Science.gov

Sample records for radio channel measurements

  1. Microwave line-of-sight channel measurements, channel modelling, and application of channel models to digital radio performance prediction, publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeggman, S. G.

    1991-06-01

    Seven scientific papers published during 1978 to 1990 are reviewed. The papers constitute the basis for a PhD. The titles of the 7 papers are as follows: Time domain observation of microwave multipath propagation and estimation of channel model parameters; Microwave channel model parameters from pulse propagation measurements; The use of simple channel models in the analysis of 16 QAM radio links; Multipath outage probability for QAM systems with interference; Planning of propagation measurements for characterization of digital radio link channels; Measurement and statistical characterization of two 40 MHz line of sight radio channels at 6.2 GHz; and Effects on bandwidth on microwave line of sight channel modeling and digital radio performance prediction.

  2. A radio frequency device for measurement of minute dielectric property changes in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunrong; Wang, Pingshan

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a sensitive radio frequency (rf) device to detect small dielectric property changes in microfluidic channel. The device consists of an on-chip Wilkinson power divider and a rat-race hybrid, which are built with planar microstrip lines and thin film chip resistors. Interference is used to cancel parasitic background signals. As a result, the measurement sensitivity is improved by more than 20 dB compared with conventional transmission lines. Compared with an ultrasensitive slot antenna/cuvette assembly [K. M. Taylor and D. W. van der Weide, IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 53, 1576 (2005)], the proposed rf device is two times more sensitive.

  3. Search for High Rotation Measures in Extragalactic Radio Sources I. Multi-Channel Observations at 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Tabara, H.; Kato, T.; Aizu, K.

    1995-12-01

    Multi-channel polarimetry has been performed to detect high rotation measure (RM) at 3 cm using the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. The high RM candidates of 96 radio sources were selected to be observed, and RMs of 35 sources were derived from the observations. Since the four channels are set contiguously from 2.84 cm to 3.31 cm, |RM| can be derived uniquely up to 15000 rad m(-2) by this polarimeter. We found that there exist sources with RM of several thousands rad m(-2) . In fact, 5 sources have |RM| > 1000 rad m(-2) . On the other hand, all sources observed are well within this system limits, and therefore we suggest the observed upper limit of |RM| is around 5000 rad m(-2) for extragalactic radio sources, even taken into account the redshift of sources.

  4. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  5. Digital data communications over microwave radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, J.

    1984-10-01

    A major contribution to system outage in a terrestrial digital radio channel is deep fading of the frequency transfer characteristic, which in addition to causing a precipitous drop in received signal-to-noise ratio also causes signal dispersion that can result in severe intersymbol interference. Because the temporal variation of the channel is slow compared to the signaling rate, the information theoretic channel capacity and the efficiency index in bits/cycle can be viewed as random processes. Based on an established mathematical model for fading channels, the probability distribution of channel capacity and the distribution of efficiency indices for different communications techniques are estimated. A crucial obstacle to achieving these rates is the nonlinear distortion introduced by power amplifiers. A method for coping with this nonlinear distortion is also described.

  6. Cognitive radio based optimal channel sensing and resources allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayasarveswari, V.; Khatun, S.; Fakir, M. M.; Nayeem, M. N.; Kamarudin, L. M.; Jakaria, A.

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) is the latest type of wireless technoloy that is proposed to mitigate spectrum saturation problem. İn cognitve radio, secondary user will use primary user's spectrum during primary user's absence without interupting primary user's transmission. This paper focuses on practical cognitive radio network development process using Android based smart phone for the data transmission. Energy detector based sensing method was proposed and used here because it doesnot require primary user's information. Bluetooth and Wi-fi are the two available types of spectrum that was sensed for CR detection. Simulation showed cognitive radio network can be developed using Android based smart phones. So, a complete application was developed using Java based Android Eclipse program. Finally, the application was uploaded and run on Android based smart phone to form and verify CR network for channel sensing and resource allocation. The observed efficiency of the application was around 81%.

  7. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  8. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  9. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  10. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  11. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  12. Development of a fast sampling system for estimation of impulse responses of mobile radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melancon, Pierre

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the features of measurement equipment developed to measure impulse response estimates of mobile radio channels in less than a ms per measurement. The development of such equipment was required to measure mobile radio channels in realistic operating scenarios, in a normal sized vehicle moving at typical speeds in different environments. Up to speeds of 70 km/hr, the measurement period is short enough to assume the equipment is measuring the same channel during the whole sampling interval. AT the transmitter end of the measurement system, a wideband signal (10 MHz) is produced by modulating a carrier frequency with a 511 bit pseudo random sequence at 5 Mb/s and transmitted through the radio channel. The received signal is down-converted to 70 MHz and demodulated by a complex demodulator. The quadrature baseband signals at the demodulator outputs are then filtered and sampled at high speed by two fast digitizers. During this process, the data are stored in large memory banks to allow a fast sampling rate during a long period of time. Data are transferred to laser disks for further processing in the laboratory. Impulse response of radio channels are estimated by performing a software correlation between a measurement system back to back reference and real time measurements. A minivan was modified to hold the receiver, digitizers, memory banks and the computer. A shaft encoder was attached to its rear left wheel to trigger measurements while moving. Features of the system are discussed along with the effects of data block length, signal to noise ratio, sampling rate, memory size and phase stability on the design of the measurement equipment. Finally, some measurement results are presented and discussed.

