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Sample records for radical stability directs

  1. Radical stability directs electron capture and transfer dissociation of β-amino acids in peptides.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Vorobyev, Aleksey; Larregola, Maud; Lukaszuk, Aneta; Tourwé, Dirk; Lavielle, Solange; Karoyan, Philippe; Tsybin, Yury O

    2010-04-19

    We report on the characteristics of the radical-ion-driven dissociation of a diverse array of β-amino acids incorporated into α-peptides, as probed by tandem electron-capture and electron-transfer dissociation (ECD/ETD) mass spectrometry. The reported results demonstrate a stronger ECD/ETD dependence on the nature of the amino acid side chain for β-amino acids than for their α-form counterparts. In particular, only aromatic (e.g., β-Phe), and to a substantially lower extent, carbonyl-containing (e.g., β-Glu and β-Gln) amino acid side chains, lead to N-Cβ bond cleavage in the corresponding β-amino acids. We conclude that radical stabilization must be provided by the side chain to enable the radical-driven fragmentation from the nearby backbone carbonyl carbon to proceed. In contrast with the cleavage of backbones derived from α-amino acids, ECD of peptides composed mainly of β-amino acids reveals a shift in cleavage priority from the N-Cβ to the Cα-C bond. The incorporation of CH2 groups into the peptide backbone may thus drastically influence the backbone charge solvation preference. The characteristics of radical-driven β-amino acid dissociation described herein are of particular importance to methods development, applications in peptide sequencing, and peptide and protein modification (e.g., deamidation and isomerization) analysis in life science research.

  2. Mechanically Stabilized Tetrathiafulvalene Radical Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Coskun, Ali; Spruell, Jason M.; Barin, Gokhan; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmieli, Raanan; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Friedman, Douglas C.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Two donor-acceptor [3]catenanes—composed of a tetracationic molecular square, cyclobis(paraquat-4,4'-biphenylene), as the π-electron deficient ring and either two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) containing macrocycles or two TTF-butadiyne-containing macrocycles as the π-electron rich components—have been investigated in order to study their ability to form TTF radical dimers. It has been proven that the mechanically interlocked nature of the [3]catenanes facilitates the formation of the TTF radical dimers under redox control, allowing an investigation to be performed on these intermolecular interactions in a so-called “molecular flask” under ambient conditions in considerable detail. In addition, it has also been shown that the stability of the TTF radical-cation dimers can be tuned by varying the secondary binding motifs in the [3]catenanes. By replacing the DNP station with a butadiyne group, the distribution of the TTF radical-cation dimer can be changed from 60% to 100%. These findings have been established by several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemistry and UV-vis-NIR and EPR spectroscopies, as well as with X-ray diffraction analysis which has provided a range of solid-state crystal structures. The experimental data are also supported by high-level DFT calculations. The results contribute significantly to our fundamental understanding of the interactions within the TTF radical dimers.

  3. Competition of charge- versus radical-directed fragmentation of gas-phase protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Love, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-24

    The fragmentation behavior of various cysteine sulfinyl ions (intact, N-acetylated, and O-methylated), new members of the gas-phase amino acid radical ion family, was investigated by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). The dominant fragmentation channel for the protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals ((SO•)Cys) was the radical-directed Cα-Cβ homolytic cleavage, resulting in the formation of glycyl radical ions and loss of CH2SO. This channel, however, was not observed for protonated N-acetylated cysteine sulfinyl radicals (Ac-(SO•)Cys); instead, charge-directed H2O loss followed immediately by SH loss prevailed. Counterintuitively, the H2O loss did not derive from the carboxyl group but involved the sulfinyl oxygen, a proton, and a Cβ hydrogen atom. Theoretical calculations suggested that N-acetylation significantly increases the barrier (~14 kcal mol(-1)) for the radical-directed fragmentation channel because of its reduced capability to stabilize the thus-formed glycyl radical ions via the captodative effect. N-Acetylation also assists in moving the proton to the sulfinyl site, which reduces the barrier for H2O loss. Our studies demonstrate that for cysteine sulfinyl radical ions, the stability of the product ions (glycyl radical ions) and the location of the charge (proton) can significantly modulate the competition between radical- and charge-directed fragmentation.

  4. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  5. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(ii) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal–ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol−1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  6. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  7. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  8. Formation and stabilization of persistent free radicals

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Khachatryan, Lavrent; Maskos, Zofia; Hall, Randall W.; Adounkpe, Julien; McFerrin, Cheri; Truong, Hieu

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that stable and relatively unreactive “environmentally persistent free radicals (PFRs)” can be readily formed in the post-flame and cool-zone regions of combustion systems and other thermal processes. These resonance-stabilized radicals, including semiquinones, phenoxyls, and cyclopentadienyls, can be formed by the thermal decomposition of molecular precursors including catechols, hydroquinones and phenols. Association with the surfaces of fine particles imparts additional stabilization to these radicals such that they can persist almost indefinitely in the environment. A mechanism of chemisorption and electron transfer from the molecular adsorbate to a redox-active transition metal or other receptor is shown through experiment, and supported by molecular orbital calculations, to result in PFR formation. Both oxygen-centered and carbon-centered PFRs are possible that can significantly affect their environmental and biological reactivity. PMID:25598747

  9. Stabilization of the veratryl alcohol cation radical by lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Khindaria, A; Yamazaki, I; Aust, S D

    1996-05-21

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalyzes the H2O2-dependent oxidation of veratryl alcohol (VA) to veratryl aldehyde, with the enzyme-bound veratryl alcohol cation radical (VA.+) as an intermediate [Khindaria et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 16860-16869]. The decay constant we observed for the enzyme generated cation radical did not agree with the decay constant in the literature [Candeias and Harvey (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 16745-16748] for the chemically generated radical. Moreover, we have found that the chemically generated VA.+ formed by oxidation of VA by Ce(IV) decayed rapidly with a first-order mechanism in air- or oxygen-saturated solutions, with a decay constant of 1.2 x 10(3) s-1, and with a second-order mechanism in argon-saturated solution. The first-order decay constant was pH- independent suggesting that the rate-limiting step in the decay was deprotonation. When VA.+ was generated by oxidation with LiP the decay also occurred with a first-order mechanism but was much slower, 1.85 s-1, and was the same in both oxygen- and argon-saturated reaction mixtures. However, when the enzymatic reaction mixture was acid-quenched the decay constant of VA.+ was close to the one obtained in the Ce(IV) oxidation system, 9.7 x 10(2) s-1. This strongly suggested that the LiP-bound VA.+ was stabilized and decayed more slowly than free VA.+. We propose that the stabilization of VA.+ may be due to the acidic microenvironment in the enzyme active site, which prevents deprotonation of the radical and subsequent reaction with oxygen. We have also obtained reversible redox potential of VA.+/VA couple using cyclic voltammetery. Due to the instability of VA.+ in aqueous solution the reversible redox potential was measured in acetone, and was 1.36 V vs normal hydrogen electrode. Our data allow us to propose that enzymatically generated VA.+ can act as a redox mediator but not as a diffusible oxidant for LiP-catalyzed lignin or pollutant degradation.

  10. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  11. Effect of Substituents on the Stability of Sulfur-Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Isa; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-09-22

    High-level ab initio calculations have been used to calculate the standard and inherent radical stabilities (RSEs) of a test set of 41 sulfur-centered radicals, chosen for their relevance in fields as diverse as combustion, atmospheric chemistry, polymer chemistry, and biochemistry. Radical stability was shown to be profoundly affected by substituents, varying over a 30 kcal mol(-1) range for the test set studied. Like carbon-centered radicals, substituent effects on sulfur-centered radical stabilities result from the competition between the stabilizing effect of electron delocalization by lone pair donation and π-acceptance, and the destabilizing effect of σ withdrawal. However, in contrast to carbon-centered radicals, the heavier thiyl radicals are better able to undergo resonance and lone-pair donor interactions with heavier substituents. In particular, sulfur-containing lone pair donor and π-acceptor substituents have the greatest stabilizing effect, whereas σ-withdrawing substituents such as carbonyls and pyridines are the least stabilizing. The stabilities predicted using the standard definition and Zavitsas's inherent RSEZ scheme are shown to be in surprisingly good agreement with one another for most species tested. The RSEZ values have also been shown to be capable of making chemically accurate estimates of bond energies by comparing our calculated values with 34 currently available experimental ones. PMID:27618569

  12. Tested Demonstrations: The Effect of Free Radical Stability on the Rate of Bromination of Hydrocarbons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents a demonstration of the effect of alkyl free radical stability on the rate of free radical halogenation of hydrocarbons. The arenes toluene, ethylbenzene and comene are photobrominated comparatively, using an overhead projector both to provide a light source for the chemical reaction and to project the results on a screen. (CS)

  13. Spectroscopy and Ionization Thresholds of Isoelectronic 1-PHENYLALLYL and Benzylallenyl Resonance Stabilized Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Kidwell, Nathan; Buchanan, Evan; Zwier, Timothy S.; Zgierski, Marek

    2011-06-01

    In recent years it has been proposed that resonance-stabilized radicals (RSRs) may play an important role as intermediates in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). RSRs gain extra stability by delocalizing the unpaired electron through a neighboring conjugated π-system. Because of this extra stability, RSRs are able to build up in concentration, allowing for the creation of larger, more complex systems through their recombination with other RSRs. Mass-selective two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectra of two RSRs, phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals, have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions. These two radicals, while sharing the same radical conjugation, have unique properties. The phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals were respectively produced via discharge of trans-β-methylstyrene and benzylallene in argon prior to supersonic expansion. The D0-D1 origin of the phenylallyl radical was found at 19204 wn and was found to have a strong vertical ionization energy of 6.905(2) eV. By comparison, the benzylallenyl radical has an origin at 19703 wn and, while showing similar Franck-Condon activity to phenylallyl, has an IP curve indicative of a large geometry change between the ground state and the ion 7.50(2) eV. Visible-visible holeburning was used to show that each radical exists in one conformeric form in the expansion. The CH stretch region of each radical was taken using D0-Resonant Ion Dip Infrared Spectroscopy in a novel four laser experiment. A combination of this and DFT calculations was used to show that each radical exists in a trans geometry.

  14. Ginsenoside Rb1 directly scavenges hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Weakley, Sarah M; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in a variety of inflammatory diseases including cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, autism, cataracts and aging. When endogenous mechanisms for the maintenance of redox homeostasis are overwhelmed, dietary intake of antioxidants contributes substantially to balancing the body's oxidant/antioxidant status. Ginsenosides are thought to be primarily responsible for the pharmacological effect of P. ginseng root extracts on oxidative stress and inflammation. However, little is known about the underlying antioxidant mechanisms of individual ginsenoside; specifically, the reactivity of ginsenoside Rb1 with ROS has not been well studied. We found that Rb1 can significantly and selectively reduce hydroxyl radical (●OH) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), two of the strongest ROS, with unique molecular mechanisms in a cell-free system. Rb1 directly scavenges the ●OH and protects plasmid DNA from damage induced by ●OH. ●OH likely attacks the double bond on the side chain of Rb1 as well as hydrogen atoms adjacent to the -OH groups, including those of sugar moieties. Rb1 also shows a high reactivity to HOCl and effectively inhibits HOCl-induced tyrosine chlorination in a cell free system. HOCl is added to the double bond of Rb1; the -Cl group and -OH group of HOCl possibly bond at C-24 and C-25 of Rb1 based on the regioselectivity of Markovnikov's Rule. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that ginsenoside Rb1 scavenges HOCl and protects tyrosine from HOCl-induced chlorination. Thus, this study reveals unique antioxidant mechanisms of individual ginsenoside Rb1, which may contribute to the pharmacological effect of P. ginseng and to the development of effective strategies for clinical applications of ginsenosides.

  15. Convection and morphological stability during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, Sam R.; Chernov, A. A.; Murray, Bruce T.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1994-01-01

    For growth of a vicinal face at constant velocity, the effect of anisotropic interface kinetics on morphological stability is calculated for a binary alloy. The dependence of the interface kinetic coefficient on crystallographic orientation is based on the motion and density of steps. Anisotropic kinetics give rise to traveling waves along the crystal-melt interface, and can lead to a significant enhancement of morphological stability. The stability enhancement increases as the orientation approaches a singular orientation and as the solidification velocity increases. Shear flows interact with the traveling waves and, depending on the direction of the flow, may either stabilize or destabilize the interface. Specific calculations are carried out for germanium-silicon alloys.

  16. The properties and Roles of Resonance-Stabilized Radicals in Photochemical Pathways in Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Kidwell, Nathan; Zwier, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, the Cassini satellite has been providing details about the composition of Titan's atmosphere. Recent data has shown the existence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at higher altitudes than previously expected including masses tentatively ascribed to naphthalene and anthracene. The formation of indene (C9H9) and naphthalene (C10H8), the simplest PAHs, and their derivatives are of great interest as similar mechanisms may lead to the formation of larger fused-ring systems. In recent years it has been proposed that resonance-stabilized radicals (RSRs) may play an important role as intermediates along these pathways. RSRs gain extra stability by delocalizing the unpaired electron through a neighboring conjugated π-system. Because of this extra stability, RSRs are able to build up in concentration, allowing for the creation of larger, more complex systems through their recombination with other RSRs. Mass-selective UV-visible spectra of two RSRs, phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals, have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions. These two radicals, while sharing the same radical conjugation, have unique properties. The roles these radicals may play in the formation of fused ring systems will be discussed along with recent photochemical results on reaction pathways starting from benzylallene through the benzylallenyl radical.

  17. 14 CFR 23.177 - Static directional and lateral stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional and lateral stability... Flight Stability § 23.177 Static directional and lateral stability. (a) The static directional stability... stability, as shown by the tendency to raise the low wing in a sideslip, must be positive for all...

  18. 14 CFR 23.177 - Static directional and lateral stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static directional and lateral stability... Flight Stability § 23.177 Static directional and lateral stability. (a) The static directional stability... stability, as shown by the tendency to raise the low wing in a sideslip, must be positive for all...

  19. Discovery of hypoiodite-mediated aminyl radical cyclization lacking a nitrogen radical-stabilizing group: application to synthesis of an oxazaspiroketal-containing cephalostatin analog.

    PubMed

    Koag, Myong; Lee, Seongmin

    2011-09-16

    Synthesis of an oxazaspiroketal-containing bissteroidal pyrazine is described. The key transformation of this synthesis involves stereoselective formation of oxazaspiroketal via aminyl-radical cyclization of primary amine lacking a radical-stabilizing group by Suárez hypoiodite oxidation.

  20. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C-H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursalian, Gregory B.; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C-H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C-H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C-H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C-H functionalization reactions.

  1. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C–H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursalian, Gregory B.; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C–H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C–H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C–H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C–H functionalization reactions.

  2. Linear stability of directional solidification cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A. ); Levine, H. )

    1990-03-15

    We formulate the problem of finding the stability spectrum of the cellular pattern seen in directional solidification. This leads to a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for an integro-differential operator. We solve this problem numerically and compare our results to those obtained by linearizing the eigenvalue problem by employing the quasistatic approximation. Contrary to some recent claims, we find no evidence for a Hopf bifurcation to a dendritic pattern.

  3. Sensing magnetic directions in birds: radical pair processes involving cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Birds can use the geomagnetic field for compass orientation. Behavioral experiments, mostly with migrating passerines, revealed three characteristics of the avian magnetic compass: (1) it works spontaneously only in a narrow functional window around the intensity of the ambient magnetic field, but can adapt to other intensities, (2) it is an "inclination compass", not based on the polarity of the magnetic field, but the axial course of the field lines, and (3) it requires short-wavelength light from UV to 565 nm Green. The Radical Pair-Model of magnetoreception can explain these properties by proposing spin-chemical processes in photopigments as underlying mechanism. Applying radio frequency fields, a diagnostic tool for radical pair processes, supports an involvement of a radical pair mechanism in avian magnetoreception: added to the geomagnetic field, they disrupted orientation, presumably by interfering with the receptive processes. Cryptochromes have been suggested as receptor molecules. Cry1a is found in the eyes of birds, where it is located at the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the UV-cones in chickens and robins. Immuno-histochemical studies show that it is activated by the wavelengths of light that allow magnetic compass orientation in birds.

  4. Sensing magnetic directions in birds: radical pair processes involving cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Birds can use the geomagnetic field for compass orientation. Behavioral experiments, mostly with migrating passerines, revealed three characteristics of the avian magnetic compass: (1) it works spontaneously only in a narrow functional window around the intensity of the ambient magnetic field, but can adapt to other intensities, (2) it is an "inclination compass", not based on the polarity of the magnetic field, but the axial course of the field lines, and (3) it requires short-wavelength light from UV to 565 nm Green. The Radical Pair-Model of magnetoreception can explain these properties by proposing spin-chemical processes in photopigments as underlying mechanism. Applying radio frequency fields, a diagnostic tool for radical pair processes, supports an involvement of a radical pair mechanism in avian magnetoreception: added to the geomagnetic field, they disrupted orientation, presumably by interfering with the receptive processes. Cryptochromes have been suggested as receptor molecules. Cry1a is found in the eyes of birds, where it is located at the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the UV-cones in chickens and robins. Immuno-histochemical studies show that it is activated by the wavelengths of light that allow magnetic compass orientation in birds. PMID:25587420

  5. Stability and reactivity of free radicals: a physicochemical perspective with biological implications.

    PubMed

    Karogodina, Tatiana Yu; Sergeeva, Svetlana V; Stass, Dmitri V

    2011-01-01

    Several factors control the reactivity of radicals and can provide the strategies to convert highly reactive species into more persistent species that are easier to detect in an experiment. A reaction can only proceed if sufficient mobility and thermodynamic driving force are provided and the reaction is allowed by steric considerations and by electronic states of the reagents and products. A violation of at least one of these conditions can make the radical relatively stable. In certain cases, these factors occur naturally, in other situations, they can be purposefully manipulated to reduce the reactivity of highly reactive radicals, prolonging their lifetime and increasing their concentration. The discussed examples cover a vast range of lifetimes, from 10(-9) seconds to 10(9) years, at concentration levels down to 10(3) radicals per sample (10(-18) M), and stress that stability and reactivity are not independent notions and are the two sides of the same coin. PMID:21599439

  6. EPR study of phenolic radical stabilization by grafting on SiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiota, Stathi; Louloudi, Maria; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid [SiO 2-GA] material has been synthesized by grafting Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) on SiO 2 via formation of amide bonds between amine groups on aminopropyl-silica and the carboxyl group of GA. The spatial fixation of GA prevents polymerization effects. EPR spectroscopy shows that GA radicals on [SiO 2-GA] show remarkable stability, comparable to that previously observed only for radicals in biological matrices on in soil organic matter. EPR reveals a bundle-like organization of the GA molecules on [SiO 2-GA] material. The relation of these factors to the enhanced radical stability is discussed.

  7. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis

  8. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  9. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a) The static directional stability (as shown by the tendency to recover from a...

  10. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a) The static directional stability (as shown by the tendency to recover from a...

  11. Stabilization of long-chain intermediates in solution. Tridecyl radicals and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorović, Aleksandar V.; Badjuk, Dalibor M.; Stevanović, Nenad; Pavlović, Radoslav Z.

    2015-03-01

    Tetradecanoic acid was decarboxylated by means of lead(IV) acetate (LTA) under thermal (81 °C) and photolytic (r.t.) conditions in benzene solution. The mixture of products, obtained in thermal reaction, consists of esters (acetoxyalkanes and carboxylates), tridecenes, tridecane and phenyltridecane. Additionally, tetradecane and hexacosane, under photolytic conditions, were formed. The classes of products and their distribution might be explained by presence of intermediate 1-tridecyl radical which can undergo intramolecular (result in formation of rearranged carbon centered radicals) and intermolecular stabilization pathways. Experimentally obtained results were used as input data for computational Monte Carlo simulation study of the reaction. On the basis of these results, radical rearrangements, as well as hydride shifts in tridecyl system are discussed.

  12. Photodissociation of TEMPO-modified peptides: new approaches to radical-directed dissociation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Hansen, Christopher S; Trevitt, Adam J; Oh, Han Bin; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-03-14

    Radical-directed dissociation of gas phase ions is emerging as a powerful and complementary alternative to traditional tandem mass spectrometric techniques for biomolecular structural analysis. Previous studies have identified that coupling of 2-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl)methyl]benzoic acid (TEMPO-Bz) to the N-terminus of a peptide introduces a labile oxygen-carbon bond that can be selectively activated upon collisional activation to produce a radical ion. Here we demonstrate that structurally-defined peptide radical ions can also be generated upon UV laser photodissociation of the same TEMPO-Bz derivatives in a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer. When subjected to further mass spectrometric analyses, the radical ions formed by a single laser pulse undergo identical dissociations as those formed by collisional activation of the same precursor ion, and can thus be used to derive molecular structure. Mapping the initial radical formation process as a function of photon energy by photodissociation action spectroscopy reveals that photoproduct formation is selective but occurs only in modest yield across the wavelength range (300-220 nm), with the photoproduct yield maximised between 235 and 225 nm. Based on the analysis of a set of model compounds, structural modifications to the TEMPO-Bz derivative are suggested to optimise radical photoproduct yield. Future development of such probes offers the advantage of increased sensitivity and selectivity for radical-directed dissociation.

  13. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  14. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  15. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  16. In vivo triarylmethyl radical stabilization through encapsulation in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Kahina; Boutier-Pischon, Audrey; Auger, Florian; Françon, Dominique; Almario, Antonio; Frapart, Yves-Michel

    2016-09-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and spectroscopy are non-invasive technologies used to specifically detect and quantify paramagnetic species. However, the relative instability of spin probes such as triarylmethyl radicals limits their application to conduct oxygen quantification and mapping. In this study we encapsulated tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical (TAM; known as "Finland" probe) in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel (PF-127) in order to limit its degradation and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo EPR properties as a function of oxygen. Our results show that the EPR signal of encapsulated TAM in PF-127 hydrogel is similar to the one in solution. Although it is less sensitive to oxygen, it is suitable for oximetry. We also demonstrated that the incorporation of TAM in PF-127 hydrogel leads to an improved in vivo EPR stability of the radical under anesthesia. This new formulation enables high quality EPR imaging and oximetry and paves the way for the application of TAM radical-based probes in various biomedical fields.

  17. In vivo triarylmethyl radical stabilization through encapsulation in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Kahina; Boutier-Pischon, Audrey; Auger, Florian; Françon, Dominique; Almario, Antonio; Frapart, Yves-Michel

    2016-09-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and spectroscopy are non-invasive technologies used to specifically detect and quantify paramagnetic species. However, the relative instability of spin probes such as triarylmethyl radicals limits their application to conduct oxygen quantification and mapping. In this study we encapsulated tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical (TAM; known as "Finland" probe) in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel (PF-127) in order to limit its degradation and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo EPR properties as a function of oxygen. Our results show that the EPR signal of encapsulated TAM in PF-127 hydrogel is similar to the one in solution. Although it is less sensitive to oxygen, it is suitable for oximetry. We also demonstrated that the incorporation of TAM in PF-127 hydrogel leads to an improved in vivo EPR stability of the radical under anesthesia. This new formulation enables high quality EPR imaging and oximetry and paves the way for the application of TAM radical-based probes in various biomedical fields.

  18. Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.H.

    1996-04-23

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

  19. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 74654, December 1, 2011. (a)-(b) (c)...

  20. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a)-(b) (c) In straight, steady sideslips, the aileron and rudder control movements...

  1. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a)-(b) (c) In straight, steady sideslips, the aileron and rudder control movements...

  2. Discriminating D-amino acid-containing peptide epimers by radical-directed dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yuanqi; Quebbemann, Neil R; Julian, Ryan R

    2012-08-01

    The presence of a single D-amino acid in a peptide is very difficult to detect. Mass spectrometry-based approaches rely on differences in fragmentation between all L-amino acid-containing peptides and single D-amino acid-containing peptides (which are epimers) for identification. The success of this approach is dependent on the structural sensitivity of the fragmentation method. Recently, experiments have demonstrated that fragmentation initiated by radical chemistry, or radical-directed dissociation (RDD), is particularly sensitive to the structure of the ion being fragmented. Herein, RDD is used to identify the presence of D-serine, D-alanine, or D-aspartic acid in eight biologically relevant peptides. It is demonstrated that chiral disambiguation by RDD is dependent on both the initial radical site and subsequent radical migration. Fortuitously, RDD can be initiated by a variety of different radical precursors which can be associated with the peptide via covalent or noncovalent means, and RDD can be examined in all observable charge states (both positive and negative). This diversity enables numerous initial radical sites and migration pathways to be explored. For all but one of the peptides that were examined, RDD provides significantly better chiral discrimination than CID. Quantitation of peptide epimers by RDD is also described.

  3. Helical Folding-Induced Stabilization of Ferromagnetic Polyradicals Based on Triarylmethyl Radical Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Reta Mañeru, Daniel; Moreira, Ibério de P R; Illas, Francesc

    2016-04-27

    Magnetic ordering in purely organic π-conjugated materials is a challenging, rare, and desirable event. The interest lies on the unique magnetic properties derived from high-spin carbon-based polymers/macromolecules tailored through appropriate synthetic routes. Ground-breaking achievements have been reported regarding magnetic ordering in an organic polymer using spin clusters as building blocks. This strategy leads to two-dimensional extended polyradicals with a concomitant loss of appealing macroscopic properties such as expected magnetic anisotropy in elongated shaped macromolecules containing carbon-bearing radicals. Here we provide compelling evidence of a secondary structure-induced stabilization of ferromagnetic polyradicals with robust magnetic properties and strongly suggest revisiting a discarded attempt to obtain polymeric linear-like radicals. An alternative synthetic approach is also proposed, based on polyradicals obtained from discrete molecular precursors (oligomers) long enough to ensure a secondary structure, rather than from polymerization processes. PMID:27046281

  4. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177 Section 27.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and...

  5. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177 Section 29.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the...

  6. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177 Section 29.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the...

  7. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177 Section 29.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the...

  8. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177 Section 29.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the...

  9. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177 Section 27.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and...

  10. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177 Section 27.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and...

  11. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177 Section 27.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and...

  12. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177 Section 29.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the...

  13. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177 Section 27.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and...

  14. The Natural Polyamine Spermine Functions Directly as a Free Radical Scavenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Hyo Chol; Sirisoma, Nilantha S.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Zweier, Jay L.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    1998-09-01

    The polyamines are small organic cations that are absolutely required for eukaryotic cell growth. Although their growth requirements are well established, the molecular functions of the polyamines are ill-defined. Oxidative damage to DNA by reactive oxygen species is a continual problem that cells must guard against to survive. The polyamine spermine, which is normally found in millimolar concentrations in the nucleus, is shown here to function directly as a free radical scavenger, and adducts formed as a result of this function are identified. These data suggest that spermine is a major natural intracellular compound capable of protecting DNA from free radical attack.

  15. Free radicals and SOD activity of jaw cyst. Direct measurement and spin trapping studies by ESR.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Simodate, H; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    Free radicals produced in the fluid of jaw cysts were directly measured at room temperature using ESR. With these samples, SOD activity of the cyst fluid was measured by the ESR spin trapping method with DMPO as a trapping agent. Freeze-dried samples of cyst fluid showed a broad ESR signal at g = 2.005. Relative signal intensity of samples from jaw cysts with inflammation was higher than jaw cysts without inflammation. SOD activity of cyst fluid with high viscosity showed higher values than that of cyst fluid with low viscosity. We suggest that free radicals produced in jaw cyst damage tissues while higher SOD activity of cyst fluid play a role in a self-defense mechanism against free radicals.

  16. 213 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation on Peptide Anions: Radical-Directed Fragmentation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of acidic peptides and proteins is greatly hindered due to lack of suitable analytical techniques. Here we present the implementation of 213 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) in high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer in negative polarity for peptide anions. Radical-driven backbone fragmentation provides 22 distinctive fragment ion types, achieving the complete sequence coverage for all reported peptides. Hydrogen-deficient radical anion not only promotes the cleavage of Cα-C bond but also stimulates the breaking of N-Cα and C-N bonds. Radical-directed loss of small molecules and specific side chain of amino acids are detected in these experiments. Radical containing side chain of amino acids (Tyr, Ser, Thr, and Asp) may possibly support the N-Cα backbone fragmentation. Proline comprising peptides exhibit the unusual fragment ions similar to reported earlier. Interestingly, basic amino acids such as Arg and Lys also stimulated the formation of abundant b and y ions of the related peptide anions. Loss of hydrogen atom from the charge-reduced radical anion and fragment ions are rationalized by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation, locating the potential energy surface (PES) of ππ* and repulsive πσ* excited states of a model amide system.

  17. Direct measurements of HOx radicals in the marine boundary layer: testing the current tropospheric chemistry mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yugo; Akimoto, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    OH and HO(2) radicals, atmospheric detergents, and the reservoir thereof, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. In spite of their importance, we had no choice but to trust their concentrations predicted by modeling studies based on known chemical processes. However, recent direct measurements of these radicals have enabled us to test and revise our knowledge of the processes by comparing the predicted and observed values of the radical concentrations. We developed a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument and successfully observed OH and HO(2) at three remote islands of Japan (Oki Island, Okinawa Island, and Rishiri Island). At Okinawa Island, the observed daytime level of HO(2) agreed closely with the model estimates, suggesting that the photochemistry at Okinawa is well described by the current chemistry mechanism. At Rishiri Island, in contrast, the observed daytime level of HO(2) was consistently much lower than the calculated values. We proposed that iodine chemistry, usually not incorporated into the mechanism, is at least partly responsible for the discrepancy in the results. At night, HO(2) was detected at levels greater than 1 pptv at all three islands, suggesting the presence of processes in the dark that produce radicals. We showed that ozone reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons, including monoterpenes, could significantly contribute to radical production.

  18. Direct measurements of HOx radicals in the marine boundary layer: testing the current tropospheric chemistry mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yugo; Akimoto, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    OH and HO(2) radicals, atmospheric detergents, and the reservoir thereof, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. In spite of their importance, we had no choice but to trust their concentrations predicted by modeling studies based on known chemical processes. However, recent direct measurements of these radicals have enabled us to test and revise our knowledge of the processes by comparing the predicted and observed values of the radical concentrations. We developed a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument and successfully observed OH and HO(2) at three remote islands of Japan (Oki Island, Okinawa Island, and Rishiri Island). At Okinawa Island, the observed daytime level of HO(2) agreed closely with the model estimates, suggesting that the photochemistry at Okinawa is well described by the current chemistry mechanism. At Rishiri Island, in contrast, the observed daytime level of HO(2) was consistently much lower than the calculated values. We proposed that iodine chemistry, usually not incorporated into the mechanism, is at least partly responsible for the discrepancy in the results. At night, HO(2) was detected at levels greater than 1 pptv at all three islands, suggesting the presence of processes in the dark that produce radicals. We showed that ozone reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons, including monoterpenes, could significantly contribute to radical production. PMID:12112871

  19. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  20. Stabilities of nitrogen containing heterocyclic radicals and geometrical influences on non-radiative processes in organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evleth, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Stabilities of nitrogen containing heterocyclic radicals were studied to detect radicals of the type R-N-R, and to theoretically rationalize their electronic structure. The computation of simple potential energy surfaces for ground and excited states is discussed along with the photophysical properties of indolizine. Methods of calculation and problems associated with the calculations are presented. Results, tables, diagrams, discussions, and references are included.

  1. Direct Dynamics Study of Hydrogen-Transfer Isomerization of 1-Pentyl and 1-Hexyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-07-01

    The rate constants of three intramolecular hydrogen-transfer isomerization reactions, namely, 1-4 isomerization of the 1-pentyl radical and 1-4 and 1-5 isomerizations of the 1-hexyl radical, are calculated using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling, in particular by using canonical variational theory (CVT, which is the version of variational transition state theory in which the transition state dividing surface is optimized for a canonical ensemble) with small-curvature tunneling (SCT) for the transmission coefficient. The required potential energy surfaces were obtained implicitly by direct dynamics employing interpolated variational transition state theory with mapping (IVTST-M) and variational transition state theory with interpolated single-point energies (VTST-ISPE). Single-level direct dynamics calculations were performed for all of the reactions by IVTST-M using M06-2X/MG3S or M08-HX/cc-pVTZ+ potential energy surfaces or both. The stationary points of 1-4 isomerization of 1-pentyl and the stationary points for the forward reactions of 1-4 and 1-5 isomerizations of 1-hexyl were also optimized by BMC-CCSD, and for all three reactions we also performed dual-level direct dynamics calculations using VTST-ISPE in which MCG3-MPW single-point energies served as the higher level. The calculated MCG3-MPW//M06-2X/MG3S rate constants agree well with experimental values for 1-4 isomerization of the 1-pentyl radical at high temperature, and this validates the accuracy of this theoretical method for 1-4 isomerization. The MCG3-MPW//M06-2X/MG3S method was therefore used to make a reliable prediction for the rata constants of 1-4 isomerization of the 1-hexyl radical for which a direct experimental measurement is not available. The calculated CVT/SCT/M08-HX/cc-pVTZ+ rate constants agree well with experimental values for 1-5 isomerization of the 1-hexyl radical, and they show that the tunneling effect for these reactions was underestimated in

  2. Direct Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Budd, S.; Chu, P.H.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Gerberich, H.; Grundler, U.; Junk, T.R.; Kraus, J.; Liss, T.M.; Marino, C.; Pitts, K.; Rogers, E.; Taffard, A.; Veramendi, G.; Vickey, T.; Zhang, X.; Acosta, D.; Cruz, A.

    2006-05-26

    We search for pair-produced Dirac magnetic monopoles in 35.7 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We find no monopole candidates corresponding to a 95% confidence-level cross-section limit {sigma}<0.2 pb for a monopole with mass between 200 and 700 GeV/c{sup 2}. Assuming a Drell-Yan pair-production mechanism, we set a mass limit m>360 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  3. Anisotropic flow in the forward directions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Markus D.

    2004-03-09

    The addition of the two Forward TPCs to the STAR detector allows one to measure anisotropic flow at forward pseudorapidities. This made possible the first measurement of directed flow at collision energies of {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. PHOBOS' results on elliptic flow at forward rapidities were confirmed, and the sign of v{sub 2} was determined to be positive for the first time at RHIC energies. The higher harmonic, v{sub 4}, is consistent with the recently suggested v{sub 2}2 scaling behavior.

  4. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis.

  5. Choice of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies on which to Base the Stabilization Energies of Simple Radicals: DH(R-H)is Preferred because DH(R-Me) is Perturbed by Changes in Chain Branching

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2008-01-01

    The relative stabilization energies of radicals, SE(R ), along the simple series methyl/ethyl/i-propyl/t-butyl are known to vary in spread and even direction dependent on which dissociation enthalpies, DH(R-X), they are based on. Using a highly electronegative X is recognized as unwise, but it is not clear whether a choice of X = Me or X = R might not be preferred over the almost universal use of R = H. The enthalpies of isomerization of C4 radical pairs that vary only in the substitution pattern at the radical center but not in carbon skeleton illustrate that R = H is indeed the better choice. Comparisons in the context of recent predictive models for alkane and radical stability indicate that, while relative DH(R-H) values highlight the desired difference in substitution pattern at the radical center, relative DH(R-Me) values are perturbed by differences in skeletal branching or protobranching which are well-known to affect thermochemistry. As a result, SE(R ) values derived from relative DH(R-Me) values are consistently too small. The same pattern is illustrated for prim, sec, and tert allylic and benzylic radicals (larger SE(R )) and for the parent vinyl, phenyl, and ethynyl radicals (negative SE(R )).

  6. Stability and properties of the two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride monolayer functionalized by hydroxyl (OH) radicals: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-mei; Liu, Yue-jie; Wang, Hong-xia; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Cai, Qing-hai; Wang, Xuan-zhang

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by the great advance in graphene hydroxide--a versatile material with various applications--we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the functionalization of the two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which has been achieved experimentally recently. Particular attention was paid to searching for the most favorable site(s) for the adsorbed OH radicals on a h-BN sheet and addressing the roles of OH radical coverage on the stability and properties of functionalized h-BN sheet. The results indicate that, for an individual OH radica, the most stable configuration is that it is adsorbed on the B site of the h-BN surface with an adsorption energy of -0.88 eV and a magnetic moment of 1.00 μ(B). Upon adsorption of more than one OH radical on a h-BN sheet, however, these adsorbates prefer to adsorb in pairs on the B and its nearest N atoms from both sides of h-BN sheet without magnetic moment. An energy diagram of the average adsorption energy of OH radicals on h-BN sheet as a function of its coverage indicates that when the OH radical coverage reaches to 60 %, the functionalized h-BN sheet is the most stable among all studied configurations. More importantly, this configuration exhibits good thermal and dynamical stability at room temperature. Owing to the introduction of certain impurity levels, the band gap of h-BN sheet gradually decreases with increasing OH coverage, thereby enhancing its electrical conductivity. PMID:24092267

  7. Stability and properties of the two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride monolayer functionalized by hydroxyl (OH) radicals: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-mei; Liu, Yue-jie; Wang, Hong-xia; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Cai, Qing-hai; Wang, Xuan-zhang

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by the great advance in graphene hydroxide--a versatile material with various applications--we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the functionalization of the two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which has been achieved experimentally recently. Particular attention was paid to searching for the most favorable site(s) for the adsorbed OH radicals on a h-BN sheet and addressing the roles of OH radical coverage on the stability and properties of functionalized h-BN sheet. The results indicate that, for an individual OH radica, the most stable configuration is that it is adsorbed on the B site of the h-BN surface with an adsorption energy of -0.88 eV and a magnetic moment of 1.00 μ(B). Upon adsorption of more than one OH radical on a h-BN sheet, however, these adsorbates prefer to adsorb in pairs on the B and its nearest N atoms from both sides of h-BN sheet without magnetic moment. An energy diagram of the average adsorption energy of OH radicals on h-BN sheet as a function of its coverage indicates that when the OH radical coverage reaches to 60 %, the functionalized h-BN sheet is the most stable among all studied configurations. More importantly, this configuration exhibits good thermal and dynamical stability at room temperature. Owing to the introduction of certain impurity levels, the band gap of h-BN sheet gradually decreases with increasing OH coverage, thereby enhancing its electrical conductivity.

  8. Formation and Stabilization of Combustion-Generated, Environmentally Persistent Radicals on Ni(II)O Supported on a Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    Vejerano, Eric; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) are formed when hydroxyl- and chlorine-substituted aromatics chemisorbed on Cu(II)O and Fe(III)2O3 surfaces and were stabilized through their interactions with the surface metal cation. The current study reports our laboratory investigation on the formation and stabilization of EPFRs on an Ni(II)O surface. The EPFRs were produced by the chemisorption of adsorbates on the supported metal oxide surface and transfer of an electron from the adsorbate to the metal center, resulting in reduction of the metal cation. Depending on the temperature and the nature of the adsorbate, more than one type of organic radical was formed. A phenoxyl-type radical, with g-value between 2.0029 and 2.0044, and a semiquinone-type radical, with g-value from 2.0050 to as high as 2.0081, were observed. The half-lives on Ni(II)O were long and ranged from 1.5 to 5.2 days, which were similar to what were observed on Fe(III)2O3,. The yields of the EPFRs formed on Ni(II)O was ~ 8x higher than on Cu(II)O and ~50x higher than on Fe(III)2O3. PMID:22831558

  9. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health.

  10. Two tyrosyl radicals stabilize high oxidation states in cytochrome c oxidase for efficient energy conservation and proton translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2012-02-01

    The reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (bCcO) was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the properties of radical intermediates. Two distinct radicals with widths of 12 and 46 G are directly observed by X-band CW-EPR in the reaction of bCcO with H2O2 at pH 6 and pH 8. High-frequency EPR (D-band) provides assignments to tyrosine for both radicals based on well-resolved g-tensors. The 46 G wide radical has extensive hyperfine structure and can be fit with parameters consistent with Y129. However, the 12 G wide radical has minimal hyperfine structure and can be fit using parameters unique to the post-translationally modified Y244 in CcO. The results are supported by mixed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. This study reports spectroscopic evidence of a radical formed on the modified tyrosine in CcO and resolves the much debated controversy of whether the wide radical seen at low pH in the bovine system is a tyrosine or tryptophan. A model is presented showing how radical formation and migration may play an essential role in proton translocation. This work was done in collaboration with Michelle A. Yu, Tsuyoshi Egawa, Syun-Ru Yeh and Gary J. Gerfen from Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Kyoko Shinzawa-Itoh and Shinya Yoshikawa from the University of Hyogo; and Victor Guallar from the Barcelona Supercomputing Center.

  11. Extraordinary stability of naphthalenediimide radical ion and its ultra-electron-deficient precursor: strategic role of the phosphonium group.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sharvan; Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2014-08-27

    Stabilization of radical ions and highly electron-deficient systems under ambient conditions is of great significance. A new design concept is presented that applies the multifaceted features of the phosphonium group to achieve isolation of (a) the first naphthalenediimide (NDI) radical ion [(1a•+)BPh4(–)] as single crystals and (b) an ultra-electron-deficient NDI [(1a(2+))2BF4(–)] having the lowest LUMO level recorded for an NDI, overwhelming the formative tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) molecule. Both 1a•+ and 1a(2+) exhibit unprecedented stability to normal workup procedures, chromatography, and anion metathesis in open air. To our knowledge, this is the first instance where radical ions stable toward chromatography have been obtained, which is a noteworthy development in the field of synthetic radical chemistry. The crucial components of thermodynamic and kinetic stabilization, namely, the nonbonded P···O interaction, hypervalency, and propeller-like shape of the phosphonium groups in 1a(2+) and 1a•+, were substantiated by crystallography and theoretical studies. Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations validated the P···O contact to be an nO → σP–C* orbital interaction. Spontaneous electron transfer reactions of 1a(2+) even in nonpolar solvents, anion−π interactions of 1a(2+) with the naphthalene core, and panchromism of 1a•+ are the other emergent properties. The high-yielding (∼90%) in situ synthesis of 1a•+ and the extraordinary stability fostered by the phosphonium group have the potential to turn hitherto unstable organic systems into a new genre of stable off-the-shelf systems.

  12. Extraordinary stability of naphthalenediimide radical ion and its ultra-electron-deficient precursor: strategic role of the phosphonium group.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sharvan; Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2014-08-27

    Stabilization of radical ions and highly electron-deficient systems under ambient conditions is of great significance. A new design concept is presented that applies the multifaceted features of the phosphonium group to achieve isolation of (a) the first naphthalenediimide (NDI) radical ion [(1a•+)BPh4(–)] as single crystals and (b) an ultra-electron-deficient NDI [(1a(2+))2BF4(–)] having the lowest LUMO level recorded for an NDI, overwhelming the formative tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) molecule. Both 1a•+ and 1a(2+) exhibit unprecedented stability to normal workup procedures, chromatography, and anion metathesis in open air. To our knowledge, this is the first instance where radical ions stable toward chromatography have been obtained, which is a noteworthy development in the field of synthetic radical chemistry. The crucial components of thermodynamic and kinetic stabilization, namely, the nonbonded P···O interaction, hypervalency, and propeller-like shape of the phosphonium groups in 1a(2+) and 1a•+, were substantiated by crystallography and theoretical studies. Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations validated the P···O contact to be an nO → σP–C* orbital interaction. Spontaneous electron transfer reactions of 1a(2+) even in nonpolar solvents, anion−π interactions of 1a(2+) with the naphthalene core, and panchromism of 1a•+ are the other emergent properties. The high-yielding (∼90%) in situ synthesis of 1a•+ and the extraordinary stability fostered by the phosphonium group have the potential to turn hitherto unstable organic systems into a new genre of stable off-the-shelf systems. PMID:25093533

  13. Potential role of stabilized Criegee radicals in sulfuric acid production in a high biogenic VOC environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Griffin, Robert; Rutter, Andrew P; Gong, Longwen; Cevik, Basak Karakurt

    2015-03-17

    We present field observations made in June 2011 downwind of Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, and evaluate the role of stabilized Criegee radicals (sCIs) in gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) production. Zero-dimensional model calculations show that sCI from biogenic volatile organic compounds composed the majority of the sCIs. The main uncertainty associated with an evaluation of H2SO4 production from the sCI reaction channel is the lack of experimentally determined reaction rates for sCIs formed from isoprene ozonolysis with SO2 along with systematic discrepancies in experimentally derived reaction rates between other sCIs and SO2 and water vapor. In general, the maximum of H2SO4 production from the sCI channel is found in the late afternoon as ozone increases toward the late afternoon. The sCI channel, however, contributes minor H2SO4 production compared with the conventional OH channel in the mid-day. Finally, the production and the loss rates of H2SO4 are compared. The application of the recommended mass accommodation coefficient causes significant overestimation of H2SO4 loss rates compared with H2SO4 production rates. However, the application of a lower experimental value for the mass accommodation coefficient provides good agreement between the loss and production rates of H2SO4. The results suggest that the recommended coefficient for the H2O surface may not be suitable for this relatively dry environment. PMID:25700170

  14. Direct observation of roaming radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-21

    The thermal dissociation of acetaldehyde has been studied with the reflected shock tube technique using H(D)-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry detection. The use of an unreversed light source yields extraordinarily sensitive H atom detection. As a result, we are able to measure both the total decomposition rate and the branching to radical versus molecular channels. This branching provides a direct measure of the contribution from the roaming radical mechanism since the contributions from the usual tight transition states are predicted by theory to be negligible. The experimental observations also provide a measure of the rate coefficient for H + CH{sub 3}CHO. Another set of experiments employing C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I as an H-atom source provides additional data for this rate coefficient that extends to lower temperature. An evaluation of the available experimental results for H + CH{sub 3}CHO can be expressed by a three-parameter Arrhenius expression as k = 7.66 x 10{sup -20}T{sup 2.75} exp((-486 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (298-1415 K). Analogous experiments employing C{sub 2}D{sub 5}I as a D-atom source allow for the study of the isotopically substituted reaction. The present experiments are the only direct measure for this reaction rate constant, and the results can be expressed by an Arrhenius expression as k = 5.20 x 10{sup -10} exp((-4430 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (1151-1354 K). The H/D + CH{sub 3}CHO reactions are also studied with ab initio transition-state theory, and the results are in remarkably good agreement with the current experimental data.

  15. Stability of 2{radical} (2) {times}2{radical} (2) oxygen ordered superstructures in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}

    SciTech Connect

    Aligia, A.A. |; Koval, S.; Migoni, R. |

    1998-01-01

    We have compared the ground-state energy of several observed or proposed {open_quotes}2{radical} (2) {times}2{radical} (2) oxygen ordered superstructures{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}herringbone{close_quotes} structures (HS{close_quote}s)], with those of {open_quotes}chain superstructures{close_quotes} (CS{close_quote}s) (in which the O atoms of the basal plane are ordered in chains), for different compositions x in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. The model Hamiltonian contains (i) the Madelung energy, (ii) a term linear in the difference between Cu and O hole occupancies which controls charge transfer, and (iii) covalency effects based on known results for t-J models in one and two dimensions. The optimum distribution of charge is determined, minimizing the total energy, and depends on two parameters which are determined from known results for x=1 and x=0.5. We obtain that on the O lean side, only CS{close_quote}s are stable, while for x=7/8, a HS with regularly spaced O vacancies added to the x=1 structure is more stable than the corresponding CS for the same x. We find that the detailed positions of the atoms in the structure and long-range Coulomb interactions are crucial for the electronic structure, the mechanism of charge transfer, the stability of the different phases, and the possibility of phase separation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Tactile pavement for guiding walking direction: An assessment of heading direction and gait stability.

    PubMed

    Pluijter, Nanda; de Wit, Lieke P W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Plaisier, Myrthe A

    2015-10-01

    For maintaining heading direction while walking we heavily rely on vision. Therefore, walking in the absence of vision or with visual attention directed elsewhere potentially leads to dangerous situations. Here we investigated whether tactile information from the feet can be used as a (partial) substitute for vision in maintaining a stable heading direction. If so, participants should be better able to keep a constant heading direction on tactile pavement that indicates directionality than on regular flat pavement. However, such a pavement may also be destabilizing. Thus we asked participants to walk straight ahead on regular pavement, and on tactile pavement (tiles with ridges along the walking direction) while varying the amount of vision. We assessed the effects of the type of pavement as well as the amount of vision on the variability of the heading direction as well as gait stability. Both of these measures were calculated from accelerations and angular velocities recorded from a smartphone attached to the participants trunk. Results showed that on tactile pavement participants had a less variations in their heading direction than on regular pavement. The drawback, however, was that the tactile pavement used in this study decreased gait stability. In sum, tactile pavement can be used as a partial substitute for vision in maintaining heading direction, but it can also decrease gait stability. Future work should focus on designing tactile pavement that does provided directional clues, but is less destabilizing. PMID:26344427

  17. Tactile pavement for guiding walking direction: An assessment of heading direction and gait stability.

    PubMed

    Pluijter, Nanda; de Wit, Lieke P W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Plaisier, Myrthe A

    2015-10-01

    For maintaining heading direction while walking we heavily rely on vision. Therefore, walking in the absence of vision or with visual attention directed elsewhere potentially leads to dangerous situations. Here we investigated whether tactile information from the feet can be used as a (partial) substitute for vision in maintaining a stable heading direction. If so, participants should be better able to keep a constant heading direction on tactile pavement that indicates directionality than on regular flat pavement. However, such a pavement may also be destabilizing. Thus we asked participants to walk straight ahead on regular pavement, and on tactile pavement (tiles with ridges along the walking direction) while varying the amount of vision. We assessed the effects of the type of pavement as well as the amount of vision on the variability of the heading direction as well as gait stability. Both of these measures were calculated from accelerations and angular velocities recorded from a smartphone attached to the participants trunk. Results showed that on tactile pavement participants had a less variations in their heading direction than on regular pavement. The drawback, however, was that the tactile pavement used in this study decreased gait stability. In sum, tactile pavement can be used as a partial substitute for vision in maintaining heading direction, but it can also decrease gait stability. Future work should focus on designing tactile pavement that does provided directional clues, but is less destabilizing.

  18. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal

  19. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because the thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150 °C for up to 5 h or to 125 °C for up to 24 h if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125 °C for up to 5 h if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization of

  20. The elimination of free radicals in irradiated UHMWPEs with and without vitamin E stabilization by annealing under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Ghali, Bassem W.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used to decrease the wear of joint implant bearing surfaces. While radiation crosslinking has been successful in decreasing femoral head penetration into UHMWPE acetabular liners in vivo, postirradiation thermal treatment of the polymer is required to ensure the oxidative stability of joint implants in the long term. Two types of thermal treatment have been used: (i) annealing below the melting point preserves the mechanical properties but the residual free radicals trapped in the crystalline regions are not completely eliminated, leading to oxidation in the long-term and (ii) annealing above the melting point (melting) eliminates the free radicals but leads to a decrease in mechanical properties through loss of crystallinity during the melting process. In this study, we hypothesized that free radicals could be reduced by annealing below the melting point under pressure effectively without melting due to the elevation of the melting point. By avoiding the complete melting of UHMWPE, mechanical properties would be preserved. Our hypothesis tested positive in that we found the radiation-induced free radicals to be markedly reduced (below the detection limit of state-of-the-art electron spin resonance) by thermal annealing under pressure in radiation crosslinked virgin UHMWPE and UHMWPE/vitamin-E blends without loss of mechanical properties. PMID:21381192

  1. Comparison of commercial uv lamps for radical oxidation and direct photolysis in water

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W; Wang, F T

    1999-08-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is charged with developing methods for treating contaminated sites and destroying waste organic compounds that are currently being accumulated, including Trimsol (machining oil), trichloroethene (ICE), tributyl phosphate (TBP), kerosene, and many other organics. These organics are sometimes present mixed with radioactive waste, and in these cases it is important to destroy the organics in such a way as to not increase the total volume of the waste and to ensure that no radioactivity is released in the process. Among the most promising techniques for treating aqueous mixed wastes are ultraviolet light (UV) oxidation and the molten salt process, as opposed to methods like incineration or supercritical water oxidation that might lead to air emissions of radioactivity if not very carefully controlled. The purpose of the present study was to compare the energy efficiency of various commercial UV lamp systems designed for photooxidation. Two type of tests were conducted: (1) direct photolysis of a chlorinated compound and (2) photolysis of hydrogen peroxide, which is an additive often used to photooxidize compounds that are not amenable to direct photolysis. The results should allow LLNL to select the most cost-effective system for treating wastes by UV- enhanced radical oxidation processes.

  2. Enhanced enzyme stability through site-directed covalent immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jeffrey Chun Yu; Hutchings, Christopher Hayden; Lindsay, Mark Jeffrey; Werner, Christopher James; Bundy, Bradley Charles

    2015-01-10

    Breakthroughs in enzyme immobilization have enabled increased enzyme recovery and reusability, leading to significant decreases in the cost of enzyme use and fueling biocatalysis growth. However, current enzyme immobilization techniques suffer from leaching, enzyme stability, and recoverability and reusability issues. Moreover, these techniques lack the ability to control the orientation of the immobilized enzymes. To determine the impact of orientation on covalently immobilized enzyme activity and stability, we apply our PRECISE (Protein Residue-Explicit Covalent Immobilization for Stability Enhancement) system to a model enzyme, T4 lysozyme. The PRECISE system uses non-canonical amino acid incorporation and the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition "click" reaction to enable directed enzyme immobilization at rationally chosen residues throughout an enzyme. Unlike previous site-specific systems, the PRECISE system is a truly covalent immobilization method. Utilizing this system, enzymes immobilized at proximate and distant locations from the active site were tested for activity and stability under denaturing conditions. Our results demonstrate that orientation control of covalently immobilized enzymes can provide activity and stability benefits exceeding that of traditional random covalent immobilization techniques. PRECISE immobilized enzymes were 50 and 73% more active than randomly immobilized enzymes after harsh freeze-thaw and chemical denaturant treatments.

