    2015-02-01

    The results of our calculations suggest that the reaction of 4'-cyanoPLP with lysine 5,6-aminomutase offers better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic azacyclopropylcarbinyl radical (I), which is proposed to be a key intermediate in the reaction of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate dependent radical aminomutases. We have calculated the corresponding hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) for (14)N and (13)C of cyano group using several basis sets to help the characterization of 4'-cyanoI.

  16. Magnetic-field-induced orientation of photosynthetic reaction centers as revealed by time-resolved W-band EPR of spin-correlated radical pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, T.; Bechtold, M.; Heinen, U.; Link, G.; Poluektov, O.; Utschig, L.; Tang, J.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Kothe, G.

    1999-12-09

    The spin-polarized W-band EPR spectra of the secondary radical pair in plant photosystem 1 indicate a magnetic-field-induced orientation of the photosynthetic reaction centers in the field of the EPR spectrometer. This orientation arises due to the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the reaction center protein. Analysis of the angular-dependent EPR spectra on the basis of the spin-correlated radical pair concept provides new information on the cofactor arrangement in plant photosystem 1.

  17. Rational Design in Catalysis: A Mechanistic Study of β-Hydride Eliminations in Gold(I) and Gold(III) Complexes Based on Features of the Reaction Valley.

    PubMed

    Castiñeira Reis, Marta; López, Carlos Silva; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter; Faza, Olalla Nieto

    2016-09-01

    β-Hydride eliminations for ethylgold(III) dichloride complexes are identified as reactions with an unusually long prechemical stage corresponding to the conformational preparation of the reaction complex and spanning six phases. The prechemical process is characterized by a geared rotation of the L-Au-L group (L = Cl) driving methyl group rotation and causing a repositioning of the ligands. This requires more than 28 kcal/mol of the total barrier of 34.0 kcal/mol, according to the unified reaction valley approach, which also determines that the energy requirements of the actual chemical process leading to the β-elimination product are only about 5.5 kcal/mol. A detailed mechanistic analysis was used as a basis for a rational design of substrates (via substituents on the ethyl group) and/or ligands, which can significantly reduce the reaction barrier. This strategy takes advantage of either a higher trans activity of the ligands or a tuned electronic demand of the ethyl group. The β-hydride elimination of gold(I) was found to suffer from strong Coulomb and exchange repulsion when a positively charged hydrogen atom enforces a coordination position in a d(10)-configured gold atom, thus triggering an unassisted σ-π Au(I)-C conversion. PMID:27537214

  18. Rational Design in Catalysis: A Mechanistic Study of β-Hydride Eliminations in Gold(I) and Gold(III) Complexes Based on Features of the Reaction Valley.

    PubMed

    Castiñeira Reis, Marta; López, Carlos Silva; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter; Faza, Olalla Nieto

    2016-09-01

    β-Hydride eliminations for ethylgold(III) dichloride complexes are identified as reactions with an unusually long prechemical stage corresponding to the conformational preparation of the reaction complex and spanning six phases. The prechemical process is characterized by a geared rotation of the L-Au-L group (L = Cl) driving methyl group rotation and causing a repositioning of the ligands. This requires more than 28 kcal/mol of the total barrier of 34.0 kcal/mol, according to the unified reaction valley approach, which also determines that the energy requirements of the actual chemical process leading to the β-elimination product are only about 5.5 kcal/mol. A detailed mechanistic analysis was used as a basis for a rational design of substrates (via substituents on the ethyl group) and/or ligands, which can significantly reduce the reaction barrier. This strategy takes advantage of either a higher trans activity of the ligands or a tuned electronic demand of the ethyl group. The β-hydride elimination of gold(I) was found to suffer from strong Coulomb and exchange repulsion when a positively charged hydrogen atom enforces a coordination position in a d(10)-configured gold atom, thus triggering an unassisted σ-π Au(I)-C conversion.

  19. Reducing power of simple polyphenols by electron-transfer reactions using a new stable radical of the PTM series, tris(2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitrophenyl)methyl radical.