  13. Radio science measurements with suppressed carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S.; Divsalar, D.; Oudrhiri, K.; Hamkins, J.

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early deep space missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. The type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of the CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that is presented here. Some numerical results are provided for a coded system.

  14. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  15. Coronal Structures Observed by Radio Propagation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes (1) advances in our knowledge of coronal structures inferred from radio propagation measurements, and (2) gains in our understanding of the relationship between radio propagation and white-light coronagraph measurements. Radio propagation measurements confirm that streamers are ray-like structures as depicted in coronagraph pictures, but also reveal a hierarchy of filamentary structures throughout the corona, extending from the size of streamers down to scale sizes as small as about 1 km at the Sun (10(ghe) arcsec). Doppler scintillation measurements, therefore, open a new window on small-scale structure that has long eluded coronagraph measurements. In addition, high precision ranging measurements make it possible to investigate large-scale structures not yet observed in corona graphs, such as plumes in equatorial coronal regions.

  16. Radio occultation measurements of the lunar ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Maccaferri, G.; Cassaro, P.

    Radio occultation measurements by using interplanetary probes is a well known technique to obtain information on planetary atmospheres. To further understand the morphology of the lunar ionosphere we performed radio occultation experiments by using the radio sounding technique. This method mainly consists in the analisys of the effects produced on the radio wave transmitted from the spacecraft to the Earth when it crosses the atmosphere. The wave amplitude and phase undergo modifications that are correlated to the physical parameters - i.e. electron density - of the crossed medium. The first data set was obtained during the lunar occultations of the European probe SMART-1 shortly before impacting the lunar soil on September 3rd, 2006. During this experiment several radio occultation measurements of the signal transmitted by the spacecraft were performed in S and X band by using the 32 meters radiotelescopes (at Medicina and Noto) of the Istituto di Radioastronomia - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica. Further experiments were performed during lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus. On May 22nd and June 18th 2007 the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting Saturn, and the Venus Express spacecraft, orbiting Venus, respectively were occulted by the Moon. The variation of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by our instruments (˜ 1013 el/m2) on this occasion is in agreement with values of the electron number density acquired by in situ measuments of the US Apollo missions and the USSR Luna 19 and 22 probes.

  17. Adaptation of the Electra Radio to Support Multiple Receive Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, Edgar H.; Shah, Biren N.; Bruvold, Kristoffer N.; Bell, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Proposed future Mars missions plan communication between multiple assets (rovers). This paper presents the results of a study carried out to assess the potential adaptation of the Electra radio to a multi-channel transceiver. The basic concept is a Frequency Division multiplexing (FDM) communications scheme wherein different receiver architectures are examined. Options considered include: (1) multiple IF slices, A/D and FPGAs each programmed with an Electra baseband modem; (2) common IF but multiple A/Ds and FPGAs and (3) common IF, single A/D and single or multiple FPGAs programmed to accommodate the FDM signals. These options represent the usual tradeoff between analog and digital complexity. Given the space application, a common IF is preferable; however, multiple users present dynamic range challenges (e.g., near-far constraints) that would favor multiple IF slices (Option 1). Vice versa, with a common IF and multiple A/Ds (Option 2), individual AGC control of the A/Ds would be an important consideration. Option 3 would require a common AGC control strategy and would entail multiple digital down conversion paths within the FPGA. In this paper, both FDM parameters as well as the different Electra design options will be examined. In particular, signal channel spacing as a function of user data rates and transmit powers will be evaluated. In addition, tradeoffs between the different Electra design options will be presented with the ultimate goal of defining an augmented Electra radio architecture for potential future missions.

  18. Future Nanosatellite Constellation for Radio Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallet, C.; Mahfouf, J. F.; Hauchechrne, A.; Mathieu, R.; Martin, T.; Capet, N.; Mandea, M.

    2016-08-01

    The future nanosatellite constellation for radio occultation measurements aims to provide 10000 occultations per day (horizon 2020). The radio occultation technique based on the refraction of an electromagnetic signal between a GNSS satellite (Global Navigation Satellite System) and a receiver satellite located o a low orbit provides a way to observe the Earth's atmosphere, especially its temperature, pressure and water vapor, but also the ionosphere. This technique is now considered a mature concept, the benefits clearly recognized by the communities of weather prediction, climatology and space weather. Activities are underway at CNES to define a low cost system and instrumental concept to satisfy the specifications of the different communities.

  19. Radio-controlled boat for measuring water velocities and bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, Andrej; Bezak, Nejc; Sečnik, Matej