  3. Are gait variability and stability measures influenced by directional changes?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many gait variability and stability measures have been proposed in the literature, with the aim to quantify gait impairment, degree of neuro-motor control and balance disorders in healthy and pathological subjects. These measures are often obtained from lower trunk acceleration data, typically acquired during rectilinear gait, but relevant experimental protocols and data processing techniques lack in standardization. Since directional changes represent an essential aspect of gait, the assessment of their influence on such measures is essential for standardization. In addition, their investigation is needed to evaluate the applicability of these measures in laboratory trials and in daily life activity analysis. A further methodological aspect to be standardized concerns the assessment of the sampling frequency, which could affect stability measures. The aim of the present study was hence to assess if gait variability and stability measures are affected by directional changes, and to evaluate the influence of sampling frequency of trunk acceleration data on the results. Methods Fifty-one healthy young adults performed a 6-minute walk test along a 30 m straight pathway, turning by 180 deg at each end of the pathway. Nine variability and stability measures (Standard deviation, Coefficient of variation, Poincaré plots, maximum Floquet multipliers, short-term Lyapunov exponents, Recurrence quantification analysis, Multiscale entropy, Harmonic ratio and Index of harmonicity) were calculated on stride duration and trunk acceleration data (acquired at 100 Hz and 200 Hz) coming from straight walking windows and from windows including both straight walking and the directional change. Results Harmonic ratio was the only measure that resulted to be affected by directional changes and sampling frequency, decreasing with the presence of a directional change task. HR was affected in the AP and V directions for the 200 Hz, but only in AP direction for the 100 Hz group

  4. Direct observation of hexamethylbenzenium radical cations generated during zeolite methanol-to-olefin catalysis: an ESR study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Hoi-Gu; Lee, Jun Kyu; Min, Hyung-Ki; Hong, Suk Bong; Seo, Gon

    2011-09-01

    The generation of hexamethylbenzenium radical cations as the key reaction intermediate in chabazite-type molecular sieve acids (i.e., H-SAPO-34 and H-SSZ-13) during the methanol-to-olefin process has been directly evidenced by ESR spectroscopy. PMID:21766115

  5. Arene-thioether mixed complex radical cations

    SciTech Connect

    Werst, D.W.

    1994-03-01

    Studies of radiolytically generated radical cations in aromatic hydrocarbon solvents have led to the first direct characterization of monomeric thioether radical cations in liquid solution. Observation of these very reactive chemical intermediates is made possible by the great sensitivity of fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance (FDMR) and by solvent stabilization of the thioether radical cations via electron donation. Monomeric thioether radical cations in arene solvents such as toluene exist as arene-thioether mixed complex radical cations -- the first {pi}-lone pair mixed complex radical cations ever observed. Such orbital interactions are of fundamental importance for open-shell intermediates as they have consequences for both electronic structure and reactivity. Thioether radical cations provide a valuable test system to probe the chemical influence of orbital interactions that are generic to all {pi}-type and heteroatom-containing organic radical cations, and magnetic resonance provides unsurpassed structural resolution for condensed-phase paramagnetic intermediates.

  6. Stability of a directional solidification front in subdiffusive media.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohammad Abu; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of crystal growth in alloys is limited by the morphological instability, which is caused by a positive feedback between the interface deformation and the diffusive flux of solute at the front of the phase transition. Usually this phenomenon is described in the framework of the normal diffusion equation, which stems from the linear relation between time and the mean squared displacement of molecules 〈x2(t)〉∼K1t (K1 is the classical diffusion coefficient) that is characteristic of Brownian motion. However, in some media (e.g., in gels and porous media) the random walk of molecules is hindered by obstacles, which leads to another power law, 〈x2(t)〉∼Kαtα, where 0<α≤1. As a result, the diffusion is anomalous, and it is governed by an integro-differential equation including a fractional derivative in time variable, i.e., a memory. In the present work, we investigate the stability of a directional solidification front in the case of an anomalous diffusion. Linear stability of a moving planar directional solidification front is studied, and a generalization of the Mullins-Sekerka stability criterion is obtained. Also, an asymptotic nonlinear long-wave evolution equation of Sivashinsky's type, which governs the cellular structures at the interface, is derived.

  7. Stability of a directional solidification front in subdiffusive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Mohammad Abu; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of crystal growth in alloys is limited by the morphological instability, which is caused by a positive feedback between the interface deformation and the diffusive flux of solute at the front of the phase transition. Usually this phenomenon is described in the framework of the normal diffusion equation, which stems from the linear relation between time and the mean squared displacement of molecules ˜K1t (K1 is the classical diffusion coefficient) that is characteristic of Brownian motion. However, in some media (e.g., in gels and porous media) the random walk of molecules is hindered by obstacles, which leads to another power law, ˜Kαtα, where 0<α≤1. As a result, the diffusion is anomalous, and it is governed by an integro-differential equation including a fractional derivative in time variable, i.e., a memory. In the present work, we investigate the stability of a directional solidification front in the case of an anomalous diffusion. Linear stability of a moving planar directional solidification front is studied, and a generalization of the Mullins-Sekerka stability criterion is obtained. Also, an asymptotic nonlinear long-wave evolution equation of Sivashinsky's type, which governs the cellular structures at the interface, is derived.

  8. Human Cryptochrome-1 Confers Light Independent Biological Activity in Transgenic Drosophila Correlated with Flavin Radical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Jacqueline; Jones, Alex R.; Danon, Antoine; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hoang, Nathalie; Robles, David; Tait, Shirley; Heyes, Derren J.; Picot, Marie; Yoshii, Taishi; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Klarsfeld, André; Rouyer, Francois; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Ahmad, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are conserved flavoprotein receptors found throughout the biological kingdom with diversified roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in animals. Light perception is proposed to occur through flavin radical formation that correlates with biological activity in vivo in both plants and Drosophila. By contrast, mammalian (Type II) cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock independently of light, raising the fundamental question of whether mammalian cryptochromes have evolved entirely distinct signaling mechanisms. Here we show by developmental and transcriptome analysis that Homo sapiens cryptochrome - 1 (HsCRY1) confers biological activity in transgenic expressing Drosophila in darkness, that can in some cases be further stimulated by light. In contrast to all other cryptochromes, purified recombinant HsCRY1 protein was stably isolated in the anionic radical flavin state, containing only a small proportion of oxidized flavin which could be reduced by illumination. We conclude that animal Type I and Type II cryptochromes may both have signaling mechanisms involving formation of a flavin radical signaling state, and that light independent activity of Type II cryptochromes is a consequence of dark accumulation of this redox form in vivo rather than of a fundamental difference in signaling mechanism. PMID:22427812

  9. Direct measurement of methyl radicals in a methane/air flame at atmospheric pressure by radar REMPI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Bottom, Andrew; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M; Katta, Viswanath R

    2011-11-21

    We report the direct measurements of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure by using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI), also known as the Radar REMPI technique. A tunable dye laser was used to selectively induce the (2 + 1) REMPI ionization of methyl radicals (CH(3), 3p(2)A(2)('')0(0)(0) band) in a near adiabatic and premixed laminar methane/air flame, generated by a Hencken burner. In situ measurements of the REMPI electrons were made by non-intrusively using a microwave homodyne transceiver detection system. The REMPI spectrum of the CH(3) radical was obtained and a spatial distribution of the radicals limited by focused laser beam geometry, approximately 20 µm normal to the flame front and 2.4 mm parallel to the flame, was determined. The measured CH(3) was in good agreement with numerical simulations performed using the detailed kinetic mechanism of GRI-3.0. To the authors' knowledge, these experiments represent the first directly-measured spatially-resolved CH(3) in a flame at atmospheric pressure.

  10. Involvement of radical species in inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in saline solutions by direct-current electric treatment.

    PubMed

    Urano, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Fukuzaki, Satoshi

    2006-11-01

    The effect of pulsed low-direct-current (DC) electric treatment on the viability of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in artificial seawater and 3.0% (w/v) NaCl solution was studied as a function of available chlorine (AC) concentration. The amount of AC generated during the DC electric treatment increased in proportion to the amount of passed DC. The survival fraction of V. parahaemolyticus cells decreased depending on AC concentration. When the generated AC components were completely reduced in the presence of sufficient sodium thiosulfate, no inactivation of V. parahaemolyticus in the NaCl solution was observed during the DC electric treatment. Based on the AC concentration, the inactivation efficacies of the DC electric treatment of the seawater and NaCl solution were approximately 4-fold and 30-fold that of the exogenous addition of sodium hypochlorite, respectively. Fluorometric analysis using 2-[6-(4'-hydroxy)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid showed that the generation of highly reactive radical species such as hydroxyl radical in the seawater and NaCl solution occurred during the DC electric treatment. The amount of generated radical species depended on the amount of passed DC. It is concluded that pulsed low-DC electric treatment of saline solutions exerts superior inactivation efficacy against V. parahaemolyticus to sodium hypochlorite owing to the generation of radical species. PMID:17189175

  11. Highly Regioselective Radical Amination of Allenes: Direct Synthesis of Allenamides and Tetrasubstituted Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Xiong, Tao; Wang, Zining; Xu, Guoxing; Wang, Xuedan; Zhang, Qian

    2015-10-19

    The first controllable, regioselective radical amination of allenes with N-fluoroarylsulfonimide is described to proceed under very mild reaction conditions. With this methodology, a general and straightforward route for the synthesis of both allenamides and fluorinated tetrasubstituted alkenes was realized from a wide range of terminal and internal allenes.

  12. Unusual reduction of ammonium heptamolybdate to novel molybdenum(IV)-stabilized azo anion radical complexes.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Anasuya; Banerjee, Priyabrata; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2004-11-15

    In an unusual reaction of the polyacid, ammoniumheptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH(4))(6)[Mo(7)O(24)].4H(2)O), and the ligand, 2-[(arylamino)phenylazo]pyridine (general abbreviation HL), in the presence of PPh(3) afforded the brown oxo free molybdenum complexes of type [Mo(L)(2)] in high yields (ca. 80%). The reaction occurs smoothly in ethanol. It is slow on a steam bath (25 h) but is complete in about an hour in a microwave oven. X-ray structures of two representatives are reported. In these complexes the ligand acted as a tridentate ligand using its pyridyl(N), azo(N), and the deprotonated amine(N), respectively. The geometry is meridional, and the relative orientations within the coordinated pairs of nitrogens are cis, trans, and cis, respectively. Bond length data of the coordinated ligands are consistent with a Mo(IV)[L.](2) ([L.](2-) = azo dianion radical formed by one electron reduction of the deprotonated anionic ligand, [L](-)) description. For example, the N-N lengths (1.349(5)-1.357(2) A) in these complexes are appreciably longer than that (1.246(3) A) in the uncoordinated and protonated salt of a representative ligand, [H(2)L(d)]ClO(4). The N-N lengths, however, correspond well with metal complexes of the ligand containing azo ion radical. The complexes are diamagnetic and showed highly resolved (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. The two coordinated ligands in these are magnetically equivalent, and resonances for only one ligand were observed in their spectra. Diamagnetism in the present molybdenum complexes is attributed to strong antiferromagnetic coupling between Mo(IV)(4d(2)) and the two planar radical [L.](2-) ligands. The complexes display multiple redox responses. The ESR spectrum of electrogenerated [1a](-) showed a characteristic spectrum for Mo(III) with weak hyperfine lines due to the presence of molybdenum isotopes having nonzero nuclear spin. Visible range multiple charge transfer transitions in these complexes are ascribed to ligand

  13. Stability of directionally solidified nickel aluminum-9 molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kush, Matthew Thomas

    The microstructural stability of a directionally solidified (DS) NiAl-9 at.%Mo has was investigated. The DS alloy consisted of faceted rods of Mo in a matrix of NiAl. Two microstructures were produced by varying processing conditions: a cellular microstructure and a columnar-grain microstructure. The cellular microstructure consisted of Mo rods that were branched and bent towards the cell boundary. The columnar grain structure was fault free with the rods completely aligned to the < 001> growth direction. Both microstructures were investigated for stability at elevated temperatures during isothermal annealing at temperatures near the melting point (Tsb{M}) and thermal fatigue at temperatures near 0.75Tsb{M}. Changes of fiber size and size distribution and number of fibers per unit area were measured as a function of temperature. The branch-free microstructures resisted coarsening for up to 200 h at temperatures up to 0.97Tsb{M}. However, the cells containing branched Mo rods did coarsen, but only at the maximum temperature of the study, 0.97Tsb{M}. The coarsening is explained by fault migration reducing the number of fibers per area. Thermal fatigue tests were conducted on disk-shaped specimens induction heated in an argon gas atmosphere. Heating and cooling cycles were controlled to approximate engine conditions. Although microstructure did not coarsen, the disks deformed plastically. The shape change was related to the microstructure, specifically to deformation at or near the individual cells. Material with the columnar grains deformed in the first few cycles, whereas the cellular material underwent 6000 cycles before appreciable deformation was noted. The conclusion is that the cellular microstructures are more stable than highly oriented ones.

  14. Novel Synthesis of Surface-Grafted Radical Initiator With Improved Stability and Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Erich; Dawes, Keith; Hu, Xinfang; Gorman, Christopher; Srogl, Jiri; Genzer, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Polymers grafted at interfaces are attractive for applications including antifouling coatings, biologically functionalized materials, and responsive surfaces. The ``grafting from'' approach to form densely packed brushes involves functionalizing a substrate with initiating moieties, and carrying out polymerization, e.g., surface-inititated free-radical polymerization (SI-FRP). Azo initiators for SI-FRP are commonly synthesized by a low-yielding route requiring large amounts of potassium cyanide. Those initiators are linked to a substrate by means of an ester group, rendering tethered polymers susceptible to degrafting by hydrolysis. We present a novel synthetic route to an asymmetric azo initiator, whose yield is nearly double that of previous syntheses. Cyanide usage in the new method is reduced by 72 percent. The spacer linking the initiator to a substrate contains only carbon-carbon bonds, resulting in stable brushes. Results are demonstrated for SI-FRP as well as reverse ATRP and RAFT.

  15. Efficient radical cation stabilization of PANI-ZnO and PANI-ZnO-GO composites and its optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathavan, T.; Divya, A.; Archana, J.; Ramasubbu, A.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jothirajan, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and its composites PANI-ZnO (Zinc oxide) and PANI-ZnO-GO (Graphene oxide) were successfully constructed. These materials were characterized by electron spin resonance (ESR) technique and ultraviolet visible spectrometry. The parameters such as line width, g-factor and spin concentration were deduced from ESR spectra, from the results the radical cation stabilization of PANI, PANI-ZnO and PANI-ZnO-GO composites were compared by the polaron and bipolaron formation. The absorption features obtained in the UV absorption spectra reveal the band gap of these modified PANI composites and also predicted the information of increasing and decreasing features of signal intensity and spin concentration.

  16. Combining Traceless Directing Groups with Hybridization Control of Radical Reactivity: From Skipped Enynes to Defect-Free Hexagonal Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Pati, Kamalkishore; Dos Passos Gomes, Gabriel; Alabugin, Igor V

    2016-09-12

    This work discloses the first general solution for converting oligoalkynes into polyaromatic polycyclic systems free of pentagonal defects. The efficiency and selectivity of this cascade originate from the combination of the Bu3 Sn-mediated TDG (traceless directing group) cascade transformations of skipped alkynes where the reactivity of the key radical precursor is tempered by hybridization effects. This approach ensures that the final structure consists of only six-membered rings. Practical implementation of this strategy is readily accomplished by incorporation of a suitably-substituted alkene as a final unit in the domino transformation. This strategy opens a new avenue for the controlled preparation of polyaromatic ribbons. The resulting ester functionality can be used for an additional Friedel-Crafts ring closure which effectively anneals two extra cycles with distinct electronic features to the extended aromatic system formed by the radical cascade. PMID:27534837

  17. Direct Evidence of Solution-Mediated Superoxide Transport and Organic Radical Formation in Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun; Fernandes, Russel; Cho, Franklin H; Sudhakar, Niranjan; Buonacorsi, Brandon; Walker, Sean; Xu, Meng; Baugh, Jonathan; Nazar, Linda F

    2016-09-01

    Advanced large-scale electrochemical energy storage requires cost-effective battery systems with high energy densities. Aprotic sodium-oxygen (Na-O2) batteries offer advantages, being comprised of low-cost elements and possessing much lower charge overpotential and higher reversibility compared to their lithium-oxygen battery cousins. Although such differences have been explained by solution-mediated superoxide transport, the underlying nature of this mechanism is not fully understood. Water has been suggested to solubilize superoxide via formation of hydroperoxyl (HO2), but direct evidence of these HO2 radical species in cells has proven elusive. Here, we use ESR spectroscopy at 210 K to identify and quantify soluble HO2 radicals in the electrolyte-cold-trapped in situ to prolong their lifetime-in a Na-O2 cell. These investigations are coupled to parallel SEM studies that image crystalline sodium superoxide (NaO2) on the carbon cathode. The superoxide radicals were spin-trapped via reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide at different electrochemical stages, allowing monitoring of their production and consumption during cycling. Our results conclusively demonstrate that transport of superoxide from cathode to electrolyte leads to the nucleation and growth of NaO2, which follows classical mechanisms based on the variation of superoxide content in the electrolyte and its correlation with the crystallization of cubic NaO2. The changes in superoxide content upon charge show that charge proceeds through the reverse solution process. Furthermore, we identify the carbon-centered/oxygen-centered alkyl radicals arising from attack of these solubilized HO2 species on the diglyme solvent. This is the first direct evidence of such species, which are likely responsible for electrolyte degradation. PMID:27498623

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation of Stable Channel Flow at Large Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwstadt, F. T. M.

    2005-08-01

    We consider a model for the stable atmospheric boundary at large stability, i.e. near the limit where turbulence is no longer able to survive. The model is a plane horizontally homogeneous channel flow, which is driven by a constant pressure gradient and which has a no-slip wall at the bottom and a free-slip wall at the top. At the lower wall a constant negative temperature flux is imposed. First, we consider a direct numerical simulation of the same channel flow. The simulation is computed with the neutral channel flow as initial condition and computed as a function of time for various values of the stability parameter h/L, where h is the channel height and L is related to the Obukhov length. We find that a turbulent solution is only possible for h/L < 1.25 and for larger values turbulence decays. Next, we consider a theoretical model for this channel flow based on a simple gradient transfer closure. The resulting equations allow an exact solution for the case of a stationary flow. The velocity profile for this solution is almost linear as a function of height in most of the channel. In the limit of infinite Reynolds number, the temperature profile has a logarithmic singularity at the upper wall of the channel. For the cases where a turbulent flow is maintained in the numerical simulation, we find that the velocity and temperature profiles are in good agreement with the results of the theoretical model when the effects of the surface layer on the exchange coefficients are taken into account.

  19. Tuning the Reactivity of Radical through a Triplet Diradical Cu(II) Intermediate in Radical Oxidative Cross-Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liangliang; Yi, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Qi, Xiaotian; Jiang, Hanpeng; Liu, Chao; Feng, Yuqi; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-11-01

    Highly selective radical/radical cross-coupling is paid more attention in bond formations. However, due to their intrinsic active properties, radical species are apt to achieve homo-coupling instead of cross-coupling, which makes the selective cross-coupling as a great challenge and almost untouched. Herein a notable strategy to accomplish direct radical/radical oxidative cross-coupling has been demonstrated, that is metal tuning a transient radical to a persistent radical intermediate followed by coupling with another transient radical. Here, a transient nitrogen-centered radical is tuned to a persistent radical complex by copper catalyst, followed by coupling with a transient allylic carbon-centered radical. Firstly, nitrogen-centered radical generated from N-methoxybenzamide stabilized by copper catalyst was successfully observed by EPR. Then DFT calculations revealed that a triplet diradical Cu(II) complex formed from the chelation N-methoxybenzamide nitrogen-centered radical to Cu(II) is a persistent radical species. Moreover, conceivable nitrogen-centered radical Cu(II) complex was observed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultimately, various allylic amides derivatives were obtained in good yields by adopting this strategy, which might inspire a novel and promising landscape in radical chemistry.

  20. Tuning the Reactivity of Radical through a Triplet Diradical Cu(II) Intermediate in Radical Oxidative Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liangliang; Yi, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Qi, Xiaotian; Jiang, Hanpeng; Liu, Chao; Feng, Yuqi; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective radical/radical cross-coupling is paid more attention in bond formations. However, due to their intrinsic active properties, radical species are apt to achieve homo-coupling instead of cross-coupling, which makes the selective cross-coupling as a great challenge and almost untouched. Herein a notable strategy to accomplish direct radical/radical oxidative cross-coupling has been demonstrated, that is metal tuning a transient radical to a persistent radical intermediate followed by coupling with another transient radical. Here, a transient nitrogen-centered radical is tuned to a persistent radical complex by copper catalyst, followed by coupling with a transient allylic carbon-centered radical. Firstly, nitrogen-centered radical generated from N-methoxybenzamide stabilized by copper catalyst was successfully observed by EPR. Then DFT calculations revealed that a triplet diradical Cu(II) complex formed from the chelation N-methoxybenzamide nitrogen-centered radical to Cu(II) is a persistent radical species. Moreover, conceivable nitrogen-centered radical Cu(II) complex was observed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultimately, various allylic amides derivatives were obtained in good yields by adopting this strategy, which might inspire a novel and promising landscape in radical chemistry. PMID:26525888

  1. Tuning the Reactivity of Radical through a Triplet Diradical Cu(II) Intermediate in Radical Oxidative Cross-Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liangliang; Yi, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Qi, Xiaotian; Jiang, Hanpeng; Liu, Chao; Feng, Yuqi; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective radical/radical cross-coupling is paid more attention in bond formations. However, due to their intrinsic active properties, radical species are apt to achieve homo-coupling instead of cross-coupling, which makes the selective cross-coupling as a great challenge and almost untouched. Herein a notable strategy to accomplish direct radical/radical oxidative cross-coupling has been demonstrated, that is metal tuning a transient radical to a persistent radical intermediate followed by coupling with another transient radical. Here, a transient nitrogen-centered radical is tuned to a persistent radical complex by copper catalyst, followed by coupling with a transient allylic carbon-centered radical. Firstly, nitrogen-centered radical generated from N-methoxybenzamide stabilized by copper catalyst was successfully observed by EPR. Then DFT calculations revealed that a triplet diradical Cu(II) complex formed from the chelation N-methoxybenzamide nitrogen-centered radical to Cu(II) is a persistent radical species. Moreover, conceivable nitrogen-centered radical Cu(II) complex was observed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultimately, various allylic amides derivatives were obtained in good yields by adopting this strategy, which might inspire a novel and promising landscape in radical chemistry. PMID:26525888

  2. A heterobimetallic approach to stabilize the elusive disulfur radical trianion ("subsulfide") S2(·3-).

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenglai; Hrobárik, Peter; Meier, Florian; Rudolph, Robert; Bill, Eckhard; Irran, Elisabeth; Kaupp, Martin; Driess, Matthias

    2013-01-21

    A unique heterobimetallic disulfur monoradical, complex 2, with a diamond-shaped {NiS(2)Pt} core has been synthesized by two-electron reduction of a supersulfido-(nacnac)nickel(II) complex (nacnac=β-diketiminato) with [Pt(Ph(3)P)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))] as a platinum(0) source and isolated in 82% yield. Strikingly, the results of DFT calculations in accordance with spectroscopic (EPR, paramagnetic NMR) and structural features of the complex revealed that the bonding situation of the S(2) ligand is between the elusive "half-bonded" S(2) radical trianion (S2(·3-)) and two separated S(2-) ligands and two separated S(2-) ligands. Accordingly, the Ni(II) center is partially oxidized, whereas the Pt(II) site is redox innocent. The complex can be reversibly oxidized to the corresponding Ni,Pt-disulfido monocation, compound 3, with a S--S single bond, and reacts readily with O(2) to form the corresponding superoxonickel(II) and disulfidoplatinum(II) (4) complexes. These compounds have been isolated in crystalline form and fully characterized, including IR and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy as well as ESI mass spectrometry. The molecular structures of compounds 2-4 have been confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:23255520

  3. Direct gas-phase epoxidation of propylene to propylene oxide through radical reactions: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Ali Can; Fellah, Mehmet Ferdi; Onal, Isik

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase radical chain reactions which utilize O 2 as the oxidant to produce propylene oxide (PO) are investigated through theoretical calculations. The transition states and energy profiles were obtained for each path. The rate constants were also calculated. The energetics for the competing pathways indicate that PO can be formed selectively due to its relatively low activation barrier (9.3 kcal/mol) which is in a good agreement with the experimental value (11 kcal/mol) of gas-phase propylene epoxidation. The formation of the acrolein and combustion products have relatively high activation barriers and are not favored. These results also support the recent experimental findings.

  4. Direct Measurement of the Radiative Lifetime of Vibrationally Excited OH Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard; Loo, Mark P.J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2005-07-01

    Neutral molecules, isolated in the gas phase, can be prepared in a long-lived excited state and stored in a trap. The long observation time afforded by the trap can then be exploited to measure the radiative lifetime of this state by monitoring the temporal decay of the population in the trap. This method is demonstrated here and used to benchmark the Einstein A coefficients in the Meinel system of OH. A pulsed beam of vibrationally excited OH radicals is Stark decelerated and loaded into an electrostatic quadrupole trap. The radiative lifetime of the upper {lambda}-doublet component of the X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2}, v=1, J=3/2 level is determined as 59.0{+-}2.0 ms, in good agreement with the calculated value of 58.0{+-}1.0 ms.

  5. 14 CFR 23.233 - Directional stability and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-component of wind velocity, demonstrated to be safe for taxiing, takeoff, and landing must be established... stability and control for water operations up to the maximum wind velocity specified in paragraph (a)...

  6. 14 CFR 23.233 - Directional stability and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-component of wind velocity, demonstrated to be safe for taxiing, takeoff, and landing must be established... stability and control for water operations up to the maximum wind velocity specified in paragraph (a)...

  7. 14 CFR 23.233 - Directional stability and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-component of wind velocity, demonstrated to be safe for taxiing, takeoff, and landing must be established... stability and control for water operations up to the maximum wind velocity specified in paragraph (a)...

  8. 14 CFR 23.233 - Directional stability and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-component of wind velocity, demonstrated to be safe for taxiing, takeoff, and landing must be established... stability and control for water operations up to the maximum wind velocity specified in paragraph (a)...

  9. 14 CFR 23.233 - Directional stability and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-component of wind velocity, demonstrated to be safe for taxiing, takeoff, and landing must be established... stability and control for water operations up to the maximum wind velocity specified in paragraph (a)...

  10. Effect of hydrogen pressure on free radicals in direct coal liquefaction/coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Seehra, M.S.; Ibrahim, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the coprocessing of coal with waste tires and commingled plastics and to characterize the relevant catalysts, using high pressure/high temperature in-situ ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) spectroscopy. The recent results from high pressure ESR spectroscopy are emphasized. During this period, considerable progress was made in developing the high pressure capabilities in in-situ ESR spectroscopy and new results carried out in 1000 psi of H{sub 2}gas are presented. In these experiments, sapphire tubes were used to contain the high pressures at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C. Results of the experiments carried out under 1000 psi of H{sub 2} are compared with those under 1000 psi of non-interacting argon and with the earlier experiments in flowing H{sub 2} gas where the volatiles are removed by the flowing gas. In these experiments, the free radical density N of the Blind Canyon coal was measured at each temperature and pressure by double integration of the ESR signal and calibrating it against a standard. The details of the experimental apparatus and procedures have been described in earlier publications.

  11. The production mechanisms of OH radicals in a pulsed direct current plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; Pei, X. K.; Lu, X. P.; Liu, D. W.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-09-15

    The production mechanism of OH radicals in a pulsed DC plasma jet is studied by a two-dimensional (2-D) plasma jet model and a one-dimensional (1-D) discharge model. For the plasma jet in the open air, electron-impact dissociation of H{sub 2}O, electron neutralization of H{sub 2}O{sup +}, as well as dissociation of H{sub 2}O by O(1D) are found to be the main reactions to generate the OH species. The contribution of the dissociation of H{sub 2}O by electron is more than the others. The additions of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, air, and H{sub 2}O into the working gas increase the OH density outside the tube slightly, which is attributed to more electrons produced by Penning ionization. On the other hand, the additions of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O into the working gas increase the OH density inside the tube substantially, which is attributed to the increased O (1D) and H{sub 2}O concentration, respectively. The gas flow will transport high density OH out of the tube during pulse off period. It is also shown that the plasma chemistry and reactivity can be effectively controlled by the pulse numbers. These results are supported by the laser induced fluorescence measurements and are relevant to several applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas in health care, medicine, and materials processing.

  12. Electron capture dissociation product ion abundances at the X amino acid in RAAAA-X-AAAAK peptides correlate with amino acid polarity and radical stability.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Aleksey; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Tsybin, Yury O

    2009-12-01

    We present mechanistic studies aimed at improving the understanding of the product ion formation rules in electron capture dissociation (ECD) of peptides and proteins in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In particular, we attempted to quantify the recently reported general correlation of ECD product ion abundance (PIA) with amino acid hydrophobicity. The results obtained on a series of model H-RAAAAXAAAAK-OH peptides confirm a direct correlation of ECD PIA with X amino acid hydrophobicity and polarity. The correlation factor (R) exceeds 0.9 for 12 amino acids (Ile, Val, His, Asn, Asp, Glu, Gln, Ser, Thr, Gly, Cys, and Ala). The deviation of ECD PIA for seven outliers (Pro is not taken into consideration) is explained by their specific radical stabilization properties (Phe, Trp, Tyr, Met, and Leu) and amino acid basicity (Lys, Arg). Phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr decreases the efficiency of ECD around phosphorylated residues, as expected. The systematic arrangement of amino acids reported here indicates a possible route toward development of a predictive model for quantitative electron capture/transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, with possible applications in proteomics.

  13. On the Electronic Spectroscopy of Closed Shell Cations Derived from Resonance Stabilized Radicals: Insights from Theory and Franck-Condon Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, Tyler P.; Kable, Scott H.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Reid, Scott A.

    2012-06-01

    Recent attention has been directed on closed shell aromatic cations as potential carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The spectra of mass-selected, matrix-isolated benzylium and tropylium cations were recently reported [Nagy, A., Fulara, J., Garkusha, I. and Maier, J. P. (2011), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 50: 3022-3025]. The benzylium spectrum shows an extended progression in a low frequency (510 cm-1) ring distortion mode. Modeling of the benzylium spectrum using (TD)DFT and MCSCF-PT2 methods in concert with multidimensional Franck-Condon (FC) analysis is found to yield excellent agreement with the experimental spectrum. We extended this analysis to larger (2 and 3 ring) PAH cations derived from resonance stabilized radicals, which are predicted to show strong S0 → Sn transitions in the visible region. The FC progression is significantly quenched in the larger species, and our results for 1-napthylmethylium are in excellent agreement with very recent experiments [Nagy, A., Fulara, J., and Maier, J. P. (2011), J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 19796]. Since carriers of the DIBs should exhibit spectra dominated by a single vibronic transition, our results demonstrate that closed-shell cations may present spectra with the required properties. Furthermore, the calculated ionization energies of a range of CSCs were found to be in the 13-14 eV range, consistent with variations in behaviour of the DIB carriers with respect to various astrophysical environments.

  14. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-07-01

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 107 s-1, which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s-1 at 298 K.

  15. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Lester, Marsha I

    2016-07-28

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 10(7) s(-1), which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s(-1) at 298 K. PMID:27475366

  16. Channeling the SmI₂ reactions to the radical path: radicals resisting reduction by SmI₂.

    PubMed

    Yella, Ramesh; Hoz, Shmaryahu

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the reaction of 4-(2,2-diphenylvinyl)pyridine with SmI2 revealed that the intermediate radical strongly resists further reduction to the corresponding anion. The resistance of the radical to accepting another electron is traced to its stabilization by the nitrogen lone pair. The literature suggests that oxygen may also play a role similar to that of nitrogen in directing the course of the reaction toward radical rather than to anionic chemistry.

  17. Reductive Umpolung of Carbonyl Derivatives with Visible‐Light Photoredox Catalysis: Direct Access to Vicinal Diamines and Amino Alcohols via α‐Amino Radicals and Ketyl Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eleonora; Millet, Anthony; Nakajima, Masaki; Loescher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Visible‐light‐mediated photoredox‐catalyzed aldimine–aniline and aldehyde–aniline couplings have been realized. The reductive single electron transfer (SET) umpolung of various carbonyl derivatives enabled the generation of intermediary ketyl and α‐amino radical anions, which were utilized for the synthesis of unsymmetrically substituted 1,2‐diamines and amino alcohols. PMID:27136443

  18. High angle of attack: Forebody flow physics and design emphasizing directional stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, R.

    A framework for understanding the fundamental physics of flowfields over forebody type shapes at low speed, high angle of attack conditions with special emphasis on sideslip has been established. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study flowfieids over experimentally investigated forebodies: the Lamont tangent-ogive forebody, the F-5A forebody and the Erickson chine forebody. A modified version of a current advanced code, CFL3D, was used to solve the Euler and thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The Navier-Stokes equations used a form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model modified to account for massive crossflow separation. Using the insight provided by the solutions obtained using CFD, together with comparison with limited available data, the aerodynamics of forebodies with positive directional stability has been revealed. An unconventional way of presenting the results is used to illustrate how a positive contribution to directional stability arises. Based on this new understanding, a parametric study was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability. The effect of cross-sectional shape on directional stability was found to be very significant. Broad chine-shaped cross-sections were found to promote directional stability. Also, directional stability is improved if the chine is placed closer to the top of the cross-section. Planform shapes also played an important role in determining the forebody directional stability characteristics. This initial parametric study has been used to propose some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability.

  19. Oxidation of thioanisole and p-methoxythioanisole by lignin peroxidase: kinetic evidence of a direct reaction between compound II and a radical cation.

    PubMed Central

    Brück, Thomas B; Gerini, Maria Francesca; Baciocchi, Enrico; Harvey, Patricia J

    2003-01-01

    The reaction of H2O2 with thioanisole and p-methoxythioanisole catalysed by lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been studied spectrophotometrically under turnover and single turnover conditions with a stopped-flow apparatus. Pre-formed lignin peroxidase compounds I and II are each able to react with the sulphides to form a sulphide radical cation. The radical cation is then converted into the sulphoxide either by reaction with the medium or by reaction with compound II. This is the first report of a direct reaction between compound II and the substrate radical cation. With thioanisole, significant enantiomeric selectivity and high oxygen incorporation in the sulphoxide are obtained because compound II is preferentially reduced by the enzyme-bound thioanisole radical cation compared with the neutral substrate. By contrast, with p-methoxythioanisole, the data imply formation of an intermediate ternary complex comprising compound II, radical cation and neutral substrate, such that a chain of electron transfer reactions starting from neutral molecule and progressing to oxidized haem via substrate radical cation is facilitated, yielding the native enzyme and two molecules of p-methoxythioanisole radical cation as products. The reactions of compounds I and II with sulphides imply flexing of the apoprotein moiety during catalysis. PMID:12803544

  20. Radical bonding: structure and stability of bis(phenalenyl) complexes of divalent metals from across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Smaranda; Donald, Kelling J

    2009-07-01

    We examine the bonding possibilities of the bis(phenalenyl) MP(2) sandwich complexes of the divalent metals M = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, and Hg, at the B3LYP level of theory. The outcome is an extraordinarily diverse class of low symmetry bis(phenalenyl)metal complexes in which bonding preferences and binding enthalpies differ dramatically. The lowest energy group 2 metal MP(2) complexes include an intriguing eta(1),eta(3) BeP(2) structure, and bent eta(6),eta(6) systems for M = Ca, Sr, and Ba. The group 12 bis(phenalenyl) complexes are thermodynamically unstable eta(1),eta(1) slip-sandwich structures. To better understand changes in the structural preferences going from the (eta(6),eta(6)) group 2 to the (eta(1),eta(1)) group 12 complexes, we explored the bonding in the bis(phenalenyl) complexes of transition metals with stable +2 oxidations states between Ca and Zn in period 4. The computed binding enthalpies are large and negative for nearly all of the minimum energy bis(phenalenyl) complexes of the group 2 and the transition metals; they are tiny for MgP(2), and are quite positive for the group 12 systems. The structural preferences and stability of the complexes is a subtle negotiation of several influences: the (un)availability of (n - 1)d and np, orbitals for bonding, the cost of the rehybridization at carbon sites in the phenalenyl rings in preparation for bonding to the metals, and the (P---P) interaction between the phenalenyl radicals.

  1. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function. PMID:21986200

  2. Direct modulation of microtubule stability contributes to anthracene general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Daniel J; Weiser, Brian P; Psonis, John; Liao, Zhengzheng; Taratula, Olena; Fiamengo, Ashley; Wang, Xiaozhao; Sugasawa, Keizo; Smith, Amos B; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2013-04-10

    Recently, we identified 1-aminoanthracene as a fluorescent general anesthetic. To investigate the mechanism of action, a photoactive analogue, 1-azidoanthracene, was synthesized. Administration of 1-azidoanthracene to albino stage 40-47 tadpoles was found to immobilize animals upon near-UV irradiation of the forebrain region. The immobilization was often reversible, but it was characterized by a longer duration consistent with covalent attachment of the ligand to functionally important targets. IEF/SDS-PAGE examination of irradiated tadpole brain homogenate revealed labeled protein, identified by mass spectrometry as β-tubulin. In vitro assays with aminoanthracene-cross-linked tubulin indicated inhibition of microtubule polymerization, similar to colchicine. Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed anthracene binding near the colchicine site. Stage 40-47 tadpoles were also incubated 1 h with microtubule stabilizing agents, epothilone D or discodermolide, followed by dosing with 1-aminoanthracene. The effective concentration of 1-aminoanthracene required to immobilize the tadpoles was significantly increased in the presence of either microtubule stabilizing agent. Epothilone D similarly mitigated the effects of a clinical neurosteroid general anesthetic, allopregnanolone, believed to occupy the colchicine site in tubulin. We conclude that neuronal microtubules are "on-pathway" targets for anthracene general anesthetics and may also represent functional targets for some neurosteroid general anesthetics. PMID:23484901

  3. Direct Modulation of Microtubule Stability Contributes to Anthracene General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Daniel J.; Weiser, Brian P.; Psonis, John; Liao, Zhengzheng; Taratula, Olena; Fiamengo, Ashley; Wang, Xiaozhao; Sugasawa, Keizo; Smith, Amos B.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we identified 1-aminoanthracene as a fluorescent general anesthetic. To investigate the mechanism of action, a photoactive analogue, 1-azidoanthracene, was synthesized. Administration of 1-azidoanthracene to albino stage 40–47 tadpoles was found to immobilize animals upon near-UV irradiation of the forebrain region. The immobilization was often reversible, but it was characterized by a longer duration consistent with covalent attachment of the ligand to functionally important targets. IEF/SDS-PAGE examination of irradiated tadpole brain homogenate revealed labeled protein, identified by mass spectrometry as β-tubulin. In vitro assays with aminoanthracene-cross-linked tubulin indicated inhibition of microtubule polymerization, similar to colchicine. Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed anthracene binding near the colchicine site. Stage 40–47 tadpoles were also incubated 1 h with microtubule stabilizing agents, epothilone D or discodermolide, followed by dosing with 1-aminoanthracene. The effective concentration of 1-aminoanthracene required to immobilize the tadpoles was significantly increased in the presence of either microtubule stabilizing agent. Epothilone D similarly mitigated the effects of a clinical neurosteroid general anesthetic, allopregnanolone, believed to occupy the colchicine site in tubulin. We conclude that neuronal microtubules are “on-pathway” targets for anthracene general anesthetics and may also represent functional targets for some neurosteroid general anesthetics. PMID:23484901

  4. Model of diffusion-assisted direct laser writing by means of nanopolymerization in the presence of radical quencher

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulin, Alexander Bityurin, Nikita; Sokolov, Viktor I.

    2015-12-15

    Diffusion-assisted direct laser writing (DA-DLW) by multiphoton polymerization has been recently shown to be one of the most promising methods for the high-resolution 3D nanofabrication [I. Sakellari, et al., ACS Nano 6, 2302 (2012)]. The improvement of the writing spatial resolution has been observed under certain conditions when the mobile radical quencher (polymerization inhibitor) is added to the photosensitive composition. In this work, we present a theoretical study of this method, focusing on the resolution capabilities and optimal writing parameters. The laser beam absorption in the polymerizable composition causes the localized depletion of the quencher molecules. If the quencher depletion is balanced by its diffusion from the outside of the focal volume, the quasi-stationary non-equillibrium concentration spatial profile with zero minimum can be obtained. The polymer is then effectively formed only in the domain where the quencher is depleted. The spatially-distributed quencher, in this case, has the effect similar to that of the vortex beam in STimulated Emission Microscopy (STED)

  5. Dynamics and stability of directional jumps in the desert locust

    PubMed Central

    Gvirsman, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Locusts are known for their ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. The jump also serves to launch the adult locust into the air in order to initiate flight. Various aspects of this important behavior have been studied extensively, from muscle physiology and biomechanics, to the energy storage systems involved in powering the jump, and more. Less well understood are the mechanisms participating in control of the jump trajectory. Here we utilise video monitoring and careful analysis of experimental directional jumps by adult desert locusts, together with dynamic computer simulation, in order to understand how the locusts control the direction and elevation of the jump, the residual angular velocities resulting from the jump and the timing of flapping-flight initiation. Our study confirms and expands early findings regarding the instrumental role of the initial body position and orientation. Both real-jump video analysis and simulations based on our expanded dynamical model demonstrate that the initial body coordinates of position (relative to the hind-legs ground-contact points) are dominant in predicting the jumps’ azimuth and elevation angles. We also report a strong linear correlation between the jumps’ pitch-angular-velocity and flight initiation timing, such that head downwards rotations lead to earlier wing opening. In addition to offering important insights into the bio-mechanical principles of locust jumping and flight initiation, the findings from this study will be used in designing future prototypes of a bio-inspired miniature jumping robot that will be employed in animal behaviour studies and environmental monitoring applications. PMID:27703846

  6. Direct evidence of iNOS-mediated in vivo free radical production and protein oxidation in acetone-induced ketosis.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G; Dallas, Shannon; Duma, Danielle; Mason, Ronald P; Kadiiska, Maria B

    2008-08-01

    Diabetic patients frequently encounter ketosis that is characterized by the breakdown of lipids with the consequent accumulation of ketone bodies. Several studies have demonstrated that reactive species are likely to induce tissue damage in diabetes, but the role of the ketone bodies in the process has not been fully investigated. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with novel spin-trapping and immunological techniques has been used to investigate in vivo free radical formation in a murine model of acetone-induced ketosis. A six-line EPR spectrum consistent with the alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct of a carbon-centered lipid-derived radical was detected in the liver extracts. To investigate the possible enzymatic source of these radicals, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase knockout mice were used. Free radical production was unchanged in the NADPH oxidase knockout but much decreased in the iNOS knockout mice, suggesting a role for iNOS in free radical production. Longer-term exposure to acetone revealed iNOS overexpression in the liver together with protein radical formation, which was detected by confocal microscopy and a novel immunospin-trapping method. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation as a consequence of persistent free radical generation after 21 days of acetone treatment in control and NADPH oxidase knockout but not in iNOS knockout mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acetone administration, a model of ketosis, can lead to protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation through a free radical-dependent mechanism driven mainly by iNOS overexpression.

  7. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  8. Stability boundaries for aircraft with unstable lateral-directional dynamics and control saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, Prakash C.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft that do not possess inherent (aerodynamic) stability must rely on closed-loop control systems for stable operation. Because there are limits on the deflections of an aircraft's control surfaces, the region of stable operation also is bounded. These boundaries are investigated for a lateral-directional example in which vertical fin size is inadequate to provide directional stability and where aileron and rudder deflections are subject to saturation. Fourth-order models are used in this study, with flight control logic based on minimum-control-energy linear-quadratic-regulatory theory. It is found that the stability boundaries can be described by unstable limit cycles surrounding stable equilibrium points. Variations in regions of stability with gain levels and command inputs are illustrated. Current results suggest guidelines for permissible limits on the open-loop instability of an aircraft's lateral-directional modes.

  9. Beta-Carotene chemical stability in nanoemulsions was improved by stabilized with Beta-Lactoglobulin-Catechin conjugates through free radical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG)-catechin conjugates were prepared by a free radical method and investigated with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and far-UV circular dichroism (CD). Covalent binding between BLG and cat...

  10. Radicalization and Radical Catalysis of Biomass Sugars: Insights from First-principles Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Zhu, Chang; Zou, Xianli; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations are conducted to investigate the radicalization processes and radical catalysis of biomass sugars. Structural alterations due to radicalization generally focus on the radicalized sites, and radicalization affects H-bonds in D-fructofuranose more than in D-glucopyranose, potentially with outcome of new H-bonds. Performances of different functionals and basis sets are evaluated for all radicalization processes, and enthalpy changes and Gibbs free energies for these processes are presented with high accuracy, which can be referenced for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies. It shows that radicalization can be utilized for direct transformation of biomass sugars, and for each sugar, C rather than O sites are always preferred for radicalization, thus suggesting the possibility to activate C-H bonds of biomass sugars. Radical catalysis is further combined with Brønsted acids, and it clearly states that functionalization fundamentally regulates the catalytic effects of biomass sugars. In presence of explicit water molecules, functionalization significantly affects the activation barriers and reaction energies of protonation rather than dehydration steps. Tertiary butyl and phenyl groups with large steric hindrances or hydroxyl and amino groups resulting in high stabilities for protonation products drive the protonation steps to occur facilely at ambient conditions.

  11. Radicalization and Radical Catalysis of Biomass Sugars: Insights from First-principles Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gang; Zhu, Chang; Zou, Xianli; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations are conducted to investigate the radicalization processes and radical catalysis of biomass sugars. Structural alterations due to radicalization generally focus on the radicalized sites, and radicalization affects H-bonds in D-fructofuranose more than in D-glucopyranose, potentially with outcome of new H-bonds. Performances of different functionals and basis sets are evaluated for all radicalization processes, and enthalpy changes and Gibbs free energies for these processes are presented with high accuracy, which can be referenced for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies. It shows that radicalization can be utilized for direct transformation of biomass sugars, and for each sugar, C rather than O sites are always preferred for radicalization, thus suggesting the possibility to activate C-H bonds of biomass sugars. Radical catalysis is further combined with Brønsted acids, and it clearly states that functionalization fundamentally regulates the catalytic effects of biomass sugars. In presence of explicit water molecules, functionalization significantly affects the activation barriers and reaction energies of protonation rather than dehydration steps. Tertiary butyl and phenyl groups with large steric hindrances or hydroxyl and amino groups resulting in high stabilities for protonation products drive the protonation steps to occur facilely at ambient conditions. PMID:27405843

  12. Radicalization and Radical Catalysis of Biomass Sugars: Insights from First-principles Studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Zhu, Chang; Zou, Xianli; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations are conducted to investigate the radicalization processes and radical catalysis of biomass sugars. Structural alterations due to radicalization generally focus on the radicalized sites, and radicalization affects H-bonds in D-fructofuranose more than in D-glucopyranose, potentially with outcome of new H-bonds. Performances of different functionals and basis sets are evaluated for all radicalization processes, and enthalpy changes and Gibbs free energies for these processes are presented with high accuracy, which can be referenced for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies. It shows that radicalization can be utilized for direct transformation of biomass sugars, and for each sugar, C rather than O sites are always preferred for radicalization, thus suggesting the possibility to activate C-H bonds of biomass sugars. Radical catalysis is further combined with Brønsted acids, and it clearly states that functionalization fundamentally regulates the catalytic effects of biomass sugars. In presence of explicit water molecules, functionalization significantly affects the activation barriers and reaction energies of protonation rather than dehydration steps. Tertiary butyl and phenyl groups with large steric hindrances or hydroxyl and amino groups resulting in high stabilities for protonation products drive the protonation steps to occur facilely at ambient conditions. PMID:27405843

  13. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions.

  14. Stability analysis of the rotor of ultrasonic motor driving fluid directly.

    PubMed

    Changliang, Xia; Mengli, Wang

    2005-06-01

    The stability of the rotor of ultrasonic motor driving fluid directly is a key to its applications and control. This paper introduced the acoustic streaming and acoustic viscous stress near the boundary layer. Following this, the effect of acoustic viscous force on the stability of the rotor of ultrasonic motor driving fluid directly was presented in detail. The result showed that this system can be equivalent to a mass-spring and the spring constant can be used to weigh the stability of the rotor. By this model and relevant experiments, factors that affect the stability of the rotor such as the driving frequency, the rotor's weight and radius, the saturated acoustic streaming velocity, the mode number of stator vibration, the fluid's height and type are investigated and useful guidelines for design and application are obtained.

  15. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    SciTech Connect

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Seong Jip; Nahm, Sahn

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

  16. Formation of a tyrosyl radical intermediate in Proteus mirabilis catalase by directed mutagenesis and consequences for nucleotide reactivity.

    PubMed

    Andreoletti, P; Gambarelli, S; Sainz, G; Stojanoff, V; White, C; Desfonds, G; Gagnon, J; Gaillard, J; Jouve, H M

    2001-11-13

    Proteus mirabilis catalase (PMC) belongs to the family of NADPH binding catalases. The function of NADPH in these enzymes is still a matter of debate. This study presents the effects of two independent phenylalanine mutations (F194 and F215), located between NADPH and heme in the PMC structure. The phenylalanines were replaced with tyrosines which we predicted could carry radicals in a NADPH-heme electron transfer. The X-ray crystal structures of the two mutants indicated that neither the binding site of NADPH nor the immediate environment of the residues was affected by the mutations. Measurements using H2O2 as a substrate confirmed that the variants were as active as the native enzyme. With equivalent amounts of peroxoacetic acid, wild-type PMC, F215Y PMC, and beef liver catalase (BLC) formed a stable compound I, while the F194Y PMC variant produced a compound I which was rapidly transformed into compound II and a tyrosyl radical. EPR studies showed that this radical, generated by the oxidation of Y194, was not related to the previously observed radical in BLC, located on Y369. In the presence of excess NADPH, compound I was reduced to a resting enzyme (k(obs) = 1.7 min(-1)) in a two-electron process. This was independent of the enzyme's origin and did not require any thus far identified tyrosyl radicals. Conversely, the presence of a tyrosyl radical in F194Y PMC greatly enhanced the oxidation of reduced beta-nicotinamide mononucleotide under a steady-state H2O2 flow with observable compound II. This process could involve a one-electron reduction of compound I via Y194. PMID:11695923

  17. Stabilities of nitrogen containing heterocyclic radicals and geometrical influences on non-radiative processes in organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evleth, E. M.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental work on generating radicals by removal of a hydrogen atom from pyrrole, imidazole, indole, and carbazole is reported. Photophysical studies on indolizine and related aza-derivatives show that materials having large S2-S1 energy gaps might exhibit upper state fluorescence. Photodecomposition quantum yields of a series of sterically hindered p-aminobenzene diazonium cations in water were found structurally and wavelength dependent and unquenched in aqueous sodium bromide solutions. Photodecomposition of diazonium materials did not produce a metastable species with a longer lifetime than 1 msec.

  18. Development of the radical-stable Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by blocking the radical attack.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Kim, Han Sang; Kwon, Inchan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2014-11-10

    Despite the potential use of peroxidases as industrial biocatalysts, their practical application is often impeded due to suicide inactivation by radicals generated in oxidative reactions. Using a peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus (CiP) as a model enzyme, we revealed a dominant factor for peroxidase inactivation during phenol oxidation, and we engineered radical-stable mutants by site-directed mutagenesis of an amino acid residue susceptible to modification by phenoxyl radical. Mass spectrometry analysis of inactivated CiP identified an adduct between F230 and a phenoxyl radical, and subsequently, the F230 residue was mutated to amino acids that resisted radical coupling. Of the F230 mutants, the F230A mutant showed the highest stability against radical inactivation, retaining 80% of its initial activity, while the wild-type protein was almost completely inactivated. The F230A mutant also exhibited a 16-fold higher turnover of the phenol substrate compared with the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the F230A mutant was stable during the oxidation of other phenolic compounds, including m-cresol and 3-methoxyphenol. No structural changes were observed by UV-vis and CD spectra of CiP after radical coupling, implying that the F230-phenol radical adduct inactivated CiP by blocking substrate access to the active site. Our novel strategy can be used to improve the stability of other peroxidases inactivated by radicals.

  19. The direct observation of secondary radical chain chemistry in the heterogeneous reaction of chlorine atoms with submicron squalane droplets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Lin; Smith, Jared D; Che, Dung L; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-05-21

    The reaction of Cl atoms, in the presence of Cl(2) and O(2), with sub-micron squalane particles is used as a model system to explore how surface hydrogen abstraction reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. The heterogeneous reaction is measured in a photochemical flow tube reactor in which chlorine atoms are produced by the photolysis of Cl(2) at 365 nm. By monitoring the heterogeneous reaction, using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer, the effective reactive uptake coefficient and the distributions of both oxygenated and chlorinated reaction products are measured and found to depend sensitively upon O(2), Cl(2), and Cl concentrations in the flow reactor. In the absence of O(2), the effective reactive uptake coefficient monotonically increases with Cl(2) concentration to a value of ∼3, clearly indicating the presence of secondary chain chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. The effective uptake coefficient decreases with increasing O(2) approaching a diffusion corrected value of 0.65 ± 0.07, when 20% of the total nitrogen flow rate in the reactor is replaced with O(2). Using a kinetic model it is found that the amount of secondary chemistry and the product distributions in the aerosol phase are controlled by the competitive reaction rates of O(2) and Cl(2) with alkyl radicals. The role that a heterogeneous pathway might play in the reaction of alkyl radicals with O(2) and Cl(2) is investigated within a reasonable range of reaction parameters. These results show, more generally, that for heterogeneous reactions involving secondary chain chemistry, time and radical concentration are not interchangeable kinetic quantities, but rather the observed reaction rate and product formation chemistry depends sensitively upon the concentrations and time evolution of radical initiators and those species that propagate or terminate free radical chain reactions.