    PubMed

    Torres, Josep Lluís; Carreras, Anna; Jiménez, Aurora; Brillas, Enric; Torrelles, Xavier; Rius, Jordi; Juliá, Luis

    2007-05-11

    The synthesis and characterization of a new radical and its use for testing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols by electron transfer are reported. This new and stable species of magnetic nature, tris(2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitrophenyl)methyl (TNPTM) radical, has been characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance and its molecular structure determined by X-ray analysis. This new radical of the PTM (perchlorotriphenylmethyl) series, unlike 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, is stable in conditions of hydrogen abstraction reactions. TNPTM radical is able to discriminate between the antioxidant activities of catechol and pyrogallol in hydroxylated solvent mixtures such as chloroform/methanol (2:1). These features determine the antioxidant/pro-oxidant character and the biological activities of natural and synthetic flavonoids.

  20. Aging Oxidation Reactions on Atmospheric Black Carbon by OH Radicals. A Theoretical Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Laura; Peraza, Alexander; Ruette, Fernando

    2015-12-31

    Aging processes of black carbon (BC) particles require knowledge of their chemical reactivities, which have impact on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities, radiant properties and health problems related to air pollutions. In the present work, interactions between several OH radicals with BC (modeled with a coronene molecule) were calculated by using DFT and PM6 codes as described by Mysak et al. Water interaction with BC was also included. Results show that OH radical adsorption is preferred on border sites, independent of the theoretical method employed. Potential energy curves using DFT(TPSS-D3) approach for OH chemisorption showed small-energy barriers, as reported in previous work with PM6. A dipole moment has been created, and the hydrophobic coronene surface is transformed to hydrophilic after the first OH chemisorption. Several stages were found in the BC aging by OH radicals, thus (a) Hydroxylation of coronene by several OH radical would lead to H abstractions directly from the substrate. (b) Abstraction of H from adsorbed OH (at the border sites) drives a C-C bond breaking and the formation of carboxyl groups. (c) Hydrogen abstraction from carboxyl group produces decarboxylation (CO2 plus water) as experimentally obtained. Potential energy curves of one of the reactive path were calculated with the PM6 method. The formation of products was confirmed using DFT. Coronene interaction with O2 was also considered to have a realistic atmospheric environment.

  1. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  2. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8

  3. Mechanistic Studies Lead to Dramatically Improved Reaction Conditions for the Cu-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydroamination of Olefins.

    PubMed

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Pirnot, Michael T; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-11-25

    Enantioselective copper(I) hydride (CuH)-catalyzed hydroamination has undergone significant development over the past several years. To gain a general understanding of the factors governing these reactions, kinetic and spectroscopic studies were performed on the CuH-catalyzed hydroamination of styrene. Reaction profile analysis, rate order assessment, and Hammett studies indicate that the turnover-limiting step is regeneration of the CuH catalyst by reaction with a silane, with a phosphine-ligated copper(I) benzoate as the catalyst resting state. Spectroscopic, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and nonlinear effect studies are consistent with a monomeric active catalyst. With this insight, targeted reagent optimization led to the development of an optimized protocol with an operationally simple setup (ligated copper(II) precatalyst, open to air) and short reaction times (<30 min). This improved protocol is amenable to a diverse range of alkene and alkyne substrate classes. PMID:26522837

  4. Online Monitoring Oxidative Products and Metabolites of Nicotine by Free Radicals Generation with Fenton Reaction in Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Liao, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2013-01-01

    In general, over 70% absorbed nicotine is metabolized to cotinine and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine by cytochrome oxidase P450, and nicotine is also a major addictive and the psychoactive component in cigarettes. As a xenobiotic metabolism, hydrophobic compounds are usually converted into more hydrophilic products through enzyme systems such as cytochrome oxidase P450, sulfotransferases, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to deliver drug metabolites out of the cell during the drug metabolic process. In this study, an electrodeless electrochemical oxidation (EEO) reaction via Fenton reaction by producing free radical to react with nicotine to immediately monitor the oxidative products and metabolic derivatives of nicotine by tandem mass spectrometer (MS) is done. Fenton reaction generates free radicals via ferrous ion (Fe2+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to oxidize DNA and to degrade proteins in cells. In the EEO method, the oxidative products of nicotine including cotinine, cotinine-N-oxide, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, 4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)-butanoic acid, 4-hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl)-butanoic acid, and nicotine-N′-oxide were detected by tandem mass spectrometer to simulate the changes of nicotine and its derivatives in a time-dependent manner. PMID:23983622