    2016-04-01

    Radio-controlled boat named "Hi3" was designed and developed in order to facilitate water velocity and bathymetry measurements. The boat is equipped with the SonTek RiverSurveyor M9 instrument that is designed for measuring open channel hydraulics (discharge and bathymetry). Usually channel cross sections measurements are performed either from a bridge or from a vessel. However, these approaches have some limitations such as performing bathymetry measurements close to the hydropower plant turbine or downstream from a hydropower plant gate where bathymetry changes are often the most extreme. Therefore, the radio-controlled boat was designed, built and tested in order overcome these limitations. The boat is made from a surf board and two additional small balance support floats. Additional floats are used to improve stability in fast flowing and turbulent parts of rivers. The boat is powered by two electric motors, steering is achieved with changing the power applied to left and right motor. Furthermore, remotely controlled boat "Hi3" can be powered in two ways, either by a gasoline electric generator or by lithium batteries. Lithium batteries are lighter, quieter, but they operation time is shorter compared to an electrical generator. With the radio-controlled boat "Hi3" we can perform measurements in potentially dangerous areas such as under the lock gates at hydroelectric power plant or near the turbine outflow. Until today, the boat "Hi3" has driven more than 200 km in lakes and rivers, performing various water speed and bathymetry measurements. Moreover, in future development the boat "Hi3" will be upgraded in order to be able to perform measurements automatically. The future plans are to develop and implement the autopilot. With this approach the user will define the route that has to be driven by the boat and the boat will drive the pre-defined route automatically. This will be possible because of the very accurate differential GPS from the Sontek River

  20. Radio Plasma Imager Simulations and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Benson, R. F.; Fung, S. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Boardsen, S. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Haines, D. M.; Bibl, K.; Cheney, G.; Galkin, I. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) will be the first-of-its kind instrument designed to use radio wave sounding techniques to perform repetitive remote sensing measurements of electron number density (N(sub e)) structures and the dynamics of the magnetosphere and plasmasphere. RPI will fly on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission to be launched early in the year 2000. The design of the RPI is based on recent advances in radio transmitter and receiver design and modern digital processing techniques perfected for ground-based ionospheric sounding over the last two decades. Free-space electromagnetic waves transmitted by the RPI located in the low density magnetospheric cavity will be reflected at distant plasma cutoffs. The location and characteristics of the plasma at those remote reflection points can then be derived from measurements of the echo amplitude, phase, delay time, frequency, polarization, Doppler shift, and echo direction. The 500 m tip-to-tip X and Y (spin plane) antennas and 20 m boom Z axis antenna on RPI will be used to measures echoes coming from distances of several R(sub E).

  1. Estimation of the Potential Interference Immunity of Radio Reception with Spatial Signal Processing in Multipath Radio-Communication Channels. I. Decameter Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelev, S. A.; Lvov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method for estimating potential interference immunity of radio reception in the multipath radio-communication channels. Using this method for the modified Watterson model of the decameter radio channel, we study the achievable interference immunity of devices with spatial signal processing.

  2. Design and Implementation of an Underlay Control Channel for Cognitive Radios

    SciTech Connect

    Daryl Wasden; Hussein Moradi; Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny

    2012-11-01

    Implementation of any cognitive radio network requires an effective control channel that can operate under various modes of activity from the primary users. This paper reports the design and implementation of a filter bank multicarrier spread spectrum (FBMC-SS) system for use as the control channel in cognitive radio networks. The proposed design is based on a filtered multitone (FMT) implementation. Carrier and timing acquisition and tracking methods as well as a blind channel estimation method are developed for the proposed control channel. We also report an implementation of the proposed FBMC-SS system on a hardware platform; a FlexRIO FPGA module from National Instruments.

  3. Radio frequency sensing measurements and methods for location classification in wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Dustin C.

    The wireless radio channel is typically thought of as a means to move information from transmitter to receiver, but the radio channel can also be used to detect changes in the environment of the radio link. This dissertation is focused on the measurements we can make at the physical layer of wireless networks, and how we can use those measurements to obtain information about the locations of transceivers and people. The first contribution of this work is the development and testing of an open source, 802.11b sounder and receiver, which is capable of decoding packets and using them to estimate the channel impulse response (CIR) of a radio link at a fraction of the cost of traditional channel sounders. This receiver improves on previous implementations by performing optimized matched filtering on the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) of the Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP), allowing it to operate at full bandwidth. The second contribution of this work is an extensive experimental evaluation of a technology called location distinction, i.e., the ability to identify changes in radio transceiver position, via CIR measurements. Previous location distinction work has focused on single-input single-output (SISO) radio links. We extend this work to the context of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radio links, and study system design trade-offs which affect the performance of MIMO location distinction. The third contribution of this work introduces the "exploiting radio windows" (ERW) attack, in which an attacker outside of a building surreptitiously uses the transmissions of an otherwise secure wireless network inside of the building to infer location information about people inside the building. This is possible because of the relative transparency of external walls to radio transmissions. The final contribution of this dissertation is a feasibility study for building a rapidly deployable radio tomographic (RTI) imaging system for special operations forces

  4. A review of radio channel models for body centric communications.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Simon L; D'Errico, Raffaele; Oestges, Claude

    2014-06-01

    The human body is an extremely challenging environment for the operation of wireless communications systems, not least because of the complex antenna-body electromagnetic interaction effects which can occur. This is further compounded by the impact of movement and the propagation characteristics of the local environment which all have an effect upon body centric communications channels. As the successful design of body area networks (BANs) and other types of body centric system is inextricably linked to a thorough understanding of these factors, the aim of this paper is to conduct a survey of the current state of the art in relation to propagation and channel models primarily for BANs but also considering other types of body centric communications. We initially discuss some of the standardization efforts performed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 802.15.6 task group before focusing on the two most popular types of technologies currently being considered for BANs, namely narrowband and Ultrawideband (UWB) communications. For narrowband communications the applicability of a generic path loss model is contended, before presenting some of the scenario specific models which have proven successful. The impacts of human body shadowing and small-scale fading are also presented alongside some of the most recent research into the Doppler and time dependencies of BANs. For UWB BAN communications, we again consider the path loss as well as empirical tap delay line models developed from a number of extensive channel measurement campaigns conducted by research institutions around the world. Ongoing efforts within collaborative projects such as Committee on Science and Technology Action IC1004 are also described. Finally, recent years have also seen significant developments in other areas of body centric communications such as off-body and body-to-body communications. We highlight some of the newest relevant research in these areas as well as discussing