  20. Direct {anti b}b production in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, J.

    1993-12-31

    The first measurement of bottom quark production in the forward detector at CDF is presented in this thesis. Events from the 1988/89 Fermilab collider run were selected with forward muons with nearby jets to form a bottom quark tag. The efficiency and acceptance of the detector are then taken into account and the number of events is turned into a cross section: {sigma}(p{sub t}{sup b} > 20 GeV, 1.9 < {vert_bar}{eta}{sup b}{vert_bar} < 2.5) = (124. {+-} 35. {+-} 76.) nb. The contribution from direct bottom quarks is {sigma}(p{sub t}{sup b} > 20 GeV, p{sub t}{sup {anti b}} > 15 GeV, 1.9 < {vert_bar}{eta}{sup b}{vert_bar} < 2.5) = (100. {+-} 30.{sub {minus}31.}{sup +30.}) nb.

  1. Direct fiber comb stabilization to a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shun; Wang, Chenchen; Fourcade-Dutin, Coralie; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2014-09-22

    We have isolated a single tooth from a fiber laser-based optical frequency comb for nonlinear spectroscopy and thereby directly referenced the comb. An 89 MHz erbium fiber laser frequency comb is directly stabilized to the P(23) (1539.43 nm) overtone transition of (12)C(2)H(2) inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. To do this, a single comb tooth is isolated and amplified from 20 nW to 40 mW with sufficient fidelity to perform saturated absorption spectroscopy. The fractional stability of the comb, ~7 nm away from the stabilized tooth, is shown to be 6 × 10(-12) at 100 ms gate time, which is over an order of magnitude better than that of a comb referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator.

  2. Catalytic surface radical in dye-decolorizing peroxidase: a computational, spectroscopic and site-directed mutagenesis study

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Dolores; Pogni, Rebecca; Cañellas, Marina; Lucas, Fátima; Guallar, Victor; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Coscolín, Cristina; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2014-01-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) of Auricularia auricula-judae has been expressed in Escherichia coli as a representative of a new DyP family, and subjected to mutagenic, spectroscopic, crystallographic and computational studies. The crystal structure of DyP shows a buried haem cofactor, and surface tryptophan and tyrosine residues potentially involved in long-range electron transfer from bulky dyes. Simulations using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration) software provided several binding-energy optima for the anthraquinone-type RB19 (Reactive Blue 19) near the above aromatic residues and the haem access-channel. Subsequent QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) calculations showed a higher tendency of Trp-377 than other exposed haem-neighbouring residues to harbour a catalytic protein radical, and identified the electron-transfer pathway. The existence of such a radical in H2O2-activated DyP was shown by low-temperature EPR, being identified as a mixed tryptophanyl/tyrosyl radical in multifrequency experiments. The signal was dominated by the Trp-377 neutral radical contribution, which disappeared in the W377S variant, and included a tyrosyl contribution assigned to Tyr-337 after analysing the W377S spectra. Kinetics of substrate oxidation by DyP suggests the existence of high- and low-turnover sites. The high-turnover site for oxidation of RB19 (kcat> 200 s−1) and other DyP substrates was assigned to Trp-377 since it was absent from the W377S variant. The low-turnover site/s (RB19 kcat ~20 s−1) could correspond to the haem access-channel, since activity was decreased when the haem channel was occluded by the G169L mutation. If a tyrosine residue is also involved, it will be different from Tyr-337 since all activities are largely unaffected in the Y337S variant. PMID:25495127

  3. Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics of aeroassist flight experiment configuration in air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.; Wells, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics measured on a 60 deg half-angle elliptical cone, which was raked at an angle of 73 deg from the cone centerline and with an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane), are presented for angles of attack from -10 to 10 deg. The high normal-shock density ratio of a real gas was simulated by tests at a Mach number of 6 in air and CF4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). Tests were conducted in air at Mach 6 and 10 and in CF4 at Mach 6 to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and normal-shock density ratio. Changes in Mach number from 6 to 10 in air or in Reynolds number by a factor of 4 at Mach 6 had a negligible effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Variations in normal-shock density ratio had a measurable effect on lateral and directional aerodynamic coefficients, but no significant effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Tests in air and CF4 indicated that the configuration was laterally and directionally stable through the test range of angle of attack.

  4. Ethylbenzene induces microsomal oxygen free radical generation: antibody-directed characterization of the responsible cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Serron, S C; Dwivedi, N; Backes, W L

    2000-05-01

    Small aromatic hydrocarbons cause changes in oxidative metabolism by modulating the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes, with the changes in these enzymes being responsible for qualitative changes in aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine if exposure to the small alkylbenzene ethylbenzene (EB) leads to an increase in hepatic free radical production. Male F344 rats were treated with ip injections of EB (10 mmol/kg) and compared to corn oil controls. Hepatic free radical production was examined by measuring the conversion of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) to its fluorescent product 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). A significant elevation of fluorescent DCF production was observed after treatment with EB, despite the lack of effect on overall cytochrome P450 levels. This process was shown to be inhibitable by metyrapone, an inhibitor of P450. DCF production was also inhibited by catalase, suggesting that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is one of the reactive oxygen intermediates involved in EB-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Interestingly, superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not inhibit DCF production in corn oil-treated rats but was an effective inhibitor in the EB-treated groups. In an effort to determine if the increase in ROS production was related to changes in specific P450 enzymes, DCF production was measured in the presence of anti-CYP2B, anti-CYP2C11, anti-CYP2E1, and anti-CYP3A2 inhibitory antibodies. Anti-CYP2B antibodies inhibited DCF production in EB-treated, but not corn oil groups, which is consistent with the low constitutive levels of this enzyme and its induction by EB. The data also demonstrate that CYP2B contributes to ROS production. Anti-CYP2C11 did not influence DCF production in either group. ROS formation in corn oil-treated rats as well as in ethylbenzene-treated rats was also inhibited with antibodies to anti-CYP2E1 and anti-CYP3A2. These results suggest that CYP2C11 does not appear to

  5. Some effects of nonlinear variation in the directional-stability and damping-in-yawing derivatives on the lateral stability of an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfield, Leonard

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made to determine the effect of nonlinear stability derivatives on the lateral stability of an airplane. Motions were calculated on the assumption that the directional-stability and the damping-in-yawing derivatives are functions of the angle of sideslip. The application of the Laplace transform to the calculation of an airplane motion when certain types of nonlinear derivatives are present is described in detail. The types of nonlinearities assumed correspond to the condition in which the values of the directional-stability and damping-in-yawing derivatives are zero for small angle of sideslip.

  6. Photochemical reaction dynamics of 2,2'-dithiobis(benzothiazole): direct observation of the addition product of an aromatic thiyl radical to an alkene with time-resolved vibrational and electronic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-04-28

    The photochemical reaction dynamics of the benzothiazole-2-thiyl (BS) radical, produced by 330 nm ultraviolet photolysis of 2,2'-dithiobis(benzothiazole) (BSSB), are examined on the picosecond time scale. The initial addition product of a thiol-ene reaction between the BS radical and styrene is directly observed by transient vibrational absorption spectroscopy (TVAS). Transient electronic absorption spectroscopy (TEAS) in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions reveals rapid formation of the ground state BS radical with a time constant of ∼200 fs. The photolytically generated BS radical decays through geminate recombination to the parent molecule BSSB and competitive formation of a BS radical dimer with a rate coefficient of (3.7 ± 0.2) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) in methanol, and thereafter (36 ± 1)% of the initially formed BS radicals survive at the longest time delay (1.3 ns). In styrene solution, in contrast to methanol and toluene solutions, kinetic traces of the BS radical show an additional decay with a time constant of 305 ± 13 ps, and a broad band at 345-500 nm grows with the same time constant, suggesting a bimolecular reaction of the BS radical with styrene. The TVAS measurements reveal an absorption band of the ground state BS radical at 1301 cm(-1) in toluene solution, and the band decays with a time constant of 294 ± 32 ps in styrene solution. Two product bands grow at 1239 cm(-1) and 1429 cm(-1) with respective time constants of 312 ± 68 ps and 325 ± 33 ps, and are attributed to the addition product BS-St radical formed from the BS radical and styrene. A bimolecular reaction rate coefficient of kreact = (3.8 ± 0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) is deduced and 22 ± 1% of the initially formed BS radicals are converted to the BS-St radical in neat styrene solution.

  7. Increased functional stability and homogeneity of viral envelope spikes through directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Leaman, Daniel P; Zwick, Michael B

    2013-02-01

    The functional HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer, the target of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies (Abs), is innately labile and coexists with non-native forms of Env. This lability and heterogeneity in Env has been associated with its tendency to elicit non-neutralizing Abs. Here, we use directed evolution to overcome instability and heterogeneity of a primary Env spike. HIV-1 virions were subjected to iterative cycles of destabilization followed by replication to select for Envs with enhanced stability. Two separate pools of stable Env variants with distinct sequence changes were selected using this method. Clones isolated from these viral pools could withstand heat, denaturants and other destabilizing conditions. Seven mutations in Env were associated with increased trimer stability, primarily in the heptad repeat regions of gp41, but also in V1 of gp120. Combining the seven mutations generated a variant Env with superior homogeneity and stability. This variant spike moreover showed resistance to proteolysis and to dissociation by detergent. Heterogeneity within the functional population of hyper-stable Envs was also reduced, as evidenced by a relative decrease in a proportion of virus that is resistant to the neutralizing Ab, PG9. The latter result may reflect a change in glycans on the stabilized Envs. The stabilizing mutations also increased the proportion of secreted gp140 existing in a trimeric conformation. Finally, several Env-stabilizing substitutions could stabilize Env spikes from HIV-1 clades A, B and C. Spike stabilizing mutations may be useful in the development of Env immunogens that stably retain native, trimeric structure. PMID:23468626

  8. Directional Persistence of EGF-Induced Cell Migration Is Associated with Stabilization of Lamellipodial Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Brian D.; Bassi, Gina M.; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Migrating cells can sustain a relatively constant direction of lamellipodial protrusion and locomotion over timescales ranging from minutes to hours. However, individual waves of lamellipodial extension occur over much shorter characteristic times. Little understanding exists regarding how cells might integrate biophysical processes across these disparate timescales to control the directional persistence of locomotion. We address this issue by examining the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation on long-timescale directional persistence and short-timescale lamellipodial dynamics of EGF receptor-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells migrating on fibronectin-coated substrata. Addition of EGF increased persistence, with the magnitude of increase correlating with fibronectin coating concentration. Kymographic analysis of EGF-stimulated lamellipodial dynamics revealed that the temporal stability of lamellipodial protrusions similarly increased with fibronectin concentration. A soluble RGD peptide competitor reduced both the persistence of long-timescale cell paths and the stability of short-timescale membrane protrusions, indicating that cell-substratum adhesion concomitantly influences lamellipodial dynamics and directional persistence. These results reveal the importance of adhesion strength in regulating the directional motility of cells and suggest that the short-timescale kinetics of adhesion complex formation may play a key role in modulating directional persistence over much longer timescales. PMID:15713602

  9. Direct delivery of functional proteins and enzymes to the cytosol using nanoparticle-stabilized nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Kim, Chang Soo; Solfiell, David J; Rana, Subinoy; Mout, Rubul; Velázquez-Delgado, Elih M; Chompoosor, Apiwat; Jeong, Youngdo; Yan, Bo; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Kim, Chaekyu; Hardy, Jeanne A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2013-08-27

    Intracellular protein delivery is an important tool for both therapeutic and fundamental applications. Effective protein delivery faces two major challenges: efficient cellular uptake and avoiding endosomal sequestration. We report here a general strategy for direct delivery of functional proteins to the cytosol using nanoparticle-stabilized capsules (NPSCs). These NPSCs are formed and stabilized through supramolecular interactions between the nanoparticle, the protein cargo, and the fatty acid capsule interior. The NPSCs are ~130 nm in diameter and feature low toxicity and excellent stability in serum. The effectiveness of these NPSCs as therapeutic protein carriers was demonstrated through the delivery of fully functional caspase-3 to HeLa cells with concomitant apoptosis. Analogous delivery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) confirmed cytosolic delivery as well as intracellular targeting of the delivered protein, demonstrating the utility of the system for both therapeutic and imaging applications.

  10. Volume change effect on the salt-finger stability of directionally solidifying ammonium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Chen, Falin

    1995-09-01

    The effect of the volume change due to phase transformation on the stability of salt-finger convection of directionally solidifying NH 4Cl aqueous solution cooling from below is investigated. The basic flow, induced by the volume change, not only changes the morphology and the depth of the dendritic mushy layer, but also influences the stability of salt-finger convection. A new mathematical model is proposed, which differs from the previous one mainly on the dynamical condition at the melt/mush interface. This difference not only leads to a less stable state, but can also be crucial to the dynamical behavior of the oscillatory instability mode since the convection cells of this mode are coupled viscously through the interface. In the discussion, special emphasis is placed on the volume change effect on the instability mode competition, which may be influential to the stability characteristics of the subsequent plume convection.

  11. Stabilizing coordinated radicals via metal-ligand covalency: a structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical investigation of group 9 tris(dithiolene) complexes.

    PubMed

    Morsing, Thorbjørn J; MacMillan, Samantha N; Uebler, Jacob W H; Brock-Nannestad, Theis; Bendix, Jesper; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2015-04-01

    Proper assignment of redox loci in coordination complexes with redox-active ligands to either the metal or the ligand is essential for rationalization of their chemical reactivity. However, the high covalency endemic to complexes of late, third-row transition metals complicates such assignments. Herein, we systematically explore the redox behavior of a series of group 9 tris(dithiolene) complexes, [M(mnt)3]3– (M = Ir, Rh, Co; mnt = maleonitriledithiolate). The Ir species described comprise the first examples of homoleptic Ir dithiolene complexes. The enhanced metal–ligand covalency of the Ir–S interaction leads to remarkable reactivity of [Ir(mnt)3]3– and stabilization of mononuclear [Ir(mnt)3]2– complex ions as well as dimerized versions featuring weak, covalent, intermolecular S–S bonds. The dianionic Rh and Co analogues are, in contrast, highly unstable, resulting in the rapid formation of [Rh2(mnt)5]4– and [Co(mnt)2]22–, respectively. The synthesized complexes were studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, magnetometry, density functional theory, and spectroscopy-oriented configuration interaction calculations. Spectroscopic and theoretical analyses suggest that the stability of [Ir(mnt)3]2– may be attributed to dilution of ligand radical character by a high degree of Ir 5d character in the singly occupied molecular orbital.

  12. Structures and stabilities of hemi-bonded vs proton-transferred isomers of dimer radical cation systems (XH3sbnd YH3)+ (X,Y = N, P, As)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Li Fei; Li, An Yong; Li, Zhuo Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Structures, bonding and relative stabilities of the radical dimer cations (XH3sbnd YH3)+ (X,Y = N, P, As) have been studied theoretically. Two kinds of structures (hemi-bonded and proton-transferred isomers) are obtained for each system. For (NH3sbnd N/P/AsH3)+ the stable conformer is the proton-transferred structure; for (PH3sbnd PH3)+ and (AsH3sbnd AsH3)+ the stable structure is the hemi-bonded one; for (PH3sbnd AsH3)+ three proton-transferred and one hemi-bonded isomers were found with the stability order: (Hsbnd PH3+⋯AsH2) I > (H3PH+⋯AsH2) II > (H3P⋯AsH3+) > (H3AsH+⋯PH2) III. The hemi-bonds have large interaction energies 25.2-35.1 kcal/mol and are partially covalent in nature, while the proton-transferred structures have moderate interaction energies 6.5-22.2 kcal/mol.

  13. Direct observation of the transitions 2Δ = 1 of the NiH radical by Faraday LMR, employing a CO overtone laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, E.; Urban, W.; Nelis, Th.

    We report the first direct gas phase observations of the electronic transitions, 2Δ5/2, ν = 0 → 2Π3/2, ν = 0 and 2Δ5/2, ν = 0 → 2Δ3/2, ν = 1, in the NiH radical. From the observed transitions we obtained transition frequencies and electronic g factors. The observation of these electronic transitions by LMR has been possible only by employing the recently developed CO overtone laser. This work forms the first spectroscopic application of this new laser.

  14. Direct observation of f-pair magnetic field effects and time-dependence of radical pair composition using rapidly switched magnetic fields and time-resolved infrared methods.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Jonathan R; Foster, Timothy J; Salaoru, Adrian T; Vink, Claire B

    2008-07-21

    A rapidly switched (<10 ns) magnetic field was employed to directly observe magnetic fields from f-pair reactions of radical pairs in homogeneous solution. Geminate radical pairs from the photoabstraction reaction of benzophenone from cyclohexanol were observed directly using a pump-probe pulsed magnetic field method to determine their existence time. No magnetic field effects from geminate pairs were observed at times greater than 100 ns after initial photoexcitation. By measuring magnetic field effects for fields applied continuously only after this initial geminate period, f-pair effects could be directly observed. Measurement of the time-dependence of the field effect for the photolysis of 2-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-2-methylpropiophenone in cyclohexanol using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy revealed not only the presence of f-pair magnetic field effects but also the ability of the time dependence of the MARY spectra to observe the changing composition of the randomly encountering pairs throughout the second order reaction period.

  15. Stability analysis of direct contact heat exchangers subject to system perturbations. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes a project summary, copies of two papers resulting from the work and the Ph.D. Dissertation of Dr. Mehdi Golafshani entitled, ''Stability of a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger''. Specifically, the work deals with the operational stability of a spray column type heat exchanger subject to disturbances typical of those which can occur for geothermal applications. A computer program was developed to solve the one-dimensional transient two-phase flow problem and it was applied to the design of a spray column. The operation and design of the East Mesa 500kW/sub e/ direct contactor was assessed. It is shown that the heat transfer is governed by the internal resistance of the dispersed phase. In fact, the performance is well-represented by diffusion of heat within the drops. 5 refs.

  16. HOCO radical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Joseph S; Muckerman, James T; Yu, Hua-Gen

    2010-12-21

    Free radicals are important species in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma environments, interstellar clouds, and biochemistry. Therefore, researchers would like to understand the formation mechanism, structure, stability, reactivity, spectroscopy, and dynamics of these chemical species. However, due to the presence of one or more unpaired electrons, radicals are often very reactive and have short lifetimes, which makes it difficult to conduct experiments. The HOCO radical appears in the atmosphere as well as in combustion environments and plays an important role in the conversion of CO to CO(2). Through the interplay between theoretical and experimental investigations, researchers have only recently understood the chemical role of the HOCO radical. In this Account, we systematically describe the current state of knowledge of the HOCO radical based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. This radical's two stable conformers, trans- and cis-HOCO, have been identified by high-level ab initio calculations and experimental spectroscopy. trans-HOCO is more stable by approximately 1.8 kcal/mol. The heat of formation of HOCO (298 K) was determined to be -43.0 ± 0.5 kcal/mol, giving a potential well depth of 30.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol relative to the asymptote of the reactants OH + CO. The HOCO radical is very reactive. In most reactions between the HOCO radical and atoms, the HOCO radical acts as a hydrogen donor to reaction partners. Generally, the hydrogen is transferred through the formation of an association intermediate, which then proceeds through a molecular elimination step to produce the reaction products. The reaction rates of HOCO with some small radicals fall in the range of 10(-11)-10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). These results clearly illustrate important features in the reactivity of the HOCO radical with other molecules.

  17. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  18. Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics of a C-54D Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmage, Donald B; Reeder, John P

    1949-01-01

    Data are presented showing compliance of C-54D with Army and Navy lateral and directional stability and control specifications. The airplane met requirements except for the rolling effectiveness pb/2V, the aileron forces in rolling, and the rudder forces in the asymmetric power conditions which were marginal. Also, the results of special tests concerning asymmetric power, asymmetric loading, and pitch due to yaw requested by the Airplane Handling Qualities Subcommittee of the Air Transport Association are presented.

  19. A computational examination of directional stability for smooth and chined forebodies at high-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, Ramakrishnan; Mason, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study aircraft forebody flowfields at low-speed, angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. The purpose is to define forebody geometries which provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. The flows over the experimentally investigated F-5A forebody and chine type configuration, previously computed by the authors, were recomputed with better grid topology and resolution. The results were obtained using a modified version of CFL3D (developed at NASA Langley) to solve either the Euler equations or the Reynolds equations employing the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with the Degani-Schiff modification to account for massive crossflow separation. Based on the results, it is concluded that current CFD methods can be used to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies to achieve desirable high angle-of-attack characteristics. An analytically defined generic forebody model is described, and a parametric study of various forebody shapes was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high angle-of-attack. An unconventional approach for presenting the results is used to illustrate how the positive contribution arises. Based on the results of this initial parametric study, some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  20. Hi-alpha forebody design. Part 2: Determination of body shapes for positive directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, R.; Mason, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study aircraft forebody flowfields at low speed high angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. The purpose is to define forebody geometries which provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. The flows of the F-5A forebody and Erickson forebody were recomputed with better and refined grids. The results were obtained using a modified version of cfl3d to solve either the Euler equations or the Reynolds equations employing a form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. Based on those results, we conclude that current CFD methods can be used to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies to achieve desirable high angle-of-attack characteristics. An analytically defined generic forebody model is described, and a systematic study of forebody shapes was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high angle-of-attack. A novel way of presenting the results is used to illustrate how the positive contribution arises. Based on the results of this initial parametric study, some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  1. Effects of antioxidants and additional emulsifiers on the stability of emulsified milk fat in the photo/radical oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukihiro; Hiyama, Shinichiro; Takase, Yoshihiko; Kadowaki, Akio; Hara, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antioxidants on the oxidative deterioration of emulsified oils and fats differ depending on the oxidation conditions, oils and fats used, and type of emulsifier. In this study, milk fat was emulsified to obtain water-oil (O/W) emulsion using Tween20 as emulsifier. The antioxidative effects of several antioxidants with various lipophilic properties, such as δ-tocopherol (Toc), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), quercetin (Qu), green tea extract (GTE), and rooibos tea extract (RTE) were investigated, the effects of additional emulsifiers such as polyglycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids on the oxidation stability of the emulsion were also investigated. Under oxidative conditions of 30°C in 650 lx, Toc was more effective than GTE in suppressing the increase of the peroxide value (PV, meq/kg) of the emulsified milk fat. Under these oxidative conditions, the antioxidative effect of GTE was enhanced by the addition of polyglycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Under the oxidative conditions at 40°C in dark with 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) or 2,2'-azobis (2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (AMVN), Toc showed the most antioxidative effect on suppression of the increase of PV and anisidine value (AnV) of the emulsified milk fat. Furthermore, additional emulsifiers also showed suppressive effects on the increase of the PV and AnV of the emulsified milk fat even without any antioxidants. The effects of additional emulsifiers on the oxidative stability of O/W emulsions were enhanced with antioxidants such as Toc, EGCg, and Qu.

  2. Calculation of the relative geometry of tRNAs in the ribosome from directed hydroxyl-radical probing data.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S; Whirl, M L; Kondo, D; Noller, H F; Altman, R B

    2000-01-01

    The many interactions of tRNA with the ribosome are fundamental to protein synthesis. During the peptidyl transferase reaction, the acceptor ends of the aminoacyl and peptidyl tRNAs must be in close proximity to allow peptide bond formation, and their respective anticodons must base pair simultaneously with adjacent trinucleotide codons on the mRNA. The two tRNAs in this state can be arranged in two nonequivalent general configurations called the R and S orientations, many versions of which have been proposed for the geometry of tRNAs in the ribosome. Here, we report the combined use of computational analysis and tethered hydroxyl-radical probing to constrain their arrangement. We used Fe(II) tethered to the 5' end of anticodon stem-loop analogs (ASLs) of tRNA and to the 5' end of deacylated tRNA(Phe) to generate hydroxyl radicals that probe proximal positions in the backbone of adjacent tRNAs in the 70S ribosome. We inferred probe-target distances from the resulting RNA strand cleavage intensities and used these to calculate the mutual arrangement of A-site and P-site tRNAs in the ribosome, using three different structure estimation algorithms. The two tRNAs are constrained to the S configuration with an angle of about 45 degrees between the respective planes of the molecules. The terminal phosphates of 3'CCA are separated by 23 A when using the tRNA crystal conformations, and the anticodon arms of the two tRNAs are sufficiently close to interact with adjacent codons in mRNA. PMID:10688361

  3. Linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation of a miscible two-fluid channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapanen, Siina Ilona

    The temporal evolution of an initially laminar two-fluid channel flow is investigated using linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation. The stability of a two-fluid shear flow is encountered in numerous situations, including water wave generation by wind, atomization of fuels, aircraft deicing and nuclear reactor cooling. The application of particular interest in this study is liquefying hybrid combustion, for which the two-fluid channel flow is used as a model problem to characterize the relevant mixing and entrainment mechanisms. The two fluids are miscible with dissimilar densities and viscosities. The thickness of one of the fluid layers is much smaller than that of the other, with the denser and more viscous fluid comprising the thin layer. Linear stability analysis is used to identify possibly unstable modes in the two-fluid configuration. The analysis is considered for two different situations. In one case, the fluid density and viscosity change discontinuously across a sharp interface, while in the other, the fluids are separated by a finite thickness transition layer, over which the fluid properties vary continuously. In the sharp interface limit, the linear stability is governed by an Orr-Sommerfeld equation in each fluid layer, coupled by boundary conditions at the interface. A numerical solution of the system of equations is performed using a Chebyshev spectral collocation method. In the case where the fluids are separated by a finite thickness transition zone, an Orr-Sommerfeld-type equation is solved with the compound matrix method. The non-linear stages of the flow evolution are investigated by direct numerical simulation. In a temporal simulation, two of the three spatial dimensions are periodic. Fourier spectral discretization is used in these dimensions, while a compact finite difference scheme is utilized in the non-periodic direction. The time advancement is performed by a projection method with a third order Adams

  4. Development and validation of a simple high performance thin layer chromatography method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay to quantify free radical scavenging activity in wine.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W; Yusof, Ahmad P

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to: (a) develop a simple, high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay to rapidly assess and compare free radical scavenging activity or anti-oxidant activity for major classes of polyphenolics present in wines; and (b) to investigate relationship between free radical scavenging activity to the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the wine samples. The most potent free radical scavengers that we tested for in the wine samples were found to be resveratrol (polyphenolic non-flavonoid) and rutin (flavonoid), while polyphenolic acids (caffeic acid and gallic acid) although present in all wine samples were found to be less potent free radical scavengers. Therefore, the total antioxidant capacity was mostly affected by the presence of resveratrol and rutin, while total polyphenolic content was mostly influenced by the presence of the less potent free radical scavengers gallic and caffeic acids.

  5. The effect of resistance exercise direction for hip joint stabilization on lateral abdominal muscle thickness

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of resistance direction in hip joint stabilization exercise on change in lateral abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults. Twenty-six healthy adults were randomly allocated to either a hip stabilization exercise by hip straight resistance group (n=12) or a hip diagonal resistance group (n=14). The outcome measures included contraction thickness ratio in transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique, and TrA lateral slide were assessed during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver by b-mode ultrasound. The researcher measured the abdominal muscle thickness of each participant before the therapist began the intervention and at the moment intervention was applied. There was a significant difference in lateral abdominal muscle thickness between the straight resistance exercise of hip joint group and the diagonal resistance exercise of hip joint group. Significant differences were found between the two groups in the percentage of change of muscle thickness of the TrA (P=0.018) and in the thickness ratio of the TrA (P=0.018). Stability exercise accompanied by diagonal resistance on the hip joint that was applied in this study can induce automatic contraction of the IO and TrA, which provides stability to the lumbar spine. PMID:27807520

  6. Lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Jack D.; Jeske, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of flight experiments to determine the lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), an experimental aircraft designed to furnish information on various aerodynamic characteristics of a transport type of airplane that makes use of the upper-surface blown (USB) flap technology to achieve short takeoff and landing (STOL) performance. The flight program designed to acquire the data consisted of maneuvers produced by rudder and control-wheel inputs with the airplane in several configurations that had been proposed for landing approach and takeoff operation. The normal stability augmentation system was not engaged during these maneuvers. Time-history records from the maneuvers were analyzed with a parameter estimation procedure to extract lateral-directional stability and control derivatives. For one aircraft configuration in which the USB flaps were deflected 50 deg, several maneuvers were performed to determine the effects of varying the average angle of attack, varying the thrust coefficient, and setting the airplane's upper surface spoilers at a 13 deg symmetrical bias angle . The effects on the lateral characteristics of deflecting the spoilers were rather small and generally favorable. The data indicate that for one test, conducted at low thrust (a thrust coefficient of 0.38), compared with results from tests at thrust coefficients of 0.77 and larger, there was a significant decrease in the lateral control effectiveness, in the yaw damping and in the directional derivative. The directional derivative was also decreased (by about 30 percent) when the average angle of attack of the test was increased from 3 to 16 deg.

  7. Empirical Research on the Radical Subjective Solution of the Measurement Problem. Does Time get its Direction through Conscious Observation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Dick J.

    2006-10-01

    In a number of experimental studies we explored the so-called `radical subjective', and rather controversial, solution of the measurement problem. This solution posits that an interaction with a conscious entity is required to complete the measurement. Thus the collapse of the wave packet is assumed to be causally linked to a conscious observation. Under the assumption that the brain is sensitive for the difference between observing a quantum (superposition) state and a classical state this radical solution can be tested. A radioactive source was used to trigger beeps that first were delayed for 1 second and then were observed by a (final) observer from whom a continuous recording of brain activity was made. In about 50% of the events, another (pre) observer got feedback of this quantum event before the final observer. In those cases, presumably the pre-observer's observation resulted in collapse of the wave-packet while in the other half of the cases the final observer was `producing' the collapse. The brain signals of the final observer for the two types of events were compared. The ambiguous results of the studies will be discussed. If consciousness is the crucial ingredient for `collapse' to occur, then this might also give a new anthropocentric hypothesis with regard to the `arrow of time'. The projection postulate implies a irreversible process of reduction and hence can be seen as one of the few non time-symmetric processes in physics. If consciousness is required to have a collapse then it might follow that consciousness introduces time asymmetry into physics. New neuro-cognitive models of consciousness suggest that the neural correlate of conscious experience (rather than non conscious processing) is the occurrence of massive parallel recurrent (i.e. non linear) neural activation. Thus the collapse of the wave packet would become associated with a strong non-linear process. This fits, at least in a metaphorical sense, with the theoretical results where an

  8. Transient Dynamics of Electric Power Systems: Direct Stability Assessment and Chaotic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Chi

    A power system is continuously experiencing disturbances. Analyzing, predicting, and controlling transient dynamics, which describe transient behaviors of the power system following disturbances, is a major concern in the planning and operation of a power utility. Important conclusions and decisions are made based on the result of system transient behaviors. As today's power network becomes highly interconnected and much more complex, it has become essential to enhance the fundamental understanding of transient dynamics, and to develop fast and reliable computational algorithms. In this thesis, we emphasize mathematical rigor rather than physical insight. Nonlinear dynamical system theory is applied to study two fundamental topics: direct stability assessment and chaotic motions. Conventionally, power system stability is determined by calculating the time-domain transient behaviors for a given disturbance. In contrast, direct methods identify whether or not the system will remain stable once the disturbance is removed by comparing the corresponding energy value of the post-fault system to a calculated threshold value. Direct methods not only avoid the time-consuming numerical integration of the time domain approach, but also provide a quantitative measure of the degree of system stability. We present a general framework for the theoretical foundations of direct methods. Canonical representations of network-reduction models as well as network-preserving models are proposed to facilitate the analysis and the construction of energy functions of various power system models. An advanced and practical method, called the boundary of stability region based controlling unstable equilibrium point method (BCU method), of computing the controlling unstable equilibrium point is proposed along with its theoretical foundation. Numerical solution algorithms capable of supporting on-line applications of direct methods are provided. Further possible improvements and enhancements are

  9. Structures and stabilities of CBHz (z ≤ 8) and CxB3-xHz (x = 1, 2, z ≤ 14): prediction of novel organo-boron radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Na; Zhang, Xiao-yong; Xu, Jing; Ding, Yi-hong

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogenated boron-carbon clusters, i.e. organo-borons, have received considerable attention both theoretically and experimentally. Herein, using a topology searching strategy, we systematically explore the structures and stabilities of small organo-borons with CBHz (z ≤ 8) and CxB3-xHz (x = 1, 2,z≤ 14) stoichiometry, with particular interests in the intrinsic stabilities of the organo-boron radicals. At the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ//B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ levels, the stabilities of these global minimum organo-boron species were evaluated by considering dissociation pathways and the binding energy per atom. Aside from the five already studied radicals (CBH2, CBH4, C2BH2, C2BH4 and CB2H3), we predict six novel radicals, i.e. CBH6, C2BH6, C2BH8, CB2H, CB2H5 and CB2H7, which could be detected under suitable circumstances. However, observation of the highly hydrogenated CB2H9 radical is much less likely due to its minute stability towards H-extrusion. The computationally determined stable/meta-stable maximum hydrogenation numbers for CB, C2B and CB2 (6, 8 and 8, respectively) are in excellent agreement with a simple electron-counting model for CxBy chains. The newly predicted organo-boron radicals await future laboratory verification.

  10. Quality, stability and radical scavenging activity of olive oils after Chétoui olives (Olea europaea L.) storage under modified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Ben Yahia, L; Baccouri, B; Ouni, Y; Hamdi, S

    2012-08-01

    At the industrial scale, the major source of olive oil deterioration is the poor handling of the raw material during the time separating harvesting from processing. The objective of this work was to verify the effect of modified atmospheres and cold storage in relation to quality parameters of the extracted oils. Olives (cv Chétoui) intended for oil extraction, were stored for 21 days at two different temperatures (ambient temperature 14 ± 2 °C and 5 °C) and under two different modified atmospheres 21% O₂ - 0% CO₂ and 2% O₂ - 5% CO₂. Oils quality was ascertained with analytical parameters: free fatty acids, peroxide value, K₂₃₂, K₂₇₀ as suggested by European regulation. Oxidative stability, total phenols content, radical scavenging activity and fatty acids composition were carried out in order to measure the hydrolytic and oxidative degradation of oils. Olive oils quality parameters were significantly affected by treatments with especially a beneficial effect on primary oxidation indicators and free acidity. Most efficient treatments, with regard to oils phenolic content and involved parameters, were 21% O₂ - 0% CO₂ at ambient temperature (636.25 mg ca/kg) and 2% O₂ - 5% CO₂ under 5 °C (637.50 mg ca/kg). Those two treatments improved individually oil samples phenolic content of 25% but not at the same storage period.

  11. Directional versus Stabilizing Selection for Developmental Time in Natural and Laboratory Populations of Flour Beetles.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P S

    1975-08-01

    Artificial selection for fast development is successful in long-established laboratory populations of Tribolium, but not in strains recently derived from natural populations. It is shown that selection against fast development in dense, synchronized cultures operates through cannibalism of early pupae by larvae. Since standard husbandry procedures for laboratory strains involve the periodic creation of dense, synchronized cultures, it is suggested that these populations are subjected to stabilizing selection for intermediate developmental time. Natural populations, on the other hand, are probably subjected to directional selection for rapid development. PMID:17248688

  12. Determination of direct photolysis rate constants and OH radical reactivity of representative odour compounds in brewery broth using a continuous flow-stirred photoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgens, Marion; Jacob, Fritz; Ekici, Perihan; Friess, Albrecht; Parlar, Harun

    A method based on photolysis was developed for the appropriate treatment of organic pollutants in air exhausting from breweries upon wort decoction, and thereby causing smell nuisance. A continuous flow stirred photoreactor was built-up exclusively, allowing OH radicals to react with selected odorous compounds contained in exhaust vapours, such as: 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, n-hexanal, 2-methylbutyl isobutyrate, 2-undecanone, phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, limonene, linalool, humulene, dimethylsulphide, and dimethyltrisulphide. These substances were quantified in brewery broth before and after UV irradiation using high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). For odour analysis, high-resolution gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (HRGC-FID) coupled with sensory methods was used. Determined quantum yields of about 10 -3 for phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, and humulene pointed out that direct photolysis contributed to their decay. Quantum yields of below 10 -4 for the other substances indicated that UV irradiation did not contribute significantly to their degradation processes. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and Henry constants of organic compounds were also measured. Substances accompanied with low Henry constants converted rapidly, whereas those with higher ones, relatively slowly. Determined aroma values concluded that after UV-H 2O 2 treatment, only dimethylsulphide and myrcene remained as important odorous compounds, but in significantly reduced concentrations. The UV-H 2O 2 treatment of brewery broth has been proved effective to reduce smell-irritating substances formed upon wort decoction.

  13. Improving Kinetic or Thermodynamic Stability of an Azoreductase by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Brissos, Vânia; Gonçalves, Nádia; Melo, Eduardo P.; Martins, Lígia O.

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability arises from a combination of factors which are often difficult to rationalise. Therefore its improvement is better addressed through directed evolution than by rational design approaches. In this study, five rounds of mutagenesis/recombination followed by high-throughput screening (≈10,000 clones) yielded the hit 1B6 showing a 300-fold higher half life at 50°C than that exhibited by the homodimeric wild type PpAzoR azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94. The characterization using fluorescence, calorimetry and light scattering shows that 1B6 has a folded state slightly less stable than the wild type (with lower melting and optimal temperatures) but in contrast is more resistant to irreversible denaturation. The superior kinetic stability of 1B6 variant was therefore related to an increased resistance of the unfolded monomers to aggregation through the introduction of mutations that disturbed hydrophobic patches and increased the surface net charge of the protein. Variants 2A1 and 2A1-Y179H with increased thermodynamic stability (10 to 20°C higher melting temperature than wild type) were also examined showing the distinctive nature of mutations that lead to improved structural robustness: these occur in residues that are mostly involved in strengthening the solvent-exposed loops or the inter-dimer interactions of the folded state. PMID:24475252

  14. Direct osmolyte-macromolecule interactions confer entropic stability to folded states.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ropero, Francisco; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2014-07-01

    Protective osmolytes are chemical compounds that shift the protein folding/unfolding equilibrium toward the folded state under osmotic stresses. The most widely considered protection mechanism assumes that osmolytes are depleted from the protein's first solvation shell, leading to entropic stabilization of the folded state. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that protective osmolytes may directly interact with the macromolecule. As an exemplary and experimentally well-characterized system, we herein discuss poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) in water whose folding/unfolding equilibrium shifts toward the folded state in the presence of urea. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of this specific system, we propose a new microscopic mechanism that explains how direct osmolyte-macromolecule interactions confer stability to folded states. We show that urea molecules preferentially accumulate in the first solvation shell of PNiPAM driven by attractive van der Waals dispersion forces with the hydrophobic isopropyl groups, leading to the formation of low entropy urea clouds. These clouds provide an entropic driving force for folding, resulting in preferential urea binding to the folded state and a decrease of the lower folding temperature in agreement with experiment. The simulations further indicate that thermodynamic nonideality of the bulk solvent opposes this driving force and may lead to denaturation, as illustrated by simulations of PNiPAM in aqueous solutions with dimethylurea. The proposed mechanism provides a new angle on relations between the properties of protecting and denaturing osmolytes, salting-in or salting-out effects, and solvent nonidealities.

  15. Direct mass measurements above uranium bridge the gap to the island of stability.

    PubMed

    Block, M; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Droese, C; Dworschak, M; Eliseev, S; Fleckenstein, T; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Hessberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Ketter, J; Kluge, H-J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Novikov, Yu N; Plass, W R; Popeko, A; Rahaman, S; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Vorobyev, G K; Weber, C

    2010-02-11

    The mass of an atom incorporates all its constituents and their interactions. The difference between the mass of an atom and the sum of its building blocks (the binding energy) is a manifestation of Einstein's famous relation E = mc(2). The binding energy determines the energy available for nuclear reactions and decays (and thus the creation of elements by stellar nucleosynthesis), and holds the key to the fundamental question of how heavy the elements can be. Superheavy elements have been observed in challenging production experiments, but our present knowledge of the binding energy of these nuclides is based only on the detection of their decay products. The reconstruction from extended decay chains introduces uncertainties that render the interpretation difficult. Here we report direct mass measurements of trans-uranium nuclides. Located at the farthest tip of the actinide species on the proton number-neutron number diagram, these nuclides represent the gateway to the predicted island of stability. In particular, we have determined the mass values of (252-254)No (atomic number 102) with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The uncertainties are of the order of 10 keV/c(2) (representing a relative precision of 0.05 p.p.m.), despite minute production rates of less than one atom per second. Our experiments advance direct mass measurements by ten atomic numbers with no loss in accuracy, and provide reliable anchor points en route to the island of stability. PMID:20148034

  16. A novel method to directionally stabilize enzymes together with redox mediators by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wentao; Lin, Nansen; Song, Yilin; Liu, Chunxiu; Zhou, Shuai; Cai, Xinxia

    2014-01-15

    This paper depicts a novel method to directionally stabilize enzymes together with redox mediators by electrodeposition. Chitosan was used as a stabilizing matrix. By electrochemical removal of local H(+), chitosan close to working electrode became locally insoluble, and enzymes and redox mediators in chitosan were stabilized. The microelectrode on home-made microelectrode array (MEA) served as the working electrode. Three model enzymes--horseradish peroxidase (HRP), glucose oxidase (GOD), and glutamate oxidase (GlOD)--were used to fabricate different biosensors, and the redox mediator model was a poly(vinylpyridine) complex of Os(bpy)2Cl and a diepoxide (PVP-Os). Biosensors fabricated by the method exhibited very high performance. For HRP biosensor fabricated by this method, the sensitivity was 5.274 nA μM(-1) mm(-2), with linear detection range (LDR) of 2-220 μM and limit of detection (LOD) of 1 μM (S/N=3); for GOD biosensor, the sensitivity was 2.65 nA μM(-1) mm(-2), with LDR of 4-500 μM and LOD of 2 μM (S/N=3); for GlOD biosensor, the sensitivity was 0.33 nA μM(-1)mm(-2), with LDR of 4-500 μM and LOD of 2 μM (S/N=3). Since this method is very simple and especially suitable for directionally introducing enzymes and redox mediators onto microelectrode without contaminating other sites in the same microenvironment, it could be used for fabricating in vivo or in vitro 2nd generation biosensors in μm-scale, especially in neuroscience.

  17. Direct Formation of the C5′-Radical in the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone of DNA by High Energy Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Palmer, Brian J.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral sugar radicals formed in DNA sugar-phosphate backbone are well-established as precursors of biologically important damage such as DNA-strand scission and crosslinking. In this work, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence showing that the sugar radical at C5′ (C5′•) is one of the most abundant (ca. 30%) sugar radicals formed by γ- and Ar ion-beam irradiated hydrated DNA samples. Taking dimethyl phosphate as a model of sugar-phosphate backbone, ESR and theoretical (DFT) studies of γ-irradiated dimethyl phosphate were carried out. CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is formed via deprotonation from the methyl group of directly ionized dimethyl phosphate at 77 K. Formation of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is independent of dimethyl phosphate concentration (neat or in aqueous solution) or pH. ESR spectra of C5′• found in DNA and of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• do not show an observable β-phosphorous hyperfine coupling (HFC). Further, C5′• found in DNA does not show a significant C4′-H β–proton HFC. Applying the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, a study of conformational dependence of the phosphorous HFC in CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• shows that in its minimum energy conformation, CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• has a negligible β-phosphorous HFC. Based on these results, formation of radiation-induced C5′• is proposed to occur via a very rapid deprotonation from the directly ionized sugar-phosphate backbone and rate of this deprotonation must be faster than that of energetically downhill transfer of the unpaired spin (hole) from ionized sugar-phosphate backbone to the DNA bases. Moreover, C5′• in irradiated DNA is found to be in a conformation that does not exhibit β proton or β phosphorous HFCs. PMID:22553971

  18. Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Salt Alternative Phase III Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1998-12-07

    The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The composition of the direct grout salt solution is higher in sodium salts and contains up to a few hundred ppm Cs-137 more than the current reference salt solution. However it is still similar to the composition of the current reference salt solution. Consequently, the processing, setting, and leaching properties (including TCLP for Cr and Hg) of the direct grout and current saltstone waste forms are very similar. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The Cs-137 concentration in the direct grout salt solution will also affect the long-term curing temperature of the waste form since 4.84 Watts of energy are generated per 1000 Ci of Cs-137. The temperature rise of the direct grout during long-term curing has been calculated by A. Shaddy, SRTC.1 The effect of curing temperature on the strength, leaching and physical durability of the direct grout saltstone is described in this report. At the present time, long term curing at 90 degrees C appears to be unacceptable because of cracking which will affect the structural integrity as evaluated in the immersion test. (The experiments conducted in this feasibility study do not address the effect of cracking on leaching of contaminants other than Cr, Hg, and Cs.) No cracking of the direct grout or reference saltstone waste forms was observed for samples cured at 70 degrees C. At the present time the implications of waste form cracking at elevated curing temperatures has not been fully addressed. The direct grout falls within the

  19. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk.

  20. Silicon based radicals, radical ions, diradicals and diradicaloids.

    PubMed

    Chandra Mondal, Kartik; Roy, Sudipta; Roesky, Herbert W

    2016-02-21

    Radicals are an important class of species which act as intermediates in numerous chemical and biological processes. Most of the radicals have short lifetimes. However, radicals with longer lifetimes can be isolated and stored in a pure form. They are called stable radicals. Over the last five decades, the syntheses of several stable radicals have been reported. Recently, highly unstable radicals have been successfully stabilized via strong σ-donation of singlet carbenes. Cyclic aklyl(amino) carbene (cAAC) is regarded as a stronger σ-donor and a better π-acceptor when compared with that of an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC). In this article we review preferentially the results of our group to generate stable radical centers on the carbene carbon atoms by employing the so far hidden and unique ability of the cAACs. We focus on the development of new synthetic routes to stable and isolable radicals containing silicon atoms. All the compounds have been well characterized by single crystal X-ray analysis; the mono-radicals have been distinguished by EPR spectroscpy and the ground state of the diradicals has been studied by magnetic susceptibility measurements and theoretical calculations. Many of these compounds are studied by cyclic voltammetry and are often converted to their corresponding radical cations or radical anions via electron abstraction or addition processes. Some of them are stable, having long lifetimes and hence are isolated and characterized thoroughly. Not much information has been obtained on the short lived persistent radical species. Herein, we discuss some of the examples of such a type of species and focus on what kind of chemical reactions are initiated by these short-lived radical species in solution. We also briefly mention the syntheses and charaterization of the so far reported stable silicon centered radicals. PMID:26585359

  1. In vivo copper-mediated free radical production: an ESR spin-trapping study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadiiska, Maria B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2002-04-01

    Copper has been suggested to facilitate oxidative tissue injury through a free radical-mediated pathway analogous to the Fenton reaction. By applying the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique, evidence for hydroxyl radical formation in vivo was obtained in rats treated simultaneously with copper and ascorbic acid or paraquat. A secondary radical spin-trapping technique was used in which the hydroxyl radical formed the methyl radical upon reaction with dimethylsulfoxide. The methyl radical was then detected by ESR spectroscopy as its adduct with the spin trap phenyl- N- t-butyl- nitrone (PBN). In contrast, lipid derived radical was detected in vivo in copper-challenged, vitamin E and selenium-deficient rats. These findings support the proposal that dietary selenium and vitamin E can protect against lipid peroxidation and copper toxicity. Since copper excreted into the bile from treated animals is expected to be maintained in the Cu(I) state (by ascorbic acid or glutathione), a chelating agent that would redox-stablilize it in the Cu(I) state was used to prevent ex vivo redox chemistry. Bile samples were collected directly into solutions of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, a Cu(I)-stabilizing agent, and 2,2'-dipyridyl, a Fe(II)-stabilizing agent. If these precautions were not taken, radical adducts generated ex vivo could be mistaken for radical adducts produced in vivo and excreted into the bile.

  2. Antioxidant effects of coumarins include direct radical scavenging, metal chelation and inhibition of ROS-producing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Filipský, Tomáš; Říha, Michal; Macáková, Kateřina; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Karlíčková, Jana; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2015-01-01

    Coumarins represent a large group of 1,2-benzopyrone derivatives which have been identified in many natural sources and synthetized as well. Several studies have shown that their antioxidant capacity is not based only on direct scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) but other mechanisms are also involved. These include: a) the chelation of transient metals iron and copper, which are known to catalyse the Fenton reaction; and b) the inhibition of RONS-producing enzymes (e.g. xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase and lipoxygenase), suggesting that mechanism(s) involved on cellular level are complex and synergistic. Moreover, many factors must be taken into account when analysing structure-antioxidant capacity relationships of coumarins due to different in vitro/in vivo methodological approaches. The structural features necessary for the direct RONS scavenging and metal chelation are apparently similar and the ideal structures are 6,7-dihydroxy- or 7,8-dihydroxycoumarins. However, the clinical outcome is unknown, because these coumarins are able to reduce copper and iron, and may thus paradoxically potentiate the Fenton chemistry. The similar structural features appear to be associated with inhibition of lipoxygenase, probably due to interference with iron in its active site. Contrarily, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin seems to be the most active coumarin in the inhibition of xanthine oxidase while its derivative bearing the 4-methyl group or 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin are less active or inactive. In addition, coumarins may hinder the induction of inducible NO-synthase and cyclooxygenase- 2. Sparse data on inhibition of myeloperoxidase do not enable any clear conclusion, but some coumarins may block it.

  3. Pattern formation in directional solidification under shear flow. I. Linear stability analysis and basic patterns.

    PubMed

    Marietti, Y; Debierre, J M; Bock, T M; Kassner, K

    2001-06-01

    An asymptotic interface equation for directional solidification near the absolute stability limit is extended by a nonlocal term describing a shear flow parallel to the interface. In the long-wave limit considered, the flow acts destabilizing on a planar interface. Moreover, linear stability analysis suggests that the morphology diagram is modified by the flow near onset of the Mullins-Sekerka instability. Via numerical analysis, the bifurcation structure of the system is shown to change. Besides the known hexagonal cells, structures consisting of stripes arise. Due to its symmetry-breaking properties, the flow term induces a lateral drift of the whole pattern, once the instability has become active. The drift velocity is measured numerically and described analytically in the framework of a linear analysis. At large flow strength, the linear description breaks down, which is accompanied by a transition to flow-dominated morphologies which is described in the following paper. Small and intermediate flows lead to increased order in the lattice structure of the pattern, facilitating the elimination of defects. Locally oscillating structures appear closer to the instability threshold with flow than without.

  4. STABILITY OF THE DIRECTLY IMAGED MULTIPLANET SYSTEM HR 8799: RESONANCE AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2010-02-20

    A new era of directly imaged extrasolar planets has produced a three-planet system, where the masses of the planets have been estimated by untested cooling models. We point out that the nominal circular, face-on orbits of the planets lead to a dynamical instability in {approx}10{sup 5} yr, a factor of at least 100 shorter than the estimated age of the star. Reduced planetary masses produce stability only for unreasonably small planets ({approx}<2 M{sub Jup}). Relaxing the face-on assumption, but still requiring circular orbits while fitting the observed positions, makes the instability time even shorter. A promising solution is that the inner two planets have a 2:1 commensurability between their periods, and they avoid close encounters with each other through this resonance. The fact that the inner resonance has lasted until now, in spite of the perturbations of the outer planet, leads to a limit {approx}<10 M{sub Jup} on the masses unless the outer two planets are also engaged in a 2:1 mean-motion resonance. In a double resonance, which is consistent with the current data, the system could survive until now even if the planets have masses of {approx}20 M{sub Jup}. Apsidal alignment can further enhance the stability of a mean-motion resonant system. A completely different dynamical configuration, with large eccentricities and large mutual inclinations among the planets, is possible but finely tuned.

  5. Stability robustness improvement of direct eigenspace assignment based feedback systems using singular value sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    1989-01-01

    A methodology to improve the stability robustness of feedback control systems designed using direct eigenspace assignment techniques is presented. The method consists of considering the sensitivity of the minimum singular value of the return difference transfer matrix at the plant input to small changes in the desired closed-loop eigenvalues and the specified elements of the desired closed-loop eigenvectors. Closed-form expressions for the gradient of the minimum return difference singular value with respect to desired closed-loop eigenvalue and eigenvector parameters are derived. Closed-form expressions for the gradients of the control feedback gains with respect to the specified eigenspace parameters are obtained as an intermediate step. The use of the gradient information to improve the guaranteed gain and phase margins in eigenspace assignment based designs is demonstrated by application to an advanced fighter aircraft.

  6. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the base of her partner’s penis during intercourse. Orgasm after radical hysterectomy Women who have had a ... the surgery will affect their ability to have orgasms. This has not been studied a great deal, ...

  7. Direct osmolyte-macromolecule interactions confer entropic stability to folded states.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ropero, Francisco; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2014-07-01

    Protective osmolytes are chemical compounds that shift the protein folding/unfolding equilibrium toward the folded state under osmotic stresses. The most widely considered protection mechanism assumes that osmolytes are depleted from the protein's first solvation shell, leading to entropic stabilization of the folded state. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that protective osmolytes may directly interact with the macromolecule. As an exemplary and experimentally well-characterized system, we herein discuss poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) in water whose folding/unfolding equilibrium shifts toward the folded state in the presence of urea. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of this specific system, we propose a new microscopic mechanism that explains how direct osmolyte-macromolecule interactions confer stability to folded states. We show that urea molecules preferentially accumulate in the first solvation shell of PNiPAM driven by attractive van der Waals dispersion forces with the hydrophobic isopropyl groups, leading to the formation of low entropy urea clouds. These clouds provide an entropic driving force for folding, resulting in preferential urea binding to the folded state and a decrease of the lower folding temperature in agreement with experiment. The simulations further indicate that thermodynamic nonideality of the bulk solvent opposes this driving force and may lead to denaturation, as illustrated by simulations of PNiPAM in aqueous solutions with dimethylurea. The proposed mechanism provides a new angle on relations between the properties of protecting and denaturing osmolytes, salting-in or salting-out effects, and solvent nonidealities. PMID:24927256

  8. Trapping of neutral radicals by aromatic and heterocyclic cation radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, H.J.; Soroka, M.