  5. Gas-phase reaction of methyl isothiocyanate and methyl isocyanate with hydroxyl radicals under static relative rate conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhou; Hebert, Vincent R; Miller, Glenn C

    2014-02-26

    Gaseous methyl isothiocyanate (MITC), the principal breakdown product of the soil fumigant metam sodium (sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate), is an inhalation exposure concern to persons living near treated areas. Inhalation exposure also involves gaseous methyl isocyanate (MIC), a highly reactive and toxic transformation product of MITC. In this work, gas-phase hydroxyl (OH) radical reaction rate constants of MITC and MIC have been determined using a static relative rate technique under controlled laboratory conditions. The rate constants obtained are 15.36 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MITC and 3.62 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MIC. The average half-lives of MITC and MIC in the atmosphere are estimated to be 15.7 and 66.5 h, respectively. The molar conversion of MITC to MIC for OH radical reactions is 67% ± 8%, which indicates that MIC is the primary product of the MITC-OH reaction in the gas phase.

  6. Experimental and theoretical rate coefficients for the gas phase reaction of β-Pinene with OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Manas Ranjan; Rajakumar, B.

    2013-11-01

    Rate coefficient for the reaction of β-pinene with OH radicals was determined at 298 K and 800 Torr of N2 using the relative rate technique. Isobutylene was used as a reference compound and the concentrations of the organics were followed by gas chromatographic analysis. The rate coefficient for the reaction of β-pinene with OH radical was measured to be (9.35 ± 2.79) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Theoretical kinetic calculations were also performed for the title reaction using canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with small-curvature tunneling (SCT). The kinetics data obtained over the temperature range of 200-400 K were used to derive the Arrhenius expression: k(T) = 8.24 × 10-23T3.41 exp[2421/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The OH-driven atmospheric lifetime (τ) and global warming potential (GWP) for β-pinene were computed and concluded that β-pinene is very short lived (2.5 h) in the Earth's atmosphere with a GWP of 1.6 × 10-2 at 20 years horizon of time and which is negligible. The ozone formation potential of β-pinene was also calculated and reported in this present work.

  7. Recent developments in copper-catalyzed radical alkylations of electron-rich π-systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recently, a number of papers have emerged demonstrating copper-catalyzed alkylation reactions of electron-rich small molecules. The processes are generally thought to be related to long established atom-transfer radical reactions. However, unlike classical reactions, these new transformations lead to simple alkylation products. This short review will highlight recent advances in alkylations of nitronate anions, alkenes and alkynes, as well as discuss current mechanistic understanding of these novel reactions. PMID:26734076

  8. Formation and interconversion of organo-cobalt complexes in reactions of cobalt(II) porphyrins with cyanoalkyl radicals and vinyl olefins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi-How; Li, Shan; Wayland, Bradford B

    2009-06-01

    Observation of the formation and interconversion of organo-cobalt complexes ((TMP)Co-R) is used to reveal mechanistic features in the living radical polymerization (LRP) of methyl acrylate (MA) mediated by cobalt porphyrins. Both dissociative and associative exchange of radicals in solution with organo-cobalt complexes contribute to controlling the radical polymerization. The sequence of organo-cobalt species formed during the induction period for the (TMP)Co-R mediated LRP of MA indicates that homolytic dissociation is a prominent pathway for the interconversion of organo-cobalt complexes which contrasts with the corresponding vinyl acetate (VAc) system where associative radical exchange totally dominates these processes. The dissociation equilibrium constant (K(d(333 K))) for organo-cobalt complexes formed in methyl acrylate polymerization ((TMP)Co-CH(CO(2)CH(3))CH(2)P) was estimated as 1.15 x 10(-10) from analysis of the polymerization kinetics and (1)H NMR. The ratio of the rate constants (333 K) for the cyanoisopropyl radical (*C(CH(3))(2)CN) adding with monomer (k(1)) to the process of