  5. A review of radio channel models for body centric communications

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Simon L; D'Errico, Raffaele; Oestges, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The human body is an extremely challenging environment for the operation of wireless communications systems, not least because of the complex antenna-body electromagnetic interaction effects which can occur. This is further compounded by the impact of movement and the propagation characteristics of the local environment which all have an effect upon body centric communications channels. As the successful design of body area networks (BANs) and other types of body centric system is inextricably linked to a thorough understanding of these factors, the aim of this paper is to conduct a survey of the current state of the art in relation to propagation and channel models primarily for BANs but also considering other types of body centric communications. We initially discuss some of the standardization efforts performed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 802.15.6 task group before focusing on the two most popular types of technologies currently being considered for BANs, namely narrowband and Ultrawideband (UWB) communications. For narrowband communications the applicability of a generic path loss model is contended, before presenting some of the scenario specific models which have proven successful. The impacts of human body shadowing and small-scale fading are also presented alongside some of the most recent research into the Doppler and time dependencies of BANs. For UWB BAN communications, we again consider the path loss as well as empirical tap delay line models developed from a number of extensive channel measurement campaigns conducted by research institutions around the world. Ongoing efforts within collaborative projects such as Committee on Science and Technology Action IC1004 are also described. Finally, recent years have also seen significant developments in other areas of body centric communications such as off-body and body-to-body communications. We highlight some of the newest relevant research in these areas as well as discussing

  6. Digital correlator for the portable channel prober measurement instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peo, George E., Jr.

    1987-12-01

    This document describes a Digital Correlator for the Portable Channel Prober Measurement Instrument being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory for use in experiments designed to characterize high frequency (HF) radio channels. This Digital Correlator is a digital signal processor designed and constructed by Stow Computer, 111 old Bolton Road, Stow, MA 01775, (617/508) 897-6838. Two Digital Correlators are integrated into the existing Digital Pre-processor to make a Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer. The Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer will be located at the receiving site of the channel probing experiment and is situated between the coherent radio receiver and the microcomputer used for data recording and analysis. The Portable Wideband HF Channel Analyzer computes the delay power spectrum of the received waveform. The in-phase and quadrature outputs of the receiver are sampled and converted to digital values by the Analog to Digital Converter, integrated by the Integrator, and correlated with a stored replica of the transmitted waveform by two Digital Correlators. The resulting tap gains are then read by the system microcomputer using the microcomputer interface.

  7. Characterization of dual-polarization LTE radio over a free-space optical turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Bohata, J; Zvanovec, S; Korinek, T; Mansour Abadi, M; Ghassemlooy, Z

    2015-08-10

    A dual polarization (DP) radio over a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using a long-term evolution (LTE) radio signal is proposed and analyzed under different turbulence channel conditions. Radio signal transmission over the DP FSO channel is experimentally verified by means of error vector magnitude (EVM) statistics. We demonstrate that such a system, employing a 64 quadrature amplitude modulation at the frequency bands of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz, evinces reliability with <8% of EVM in a turbulent channel. Based on the results, we show that transmitting the LTE signal over the FSO channel is a potential solution for last-mile access or backbone networks, when using multiple-input multiple-output based DP signals.

  8. Measuring the Polar Mesosphere With Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C. L.; Burrows, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    The 1957 IGY launched a program of upper atmosphere observations that continues to this day. However in 1957, observations of the upper atmosphere were limited to the tools available at the time. As we head toward the 2007 IPY we can take advantage of the tools developed in the past 50 years to continue and expand upon this extensive dataset, as well as consider novel uses for the tools already available on the continent. Over the past ten years, the polar plateau has been established as one of the preeminent sites on Earth from which to perform radio astronomy observations at frequencies ranging from 100 to 2000 GHz. As a by-product of their astronomical observations, these telescopes often collect high quality aeronomy data that is frequently overlooked. By using data from a radio telescope located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, we have measured the J=2 -> 1 (230 GHz), J=4-> 3 (461 GHz), and J=7 -> 6 (807 GHz) rotational transitions of carbon monoxide (CO) at altitudes from 50 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. These high frequency data provide a surprisingly high resolution window into the dynamics and structure of the mesosphere. With a time series extending over multiple years, these data allow us to study the dynamics of an altitude range difficult to access with other methods. The IPY provides us with an opportunity to expand these interdisciplinary collaborations and use the resources invested in the Antarctic continent to further the scientific aims of a broad range of researchers.