    1986-09-01

    A considerable amount of knowledge has been accrued during the last 15-20 years on the chemistry of polynuclear aromatic and heterocyclic cation radicals. For the most part, the reactions that have been studied have been of cation radicals with neutral and anionic nucleophiles which lead to addition or substitution products. Classic examples among these reactions are, for example, the reaction of water with the cation radical of 9,10-diphenylanthracene and perylene, and that of water with the thianthrene cation radical. Reactions such as these have been among foundation-establishing studies in the scope and mechanism of cation-radical reactions. Cation radicals can also undergo another type reaction with nucleophies, that is, electron transfer. This possibility leads to two far-reaching and connected questions: can addition and substitution reactions of aromatic cation radicals with nucleophiles be preceded by single electron transfer (SET).; and, can such cation radicals trap neutral radicals. These questions are also then related to another question having even greater impact on organic chemistry: can electrophilic aromatic substitution (ArH + E/sup +/ ..-->.. ArE + H/sup +/) be preceded by SET. The authors have been trying to answer the first two questions about SET and trapping of radicals by combining the two possibilities. That is, they have chosen the reaction of the thianthrene cation radical (represented by the symbol S/sup +./) with grignard reagents, for which two possible routes could be anticipated: either direct addition at sulfur or addition preceded by SET.

  9. High-speed fuel tracer fluorescence and OH radical chemiluminescence imaging in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine.

    PubMed

    Smith, James D; Sick, Volker

    2005-11-01

    An innovative technique has been demonstrated to achieve crank-angle-resolved planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of fuel followed by OH* chemiluminescence imaging in a firing direct-injected spark-ignition engine. This study used two standard KrF excimer lasers to excite toluene for tracking fuel distribution. The intensified camera system was operated at single crank-angle resolution at 2000 revolutions per minute (RPM) for 500 consecutive cycles. Through this work, it has been demonstrated that toluene and OH* can be imaged through the same optical setup while similar signal levels are obtained from both species, even at these high rates. The technique is useful for studying correlations between fuel distribution and subsequent ignition and flame propagation without the limitations of phase-averaging imaging approaches. This technique is illustrated for the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on combustion and will be useful for studies of misfire causes. Finally, a few general observations are presented as to the effect of preignition fuel distribution on subsequent combustion.

  10. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes β-catenin through direct competition with phosphorylation at threonine 41

    PubMed Central

    Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Buzy, Armelle; Zachayus, Jean-Luc; Guinez, Céline; Mir, Anne-Marie; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram; Copin, Marie-Christine; Boureme, Didier; Loyaux, Denis; Ferrara, Pascual; Lefebvre, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctions in Wnt signaling increase β-catenin stability and are associated with cancers, including colorectal cancer. In addition, β-catenin degradation is decreased by nutrient-dependent O-GlcNAcylation. Human colon tumors and colons from mice fed high-carbohydrate diets exhibited higher amounts of β-catenin and O-GlcNAc relative to healthy tissues and mice fed a standard diet, respectively. Administration of the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor thiamet G to mice also increased colonic expression of β-catenin. By ETD-MS/MS, we identified 4 O-GlcNAcylation sites at the N terminus of β-catenin (S23/T40/T41/T112). Furthermore, mutation of serine and threonine residues within the D box of β-catenin reduced O-GlcNAcylation by 75%. Interestingly, elevating O-GlcNAcylation in human colon cell lines drastically reduced phosphorylation at T41, a key residue of the D box responsible for β-catenin stability. Analyses of β-catenin O-GlcNAcylation mutants reinforced T41 as the most crucial residue that controls the β-catenin degradation rate. Finally, inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation decreased the β-catenin/α-catenin interaction necessary for mucosa integrity, whereas O-GlcNAcase silencing improved this interaction. These results suggest that O-GlcNAcylation regulates not only the stability of β-catenin, but also affects its localization at the level of adherens junctions. Accordingly, we propose that O-GlcNAcylation of β-catenin is a missing link between the glucose metabolism deregulation observed in metabolic disorders and the development of cancer.—Olivier-Van Stichelen, S., Dehennaut, V., Buzy, A., Zachayus, J.-L., Guinez, C., Mir, A.-M., El Yazidi-Belkoura, I., Copin, M.-C., Boureme, D., Loyaux, D., Ferrara, P., Lefebvre, T. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes β-catenin through direct competition with phosphorylation at threonine 41. PMID:24744147

  11. Direct Osmolyte-Macromolecule Interactions Confer Entropic Stability to Folded States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ropero, Francisco; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2015-03-01

    Protective osmolytes are chemical compounds that shift the (bio)macromolecule folding/unfolding equilibrium toward the folded state under osmotic stresses. Traditionally it has been considered that omolytes are depleted from the macromolecule first solvation shell, leading to entropic stabilization of the folded state. Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that protective osmolytes may directly interact with the macromolecule. As an exemplary and experimentally well-characterized system, we herein discuss poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) in water whose folding/unfolding equilibrium shifts toward the folded state in the presence of urea. Based on Molecular Dynamics simulations we show that urea preferentially accumulates in the first solvation shell of PNiPAM driven by attractive van der Waals dispersion forces leading to the formation of urea clouds around the polymer. Solvation thermodynamics analysis of the folded and unfolded states discards direct urea/macromolecule interactions as driving force of the folding mechanism. Our data shows that entropic penalization of unfolded polymer chains upon increasing urea concentration drives the collapse of the polymer chain. German Research Foundation (DFG), Cluster of Excellence 259 ``Smart Interfaces - Understanding and Designing Fluid Boundaries.''

  12. A new technique for the direct detection of HO2 radicals using bromide chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Br-CIMS): initial characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Javier; Tanner, David J.; Chen, Dexian; Huey, L. Gregory; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-08-01

    Hydroperoxy radicals (HO2) play an important part in tropospheric photochemistry, yet photochemical models do not capture ambient HO2 mixing ratios consistently. This is likely due to a combination of uncharacterized chemical pathways and measurement limitations. The indirect nature of current HO2 measurements introduces challenges in accurately measuring HO2; therefore a direct technique would help constrain HOx chemistry in the atmosphere. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and propose a direct HO2 detection scheme using bromide as a reagent ion. Ambient observations were made with a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) in Atlanta over the month of June 2015 to demonstrate the capability of this direct measurement technique. Observations displayed expected diurnal profiles, reaching daytime median values of ˜ 5 ppt between 2 and 3 p.m. local time. The HO2 diurnal profile was found to be influenced by morning-time vehicular NOx emissions and shows a slow decrease into the evening, likely from non-photolytic production, among other factors. Measurement sensitivities of approximately 5.1 ± 1.0 cps ppt-1 for a bromide ion (79Br-) count rate of 106 cps were observed. The relatively low instrument background allowed for a 3σ lower detection limit of 0.7 ppt for a 1 min integration time. Mass spectra of ambient measurements showed the 79BrHO2- peak was the major component of the signal at nominal mass-to-charge 112, suggesting high selectivity for HO2 at this mass-to-charge. More importantly, this demonstrates that these measurements can be achieved using instruments with only unit mass resolution capability.

  13. On the road from formamide ices to nucleobases: IR-spectroscopic observation of a direct reaction between cyano radicals and formamide in a high-energy impact event.

    PubMed

    Ferus, Martin; Civiš, Svatopluk; Mládek, Arnošt; Šponer, Jiří; Juha, Libor; Šponer, Judit E

    2012-12-26

    The formamide-based synthesis of nucleic acids is considered as a nonaqueous scenario for the emergence of biomolecules from inorganic matter. In the current study, we scrutinized the chemical composition of formamide ices mixed with an FeNi meteorite material treated with laser-induced dielectric breakdown plasma created in nitrogen buffer gas. These experiments aimed to capture the first steps of those chemical transformations that may lead to the formation of nucleobases during the impact of an extraterrestrial icy body containing formamide on an early Earth atmosphere. High-resolution FT-IR spectroscopy combined with quantum chemical calculations was used to analyze the volatile fraction of the products formed during such an event. We have found that the spectrum of the evaporated formamide ices is dominated by the spectral signatures of the dimeric form of formamide. Upon exposure to laser sparks, new well-defined bands appear in the spectrum centered at ~820, ~995, and ~1650 cm(-1). On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, these bands can be assigned to the absorptions of 2-amino-2-hydroxy-acetonitrile and to 2-amino-2-hydroxy-malononitrile, which are formed in a direct reaction between formamide and CN(•) radicals upon the high-energy impact event. We also show that there is an exergonic reaction route via these intermediates leading to diaminomaleonitrile, which is generally considered to play a key role in the synthesis of nucleobases.

  14. Direct emission of I2 molecule and IO radical from the heterogeneous reactions of gaseous ozone with aqueous potassium iodide solution.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yosuke; Yabushita, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Enami, Shinichi

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies indicated that gaseous halogens mediate key tropospheric chemical processes. The inclusion of halogen-ozone chemistry in atmospheric box models actually closes the approximately 50% gap between estimated and measured ozone losses in the marine boundary layer. The additional source of gaseous halogens is deemed to involve previously unaccounted for reactions of O(3)(g) with sea surface water and marine aerosols. Here, we report that molecular iodine, I(2)(g), and iodine monoxide radical, IO(g), are released ([I(2)(g)] > 100[IO(g)]) during the heterogeneous reaction of gaseous ozone, O(3)(g), with aqueous potassium iodide, KI(aq). It was found that (1) the amounts of I(2)(g) and IO(g) produced are directly proportional to [KI(aq)] up to 5 mM and (2) IO(g) yields are independent of bulk pH between 2 and 11, whereas I(2)(g) production is markedly enhanced at pH < 4. We propose that O(3)(g) reacts with I(-) at the air/water interface to produce I(2)(g) and IO(g) via HOI and IOOO(-) intermediates, respectively.

  15. On the road from formamide ices to nucleobases: IR-spectroscopic observation of a direct reaction between cyano radicals and formamide in a high-energy impact event.

    PubMed

    Ferus, Martin; Civiš, Svatopluk; Mládek, Arnošt; Šponer, Jiří; Juha, Libor; Šponer, Judit E

    2012-12-26

    The formamide-based synthesis of nucleic acids is considered as a nonaqueous scenario for the emergence of biomolecules from inorganic matter. In the current study, we scrutinized the chemical composition of formamide ices mixed with an FeNi meteorite material treated with laser-induced dielectric breakdown plasma created in nitrogen buffer gas. These experiments aimed to capture the first steps of those chemical transformations that may lead to the formation of nucleobases during the impact of an extraterrestrial icy body containing formamide on an early Earth atmosphere. High-resolution FT-IR spectroscopy combined with quantum chemical calculations was used to analyze the volatile fraction of the products formed during such an event. We have found that the spectrum of the evaporated formamide ices is dominated by the spectral signatures of the dimeric form of formamide. Upon exposure to laser sparks, new well-defined bands appear in the spectrum centered at ~820, ~995, and ~1650 cm(-1). On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, these bands can be assigned to the absorptions of 2-amino-2-hydroxy-acetonitrile and to 2-amino-2-hydroxy-malononitrile, which are formed in a direct reaction between formamide and CN(•) radicals upon the high-energy impact event. We also show that there is an exergonic reaction route via these intermediates leading to diaminomaleonitrile, which is generally considered to play a key role in the synthesis of nucleobases. PMID:23193998

  16. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  17. MOF-5-Polystyrene: Direct Production from Monomer, Improved Hydrolytic Stability, and Unique Guest Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; McDonald, Kyle A; Matzger, Adam J

    2016-09-19

    An unprecedented mode of reactivity of Zn4 O-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers a straightforward and powerful approach to polymer-hybridized porous solids. The concept is illustrated with the production of MOF-5-polystyrene wherein polystyrene is grafted and uniformly distributed throughout MOF-5 crystals after heating in pure styrene for 4-24 h. The surface area and polystyrene content of the material can be fine-tuned by controlling the duration of heating styrene in the presence of MOF-5. Polystyrene grafting significantly alters the physical and chemical properties of pristine MOF-5, which is evident from the unique guest adsorption properties (solvatochromic dye uptake and improved CO2 capacity) as well as the dramatically improved hydrolytic stability of composite. Based on the fact that MOF-5 is the best studied member of the structure class, and has been produced at scale by industry, these findings can be directly leveraged for a range of current applications.

  18. MOF-5-Polystyrene: Direct Production from Monomer, Improved Hydrolytic Stability, and Unique Guest Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; McDonald, Kyle A; Matzger, Adam J

    2016-09-19

    An unprecedented mode of reactivity of Zn4 O-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers a straightforward and powerful approach to polymer-hybridized porous solids. The concept is illustrated with the production of MOF-5-polystyrene wherein polystyrene is grafted and uniformly distributed throughout MOF-5 crystals after heating in pure styrene for 4-24 h. The surface area and polystyrene content of the material can be fine-tuned by controlling the duration of heating styrene in the presence of MOF-5. Polystyrene grafting significantly alters the physical and chemical properties of pristine MOF-5, which is evident from the unique guest adsorption properties (solvatochromic dye uptake and improved CO2 capacity) as well as the dramatically improved hydrolytic stability of composite. Based on the fact that MOF-5 is the best studied member of the structure class, and has been produced at scale by industry, these findings can be directly leveraged for a range of current applications. PMID:27555362

  19. Formation and stability of gas-phase o-benzoquinone from oxidation of ortho-hydroxyphenyl: a combined neutral and distonic radical study.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Matthew B; Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Taatjes, Craig A; Masters, Kye-Simeon; Blanksby, Stephen J; da Silva, Gabriel; Trevitt, Adam J

    2016-02-14

    Gas-phase product detection studies of o-hydroxyphenyl radical and O2 are reported at 373, 500, and 600 K, at 4 Torr (533.3 Pa), using VUV time-resolved synchrotron photoionisation mass spectrometry. The dominant products are assigned as o-benzoquinone (C6H4O2, m/z 108) and cyclopentadienone (C5H4O, m/z 80). It is concluded that cyclopentadienone forms as a secondary product from prompt decomposition of o-benzoquinone (and dissociative ionization of o-benzoquinone may contribute to the m/z 80 signal at photon energies ≳9.8 eV). Ion-trap reactions of the distonic o-hydroxyphenyl analogue, the 5-ammonium-2-hydroxyphenyl radical cation, with O2 are also reported and concur with the assignment of o-benzoquinone as the dominant product. The ion-trap study also provides support for a mechanism where cyclopentadienone is produced by decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone. Kinetic studies compare oxidation of the ammonium-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radical cations along with trimethylammonium-tagged analogues. Reaction efficiencies are found to be ca. 5% for both charge-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radicals irrespective of the charged substituent. G3X-K quantum chemical calculations are deployed to rationalise experimental results for o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and its charge-tagged counterpart. The prevailing reaction mechanism, after O2 addition, involves a facile 1,5-H shift in the peroxyl radical and subsequent elimination of OH to yield o-benzoquinone that is reminiscent of the Waddington mechanism for β-hydroxyperoxyl radicals. These results suggest o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone serve as plausible OH and CO sources in combustion. PMID:26509247

  20. Formation and stability of gas-phase o-benzoquinone from oxidation of ortho-hydroxyphenyl: A combined neutral and distonic radical study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prendergast, Matthew B.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Masters, Kye -Simeon; Blanksby, Stephen J.; da Silva, Gabriel; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2015-10-19

    Gas-phase product detection studies of o-hydroxyphenyl radical and O2 are reported at 373, 500, and 600 K, at 4 Torr (533.3 Pa), using VUV time-resolved synchrotron photoionisation mass spectrometry. The dominant products are assigned as o-benzoquinone (C6H4O2, m/z 108) and cyclopentadienone (C5H4O, m/z 80). It is concluded that cyclopentadienone forms as a secondary product from prompt decomposition of o-benzoquinone (and dissociative ionization of o-benzoquinone may contribute to the m/z 80 signal at photon energies ≳9.8 eV). Ion-trap reactions of the distonic o-hydroxyphenyl analogue, the 5-ammonium-2-hydroxyphenyl radical cation, with O2 are also reported and concur with the assignment of o-benzoquinone asmore » the dominant product. In addition, the ion-trap study also provides support for a mechanism where cyclopentadienone is produced by decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone. Kinetic studies compare oxidation of the ammonium-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radical cations along with trimethylammonium-tagged analogues. Reaction efficiencies are found to be ca. 5% for both charge-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radicals irrespective of the charged substituent. G3X-K quantum chemical calculations are deployed to rationalise experimental results for o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and its charge-tagged counterpart. The prevailing reaction mechanism, after O2 addition, involves a facile 1,5-H shift in the peroxyl radical and subsequent elimination of OH to yield o-benzoquinone that is reminiscent of the Waddington mechanism for β-hydroxyperoxyl radicals. These results suggest o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone serve as plausible OH and CO sources in combustion.« less

  1. Production of sulfate radical from peroxymonosulfate induced by a magnetically separable CuFe2O4 spinel in water: efficiency, stability, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Haibo; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-03-19

    A simple, nonhazardous, efficient and low energy-consuming process is desirable to generate powerful radicals from peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for recalcitrant pollutant removal. In this work, the production of radical species from PMS induced by a magnetic CuFe(2)O(4) spinel was studied. Iopromide, a recalcitrant model pollutant, was used to investigate the efficiency of this process. CuFe(2)O(4) showed higher activity and 30 times lower Cu(2+) leaching (1.5 μg L(-1) per 100 mg L(-1)) than a well-crystallized CuO at the same dosage. CuFe(2)O(4) maintained its activity and crystallinity during repeated batch experiments. In comparison, the activity of CuO declined significantly, which was ascribed to the deterioration in its degree of crystallinity. The efficiency of the PMS/CuFe(2)O(4) was highest at neutral pH and decreased at acidic and alkaline pHs. Sulfate radical was the primary radical species responsible for the iopromide degradation. On the basis of the stoichiometry of oxalate degradation in the PMS/CuFe(2)O(4), the radical production yield from PMS was determined to be near 1 mol/mol. The PMS decomposition involved an inner-sphere complexation with the oxide's surface Cu(II) sites. In situ characterization of the oxide surface with ATR-FTIR and Raman during the PMS decomposition suggested that surface Cu(II)-Cu(III)-Cu(II) redox cycle was responsible for the efficient sulfate radical generation from PMS.

  2. Production of sulfate radical from peroxymonosulfate induced by a magnetically separable CuFe2O4 spinel in water: efficiency, stability, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Haibo; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-03-19

    A simple, nonhazardous, efficient and low energy-consuming process is desirable to generate powerful radicals from peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for recalcitrant pollutant removal. In this work, the production of radical species from PMS induced by a magnetic CuFe(2)O(4) spinel was studied. Iopromide, a recalcitrant model pollutant, was used to investigate the efficiency of this process. CuFe(2)O(4) showed higher activity and 30 times lower Cu(2+) leaching (1.5 μg L(-1) per 100 mg L(-1)) than a well-crystallized CuO at the same dosage. CuFe(2)O(4) maintained its activity and crystallinity during repeated batch experiments. In comparison, the activity of CuO declined significantly, which was ascribed to the deterioration in its degree of crystallinity. The efficiency of the PMS/CuFe(2)O(4) was highest at neutral pH and decreased at acidic and alkaline pHs. Sulfate radical was the primary radical species responsible for the iopromide degradation. On the basis of the stoichiometry of oxalate degradation in the PMS/CuFe(2)O(4), the radical production yield from PMS was determined to be near 1 mol/mol. The PMS decomposition involved an inner-sphere complexation with the oxide's surface Cu(II) sites. In situ characterization of the oxide surface with ATR-FTIR and Raman during the PMS decomposition suggested that surface Cu(II)-Cu(III)-Cu(II) redox cycle was responsible for the efficient sulfate radical generation from PMS. PMID:23439015

  3. A Stability Study of Ni/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Anode for Direct Ammonia Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-12-30

    In recent years, solid oxide fuel cells fueled with ammonia have been attracting intensive attention. In this work, ammonia fuel was supplied to the Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermet anode at 600 and 700 °C, and the change of electrochemical performance and microstructure under the open-circuit state was studied in detail. The influence of ammonia exposure on the microstructure of Ni was also investigated by using Ni/YSZ powder and Ni film deposited on a YSZ disk. The obtained results demonstrated that Ni in the cermet anode was partially nitrided under an ammonia atmosphere, which considerably roughened the Ni surface. Moreover, the destruction of the anode support layer was confirmed for the anode-supported cell upon the temperature cycling test between 600 and 700 °C because of the nitriding phenomenon of Ni, resulting in severe performance degradation.

  4. Improvement of the stability and activity of the BPO-A1 haloperoxidase from Streptomyces aureofaciens by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryosuke; Higo, Tatsutoshi; Yoshikawa, Chisa; China, Hideyasu; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2014-12-20

    Haloperoxidases are oxygenases that catalyze the halogenation of a range of organic compounds without the need for additional high-cost cofactors. Thus, haloperoxidases with high activity and stability are desired for industrial application. In this study, a directed evolution approach was adopted to improve the thermostability of the homodimeric BPO-A1 haloperoxidase from Streptomyces aureofaciens. Among 1000 mutant BPO-A1 haloperoxidases, 2 mutants HT177 and HT507, having higher thermostabilities than the wild-type BPO-A1 haloperoxidase, were obtained by directed evolution. The residual activities of mutants HT177 and HT507 were 2.3- and 5.1-fold higher than that of wild-type BPO-A1, respectively, after incubation at 80 °C for 1 h. In addition, mutant HT177 showed higher stability in organic solvents, such as methanol, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and N,N-dimethylformamide, than the wild-type BPO-A1 haloperoxidase. Furthermore, mutant HT507 showed higher specific activity. Based on the evaluation of single-amino-acid-substituted mutants, stabilization of the α-helix conformation, substitution of amino acid residues located at the surface of the protein molecule, and enhancement of the interaction between subunits may account for the improvement in thermostability, organic solvent stability, and specific activity. Consequently, the thermostability, organic solvent stability, and specific activity of S. aureofaciens BPO-A1 haloperoxidase were successfully improved by a directed evolution approach.

  5. Hydrodynamic stability and Ti-tracer distribution in low-adiabat OMEGA direct-drive implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tirtha R.

    We discuss the hydrodynamic stability of low-adiabat OMEGA direct-drive implosions based on results obtained from simultaneous emission and absorption spectroscopy of a titanium tracer added to the target. The targets were deuterium filled, warm plastic shells of varying thicknesses and filling gas pressures with a submicron Ti-doped tracer layer initially located on the inner surface of the shell. The spectral features from the titanium tracer are observed during the deceleration and stagnation phases of the implosion, and recorded with a time integrated spectrometer (XRS1), streaked crystal spectrometer (SSCA) and three gated, multi-monochromatic X-ray imager (MMI) instruments fielded along quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight. The time-integrated, streaked and gated data show simultaneous emission and absorption spectral features associated with titanium K-shell line transitions but only the MMI data provides spatially resolved information. The arrays of gated spectrally resolved images recorded with MMI were processed to obtain spatially resolved spectra characteristic of annular contour regions on the image. A multi-zone spectroscopic analysis of the annular spatially resolved spectra permits the extraction of plasma conditions in the core as well as the spatial distribution of tracer atoms. In turn, the titanium atom distribution provides direct evidence of tracer penetration into the core and thus of the hydrodynamic stability of the shell. The observations, timing and analysis indicate that during fuel burning the titanium atoms have migrated deep into the core and thus shell material mixing is likely to impact the rate of nuclear fusion reactions, i.e. burning rate, and the neutron yield of the implosion. We have found that the Ti atom number density decreases towards the center in early deceleration phase, but later in time the trend is just opposite, i.e., it increases towards the center of the implosion core. This is in part a consequence of the convergent

  6. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  7. A simple, post-additional antioxidant capacity assay using adenosine triphosphate-stabilized 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation in a G-quadruplex DNAzyme catalyzed ABTS-H2O2 system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shu-Min; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Kong, De-Ming; Shen, Han-Xi

    2012-05-15

    The scavenging of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation (ABTS(+)) by antioxidants has been widely used in antioxidant capacity assay. Because of ABTS(+) disproportionation, however, this radical cannot be prepared on a large scale and stored long-term, making it unsuitable for high-throughput detection and screening of antioxidants. We developed a modified "post-additional" antioxidant capacity assay. This method possessed two remarkable features: First, instead of natural peroxidases, an artificial enzyme, G-quadruplex DNAzyme, was used for the preparation of ABTS(+), thus greatly reducing the cost of the assay, and eliminating the strict demand for the storage of enzymes. Second, an ABTS(+) stabilizer, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), was used. In the presence of ATP, the disproportionation of ABTS(+) was effectively inhibited, and the lifetime of this radical cation was prolonged about 6-fold (12 days versus 2 days), making the large-scale preparation of ABTS(+) possible. Utilizing this method, the antioxidant capacities of individual antioxidants and real samples can be quantified and compared easily. In addition, this method can be developed as a high-throughput screening method for antioxidants. The screening results could even be judged by the naked eye, eliminating the need for expensive instruments.

  8. Formation and stability of gas-phase o-benzoquinone from oxidation of ortho-hydroxyphenyl: A combined neutral and distonic radical study

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Matthew B.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Masters, Kye -Simeon; Blanksby, Stephen J.; da Silva, Gabriel; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2015-10-19

    Gas-phase product detection studies of o-hydroxyphenyl radical and O2 are reported at 373, 500, and 600 K, at 4 Torr (533.3 Pa), using VUV time-resolved synchrotron photoionisation mass spectrometry. The dominant products are assigned as o-benzoquinone (C6H4O2, m/z 108) and cyclopentadienone (C5H4O, m/z 80). It is concluded that cyclopentadienone forms as a secondary product from prompt decomposition of o-benzoquinone (and dissociative ionization of o-benzoquinone may contribute to the m/z 80 signal at photon energies ≳9.8 eV). Ion-trap reactions of the distonic o-hydroxyphenyl analogue, the 5-ammonium-2-hydroxyphenyl radical cation, with O2 are also reported and concur with the assignment of o-benzoquinone as the dominant product. In addition, the ion-trap study also provides support for a mechanism where cyclopentadienone is produced by decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone. Kinetic studies compare oxidation of the ammonium-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radical cations along with trimethylammonium-tagged analogues. Reaction efficiencies are found to be ca. 5% for both charge-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radicals irrespective of the charged substituent. G3X-K quantum chemical calculations are deployed to rationalise experimental results for o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and its charge-tagged counterpart. The prevailing reaction mechanism, after O2 addition, involves a facile 1,5-H shift in the peroxyl radical and subsequent elimination of OH to yield o-benzoquinone that is reminiscent of the Waddington mechanism for β-hydroxyperoxyl radicals. These results suggest o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone serve as plausible OH and CO sources in combustion.

  9. Direct kinetic study of radical transformation reaction Me sub 2 COH + Ph sub 2 CO yields Me sub 2 CO + Ph sub 2 COH

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, A.; Berces, T. )

    1991-02-07

    Reaction Me{sub 2}COH + Ph{sub 2}CO {yields} Me{sub 2}CO + Ph{sub 2}COH (5) was studied by laser flash photolysis under such experimental conditions where the changes in the concentrations of ketyl radicals with reaction time were controlled by this radical transformation process. Diphenylketyl radical concentration profiles were obtained by monitoring transient absorption at 540 nm and the rate coefficient k{sub 5} was extracted from that part of the concentration trajectory which was determined solely by reaction 5. Thus, k{sub 5} = (3.6 {plus minus} 0.6) {times} 10{sup 5} dm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} was determined at 298 K in acetonitrile, which is higher than the two recently reported values derived from quantum yields measured under steady-state conditions. A reaction mechanism for the radical transformation process (5) is proposed in which hydrogen-bonded species formed from ketyl radical and benzophenone participate.

  10. Stability of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as a spin-trap for quantification of hydroxyl radicals in processes based on Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Fontmorin, J M; Burgos Castillo, R C; Tang, W Z; Sillanpää, M

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction was used to produce hydroxyl radicals under conditions similar to AOPs with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap agent in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. A theoretical kinetics model was developed to determine conditions under which the spin-adduct DMPO-OH is not further oxidized by Fe(3+) and excessive radicals, so that hydroxyl radicals concentration could be accurately inferred. Experiments were designed based upon the model and H2O2 and Fe(2+) concentrations were varied from 1 to 100 mM and from 0.1 to 10 mM, respectively, with a constant H2O2: Fe(2+) ratio of 10:1. Results confirmed that DMPO concentration should be at least 20 times higher than the concentration of H2O2 and 200 times higher than iron concentration to produce stable DMPO-OH EPR signal. When DMPO: H2O2 ratio varied from 1 to 10, DMPO-OH could generate intermediates and be further oxidized leading to the apparition of an additional triplet. This signal was attributed to a paramagnetic dimer: its structure and a formation mechanism were proposed. Finally, the utilization of sodium sulfite and catalase to terminate Fenton reaction was discussed. Catalase appeared to be compatible with DMPO. However, sodium sulfite should be avoided since it reacted with DMPO-OH to form DMPO-SO3. PMID:27132196

  11. A Study of Morphological Stability During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, J. J.; Lehmann, P.; Drevet, B.; Garandet, J. P.; Camel, D.; Coriell, S. R.

    Introduction Experimental Techniques The Seebeck Signal Sample Analysis Steady State Results and Interpretation Stability Threshold Wavelengths Anisotropy of the Microstructure Characterization of the Bifurcation Transient Results and Interpretation Concluding Remarks

  12. Direct analysis and stability of methylated trivalent arsenic metabolites in cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Currier, Jenna M; Svoboda, Milan; Matoušek, Tomáš; Dědina, Jiří; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2011-12-01

    Chronic ingestion of water containing inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been linked to a variety of adverse health effects, including cancer, hypertension and diabetes. Current evidence suggests that the toxic methylated trivalent metabolites of iAs, methylarsonous acid (MAs(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAs(III)) play a key role in the etiology of these diseases. Both MAs(III) and DMAs(III) have been detected in urine of subjects exposed to iAs. However, the rapid oxidation of DMAs(III) and, to a lesser extent, MAs(III) in oxygen-rich environments leads to difficulties in the analysis of these metabolites in samples of urine collected in population studies. Results of our previous work indicate that MAs(III) and DMAs(III) are relatively stable in a reducing cellular environment and can be quantified in cells and tissues. In the present study, we used the oxidation state-specific hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-CT-AAS) to examine the presence and stability of these trivalent metabolites in the liver of mice and in UROtsa/F35 cells exposed to iAs. Tri- and pentavalent metabolites of iAs were analyzed directly (without chemical extraction or digestion). Liver homogenates prepared in cold deionized water and cell culture medium and lysates were stored at either 0 °C or -80 °C for up to 22 days. Both MAs(III) and DMAs(III) were stable in homogenates stored at -80 °C. In contrast, DMAs(III) in homogenates stored at 0 °C began to oxidize to its pentavalent counterpart after 1 day; MAs(III) remained stable for at least 3 weeks under these conditions. MAs(III) and DMAs(III) generated in UROtsa/F35 cultures were stable for 3 weeks when culture media and cell lysates were stored at -80 °C. These results suggest that samples of cells and tissues represent suitable material for the quantitative, oxidation state-specific analysis of As in laboratory and population studies examining the metabolism or toxic effects of this metalloid.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of radicals and radical pairs in fruit fly cryptochrome - protonated and nonprotonated flavin radical-states.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Bernd; Bajzath, Csaba; Melin, Frédéric; Heidinger, Lorenz; Kromm, Viktoria; Herkersdorf, Christoph; Benz, Ulrike; Mann, Lisa; Stehle, Patricia; Hellwig, Petra; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome is one of the model proteins for animal blue-light photoreceptors. Using time-resolved and steady-state optical spectroscopy, we studied the mechanism of light-induced radical-pair formation and decay, and the photoreduction of the FAD cofactor. Exact kinetics on a microsecond to minutes timescale could be extracted for the wild-type protein using global analysis. The wild-type exhibits a fast photoreduction reaction from the oxidized FAD to the FAD(•-) state with a very positive midpoint potential of ~ +125 mV, although no further reduction could be observed. We could also demonstrate that the terminal tryptophan of the conserved triad, W342, is directly involved in electron transfer; however, photoreduction could not be completely inhibited in a W342F mutant. The investigation of another mutation close to the FAD cofactor, C416N, rather unexpectedly reveals accumulation of a protonated flavin radical on a timescale of several seconds. The obtained data are critically discussed with the ones obtained from another protein, Escherichia coli photolyase, and we conclude that the amino acid opposite N(5) of the isoalloxazine moiety of FAD is able to (de)stabilize the protonated FAD radical but not to significantly modulate the kinetics of any light-inducted reactions.

  14. Ribonucleotide Reductase-- a Radical Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Peter; Ehrenberg, Anders

    1983-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases catalyze the enzymatic formation of deoxyribonucleotides, an obligatory step in DNA synthesis. The native form of the enzyme from Escherichia coli or from mammalian sources contains as part of its polypeptide structure a free tyrosyl radical, stabilized by an iron center. The radical participates in all probability in the catalytic process during the substitution of the hydroxyl group at C-2 of ribose by a hydrogen atom. A second, inactive form of the E. coli reductase lacks the tyrosyl radical. Extracts from E. coli contain activities that interconvert the two forms. The tyrosyl radical is introduced in the presence of oxygen, while anaerobiosis favors its removal, suggesting a regulatory role in DNA synthesis for oxygen.

  15. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  16. Free radical generation and concentration in a plasma polymer: the effect of aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Ershov, Sergey; Khelifa, Farid; Lemaur, Vincent; Cornil, Jérôme; Cossement, Damien; Habibi, Youssef; Dubois, Philippe; Snyders, Rony

    2014-08-13

    Plasma polymer films (PPF) have increasing applications in many fields due to the unique combination of properties of this class of materials. Among notable features arising from the specifics of plasma polymerization synthesis, a high surface reactivity can be advantageously used when exploited carefully. It is related to the presence of free radicals generated during the deposition process through manifold molecular bond scissions in the energetic plasma environment. In ambient atmosphere, these radicals undergo autoxidation reactions resulting in undesired polymer aging. However, when the reactivity of surface radicals is preserved and they are put in direct contact with a chemical group of interest, a specific surface functionalization or grafting of polymeric chains can be achieved. Therefore, the control of the surface free radical density of a plasma polymer is crucially important for a successful grafting. The present investigation focuses on the influence of the hydrocarbon precursor type, aromatic vs aliphatic, on the generation and concentration of free radicals on the surface of the PPF. Benzene and cyclohexane were chosen as model precursors. First, in situ FTIR analysis of the plasma phase supplemented by density functional theory calculations allowed the main fragmentation routes of precursor molecules in the discharge to be identified as a function of energy input. Using nitric oxide (NO) chemical labeling in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, a quantitative evaluation of concentration of surface free radicals as a function of input power has been assessed for both precursors. Different evolutions of the surface free radical density for the benzene- and cyclohexane-based PPF, namely, a continuous increase versus stabilization to a plateau, are attributed to different plasma polymerization mechanisms and resulting structures as illustrated by PPF characterization findings. The control of surface free radical density can be

  17. Direct synthesis of sulfonated dihydroisoquinolinones from N-allylbenzamide and arylsulfinic acids via TBHP-promoted cascade radical addition and cyclization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dong; Li, Yang; Miao, Tao; Li, Pinhua; Wang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    A novel synthesis of sulfonated dihydroisoquinolinones via cascade radical addition and cyclization was developed in the presence of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). The reactions generated the desired sulfonated dihydroisoquinolinones in good yields from readily available arylsulfinic acids and N-allylbenzamides under metal-free conditions. PMID:27604055

  18. Homolytic dissociation of the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) and structures and stabilities of the related radicals Me2NCSn* (n = 1-4).

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana; Mak, Adrian Matthew; Wong, Ming Wah

    2006-12-01

    The homolytic dissociation of the important vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) has been studied by ab initio calculations according to the G3X(MP2) and G3X(MP2)-RAD theories. Homolytic cleavage of the SS bond requires a low enthalpy of 150.0 kJ mol-1, whereas 268.0 kJ mol-1 is needed for the dissociation of one of the C-S single bonds. To cleave one of the SS bonds of the corresponding trisulfide (TMTT) requires 191.1 kJ mol-1. Me2NCS2* is a particularly stable sulfur radical as reflected in the low S-H bond dissociation enthalpy of the corresponding acid Me2NC(=S)SH (301.7 kJ mol-1). Me2NCS2* (2B2) is a sigma radical characterized by the unpaired spin density shared equally between the two sulfur atoms and by a 4-center (NCS2) delocalized pi system. The ESR g-tensors of the radicals Me2NCSn* (n = 1-3) have been calculated. Both TMTD and the mentioned radicals form stable chelate complexes with a Li+ cation, which here serves as a model for the zinc ions used in accelerated rubber vulcanization. Although the binding energy of the complex [Li(TMTD)]+ is larger than that of the isomeric species [Li(S2CNMe2)2]+ (12), the dissociation enthalpy of TMTD as a ligand is smaller (125.5 kJ mol-1) than that of free TMTD. In other words, the homolytic dissociation of the SS bonds of TMTD is facilitated by the presence of Li+ ions. The sulfurization of TMTD in the presence of Li+ to give the paramagnetic complex [Li(S3CNMe2)2]+ is strongly exothermic. These results suggest that TMTD reacts with naked zinc ions as well as with the surface atoms of solid zinc oxide particles in an analogous manner producing highly reactive complexes, which probably initiate the crosslinking process during vulcanization reactions of natural or synthetic rubber accelerated by TMTD/ZnO. PMID:17137356

  19. Homolytic dissociation of the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) and structures and stabilities of the related radicals Me2NCSn* (n = 1-4).

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana; Mak, Adrian Matthew; Wong, Ming Wah

    2006-12-01

    The homolytic dissociation of the important vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) has been studied by ab initio calculations according to the G3X(MP2) and G3X(MP2)-RAD theories. Homolytic cleavage of the SS bond requires a low enthalpy of 150.0 kJ mol-1, whereas 268.0 kJ mol-1 is needed for the dissociation of one of the C-S single bonds. To cleave one of the SS bonds of the corresponding trisulfide (TMTT) requires 191.1 kJ mol-1. Me2NCS2* is a particularly stable sulfur radical as reflected in the low S-H bond dissociation enthalpy of the corresponding acid Me2NC(=S)SH (301.7 kJ mol-1). Me2NCS2* (2B2) is a sigma radical characterized by the unpaired spin density shared equally between the two sulfur atoms and by a 4-center (NCS2) delocalized pi system. The ESR g-tensors of the radicals Me2NCSn* (n = 1-3) have been calculated. Both TMTD and the mentioned radicals form stable chelate complexes with a Li+ cation, which here serves as a model for the zinc ions used in accelerated rubber vulcanization. Although the binding energy of the complex [Li(TMTD)]+ is larger than that of the isomeric species [Li(S2CNMe2)2]+ (12), the dissociation enthalpy of TMTD as a ligand is smaller (125.5 kJ mol-1) than that of free TMTD. In other words, the homolytic dissociation of the SS bonds of TMTD is facilitated by the presence of Li+ ions. The sulfurization of TMTD in the presence of Li+ to give the paramagnetic complex [Li(S3CNMe2)2]+ is strongly exothermic. These results suggest that TMTD reacts with naked zinc ions as well as with the surface atoms of solid zinc oxide particles in an analogous manner producing highly reactive complexes, which probably initiate the crosslinking process during vulcanization reactions of natural or synthetic rubber accelerated by TMTD/ZnO.

  20. Direct laser initiation and improved thermal stability of nitrocellulose/graphene oxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Hikal, Walid M.; Zhang, Yue; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K.; Li, Li; Panditrao, Siddharth; Wang, Shiren; Weeks, Brandon L.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the enhancement and possible control of both laser ignition and burn rates of Nitrocellulose (NC) microfilms when doped with graphene oxide (GO). A Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 20 ns) laser is used to ignite GO-doped NC films at low temperatures. The effect of GO on the doping concentration of the activation energies of laser ignition and thermal stability of the NC films is studied. The activation energy of laser ignition decreases with increasing GO/NC weight ratio and attains a constant value with higher concentrations. This behavior is accompanied by an increase in the thermal stability.

  1. Calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives for wing-body combinations with and without jet-interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for predicting the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with or without the blowing jet effect. The fuselage effect is accounted for by the axial distribution of vortex multiplets. Comparison of the predicted results with experiments and other theoretical methods show good agreement for configurations without the blowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  2. Optimizing wind farm layout via LES-calibrated geometric models inclusive of wind direction and atmospheric stability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cristina; Ghaisas, Niranjan

    2015-04-01

    The energy generation at a wind farm is controlled primarily by the average wind speed at hub height. However, two other factors impact wind farm performance: 1) the layout of the wind turbines, in terms of spacing between turbines along and across the prevailing wind direction; staggering or aligning consecutive rows; angles between rows, columns, and prevailing wind direction); and 2) atmospheric stability, which is a measure of whether vertical motion is enhanced (unstable), suppressed (stable), or neither (neutral). Studying both factors and their complex interplay with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is a valid approach because it produces high-resolution, 3D, turbulent fields, such as wind velocity, temperature, and momentum and heat fluxes, and it properly accounts for the interactions between wind turbine blades and the surrounding atmospheric and near-surface properties. However, LES are computationally expensive and simulating all the possible combinations of wind directions, atmospheric stabilities, and turbine layouts to identify the optimal wind farm configuration is practically unfeasible today. A new, geometry-based method is proposed that is computationally inexpensive and that combines simple geometric quantities with a minimal number of LES simulations to identify the optimal wind turbine layout, taking into account not only the actual frequency distribution of wind directions (i.e., wind rose) at the site of interest, but also atmospheric stability. The geometry-based method is calibrated with LES of the Lillgrund wind farm conducted with the Software for Offshore/onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), based on the open-access OpenFOAM libraries. The geometric quantities that offer the best correlations (>0.93) with the LES results are the blockage ratio, defined as the fraction of the swept area of a wind turbine that is blocked by an upstream turbine, and the blockage distance, the weighted distance from a given turbine to all upstream turbines

  3. Temporal Variability and Stability in Infant-Directed Sung Speech: Evidence for Language-Specific Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Simone

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, sung speech is used as a methodological tool to explore temporal variability in the timing of word-internal consonants and vowels. It is hypothesized that temporal variability/stability becomes clearer under the varying rhythmical conditions induced by song. This is explored cross-linguistically in German--a language that exhibits a…

  4. Adsorption and separation of reactive aromatic isomers and generation and stabilization of their radicals within cadmium(II)-triazole metal-organic confined space in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal fashion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Kui; Ma, Jian-Ping; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2010-05-26

    A series of reactive group functionalized aromatics, namely 2-furaldehyde, 3-furaldehyde, 2-thenaldehyde, 3-thenaldehyde, o-toluidine, m-toluidine, p-toluidine, and aniline, can be absorbed by a CdL(2) (1; L = 4-amino-3,5-bis(4-pyridyl-3-phenyl)-1,2,4-triazole) porous framework in both vapor and liquid phases to generate new G(n) [symbol: see text] CdL(2) (n = 1, 2) host-guest complexes. In addition, the CdL(2) framework can be a shield to protect the active functional group (-CHO and -NH(2)) substituted guests from reaction with the outside medium containing their reaction partners. That is, aldehyde-substituted guests within the CdL(2) host become "stable" in the aniline phase and vice versa. Moreover, 1 displays a very strict selectivity for these reactive group substituted aromatic isomers and can completely separate these guest isomers under mild conditions (i.e., 2-furaldehyde vs 3-furaldehyde, 2-thenaldehyde vs 3-thenaldehyde, and o-toluidine vs m-toluidine vs p-toluidine). All adsorptions and separations are directly performed on the single crystals of 1. More interestingly, these reactive group substituted aromatics readily transform to the corresponding radicals within the CdL(2) host upon ambient light or UV light (355 nm) irradiation. Furthermore, the generated organic radicals are alive for 1 month within the interior cavity in air under ambient conditions. Simple organic radicals are highly reactive short-lived species, and they cannot be generally isolated and conserved under ambient conditions. Thus, the CdL(2) host herein could be considered as a radical generator and storage vessel.

  5. Dual high-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of minor and major constituents directly from the crude extract of Pueraria lobata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Qinglei, Sun; Nyberg, Nils T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2015-02-27

    The crude methanol extract of Pueraria lobata was investigated by dual high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition and radical scavenging profiling combined with hyphenated HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Direct analysis of the crude extract without preceding purification was facilitated by combining chromatograms from two analytical-scale HPLC separations of 120 and 600 μg on-column, respectively. High-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiles were obtained after microfractionation of the eluate in 96-well microplates. This allowed full bioactivity profiling of individual peaks in the HPLC chromatogram of the crude methanol extract. Subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis allowed identification of 21 known compounds in addition to two new compounds, i.e., 3'-methoxydaidzein 8-C-[α-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside and 6″-O-malonyl-3'-methoxydaidzin, as well as an unstable compound tentatively identified as 3'-de-O-methylpuerariafuran. PMID:25679337

  6. Direct interaction with filamins modulates the stability and plasma membrane expression of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, William R.; Chen, Yun; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sallee, Jennifer L.; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Jacobson, Ken; Stutts, M. Jackson; Milgram, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel on the apical membrane of epithelia is well established. However, the processes by which CFTR is regulated on the cell surface are not clear. Here we report the identification of a protein-protein interaction between CFTR and the cytoskeletal filamin proteins. Using proteomic approaches, we identified filamins as proteins that associate with the extreme CFTR N terminus. Furthermore, we identified a disease-causing missense mutation in CFTR, serine 13 to phenylalanine (S13F), which disrupted this interaction. In cells, filamins tethered plasma membrane CFTR to the underlying actin network. This interaction stabilized CFTR at the cell surface and regulated the plasma membrane dynamics and confinement of the channel. In the absence of filamin binding, CFTR was internalized from the cell surface, where it prematurely accumulated in lysosomes and was ultimately degraded. Our data demonstrate what we believe to be a previously unrecognized role for the CFTR N terminus in the regulation of the plasma membrane stability and metabolic stability of CFTR. In addition, we elucidate the molecular defect associated with the S13F mutation. PMID:17235394

  7. Influence of pH, metal chelator, free radical scavenger and interfacial characteristics on the oxidative stability of β-carotene in conjugated whey protein-pectin stabilised emulsion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Duoxia; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2013-08-15

    The influence of whey protein isolate (WPI)-beet pectin conjugates formed by dry-heating on the oxidative stability of β-carotene in O/W emulsions was studied. It was mainly focused on the influence of pH, metal chelator, free radical scavenger and interfacial characteristics on the degradation of β-carotene in the emulsion stabilised by conjugate. The conjugate increased the oxidative stability of β-carotene in the emulsion as compared to their unconjugated mixture at pH 7.0. The desferoxamine retarded β-carotene degradation at pH 4.0 more effectively than pH 7.0 and more effectively in the emulsion with the conjugate than the unconjugated mixture (p<0.05). The addition of 200 mg/kg α-tocopherol significantly improved the stability of β-carotene in the conjugate stabilised emulsion. The emulsions were washed to remove conjugate not absorbed to the emulsion droplet interface, indicating that unabsorbed emulsifiers could protect β-carotene. It suggested that WPI-pectin conjugate could be used to protect bioactive lipids in emulsions.

  8. Stability of formation control using a consensus protocol under directed communications with two time delays and delay scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Gomez, Rudy; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-01-01

    We consider a linear algorithm to achieve formation control in a group of agents which are driven by second-order dynamics and affected by two rationally independent delays. One of the delays is in the position and the other in the velocity information channels. These delays are taken as constant and uniform throughout the system. The communication topology is assumed to be directed and fixed. The formation is attained by adding a supplementary control term to the stabilising consensus protocol. In preparation for the formation control logic, we first study the stability of the consensus, using the recent cluster treatment of characteristic roots (CTCR) paradigm. This effort results in a unique depiction of the non-conservative stability boundaries in the domain of the delays. However, CTCR requires the knowledge of the potential stability switching loci exhaustively within this domain. The creation of these loci is done in a new surrogate coordinate system, called the 'spectral delay space (SDS)'. The relative stability is also investigated, which has to do with the speed of reaching consensus. This step leads to a paradoxical control design concept, called the 'delay scheduling', which highlights the fact that the group behaviour may be enhanced by increasing the delays. These steps lead to a control strategy to establish a desired group formation that guarantees spacing among the agents. Example case studies are presented to validate the underlying analytical derivations.

  9. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5–9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50°C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5–7.0 and temperatures of up to 40°C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases. PMID:26790148

  10. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Boyang; Amano, Yoshihiko; Nozaki, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5-9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50 °C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5-7.0 and temperatures of up to 40 °C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases.

  11. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes E Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ(13)C and δ(15)N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ(13)C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ(15)N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability.

  12. Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy is directed by vascular phenotype, vessel stabilization, and maturation in malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Scheffrahn, Inka; Bartling, Sönke; Weis, Joachim; von Felbert, Verena; Middleton, Mark; Kato, Masahi; Ergün, Süleyman; Augustin, Hellmut G.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is not only dependent on endothelial cell invasion and proliferation, it also requires pericyte coverage of vascular sprouts for stabilization of vascular walls. Clinical efficacy of angiogenesis inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway is still limited to date. We hypothesized that the level of vessel maturation is critically involved in the response to antiangiogenic therapies. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the vascular network in spontaneously developing melanomas of MT/ret transgenic mice after using PTK787/ZK222584 for anti-VEGF therapy but also analyzed human melanoma metastases taken at clinical relapse in patients undergoing adjuvant treatment using bevacizumab. Both experimental settings showed that tumor vessels, which are resistant to anti-VEGF therapy, are characterized by enhanced vessel diameter and normalization of the vascular bed by coverage of mature pericytes and immunoreactivity for desmin, NG-2, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, and the late-stage maturity marker α smooth muscle actin. Our findings emphasize that the level of mural cell differentiation and stabilization of the vascular wall significantly contribute to the response toward antiangiogenic therapy in melanoma. This study may be useful in paving the way toward a more rational development of second generation antiangiogenic combination therapies and in providing, for the first time, a murine model to study this. PMID:20194633

  13. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes e Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ13C and δ15N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ13C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ15N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability. PMID:26490319

  14. Direct force measurement of the stability of poly(ethylene glycol)-polyethylenimine graft films.

    PubMed

    Nnebe, Ijeoma M; Tilton, Robert D; Schneider, James W

    2004-08-15

    The stability and passivity of poly(ethylene glycol)-polyethylenimine (PEG-PEI) graft films are important for their use as antifouling coatings in a variety of biotechnology applications. We have used AFM colloidal-probe force measurements combined with optical reflectometry to characterize the surface properties and stability of PEI and dense PEG-PEI graft films on silica. Initial contact between bare silica probes and PEI-modified surfaces yields force curves that exhibit a long-range electrostatic repulsion and short-range attraction between the surfaces, indicating spontaneous desorption of PEI in the aqueous medium. Further transfer of PEI molecules to the probe occurs with subsequent application of forces between FR = 300 and 500 microN/m. The presence of PEG reduces the adhesive properties of the PEI surface and prevents transfer of PEI molecules to the probe with continuous contact, though an initial desorption of PEI still occurs. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of the graft films prevents both the initial desorption and subsequent transfer of the PEI, resulting in sustained attractive interaction forces of electrostatic origin between the negatively charged probe and the positively charged copolymer graft films.

  15. Both visual and idiothetic cues contribute to head direction cell stability during navigation along complex routes

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Ryan M.; Clark, Benjamin J.; Brown, Joel E.; Lamia, Mignon V.; Valerio, Stephane; Shinder, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Successful navigation requires a constantly updated neural representation of directional heading, which is conveyed by head direction (HD) cells. The HD signal is predominantly controlled by visual landmarks, but when familiar landmarks are unavailable, self-motion cues are able to control the HD signal via path integration. Previous studies of the relationship between HD cell activity and path integration have been limited to two or more arenas located in the same room, a drawback for interpretation because the same visual cues may have been perceptible across arenas. To address this issue, we tested the relationship between HD cell activity and path integration by recording HD cells while rats navigated within a 14-unit T-maze and in a multiroom maze that consisted of unique arenas that were located in different rooms but connected by a passageway. In the 14-unit T-maze, the HD signal remained relatively stable between the start and goal boxes, with the preferred firing directions usually shifting <45° during maze traversal. In the multiroom maze in light, the preferred firing directions also remained relatively constant between rooms, but with greater variability than in the 14-unit maze. In darkness, HD cell preferred firing directions showed marginally more variability between rooms than in the lighted condition. Overall, the results indicate that self-motion cues are capable of maintaining the HD cell signal in the absence of familiar visual cues, although there are limits to its accuracy. In addition, visual information, even when unfamiliar, can increase the precision of directional perception. PMID:21451060

  16. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from papaya seed by response surface methodology: oil recovery, radical scavenging antioxidant activity, and oxidation stability.

    PubMed

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Bordbar, Sara; Serjouie, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) condition on the yield, antioxidant activity and stability of the oil from papaya seed. The studied ultrasound variables were time, temperature, ultrasound power and solvent to sample ratio. The main goal was to optimise UAE condition providing the highest recovery of papaya seed oil with the most desirable antioxidant activity and stability. The interaction of ultrasound variables had the most and least significant effects on the antioxidant activity and stability, respectively. Ultrasound-assisted extraction provided a relatively high oil recovery (∼ 73%) from papaya seed. The strongest antioxidant activity was achieved by the extraction at the elevated temperature using low solvent to sample ratio. The optimum ultrasound extraction was set at the elevated temperature (62.5 °C) for 38.5 min at high ultrasound power (700 W) using medium solvent to sample ratio (∼ 7:1 v/w). The optimum point was practically validated.

  17. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from papaya seed by response surface methodology: oil recovery, radical scavenging antioxidant activity, and oxidation stability.

    PubMed

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Bordbar, Sara; Serjouie, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) condition on the yield, antioxidant activity and stability of the oil from papaya seed. The studied ultrasound variables were time, temperature, ultrasound power and solvent to sample ratio. The main goal was to optimise UAE condition providing the highest recovery of papaya seed oil with the most desirable antioxidant activity and stability. The interaction of ultrasound variables had the most and least significant effects on the antioxidant activity and stability, respectively. Ultrasound-assisted extraction provided a relatively high oil recovery (∼ 73%) from papaya seed. The strongest antioxidant activity was achieved by the extraction at the elevated temperature using low solvent to sample ratio. The optimum ultrasound extraction was set at the elevated temperature (62.5 °C) for 38.5 min at high ultrasound power (700 W) using medium solvent to sample ratio (∼ 7:1 v/w). The optimum point was practically validated. PMID:25442517

  18. Lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration at angles of attack up to 44 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.; Huffman, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of configuration variables on the lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration. The variables under study included variations in the location of a single center-line vertical tail and twin vertical tails, wing height, fuselage strakes, and horizontal tails. The study was conducted in the Langley high-speed 7-by 10-foot tunnel at a Mach number of 0.30, at angles of attack up to 44 deg and at sideslip angles of 0 deg and plus or minus 5 deg.