  9. Numerical characterization and modeling of subject-specific ultrawideband body-centric radio channels and systems for healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Qammer Hussain; Sani, Andrea; Alomainy, Akram; Hao, Yang

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents a subject-specific radio propagation study and system modeling in wireless body area networks using a simulation tool based on the parallel finite-difference time-domain technique. This technique is well suited to model the radio propagation around complex, inhomogeneous objects such as the human body. The impact of different digital phantoms in on-body radio channel and system performance was studied. Simulations were performed at the frequency of 3-10 GHz considering a typical hospital environment, and were validated by on-site measurements with reasonably good agreement. The analysis demonstrated that the characteristics of the on-body radio channel and system performance are subject-specific and are associated with human genders, height, and body mass index. Maximum variations of almost 18.51% are observed in path loss exponent due to change of subject, which gives variations of above 50% in system bit error rate performance. Therefore, careful consideration of subject-specific parameters are necessary for achieving energy efficient and reliable radio links and system performance for body-centric wireless network.

  10. An analysis of the materiel fielding plan for the SINCGARS (Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System) radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegen, C. M.

    1984-12-01

    This thesis is an analysis of the materiel fielding plan (MFP) for the Army's Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS). Objectives of the study are to identify major potential problem areas in the MFP, and to generate recommendations for resolving these problems. The study involves a specific analysis of the maintenance and supply support aspects of the MFP within the context of the Major System acquisition framework. Research included extensive field interviews with personnel in the functional management areas of the Communications and Electronics Command (CECOM), the Project Office, and the Department of Army Staff. Potential problems identified concern the redistribution of VRC-12 series and PRC-77 radios, the imbedded COMSEC modification, and the issue of warranties. Recommendations include purchasing a warranty for the original production contract, improving the planning for redistribution of old radios, and providing strict control over the design of the imbedded COMSEC modification.

  11. Multi-Channel Distributed Coordinated Function over Single Radio in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Carlene E.-A.; Loo, Kok-Keong (Jonathan); Gemikonakli, Orhan; Khan, Shafiullah; Singh, Dhananjay

    2011-01-01

    Multi-channel assignments are becoming the solution of choice to improve performance in single radio for wireless networks. Multi-channel allows wireless networks to assign different channels to different nodes in real-time transmission. In this paper, we propose a new approach, Multi-channel Distributed Coordinated Function (MC-DCF) which takes advantage of multi-channel assignment. The backoff algorithm of the IEEE 802.11 distributed coordination function (DCF) was modified to invoke channel switching, based on threshold criteria in order to improve the overall throughput for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) over 802.11 networks. We presented simulation experiments in order to investigate the characteristics of multi-channel communication in wireless sensor networks using an NS2 platform. Nodes only use a single radio and perform channel switching only after specified threshold is reached. Single radio can only work on one channel at any given time. All nodes initiate constant bit rate streams towards the receiving nodes. In this work, we studied the impact of non-overlapping channels in the 2.4 frequency band on: constant bit rate (CBR) streams, node density, source nodes sending data directly to sink and signal strength by varying distances between the sensor nodes and operating frequencies of the radios with different data rates. We showed that multi-channel enhancement using our proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in terms of throughput, packet delivery ratio and delay. This technique can be considered for WSNs future use in 802.11 networks especially when the IEEE 802.11n becomes popular thereby may prevent the 802.15.4 network from operating effectively in the 2.4 GHz frequency band. PMID:22346614

  12. Multi-channel distributed coordinated function over single radio in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Carlene E-A; Loo, Kok-Keong Jonathan; Gemikonakli, Orhan; Khan, Shafiullah; Singh, Dhananjay

    2011-01-01

    Multi-channel assignments are becoming the solution of choice to improve performance in single radio for wireless networks. Multi-channel allows wireless networks to assign different channels to different nodes in real-time transmission. In this paper, we propose a new approach, Multi-channel Distributed Coordinated Function (MC-DCF) which takes advantage of multi-channel assignment. The backoff algorithm of the IEEE 802.11 distributed coordination function (DCF) was modified to invoke channel switching, based on threshold criteria in order to improve the overall throughput for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) over 802.11 networks. We presented simulation experiments in order to investigate the characteristics of multi-channel communication in wireless sensor networks using an NS2 platform. Nodes only use a single radio and perform channel switching only after specified threshold is reached. Single radio can only work on one channel at any given time. All nodes initiate constant bit rate streams towards the receiving nodes. In this work, we studied the impact of non-overlapping channels in the 2.4 frequency band on: constant bit rate (CBR) streams, node density, source nodes sending data directly to sink and signal strength by varying distances between the sensor nodes and operating frequencies of the radios with different data rates. We showed that multi-channel enhancement using our proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in terms of throughput, packet delivery ratio and delay. This technique can be considered for WSNs future use in 802.11 networks especially when the IEEE 802.11n becomes popular thereby may prevent the 802.15.4 network from operating effectively in the 2.4 GHz frequency band.

  13. Measurement and Evaluation Studies of Packet Radio Telecommunications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-07

    and to perform, evaluation of Packet Radio Network In support of the evolution of packet radio technology . The (continued) DD ,: FORM AN 71 1473...by the PRNET investi- gation efforts in support of the continuing evolution of packet radio technology . The reliance on simulation and measurement...potentials of such technology . The PRNET Project has involved the efforts of a number of contracting institution. As one of the major participants, this

  14. Energy-Efficient Channel Handoff for Sensor Network-Assisted Cognitive Radio Network

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad; Sajjad Khan, Muhammad; Vu-Van, Hiep; Insoo, Koo

    2015-01-01

    The visiting and less-privileged status of the secondary users (SUs) in a cognitive radio network obligates them to release the occupied channel instantly when it is reclaimed by the primary user. The SU has a choice to make: either wait for the channel to become free, thus conserving energy at the expense of delayed transmission and delivery, or find and switch to a vacant channel, thereby avoiding delay in transmission at the expense of increased energy consumption. An energy-efficient decision that considers the tradeoff between energy consumption and continuous transmission needs to be taken as to whether to switch the channels. In this work, we consider a sensor network-assisted cognitive radio network and propose a backup channel, which is sensed by the SU in parallel with the operating channel that is being sensed by the sensor nodes. Imperfect channel sensing and residual energy of the SU are considered in order to develop an energy-efficient handoff strategy using the partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), which considers beliefs about the operating and backup channels and the remaining energy of the SU in order to take an optimal channel handoff decision on the question “Should we switch the channel?” The objective is to dynamically decide in each time slot whether the SU should switch the channel or not in order to maximize throughput by utilizing energy efficiently. Extensive simulations were performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed channel handoff strategy, which was demonstrated in the form of throughput with respect to various parameters, i.e., detection probability, the channel idle probabilities of the operating and backup channels, and the maximum energy of the SU. PMID:26213936

  15. Energy-Efficient Channel Handoff for Sensor Network-Assisted Cognitive Radio Network.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Sajjad; Vu-Van, Hiep; Insoo, Koo

    2015-07-23

    The visiting and less-privileged status of the secondary users (SUs) in a cognitive radio network obligates them to release the occupied channel instantly when it is reclaimed by the primary user. The SU has a choice to make: either wait for the channel to become free, thus conserving energy at the expense of delayed transmission and delivery, or find and switch to a vacant channel, thereby avoiding delay in transmission at the expense of increased energy consumption. An energy-efficient decision that considers the tradeoff between energy consumption and continuous transmission needs to be taken as to whether to switch the channels. In this work, we consider a sensor network-assisted cognitive radio network and propose a backup channel, which is sensed by the SU in parallel with the operating channel that is being sensed by the sensor nodes. Imperfect channel sensing and residual energy of the SU are considered in order to develop an energy-efficient handoff strategy using the partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), which considers beliefs about the operating and backup channels and the remaining energy of the SU in order to take an optimal channel handoff decision on the question "Should we switch the channel?" The objective is to dynamically decide in each time slot whether the SU should switch the channel or not in order to maximize throughput by utilizing energy efficiently. Extensive simulations were performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed channel handoff strategy, which was demonstrated in the form of throughput with respect to various parameters, i.e., detection probability, the channel idle probabilities of the operating and backup channels, and the maximum energy of the SU.

  16. Optimization-based channel constrained data aggregation routing algorithms in multi-radio wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hong-Hsu

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, data aggregation routing could reduce the number of data transmissions so as to achieve energy efficient transmission. However, data aggregation introduces data retransmission that is caused by co-channel interference from neighboring sensor nodes. This kind of co-channel interference could result in extra energy consumption and significant latency from retransmission. This will jeopardize the benefits of data aggregation. One possible solution to circumvent data retransmission caused by co-channel interference is to assign different channels to every sensor node that is within each other's interference range on the data aggregation tree. By associating each radio with a different channel, a sensor node could receive data from all the children nodes on the data aggregation tree simultaneously. This could reduce the latency from the data source nodes back to the sink so as to meet the user's delay QoS. Since the number of radios on each sensor node and the number of non-overlapping channels are all limited resources in wireless sensor networks, a challenging question here is to minimize the total transmission cost under limited number of non-overlapping channels in multi-radio wireless sensor networks. This channel constrained data aggregation routing problem in multi-radio wireless sensor networks is an NP-hard problem. I first model this problem as a mixed integer and linear programming problem where the objective is to minimize the total transmission subject to the data aggregation routing, channel and radio resources constraints. The solution approach is based on the Lagrangean relaxation technique to relax some constraints into the objective function and then to derive a set of independent subproblems. By optimally solving these subproblems, it can not only calculate the lower bound of the original primal problem but also provide useful information to get the primal feasible solutions. By incorporating these Lagrangean multipliers

  17. CMOS neurostimulation ASIC with 100 channels, scaleable output, and bidirectional radio-frequency telemetry.

    PubMed

    Suaning, G J; Lovell, N H

    2001-02-01

    100-channel neurostimulation circuit comprising a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has been designed, constructed and tested. The ASIC forms a significant milestone and an integral component of a 100-electrode neurostimulation system being developed by the authors. The system comprises an externally worn transmitter and a body implantable stimulator. The purpose of the system is to communicate both data and power across tissue via radio-frequency (RF) telemetry such that externally programmable, constant current, charge balanced, biphasic stimuli may be delivered to neural tissue at 100 unique sites. An intrinsic reverse telemetry feature of the ASIC has been designed such that information pertaining to the device function, reconstruction of the stimulation voltage waveform, and the measurement of impedance may be obtained through noninvasive means. To compensate for the paucity of data pertaining to the stimulation thresholds necessary in evoking a physiological response, the ASIC has been designed with scaleable current output. The ASIC has been designed primarily as a treatment of degenerative disorders of the retina whereby the 100 channels are to be utilized in the delivery of a pattern of stimuli of varying intensity and or duty cycle to the surviving neural tissue of the retina. However, it is conceivable that other fields of neurostimulation such as cochlear prosthetics and functional electronic stimulation may benefit from the employment of the system.