  19. Histidine-rich stabilized polyplexes for cMet-directed tumor-targeted gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Petra; Lächelt, Ulrich; Herrmann, Annika; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Döblinger, Markus; He, Dongsheng; Krhač Levačić, Ana; Morys, Stephan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing terminal cysteines for redox-sensitive polyplex stabilization, were assembled by solid-phase supported syntheses. The resulting oligomers exhibited a greatly enhanced cellular uptake and gene transfer over non-targeted control sequences, confirming the efficacy and target-specificity of the formed polyplexes. Implementation of endosomal escape-promoting histidines in the cationic core was required for gene expression without additional endosomolytic agent. The histidine-enriched polyplexes demonstrated stability in serum as well as receptor-specific gene transfer in vivo upon intratumoral injection. The co-formulation with an analogous PEG-free cationic oligomer led to a further compaction of pDNA polyplexes with an obvious change of shape as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Such compaction was critically required for efficient intravenous gene delivery which resulted in greatly enhanced, cMBP2 ligand-dependent gene expression in the distant tumor.Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing

  20. Direct and indirect effects of unilateral divorce law on marital stability.

    PubMed

    Kneip, Thorsten; Bauer, Gerrit; Reinhold, Steffen

    2014-12-01

    Previous research examining the impact of unilateral divorce law (UDL) on the prevalence of divorce has provided mixed results. Studies based on cross-sectional cross-country/cross-state survey data have received criticism for disregarding unobserved heterogeneity across countries, as have studies using country-level panel data for failing to account for possible mediating mechanisms at the micro level. We seek to overcome both shortcomings by using individual-level event-history data from 11 European countries (SHARELIFE) and controlling for unobserved heterogeneity over countries and cohorts. We find that UDL in total increased the incidence of marital breakdown by about 20 %. This finding, however, neglects potential selection effects into marriage. Accordingly, the estimated effect of unilateral divorce laws becomes much larger when we control for age at marriage, which is used as indicator for match quality. Moreover, we find that UDL particularly affects marital stability in the presence of children.

  1. The direct criterion of Newcomb for the ideal MHD stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for determining the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma, based on a toroidal generalization of the method developed by Newcomb for fixed-boundary modes in a cylindrical plasma. For toroidal mode number n ≠ 0 , the stability problem is reduced to the numerical integration of a high-order complex system of ordinary differential equations, the Euler-Lagrange equation for extremizing the potential energy, for the coupled amplitudes of poloidal harmonics m as a function of the radial coordinate ψ in a straight-fieldline flux coordinate system. Unlike the cylindrical case, different poloidal harmonics couple to each other, which introduces coupling between adjacent singular intervals. A boundary condition is used at each singular surface, where m = nq and q ( ψ ) is the safety factor, to cross the singular surface and continue the solutions beyond it. Fixed-boundary instability is indicated by the vanishing of a real determinant of a Hermitian complex matrix constructed from the fundamental matrix of solutions, the generalization of Newcomb's crossing criterion. In the absence of fixed-boundary instabilities, an M × M plasma response matrix W P , with M the number of poloidal harmonics used, is constructed from the Euler-Lagrange solutions at the plasma-vacuum boundary. This is added to a vacuum response matrix W V to form a total response matrix W T . The existence of negative eigenvalues of W T indicates the presence of free-boundary instabilities. The method is implemented in the fast and accurate DCON code.

  2. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  3. The Nucleus Prepositus Hypoglossi Contributes to Head Direction Cell Stability in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Butler, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Head direction (HD) cells in the rat limbic system fire according to the animal's orientation independently of the animal's environmental location or behavior. These HD cells receive strong inputs from the vestibular system, among other areas, as evidenced by disruption of their directional firing after lesions or inactivation of vestibular inputs. Two brainstem nuclei, the supragenual nucleus (SGN) and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH), are known to project to the HD network and are thought to be possible relays of vestibular information. Previous work has shown that lesioning the SGN leads to a loss of spatial tuning in downstream HD cells, but the NPH has historically been defined as an oculomotor nuclei and therefore its role in contributing to the HD signal is less clear. Here, we investigated this role by recording HD cells in the anterior thalamus after either neurotoxic or electrolytic lesions of the NPH. There was a total loss of direction-specific firing in anterodorsal thalamus cells in animals with complete NPH lesions. However, many cells were identified that fired in bursts unrelated to the animals' directional heading and were similar to cells seen in previous studies that damaged vestibular-associated areas. Some animals with significant but incomplete lesions of the NPH had HD cells that were stable under normal conditions, but were unstable under conditions designed to minimize the use of external cues. These results support the hypothesis that the NPH, beyond its traditional oculomotor function, plays a critical role in conveying vestibular-related information to the HD circuit. PMID:25673848

  4. Implosion stability and symmetry analysis of OMEGA direct-drive implosions using spectrally-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Heather M.

    Abstract Line absorption spectroscopy of Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell of inertial confinement fusion targets is a powerful diagnostic to characterize the state of the un-ablated and compressed shell that confines the hot and dense core fuel. In this dissertation we investigate two applications of this diagnostic to warm shell implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA national laser user facility that provide new insights about implosion symmetry, stability and mixing. This was accomplished through two groups of experiments and different types of data processing and analysis. In a first group of experiments, streaked high-spectral resolution but spatially integrated measurements were recorded with a crystal spectrometer to determine the time-history of electron temperature and density, ionization state and areal density for tracer layers initially located at several depths from the shell's inner surface. This analysis included, for the first time, the effect of self-emission of Ti K-shell line transitions. We found that the self-emission is important for tracer layers located close to the core, and has to be taken into account in order to obtain accurate values of temperature and density; but this effect is less important for tracer layers initially placed farther from the core, for which the self-emission may be neglected and analysis of transmission is sufficient to model and interpret the absorption spectrum. This finding is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions will remain at lower temperatures because they are less affected by thermal transport. In a second group of experiments, arrays of spectrally-resolved images were recorded with a novel multi-monochromatic x-ray imager: the MMI instrument. The MMI affords simultaneous time-gated (snapshots), spatial- (based on pinholes) and spectral- (multi-layer Bragg

  5. A direct proofreader–clamp interaction stabilizes the Pol III replicase in the polymerization mode

    PubMed Central

    Jergic, Slobodan; Horan, Nicholas P; Elshenawy, Mohamed M; Mason, Claire E; Urathamakul, Thitima; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Robinson, Andrew; Goudsmits, Joris M H; Wang, Yao; Pan, Xuefeng; Beck, Jennifer L; van Oijen, Antoine M; Huber, Thomas; Hamdan, Samir M; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2013-01-01

    Processive DNA synthesis by the αɛθ core of the Escherichia coli Pol III replicase requires it to be bound to the β2 clamp via a site in the α polymerase subunit. How the ɛ proofreading exonuclease subunit influences DNA synthesis by α was not previously understood. In this work, bulk assays of DNA replication were used to uncover a non-proofreading activity of ɛ. Combination of mutagenesis with biophysical studies and single-molecule leading-strand replication assays traced this activity to a novel β-binding site in ɛ that, in conjunction with the site in α, maintains a closed state of the αɛθ–β2 replicase in the polymerization mode of DNA synthesis. The ɛ–β interaction, selected during evolution to be weak and thus suited for transient disruption to enable access of alternate polymerases and other clamp binding proteins, therefore makes an important contribution to the network of protein–protein interactions that finely tune stability of the replicase on the DNA template in its various conformational states. PMID:23435564

  6. The stability of Taylor bubbles in large-diameter tubes: direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanjal, Amanjalot; Saravan-Butler, Maya; Smith, Sydney; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Slug flow corresponds to intermittent Taylor bubbles and liquid slugs, and is widely observed in the oil-and-gas industry. The fluctuating flow rate caused by Taylor bubbles is problematical; thus, the destabilisation of this regime would be beneficial. To gain better understanding of this regime in vertical tubes, three-dimensional CFD simulations of Taylor air bubble rise in initially stagnant water and progressively larger diameter tubes, are carried out. Tubes with diameters in the range of 0.032m-0.290m and a height of 2m are considered. The topology of the Taylor bubbles and their rise velocity are predicted and validated against experimental results. Our results suggest that the wake of leading bubbles plays a key role in the deformation and break-up of trailing bubbles. Motivated by these results, the effect of bubble separation distance, and aspect ratio, on bubble stability and the slug flow regime is investigated. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  7. Direct versus limited-step reconstitution reveals key features of an RNA hairpin-stabilized paused transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, Scotty; Ha, Kook Sun; Landick, Robert; Palangat, Murali

    2007-06-29

    We have identified minimal nucleic acid scaffolds capable of reconstituting hairpin-stabilized paused transcription complexes when incubated with RNAP either directly or in a limited step reconstitution assay. Direct reconstitution was achieved using a 29-nucleotide (nt) RNA whose 3'-proximal 9-10 nt pair to template DNA within an 11-nt noncomplementary bubble of a 39-bp duplex DNA; the 5'-proximal 18 nt of RNA forms the his pause RNA hairpin. Limited-step reconstitution was achieved on the same DNAs using a 27-nt RNA that can be 3'-labeled during reconstitution and then extended 2 nt past the pause site to assay transcriptional pausing. Paused complexes formed by either method recapitulated key features of a promoter-initiated, hairpin-stabilized paused complex, including a slow rate of pause escape, resistance to transcript cleavage and pyrophosphorolysis, and enhancement of pausing by the elongation factor NusA. These findings establish that RNA upstream from the pause hairpin and pyrophosphate are not essential for pausing and for NusA action. Reconstitution of the his paused transcription complex provides a valuable tool for future studies of protein-nucleic interactions involved in transcriptional pausing. PMID:17502377

  8. Direct measurement of human ankle stiffness during quiet standing: the intrinsic mechanical stiffness is insufficient for stability

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D; Lakie, Martin

    2002-01-01

    During quiet standing the human ‘inverted pendulum’ sways irregularly. In previous work where subjects balanced a real inverted pendulum, we investigated what contribution the intrinsic mechanical ankle stiffness makes to achieve stability. Using the results of a plausible model, we suggested that intrinsic ankle stiffness is inadequate for providing stability. Here, using a piezo-electric translator we applied small, unobtrusive mechanical perturbations to the foot while the subject was standing freely. These short duration perturbations had a similar size and velocity to movements which occur naturally during quiet standing, and they produced no evidence of any stretch reflex response in soleus, or gastrocnemius. Direct measurement confirms our earlier conclusion; intrinsic ankle stiffness is not quite sufficient to stabilise the body or pendulum. On average the directly determined intrinsic stiffness is 91 ± 23 % (mean ± s.d.) of that necessary to provide minimal stabilisation. The stiffness was substantially constant, increasing only slightly with ankle torque. This stiffness cannot be neurally regulated in quiet standing. Thus we attribute this stiffness to the foot, Achilles’ tendon and aponeurosis rather than the activated calf muscle fibres. Our measurements suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance via a spring-like element which is itself too compliant to guarantee stability. The implication is that the brain cannot set ankle stiffness and then ignore the control task because additional modulation of torque is required to maintain balance. We suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance by predictively controlling the proximal offset of the spring-like element in a ballistic-like manner. PMID:12482906

  9. VORSTAB: A computer program for calculating lateral-directional stability derivatives with vortex flow effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1985-01-01

    A computer program based on the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice Method of Lan is presented for calculating longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of nonplanar wing-body combination. The method is based on the assumption of inviscid subsonic flow. Both attached and vortex-separated flows are treated. For the vortex-separated flow, the calculation is based on the method of suction analogy. The effect of vortex breakdown is accounted for by an empirical method. A summary of the theoretical method, program capabilities, input format, output variables and program job control set-up are described. Three test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the code.

  10. Direction-specific impairment of stability limits and falls in children with developmental coordination disorder: Implications for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Chung, Louisa M Y; Ki, W Y; Chow, Lina P Y; Macfarlane, Duncan J

    2016-01-01

    Limit of stability (LOS) is an important yet under-examined postural control ability in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). This study aimed to (1) compare the LOS and fall frequencies of children with and without DCD, and (2) explore the relationships between LOS parameters and falls in the DCD population. Thirty primary school-aged children with DCD and twenty age- and sex-matched typically-developing children participated in the study. Postural control ability, specifically LOS in standing, was evaluated using the LOS test. Reaction time, movement velocity, maximum excursion, end point excursion, and directional control were then calculated. Self-reported fall incidents in the previous week were also documented. Multivariate analysis of variance results revealed that children with DCD had shorter LOS maximum excursion in the backward direction compared to the control group (p=0.003). This was associated with a higher number of falls in daily life (rho=-0.556, p=0.001). No significant between-groups differences were found in other LOS-derived outcomes (p>0.05). Children with DCD had direction-specific postural control impairment, specifically, diminished LOS in the backward direction. This is related to their falls in daily life. Therefore, improving LOS should be factored into rehabilitation treatment for children with DCD.

  11. Preparation of Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment by direct precipitation and graft onto cellulose fiber via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yue; Lv, Lihua; Cui, Yongzhu; Wei, Chunyan; Pang, Guibing

    2016-02-01

    Mg(OH)2 flame retardant hybrid pigment is synthesized through simultaneous solution precipitation and adsorption of anionic dyes (C.I. Acid Red 6). The Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment bearing vinyl groups after surface silane modification is immobilized onto the surface of bromo end-functional cellulose fiber by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The morphology and structure of Mg(OH)2 pigments and cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are characterized. The thermal properties, flammability and color fastness of cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are measured. The results reveal that anionic dye molecules are adsorbed onto Mg(OH)2 crystals and affect the formation of lamella-like Mg(OH)2 crystals. The cellulose fiber grafted with modified Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment absorbs about four times heat more than original cellulose fiber with about 4% immobilization ratio of pigment, which shortens nearly half of afterflame time and afterglow time.

  12. Improving the stability and catalyst lifetime of the halogenase RebH by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Poor, Catherine B; Andorfer, Mary C; Lewis, Jared C

    2014-06-16

    We previously reported that the halogenase RebH catalyzes selective halogenation of several heterocycles and carbocycles, but product yields were limited by enzyme instability. Here, we use directed evolution to engineer an RebH variant, 3-LR, with a Topt over 5 °C higher than that of wild-type, and 3-LSR, with a Tm 18 °C higher than that of wild-type. These enzymes provided significantly improved conversion (up to fourfold) for halogenation of tryptophan and several non-natural substrates. This initial evolution of RebH not only provides improved enzymes for immediate synthetic applications, but also establishes a robust protocol for further halogenase evolution.

  13. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics. PMID:10836793

  14. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics.

  15. Global stabilities, selection of steady cellular growth, and origin of side branches in directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Yong-Qiang

    2011-06-01

    The present paper investigates the global instability mechanisms of arrayed-cellular growth with asymptotic approach. We find that the system of directional solidification involves two types of global instability mechanisms: the low-frequency instability and the global oscillatory instability, which are profoundly similar to that found in the system of viscous fingering and free dendritic growth. Based on these global instabilities, the neutral mode selection principle for the limiting state of growth is proposed; the origin and essence of side branching on the interface are elucidated with the so-called global trapped wave mechanism, which involves the interfacial wave reflection and amplification along the interface. It is demonstrated that side branching is self-sustaining and can persist without continuously applying the external noise; the effect of the anisotropy of interfacial energy is not essential for the selection of steady cellular growth and for the origin and formation of side branching at the interface. The comparisons of theoretical results are made with the most recent experimental works and the numerical simulations which show very good quantitative agreement.

  16. TRIM32 modulates pluripotency entry and exit by directly regulating Oct4 stability

    PubMed Central

    Bahnassawy, Lamia’a; Perumal, Thanneer M.; Gonzalez-Cano, Laura; Hillje, Anna-Lena; Taher, Leila; Makalowski, Wojciech; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fuellen, Georg; Sol, Antonio del; Schwamborn, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have revolutionized the world of regenerative medicine; nevertheless, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their generation and differentiation remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of the cell fate determinant TRIM32 in modulating such processes. TRIM32 is essential for the induction of neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells by poly-ubiquitinating cMyc to target it for degradation resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. To elucidate the role of TRIM32 in regulating somatic cell reprogramming we analysed the capacity of TRIM32-knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in generating iPSC colonies. TRIM32 knock-out MEFs produced a higher number of iPSC colonies indicating a role for TRIM32 in inhibiting this cellular transition. Further characterization of the generated iPSCs indicated that the TRIM32 knock-out iPSCs show perturbed differentiation kinetics. Additionally, mathematical modelling of global gene expression data revealed that during differentiation an Oct4 centred network in the wild-type cells is replaced by an E2F1 centred network in the TRIM32 deficient cells. We show here that this might be caused by a TRIM32-dependent downregulation of Oct4. In summary, the data presented here reveal that TRIM32 directly regulates at least two of the four Yamanaka Factors (cMyc and Oct4), to modulate cell fate transitions. PMID:26307407

  17. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  18. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis.

  20. Direct force measurements reveal that protein Tau confers short-range attractions and isoform-dependent steric stabilization to microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Peter J.; Choi, Myung Chul; Miller, Herbert P.; Feinstein, H. Eric; Raviv, Uri; Li, Youli; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cytoskeletal filaments assembled from αβ-tubulin heterodimers. Tau, an unstructured protein found in neuronal axons, binds to MTs and regulates their dynamics. Aberrant Tau behavior is associated with neurodegenerative dementias, including Alzheimer’s. Here, we report on a direct force measurement between paclitaxel-stabilized MTs coated with distinct Tau isoforms by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of MT-Tau mixtures under osmotic pressure (P). In going from bare MTs to MTs with Tau coverage near the physiological submonolayer regime (Tau/tubulin-dimer molar ratio; ΦTau = 1/10), isoforms with longer N-terminal tails (NTTs) sterically stabilized MTs, preventing bundling up to PB ∼ 10,000–20,000 Pa, an order of magnitude larger than bare MTs. Tau with short NTTs showed little additional effect in suppressing the bundling pressure (PB ∼ 1,000–2,000 Pa) over the same range. Remarkably, the abrupt increase in PB observed for longer isoforms suggests a mushroom to brush transition occurring at 1/13 < ΦTau < 1/10, which corresponds to MT-bound Tau with NTTs that are considerably more extended than SAXS data for Tau in solution indicate. Modeling of Tau-mediated MT–MT interactions supports the hypothesis that longer NTTs transition to a polyelectrolyte brush at higher coverages. Higher pressures resulted in isoform-independent irreversible bundling because the polyampholytic nature of Tau leads to short-range attractions. These findings suggest an isoform-dependent biological role for regulation by Tau, with longer isoforms conferring MT steric stabilization against aggregation either with other biomacromolecules or into tight bundles, preventing loss of function in the crowded axon environment. PMID:26542680

  1. Microwave assisted synthesis of surfactant stabilized platinum/carbon nanotube electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, M.; Schlange, A.; Kunz, U.; Turek, T.

    Platinum electrocatalysts deposited on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) with high loading were prepared using a microwave-assisted polyol reduction method and employed for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). A zwitterionic surfactant was used as a stabilizing agent for the formation of Pt nanoparticles. A uniform and narrow size distribution of highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles could be achieved by adjusting the weight ratio of surfactant to Pt precursor allowing for Pt loadings of up to 60 wt%. The heating time and the temperature for the ethylene glycol (EG) oxidation were found to be the key factors for depositing Pt nanoparticles homogeneously on carbon nanotubes. The smallest average particle diameter of 1.8 nm was obtained through microwave heating to 140 °C in 50 s. The structure, amount and morphology of the electrocatalysts were characterized with XRD, TGA, and TEM, respectively. Single cell DMFC measurements were performed in a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) with 5 cm 2 active area and very low catalyst loading (0.25 mg cm -2 of noble metal on both anode and cathode). The DMFC performance of the surfactant stabilized cathode catalyst obtained by the new method described here revealed that the power density was three times higher than for a commercial catalyst used for comparison and two times higher than for an unstabilized CNT supported catalyst.

  2. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  3. Sub-kilohertz linewidth narrowing of a mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator idler frequency by direct cavity stabilization.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, I; Mosca, S; Parisi, M; Maddaloni, P; Santamaria, L; De Natale, P; De Rosa, M

    2015-10-15

    We stabilize the idler frequency of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator directly to the resonance of a mid-infrared Fabry-Perot reference cavity. This is accomplished by the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, controlling either the pump laser or the resonant signal frequency. A residual relative frequency noise power spectral density below 10(3)  Hz(2)/Hz is reached on average, with a Gaussian linewidth of 920 Hz over 100 ms, which reveals the potential for reaching spectral purity down to the hertz level by locking the optical parametric oscillator against a mid-infrared cavity with state-of-the-art superior performance. PMID:26469609

  4. Direct evidence for in vivo hydroxyl radical generation in blood of mice after acute chromium(VI) intake: electron spin resonance spin-trapping investigation.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Okado, A; Kawazoe, S; Mizutani, T

    2000-07-01

    Although it is assumed from in vitro experiments that the hydroxyl radical (*OH) may be responsible for chromium(VI) toxicity/carcinogenicity, no electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence for the generation of *OH in vivo has been reported. In this study, we have employed an ESR spin-trapping technique with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), a selective *OH trap, to detect *OH in blood. The ESR spectrum of spin adduct observed in the blood of mice given 4.8 mmol Cr(VI)/kg body weight exhibited the 1:2:2:1 intensity pattern of a quartet with a hyperfine coupling constant A(N) = A(H) = 14.81 G and g-value = 2.0067. The concentration of the spin adduct detected in the blood was 7.37 microM. The adduct production was inhibited by the addition of specific *OH scavengers such as sodium benzoate and methional to the blood. The results indicate that the spin adduct is nitroxide produced by the reaction of *OH with DMPO. This is the first report of ESR evidence for the in vivo generation of *OH in mammals by Cr(VI).

  5. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis in the N-terminal domain of thermolysin on its stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yuichi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2013-01-01

    The thermolysin variant G8C/N60C/S65P in which the triple mutation in the N-terminal domain, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys/Ser65→Pro, is undertaken increases stability [Yasukawa, K. and Inouye, K. (2007) Improving the activity and stability of thermolysin by site-directed mutagenesis. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1774, 1281–1288] and its mechanism is examined in this study. The apparent denaturing temperatures based on ellipticity at 222 nm of the wild-type thermolysin (WT), G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 85, >95, 88 and >95°C, respectively. The first-order rate constants, kobs, of the thermal inactivation of WT and variants at 10 mM CaCl2 increased with increasing thermal treatment temperatures (70–95°C), and those at 80°C decreased with increasing CaCl2 concentrations (1–100 mM). The kobs values were in the order of WT > S65P > G8C/N60C≒G8C/N60C/S65P at all temperatures and CaCl2 concentrations. These results indicate that the mutational combination, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro, increases stability only as high as Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys does. Assuming that irreversible inactivation of thermolysin occurs only in the absence of calcium ions, the dissociation constants, Kd, to the calcium ions of WT, G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 47, 8.9, 17 and 7.2 mM, respectively, suggesting that Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro stabilize thermolysin by improving its affinity to calcium ions, most probably the one at the Ca2+-binding site III in the N-terminal domain. PMID:23087322

  6. Structure and Stability of Pentafluoroaniline and 4-Aminononafluorobiphenyl Radical Anions: Optically Detected Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, Time-Resolved Fluorescence, Time-Resolved Magnetic Field Effect, and Quantum Chemical Study.

    PubMed

    Borovkov, Vsevolod I; Beregovaya, Irina V; Shchegoleva, Lyudmila N; Blinkova, Svetlana V; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Gurskaya, Larisa Yu; Shteingarts, Vitaly D; Bagryansky, Victor A; Molin, Yuriy N

    2015-08-01

    Radical anions (RAs) are the key intermediates of the selective hydrodefluorination of polyfluoroarenes. We used the techniques of optically detected electron paramagnetic resonance (OD EPR), time-resolved fluorescence, time-resolved magnetic field effect (TR MFE), and the density functional theory to study the possibility of RAs formation from 4-aminononafluorobiphenyl (1) and pentafluoroaniline (2) and estimate their lifetimes and decay channels. To our knowledge, both RAs have not been detected earlier. We have registered the OD EPR spectrum for relatively stable in nonpolar solutions 1(-•) but failed to register the spectra for 2(-•). However, we have managed to fix the 2(-•) by the TR MFE method and obtained its hyperfine coupling constants. The lifetime of 2(-•) was found to be only a few nanoseconds. The activation energy of its decay was estimated to be 3.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. According to the calculation results, the short lifetime of 2(-•) is due to the RA fast fragmentation with the F(-) elimination from ortho-position to the amine group. The calculated energy barrier, 3.2 kcal/mol, is close to the experimental value. The fragmentation of 2(-•) in a nonpolar solvent is possible due to the stabilization of the incipient F(-) anion by the binding with the amine group proton.

  7. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  8. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during sleep has a sleep-stabilizing effect in chronic insomnia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Saebipour, Mohammad R; Joghataei, Mohammad T; Yoonessi, Ali; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Khalighinejad, Nima; Khademi, Soroush

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lack of slow-wave activity may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of insomnia. Pharmacological approaches and brain stimulation techniques have recently offered solutions for increasing slow-wave activity during sleep. We used slow (0.75 Hz) oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation during stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleeping insomnia patients for resonating their brain waves to the frequency of sleep slow-wave. Six patients diagnosed with either sleep maintenance or non-restorative sleep insomnia entered the study. After 1 night of adaptation and 1 night of baseline polysomnography, patients randomly received sham or real stimulation on the third and fourth night of the experiment. Our preliminary results show that after termination of stimulations (sham or real), slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation increased the duration of stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 33 ± 26 min (P = 0.026), and decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep duration by 22 ± 17.7 min (P = 0.028), compared with sham. Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep and wake time after sleep-onset durations, together, by 55.4 ± 51 min (P = 0.045). Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation also increased sleep efficiency by 9 ± 7% (P = 0.026), and probability of transition from stage 2 to stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 20 ± 17.8% (P = 0.04). Meanwhile, slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased transitions from stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleep to wake by 12 ± 6.7% (P = 0.007). Our preliminary results suggest a sleep-stabilizing role for the intervention, which may mimic the effect of sleep slow-wave-enhancing drugs.

  9. Dynamic Longitudinal and Directional Stability Derivatives for a 45 deg. Sweptback-Wing Airplane Model at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielat, Ralph P.; Wiley, Harleth G.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was made at transonic speeds to determine some of the dynamic stability derivatives of a 45 deg. sweptback-wing airplane model. The model was sting mounted and was rigidly forced to perform a single-degree-of-freedom angular oscillation in pitch or yaw of +/- 2 deg. The investigation was made for angles of attack alpha, from -4 deg. to 14 deg. throughout most of the transonic speed range for values of reduced-frequency parameter from 0.015 to 0.040 based on wing mean aerodynamic chord and from 0.04 to 0.14 based on wing span. The results show that reduced frequency had only a small effect on the damping-in-pitch derivative and the oscillatory longitudinal stability derivative for all Mach numbers M and angles of attack with the exception of the values of damping coefficient near M = 1.03 and alpha = 8 deg. to 14 deg. In this region, the damping coefficient changed rapidly with reduced frequency and negative values of damping coefficient were measured at low values of reduced frequency. This abrupt variation of pitch damping with reduced frequency was a characteristic of the complete model or wing-body-vertical-tail combination. The damping-in-pitch derivative varied considerably with alpha and M for the horizontal-tail-on and horizontal-tail-off configurations, and the damping was relatively high at angles of attack corresponding to the onset of pitch-up for both configurations. The damping-in-yaw derivative was generally independent of reduced frequency and M at alpha = -4 deg. to 4 deg. At alpha = 8 deg. to 14 deg., the damping derivative increased with an increase in reduced frequency and alpha for the configurations having the wing, whereas the damping derivative was either independent of or decreased with increase in reduced frequency for the configuration without the wing. The oscillatory directional stability derivative for all configurations generally decreased with an increase in the reduced-frequency parameter, and, in some instances

  10. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  11. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities.

  12. [Lavoisier and radicals].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Lavoisier and his co-workers (Guyton de Morveau, Bertholet, Fourcroy) considered that acids were constituted of oxygen and of something else that they called radicals. These radicals were known in some cases, i.e. nitrogen for nitrous acid, carbon for carbonic acid, phosphorus for phosphoric acid. In the case of sulfur, the sulfuric radical could be associated with different quantities of oxigen leading to sulfuric or sulfurous acids. In other cases radicals remained unknown at the time i.e. muriatic radical for muriatic acid, or benzoyl radical for benzoic acid. It is interesting to notice that Lavoisier evoked the case of compound radicals constituted of different substances such as carbon and hydrogen.

  13. Hydrogen diffusion and stabilization in single-crystal VO2 micro/nanobeams by direct atomic hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Ji, Heng; Swift, Michael W; Hardy, Will J; Peng, Zhiwei; Fan, Xiujun; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Tour, James M; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-09-10

    We report measurements of the diffusion of atomic hydrogen in single crystalline VO2 micro/nanobeams by direct exposure to atomic hydrogen, without catalyst. The atomic hydrogen is generated by a hot filament, and the doping process takes place at moderate temperature (373 K). Undoped VO2 has a metal-to-insulator phase transition at ∼340 K between a high-temperature, rutile, metallic phase and a low-temperature, monoclinic, insulating phase with a resistance exhibiting a semiconductor-like temperature dependence. Atomic hydrogenation results in stabilization of the metallic phase of VO2 micro/nanobeams down to 2 K, the lowest point we could reach in our measurement setup. Optical characterization shows that hydrogen atoms prefer to diffuse along the c axis of rutile (a axis of monoclinic) VO2, along the oxygen "channels". Based on observing the movement of the hydrogen diffusion front in single crystalline VO2 beams, we estimate the diffusion constant for hydrogen along the c axis of the rutile phase to be 6.7 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s at approximately 373 K, exceeding the value in isostructural TiO2 by ∼38×. Moreover, we find that the diffusion constant along the c axis of the rutile phase exceeds that along the equivalent a axis of the monoclinic phase by at least 3 orders of magnitude. This remarkable change in kinetics must originate from the distortion of the "channels" when the unit cell doubles along this direction upon cooling into the monoclinic structure. Ab initio calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental trends in the relative kinetics of the two phases. This raises the possibility of a switchable membrane for hydrogen transport.

  14. Measurement of Flying Qualities of a Dehavilland Mosquito F-8 Airplane (AAF No. 43-334960) I: Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W.E.; Talmage, D.B.; Crane, H.L.

    1945-01-01

    The data presented have no bearing on performance characteristics of airplane, which were considered exceptionally good in previous tests. Some of the undesirable features of lateral and directional stability and control characteristics of the F-8 are listed. Directional stability, with rudder fixed, did not sufficiently restrict aileron yaw; rudder control was inadequate during take-off and landing, and was insufficient to fly airplane with one engine; in clean condition, power of ailerons was slightly below minimum value specified; it was difficult to trim airplane in rough air.

  15. A computer program for calculating symmetrical aerodynamic characteristics and lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with blowing jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Mehrotra, S. C.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics under symmetrical flight conditions and the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with upper-surface-blowing (USB) or over-wing-blowing (OWB) jets are described. The following new features were added to the program: (1) a fuselage of arbitrary body of revolution has been included. The effect of wing-body interference can now be investigated, and (2) all nine lateral-directional stability derivatives can be calculated. The program is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC Cyber 175 and Honeywell 66/60 computers.

  16. Electrostatic control of the tryptophan radical in cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Tiffany P; Bhaskar, B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2004-07-13

    Previously a K(+)-binding site, analogous to that found in ascorbate peroxidase (APX), was engineered into cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) to test the hypothesis that the bound K(+) influences the stability of the Trp191 cation radical formed during the CcP catalytic cycle (Bonagura et al., (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6107 and Bonagura et al., (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5528). Characterization of this mutant, designated CcPK2, showed that the stability of the Trp191 cation radical is dependent on the occupancy of the engineered K(+) site and that the Trp191 radical was much less stable in this mutant than in wild-type CcP. The mutations Met230Leu, Met231Gln, and Met172Ser have now been constructed on the CcPK2 mutant template to test if the Met residues also contribute to the stabilization of the Trp191 cation radical. Crystal structures show that the mutations affect only the local structure near the sites of mutation. Removal of these electronegative residues located less than 8 A from the Trp radical results in a further destabilization of the Trp radical. The characteristic EPR signal associated with the Trp radical is significantly narrowed and is characteristic of a tyrosine radical signal. Double-mixing stopped-flow experiments, where the delay time between the formation of CcP compound I and its mixing with horse heart ferrocytochrome c is varied, show that the stability of the Trp radical decreases as the Met residues are removed from the proximal cavity. When taken together, these results demonstrate a strong correlation between the experimentally determined stability of the Trp191 radical, the enzyme activity, and the calculated electrostatic stabilization of the Trp191 radical. PMID:15236591

  17. Direct ceramic inkjet printing of yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte layers for anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, R. I.; Krauz, M.; Jewulski, J.; Hopkins, S. C.; Kluczowski, J. R.; Glowacka, D. M.; Glowacki, B. A.

    Electromagnetic drop-on-demand direct ceramic inkjet printing (EM/DCIJP) was employed to fabricate dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers on a porous NiO-YSZ anode support from ceramic suspensions. Printing parameters including pressure, nozzle opening time and droplet overlapping were studied in order to optimize the surface quality of the YSZ coating. It was found that moderate overlapping and multiple coatings produce the desired membrane quality. A single fuel cell with a NiO-YSZ/YSZ (∼6 μm)/LSM + YSZ/LSM architecture was successfully prepared. The cell was tested using humidified hydrogen as the fuel and ambient air as the oxidant. The cell provided a power density of 170 mW cm -2 at 800 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a highly coherent dense YSZ electrolyte layer with no open porosity. These results suggest that the EM/DCIJP inkjet printing technique can be successfully implemented to fabricate electrolyte coatings for SOFC thinner than 10 μm and comparable in quality to those fabricated by more conventional ceramic processing methods.

  18. Extraction of Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives for the Basic F-18 Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The results of parameter identification to determine the lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of an F-18 research aircraft in its basic hardware and software configuration are presented. The derivatives are estimated from dynamic flight data using a specialized identification program developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The formulation uses the linearized aircraft equations of motions in their continuous/discrete form and a maximum likelihood estimator that accounts for both state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics, such as separated and vortical flows, over the aircraft. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack between 3 deg and 47 deg and compared with wind-tunnel predictions. The quality of the derivative estimates obtained by parameter identification is somewhat degraded because the maneuvers were flown with the aircraft's control augmentation system engaged, which introduced relatively high correlations between the control variables and response variables as a result of control motions from the feedback control system.

  19. Stability-indicating simultaneous determination of paracetamol and three of its related substances using a direct GC/MS method.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek; Awad, Tamer; Clark, C Randall

    2009-01-01

    A simple, direct, and selective stability-indicating GC/MS procedure was developed for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PR) and three of its related substances: 4-aminophenol (4-AP), acetanilide (AD), and 4'-chloroacetanilide (4-CA). The method involved resolution of the underivatized compounds using a 100% dimethylpolysiloxane (Rtx-1) column, and MS detection was carried out in the electron-impact mode. The four compounds were completely resolved in less than 11 min. The fragmentation pathways for the four compounds were described, and the structures of the major fragment ions peaks were proposed. Quantification of the analytes was based on measuring their peak areas. The reliability and analytical performance of the proposed method including linearity, range, precision, accuracy, and detection and quantification limits were statistically validated. Calibration curves were linear over the ranges 75-500, 25-350, 25-350, and 25-350 microg/mL for PR, 4-AP, AD, and 4-CA, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PR and its related substances in laboratory-prepared mixtures of different proportions. Also, it was applied for the assay of PR in several commercially available pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries of 98.95-100.76%. PMID:20166578

  20. X-29A Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives Extracted From High-Angle-of-Attack Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles Wang

    1996-01-01

    The lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of the X-29A number 2 are extracted from flight data over an angle-of-attack range of 4 degrees to 53 degrees using a parameter identification algorithm. The algorithm uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion and a maximum likelihood estimator in the presence of state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft at angles of attack above 15 degrees. The results supported the flight-envelope-expansion phase of the X-29A number 2 by helping to update the aerodynamic mathematical model, to improve the real-time simulator, and to revise flight control system laws. Effects of the aircraft high gain flight control system on maneuver quality and the estimated derivatives are also discussed. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack and compared with the predicted aerodynamic database. Agreement between predicted and flight values is quite good for some derivatives such as the lateral force due to sideslip, the lateral force due to rudder deflection, and the rolling moment due to roll rate. The results also show significant differences in several important derivatives such as the rolling moment due to sideslip, the yawing moment due to sideslip, the yawing moment due to aileron deflection, and the yawing moment due to rudder deflection.

  1. Quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration in premixed flat flame by combining laser-induced fluorescence and direct absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang; Su, Tie; Li, Zhong-Shan; Bai, Han-Chen; Yan, Bo; Yang, Fu-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An accurate and reasonable technique combining direct absorption spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods is developed to quantitatively measure the concentrations of hydroxyl in CH4/air flat laminar flame. In our approach, particular attention is paid to the linear laser-induced fluorescence and absorption processes, and experimental details as well. Through measuring the temperature, LIF signal distribution and integrated absorption, spatially absolute OH concentrations profiles are successfully resolved. These experimental results are then compared with the numerical simulation. It is proved that the good quality of the results implies that this method is suitable for calibrating the OH-PLIF measurement in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338), the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory Funding, China (Grant No. STSKFKT 2013004), and the China Scholarship Council.

  2. A Mechanochemical Switch to Control Radical Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    B12-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB12-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is “off”, the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch “on,” the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions. PMID:24846280

  3. A mechanochemical switch to control radical intermediates.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Kellett, Whitney F; Richards, Nigel G J; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2014-06-17

    B₁₂-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB₁₂-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is "off", the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch "on," the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions.

  4. Identifying the tobacco related free radicals by UPCC-QTOF-MS with radical trapping method in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Misha; Zhu, Yingjing; Cheng, Kuan; Da Wu; Liu, Baizhan; Li, Fengting

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco related free radicals (TFRs) in the cigarette smoke are specific classes of hazardous compounds that merit concern. In this study, we developed a hybrid method to identify TFRs directly based on ultra-performance convergence chromatography with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPCC-QTOF MS) combined spin trapping technique. The short-lived TFRs were stabilized successfully in situ through spin trapping procedure and UPCC was applied to facilitate efficient separation of complex derivative products. Coupling of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), UPCC-QTOF MS system enabled us to identify specific potential TFRs with exact chemical formula. Moreover, computational stimulations have been carried out to evaluate the optimized stability of TFRs. This work is a successful demonstration for the application of an advanced hyphenated technique for separation of TFRs with short detection time (less than 7min) and high throughput.

  5. Identifying the tobacco related free radicals by UPCC-QTOF-MS with radical trapping method in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Misha; Zhu, Yingjing; Cheng, Kuan; Da Wu; Liu, Baizhan; Li, Fengting

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco related free radicals (TFRs) in the cigarette smoke are specific classes of hazardous compounds that merit concern. In this study, we developed a hybrid method to identify TFRs directly based on ultra-performance convergence chromatography with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPCC-QTOF MS) combined spin trapping technique. The short-lived TFRs were stabilized successfully in situ through spin trapping procedure and UPCC was applied to facilitate efficient separation of complex derivative products. Coupling of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), UPCC-QTOF MS system enabled us to identify specific potential TFRs with exact chemical formula. Moreover, computational stimulations have been carried out to evaluate the optimized stability of TFRs. This work is a successful demonstration for the application of an advanced hyphenated technique for separation of TFRs with short detection time (less than 7min) and high throughput. PMID:27591593

  6. Unsteadiness in the wake of disks and spheres: Instability, receptivity and control using direct and adjoint global stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliga, P.; Chomaz, J.-M.; Sipp, D.

    2009-05-01

    We consider the stability of the steady, axisymmetric wake of a disk and a sphere as a function of the Reynolds number. Both the direct and adjoint eigenvalue problems are solved. The threshold Reynolds numbers and characteristics of the destabilizing modes agree with that documented in previous studies: for both configurations, the first destabilization occurs for a stationary mode of azimuthal wavenumber m=1, and the second destabilization for an oscillating mode of same azimuthal wavenumber. For both geometries, the adjoint mode computation allows us to determine the receptivity of each mode to particular initial conditions or forcing and to define control strategies. We show that the adjoint global mode reaches a maximum amplitude within the recirculating bubble and downstream of the separation point for both the disk and the sphere. In the case of the sphere, the optimal forcing corresponds to a displacement of the separation point along the sphere surface with no tilt of the separation line. However, in the case of the disk, its blunt shape does not allow such displacement and the optimal forcing corresponds to a tilt of the separation line with no displacement of the separation point. As a result, the magnitudes of the adjoint global modes are larger for the sphere than for the disk, showing that the wake of the sphere is more receptive to forcing than the disk. In the case of active control at the boundary through blowing and suction at the body wall, the actuator should be placed close to the separation point, where the magnitude of the adjoint pressure reaches its maximum in the four cases. In the case of passive control, we show that the region of the wake that is most sensitive to local modifications of the linearized Navier-Stokes operator, including base flow alterations, is limited to the recirculating bubble for both geometries and both instability modes. This region may therefore be identified as the intrinsical wavemaker.

  7. Formation and Fragmentation of Unsaturated Fatty Acid [M - 2H + Na]- Ions: Stabilized Carbanions for Charge-Directed Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael C.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J.; Nette, Geoffrey W.

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H]- ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H + FeIICl]-. In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H + Na]-). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H + NaF]- ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H + Na]- ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H + Na]- ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H + Na]- ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F- and -OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway.

  8. Formation and fragmentation of unsaturated fatty acid [M - 2H + Na]- ions: stabilized carbanions for charge-directed fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Kirk, Benjamin B; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H](-) ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H  +  Fe(II)Cl](-). In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H  +  Na](-)). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H  +  NaF](-) ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F(-) and (-)OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway. PMID:24338213

  9. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation can stabilize perception of movement: Evidence from the two-thirds power law illusion.

    PubMed

    Scocchia, Lisa; Bolognini, Nadia; Convento, Silvia; Stucchi, Natale

    2015-11-16

    Human movements conform to specific kinematic laws of motion. One of such laws, the "two-thirds power law", describes the systematic co-variation between curvature and velocity of body movements. Noticeably, the same law also influences the perception of moving stimuli: the velocity of a dot moving along a curvilinear trajectory is perceived as uniform when the dot kinematics complies with the two-thirds power law. Instead, if the dot moves at constant speed, its velocity is perceived as highly non-uniform. This dynamic visual illusion points to a strong coupling between action and perception; however, how this coupling is implemented in the brain remains elusive. In this study, we tested whether the premotor cortex (PM) and the primary visual cortex (V1) play a role in the illusion by means of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). All participants underwent three tDCS sessions during which they received active or sham cathodal tDCS (1.5mA) over PM or V1 of the left hemisphere. During tDCS, participants were required to adjust the velocity of a dot moving along an elliptical trajectory until it looked uniform across the whole trajectory. Results show that occipital tDCS decreases the illusion variability both within and across participants, as compared to sham tDCS. This means that V1 stimulation increases individual sensitivity to the illusory motion and also increases coherence across different observers. Conversely, the illusion seems resistant to tDCS in terms of its magnitude, with cathodal stimulation of V1 or PM not affecting the amount of the illusory effect. Our results provide evidence for strong visuo-motor coupling in visual perception: the velocity of a dot moving along an elliptical trajectory is perceived as uniform only when its kinematics closely complies to the same law of motion that constrains human movement production. Occipital stimulation by cathodal tDCS can stabilize such illusory percept.

  10. Forgotten radicals in biology.

    PubMed

    Luc, Rochette; Vergely, Catherine

    2008-12-01

    Redox reactions play key roles in intra- and inter-cellular signaling, and in adaptative processes of tissues towards stress. Among the major free radicals with essential functions in cells are reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide anion (O2 (•-)), hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide ((•)NO). In this article, we review the forgotten and new radicals with potential relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiology. Approximately 0.3% of O2 (•-) present in cytosol exists in its protonated form: hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 (•)). Water (H2O) can be split into two free radicals: (•)OH and hydrogen radical (H(•)). Several free radicals, including thiyl radicals (RS(•)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 (•)) are known to isomerize double bonds. In the omega-6 series of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), cis-trans isomerization of γ-linolenate and arachidonate catalyzed by RS(•) has been investigated. Evidence is emerging that hydrogen disulphide (H2S) is a signaling molecule in vivo which can be a source of free radicals. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme can oxidize the ionized form of H2S to hydro-sulphide radical: HS(•). Recent studies suggest that H2S plays an important function in cardiovascular functions. Carbonate radical, which can be formed when (•)OH reacts with carbonate or bicarbonate ions, is also involved in the activity of Cu-Zn-SOD. Recently, it has been reported that carbonate anion were potentially relevant oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. In conclusion, there is solid evidence supporting the formation of many free radicals by cells leading which may play an important role in their homeostasis. PMID:23675099

  11. Reactive intermediates: Radicals with multiple personalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Malcolm D. E.

    2013-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach has revealed that radicals can be significantly stabilized by the presence of a remote anionic site in the same molecule. This finding has implications for understanding and potentially controlling the reactivity of these important reactive intermediates.

  12. Scavenging and characterization of short-lived radicals using a novel stable nitroxide radical with a characteristic UV-vis absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Toba, Ryuta; Gotoh, Hiroaki; Sakakibara, Kazuhisa

    2014-08-01

    A stable tert-butyl(10-phenyl-9-anthryl)nitroxide (BPAN) radical was newly synthesized and used for the capture/characterization of reactive radicals. Adducts obtained from the reactions of BPAN with in situ generated reactive radicals showed excellent stability, assuring complete isolation and purification. The structures of the adducts were established by LC-MS and NMR analyses.

  13. Radical [1,3] Rearrangements of Breslow Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Alwarsh, Sefat; Xu, Yi; Qian, Steven Y; McIntosh, Matthias C

    2016-01-01

    Breslow intermediates that bear radical-stabilizing N substituents, such as benzyl, cinnamyl, and diarylmethyl, undergo facile homolytic C-N bond scission under mild conditions to give products of formal [1,3] rearrangement rather than benzoin condensation. EPR experiments and computational analysis support a radical-based mechanism. Implications for thiamine-based enzymes are discussed.

  14. DFT and ENDOR Study of Bixin Radical Cations and Neutral Radicals on Silica-Alumina.

    PubMed

    Tay-Agbozo, Sefadzi S; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Bowman, Michael K; Street, Shane; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-06-18

    Bixin, a carotenoid found in annatto (Bixa orellana), is unique among natural carotenoids by being water-soluble. We stabilized free radicals from bixin on the surface of silica-alumina (Si-Al) and characterized them by pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR). DFT calculations of unpaired electron spin distribution for various bixin radicals predict the EPR hyperfine couplings. Least-square fitting of experimental ENDOR spectra by spectra calculated from DFT hyperfine couplings characterized the radicals trapped on Si-Al. DFT predicts that the trans bixin radical cation is more stable than the cis bixin radical cation by 1.26 kcal/mol. This small energy difference is consistent with the 26% trans and 23% cis radical cations in the ENDOR spectrum. The remainder of the ENDOR spectrum is due to several neutral radicals formed by loss of a H(+) ion from the 9, 9', 13, or 13' methyl group, a common occurrence in all water-insoluble carotenoids previously studied. Although carboxyl groups of bixin strongly affect its solubility relative to other natural carotenoids, they do not alter properties of its free radicals based on DFT calculations and EPR measurements which remain similar to typical water-insoluble carotenoids.

  15. DFT and ENDOR Study of Bixin Radical Cations and Neutral Radicals on Silica-Alumina.

    PubMed

    Tay-Agbozo, Sefadzi S; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Bowman, Michael K; Street, Shane; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-06-18

    Bixin, a carotenoid found in annatto (Bixa orellana), is unique among natural carotenoids by being water-soluble. We stabilized free radicals from bixin on the surface of silica-alumina (Si-Al) and characterized them by pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR). DFT calculations of unpaired electron spin distribution for various bixin radicals predict the EPR hyperfine couplings. Least-square fitting of experimental ENDOR spectra by spectra calculated from DFT hyperfine couplings characterized the radicals trapped on Si-Al. DFT predicts that the trans bixin radical cation is more stable than the cis bixin radical cation by 1.26 kcal/mol. This small energy difference is consistent with the 26% trans and 23% cis radical cations in the ENDOR spectrum. The remainder of the ENDOR spectrum is due to several neutral radicals formed by loss of a H(+) ion from the 9, 9', 13, or 13' methyl group, a common occurrence in all water-insoluble carotenoids previously studied. Although carboxyl groups of bixin strongly affect its solubility relative to other natural carotenoids, they do not alter properties of its free radicals based on DFT calculations and EPR measurements which remain similar to typical water-insoluble carotenoids. PMID:25333911

  16. Making graphene holey. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated hydroxyl radical attack on reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Radich, James G; Kamat, Prashant V

    2013-06-25

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have important applications in the development of new electrode and photocatalyst architectures. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have now been employed as catalyst to generate OH(•) and oxidize RGO via hydroxyl radical attack. The oxidation of RGO is marked by pores and wrinkles within the 2-D network. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis was used in conjunction with competition kinetics to elucidate the oxidative mechanism and calculate rate constants for the AuNP-catalyzed and direct reaction between RGO and OH(•). The results highlight the use of the AuNP-mediated oxidation reaction to tune the properties of RGO through the degree of oxidation and/or functional group selectivity in addition to the nanoporous and wrinkle facets. The ability of AuNPs to catalyze the photolytic decomposition of H2O2 as well as the hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of RGO raises new issues concerning graphene stability in energy conversion and storage (photocatalysis, fuel cells, Li-ion batteries, etc.). Understanding RGO oxidation by free radicals will aid in maintaining the long-term stability of RGO-based functional composites where intimate contact with radical species is inevitable.

  17. Making graphene holey. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated hydroxyl radical attack on reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Radich, James G; Kamat, Prashant V

    2013-06-25

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have important applications in the development of new electrode and photocatalyst architectures. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have now been employed as catalyst to generate OH(•) and oxidize RGO via hydroxyl radical attack. The oxidation of RGO is marked by pores and wrinkles within the 2-D network. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis was used in conjunction with competition kinetics to elucidate the oxidative mechanism and calculate rate constants for the AuNP-catalyzed and direct reaction between RGO and OH(•). The results highlight the use of the AuNP-mediated oxidation reaction to tune the properties of RGO through the degree of oxidation and/or functional group selectivity in addition to the nanoporous and wrinkle facets. The ability of AuNPs to catalyze the photolytic decomposition of H2O2 as well as the hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of RGO raises new issues concerning graphene stability in energy conversion and storage (photocatalysis, fuel cells, Li-ion batteries, etc.). Understanding RGO oxidation by free radicals will aid in maintaining the long-term stability of RGO-based functional composites where intimate contact with radical species is inevitable. PMID:23641756

  18. Structure, Stability and Emissions of Lean Direct Injection Combustion, including a Novel Multi-Point LDI System for NOx Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalva Gomez, Rodrigo

    Experimental research on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) combustors for gas turbine applications is presented. LDI combustion is an alternative to lean premixed combustion which has the potential of equivalent reduction of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions and of peak combustor exit temperatures, but without some drawbacks of premixed combustors, such as flashback and autoignition. Simultaneous observations of the velocity field and reaction zone of an LDI swirl-stabilized combustor with a mixing tube at atmospheric conditions, with the goal of studying the flame stabilization mechanism, are shown. The flame was consistently anchored at the shear layer formed by the high-speed reactants exiting the mixing tube and the low speed recirculation region. Individual image analysis of the location of the tip of the recirculation zone and tip of the reaction region confirmed previously observed trends, but showed that calculation of the distance between these two points for corresponding image pairs yields results no different than when calculated from random image pairs. This most likely indicates a lag in the anchoring of the flame to changes in the recirculation zone, coupled with significant stochastic variation. An alternate LDI approach, multi-point LDI (MLDI), is also tested experimentally. A single large fuel nozzle is replaced by multiple small fuel nozzles to improve atomization and reduce the total volume of the high-temperature, low velocity recirculation zones, reducing NOx formation. The combustor researched employs a novel staged approach to allow good performance across a wide range of conditions by using a combination of nozzle types optimized to various power settings. The combustor has three independent fuel circuits referenced as pilot, intermediate, and outer. Emissions measurements, OH* chemiluminescence imaging, and thermoacoustic instability studies were run in a pressurized combustion facility at pressures from 2.0 to 5.3 bar. Combustor performance

  19. Directed evolution of stabilized IgG1-Fc scaffolds by application of strong heat shock to libraries displayed on yeast.

    PubMed

    Traxlmayr, Michael W; Faissner, Maximilian; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Hasenhindl, Christoph; Antes, Bernhard; Rüker, Florian; Obinger, Christian

    2012-04-01

    We have constructed IgG1-Fc scaffolds with increased thermal stability by directed evolution and yeast surface display. As a basis a new selection strategy that allowed the application of yeast surface display for screening of stabilizing mutations in proteins of already high intrinsic thermal stability and T(m)-values up to 85°C was developed. Besides library construction by error prone PCR, strong heat stress at 79°C for 10min and screening for well-folded proteins by FACS, sorting rounds had to include an efficient plasmid DNA isolation step for amplification and further transfection. We describe the successful application of this experimental setup for selection of 17 single, double and triple IgG1-Fc variants of increased thermal stability after four selection rounds. The recombinantly produced homodimeric proteins showed a wild-type-like elution profile in size exclusion chromatography as well as content of secondary structures. Moreover, the kinetics of binding of FcRn, CD16a and Protein A to the engineered Fc-molecules was very similar to the wild-type protein. These data clearly demonstrate the importance and efficacy of the presented strategy for selection of stabilizing mutations in proteins of high intrinsic stability within reasonable time. PMID:22285845

  20. Directed evolution of stabilized IgG1-Fc scaffolds by application of strong heat shock to libraries displayed on yeast.