  18. Estimation of Potential Interference Immunity of Radio Reception with Spatial Signal Processing in Mutipath Radio-Communication Channels. Part II. Meter and Decimeter Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvov, A. V.; Metelev, S. L.

    2016-11-01

    We propose simulation models for estimating the interference immunity of radio reception using the spatial processing of signals in the airborne and ground-based communication channels of the meter and decimeter wavelength ranges. The ultimate achievable interference immunity under various radio-wave propagation conditions is studied.

  19. Entanglement in channel discrimination with restricted measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, William; Piani, Marco; Watrous, John

    2010-09-15

    We study the power of measurements implementable with local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) measurements in the setting of quantum channel discrimination. More precisely, we consider discrimination procedures that attempt to identify an unknown channel, chosen uniformly from two known alternatives, that take the following form: (i) the input to the unknown channel is prepared in a possibly entangled state with an ancillary system, (ii) the unknown channel is applied to the input system, and (iii) an LOCC measurement is performed on the output and ancillary systems, resulting in a guess for which of the two channels was given. The restriction of the measurement in such a procedure to be an LOCC measurement is of interest because it isolates the entanglement in the initial input-ancillary systems as a resource in the setting of channel discrimination. We prove that there exist channel discrimination problems for which restricted procedures of this sort can be at either of the two extremes: they may be optimal within the set of all discrimination procedures (and simultaneously outperform all strategies that make no use of entanglement), or they may be no better than unentangled strategies (and simultaneously suboptimal within the set of all discrimination procedures).

  20. Comparasion of Energy Detection in Cognitive Radio over different fading channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttar, Simar

    2012-07-01

    With the advance of wireless communications, the problem of bandwidth scarcity has become more prominent. Cognitive radio technology has come out as a way to solve this problem by allowing the unlicensed users to use the licensed bands opportunistically. To sense the existence of licensed users, many spectrum sensing techniques have been devised. In this paper, energy detection and cyclic prefix is used for spectrum sensing.The comparison of ROC curves has been done for various wireless fading channels using squaring and cubingoperation,the improvement has gone as high as up to 0.6 times for AWGN channel and 0.4 times for Rayleigh channel as we go from squaring to cubing operation in an energy detector. Closed form expressions for Probability of detection for AWGN and Rayleigh channels are described.Nakagami fading channel shows worst results .

  1. Joint Spectrum Allocation and Scheduling in Multi-Radio Multi-Channel Cognitive Radio Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    radios in node y. The time required to solve this problem can be significantly decreased if a greedy clique decomposition of the conflict graph is...performed. Specifically, a set of cliques © Qi, i = 1, 2, ...Q ª are found such that if yj ∈ χ (xk), then there is a clique Qi such that xk ∈ Qi and yj ∈ Qi...and trace files. The propagation simulator is based on ray -tracing and accounts for reflections off of the ground and off of buildings, transmission

  2. Large rotation measures in radio galaxies at Z > 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athreya, R. M.; Kapahi, V. K.; McCarthy, P. J.; van Breugel, W.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out multifrequency radio polarisation imaging of a sample of 15 radio galaxies at z > 2 from the MRC/1Jy sample using the VLA. We report here the discovery of large rotation measures (RM) in a considerable fraction of the high redshift radio galaxies. Using the difference between the RM values of the two radio lobes in each source and statistical arguments, we show that the Faraday screens responsible for the RMs are most likely to be in the vicinity of the radio sources themselves. Four of the 15 galaxies show intrinsic (redshift corrected) RMs in excess of 1000radm\\pow{-2\\ } with the highest value of ~ 6000radm\\pow{-2\\ } in 1138-262 at z = 2.17. These observations suggest that the environments of the radio galaxies at z > 2 have micro gauss magnetic fields correlated over many kpc (>5--10), at least. We have discussed the problems due to the short time available at those redshifts for the various mechanisms, which are believed to generate and correlate strong magnetic fields on large scales, to operate. In particular, we argue that, unlike at low redshifts, cluster cooling flows are unlikely to have a role in forming deep Faraday screens at high redshifts. It is not clear if the dynamo mechanism is capable of generating such fields in the ambient medium around the radio sources. It appears plausible that condensates of magnetised plasma (galactic or subgalactic sized) are the deep Faraday screens responsible for the observed RMs. We suggest that plasma clumps of as small as \\solmass{9} in the path of the radio jet may generate very large RMs. The presence of such strong and large scale magnetic fields in the medium around the radio sources at such early epochs poses a considerable challenge to models of the origin of magnetic fields in the Universe.

  3. Status of air-shower measurements with sparse radio arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2017-03-01

    This proceeding gives a summary of the current status and open questions of the radio technique for cosmic-ray air showers, assuming that the reader is already familiar with the principles. It includes recent results of selected experiments not present at this conference, e.g., LOPES and TREND. Current radio arrays like AERA or Tunka-Rex have demonstrated that areas of several km2 can be instrumented for reasonable costs with antenna spacings of the order of 200m. For the energy of the primary particle such sparse antenna arrays can already compete in absolute accuracy with other precise techniques, like the detection of air-fluorescence or air-Cherenkov light. With further improvements in the antenna calibration, the radio detection might become even more accurate. For the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, Xmax, currently only the dense array LOFAR features a precision similar to the fluorescence technique, but analysis methods for the radio measurement of Xmax are still under development. Moreover, the combination of radio and muon measurements is expected to increase the accuracy of the mass composition, and this around-the-clock recording is not limited to clear nights as are the light-detection methods. Consequently, radio antennas will be a valuable add-on for any air shower array targeting the energy range above 100 PeV.