    PubMed

    Traxlmayr, Michael W; Faissner, Maximilian; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Hasenhindl, Christoph; Antes, Bernhard; Rüker, Florian; Obinger, Christian

    2012-04-01

    We have constructed IgG1-Fc scaffolds with increased thermal stability by directed evolution and yeast surface display. As a basis a new selection strategy that allowed the application of yeast surface display for screening of stabilizing mutations in proteins of already high intrinsic thermal stability and T(m)-values up to 85°C was developed. Besides library construction by error prone PCR, strong heat stress at 79°C for 10min and screening for well-folded proteins by FACS, sorting rounds had to include an efficient plasmid DNA isolation step for amplification and further transfection. We describe the successful application of this experimental setup for selection of 17 single, double and triple IgG1-Fc variants of increased thermal stability after four selection rounds. The recombinantly produced homodimeric proteins showed a wild-type-like elution profile in size exclusion chromatography as well as content of secondary structures. Moreover, the kinetics of binding of FcRn, CD16a and Protein A to the engineered Fc-molecules was very similar to the wild-type protein. These data clearly demonstrate the importance and efficacy of the presented strategy for selection of stabilizing mutations in proteins of high intrinsic stability within reasonable time.

  1. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  2. [Free radicals and eye inflammations].

    PubMed

    Ianopol, N

    1998-01-01

    Free radicals (FR), mainly those oxygen derived (FRO) are considered to be inflammation's mediators. Produced either by photochemical reactions or by synthesis into active phagocytic cells (in the cellular time of inflammation), FRO can determine an inflammatory reaction or they can augment a pre-existed one. These phenomena are produced by synthesis of inflammation's mediators as: prostaglandines, prostaciclines, thromboxane and leucotrienes starting from arachidonic acid, by the generation of some compounds with chemotactic properties and by the activation of phagocytic cells, by the augmentation of the proteolytic activity due to natural protease inhibitors inactivation and, last but not least, by the directly destructive action against different tissue compounds. In the first part of this lecture I presented general data about FR, inflammation, photosensitive agents and radical reactions. In the second part, I presented the pathogenic relation between FR and ocular inflammations from two different point of view: that of inflammation generation by FR, and that of FR generation during a preexistent inflammation.

  3. Stability of the S₃and S₂state intermediates in photosystem II directly probed by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Han, Guangye; Göransson, Erik; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2012-01-10

    The stability of the S(3) and S(2) states of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II (PSII) was directly probed by EPR spectroscopy in PSII membrane preparations from spinach in the presence of the exogenous electron acceptor PpBQ at 1, 10, and 20 °C. The decay of the S(3) state was followed in samples exposed to two flashes by measuring the split S(3) EPR signal induced by near-infrared illumination at 5 K. The decay of the S(2) state was followed in samples exposed to one flash by measuring the S(2) state multiline EPR signal. During the decay of the S(3) state, the S(2) state multiline EPR signal first increased and then decreased in amplitude. This shows that the decay of the S(3) state to the S(1) state occurs via the S(2) state. The decay of the S(3) state was biexponential with a fast kinetic phase with a few seconds decay half-time. This occurred in 10-20% of the PSII centers. The slow kinetic phase ranged from a decay half-time of 700 s (at 1 °C) to ~100 s (at 20 °C) in the remaining 80-90% of the centers. The decay of the S(2) state was also biphasic and showed quite similar kinetics to the decay of the S(3) state. Our experiments show that the auxiliary electron donor Y(D) was oxidized during the entire experiment. Thus, the reduced form of Y(D) does not participate to the fast decay of the S(2) and S(3) states we describe here. Instead, we suggest that the decay of the S(3) and S(2) states reflects electron transfer from the acceptor side of PSII to the donor side of PSII starting in the corresponding S state. It is proposed that this exists in equilibrium with Y(Z) according to S(3)Y(Z) ⇔ S(2)Y(Z)(•) in the case of the S(3) state decay and S(2)Y(Z) ⇔ S(1)Y(Z)(•) in the case of the S(2) state decay. Two kinetic models are discussed, both developed with the assumption that the slow decay of the S(3) and S(2) states occurs in PSII centers where Y(Z) is also a fast donor to P(680)(+) working in the nanosecond time regime and that the fast

  4. The three nitric-oxide synthases differ in their kinetics of tetrahydrobiopterin radical formation, heme-dioxy reduction, and arginine hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Durra, Deborah; Hemann, Craig; Hille, Russ; Garcin, Elsa D; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2005-03-11

    The nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs) make nitric oxide and citrulline from l-arginine. How the bound cofactor (6R)-tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) participates in Arg hydroxylation is a topic of interest. We demonstrated previously that H4B radical formation in the inducible NOS oxygenase domain (iNOSoxy) is kinetically coupled to the disappearance of a heme-dioxy intermediate and to Arg hydroxylation. Here we report single turnover studies that determine and compare the kinetics of these transitions in Arg hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by the oxygenase domains of endothelial and neuronal NOSs (eNOSoxy and nNOSoxy). There was a buildup of a heme-dioxy intermediate in eNOSoxy and nNOSoxy followed by a monophasic transition to ferric enzyme during the reaction. The rate of heme-dioxy decay matched the rates of H4B radical formation and Arg hydroxylation in both enzymes. The rates of H4B radical formation differed such that nNOSoxy (18 s(-1)) > iNOSoxy (11 s(-1)) > eNOSoxy (6 s(-1)), whereas the lifetimes of the resulting H4B radical followed an opposite rank order. 5MeH4B supported a three-fold faster radical formation and greater radical stability relative to H4B in both eNOSoxy and nNOSoxy. Our results indicate the following: (i) the three NOSs share a common mechanism, whereby H4B transfers an electron to the heme-dioxy intermediate. This step enables Arg hydroxylation and is rate-limiting for all subsequent steps in the hydroxylation reaction. (ii) A direct correlation exists between pterin radical stability and the speed of its formation in the three NOSs. (iii) Uncoupled NO synthesis often seen for eNOS at low H4B concentrations may be caused by the slow formation and poor stability of its H4B radical. PMID:15632185

  5. Effect of aging on dynamic postural stability and variability during a multi-directional lean and reach object transportation task.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Andrew H; Zettel, John L; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    A "reach and transport object" task that represents common activities of daily living may provide improved insight into dynamic postural stability and movement variability deficits in older adults compared to previous lean to reach and functional reach tests. Healthy young and older, community dwelling adults performed three same elevation object transport tasks and two multiple elevation object transport tasks under two self-selected speeds, self-paced and fast-paced. Dynamic postural stability and movement variability was quantified by whole-body center of mass motion. Older adults demonstrated significant decrements in frontal plane stability during the multiple elevation tasks while exhibiting the same movement variability as their younger counterparts, regardless of task speed. Interestingly, older adults did not exhibit a tradeoff in maneuverability in favour of maintaining stability throughout the tasks, as has previously been reported. In conclusion, the multi-planar, ecologically relevant tasks employed in the current study were specific enough to elucidate decrements in dynamic stability, and thus may be useful for assessing fall risk in older adults with suspected postural instability. PMID:27327237

  6. Intensity-Stabilized Fast-Scanned Direct Absorption Spectroscopy Instrumentation Based on a Distributed Feedback Laser with Detection Sensitivity down to 4 × 10−6

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Tan, Wei; Jia, Mengyuan; Hou, Jiajuan; Ma, Weiguang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wu, Xuechun; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Axner, Ove; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    A novel, intensity-stabilized, fast-scanned, direct absorption spectroscopy (IS-FS-DAS) instrumentation, based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, is developed. A fiber-coupled polarization rotator and a fiber-coupled polarizer are used to stabilize the intensity of the laser, which significantly reduces its relative intensity noise (RIN). The influence of white noise is reduced by fast scanning over the spectral feature (at 1 kHz), followed by averaging. By combining these two noise-reducing techniques, it is demonstrated that direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) can be swiftly performed down to a limit of detection (LOD) (1σ) of 4 × 10−6, which opens up a number of new applications. PMID:27657082

  7. Radical-pair based avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Behavioural experiments suggest that migratory birds possess a magnetic compass sensor able to detect the direction of the geomagnetic. One hypothesis for the basis of this remarkable sensory ability is that the coherent quantum spin dynamics of photoinduced radical pair reactions transduces directional magnetic information from the geomagnetic field into changes of reaction yields, possibly involving the photoreceptor cryptochrome in the birds retina. The suggested radical-pair based avian magnetoreception has attracted attention in the field of quantum biology as an example of a biological sensor which might exploit quantum coherences for its biological function. Investigations on such a spin-based sensor have focussed on uncovering the design features for the design of a biomimetic magnetic field sensor. We study the effects of slow fluctuations in the nuclear spin environment on the directional signal. We quantitatively evaluate the robustness of signals under fluctuations on a timescale longer than the lifetime of a radical pair, utilizing two models of radical pairs. Our results suggest design principles for building a radical-pair based compass sensor that is both robust and highly directional sensitive.

  8. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  9. Growing up Radical: Investigation of Benzyl-Like Radicals with Increasing Chain Lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Joseph A.; Jawad, Khadija M.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    Combustion processes involve complex chemistry including pathways leading to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from small molecule precursors. Resonance stabilized radicals (RSRs) likely play an important role in the pathways to PAHs due to their unusual stability. Benzyl radical is a prototypical RSR that is stabilized by conjugation with the phenyl ring. Earlier work on α-methyl benzyl radical showed perturbations to the spectroscopy due to a hindered methyl rotor. If the alkyl chain is lengthened then multiple conformations become possible. This talk will discuss the jet-cooled spectroscopy of α-ethyl benzyl radical and α-propyl benzyl radical produced from the discharge of 1-phenyl propanol and 1-phenyl butanol respectively. Electronic spectra were obtained via resonant two-photon ionization, and IR spectra were obtained by resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy. Kidwell, N. M.; Reilly, N. J.; Nebgen, B.; Mehta-Hurt, D. N.; Hoehn, R. D.; Kokkin, D. L.; McCarthy, M. C.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Zwier, T. S. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 2013, 117, 13465.

  10. OVERVIEW OF THE HISTORY, PRESENT STATUS, AND FUTURE DIRECTION OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology processes are currently being utilized in the United States to treat inorganic and organic hazardous waste and radioactive waste. These wastes are generated from operating industry or have resulted from the uncontrolled management of ...

  11. Direct evidence that density-dependent regulation underpins the temporal stability of abundant species in a diverse animal community

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how ecosystems are structured and stabilized, and to identify when communities are at risk of damage or collapse, we need to know how the abundances of the taxa in the entire assemblage vary over ecologically meaningful timescales. Here, we present an analysis of species temporal variability within a single large vertebrate community. Using an exceptionally complete 33-year monthly time series following the dynamics of 81 species of fishes, we show that the most abundant species are least variable in terms of temporal biomass, because they are under density-dependent (negative feedback) regulation. At the other extreme, a relatively large number of low abundance transient species exhibit the greatest population variability. The high stability of the consistently common high abundance species—a result of density-dependence—is reflected in the observation that they consistently represent over 98% of total fish biomass. This leads to steady ecosystem nutrient and energy flux irrespective of the changes in species number and abundance among the large number of low abundance transient species. While the density-dependence of the core species ensures stability under the existing environmental regime, the pool of transient species may support long-term stability by replacing core species should environmental conditions change. PMID:25100702

  12. Radical-Mediated Fluoroalkylations.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Jin

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the development of eco-friendly radical processes has become of great interest in synthetic chemistry. In particular, visible-light photocatalysis has drawn tremendous attention for its environmental compatibility and versatility in promoting many synthetically important reactions. In addition, inorganic electrides as electron donors have emerged as new eco-friendly tools for radical transformations since they consist of non-toxic and naturally abundant main metals such as calcium. The design of new fluoroalkylation reactions has benefited greatly from recent advances in visible-light photocatalysis and the chemistry of inorganic electrides. Since adding fluoroalkyl groups can dramatically change the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, using these processes to promote eco-friendly radical fluoroalkylations will have a major impact in areas such as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and material sciences. This Personal Account reviews radical-mediated fluoroalkylations, such as trifluoromethylations and difluoroalkylations, recently developed in our laboratory. PMID:26497950

  13. Hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David; Weschler, Charles J.

    Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations were estimated using a new indoor air quality model which employs the SAPRC-99 atmospheric chemistry model to simulate indoor homogenous reactions. Model results indicate that typical indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are lower than typical outdoor summertime urban hydroxyl radical levels of 5-10×10 6 molecules cm -3; however, indoor levels can be similar to or greater than typical nighttime outdoor hydroxyl radical levels of approximately 5×10 4 molecules cm -3. Effects of selected parameters on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are presented herein. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are predicted to increase non-linearly with increasing outdoor ozone concentrations, indoor alkene emission rates, and air exchange rates. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations decrease with increasing outdoor nitric oxide concentrations. Indoor temperature and indoor light intensity have moderate impacts on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Outdoor hydroxyl radical concentrations, outdoor nitrate (NO 3rad ) radical concentrations, outdoor hydroperoxy radical concentrations, and hydroxyl radical removal by indoor surfaces are predicted to have no appreciable impact on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Production of hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments appears to be controlled primarily by reactions of alkenes with ozone, and nitric oxide with hydroperoxy radical. Estimated indoor hydroxyl radical levels may potentially affect indoor air quality. Two examples are presented in which reactions of d-limonene and α-pinene with indoor hydroxyl radicals produce aldehydes, which may be of greater concern than the original compounds.

  14. E2F1 plays a direct role in Rb stabilization and p53-independent tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Gustavo; Talos, Flaminia; Nemajerova, Alice; Moll, Ute M; Petrenko, Oleksi

    2008-06-15

    To better understand the role of E2F1 in tumor formation, we analyzed spontaneous tumorigenesis in p53(-/-)E2F1(+/+) and p53(-/-)E2F1(-/-) mice. We show that the combined loss of p53 and E2F1 leads to an increased incidence of sarcomas and carcinomas compared to the loss of p53 alone. E2F1-deficient tumors show wide chromosomal variation, indicative of genomic instability. Consistent with this, p53(-/-)E2F1(-/-) primary fibroblasts have a reduced capacity to maintain genomic stability when exposed to S-phase inhibitors or genotoxic drugs. A major mechanism of E2F1's contribution to genomic integrity lies in mediating stabilization and engagement of the Rb protein.

  15. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  16. Directed evolution of Her2/neu-binding IgG1-Fc for improved stability and resistance to aggregation by using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Traxlmayr, Michael W; Lobner, Elisabeth; Antes, Bernhard; Kainer, Manuela; Wiederkum, Susanne; Hasenhindl, Christoph; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rüker, Florian; Woisetschläger, Max; Moulder, Kevin; Obinger, Christian

    2013-04-01

    An Fcab (Fc antigen binding) is a crystallizable fragment of IgG having C-terminal structural loops of CH3 domains engineered for antigen binding. Since introduction of novel binding sites might impair the immunoglobulin fold, repairing strategies are needed for improving the biophysical properties of promising binders without decreasing affinity to the antigen. Here, a directed evolution protocol was developed and applied for stabilization of a Her2/neu-binding Fcab. Distinct loop regions of the parental binder were softly randomized by parsimonious mutagenesis, followed by heat incubation of the yeast displayed protein library and selection for retained antigen binding. Selected Fcabs were expressed solubly in Pichia pastoris and human embryonic kidney 293 cells and characterized. Fcab clones that retained their affinity to Her2/neu but exhibited a significantly increased conformational stability and resistance to aggregation could be evolved. Moreover, we demonstrate that simultaneous selection for binding to the antigen and to structurally specific ligands (FcγRI and an antibody directed against the CH2 domain) yields even more stable Fcabs. To sum up, this study presents a very potent and generally applicable method for improving the fold and stability of antibodies, antibody fragments and alternative binding scaffolds. PMID:23267121

  17. Vibronic Spectroscopy of the Phenylcyanomethyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Deepali N.; Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2011-06-01

    Resonance stabilized radicals (RSRs) are thought to be key intermediates in the formation of larger molecules in planetary atmospheres. Given the nitrogen-rich atmosphere of Titan, and the prevalence of nitriles there, it is likely that nitrile and isonitrile RSRs could be especially important in pathways leading to the formation of more complex nitrogen-containing compounds and the aerosols ("tholins") that are ultimately produced. In this talk, the results of a gas phase, jet-cooled vibronic spectroscopy study of the phenylcyanomethyl radical (C_6H_5.{C}HCN), the nitrogen-containing analog of the 1-phenylpropargyl radical, will be presented. A resonant two color photon ionization spectrum over the range 21,350-22,200 Cm-1 (450.0-468.0 nm) has been recorded, and the D_0-D_1 origin band has been tentatively identified at 21,400 Cm-1. Studies identifying the ionization threshold, and characterizing the vibronic structure will also be presented. An analogous study of the phenylisocyanomethyl radical, C_6H_5.{C}HNC, is currently being pursued for comparison with that of phenylcyanomethyl radical.

  18. Carbon-centered free radicals in particulate matter emissions from wood and coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Linwei Tian; Catherine P. Koshland; Junko Yano; Vittal K. Yachandra; Ignatius T.S. Yu; S.C. Lee; Donald Lucas

    2009-05-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the free radicals in the particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood and coal combustion. The intensity of radicals in PM dropped linearly within two months of sample storage and stabilized after that. This factor of storage time was adjusted when comparing radical intensities among different PM samples. An inverse relationship between coal rank and free radical intensities in PM emissions was observed, which was in contrast with the pattern of radical intensities in the source coals. The strong correlation between intensities of free radical and elemental carbon in PM emissions suggests that the radical species may be carbon-centered. The increased g-factors, 2.0029-2.0039, over that of purely carbon-centered radicals may indicate the presence of vicinal oxygen heteroatom. The redox and biology activities of these carbon-centered radicals are worthy of evaluation. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  20. Hydroxyl radical generation by red tide algae.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Akaike, T; Sato, K; Ishimatsu, A; Takeshita, S; Muramatsu, T; Maeda, H

    1992-04-01

    The unicellular marine phytoplankton Chattonella marina is known to have toxic effects against various living marine organisms, especially fishes. However, details of the mechanism of the toxicity of this plankton remain obscure. Here we demonstrate the generation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals from a red tide unicellular organism, C. marina, by using ESR spectroscopy with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and N-t-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN), and by using the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence response. The spin-trapping assay revealed productions of spin adduct of superoxide anion (O2-) (DMPO-OOH) and that of hydroxyl radical (.OH) (DMPO-OH) in the algal suspension, which was not observed in the ultrasonic-ruptured suspension. The addition of superoxide dismutase (500 U/ml) almost completely inhibited the formation of both DMPO-OOH and DMPO-OH, and carbon-centered radicals were generated with the disappearance of DMPO-OH after addition of 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) and 5% ethanol. Furthermore, the generation of methyl and methoxyl radicals, which are thought to be produced by the reaction of hydroxyl radical and Me2SO under aerobic condition, was identified using spin trapping with a combination of PBN and Me2SO. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay also supported the above observations. These results clearly indicate that C. marina generates and releases the superoxide radical followed by the production of hydroxyl radical to the surrounding environment. The velocity of superoxide generation by C. marina was about 100 times faster than that by mammalian phagocytes per cell basis. The generation of oxygen radical is suggested to be a pathogenic principle in the toxication of red tide to susceptible aquaculture fishes and may be directly correlated with the coastal pollution by red tide.

  1. Calculation of the Lateral Stability of a Directly Coupled Tandem-Towed Fighter Airplane and Correlation with Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanks, Robert E.

    1958-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for predicting the dynamic lateral stability characteristics of an airplane towed in tandem by a much larger airplane. Values of period and time to damp to one-half amplitude and rolling motions calculated by an analog computer have been correlated with results of two experimental investigations conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel which were part of a U.S. Air Force program (Project FICON) to develop a satisfactory arrangement by which a bomber could tow a parasite fighter. In general, the theoretical results agree with the experimental results.

  2. The application of parameter estimation to flight measurements to obtain lateral-directional stability derivatives of an augmented jet-flap STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Flight experiments with an augmented jet flap STOL aircraft provided data from which the lateral directional stability and control derivatives were calculated by applying a linear regression parameter estimation procedure. The tests, which were conducted with the jet flaps set at a 65 deg deflection, covered a large range of angles of attack and engine power settings. The effect of changing the angle of the jet thrust vector was also investigated. Test results are compared with stability derivatives that had been predicted. The roll damping derived from the tests was significantly larger than had been predicted, whereas the other derivatives were generally in agreement with the predictions. Results obtained using a maximum likelihood estimation procedure are compared with those from the linear regression solutions.

  3. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of a turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in a heated coflow: flame stabilization and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Sankaran, Ramanan; Yoo, Chun S

    2009-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near field of a three-dimensional spatially developing turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in heated coflow is performed with a detailed mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism and the flame structure. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 11,000 with over 940 million grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. A chemical flux analysis shows the occurrence of near-isothermal chemical chain branching preceding thermal runaway upstream of the stabilization point, indicative of hydrogen auto-ignition in the second limit. The Damkoehler number and key intermediate-species behaviour near the leading edge of the lifted flame also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. At the lifted-flame base, it is found that heat release occurs predominantly through ignition in which the gradients of reactants are opposed. Downstream of the flame base, both rich-premixed and non-premixed flames develop and coexist with auto-ignition. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base. In particular, the relative position of the flame base and the coherent flow structure induces a cyclic motion of the flame base in the transverse and axial directions about a mean lift-off height. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key scalars, heat release rate and velocity at the stabilization point.

  4. Effects of Dynamic Multi-directional Loading on the Microstructural Evolution and Thermal Stability of Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of 1050 commercial pure aluminum processed by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar and Instron-3369 mechanical testing machine to an accumulated strain of 3.6 were investigated. The nominal strain rates reached up to 3.0 × 103 and 1 × 10-3/s, respectively. Samples in the deformed state and annealed in the temperature interval 423-523 K for 1 h were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations reveal that the initial coarse grains are refined significantly, and the deformed structures mainly consist of equiaxed subgrains and dislocation cells with a high density of interior dislocation. In addition, the average subgrain/cell sizes of these two kinds of deformed samples are nearly the same. As to recovery behavior, recovered subgrains are observed at 473 (dynamic) versus 523 K (quasi-static), that is to say, recovery is fairly slow in the quasi-static deformed samples. It is therefore to be expected that thermal stability of this dynamic deformed aluminum is weaker than that of the quasi-static compressed one, which is due to the higher density of dislocation and nonequilibrium dislocation configurations produced during dynamic loading.

  5. Effects of Dynamic Multi-directional Loading on the Microstructural Evolution and Thermal Stability of Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Yadong

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of 1050 commercial pure aluminum processed by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar and Instron-3369 mechanical testing machine to an accumulated strain of 3.6 were investigated. The nominal strain rates reached up to 3.0 × 103 and 1 × 10-3/s, respectively. Samples in the deformed state and annealed in the temperature interval 423-523 K for 1 h were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations reveal that the initial coarse grains are refined significantly, and the deformed structures mainly consist of equiaxed subgrains and dislocation cells with a high density of interior dislocation. In addition, the average subgrain/cell sizes of these two kinds of deformed samples are nearly the same. As to recovery behavior, recovered subgrains are observed at 473 (dynamic) versus 523 K (quasi-static), that is to say, recovery is fairly slow in the quasi-static deformed samples. It is therefore to be expected that thermal stability of this dynamic deformed aluminum is weaker than that of the quasi-static compressed one, which is due to the higher density of dislocation and nonequilibrium dislocation configurations produced during dynamic loading.

  6. A cis-proline in alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein directs the structural reorganization of alpha-hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gell, David A; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P

    2009-10-23

    alpha-Hemoglobin (alphaHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with alphaHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting alphaHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in alphaHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro(30), in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro(30) to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert alphaHb. In complex with alphaHb, AHSP Pro(30) adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in alphaHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the alphaHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of alphaHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops.

  7. A cis-Proline in α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein Directs the Structural Reorganization of α-Hemoglobin*

    PubMed Central

    Gell, David A.; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with αHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting αHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in αHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro30, in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro30 to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert αHb. In complex with αHb, AHSP Pro30 adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in αHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the αHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of αHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops. PMID:19706593

  8. Radical addition-initiated domino reactions of conjugated oxime ethers.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The application of conjugated oxime ethers to the synthesis of complex chemical scaffolds using domino radical reactions has been described in detail. The triethylborane-mediated hydroxysulfenylation reaction allows for the regioselective construction of a carbon-sulfur bond and a carbon-oxygen bond in a single operation for the formation of β-hydroxy sulfides. This reaction proceeds via a radical pathway involving regioselective thiyl addition and the subsequent trapping of the resulting α-imino radical with O₂, where the imino group enhances the stability of the intermediate radical. Hydroxyalkylation reactions that occur via a carbon radical addition reaction followed by the hydroxylation of the resulting N-borylenamine with O₂ have also been developed. We investigated sequential radical addition aldol-type reactions in detail to explore the novel domino reactions that occur via the generation of N-borylenamine. The radical reaction of a conjugated oxime ether with triethylborane in the presence of an aldehyde affords γ-butyrolactone via sequential processes including ethyl radical addition, the generation of N-borylenamine, an aldol-type reaction with an aldehyde, and a lactonization reaction. A novel domino reaction has also been developed involving the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of N-boryl-N-phenoxyenamine. The triethylborane-mediated domino reactions of O-phenyl-conjugated oxime ethers afforded the corresponding benzofuro[2,3-b]pyrrol-2-ones via a radical addition/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement/cyclization/lactamization cascade.

  9. DFT studies of ESR parameters for N-O centered radicals, N-alkoxyaminyl and aminoxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akio; Nakashima, Kouichi

    2011-09-01

    Theoretical calculations of ESR parameters for aminoxyl radicals have been widely studied using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, the isomer N-alkoxyaminyl radicals have been limitedly studied. With the use of experimental data for 46 N-alkoxyaminyl and 38 aminoxyl radicals, the isotropic (14)N hyperfine coupling constants (aN ) and g-factors have been theoretically estimated by several DFT calculations. The best calculation scheme of aN for N-alkoxyaminyl radicals was PCM/B3LYP/6-31 + + G(d,p) (R(2) = 0.9519, MAE = 0.034 mT), and that for aminoxyl radicals was PCM/BHandHLYP/6-31 + + G(3df,3pd) (R(2) = 0.9336, MAE = 0.057 mT). For aminoxyl radicals, the solvation models in calculations enhanced the accuracy of reproducibility. In contrast, for N-alkoxyaminyl radicals the calculations with solvation models provided no improvement. The differences in the best functionals between two types of radicals were thought to come from the contribution ratios of neutral and dipolar canonical structures in resonance forms. The aN for N-alkoxyaminyl radicals that were stabilized by small contribution of dipolar canonical structures could be precisely reproduced by B3LYP with only 20% HF exact exchange. In contrast, the aN for aminoxyl radicals stabilized by large contribution of dipolar canonical structures was well reproduced by BHandHLYP with 50% HF exchange. The best calculation scheme of g-factors was IEFPCM/B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) (R(2) = 0.9767, MAE = 0.0001) for not only aminoxyl but also N-alkoxyaminyl radicals.

  10. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein. PMID:26305718

  11. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein.

  12. Structure and thermal cycling stability of a hafnium monocarbide reinforced directionally solidified cobalt-base eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.

    1975-01-01

    A nominal composition of Co-15Cr-2ONi-10.5 Hf-0.7 C (NASA-HAFCO-11) was directionally solidified at 0.8 cm/hr growth rate to produce aligned HfC in a cobalt matrix alloy. The aligned HfC fibers were present as rod and plate types. The diameter of the aligned fibers was about 1 micron, with volume fraction in the range of 11 to 15 percent. The growth direction of the fibers was parallel to the 100. The NASA-HAFCO-11 alloy was subjected to thermal cycling between 425 deg and 1100 C, using a 2.5 minute cycle. No microstructural degradation of the HfC fibers in the alloy was observed after 2500 cycles.

  13. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Diller, James W; Lattal, Kennon A

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their respective goals, conceptualization of human beings, and the outcomes of following either philosophy. From these comparisons it is concluded that the commonalities discerned between these two philosophies may enhance both philosophical systems. PMID:22478509

  14. Cell damage by oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, G

    1991-02-01

    The exposure of isolated and cultured cells to oxygen free radicals generated extracellularly or intracellularly during the metabolism of foreing compounds results in the development of damage that eventually lead to cell death. Multiple mechanisms are involved in these cytopathological processes, including direct attack of free radicals to macromolecules essential for cell life, as well as indirect activation of catabolic processes such as proteases, endonucleases and phospholipases. A key role in triggering these indirect events is played by Ca(2+) whose cytosolic concentration during oxidative stress raises well above the physiological limits. PMID:22358959

  15. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  16. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  17. Validation of three-dimensional incompressible spatial direct numerical simulation code: A comparison with linear stability and parabolic stability equation theories for boundary-layer transition on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    1992-01-01

    Spatially evolving instabilities in a boundary layer on a flat plate are computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In a truncated physical domain, a nonstaggered mesh is used for the grid. A Chebyshev-collocation method is used normal to the wall; finite difference and compact difference methods are used in the streamwise direction; and a Fourier series is used in the spanwise direction. For time stepping, implicit Crank-Nicolson and explicit Runge-Kutta schemes are used to the time-splitting method. The influence-matrix technique is used to solve the pressure equation. At the outflow boundary, the buffer-domain technique is used to prevent convective wave reflection or upstream propagation of information from the boundary. Results of the DNS are compared with those from both linear stability theory (LST) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) theory. Computed disturbance amplitudes and phases are in very good agreement with those of LST (for small inflow disturbance amplitudes). A measure of the sensitivity of the inflow condition is demonstrated with both LST and PSE theory used to approximate inflows. Although the DNS numerics are very different than those of PSE theory, the results are in good agreement. A small discrepancy in the results that does occur is likely a result of the variation in PSE boundary condition treatment in the far field. Finally, a small-amplitude wave triad is forced at the inflow, and simulation results are compared with those of LST. Again, very good agreement is found between DNS and LST results for the 3-D simulations, the implication being that the disturbance amplitudes are sufficiently small that nonlinear interactions are negligible.

  18. Tyrosyl Radicals in Dehaloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Dumarieh, Rania; D'Antonio, Jennifer; Deliz-Liang, Alexandria; Smirnova, Tatyana; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2013-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, having been shown to catalyze the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of trihalophenols to dihaloquinones, is the first oxygen binding globin that possesses a biologically relevant peroxidase activity. The catalytically competent species in DHP appears to be Compound ES, a reactive intermediate that contains both a ferryl heme and a tyrosyl radical. By simulating the EPR spectra of DHP activated by H2O2, Thompson et al. (Thompson, M. K., Franzen, S., Ghiladi, R. A., Reeder, B. J., and Svistunenko, D. A. (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 17501–17510) proposed that two different radicals, depending on the pH, are formed, one located on either Tyr-34 or Tyr-28 and the other on Tyr-38. To provide additional support for these simulation-based assignments and to deduce the role(s) that tyrosyl radicals play in DHP, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench EPR spectroscopic methods were employed to study radical formation in DHP when three tyrosine residues, Tyr-28, Tyr-34, and Tyr-38, were replaced either individually or in combination with phenylalanines. The results indicate that radicals form on all three tyrosines in DHP. Evidence for the formation of DHP Compound I in several tyrosine mutants was obtained. Variants that formed Compound I showed an increase in the catalytic rate for substrate oxidation but also an increase in heme bleaching, suggesting that the tyrosines are necessary for protecting the enzyme from oxidizing itself. This protective role of tyrosines is likely an evolutionary adaptation allowing DHP to avoid self-inflicted damage in the oxidative environment. PMID:24100039

  19. Nudel is crucial for the WAVE complex assembly in vivo by selectively promoting subcomplex stability and formation through direct interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Ma, Li; Wu, Yibo; Zeng, Rong; Zhu, Xueliang

    2012-08-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), consisting of WAVE, Sra, Nap, Abi, and HSPC300, activates the Arp2/3 complex to control branched actin polymerization in response to Rac activation. How the WRC is assembled in vivo is not clear. Here we show that Nudel, a protein critical for lamellipodia formation, dramatically stabilized the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1 complex against degradation in cells through a dynamic binding to Sra1, whereas its physical interaction with HSPC300 protected free HSPC300 from the proteasome-mediated degradation and stimulated the HSPC300-WAVE2 complex formation. By contrast, Nudel showed little or no interactions with the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-WAVE2 and the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-HSPC300 complexes as well as the mature WRC. Depletion of Nudel by RNAi led to general subunit degradation and markedly attenuated the levels of mature WRC. It also abolished the WRC-dependent actin polymerization in vitro and the Rac1-induced lamellipodial actin network formation during cell spreading. Therefore, Nudel is important for the early steps of the WRC assembly in vivo by antagonizing the instability of certain WRC subunits and subcomplexes. PMID:22453242

  20. Epidural anaesthesia with goal-directed administration of ropivacaine improves haemodynamic stability when combined with general anaesthesia in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q H; Xiao, W P; Yun, X

    2013-01-01

    The use of epidural ropivacaine may result in significant haemodynamic fluctuations during combined epidural and general anaesthesia. We designed this study to investigate whether epidural anaesthesia with a goal-directed approach, when combined with general anaesthesia, improved haemodynamic stability in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Seventy-five elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomly and evenly assigned to one of three groups receiving intraoperative epidural anaesthesia with either ropivacaine 0.1% (Group 1), ropivacaine 0.375% (Group 2) or ropivacaine 0.375% for abdominal wall pain and ropivacaine 0.1% for visceral pain (Group 3). General anaesthesia was induced using a target-controlled infusion of combined propofol and remifentanil. The remifentanil target concentration was adjusted according to the mean arterial pressure and heart rate, and vasoactive agents were administered to maintain stable haemodynamics. The need for vasoactive drug administrations was 1.4 (standard deviation 0.9) in Group 3 (n=24), representing a significantly lower frequency of administration compared with Groups 1 (n=24) and 2 (n=24) (P <0.05 versus Group 1; P <0.01 versus Group 2). The total intraoperative dose of remifentanil was significantly greater in Group 1 (P <0.01 versus Group 2; P <0.05 versus Group 3) but did not differ significantly between Groups 2 and 3. Goal-directed epidural anaesthesia with different ropivacaine concentrations can improve haemodynamic stability when combined with general anaesthesia for elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

  1. Scavenging of superoxide anion radical by chaparral.

    PubMed

    Zang, L Y; Cosma, G; Gardner, H; Starks, K; Shi, X; Vallyathan, V

    1999-06-01

    Chaparral is considered to act as an antioxidant. However, the inhibitory effects of chaparral on specific radical species are not well understood. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in combination with spin trapping techniques, we have found that chaparral scavenges superoxide anion radical (O2*-) in a dose-dependent manner. 5,5-dimethyl-lpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was used as a spin trapping agent and the reaction of xanthine and xanthine oxidase as a source of O2*-. The kinetic parameters, IC50 and Vmax, for chaparral scavenging of O2*- were found to be 0.899 microg/mL and 8.4 ng/mL/sec, respectively. The rate constant for chaparral scavenging O2*- was found to be 1.22 x 10(6) g(-1) s(-1). Our studies suggest that the antioxidant properties of chaparral may involve a direct scavenging effect of the primary oxygen radical, O2*-.

  2. Expanded sodalite-type metal-organic frameworks: increased stability and H(2) adsorption through ligand-directed catenation.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Mircea; Dailly, Anne; Tsay, Charlene; Long, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    The torsion between the central benzene ring and the outer aromatic rings in 1,3,5-tri-p-(tetrazol-5-yl)phenylbenzene (H3TPB-3tz) and the absence of such strain in 2,4,6-tri-p-(tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl-s-triazine (H3TPT-3tz) are shown to allow the selective synthesis of noncatenated and catenated versions of expanded sodalite-type metal-organic frameworks. The reaction of H3TPB-3tz with CuCl2.2H2O affords the noncatenated compound Cu3[(Cu4Cl)3(TPB-3tz)8]2.11CuCl2.8H2O.120DMF (2), while the reaction of H3TPT-3tz with MnCl2.4H2O or CuCl2.2H2O generates the catenated compounds Mn3[(Mn4Cl)3(TPT-3tz)8]2.25H2O.15CH3OH.95DMF (3) and Cu3[(Cu4Cl)3(TPT-3tz)8]2.xsolvent (4). Significantly, catenation helps to stabilize the framework toward collapse upon desolvation, leading to an increase in the surface area from 1120 to 1580 m2/g and an increase in the hydrogen storage capacity from 2.8 to 3.7 excess wt % at 77 K for 2 and 3, respectively. The total hydrogen uptake in desolvated 3 reaches 4.5 wt % and 37 g/L at 80 bar and 77 K, demonstrating that control of catenation can be an important factor in the generation of hydrogen storage materials.

  3. Direct observation of pH-induced coalescence of latex-stabilized bubbles using high-speed video imaging.

    PubMed

    Ata, Seher; Davis, Elizabeth S; Dupin, Damien; Armes, Steven P; Wanless, Erica J

    2010-06-01

    The coalescence of pairs of 2 mm air bubbles grown in a dilute electrolyte solution containing a lightly cross-linked 380 nm diameter PEGMA-stabilized poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) latex was monitored using a high-speed video camera. The air bubbles were highly stable at pH 10 when coated with this latex, although coalescence could be induced by increasing the bubble volume when in contact. Conversely, coalescence was rapid when the bubbles were equilibrated at pH 2, since the latex undergoes a latex-to-microgel transition and the swollen microgel particles are no longer adsorbed at the air-water interface. Rapid coalescence was also observed for latex-coated bubbles equilibrated at pH 10 and then abruptly adjusted to pH 2. Time-dependent postrupture oscillations in the projected surface area of coalescing P2VP-coated bubble pairs were studied using a high-speed video camera in order to reinvestigate the rapid acid-induced catastrophic foam collapse previously reported [Dupin, D.; et al. J. Mater. Chem. 2008, 18, 545]. At pH 10, the P2VP latex particles adsorbed at the surface of coalescing bubbles reduce the oscillation frequency significantly. This is attributed to a close-packed latex monolayer, which increases the bubble stiffness and hence restricts surface deformation. The swollen P2VP microgel particles that are formed in acid also affected the coalescence dynamics. It was concluded that there was a high concentration of swollen microgel at the air-water interface, which created a localized, viscous surface gel layer that inhibited at least the first period of the surface area oscillation. Close comparison between latex-coated bubbles at pH 10 and those coated with 66 microm spherical glass beads indicated that the former system exhibits more elastic behavior. This was attributed to the compressibility of the latex monolayer on the bubble surface during coalescence. A comparable elastic response was observed for similar sized titania particles, suggesting

  4. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  5. Radicalism, Marxism, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Navarro, V

    1983-01-01

    This article presents a critique of recent radical interpretations of medicine and provides an alternative explanation of such interpretations. It analyzes 1) the articulation of medical practices, knowledge, and institutions within specific modes of production and social formations; 2) the dual functions of medicine within capitalist relations of production; 3) the reproduction of power within medicine; and 4) the meaning of capitalist, socialist, and communist medicine. The political practice derived from these analyses is also elaborated.

  6. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  7. [Radical prostatectomy - pro robotic].

    PubMed

    Gillitzer, R

    2012-05-01

    Anatomical radical prostatectomy was introduced in the early 1980s by Walsh and Donker. Elucidation of key anatomical structures led to a significant reduction in the morbidity of this procedure. The strive to achieve similar oncological and functional results to this gold standard open procedure but with further reduction of morbidity through a minimally invasive access led to the establishment of laparoscopic prostatectomy. However, this procedure is complex and difficult and is associated with a long learning curve. The technical advantages of robotically assisted surgery coupled with the intuitive handling of the device led to increased precision and shortening of the learning curve. These main advantages, together with a massive internet presence and aggressive marketing, have resulted in a rapid dissemination of robotic radical prostatectomy and an increasing patient demand. However, superiority of robotic radical prostatectomy in comparison to the other surgical therapeutic options has not yet been proven on a scientific basis. Currently robotic-assisted surgery is an established technique and future technical improvements will certainly further define its role in urological surgery. In the end this technical innovation will have to be balanced against the very high purchase and running costs, which remain the main limitation of this technology.

  8. Carbohydrate radicals: from ethylene glycol to DNA strand breakage.

    PubMed

    von Sonntag, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    Radiation-induced DNA strand breakage results from the reactions of radicals formed at the sugar moiety of DNA. In order to elucidate the mechanism of this reaction investigations were first performed on low molecular weight model systems. Results from studies on deoxygenated aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol, 2-deoxy-d-ribose and other carbohydrates and, more relevantly, of d-ribose-5-phosphate have shown that substituents can be eliminated from the β-position of the radical site either proton and base-assisted (as in the case of the OH substituent), or spontaneously (as in the case of the phosphate substituent). In DNA the C(4') radical undergoes strand breakage via this type of reaction. In the presence of oxygen the carbon-centred radicals are rapidly converted into the corresponding peroxyl radicals. Again, low molecular weights models have been investigated to elucidate the key reactions. A typical reaction of DNA peroxyl radicals is the fragmentation of the C(4')-C(S') bond, a reaction not observed in the absence of oxygen. Although OH radicals may be the important direct precursors of the sugar radicals of DNA, results obtained with poly(U) indicate that base radicals may well be of even greater importance. The base radicals, formed by addition of the water radicals (H and OH) to the bases would in their turn attack the sugar moiety to produce sugar radicals which then give rise to strand breakage and base release. For a better understanding of strand break formation it is therefore necessary to investigate in more detail the reactions of the base radicals. For a start, the radiolysis of uracil in oxygenated solutions has been reinvestigated, and it has been shown that the major peroxyl radical in this system undergoes base-catalysed elimination of [Formula: see text], a reaction that involves the proton at N(l). In the nucleic acids the pyrimidines are bound at N(l) to the sugar moiety and this type of reaction can no longer occur. Therefore, with

  9. Alternative radical pairs for cryptochrome-based magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Lau, Jason C S; Hogben, Hannah J; Biskup, Till; Kattnig, Daniel R; Hore, P J

    2014-06-01

    There is growing evidence that the remarkable ability of animals, in particular birds, to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field relies on magnetically sensitive photochemical reactions of the protein cryptochrome. It is generally assumed that the magnetic field acts on the radical pair [FAD•- TrpH•+] formed by the transfer of an electron from a group of three tryptophan residues to the photo-excited flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor within the protein. Here, we examine the suitability of an [FAD•- Z•] radical pair as a compass magnetoreceptor, where Z• is a radical in which the electron spin has no hyperfine interactions with magnetic nuclei, such as hydrogen and nitrogen. Quantum spin dynamics simulations of the reactivity of [FAD•- Z•] show that it is two orders of magnitude more sensitive to the direction of the geomagnetic field than is [FAD•- TrpH•+] under the same conditions (50 µT magnetic field, 1 µs radical lifetime). The favourable magnetic properties of [FAD•- Z•] arise from the asymmetric distribution of hyperfine interactions among the two radicals and the near-optimal magnetic properties of the flavin radical. We close by discussing the identity of Z• and possible routes for its formation as part of a spin-correlated radical pair with an FAD radical in cryptochrome. PMID:24671932

  10. Low-temperature combustion chemistry of n-butanol: principal oxidation pathways of hydroxybutyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Welz, Oliver; Zádor, Judit; Savee, John D; Sheps, Leonid; Osborn, David L; Taatjes, Craig A

    2013-11-21

    Reactions of hydroxybutyl radicals with O2 were investigated by a combination of quantum-chemical calculations and experimental measurements of product formation. In pulsed-photolytic Cl-initiated oxidation of n-butanol, the time-resolved and isomer-specific product concentrations were probed using multiplexed tunable synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS). The interpretation of the experimental data is underpinned by potential energy surfaces for the reactions of O2 with the four hydroxybutyl isomers (1-hydroxybut-1-yl, 1-hydroxybut-2-yl, 4-hydroxybut-2-yl, and 4-hydroxybut-1-yl) calculated at the CBS-QB3 and RQCISD(T)/cc-pV∞Z//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory. The observed product yields display substantial temperature dependence, arising from a competition among three fundamental pathways: (1) stabilization of hydroxybutylperoxy radicals, (2) bimolecular product formation in the hydroxybutyl + O2 reactions, and (3) decomposition of hydroxybutyl radicals. The 1-hydroxybut-1-yl + O2 reaction is dominated by direct HO2 elimination from the corresponding peroxy radical forming butanal as the stable coproduct. The chemistry of the other three hydroxybutylperoxy radical isomers mainly proceeds via alcohol-specific internal H-atom abstractions involving the H atom from either the -OH group or from the carbon attached to the -OH group. We observe evidence of the recently reported water elimination pathway (Welz et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4 (3), 350-354) from the 4-hydroxybut-2-yl + O2 reaction, supporting its importance in γ-hydroxyalkyl + O2 reactions. Experiments using the 1,1-d2 and 4,4,4-d3 isotopologues of n-butanol suggest the presence of yet unexplored pathways to acetaldehyde.

  11. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability. PMID:27564120

  12. Radical Cation/Radical Reactions: A Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Study of Allyl Radical Reacting with Aromatic Radical Cations

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Amber L.; Rohrs, Henry W.; Read, David; Giblin, Daryl E.; Gaspar, Peter P.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the study of reactions of open-shell neutrals (radicals) and radical cations is described. Pyrolysis (25–1500 °C) of thermally labile compounds, such as, 1,5-hexadiene via a Chen nozzle yields a seeded beam of reactive species in helium. The pyrolysis products are then analyzed by electron ionization (EI) or reacted with stored ions. Electron ionization of the pyrolysis products of 1,5-hexadiene shows that both the allyl radical and allene are generated. Reactions of benzene radical cations and the pyrolysis products of 1,5-hexadiene result in carbon-carbon bond formation. Those reactions of allyl radical with the benzene radical cation yield the C7H7+ ion of m/z 91, permitting an unusual entry into arenium ions. The reaction of allene with benzene radical cation in contrast yields C9H10+. and C9H9+. PMID:20401179

  13. Stability of several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys and a directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-alpha eutectic alloy in a thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staniek, G.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal gradient testing of three oxide dispersion strengthened alloys (two Ni-base alloys, MA 754 and MA 6000 E, and the Fe-base MA 956) and the directionally solidified eutectic alloy, gamma/gamma prime-alpha, have been conducted. Experiments were carried out with maximum temperatures up to 1200 C and thermal gradients on the order of 100 C/mm. The oxide dispersion strengthened alloys were difficult to test because the thermal stresses promoted crack nucleation and growth; thus the ability of these alloys to maintain a thermal gradient may be limited. The stability of individual fibers in gamma/gamma prime-alpha was excellent; however, microstructural changes were observed in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Similar structures were also observed in isothermally annealed material; therefore thermal gradients do not affect the microstructure of gamma/gamma prime-alpha in any significant manner.

  14. Direct monitoring of the role played by a stabilizer in a solid sample of polymer using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry: the case of Irgafos 168 in polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Fouyer, Kevin; Lavastre, Olivier; Rondeau, David

    2012-10-16

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization method is used with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer to perform the analysis of industrial polyethylene pellets free of additives or containing Irgafos 168 as stabilizing agent without any sampling step. The developed analytical method uses the [M + H](+) ion of the bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) for performing the exact mass measurements of the stabilizer and polymer ions using the mass drift compensation procedure available on the AccuTOF mass spectrometer. DEHP is in fact a plastic contaminant always presents on the mass spectra of the analyzed samples. The mass spectra allow one to characterize either the ions of the polyethylene and that of the Irgafos. The analysis of thermally treated samples show that the polymer does not undergo any degradation when the Irgafos is present in the bulk of the material, and the role played by the Irgafos 168 is that of an oxygen trapping agent. Under UV exposure, the DART-TOF MS analyses performed on the exposed polyethylene pellets shows that the Irgafos 168 behavior toward the UV radiations is different since this one reacts by cleavages of its P-O bonds to prevent the degradation of the polymer. These interpretations are supported by all the elemental formula determination of the detected ions.

  15. Gum kondagogu reduced/stabilized silver nanoparticles as direct colorimetric sensor for the sensitive detection of Hg²⁺ in aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Lori; Sashidhar, R B; Karunasagar, D; Arunachalam, J

    2014-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective method is reported for the colorimetric detection of Hg(2+) in aqueous system by using label free silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). Ag NPs used in this method were synthesized by gum kondagogu (GK) which acted as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The average size of the GK-Ag NPs was found to be 5.0 ± 2.8 nm as revealed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis and the nanoparticles were stable at various pH conditions (pH 4-11) and salt concentrations (5-100 mM). The GK reduced/stabilized Ag NPs (GK-Ag NPs) were directly used for the selective colorimetric reaction with Hg(2+) without any further modification. The bright yellow colour of Ag NPs was found to fade in a concentration dependent manner with the added Hg(+) ions. The fading response was directly correlated with increasing concentration of Hg(2+). More importantly, this response was found to be highly selective for Hg(2+) as the absorption spectra were found to be unaffected by the presence of other ions like; Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), As(3+), Fe(2+), Cd(2+), etc. The metal sensing mechanism is explained based on the turbidometric and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of GK-Ag NPs with Hg(2+). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Hg(2+) in various ground water samples. The reported method can be effectively used for the quantification of total Hg(2+) in samples, wherein the organic mercury is first oxidized to inorganic form by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The limit of quantification for Hg(2+) using the proposed method was as low as 4.9 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) (50 nM). The proposed method has potential application for on-field qualitative detection of Hg(2+) in aqueous environmental samples.

  16. Formation of ions and radicals from icy grains in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher; Hendricks, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Ion and radical formation in comets are thought to occur primarily by photodissociation of gas phase molecules. Experimental evidence and theoretical calculations are presented that show that some of the radical and ions can come directly from ice grains. The experimental evidence suggest that if the frozen molecules on the surface of grains undergo direct dissociation then they may be able to release radicals directly in the gas phase. If the molecules undergo predissociation it is unlikely that they will release radicals in the gas phase since they should be quenched. Calculations of this direct photodissociation mechanism further indicate that even if the parent molecule undergoes direct dissociation, the yield will not be high enough to explain the rays structure in comets unless the radicals are stored in the grains and then released when the grain evaporates. Calculations were also performed to determine the maximum number of ions that can be stored in an icy grain's radius. This number is compared with the ratio of the ion to neutral molecular density. The comparison suggests that some of the ions observed near the nucleus of the comet could have originally been present in the cometary nucleus. It is also pointed out that the presence of these ions in icy grains could lead to radical formation via electron recombination. Finally, an avalanche process was evaluated as another means of producing ions in comets.

  17. a Free Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, Alan

    2001-10-01

    This chapter describes my research career, spanning the period from 1955 to 2000. My initial PhD work at the University of Southampton was concerned with the electronic structure and spectra of transition metal complexes and included studies of the electronic spin resonance (ESR) spectra of magnetically dilute single crystals. After a year at the University of Minnesota, I went to Cambridge University and for the next six years studied the ESR spectra of liquid phase organic free radicals. I commenced work on the microwave magnetic resonance (MMR) spectra of gaseous free radicals in 1965, and this work continued until 1975. I moved from Cambridge to Southampton in 1967. In 1975 I turned to the study of gas phase molecular ions, using ion beam methods. In the earlier years of this period I concentrated on simple fundamental species like H+2, HD+, and H+3. In the later years until my retirement in 1999, I concentrated on the observation and analysis of microwave spectra involving energy levels lying very close to a dissociation asymptote. DEDICATION This chapter is dedicated to the memory of Harry E. Radford, who died while it was being written. Harry was a quiet and shy man, who often worked alone and never indulged in self-promotion. So far as I know, he was never awarded any medals or prizes, nor elected to any academies or learned societies. Nevertheless he was an experimentalist of the highest originality and quality, a theorist of true intellectual depth, and a remarkable pioneer in many of the techniques of studying free radicals that are now commonplace.

  18. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-01

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples.

  19. Comparative evaluation of effects of bleaching on color stability and marginal adaptation of discolored direct and indirect composite laminate veneers under in vivo conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Veena; Das, Taposh K.; Pruthi, Gunjan; Shah, Naseem; Rajendiran, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    CLV's showed significant color change at CE and IE regions when ΔE was compared at 180 days and 284 days (CE 10 vs. CE 30, P = 0.008, IE 10 vs. IE 30, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found when within group comparison was made for indirect laminates. Intergroup comparison between the groups showed significant difference in marginal adaptation at CE margin at all.time points (at baseline, P = 0.005; at 180 days, P = 0.007; 194 days, P = 0.025; at 284 days, P = 0.067). Conclusion: After bleaching, indirect CLVs performed better in terms of color stability whereas direct CLVs performed better in terms of marginal adaptation. Clinical Significance: Indirect composites should be preferred to direct composites as veneering materials as they have better color stability. Special attention should be given to their marginal adaptation especially in the CE region. Bleaching should be avoided in patients with composite restorations in the mouth. PMID:26929486

  20. Complications Following Radical Nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M

    2016-05-01

    Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is the gold standard treatment strategy for bulky, high-grade, or muscle-invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Many patients with UTUC who require RNU are elderly, comorbid, and at risk for perioperative complications. Recognition of likelihood and extent of such complications guides preoperative counseling, decision-making process for major surgery, and perioperative care. A critical review of such data is essential, given the inevitable impact of complications on hospital duration, need for readmission, resource utilization, and costs associated with management. PMID:26968416

  1. Human papillomavirus 16 E2 stability and transcriptional activation is enhanced by E1 via a direct protein-protein interaction

    SciTech Connect

    King, Lauren E.; Dornan, Edward S.; Donaldson, Mary M.; Morgan, Iain M.

    2011-05-25

    Human papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 interact with cellular factors to replicate the viral genome. E2 forms homodimers and binds to 12 bp palindromic sequences adjacent to the viral origin and recruits E1 to the origin. E1 forms a di-hexameric helicase complex that replicates the viral genome. This manuscript demonstrates that E1 stabilises the E2 protein, increasing the half life in both C33a and 293 T cells respectively. This stabilisation requires a direct protein--protein interaction. In addition, the E1 protein enhances E2 transcription function in a manner that suggests the E1 protein itself can contribute to transcriptional regulation not simply by E2 stabilisation but by direct stimulation of transcription. This activation of E2 transcription is again dependent upon an interaction with E1. Overall the results suggest that in the viral life cycle, co-expression of E1 with E2 can increase E2 stability and enhance E2 function.

  2. Bursectomy at radical gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2015-01-01

    Radical gastrectomy with extended lymph node dissection and prophylactic resection of the omentum, peritoneum over the posterior lesser sac, pancreas and/or spleen was advocated at the beginning of the 1960s in Japan. In time, prophylactic routine resections of the pancreas and/or spleen were abandoned because of the high incidence of postoperative complications. However, omentectomy and bursectomy continued to be standard parts of traditional radical gastrectomy. The bursa omentalis was thought to be a natural barrier against invasion of cancer cells into the posterior part of the stomach. The theoretical rationale for bursectomy was to reduce the risk of peritoneal recurrences by eliminating the peritoneum over the lesser sac, which might include free cancer cells or micrometastases. Over time, the indication for bursectomy was gradually reduced to only patients with posterior gastric wall tumors penetrating the serosa. Despite its theoretical advantages, its benefit for recurrence or survival has not been proven yet. The possible reasons for this inconsistency are discussed in this review. In conclusion, the value of bursectomy in the treatment of gastric cancer is still under debate and large-scale randomized studies are necessary. Until clear evidence of patient benefit is obtained, its routine use cannot be recommended. PMID:26523213

  3. Bursectomy at radical gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2015-10-27

    Radical gastrectomy with extended lymph node dissection and prophylactic resection of the omentum, peritoneum over the posterior lesser sac, pancreas and/or spleen was advocated at the beginning of the 1960s in Japan. In time, prophylactic routine resections of the pancreas and/or spleen were abandoned because of the high incidence of postoperative complications. However, omentectomy and bursectomy continued to be standard parts of traditional radical gastrectomy. The bursa omentalis was thought to be a natural barrier against invasion of cancer cells into the posterior part of the stomach. The theoretical rationale for bursectomy was to reduce the risk of peritoneal recurrences by eliminating the peritoneum over the lesser sac, which might include free cancer cells or micrometastases. Over time, the indication for bursectomy was gradually reduced to only patients with posterior gastric wall tumors penetrating the serosa. Despite its theoretical advantages, its benefit for recurrence or survival has not been proven yet. The possible reasons for this inconsistency are discussed in this review. In conclusion, the value of bursectomy in the treatment of gastric cancer is still under debate and large-scale randomized studies are necessary. Until clear evidence of patient benefit is obtained, its routine use cannot be recommended. PMID:26523213

  4. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  5. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  6. Radicals in flavoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Current technical and methodical advances in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy have proven to be very beneficial for studies of stationary and short-lived paramagnetic states in proteins carrying organic cofactors. In particular, the large number of proteins with flavins as prosthetic groups can be examined splendidly by EPR in all its flavors. To understand how a flavin molecule can be fine-tuned for specific catalysis of different reactions, understanding of its electronic structure mediated by subtle protein-cofactor interactions is of utmost importance. The focus of this chapter is the description of recent research progress from our laboratory on EPR of photoactive flavoproteins. These catalyze a wide variety of important photobiological processes ranging from enzymatic DNA repair to plant phototropism and animal magnetoreception. Whereas increasing structural information on the principal architecture of photoactive flavoproteins is available to date, their primary photochemistry is still largely undetermined. Interestingly, although these proteins carry the same light-active flavin chromophore, their light-driven reactions differ significantly: Formations of photoexcited triplet states and short-lived radical pairs starting out from triplet or singlet-state precursors, as well as generation of stationary radicals have been reported recently. EPR spectroscopy is the method of choice to characterize such paramagnetic intermediates, and hence, to assist in unravelling the mechanisms of these inimitable proteins.

  7. Accumulation and evolution of the spatial distribution of radicals in vitreous propanol in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kurshev, V.V.; Raitsimring, A.M.

    1992-09-01

    Analysis of the dipole broadening of an EPR line is used to explain the change in the spatial distribution of radicals formed in the plasma of a high-frequency glow discharge on the surface of vitreous propanol, which contains an electron acceptor. The contributions of various mechanisms for radical formation are evaluated. A model is proposed to describe both the accumulation and the evolution of the stabilization region of radicals in the plasmolysis process. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Radical-radical interactions among oxidized guanine bases including guanine radical cation and dehydrogenated guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-09-19

    We present here a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of di-ionized GG base pairs (G(•+)G(•+),G(-H1)(•)G(•+), and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•)) consisting of the guanine cation radical (G(•+)) and/or dehydrogenated guanine radical (G(-H1)(•)) using density functional theory calculations. Different coupling modes (Watson-Crick/WC, Hoogsteen/Hoog, and minor groove/min hydrogen bonding, and π-π stacking modes) are considered. We infer that a series of G(•+)G(•+) complexes can be formed by the high-energy radiation. On the basis of density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent (CASSCF) calculations, we reveal that in the H-bonded and N-N cross-linked modes, (G(•+)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minI, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minIII have the triplet ground states; (G(•+)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minII, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minII possess open-shell broken-symmetry diradical-characterized singlet ground states; and (G(•+)G(•+))HoogII, (G(•+)G(•+))minI, (G(•+)G(•+))minII, (G(•+)G(•+))minIII, (G(•+)G(•+))HoHo, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minIII, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoHo, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))HoHo are the closed-shell systems. For these H-bonded diradical complexes, the magnetic interactions are weak, especially in the diradical G(•+)G(•+) series and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•) series. The magnetic coupling interactions of the diradical systems are controlled by intermolecular interactions (H-bond, electrostatic repulsion, and radical coupling). The radical-radical interaction in the π-π stacked di-ionized GG base pairs ((G(•+)G(•+))ππ, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))ππ, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))ππ) are also considered, and the magnetic coupling interactions in these π-π stacked base pairs are large. This is the first theoretical prediction that some di

  9. Free radicals in adolescent varicocele testis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Carmelo; Santoro, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relationship between the structure and function of the testis and the oxidative and nitrosative stress, determined by an excessive production of free radicals and/or decreased availability of antioxidant defenses, which occur in the testis of adolescents affected by varicocele. Moreover, the effects of surgical treatment on oxidative stress were provided. We conducted a PubMed and Medline search between 1980 and 2014 using "adolescent," "varicocele," "free radicals," "oxidative and nitrosative stress," "testis," and "seminiferous tubules" as keywords. Cross-references were checked in each of the studies, and relevant articles were retrieved. We conclude that increased concentration of free radicals, generated by conditions of hypoxia, hyperthermia, and hormonal dysfunction observed in adolescent affected by varicocele, can harm germ cells directly or indirectly by influencing nonspermatogenic cells and basal lamina. With regard to few available data in current literature, further clinical trials on the pre- and postoperative ROS and RNS levels together with morphological studies of the cellular component of the testis are fundamental for complete comprehension of the role played by free radicals in the pathogenesis of adolescent varicocele and could justify its pharmacological treatment with antioxidants.

  10. Serendipitous findings while researching oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Robert A

    2009-04-15

    This review is based on the honor of receiving the Discovery Award from the Society of Free Radical Biology and Medicine. The review is reflective and presents our thinking that led to experiments that yielded novel observations. Critical questioning of our understanding of oxygen free radicals in biomedical problems led us to use and develop more direct and extremely sensitive methods. This included nitrone free radical spin trapping and HPLC-electrochemical detection. This technology led to the pioneering use of salicylate to trap hydroxyl free radicals and show increased flux in ischemia/reperfused brain regions and also to first sensitively detect 8-hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine in oxidatively damaged DNA and help assess its role in cancer development. We demonstrated that methylene blue (MB) photoinduces formation of 8-hydroxyguanine in DNA and RNA and discovered that MB sensitively photoinactivates RNA viruses, including HIV and the West Nile virus. Studies in experimental stroke led us serendipitously to discover that alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) was neuroprotective if given after the stroke. This led to extensive commercial development of NXY-059, a PBN derivative, for the treatment of stroke. More recently we discovered that PBN nitrones have potent anti-cancer activity and are active in preventing hearing loss caused by acute acoustical trauma.

  11. Pyrolysis of Tropyl Radical (C7H7) and Benzyl Radical (C6H5CH2) in a Heated Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Grant; Ellison, Barney; Porterfield, Jessica P.; Daily, John W.; Ahmed, Musahid; Robichaud, David; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2016-06-01

    Benzyl radical (C6H5CH2) is a crucial intermediate in the combustion and pyrolysis of substituted aromatic species that are common both in modern gasoline and potential future biofuels. The decomposition of benzyl radical is complicated and has been shown by isotopic labeling to require interesting isomerizations pathways. To better understand these pathways, a set of C7H7 radicals has been studied in a heated micro-reactor. Through multiple experiments, it has be shown that benzyl radical and cycloheptatrienyl (tropyl) radical (c-C7H7) do not interconvert, even at temperatures where both have completely thermally decomposed. To confirm this, tropyl radical has been studied directly and its pyrolysis is quite simple, only cyclopentadienyl radical (c-C5H5) and acetylene (HCCH) are formed. Cyclopentadienyl radical then decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical (HCCCH2). These products have all been identified through use of tunable synchrotron radiation by confirming their respective photoionization spectra. Matrix isolation infrared (IR) spectroscopy has also been used to identity these products. A previously unanswered question in benzyl radical decomposition has been addressed by studying the pyrolysis of 2,5-norbornadiene, which indicates benzyl radical may decompose through a norbornadiene-like bicyclic radical intermediate. This pathways successfully predicts the correct isotopically labeled products observed previously during 13C labeled benzyl pyrolysis.

  12. In vivo EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Zweier, J L; Kuppusamy, P

    1994-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure free radicals; however, it has not been possible to measure important biologic radicals in situ because conventional spectrometer designs are not suitable for the performance of measurements on large aqueous structures such as whole organs or tissues. We describe the design, construction, and application of instrumentation developed in an effort to obtain optimum performance in measuring free radicals in intact biologic organs or tissues. This spectrometer consists of a 1- to 2-GHz microwave bridge with the source locked to the resonant frequency of a specially designed recessed gap, loop-gap resonator. The principles of resonator design and construction are analyzed and described. Using this spectrometer radical concentrations as low as 0.4 microM in aqueous solutions could be measured. Studies of isolated beating hearts involving simultaneous real time measurements of free radicals and cardiac contractile function are performed. This in vivo EPR technique is applied to study the kinetics of free radical uptake and metabolism in normally perfused and globally ischemic hearts. In addition, it is demonstrated that this technique can be used to noninvasively measure tissue oxygen consumption. Thus, low frequency EPR spectroscopy offers great promise in the study of in vivo free radical generation and the effects of this radical generation on whole biologic tissues. PMID:7705304

  13. EPR of CH3 Radicals in SIO2 Clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Yurij; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Benetis, Nikolas Ploutarch

    2016-06-01

    EPR lineshape simulations of CH3/SiO2 clathrates reveal the motional conditions of the CH3 radical up to the unusual regime of its stability, the high temperature diffusional regime. This was obvious by the isotropic magnetic interaction at the highest experimental temperatures over 140 K. Special motional and thermodynamics conditions for methyl radical may however prevail for the CH3/SiO2 clathrates system due to the limited space of the host voids, compared to solid gas isolation. The lowest temperature in the experiment was 4.1 K, while the highest one was 300 K. The EPR parameters of the radical revealed non-monotonic temperature dependence. The extremely wide temperature range of the radical stability may be attributed to the solidity of the clathrate voids and the small diameter of their channels that do not allow molecular collisions between the radical species. At the lowest sample temperatures, a portion of the radicals stopped to rotate thus indicating their attachment to specific matrix sites with large radical-host interaction. The unusual increase of the width of the CH3/SiO2 clathrate spectra with the temperature at high sample temperatures indicates resemblance to the spin-rotation interaction relaxation mechanism known only in the case of small species in non-viscous fluids, and is contrasted to the normal difussional decrease of the width in the CH3 hosted in a series of solid. The effect was explained by adopting extremely frequent radical collisions with the clathrate void walls leading to repeated angular momentum alterations, a kind of "reorientation". Yu. A. D. acknowledges support by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR), research project 16-02-00127a.

  14. Austenite stabilization and high strength-elongation product of a low silicon aluminum-free hot-rolled directly quenched and dynamically partitioned steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Yun-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Peng, Fei; Ju, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Di

    2015-06-15

    Microstructures composed of lath martensite and retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol.% and 12.0 vol.% were obtained in a low-C low-Si Al-free steel through hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning (HDQ&DP) processes. The austenite stabilization mechanism in the low-C low-Si Al-free steel under the special dynamical partitioning processes is investigated by analyzing the carbon partition behavior from martensite to austenite and the carbide precipitation-coarsening behavior in martensite laths combining with the possible hot rolling deformation inheritance. Results show that the satisfying retained austenite amount in currently studied low-Si Al-free HDQ&DP steel is caused by the high-efficiency carbon enrichment in the 30–80 nm thick regions of austenite near the interfaces in the hot-rolled ultra-fast cooled structure and the avoidance of serious carbides coarsening during the continuous cooling procedures. The excellent strength-elongation product reaching up to 26,000 MPa% shows that the involved HDQ&DP process is a promising method to develop a new generation of advanced high strength steel. - Highlights: • HDQ&DP processes were applied to a low-C low-Si Al-free steel. • Effective partitioning time during the continuous cooling processes is 1–220 s. • Retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol. % and 12.0 vol. % has been obtained. • The special austenite stabilization mechanism has been expounded.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) stabilizes MyoD through direct phosphorylation at tyrosine 156 during myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chulman; Cho, Sun-Jung; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2011-05-27

    Previously, we reported that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) activated in the mid-stage of skeletal muscle differentiation promotes myogenic differentiation. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we investigated an activity of MEK1 for MyoD. Activated MEK1 associates with MyoD in the nucleus of differentiating myoblasts. In vitro kinase assay using active MEK1, a (32)P-labeled protein band corresponding to GST-MyoD was observed but not to mutant GST-MyoD-Y156F. Tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous MyoD was detected with a specific anti-pMyoD-Y156 antibody; however, this response was blocked by PD184352, a MEK-specific inhibitor. These results indicate that activated MEK1 phosphorylates the MyoD-Y156 residue directly. Interestingly, the protein level of mutant MyoD-Y156F decreased compared with that of wild type but was recovered in the presence of lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor. The protein level of MyoD-Y156E, which mimics phosphorylation at Tyr-156, was above that of wild type, indicating that the phosphorylation protects MyoD from the ubiquitin proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, the low protein level of MyoD-Y156F was recovered over that of wild type by an additional mutation at Leu-164, a critical binding residue of MAFbx/AT-1, a Skp, Cullin, F-box (SCF) E3-ubiquitin ligase. The amount of MyoD co-precipitated with MAFbx/AT-1 also was reduced in the presence of active MEK1. Thus, these results suggested that the phosphorylation probably interrupts the binding of MAFbx/AT-1 to MyoD and thereby increases its stability. Collectively, our results suggest that MEK1 activated in differentiating myoblasts stimulates muscle differentiation by phosphorylating MyoD-Y156, which results in MyoD stabilization.

  16. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes.

    PubMed

    Maranzana, Andrea; Giordana, Anna; Indarto, Antonius; Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo; Causà, Mauro; Pavone, Michele

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔEAB. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔEAB are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A-B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [EMP2/CBS] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔECC-MP, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔEAB with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational

  17. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes.

    PubMed

    Maranzana, Andrea; Giordana, Anna; Indarto, Antonius; Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo; Causà, Mauro; Pavone, Michele

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔEAB. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔEAB are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A-B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [EMP2/CBS] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔECC-MP, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔEAB with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational

  18. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maranzana, Andrea E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it Giordana, Anna E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it Indarto, Antonius Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it; Causà, Mauro E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it; Pavone, Michele E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔE{sub AB}. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔE{sub AB} are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A−B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [E{sub MP2/CBS}] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔE{sub CC-MP}, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔE{sub AB} with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting

  19. Ion-radical intermediates of the radiation-chemical transformations of organic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Sosulin, Ilya S.; Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    The spectral features and reactions of ion-radical intermediates produced from organic carbonates in low-temperature matrices were investigated by EPR spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations. It was shown that radical cations of diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate underwent intramolecular hydrogen transfer to yield alkyl-type species, as was suggested previously. Meanwhile, radical cation of EC demonstrates a ring cleavage even at 77 K, while radical cation of PC is probably intrinsically stable and undergo an ion-molecule reaction with a neighboring neutral molecule in dimers or associates. Radical anions were obtained in glassy matrices of diethyl ether or perdeuteroethanol. The radical anions of linear carbonates show photoinduced fragmentation to yield the corresponding alkyl radicals; such process may also occur directly under radiolysis. Radical anions of cyclic carbonates are relatively stable and yield only trace amounts of fragmentation products under similar conditions.

  20. Comparison of Thiyl, Alkoxyl, and Alkyl Radical Addition to Double Bonds: The Unusual Contrasting Behavior of Sulfur and Oxygen Radical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Isa; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-17

    High-level ab initio calculations have been used to compare prototypical thiyl, alkoxyl, and alkyl radical addition reactions. Thiyl radical addition to the sulfur center of thioketones is exothermic and rapid, occurring with negative enthalpic barriers and only weakly positive Gibbs free energy barriers. In stark contrast, alkoxyl radical addition to the oxygen center of ketones is highly endothermic and occurs with very high reaction barriers, though these are also suppressed. On the basis of analysis of the corresponding alkyl radical additions to these substrates and the corresponding reactions of these heteroatom radicals with alkenes, it suggested that addition reactions involving thiyl radicals have low intrinsic barriers because their unpaired electrons are better able to undergo stabilizing resonance interactions with the π* orbitals of the substrate in the transition state. PMID:26932454

  1. ESR measurement of radical clearance in lung of whole mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, K.; Utsumi, H.; Hamada, A. )

    1991-06-14

    Clearance of the nitroxide radicals, hydroxy-TEMPO and carboxy-PROxYL, in whole-mouse lung was directly measured by in vivo ESR. After injecting a nitroxide radical, distribution of the nitroxide radical all over the lung was confirmed by ESR imaging. The ESR signal of hydroxy-TEMPO was reduced in the lung and the clearance obeyed first-order kinetics, whereas the signal of carboxy-PROxYL remained constant. Comparison of the clearance rates of live and dead mice indicated the presence of 2 different clearance systems in the lung: loss of its paramagnetism in the lung, and transfer from alveolar to the blood circulation system.

  2. Radical C-H functionalization to construct heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Tao; Pan, Changduo

    2016-02-01

    Heterocyclic compounds are widely present in natural products, pharmaceuticals and bioactive molecules. Thus, organic and pharmaceutical chemists have been making extensive efforts to construct those heterocyclic frameworks through developing versatile and efficient synthetic strategies. The direct C-H functionalization via the radical pathway has emerged as a promising and dramatic approach towards heterocycles with high atom- and step-economy. Heterocyclic compounds such as coumarins, furans, benzofurans, xanthones, benzothiazoles, indoles, indolines, oxindoles, quinolines, isoquinolines, quinoxaline, and phenanthridines have been successfully synthesized by C-H functionalization through the radical pathway. In this review, recent advances on radical C-H functionalization to construct heterocyclic compounds are highlighted with discussions.

  3. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  4. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  5. Fullerenols revisited as stable radical anions.

    PubMed

    Husebo, Lars O; Sitharaman, Balaji; Furukawa, Ko; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Wilson, Lon J

    2004-09-29

    The first exhaustive purification and characterization of the much-studied "fullerenols", prepared by reaction of C(60) in toluene with an oxygenated, aqueous NaOH solution using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide as a phase transfer catalyst, has been performed. The resulting fullerenol is not simply polyhydroxylated C(60) but rather is a structurally and electronically complex C(60) radical anion with a molecular formula of Na(+)(n)[C(60)O(x)(OH)(y)](n)(-) (where n = 2-3, x = 7-9, and y = 12-15) for three different, but identical, preparations. Surprisingly, Na(+)-fullerenol is paramagnetic, exhibiting mu(B) values in aqueous solution of 1.9-2.1 B.M. at 0.5 T and 300 K and R(1) proton relaxivities of 0.55-0.77 mM(-1)s(-1) at 20 MHz and 40 degrees C, values both slightly higher than those expected for a pure S = 1/2 spin system. ESR studies (ESE-FS and 2D nutation) of frozen aqueous solutions at 1.5 and 5.0 K establish that Na(+)-fullerenol is mainly S = 1/2 with a minor, but significant, component of S = 1. Thus, this is the first report to characterize these widely studied, water-soluble fullerenols as stable radical anions. The stability of the S = 1/2 Na(+)-fullerenol radical is likely due to a highly derivatized C(60) surface that protects a cyclopentadienyl radical center on the fullerene. PMID:15382940

  6. Directed evolution of anti-HER2 DARPins by SNAP display reveals stability/function trade-offs in the selection process.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Gillian; Gatti-Lafranconi, Pietro; Lowe, David; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-09-01

    In vitro display technologies have proved to be powerful tools for obtaining high-affinity protein binders. We recently described SNAP display, an entirely in vitro DNA display system that uses the SNAP-tag to link protein with its encoding DNA in water-in-oil emulsions. Here, we apply SNAP display for the affinity maturation of a designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPin) that binds to the extracellular domain of HER2 previously isolated by ribosome display. After four SNAP display selection cycles, proteins that bound specifically to HER2 in vitro, with dissociation constants in the low- to sub-nanomolar range, were isolated. In vitro affinities of the panel of evolved DARPins directly correlated with the fluorescence intensities of evolved DARPins bound to HER2 on a breast cancer cell line. A stability trade-off is observed as the most improved DARPins have decreased thermostability, when compared with the parent DARPin used as a starting point for affinity maturation. Dissection of the framework mutations of the highest affinity variant, DARPin F1, shows that functionally destabilising and compensatory mutations accumulated throughout the four rounds of evolution.

  7. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  8. Detection of DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) by novel direct fluorescence labeling methods: distinct stabilities of aldehyde and radiation-induced DPCs

    PubMed Central

    Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ohshima, Makiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Uzawa, Akiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are covalently trapped on DNA to form DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) when cells are exposed to DNA-damaging agents. DPCs interfere with many aspects of DNA transactions. The current DPC detection methods indirectly measure crosslinked proteins (CLPs) through DNA tethered to proteins. However, a major drawback of such methods is the non-linear relationship between the amounts of DNA and CLPs, which makes quantitative data interpretation difficult. Here we developed novel methods of DPC detection based on direct CLP measurement, whereby CLPs in DNA isolated from cells are labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and quantified by fluorometry or western blotting using anti-FITC antibodies. Both formats successfully monitored the induction and elimination of DPCs in cultured cells exposed to aldehydes and mouse tumors exposed to ionizing radiation (carbon-ion beams). The fluorometric and western blotting formats require 30 and 0.3 μg of DNA, respectively. Analyses of the isolated genomic DPCs revealed that both aldehydes and ionizing radiation produce two types of DPC with distinct stabilities. The stable components of aldehyde-induced DPCs have half-lives of up to days. Interestingly, that of radiation-induced DPCs has an infinite half-life, suggesting that the stable DPC component exerts a profound effect on DNA transactions over many cell cycles. PMID:22730301

  9. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Stability Analysis of the HSR Reference H Configuration at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Transonic Euler computations, based on unstructured grid methodology, are performed for a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Reference H configuration within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The predicted results are correlated with appropriate experimental wind-tunnel data for the baseline configuration with and without control surface deflections for a range of angle of attack at M(sub infinity) = 0.95. Good correlations between the predictions and measured data have been obtained for the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline configuration. The incremental effects in the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics due to horizontal rail deflections as well as wing leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflections have also been predicted reasonably well. Computational results and correlations with data are also presented for the lateral and directional stability characteristics for a range of angle of attack at a constant sideslip angle as well as a range of sideslip angles at a constant angle of attack. In addition, the results are presented to assess the computational method performance and convergence characteristics.

  10. Experimental and theoretical supersonic lateral-directional stability characteristics of a simplified wing-body configuration with a series of vertical-tail arrangements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, M.; Sawyer, W. C.; Thomas, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to provide a systematic set of lateral-directional stability data for a simplified wing-body model with a series of vertical-tail arrangements. The study was made at Mach numbers from 1.60 to 2.86 at nominal angles of attack from -8 to 12 deg and Reynolds number of 8.2 million per meter. Comparisons at zero angle of attack were made with three existing theoretical methods (MISLIFT - a second-order shock expansion and panel method; APAS - a slender body and first order panel method; and PAN AIR - a higher order panel method) and comparisons at angle of attack were made with PAN AIR. The results show that PAN AIR generally provides accurate estimates of these characteristics at moderate angles of attack for complete configurations with either single or twin vertical tails. APAS provides estimates for complete configurations at zero angle of attack. However, MISLIFT only provides estimates for the simplest body-vertical-tail configurations at zero angle of attack.

  11. Stability-indicating determination of trimetazidine dihydrochloride inthe presence of two of its related substances using a direct GC/MS method.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek S; Awad, Tamer; Clark, C Randall

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, direct, and selective stability- indicating GC/MS procedure was developed for the determination of the anti-ischemic drug trimetazidine dihydrochloride (TMZ) in the presence of two of its related substances (potential impurities), namely, 2,3,4-trimethoxybenzyl alcohol (T1) and 2,3,4-trimethoxybenzaldehyde (T2). The method involved resolution of the undeilvatized compounds using a 100% dimethylpolysiloxane (Rtx-1) capillary column, and MS detection was carried out in the electron-impact mode. The peaks of the three compounds eluted at retention times 11.69, 11.92, and 15.47 min for T1, T2, and TMZ, respectively. Quantification of the parent drug TMZ was based on measuring its peak area. The reliability and analytical performance of the proposed method, including linearity, range, precision, accuracy, selectivity, detection, and quantification limits, were statistically validated. The calibration curve of TMZ was linear over the range 100-600 μg/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to the assay of TMZ in several commercially available pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries not lessthan 96.2%. PMID:25632428

  12. The Radical-Pair Mechanism of Magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Hore, P J; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Although it has been known for almost half a century that migratory birds can detect the direction of the Earth's magnetic field, the primary sensory mechanism behind this remarkable feat is still unclear. The leading hypothesis centers on radical pairs-magnetically sensitive chemical intermediates formed by photoexcitation of cryptochrome proteins in the retina. Our primary aim here is to explain the chemical and physical aspects of the radical-pair mechanism to biologists and the biological and chemical aspects to physicists. In doing so, we review the current state of knowledge on magnetoreception mechanisms. We dare to hope that this tutorial will stimulate new interdisciplinary experimental and theoretical work that will shed much-needed additional light on this fascinating problem in sensory biology. PMID:27216936

  13. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic oxidation of anti-5-methylbicyclo(2.1.0)pentane gives the 1-methylcyclopentene radical cation as the sole rearrangement product H migration whereas oxidation of its syn isomer results in the highly selective formation of the 3-methylcyclopentene radical cation by methyl group migration. Since exactly the same stereoselectivity of olefin formation was observed in corresponding PET (photosensitized electron transfer) studies in the liquid phase, it is concluded that the rearrangement in this case also occurs through the intermediacy of radical cations. Clearly, the radical cation rearrangement must occur very rapidly (10{sup {minus}8}--10{sup {minus}9}s) under liquid-phase conditions at room temperature to compete with back electron transfer, and therefore the hydrogen (or methyl) migration is a fast process under these conditions. An intramolecular cycloaddition reaction was demonstrated in the radical cation rearrangement of 4-vinylcyclohexene to bicyclo(3.2.1)oct-2-ene. ESR studies show that the radiolytic oxidation of quadricyclane in Freon matrices under conditions of high substrate dilution leads to the bicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-2,6-diene radical cation as well as the previously reported norbornadiene radical cation, the former species predominating at sufficiently low concentrations.

  14. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Free Radicals in the Intact Beating Heart: A Technique for Detection and Characterization of Free Radicals in Whole Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweier, Jay L.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    1988-08-01

    Free radicals have been hypothesized to be important mediators of disease in a variety of organs and tissues. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure free radicals; however, it has not been possible to measure important biological radicals in situ because conventional spectrometer designs are not suitable for the performance of measurements on whole organs or tissues. We report the development of an EPR spectrometer designed for optimum performance in measuring free radicals in intact biological organs or tissues. This spectrometer consists of a 1- to 2-GHz microwave bridge with the source locked to the resonant frequency of a recessed gap loop-gap resonator. With this spectrometer, radical concentrations as low as 0.4 μ M can be measured. Isolated beating hearts were studied in which simultaneous real time measurements of free radicals and cardiac contractile function were performed. This in vivo EPR technique was applied to study the kinetics of free radical uptake and metabolism in normally perfused and globally ischemic hearts. In addition, we show that this technique can be used to noninvasively measure tissue oxygen consumption. Thus, it is demonstrated that EPR spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure in vivo free radical metabolism and tissue oxygen consumption. This technique offers great promise in the study of in vivo free radical generation and the effects of this radical generation on whole biological tissues.

  15. Reactions of allylic radicals that impact molecular weight growth kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-03-01

    The reactions of allylic radicals have the potential to play a critical role in molecular weight growth (MWG) kinetics during hydrocarbon oxidation and/or pyrolysis. Due to their stability (when compared to alkyl radicals), they can accumulate to relatively high concentrations. Thus, even though the rate coefficients for their various reactions are small, the rates of these reactions may be significant. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations to examine the recombination, addition, and abstraction reactions of allylic radicals. For the recombination reaction of allyl radicals, we assign a high pressure rate rule that is based on experimental data. Once formed, the recombination product can potentially undergo an H-atom abstraction reaction followed by unimolecular cyclization and β-scission reactions. Depending upon the conditions (e.g., higher pressures) these pathways can lead to the formation of stable MWG species. The addition of allylic radicals to olefins can also lead to MWG species formation. Once again, cyclization of the adduct followed by β-scission is an important energy accessible route. Since the recombination and addition reactions produce chemically-activated adducts, we have explored the pressure- and temperature-dependence of the overall rate constants as well as that for the multiple product channels. We describe a strategy for estimating these pressure-dependencies for systems where detailed electronic structure information is not available. We also derive generic rate rules for hydrogen abstraction reactions from olefins and diolefins by methyl and allyl radicals.

  16. Are free radicals involved in thiol-based redox signaling?

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2015-03-01

    Cells respond to many stimuli by transmitting signals through redox-regulated pathways. It is generally accepted that in many instances signal transduction is via reversible oxidation of thiol proteins, although there is uncertainty about the specific redox transformations involved. The prevailing view is that thiol oxidation occurs by a two electron mechanism, most commonly involving hydrogen peroxide. Free radicals, on the other hand, are considered as damaging species and not generally regarded as important in cell signaling. This paper examines whether it is justified to dismiss radicals or whether they could have a signaling role. Although there is no direct evidence that radicals are involved in transmitting thiol-based redox signals, evidence is presented that they are generated in cells when these signaling pathways are activated. Radicals produce the same thiol oxidation products as two electron oxidants, although by a different mechanism, and at this point radical-mediated pathways should not be dismissed. There are unresolved issues about how radical mechanisms could achieve sufficient selectivity, but this could be possible through colocalization of radical-generating and signal-transducing proteins. Colocalization is also likely to be important for nonradical signaling mechanisms and identification of such associations should be a priority for advancing the field.

  17. Tar balls from Deep Water Horizon oil spill: environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) formation during crude weathering.

    PubMed

    Kiruri, Lucy W; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawo

    2013-05-01

    Tar balls collected from the Gulf of Mexico shores of Louisiana and Florida after the BP oil spill have shown the presence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra characteristic of organic free radicals as well as transition metal ions, predominantly iron(III) and manganese(II). Two types of organic radicals were distinguished: an asphaltene radical species typically found in crude oil (g = 2.0035) and a new type of radical resulting from the environmental transformations of crude (g = 2.0041-47). Pure asphaltene radicals are resonance stabilized over a polyaromatic structure and are stable in air and unreactive. The new radicals were identified as products of partial oxidation of crude components and result from the interaction of the oxidized aromatics with metal ion centers. These radicals are similar to semiquinone-type, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) previously observed in combustion-generated particulate and contaminated soils.

  18. Tar balls from Deep Water Horizon oil spill: environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) formation during crude weathering.

    PubMed

    Kiruri, Lucy W; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawo

    2013-05-01

    Tar balls collected from the Gulf of Mexico shores of Louisiana and Florida after the BP oil spill have shown the presence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra characteristic of organic free radicals as well as transition metal ions, predominantly iron(III) and manganese(II). Two types of organic radicals were distinguished: an asphaltene radical species typically found in crude oil (g = 2.0035) and a new type of radical resulting from the environmental transformations of crude (g = 2.0041-47). Pure asphaltene radicals are resonance stabilized over a polyaromatic structure and are stable in air and unreactive. The new radicals were identified as products of partial oxidation of crude components and result from the interaction of the oxidized aromatics with metal ion centers. These radicals are similar to semiquinone-type, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) previously observed in combustion-generated particulate and contaminated soils. PMID:23510127

  19. Tar Balls from Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill: Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFR) Formation During Crude Weathering

    PubMed Central

    Kiruri, Lucy W.; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawo

    2014-01-01

    Tar balls collected from the Gulf of Mexico shores of Louisiana and Florida after the BP oil spill have shown the presence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra characteristic of organic free radicals as well as transition metal ions, predominantly iron(III) and manganese(II). Two types of organic radicals were distinguished: an asphaltene radical species typically found in crude oil (g = 2.0035) and a new type of radical resulting from the environmental transformations of crude (g = 2.0041−47). Pure asphaltene radicals are resonance stabilized over a polyaromatic structure and are stable in air and unreactive. The new radicals were identified as products of partial oxidation of crude components and result from the interaction of the oxidized aromatics with metal ion centers. These radicals are similar to semiquinone-type, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) previously observed in combustion-generated particulate and contaminated soils. PMID:23510127

  20. Free radicals and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Allamaneni, Shyam S R

    2011-03-01

    Male factor accounts for almost 50% cases of infertility. The exact mechanism of sperm dysfunction is not known in many cases. Extensive research in the last decade has led to the identification of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) as mediators of sperm dysfunction in both specific diagnoses and idiopathic cases of male infertility. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species are seen in up to 30-80% of men with male infertility. The role of free radicals has been studied extensively in the process of human reproduction. We know now that a certain level of free radicals is necessary for normal sperm function, whereas an excessive level of free radicals can cause detrimental effect on sperm function and subsequent fertilisation and offspring health. Oxidative stress develops when there is an imbalance between generation of free radicals and scavenging capacity of anti-oxidants in reproductive tract. Oxidative stress has been shown to affect both standard semen parameters and fertilising capacity. In addition, high levels of free radicals have been associated with lack of or poor fertility outcome after natural conception or assisted reproduction. Diagnostic techniques to quantify free radicals in infertile patients can assist physicians treating patients with infertility to plan for proper treatment strategies. In vivo anti-oxidants can be used against oxidative stress in male reproductive tract. Supplementation of in vitro anti-oxidants can help prevent the oxidative stress during sperm preparation techniques in assisted reproduction.

  1. Pathogens and fecal indicators in waste stabilization pond systems with direct reuse for irrigation: Fate and transport in water, soil and crops.

    PubMed

    Verbyla, M E; Iriarte, M M; Mercado Guzmán, A; Coronado, O; Almanza, M; Mihelcic, J R

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater use for irrigation is expanding globally, and information about the fate and transport of pathogens in wastewater systems is needed to complete microbial risk assessments and develop policies to protect public health. The lack of maintenance for wastewater treatment facilities in low-income areas and developing countries results in sludge accumulation and compromised performance over time, creating uncertainty about the contamination of soil and crops. The fate and transport of pathogens and fecal indicators was evaluated in waste stabilization ponds with direct reuse for irrigation, using two systems in Bolivia as case studies. Results were compared with models from the literature that have been recommended for design. The removal of Escherichia coli in both systems was adequately predicted by a previously-published dispersed flow model, despite more than 10years of sludge accumulation. However, a design equation for helminth egg removal overestimated the observed removal, suggesting that this equation may not be appropriate for systems with accumulated sludge. To assess the contamination of soil and crops, ratios were calculated of the pathogen and fecal indicator concentrations in soil or on crops to their respective concentrations in irrigation water (termed soil-water and crop-water ratios). Ratios were similar within each group of microorganisms but differed between microorganism groups, and were generally below 0.1mLg(-1) for coliphage, between 1 and 100mLg(-1) for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, and between 100 and 1000mLg(-1) for helminth eggs. This information can be used for microbial risk assessments to develop safe water reuse policies in support of the United Nations' 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda.

  2. Pathogens and fecal indicators in waste stabilization pond systems with direct reuse for irrigation: Fate and transport in water, soil and crops.

    PubMed

    Verbyla, M E; Iriarte, M M; Mercado Guzmán, A; Coronado, O; Almanza, M; Mihelcic, J R

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater use for irrigation is expanding globally, and information about the fate and transport of pathogens in wastewater systems is needed to complete microbial risk assessments and develop policies to protect public health. The lack of maintenance for wastewater treatment facilities in low-income areas and developing countries results in sludge accumulation and compromised performance over time, creating uncertainty about the contamination of soil and crops. The fate and transport of pathogens and fecal indicators was evaluated in waste stabilization ponds with direct reuse for irrigation, using two systems in Bolivia as case studies. Results were compared with models from the literature that have been recommended for design. The removal of Escherichia coli in both systems was adequately predicted by a previously-published dispersed flow model, despite more than 10years of sludge accumulation. However, a design equation for helminth egg removal overestimated the observed removal, suggesting that this equation may not be appropriate for systems with accumulated sludge. To assess the contamination of soil and crops, ratios were calculated of the pathogen and fecal indicator concentrations in soil or on crops to their respective concentrations in irrigation water (termed soil-water and crop-water ratios). Ratios were similar within each group of microorganisms but differed between microorganism groups, and were generally below 0.1mLg(-1) for coliphage, between 1 and 100mLg(-1) for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, and between 100 and 1000mLg(-1) for helminth eggs. This information can be used for microbial risk assessments to develop safe water reuse policies in support of the United Nations' 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. PMID:26881733

  3. Radical formation in the coma from photodissociation of ice grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Long ago visual observations of comets suggested that there are jets in comets but it has only been recently that A'Hearn et al. have proven that some of these jets are due to emission from the CN radical. Recent studies in the lab have shown that CN radicals can be ejected directly into the gas phase from the photolysis of frozen vapors if the parent molecular has been excited to repulsive excited state. This later observation suggests that the jets that have been observed may be due to photodissociation of icy grains in the coma. A theory of radical formation from icy grains is presented. It is shown that direct formation of free radicals in the coma is an effective way to produce radicals from icy grains in the coma. The model predicts that icy grains could produce from 6 to 800,000 OH radicals/s per grain depending upon whether the radius of the grain is 0.3 to 100 micron.

  4. Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in low-temperature solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Takada, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Lund, Anders

    2001-06-01

    Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in 77 K solids were studied by the ESR method. 1-(Dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl is converted to 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentyl radical with photoirradiation of 254 nm light. A hydrogen atom of methyl groups can hence directly transfer to the radical site at a carbon atom other than an adjacent one in the photoinduced reactions of alkyl radicals. Cyclohexyl radical is converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical with irradiation of 254 nm light. The photolysis of cyclohexyl radical causes C-C bond scission, and results in the formation of 5-hexenyl radical. It is then converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical through intramolecular rearrangement.

  5. Peroxy radical partitioning during the AMMA radical intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Hernández, M. D.; Stone, D.; Brookes, D. M.; Commane, R.; Reeves, C. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Heard, D. E.; Monks, P. S.; Burrows, J. P.; Schlager, H.; Kartal, D.; Evans, M. J.; Floquet, C. F. A.; Ingham, T.; Methven, J.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    Peroxy radicals were measured onboard two scientific aircrafts during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) campaign in summer 2006. This paper reports results from the flight on 16 August 2006 during which measurements of HO2 by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low pressure (LIF-FAGE) and total peroxy radicals (RO2* = HO2+ΣRO2, R = organic chain) by two similar instruments based on the peroxy radical chemical amplification (PeRCA) technique were subject of a blind intercomparison. The German DLR-Falcon and the British FAAM-BAe-146 flew wing tip to wing tip for about 30 min making concurrent measurements on 2 horizontal level runs at 697 and 485 hPa over the same geographical area in Burkina Faso. A full set of supporting measurements comprising photolysis frequencies, and relevant trace gases like CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and a wider range of VOCs were collected simultaneously. Results are discussed on the basis of the characteristics and limitations of the different instruments used. Generally, no data bias are identified and the RO2* data available agree quite reasonably within the instrumental errors. The [RO2*]/[HO2] ratios, which vary between 1:1 and 3:1, as well as the peroxy radical variability, concur with variations in photolysis rates and in other potential radical precursors. Model results provide additional information about dominant radical formation and loss processes.

  6. Peroxy radical partitioning during the AMMA radical intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Hernández, M. D.; Stone, D.; Brookes, D. M.; Commane, R.; Reeves, C. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Heard, D. E.; Monks, P. S.; Burrows, J. P.; Schlager, H.; Kartal, D.; Evans, M. J.; Floquet, C. F. A.; Ingham, T.; Methven, J.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Peroxy radicals were measured onboard two scientific aircrafts during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) campaign in summer 2006. This paper reports results from the flight on 16 August 2006 during which measurements of HO2 by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low pressure (LIF-FAGE) and total peroxy radicals (RO2*=HO2+ΣRO2, R= organic chain) by two similar instruments based on the peroxy radical chemical amplification (PerCA) technique were subject of a blind intercomparison. The German DLR-Falcon and the British FAAM-BAe-146 flew wing tip to wing tip for about 30 min making concurrent measurements on 2 horizontal level runs at 697 and 485 hPa over the same geographical area in Burkina Faso. A full set of supporting measurements comprising photolysis frequencies, and relevant trace gases like CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and a wider range of VOCs were collected simultaneously. Results are discussed on the basis of the characteristics and limitations of the different instruments used. Generally, no data bias are identified and the RO2* data available agree quite reasonably within the instrumental errors. The [RO2*]/[HO2] ratios, which vary between 1:1 and 3:1, as well as the peroxy radical variability, concur with variations in photolysis rates and in other potential radical precursors. Model results provide additional information about dominant radical formation and loss processes.

  7. Automatic Stability of Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1932-01-01

    It is endeavored in this report to give a full outline of the problem of airplane stability and to classify the proposed solutions systematically. Longitudinal stability, which can be studied separately, is considered first. The combination of lateral and directional stabilities, which cannot be separated, will be dealt with later.

  8. Radical induction theory of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2005-01-01

    To propose a new pathogenesis called Radical Induction to explain the genesis and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is an inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic inflammation in UC is mediated by a buildup of white blood cells (WBCs) within the colonic mucosal lining; however, to date there is no answer for why WBCs initially enter the colonic mucosa to begin with. A new pathogenesis termed “Radical Induction Theory” is proposed to explain this and states that excess un-neutralized hydrogen peroxide, produced within colonic epithelial cells as a result of aberrant cellular metabolism, diffuses through cell membranes to the extracellular space where it is converted to the highly damaging hydroxyl radical resulting in oxidative damage to structures comprising the colonic epithelial barrier. Once damaged, the barrier is unable to exclude highly immunogenic fecal bacterial antigens from invading the normally sterile submucosa. This antigenic exposure provokes an initial immune response of WBC infiltration into the colonic mucosa. Once present in the mucosa, WBCs are stimulated to secrete toxins by direct exposure to fecal bacteria leading to mucosal ulceration and bloody diarrhea characteristic of this disease. PMID:15832404

  9. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  10. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  11. Antioxidant capacity of betacyanins as radical scavengers for peroxyl radical and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Taira, Junsei; Tsuchida, Eito; Katoh, Megumi C; Uehara, Masatsugu; Ogi, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the antioxidant capacity of betacyanins as indole derived plant pigments, such as betanin, phyllocactin and betanidin. The antioxidant capacity of the betacyanins was evaluated as an index of radical scavenging ability using the peroxyl radical generating system in the presence of AAPH and NO generating system using NOR3 as an NO donor. The peroxyl radical scavenging capacity was dose-dependent in the low concentration range (25-100 nM). The mol-Trolox equivalent activity/mol compound (mol-TEA/mol-compound) as an index of the antioxidant capacity indicated the following order at 10.70 ± 0.01, 3.31 ± 0.14 and 2.83 ± 0.01 mol-TEA/mol-compound for betanidin, betanin and phyllocactin, respectively. In addition, betacyanins reduced the nitrite-level in the low concentration range of 2.5-20 μM. The IC₅₀ values (μM) of nitrogen radical scavenging activity were 24.48, 17.51 and 6.81 for betanin, phyllocactin and betanidin. ESR studies provided evidence that the compounds directly scavenged NO. These results indicated that betacyanins have a strong antioxidant capacity, particularly betanidin with a catechol group had higher activity than those of the glycoside of betacyanins. This study demonstrated that the betacyanins will be useful as natural pigments to provide defence against oxidative stress.

  12. Ethyl Radical Ejection During Photodecomposition of Butanone on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-10-15

    The photodecomposition of acetone and butanone were examined on the (110) surface of rutile TiO2 using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). In both cases, photodecomposition was proceeded by a required thermal reaction between the adsorbed ketone and coadsorbed oxygen resulting in a diolate species. The diolate photodecomposed by ejection of an organic radical from the surface leaving behind a carboxylate species. In the acetone case, only methyl radical PSD was detected and acetate was left on the surface. In the butanone case there was a possibility of either methyl or ethyl radical ejection, with propionate or acetate left behind, respectively. However, only ethyl radical PSD was detected and the species left on the surface (acetate) was the same as in the acetone case. The preference for ethyl radical ejection is linked to the greater thermal stability of the ethyl radical over that of the methyl radical. Unlike in the acetone case, where the ejected methyl radicals did not participate in thermal chemistry on the TiO2(110) surface after photoactivation of the acetone diolate, ethyl radicals photodesorbing at 100 K from butanone diolate showed a preference for dehydrogenation to ethene through the influence of coadsorbed oxygen. These results reemphasize the mechanistic importance of organic radical production during photooxidation reactions on TiO2 surface.

  13. Ethyl Radical Ejection During Photodecomposition of Butanone on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-10-15

    The photodecomposition of acetone and butanone were examined on the (110) surface of rutile TiO2 using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). In both cases, photodecomposition was proceeded by a required thermal reaction between the adsorbed ketone and coadsorbed oxygen resulting in a diolate species. The diolate photodecomposed by ejection of an organic radical from the surface leaving behind a carboxylate species. In the acetone case, only methyl radical PSD was detected and acetate was left on the surface. In the butanone case there was a possibility of either methyl or ethyl radical ejection, with propionate or acetate left behind, respectively. However, only ethyl radical PSD was detected and the species left on the surface (acetate) was the same as in the acetone case. The preference for ethyl radical ejection is linked to the greater thermal stability of the ethyl radical over that of the methyl radical. Unlike in the acetone case, where the ejected methyl radicals did not participate in thermal chemistry on the TiO2(110) surface after photoactivation of the acetone diolate, ethyl radicals photodesorbing at 100 K from butanone diolate showed a preference for dehydrogenation to ethene through the influence of coadsorbed oxygen. These results reemphasize the mechanistic importance of organic radical production during photooxidation reactions on TiO2 surface. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. Solvation of benzophenone anion radical in ethanol and ethanol/2-methyltetrahydrofuran mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    1988-01-28

    The electron spin-echo modulations and the absoprtion spectra of benzophenone anion radicals generated by ..gamma..-irradiation in the glassy matrices of ethanol and ethanol2-methyltetrahydrofuran mixtures have been measured for elucidating the mechanism of spectral shift observed during the solvation of the anion radicals in alcohols. The anion radical generated at 4.2 K in the ethanol matrix maintains the same solvation structure as that of neutral benzophenone. At 77 K ethanol molecules solvate the anion radical by orienting the O-H dipoles toward the anion radical. The anion radical is hydrogen-bonded by two ethanol molecules through the p/sub z/ orbital on the benzophenone oxygen which composes the ..pi.. orbitals of anion radical. Three kinds of anion radicals are observed in the mixed matrix at 77 K. Two of them are essentially the same as those observed in the ethanol matrix at 4.2 and 77 K. The third has the absorption maximum at 700 nm and is attributed to the anion radical hydrogen-bonded by one ethanol molecule through the p/sub z/ orbital. It is concluded that the spectral shift observed in alcohols is caused by the stabilization of a SOMO ..pi..* orbital induced by the hydrogen bonding with the (RO)H--O--H(OR) angle perpendicular to the molecular plane of the anion radical

  15. Stabilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Escherichia coli: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Protein Surface To Increase Multipoint Covalent Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Abian, Olga; Grazú, Valeria; Hermoso, Juan; González, Ramón; García, José Luis; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Three mutations on the penicillin acylase surface (increasing the number of Lys in a defined area) were performed. They did not alter the enzyme's stability and kinetic properties; however, after immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose, the mutant enzyme showed improved stability under all tested conditions (e.g., pH 2.5 at 4°C, pH 5 at 60°C, pH 7 at 55°C, or 60% dimethylformamide), with stabilization factors ranging from 4 to 11 compared with the native enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose. PMID:14766616

  16. The rotational spectrum and structure of the HOOO radical.

    PubMed

    Suma, Kohsuke; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki

    2005-06-24

    The adduct of the hydroxyl radical with oxygen has been studied theoretically, in connection with atmospheric reactions, but its stability and structure remained an open question. Pure rotational spectra of the HOOO and DOOO radicals have now been observed in a supersonic jet by using a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer with a pulsed discharge nozzle. The molecular constants extracted from 12 rotational transitions with fine and hyperfine splittings support a trans planar molecular structure, in contrast to the cis planar structure predicted by most ab initio calculations. The bond linking the HO and O2 moieties is fairly long (1.688 angstroms) and comparable to the F-O bond in the isoelectronic FOO radical.

  17. Exergonic and Spontaneous Production of Radicals through Beryllium Bonds.

    PubMed

    Brea, Oriana; Alkorta, Ibon; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Elguero, José; Corral, Inés

    2016-07-18

    High-level ab initio calculations show that the formation of radicals, by the homolytic bond fission of Y-R (Y=F, OH, NH2 ; R=CH3 , NH2 , OH, F, SiH3 , PH2 , SH, Cl, NO) bonds is dramatically favored by the association of the molecule with BeX2 (X=H and Cl) derivatives. This finding is a consequence of two concomitant effects, the significant activation of the Y-R bond after the formation of the beryllium bond, and the huge stabilization of the F(.) (OH(.) , NH2 (.) ) radical upon BeX2 attachment. In those cases where R is an electronegative group, the formation of the radicals is not only exergonic, but spontaneous.

  18. Exergonic and Spontaneous Production of Radicals through Beryllium Bonds.

    PubMed

    Brea, Oriana; Alkorta, Ibon; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Elguero, José; Corral, Inés

    2016-07-18

    High-level ab initio calculations show that the formation of radicals, by the homolytic bond fission of Y-R (Y=F, OH, NH2 ; R=CH3 , NH2 , OH, F, SiH3 , PH2 , SH, Cl, NO) bonds is dramatically favored by the association of the molecule with BeX2 (X=H and Cl) derivatives. This finding is a consequence of two concomitant effects, the significant activation of the Y-R bond after the formation of the beryllium bond, and the huge stabilization of the F(.) (OH(.) , NH2 (.) ) radical upon BeX2 attachment. In those cases where R is an electronegative group, the formation of the radicals is not only exergonic, but spontaneous. PMID:27308835

  19. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  20. π-Radical to σ-Radical Tautomerization in One-Electron-Oxidized 1-Methylcytosine and Its Analogs.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Bishop, Casandra T; Wiegand, Tyler J; Hindi, Ragda M; Adhikary, Ananya; Sevilla, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    In this work, iminyl σ-radical formation in several one-electron-oxidized cytosine analogs, including 1-MeC, cidofovir, 2'-deoxycytidine (dCyd), and 2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-dCMP), were investigated in homogeneous, aqueous (D2O or H2O) glassy solutions at low temperatures by employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Upon employing density functional theory (DFT) (DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method), the calculated hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) values of iminyl σ-radical agree quite well with the experimentally observed ones, thus confirming its assignment. ESR and DFT studies show that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical is a tautomer of the deprotonated cytosine π-cation radical [cytosine π-aminyl radical, C(N4-H)(•)]. Employing 1-MeC samples at various pHs ranging from ca. 8 to 11, ESR studies show that the tautomeric equilibrium between C(N4-H)(•) and the iminyl σ-radical at low temperature is too slow to be established without added base. ESR and DFT studies agree that, in the iminyl σ-radical, the unpaired spin is localized on the exocyclic nitrogen (N4) in an in-plane pure p-orbital. This gives rise to an anisotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz = 40 G) from N4 and a near isotropic β-nitrogen coupling of 9.7 G from the cytosine ring nitrogen at N3. Iminyl σ-radical should exist in its N3-protonated form, as the N3-protonated iminyl σ-radical is stabilized in solution by over 30 kcal/mol (ΔG = -32 kcal/mol) over its conjugate base, the N3-deprotonated form. This is the first observation of an isotropic β-hyperfine ring nitrogen coupling in an N-centered DNA radical. Our theoretical calculations predict that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical can be formed in double-stranded DNA by a radiation-induced ionization-deprotonation process that is only 10 kcal/mol above the lowest energy path.

  1. Spectroscopy of Organometallic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Michael D.

    2015-12-14

    In this grant, we have been mainly concerned with characterization of the chemical bond between transition metals and carbon, although some work has also been directed toward understanding the bonding between transition metals and other main group elements. We have also undertaken some studies on the actinide metals, U and Th.

  2. Identification of free radical intermediates in oxidized wine using electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; Andersen, Mogens L; Skibsted, Leif H; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2009-05-27

    Free radicals are thought to be key intermediates in the oxidation of wine, but their nature has not been established. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect and identify several free radical species in wine under oxidative conditions with the aid of spin traps. The 1-hydroxylethyl radical was the sole radical species observed when α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone was used as a spin trap in a heated (55 °C), low-sulfite (15 mg L(-1)) red wine. This radical appears to arise from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical, and this latter species was confirmed by using a high concentration (1.5 M) of the 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide spin trap, thus providing the first direct evidence of the Fenton reaction in wine. Hydroxyl radical formation in wine was corroborated by converting hydroxyl radicals to methyl radicals by its reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The novel spin trap 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl 5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide was also used in this study to identify sulfite radicals in wine for the first time. This spin trap has also been shown to trap hydroperoxyl radicals, the generation of which is predicted in wine; however, no evidence of this species was observed. PMID:19358607

  3. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  4. Social Radicalism as a Framework for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jack L.

    This paper examines the nature of radicalism, proposes definitions and dimensions, and suggests the dynamics of radical thoughts and their interrelation with schools. A radical idea is one which is highly divergent from the normative values, behaviors, ideals or traditions of a culture at a point in time. This paper views radical ideas as…

  5. Possible mediators of the ``living'' radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyakin, M. V.; Wasserman, A. M.; Stott, P. E.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2006-03-01

    The stable radicals derived from different compounds were detected in process of styrene autopolymerization. The nitroxide radicals are produced from nitrosocompound, hindered hydroxylamine, nitrophenols and nitroanisoles. The phenoxyl radicals are formed from quinine methides, and naphtoxyl radicals are generated from 2-nitro-1-naphtol. The radicals are identified, the kinetics of their formation and follow-up evolution are studied. These radicals can participate in process of living radical polymerization as the mediators and can effect significantly on kinetics of polymerization and structure of the resulting polymer.

  6. Is Silybin the Best Free Radical Scavenger Compound in Silymarin?

    PubMed

    Reina, Miguel; Martínez, Ana

    2016-05-26

    Silymarin is a natural mixture with beneficial properties for health, specifically due to its antiradical characteristics. The major components of this mixture are silybin (SIL), silychristin (SILYC), isosilybin (ISOSIL), silydianin (SILYD), and taxifolin (TAX). In this report, the electronic properties of these substances are investigated using density functional theory calculations, mainly in order to fully understand the free radical scavenger properties of these compounds. Optimized geometries and Raman spectra are reported. These results could be experimentally useful for identifying some of the major components of the mixture. The relative abundance of deprotonated species under physiological conditions is also included. The free radical scavenger capacity is studied in relation to three mechanisms: the single electron transfer (SET), the radical adduct formation (RAF), and the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). According to this investigation, the HAT mechanism is the most efficient mechanism for scavenging free radicals for these compounds followed by the RAF mechanism where intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in order to stabilize the (•)OOH free radical. A particularly important factor is that none of the compounds being studied showed an outstanding antiradical capacity performance compared to the others. In this sense, silymarin is an interesting mixture with antiradical properties and we now know that one single component should be as effective as the mixture. PMID:27149000

  7. Methods for determining the efficacy of radical-trapping antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Pratt, Derek A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrocarbon autoxidation is the free radical chain reaction primarily responsible for the oxidative degradation of organic materials, including those that make up cells, tissues, and organs. The identification of compounds that slow this process (antioxidants) and the quantitation of their efficacies have long been goals of academic and industrial researchers. Antioxidants are generally divided into two types: preventive and radical-trapping (also commonly referred to as chain-breaking). Preventive antioxidants slow the rate of initiation of autoxidation, whereas radical-trapping antioxidants slow the rate of propagation by reacting with chain-propagating peroxyl radicals. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of different approaches to measure the kinetics of the reactions of radical-trapping antioxidants with peroxyl radicals, and their use to study the inhibition of hydrocarbon (lipid) autoxidation in homogeneous solution, as well as biphasic media (lipid bilayers) and cell culture. Direct and indirect approaches are presented and advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed in order to facilitate method selection for investigators seeking to address particular questions in this immensely popular field.

  8. Floquet theory of radical pairs in radiofrequency magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiscock, Hamish G.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for calculating the product yield of a radical pair recombination reaction in the presence of a weak time-dependent magnetic field. This method successfully circumvents the computational difficulties presented by a direct solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for a long-lived radical pair containing many hyperfine-coupled nuclear spins. Using a modified formulation of Floquet theory, treating the time-dependent magnetic field as a perturbation, and exploiting the slow radical pair recombination, we show that one can obtain a good approximation to the product yield by considering only nearly degenerate sub-spaces of the Floquet space. Within a significant parameter range, the resulting method is found to give product yields in good agreement with exact quantum mechanical results for a variety of simple model radical pairs. Moreover it is considerably more efficient than the exact calculation, and it can be applied to radical pairs containing significantly more nuclear spins. This promises to open the door to realistic theoretical investigations of the effect of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on the photochemically induced radical pair recombination reactions in the avian retina which are believed to be responsible for the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds.

  9. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  10. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of allyl chloride with hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunju; Chao, Kai; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Wanqiao; Shi, Haijie; Yao, Cen; Su, Zhongmin; Pan, Xiumei; Zhang, Jingping; Wang, Rongshun

    2014-02-28

    The reaction of allyl chloride with the hydroxyl radical has been investigated on a sound theoretical basis. This is the first time to gain a conclusive insight into the reaction mechanism and kinetics for important pathways in detail. The reaction mechanism confirms that OH addition to the C=C double bond forms the chemically activated adducts, IM1 (CH2CHOHCH2Cl) and IM2 (CH2OHCHCH2Cl) via low barriers, and direct H-abstraction paths may also occur. Variational transition state model and multichannel RRKM theory are employed to calculate the temperature-, pressure-dependent rate constants. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with the experimental data. At 100 Torr with He as bath gas, IM6 formed by collisional stabilization is the major products in the temperature range 200-600 K; the production of CH2CHCHCl via hydrogen abstractions becomes dominant at high temperatures (600-3000 K). PMID:24588171

  11. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  12. Engineering upper hinge improves stability and effector function of a human IgG1.

    PubMed

    Yan, Boxu; Boyd, Daniel; Kaschak, Timothy; Tsukuda, Joni; Shen, Amy; Lin, Yuwen; Chung, Shan; Gupta, Priyanka; Kamath, Amrita; Wong, Anne; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Gloria Y; Totpal, Klara; Schaefer, Gabriele; Jiang, Guoying; Nogal, Bartek; Emery, Craig; Vanderlaan, Martin; Carter, Paul; Harris, Reed; Amanullah, Ashraf

    2012-02-17

    Upper hinge is vulnerable to radical attacks that result in breakage of the heavy-light chain linkage and cleavage of the hinge of an IgG1. To further explore mechanisms responsible for the radical induced hinge degradation, nine mutants were designed to determine the roles that the upper hinge Asp and His play in the radical reactions. The observation that none of these substitutions could inhibit the breakage of the heavy-light chain linkage suggests that the breakage may result from electron transfer from Cys(231) directly to the heavy-light chain linkage upon radical attacks, and implies a pathway separate from His(229)-mediated hinge cleavage. On the other hand, the substitution of His(229) with Tyr showed promising advantages over the native antibody and other substitutions in improving the stability and function of the IgG1. This substitution inhibited the hinge cleavage by 98% and suggests that the redox active nature of Tyr did not enable it to replicate the ability of His to facilitate radical induced degradation. We propose that the lower redox potential of Tyr, a residue that may be the ultimate sink for oxidizing equivalents in proteins, is responsible for the inhibition. More importantly, the substitution increased the antibody's binding to FcγRIII receptors by 2-3-fold, and improved ADCC activity by 2-fold, while maintaining a similar pharmacokinetic profile with respect to the wild type. Implications of these observations for antibody engineering and development are discussed.

  13. Radical Compatibility with Nonaqueous Electrolytes and Its Impact on an All-Organic Redox Flow Battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Walter, Eric; Lawrence, Chad; Vijayakumar, M; Henderson, Wesley A; Liu, Tianbiao; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Li, Bin; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-20

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries hold the promise of achieving higher energy density because of the broader voltage window than aqueous systems, but their current performance is limited by low redox material concentration, cell efficiency, cycling stability, and current density. We report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow battery based on high concentrations of redox materials, which shows significant, comprehensive improvement in flow battery performance. A mechanistic electron spin resonance study reveals that the choice of supporting electrolytes greatly affects the chemical stability of the charged radical species especially the negative side radical anion, which dominates the cycling stability of these flow cells. This finding not only increases our fundamental understanding of performance degradation in flow batteries using radical-based redox species, but also offers insights toward rational electrolyte optimization for improving the cycling stability of these flow batteries. PMID:25891480

  14. Radical Compatibility with Nonaqueous Electrolytes and Its Impact on an All-Organic Redox Flow Battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Walter, Eric; Lawrence, Chad; Vijayakumar, M; Henderson, Wesley A; Liu, Tianbiao; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Li, Bin; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-20

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries hold the promise of achieving higher energy density because of the broader voltage window than aqueous systems, but their current performance is limited by low redox material concentration, cell efficiency, cycling stability, and current density. We report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow battery based on high concentrations of redox materials, which shows significant, comprehensive improvement in flow battery performance. A mechanistic electron spin resonance study reveals that the choice of supporting electrolytes greatly affects the chemical stability of the charged radical species especially the negative side radical anion, which dominates the cycling stability of these flow cells. This finding not only increases our fundamental understanding of performance degradation in flow batteries using radical-based redox species, but also offers insights toward rational electrolyte optimization for improving the cycling stability of these flow batteries.

  15. Radiation-induced radicals in different polymorphic modifications of D-mannitol: Structure, conformations and dosimetric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosulin, Ilya S.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2015-12-01

    The structure and conformation of radicals produced by X-ray irradiation of three polymorphic forms of D-mannitol were investigated using EPR spectroscopy. In all the cases, primary species were identified as radicals resulting from hydrogen abstraction from position 3 or 4 of the mannitol molecule. It was found that molecular packing in crystals of different polymorphic modifications had noticeable effect on the conformation of radicals observed after irradiation at room temperature and the dehydration of the primary radicals occurring at 400 K. The radicals trapped in stable modifications (β- and δ-forms) were found to be very stable at room temperature. Relatively high radical yields and remarkable stability of radicals suggest that D-mannitol can be used as an EPR dosimeter or irradiation marker.

  16. Stable Radical Content and Anti-Radical Activity of Roasted Arabica Coffee: From In-Tact Bean to Coffee Brew

    PubMed Central

    Troup, Gordon J.; Navarini, Luciano; Liverani, Furio Suggi; Drew, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (< 3 kD) fraction exhibited the highest AO capacity using DPPH as an oxidant. The AO activity was not mediated by the stable radicals or by metal complexes within the brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds. PMID:25856192

  17. Stable radical content and anti-radical activity of roasted Arabica coffee: from in-tact bean to coffee brew.

    PubMed

    Troup, Gordon J; Navarini, Luciano; Suggi Liverani, Furio; Drew, Simon C

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (< 3 kD) fraction exhibited the highest AO capacity using DPPH as an oxidant. The AO activity was not mediated by the stable radicals or by metal complexes within the brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds. PMID:25856192

  18. The role of free radicals in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Karen M; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T

    2013-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of death and disability in both the civilian and the military populations. The primary impact causes initial tissue damage, which initiates biochemical cascades, known as secondary injury, that expand the damage. Free radicals are implicated as major contributors to the secondary injury. Our review of recent rodent and human research reveals the prominent role of the free radicals superoxide anion, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite in secondary brain injury. Much of our current knowledge is based on rodent studies, and the authors identified a gap in the translation of findings from rodent to human TBI. Rodent models are an effective method for elucidating specific mechanisms of free radical-induced injury at the cellular level in a well-controlled environment. However, human TBI does not occur in a vacuum, and variables controlled in the laboratory may affect the injury progression. Additionally, multiple experimental TBI models are accepted in rodent research, and no one model fully reproduces the heterogeneous injury seen in humans. Free radical levels are measured indirectly in human studies based on assumptions from the findings from rodent studies that use direct free radical measurements. Further study in humans should be directed toward large samples to validate the findings in rodent studies. Data obtained from these studies may lead to more targeted treatment to interrupt the secondary injury cascades.

  19. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  20. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  1. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  2. Characterization of the radical trapping activity of a novel series of cyclic nitrone spin traps.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C E; Ohlweiler, D F; Carr, A A; Nieduzak, T R; Hay, D A; Adams, G; Vaz, R; Bernotas, R C

    1996-02-01

    alpha-Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) is a nitrone spin trap, which has shown efficacy in animal models of oxidative stress, including stroke, aging, sepsis, and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. We have prepared a series of novel cyclic variants of PBN and evaluated them for radical trapping activity in vitro. Specifically, their ability to inhibit iron-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes was assessed, as well as superoxide anion (O2(-.)) and hydroxyl radical ((.)OH) trapping activity as determined biochemically and using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. All cyclic nitrones tested were much more potent as inhibitors of lipid peroxidation than was PBN. The unsubstituted cyclic variant MDL 101,002 was approximately 8-fold more potent than PBN. An analysis of the analogs of MDL 101,002 revealed a direct correlation of activity with lipophilicity. However, lipophilicity does not solely account for the difference between MDL 101,002 and PBN, inasmuch as the calculated octanol/water partition coefficient for MDL 101,002 is 1.01 as compared to 1.23 for PBN. This indicated the cyclic nitrones are inherently more effective radical traps than PBN in a membrane system. The most active compound was a dichloro analog in the seven-membered ring series (MDL 104,342), which had an IC50 of 26 mum, which was 550-fold better than that of PBN. The cyclic nitrones were shown to trap (.)OH with MDL 101,002 being 20 25 times more active than PBN as assessed using 2-deoxyribose and p-nitrosodimethylaniline as substrates, respectively. Trapping of (.)OH by MDL 101,002 was also examined by using ESR spectroscopy. When Fenton's reagent was used, the (.)OH adduct of MDL 101,002 yielded a six-line spectrum with hyperfine coupling constants distinct from that of PBN. Importantly, the half-life of the adduct was nearly 5 min, while that of PBN is less than 1 min at physiologic pH. MDL 101,002 also trapped the O2(-.) radical to yield a six-line spectrum with coupling

  3. Stabilization of hydrocarbon fuel combustion by non-stationary electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozulin, V. S.; Tretyakov, P. K.; Tupikin, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The research results of a non-stationary weak electric field effect on diffusion combustion of gas hydrocarbons are presented in the paper. The main attention was focused on the study of electric field parameters effect on a flame stabilization. The two field types were considered: pulse-periodic and with variable direction of an electric vector. In the experiments the direct photography and the video shooting were used, as well as the spectrozonal photography of the own flame luminescence (at the wavelengths of excited OH* and CH* radicals emission). It was shown that the stabilization zone tends to the place of the largest electric field strength. The rotation of the electric vector leads to the flame stabilization in the electrodes plane and the local intensification of combustion.

  4. Vaginal radical trachelectomy: an update.

    PubMed

    Plante, Marie

    2008-11-01

    The vaginal radical trachelectomy has emerged as a valuable fertility-preserving treatment option for young women with early-stage disease. Cancer-related infertility is associated with feelings of depression, grief, stress, and sexual dysfunction. Data have shown that the overall oncological outcome is safe and that the obstetrical outcome is promising. In this article, we analyze the data on the vaginal radical trachelectomy published over the last 10 years in the context of what we have learned, what issues remain unclear, and what the future holds.

  5. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  6. Praxis: The Making of Australia's Radical Education Dossier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    "Radical Education Dossier" is arguably the most successful independent continuous radical educational publication ever produced; made without financial support or institutional backing of any kind, surviving on the will and efforts of changing Editorial Collectives for more than 60 Issues over three decades, directly influencing at…

  7. ESR study of free radicals in UHMW-PE fiber irradiated by gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanning; Wang, Mouhua; Tang, Zhongfeng; Wu, Guozhong

    2010-04-01

    ESR spectra of the trapped radicals in an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) fiber irradiated by gamma rays showed well-resolved hyperfine splitting at room temperature since the c-axis of the crystallites is aligned with the fiber direction and the radicals are trapped in crystallites. The alkyl radical (-CH 2- •CH-CH 2-) was the major product after irradiation in vacuum and in air at room temperature. Some of the alkyl radicals converted to allyl radicals (-CH 2- •CH-CH=CH-) and polyenyl radicals (-CH 2- •CH-(CH=CH) n-CH 2-) during storage in vacuum. Upon storage in air atmosphere, the alkyl radicals decayed by reaction with oxygen. Of particular interest is the very slow decay rate of the alkyl radical trapped in UHMW-PE fiber, the half-life is 26 days in vacuum, and 13 days in air at room temperature, which is about 1/30 and 1/100 of that reported for high density polyethylene (HDPE), respectively. The extremely long lifetime of the alkyl radical is supposed to be caused by the large size of crystallites in UHMW-PE fiber. The rate of radical decay was accelerated by annealing at elevated temperature.

  8. The quest for significance model of radicalization: implications for the management of terrorist detainees.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Michelle; Kruglanski, Arie W

    2014-01-01

    Radicalization and its culmination in terrorism represent a grave threat to the security and stability of the world. A related challenge is effective management of extremists who are detained in prison facilities. The major aim of this article is to review the significance quest model of radicalization and its implications for management of terrorist detainees. First, we review the significance quest model, which elaborates on the roles of motivation, ideology, and social processes in radicalization. Secondly, we explore the implications of the model in relation to the risks of prison radicalization. Finally, we analyze the model's implications for deradicalization strategies and review preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program targeting components of the significance quest. Based on this evidence, we argue that the psychology of radicalization provides compelling reason for the inclusion of deradicalization efforts as an essential component of the management of terrorist detainees.

  9. Oxygen Radicals in Influenza-Induced Pathogenesis and Treatment with Pyran Polymer-Conjugated SOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Tatsuya; Akaike, Takaaki; Hamamoto, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Fujio; Hirano, Takashi; Maeda, Hiroshi

    1989-05-01

    The pathogenicity of influenza virus infection in the mice involves, at least in part, overreaction of the immune responses of the host rather than a direct effect of virus multiplication. Xanthine oxidase, which is responsible for the generation of oxygen free radicals, was elevated in serum and lung tissue of mice infected with influenza virus. To test the theory that oxygen-free radicals are involved in pathogenesis, free radicals were removed by injecting superoxide dismutase (SOD), a specific superoxide radical scavenger, which was conjugated with a pyran copolymer. The conjugate protected mice against a potentially lethal influenza virus infection if administered 5 to 8 days after infection. These findings indicate that oxygen radicals are important in the pathogenesis of influenza virus infection, and that a polymer-conjugated SOD has therapeutic potential for this virus infection and other diseases associated with free radicals.

  10. Electromagnetic pulse reduces free radical generation in rat liver mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Zhou, H; Peng, R; Wang, L; Su, Z; Chen, P; Wang, S; Wang, S; Liu, Y; Cong, J; Wu, K; Hu, X; Fan, E

    2013-04-01

    Non-ionizing radiation electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is generally recorded to induce the generation of free radicals in vivo. Though mitochondria are the primary site to produce free radicals, a rare report is designed to directly investigate the EMP effects on free radical generation at mitochondrial level. Thus the present work was designed to study how EMP induces free radical generation in rat liver mitochondria in vitro using electron paramagnetic resonance technique. Surprisingly, our data suggest that EMP prevents free radical generation by activating antioxidant enzyme activity and reducing oxygen consumption and therefore free radical generation. Electron spin resonance measurements clearly demonstrate that disordering of mitochondrial lipid fluidity and membrane proteins mobility are the underlying contributors to this decreased oxygen consumption. Therefore, our results suggest that EMP might hold the potentiality to be developed as a non-invasive means to benefit certain diseases.

  11. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  12. Vascular effects of free radicals generated by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, F.S.; Webb, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Electrical field stimulation (9 V, 1.0 ms, 4 Hz) of isolated segments of rat tail arteries and dog coronary arteries inhibits contractile response to exogenous norephinephrine and elevated potassium concentration. This inhibitory effect of electrical stimulation is blocked by various agents that alter oxygen metabolism: superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, ascorbate, and dimethyl sulfoxide. The observations suggest that the inhibitory effect is due to an action of oxygen free radical metabolites that are generated by the electrical stimulation of the oxygen-rich buffer. These free radical metabolites have two actions: 1) they oxidize drugs in the experimental system, and 2) they exert a direct inhbitory action on vascular smooth muscle.

  13. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  14. Free radicals, antioxidants, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun-Zhong; Yang, Sheng; Wu, Guoyao

    2002-10-01

    Radiation hazards in outer space present an enormous challenge for the biological safety of astronauts. A deleterious effect of radiation is the production of reactive oxygen species, which result in damage to biomolecules (e.g., lipid, protein, amino acids, and DNA). Understanding free radical biology is necessary for designing an optimal nutritional countermeasure against space radiation-induced cytotoxicity. Free radicals (e.g., superoxide, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl radicals) and other reactive species (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and hypochlorous acid) are produced in the body, primarily as a result of aerobic metabolism. Antioxidants (e.g., glutathione, arginine, citrulline, taurine, creatine, selenium, zinc, vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin A, and tea polyphenols) and antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidases) exert synergistic actions in scavenging free radicals. There has been growing evidence over the past three decades showing that malnutrition (e.g., dietary deficiencies of protein, selenium, and zinc) or excess of certain nutrients (e.g., iron and vitamin C) gives rise to the oxidation of biomolecules and cell injury. A large body of the literature supports the notion that dietary antioxidants are useful radioprotectors and play an important role in preventing many human diseases (e.g., cancer, atherosclerosis, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, neurodegeneration, and diabetes). The knowledge of enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative defense mechanisms will serve as a guiding principle for establishing the most effective nutrition support to ensure the biological safety of manned space missions. PMID:12361782

  15. The Other Women: Radicalizing Feminism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puigvert, Lidia; Darder, Antonia; Merrill, Barbara; de los Reyes, Eileen; Stromquist, Nelly

    A recent international symposium on radicalizing feminism explored ways of developing a dialogic feminism that emphasizes working in different settings under the common goal of including women who have been invisible in the dominant feminist literature by furthering theories and practices based on the principles of dialogic feminism. The seminar…

  16. Hydrogen Radicals, Nitrogen Radicals, and the Production of O3 in the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Hanisco, T. F.; Jaegle, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lanzendorf, E. J.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R.-S.; Keim, E. R.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; McKeen, S. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Profitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.; Atlas, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of the hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 in the middle and upper troposphere were measured simultaneously with those of NO, O3, CO, H2O, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and with the ultraviolet and visible radiation field. The data allow a direct examination of the processes that produce O3 in this region of the atmosphere. Comparison of the measured concentrations of OH and HO2 with calculations based on their production from water vapor, ozone, and methane demonstrate that these sources are insufficient to explain the observed radical concentrations in the upper troposphere. The photolysis of carbonyl and peroxide compounds transported to this region from the lower troposphere may provide the source of HO(sub x) required to sustain the measured abundances of these radical species. The mechanism by which NO affects the production of O3 is also illustrated by the measurements. In the upper tropospheric air masses sampled, the production rate for ozone (determined from the measured concentrations of HO2 and NO) is calculated to be about 1 part per billion by volume each day. This production rate is faster than previously thought and implies that anthropogenic activities that add NO to the upper troposphere, such as biomass burning and aviation, will lead to production of more O3 than expected.

  17. Construction of a stability landscape of the CH3 domain of human IgG1 by combining directed evolution with high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Traxlmayr, Michael W; Hasenhindl, Christoph; Hackl, Matthias; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rybka, Jakub D; Borth, Nicole; Grillari, Johannes; Rüker, Florian; Obinger, Christian

    2012-10-26

    One of the most important but still poorly understood issues in protein chemistry is the relationship between sequence and stability of proteins. Here, we present a method for analyzing the influence of each individual residue on the foldability and stability of an entire protein. A randomly mutated library of the crystallizable fragment of human immunoglobulin G class 1 (IgG1-Fc) was expressed on the surface of yeast, followed by heat incubation at 79°C and selection of stable variants that still bound to structurally specific ligands. High throughput sequencing allowed comparison of the mutation rate between the starting and selected library pools, enabling the generation of a stability landscape for the entire CH3 domain of human IgG1 at single residue resolution. Its quality was analyzed with respect to (i) the structure of IgG1-Fc, (ii) evolutionarily conserved positions and (iii) in silico calculations of the energy of unfolding of all variants in comparison with the wild-type protein. In addition, this new experimental approach allowed the assignment of functional epitopes of structurally specific ligands used for selection [Fc γ-receptor I (CD64) and anti-human CH2 domain antibody] to distinct binding regions in the CH2 domain. PMID:22846908

  18. Halogen radicals contribute to photooxidation in coastal and estuarine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kimberly M.; Mitch, William A.

    2016-05-01

    Although halogen radicals are recognized to form as products of hydroxyl radical (•OH) scavenging by halides, their contribution to the phototransformation of marine organic compounds has received little attention. We demonstrate that, relative to freshwater conditions, seawater halides can increase photodegradation rates of domoic acid, a marine algal toxin, and dimethyl sulfide, a volatile precursor to cloud condensation nuclei, up to fivefold. Using synthetic seawater solutions, we show that the increased photodegradation is specific to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and halides, rather than other seawater salt constituents (e.g., carbonates) or photoactive species (e.g., iron and nitrate). Experiments in synthetic and natural coastal and estuarine water samples demonstrate that the halide-specific increase in photodegradation could be attributed to photochemically generated halogen radicals rather than other photoproduced reactive intermediates [e.g., excited-state triplet DOM (3DOM*), reactive oxygen species]. Computational kinetic modeling indicates that seawater halogen radical concentrations are two to three orders of magnitude greater than freshwater •OH concentrations and sufficient to account for the observed halide-specific increase in photodegradation. Dark •OH generation by gamma radiolysis demonstrates that halogen radical production via •OH scavenging by halides is insufficient to explain the observed effect. Using sensitizer models for DOM chromophores, we show that halogen radicals are formed predominantly by direct oxidation of Cl‑ and Br‑ by 3DOM*, an •OH-independent pathway. Our results indicate that halogen radicals significantly contribute to the phototransformation of algal products in coastal or estuarine surface waters.

  19. Halogen radicals contribute to photooxidation in coastal and estuarine waters.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Mitch, William A

    2016-05-24

    Although halogen radicals are recognized to form as products of hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) scavenging by halides, their contribution to the phototransformation of marine organic compounds has received little attention. We demonstrate that, relative to freshwater conditions, seawater halides can increase photodegradation rates of domoic acid, a marine algal toxin, and dimethyl sulfide, a volatile precursor to cloud condensation nuclei, up to fivefold. Using synthetic seawater solutions, we show that the increased photodegradation is specific to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and halides, rather than other seawater salt constituents (e.g., carbonates) or photoactive species (e.g., iron and nitrate). Experiments in synthetic and natural coastal and estuarine water samples demonstrate that the halide-specific increase in photodegradation could be attributed to photochemically generated halogen radicals rather than other photoproduced reactive intermediates [e.g., excited-state triplet DOM ((3)DOM*), reactive oxygen species]. Computational kinetic modeling indicates that seawater halogen radical concentrations are two to three orders of magnitude greater than freshwater (•)OH concentrations and sufficient to account for the observed halide-specific increase in photodegradation. Dark (•)OH generation by gamma radiolysis demonstrates that halogen radical production via (•)OH scavenging by halides is insufficient to explain the observed effect. Using sensitizer models for DOM chromophores, we show that halogen radicals are formed predominantly by direct oxidation of Cl(-) and Br(-) by (3)DOM*, an (•)OH-independent pathway. Our results indicate that halogen radicals significantly contribute to the phototransformation of algal products in coastal or estuarine surface waters. PMID:27162335

  20. Halogen radicals contribute to photooxidation in coastal and estuarine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kimberly M.; Mitch, William A.

    2016-05-01

    Although halogen radicals are recognized to form as products of hydroxyl radical (•OH) scavenging by halides, their contribution to the phototransformation of marine organic compounds has received little attention. We demonstrate that, relative to freshwater conditions, seawater halides can increase photodegradation rates of domoic acid, a marine algal toxin, and dimethyl sulfide, a volatile precursor to cloud condensation nuclei, up to fivefold. Using synthetic seawater solutions, we show that the increased photodegradation is specific to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and halides, rather than other seawater salt constituents (e.g., carbonates) or photoactive species (e.g., iron and nitrate). Experiments in synthetic and natural coastal and estuarine water samples demonstrate that the halide-specific increase in photodegradation could be attributed to photochemically generated halogen radicals rather than other photoproduced reactive intermediates [e.g., excited-state triplet DOM (3DOM*), reactive oxygen species]. Computational kinetic modeling indicates that seawater halogen radical concentrations are two to three orders of magnitude greater than freshwater •OH concentrations and sufficient to account for the observed halide-specific increase in photodegradation. Dark •OH generation by gamma radiolysis demonstrates that halogen radical production via •OH scavenging by halides is insufficient to explain the observed effect. Using sensitizer models for DOM chromophores, we show that halogen radicals are formed predominantly by direct oxidation of Cl- and Br- by 3DOM*, an •OH-independent pathway. Our results indicate that halogen radicals significantly contribute to the phototransformation of algal products in coastal or estuarine surface waters.

  1. Kinetics for Tautomerizations and Dissociations of Triglycine Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Chi-Kit; Zhao, Junfang; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K.; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2009-06-01

    Fragmentations of tautomers of the α-centered radical triglycine radical cation, [GGG*]+, [GG*G]+, and [G*GG]+, are charge-driven, giving b-type ions; these are processes that are facilitated by a mobile proton, as in the fragmentation of protonated triglycine (Rodriquez, C.F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006 - 3012). By contrast, radical centers are less mobile. Two mechanisms have been examined theoretically utilizing density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus modeling: (1) a direct hydrogen-atom migration between two α-carbons, and (2) a two-step proton migration involving a canonical [GGG]*+ as an intermediate. Predictions employing the latter mechanism are in good agreement with results of recent CID experiments (Chu, I.K. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 7862 - 7872).

  2. The tricarbonylchromium template for stereocontrol in radical reactions of arenes.

    PubMed

    Merlic, C A; Walsh, J C

    2001-04-01

    Chromium tricarbonyl complexed aryl aldeyhydes and ketones underwent Sm(II)-promoted radical lactone formation in the presence of alpha,beta-unsaturated esters to produce diastereomerically pure lactones in good yields. The completely diastereoselective lactone formation involves capture of the benzylic ketyl radical by the ester anti to the chromium tricarbonyl moiety. The relative stereochemistry of the lactone and chromium tricarbonyl moieties was proven by X-ray crystallography and supports the proposed mechanism. Enantiopure chromium tricarbonyl complexed arenes afforded single enantiomers when subjected to Sm(II)-promoted radical lactone formation condiditions. The enantio- and diastereomerically pure chromium tricarbonyl complexed lactones were subsequently treated with BF3.OEt2 to generate a mixture of diastereomers via Lewis acid promoted chromium tricabonyl directed cationic rearrangement. The diastereomers were separated and individually decomplexed with I2 to afford both of the corresponding chromium-free enantiomerically pure lactones starting from a single enantiomerically pure chromium tricarbonyl complex. PMID:11281765

  3. Radical Compatibility with Nonaqueous Electrolytes and Its Impact on an All-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Walter, Eric D.; Lawrence, Chad W.; Vijayakumar, M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Li, Bin; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-20

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries hold the promise to achieve higher energy density ascribed to the broader voltage window than their aqueous counterparts, but their current performance is limited by low redox material concentration, poor cell efficiency, and inferior cycling stability. We report a new nonaqueous total-organic flow battery based on high concentrations of 9-fluorenone as negative and 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1-methoxy-4-[2’-methoxyethoxy]benzene as positive redox materials. The supporting electrolytes are found to greatly affect the cycling stability of flow cells through varying chemical stabilities of the charged radical species, especially the 9-fluorenone radical anions, as confirmed by electron spin resonance. Such an electrolyte optimization sheds light on mechanistic understandings of capacity fading in flow batteries employing organic radical-based redox materials and demonstrates that rational design of supporting electrolyte is vital for stable cyclability.

  4. Gas-phase reactions of aryl radicals with 2-butyne: experimental and theoretical investigation employing the N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl radical cation.

    PubMed

    Lam, A K Y; Li, C; Khairallah, G; Kirk, B B; Blanksby, S J; Trevitt, A J; Wille, U; O'Hair, R A J; da Silva, G

    2012-02-21

    Aromatic radicals form in a variety of reacting gas-phase systems, where their molecular weight growth reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons are of considerable importance. We have investigated the ion-molecule reaction of the aromatic distonic N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl (NMP) radical cation with 2-butyne (CH(3)C≡CCH(3)) using ion trap mass spectrometry. Comparison is made to high-level ab initio energy surfaces for the reaction of NMP and for the neutral phenyl radical system. The NMP radical cation reacts rapidly with 2-butyne at ambient temperature, due to the apparent absence of any barrier. The activated vinyl radical adduct predominantly dissociates via loss of a H atom, with lesser amounts of CH(3) loss. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry allows us to identify small quantities of the collisionally deactivated reaction adduct. Statistical reaction rate theory calculations (master equation/RRKM theory) on the NMP+2-butyne system support our experimental findings, and indicate a mechanism that predominantly involves an allylic resonance-stabilized radical formed via H atom shuttling between the aromatic ring and the C(4) side-chain, followed by cyclization and/or low-energy H atom β-scission reactions. A similar mechanism is demonstrated for the neutral phenyl radical (Ph˙)+2-butyne reaction, forming products that include 3-methylindene. The collisionally deactivated reaction adduct is predicted to be quenched in the form of a resonance-stabilized methylphenylallyl radical. Experiments using a 2,5-dichloro substituted methyl-pyridiniumyl radical cation revealed that in this case CH(3) loss from the 2-butyne adduct is favoured over H atom loss, verifying the key role of ortho H atoms, and the shuttling mechanism, in the reactions of aromatic radicals with alkynes. As well as being useful phenyl radical analogues, pyridiniumyl radical cations may form in the ionosphere of Titan, where they could undergo rapid

  5. ({radical}(13)x{radical}(13))R13.9 deg. and ({radical}(7)x{radical}(7))R19.1 deg. reconstructions of the polar SrTiO{sub 3} (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Bruce C.; Castell, Martin R.

    2007-04-15

    Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (111) samples are annealed in UHV at 850 deg. C for 30 min and investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that both ({radical}(7)x{radical}(7))R19.1 deg. and ({radical}(13)x{radical}(13))R13.9 deg. reconstructions coexist on the surface. Step heights of 0.21{+-}0.02 nm on the surface are equivalent to the d{sub 111} lattice parameter, which is the distance between two adjacent, similar (111) planes in the bulk crystal. The calculated LEED pattern for this co-reconstruction corresponds to the observed LEED pattern, which resembles a six-petal flower. AES analysis indicates no detectable impurities, and shows the surface to be Ti and Sr enriched and O deficient compared to the bulk stoichiometry. This change in surface composition is proposed to provide the stability for the polar surface.

  6. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology.

  7. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. PMID

  8. Radical Puppets and the Language of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Rikki

    2009-01-01

    Radical puppets are puppets with a social message. Radical puppets encourage creative ideas that lead toward understanding global and environmental aspects of society through the "art of the puppet," a phrase coined by American puppeteer Bill Baird (1965). There is a blending of performance and visual art in puppetry. Through radical puppetry,…

  9. Stabilized sulfur dissolving compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, M.J.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a storage-stable composition for the dissolution of sulfur. It comprises a major proportion of a sulfide of the formula R{sup 1}SS{sub A}SR{sup 2} where R{sup 1} and R{sup 2} are independently alkyl, aryl, alkaryl, alkoxyalkyl or hydroxyalkyl radicals wherein the alkyl moiety has from 1 to 24 carbon atoms and A is an average number ranging from 0 to 3, a catalytic amount of a mixture of an amine and a mercaptan, and a stabilizing component effective for an in an amount sufficient to inhibit loss of catalyst activity on storage.

  10. [Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Tada, M; Nakano, A; Konno, T

    1988-04-01

    The neuroanatomy of the pelvic space was studied in order to clarify the course of cavernous nerves responsible for erectile function. The cavernous nerves travel along the dorsolateral portion at the base toward the apex of the prostate, then penetrate urogenital diaphragm at the lateral aspect of the membranous urethra. According to the anatomical findings, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy was performed through the antegrade approach in 28 patients with prostate cancer. No significant surgical complications were encountered in the present series. Of the 28, evaluable cases were limited to 22 in terms of erection. Fifteen patients (68%) recovered their erectile function after nerve-sparing surgery. Therefore, the present surgical technique seems to be effective for the preservation of male sexual function following radical pelvic surgery.

  11. Mutagenicity of Oxygen Free Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Carmella S.; Hassan, Hosni M.

    1982-05-01

    Paraquat 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) was used as an intracellular generator of oxygen free radicals and was found to be highly mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium. It caused both base-pair substitution and frameshift mutations. Paraquat was much more toxic and mutagenic in a simple nutritionally restricted medium than in a rich complex medium. The mutagenicity of paraquat was dependent upon the presence of a supply of both electrons and oxygen. Cells containing high levels of superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) were more resistant to the toxicity and the mutagenicity of paraquat than were cells containing normal levels of this enzyme. The mutagenicity of paraquat thus appears to be due to its ability to exacerbate the intracellular production of superoxide radicals.

  12. Synthesis of functionalized 5-substituted thiazolidine-2-thiones via adscititious xanthate-promoted radical cyclization of allyl(alkyl/aryl)dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Simiao; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Jun; Chen, Ning; Xu, Jiaxi

    2016-01-21

    Functionalized 5-substituted thiazolidine-2-thiones were synthesized efficiently from alkyl allyl(alkyl/aryl)-dithiocarbamates via radical cyclization with the corresponding S-alkyl O-ethyl xanthates as the adscititious radical precursors. The application of the adscititious radical precursors improves not only the yields, but also the efficiency in the radical cyclization reaction significantly. The current adscititious radical precursor method provides a new strategy for the achievement and improvement of some radical reactions which are hardly or difficultly realized by the traditional direct methods. PMID:26626401

  13. Application of Controlled Radical Polymerization for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    CHU, DAVID S.H.; SCHELLINGER, JOAN G.; SHI, JULIE; CONVERTINE, ANTHONY J.; STAYTON, PATRICK S.; PUN, SUZIE H.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Nucleic acid-based therapeutics can potentially address otherwise untreatable genetic disorders and have significant potential for a wide range of diseases. Therapeutic gene delivery can restore protein function by replacing defunct genes to restore cellular health while RNA interference (RNAi) can mask mutated and harmful genes. Cationic polymers have been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications due to their self-assembly with nucleic acids into virus-sized nanoparticles and high transfection efficiency in vitro, but toxicity and particle stability have limited their clinical applications. The advent of controlled radical polymerization has improved the quality, control and reproducibility of synthesized materials. Controlled radical polymerization yields well-defined, narrowly disperse materials of designable architectures and molecular weight, allowing study of the effects of polymer architecture and molecular weight on transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity for improved design of next-generation vectors. Robust methods such as atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reverse addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT), and ring-opening metastasis polymerization (ROMP) have been used to engineer materials that specifically enhance extracellular stability, cellular specificity, and decrease toxicity. This Account reviews findings from structure-function studies that have elucidated key design motifs necessary for the development of effective nucleic acid vectors. In addition, polymers that are biodegradable, form supramolecular structures, target specific cells, or facilitate endosomal release are also discussed. Finally, promising materials with in vivo applications ranging from pulmonary gene delivery to DNA vaccines are described. PMID:22242774

  14. [Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Several hydrocarbon reactive intermediates (carbenes, biradicals, etc.) were prepared in a supersonic jet expansion. heats of formation were determined for the isosmeric C[sub 3]H[sub 2] carbenes. Fits were made to the photoelectron spectra of c-C[sub 3]H[sub 2] and c- C[sub 4]H[sub 4]. Resonant MPI (multi-photon ionization ) spectra were obtained for allyl radical and its deuterated isotopomers.

  15. [Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Several hydrocarbon reactive intermediates (carbenes, biradicals, etc.) were prepared in a supersonic jet expansion. heats of formation were determined for the isosmeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes. Fits were made to the photoelectron spectra of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} and c- C{sub 4}H{sub 4}. Resonant MPI (multi-photon ionization?) spectra were obtained for allyl radical and its deuterated isotopomers.

  16. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  17. Rovibronic Variational Calculations of the Nitrate Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated diabatic Hamiltonians have been developed in order to understand the low-energy vibronic level structure of the nitrate radical (NO_3), which exhibits strong coupling between the ~X and doubly degenerate ~B states. Previous studies have reproduced the observed vibronic level positions up to 2000 wn~above the zero-point level, yet the rotational structure has remained uninvestigated with ab initio methods. In this talk, we present calculations of the N≥0 rovibronic structure of low-lying vibronic states of NO_3, in which complicated rovibrational and Coriolis interactions have been observed. Our results include calculations using both adiabatic and diabatic Hamiltonians, enabling a direct comparison between the two. We discuss extensions of our treatment to include spin-orbit and spin-rotation effects.

  18. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ≈10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  19. A radical way to burn

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1996-08-01

    By manipulating chamber geometries as well as engine cycle pressures and timing, engineers are exploiting a long-obscure technology known as activated radical combustion. Piston-driven internal combustion engines generally come in two varieties: compression-ignited diesels and spark-ignited gasoline power plants. There, is however, a third way to initiate burning of the fuel-air mixture. The technique--variously called radical ignition (RI), activated radical (AR) combustion, Toyota-Soken combustion, and active thermo-atmosphere combustion--is not exactly new, but only recently have engineers begun to exploit the process in practical power plants. These new units include a lightweight two-stroke racing-motorcycle engine, truck diesels with reduced soot output, and lean-burn spark-ignited car engines. This long-obscure combustion process is based on a range of specialized chemical kinetic and physical acoustic techniques developed over decades. Engineers manipulate fundamental combustion parameter such as chamber geometries, valving and porting configurations, and engine cycle pressures and timing to foster the formation of certain highly reactive chemical species that lower the fuel-air mixture`s flash point so that even modest compression make sit self-ignite. These chemical initiators are then retained into the next cycle to start combustion, allowing the engineer to run stably with no spark.

  20. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  1. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Corey A; Simon, Sanford R; Schoonen, Martin AA

    2008-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF), amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH)] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:18307787

  2. Generation of free radical intermediates from foreign compounds by neutrophil-derived oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, B; Sohnle, P G

    1985-01-01

    A large number of foreign compounds, including many drugs, industrial pollutants, and environmental chemicals, can be oxidized under appropriate conditions to potentially toxic free radical intermediates. We evaluated the ability of the oxidants produced by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system to generate free radical intermediates from several such compounds. Sodium hypochlorite or hypochlorous acid produced by human peripheral blood neutrophils and trapped in the form of taurine chloramine were both found to be capable of producing free radicals from chlorpromazine, aminopyrine, and phenylhydrazine. These radical intermediates were demonstrated by visible light spectroscopy and by direct electron spin resonance (for the chlorpromazine and aminopyrine radicals) or by spin-trapping (for the phenyl radical generated from phenylhydrazine). Stable oxidants produced by the neutrophils (i.e., those present in the supernatants of stimulated neutrophils in the absence of added taurine) also were found to be capable of generating free radical intermediates. The production of the oxidants and the ability of neutrophil supernatants to generate these radicals were almost completely eliminated by sodium azide, a myeloperoxidase inhibitor. We suggest that the oxidation by neutrophils of certain chemical compounds to potentially damaging electrophilic free radical forms may represent a new metabolic pathway for these substances and could be important in the processes of drug toxicity and chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:2987307

  3. Educating Our Black Children: New Directions and Radical Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers from U.S. and British contributors focuses on positive social inclusion policy and practice for black students. There are 15 chapters in five parts. Part 1, "Tackling Historical and Contemporary Education Problems," includes: (1) "Racism, Policy and the (Mis)Education of Black Children" (David Gillborn); (2) "The…

  4. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric α-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  5. New Evidence for Hydroxyalkyl Radicals and Light- and Thermally Induced Trapped Electron Reactions in Rhamnose.

    PubMed

    Aalbergsjø, Siv G; Sagstuen, Einar

    2015-08-01

    Radical formation and trapping of radicals in X-irradiated crystals of rhamnose at 6 K were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and ENDOR-induced EPR (EIE) techniques, complemented with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The two major radical species at 6 K were the O4-centered alkoxy radical and the intermolecularly trapped electron (IMTE), previously also detected by other authors. The current experimental results provided hyperfine coupling constants for these two species in good agreement with the previous data, thus providing a consistency check that improves their credibility. In addition to the O4-centered alkoxy radical and the IMTE, the C3-centered and C5-centered hydroxyalkyl radicals are the most prominent primary species at 6 K. The C3-centered radical appears in two slightly different conformations at 6 K, designated C and D. The C5-centered radical exhibits a coupling to a methyl group with tunneling rotation at 6 K, and analysis of one of the rotational substates (A) of the spin system yielded an understanding of the structure of this radical. Visible light bleaching of the IMTE at 6 K led to the C3-centered radical C, and thermal annealing above 6 K resulted in a conversion of the C to the D conformation. In addition, thermal annealing releases the IMTE, apparently resulting in the formation of the C2-centered radical. It is possible that the thermal decay of the IMTE also contributes to a small part of the C3-centered radical (D) population at 85 K. There are several other products trapped in rhamnose crystals directly after irradiation at 6 K, among which are resonance lines due to the C2 H-abstraction product. However, these other products are minority species and were not fully characterized in the current work.

  6. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A 2∑+(v' = 1) <-- X 2Π(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  7. Radical scavengers as ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Sinha, Barij Nayan

    2012-01-01

    This paper compiled all the previous reports on radical scavengers, an interesting class of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. We have highlighted three key research areas: chemical classification of radical scavengers, structural and functional aspects of the radical site, and progress in drug designing for radical scavengers. Under the chemical classification section, we have recorded the discovery of hydroxyurea followed by discussions on hydroxamic acids, amidoximes, hydroxyguanidines, and phenolic compounds. In the next section, we have compiled the structural information for the radical site obtained from different crystallographic and theoretical studies. Finally, we have included the reported ligand based and structure based drug-designing studies.

  8. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  9. Measurement of antioxidant activity with trifluoperazine dihydrochloride radical cation.

    PubMed

    Asghar, M N; Khan, I U

    2008-06-01

    A novel, rapid and cost-effective trifluoperazine dihydrochloride (TFPH) decolorization assay is described for the screening of antioxidant activity. A chromogenic reaction between TFPH and potassium persulfate at low pH produces an orange-red radical cation with maximum absorption at 502 nm in its first-order derivative spectrum. TFPH was dissolved in distilled water to give a 100 mM solution. The TFPH radical cation solution was made by reacting 0.5 mL of the solution with K2S2O8 (final concentration: 0.1 mM) and diluting to 100 mL with 4 M H2SO4 solution. A linear inhibition of color production was observed with linearly increasing amounts of antioxidants, with correlation coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.999 to 0.983. The antioxidant capacity of standard solutions of an antioxidant was evaluated by comparing with the inhibition curve using Trolox as the standard. Comparison of antioxidant capacity determined with this newly developed TFPH assay and with the well-known 2,2'-azinobis-[3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] (ABTS)-persulfate decolorization assay indicated the efficacy and sensitivity of the procedure. The proposed assay is less expensive (costs about US$4 per 100 assays) and requires only 20 min for preparation of radical cation solution in comparison with ABTS assay, in which almost 12-16 h are required for preparation of a stable ABTS radical cation solution. The present assay has the advantage over ABTS assay that it can be used to measure the antioxidant activity of the samples, which are naturally found at a pH as low as 1, because the radical cation itself has been stabilized at low pH.

  10. Radical reactions of thiamin pyrophosphate in 2-oxoacid oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Reed, George H; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Mansoorabadi, Steven O

    2012-11-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential in carbohydrate metabolism in all forms of life. TPP-dependent decarboxylation reactions of 2-oxo-acid substrates result in enamine adducts between the thiazolium moiety of the coenzyme and decarboxylated substrate. These central enamine intermediates experience different fates from protonation in pyruvate decarboxylase to oxidation by the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, the pyruvate oxidases, and 2-oxoacid oxidoreductases. Virtually all of the TPP-dependent enzymes, including pyruvate decarboxylase, can be assayed by 1-electron redox reactions linked to ferricyanide. Oxidation of the enamines is thought to occur via a 2-electron process in the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, wherein acyl group transfer is associated with reduction of the disulfide of the lipoamide moiety. However, discrete 1-electron steps occur in the oxidoreductases, where one or more [4Fe-4S] clusters mediate the electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors. These radical intermediates can be detected in the absence of the acyl-group acceptor, coenzyme A (CoASH). The π-electron system of the thiazolium ring stabilizes the radical. The extensively delocalized character of the radical is evidenced by quantitative analysis of nuclear hyperfine splitting tensors as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and by electronic structure calculations. The second electron transfer step is markedly accelerated by the presence of CoASH. While details of the second electron transfer step and its facilitation by CoASH remain elusive, expected redox properties of potential intermediates limit possible scenarios. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology.

  11. Acute effects of whole body vibration on directionality and reaction time latency of trunk muscles: the importance of rest and implications for spine stability.

    PubMed

    Arora, Neha; Grenier, Sylvain G

    2013-04-01

    Workplace exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) has been identified as one of the major physical risk factors encountered by the population. There are indications that, subsequent to a perturbation, impaired reflex response could allow for destabilization of the spine, possibly leading to injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate if WBV alters reflex response of trunk muscles and if the direction of perturbation (flexion or extension or lateral) and delay between exposure and perturbation influences the response. The results indicate that EMG latency was increased more in the vibration condition than in sitting without vibration. Significant effects with respect to directionality were observed in Erector Spinae muscles. The EMG latency reduced from the effect of perturbation after a 20s rest period. Even though the EMG latency did not fully return to its Pre-test state, the present results still show that recovery from the acute effects of WBV is possible with a rest period.

  12. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  13. Micromachined silicon acoustic delay line with 3D-printed micro linkers and tapered input for improved structural stability and acoustic directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.; Kumar, A.; Xu, S.; Zou, J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that micromachined silicon acoustic delay lines can provide a promising solution to achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography without the need for complex transducer arrays and data acquisition electronics. To achieve deeper imaging depth and wider field of view, a longer delay time and therefore delay length are required. However, as the length of the delay line increases, it becomes more vulnerable to structural instability due to reduced mechanical stiffness. In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and testing of a new silicon acoustic delay line enhanced with 3D printed polymer micro linker structures. First, mechanical deformation of the silicon acoustic delay line (with and without linker structures) under gravity was simulated by using finite element method. Second, the acoustic crosstalk and acoustic attenuation caused by the polymer micro linker structures were evaluated with both numerical simulation and ultrasound transmission testing. The result shows that the use of the polymer micro linker structures significantly improves the structural stability of the silicon acoustic delay lines without creating additional acoustic attenuation and crosstalk. In addition, the improvement of the acoustic acceptance angle of the silicon acoustic delay lines was also investigated to better suppress the reception of unwanted ultrasound signals outside of the imaging plane. These two improvements are expected to provide an effective solution to eliminate current limitations on the achievable acoustic delay time and out-of-plane imaging resolution of micromachined silicon acoustic delay line arrays.

  14. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine.

  15. Anodic electrogenerated chemiluminescence of quantum dots: size and stabilizer matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Li, Tangsong; Yuan, Lang; Liu, Shaoqin; Wang, Zhenlong

    2012-08-01

    The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is generally believed to be independent of particle sizes or the capping agents used. Herein, we demonstrate that CdTe QDs with different sizes and stabilizers evidently exhibit different ECL behavior in aqueous solution. The ECL of CdTe QDs stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) displays two waves at potentials of about +1.17 V and +1.74 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively. ECL spectra confirm that the ECL of QDs is attributed to their band gap luminescence, in which the peak positions are changed with QD sizes. The ECL mechanism of CdTe QDs involves superoxide radical generation by reduction of dissolved oxygen at lower potential or water splitting at higher potential. Direct evidence for superoxide radicals in this medium was obtained via electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. In comparison, the 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA)-capped CdTe QDs did not exhibit any ECL in air-saturated pH 7.4 PBS. Both ESR and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) experiments revealed that amine groups in MEA-capped QDs were responsible for the absence of ECL. The reaction of an amine group with a superoxide radical leads to the quenching of ECL. The ECL quenching of MPA-capped CdTe QDs was further used to detect melamine. Under the optimum conditions, the inhibited ECL was linear with the logarithm of concentration of melamine within the concentration range of 10-9 to 10-5 M and the detection limit was found to be 6.74 × 10-10 M, which was 100-100 000 times lower than that of the most previous methods.The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is generally believed to be independent of particle sizes or the capping agents used. Herein, we demonstrate that CdTe QDs with different sizes and stabilizers evidently exhibit different ECL behavior in aqueous solution. The ECL of CdTe QDs stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) displays two waves at potentials of about +1

  16. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1993-12-01

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  17. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  18. Neuroprotective strategies in radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Jonathan D; Mulhall, John P

    2005-01-01

    In this section, authors from New York give their views on the various neuroprotective strategies for patients having a radical prostatectomy, such as the use of nerve grafts and other approaches. A joint study from Korea, the USA, Canada and the UK is presented in a paper on the importance of patient perception in the clinical assessment and management of BPH. There is also a review of robotic urological surgery. Finally, authors from New York give a review on the life of Isaac Newton. This is a new historical review in the journal, but one that will be of general interest.

  19. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer: generation of α-aminoalkyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Norrish, Andrew M; Sénéchal, Katell; Windeatt, Kim M; Coles, Simon J; Hursthouse, Michael B

    2010-10-21

    The extent to which deuterium can act as a protecting group to prevent unwanted 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer to aryl and vinyl radical intermediates was examined in the context of the generation of α-aminoalkyl radicals in a pyrrolidine ring. Intra- and intermolecular radical trapping following hydrogen atom transfer provides an illustration of the use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in directing the outcome of synthetic C-C bond-forming processes.