  4. Capacity of Cognitive Radio with Partial Channel Distribution Information in Rayleigh Fading Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Li, Q.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of the secondary user (SU) in a cognitive radio (CR) network in Rayleigh fading environments. Different from existing works where perfect channel state information (CSI) or channel distribution information (CDI) of the interference link from the SU to the primary user (PU) is assumed to be available, this paper assumes that only partial CDI is available. Specifically, we assume the distribution parameter is unknown and estimated from a set of channel gain samples. With such partial CDI, closed-form expressions for the ergodic and outage capacities of the SU are obtained under the transmit power and the interference outage constraints. It is shown that the capacity with partial CDI is not degraded compared to that with perfect CDI if the interference outage constraint is loose. It is also shown that the capacity can be significantly improved by increasing the number of channel gain samples.

  5. An 11-channel radio frequency phased array coil for magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound of the breast.

    PubMed

    Minalga, E; Payne, A; Merrill, R; Todd, N; Vijayakumar, S; Kholmovski, E; Parker, D L; Hadley, J R

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a radio frequency phased array coil was built to image the breast in conjunction with a magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) device designed specifically to treat the breast in a treatment cylinder with reduced water volume. The MRgHIFU breast coil was comprised of a 10-channel phased array coil placed around an MRgHIFU treatment cylinder where nearest-neighbor decoupling was achieved with capacitive decoupling in a shared leg. In addition a single loop coil was placed at the chest wall making a total of 11 channels. The radio frequency coil array design presented in this work was chosen based on ease of implementation, increased visualization into the treatment cylinder, image reconstruction speed, temporal resolution, and resulting signal-to-noise ratio profiles. This work presents a dedicated 11-channel coil for imaging of the breast tissue in the MRgHIFU setup without obstruction of the ultrasound beam and, specifically, compares its performance in signal-to-noise, overall imaging time, and temperature measurement accuracy to that of the standard single chest-loop coil typically used in breast MRgHIFU.

  6. 802.11s based multi-radio multi-channel mesh networking for fractionated spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Tony; Thapa, Bishal; Taylor, Steve

    802.11s is a new IEEE standard for mesh networking. It defines the protocols needed to build mobile ad hoc networks that operate over 802.11a, b, g and n waveforms running on inexpensive, and high performance commercial WiFi stations. We have developed a new capability to add to the 802.11s that uses multiple directional radio links that can operate simultaneously within a single mesh node. This is the basis of our multi-channel multi-radio mesh network used in the DARPA F6 program called F6Net. We have developed an analysis and emulation facility that lets us model the F6Net and evaluate the performance in a real world experimentation setup. This paper presents an “ Over-the-Air” experimentation testbed that uses standard Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) 2.4GHz WiFi dongles in an indoor environment, and a shared-code simulation testbed that uses hardware simulated drivers within NS3's channel simulation facility to test 80211s network. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that provides a comprehensive evaluation platform with a full-fledged COTS hardware/software prototype to evaluate 802.11s network. Furthermore, we explain the design and development of multi-radio mesh extension for 802.11s that yields a robust and scalable mesh network suitable for clusters of LEO satellites.

  7. Optical radio-photonic channel for transmission of a coherent narrowband analog signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, D. I.; Denisyuk, I. Yu.; Fokina, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    The channel of an optical transmission line of coherent narrowband analog signal consisting of a continuous-wave laser, an electro-optic modulator, and a vector phase rotator based on electrically controlled fiber-optical 1 × 2 splitter and fixed delay lines is analyzed. The scheme is constructed from commercially available components used in digital optical communication systems. The applicability of components for analog and small-signal circuits is determined. Variation of radio signal phase in the range from 0° to 170° for radio signal frequencies between 1 and 2 GHz is demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that phase variation is a linear function of frequency in this range.

  8. Radio weak lensing shear measurement in the visibility domain - I. Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivi, M.; Miller, L.; Makhathini, S.; Abdalla, F. B.

    2016-12-01

    The high sensitivity of the new generation of radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow cosmological weak lensing measurements at radio wavelengths that are competitive with optical surveys. We present an adaptation to radio data of lensfit, a method for galaxy shape measurement originally developed and used for optical weak lensing surveys. This likelihood method uses an analytical galaxy model and makes a Bayesian marginalization of the likelihood over uninteresting parameters. It has the feature of working directly in the visibility domain, which is the natural approach to adopt with radio interferometer data, avoiding systematics introduced by the imaging process. As a proof of concept, we provide results for visibility simulations of individual galaxies with flux density S ≥ 10 μJy at the phase centre of the proposed SKA1-MID baseline configuration, adopting 12 frequency channels in the band 950-1190 MHz. Weak lensing shear measurements from a population of galaxies with realistic flux and scalelength distributions are obtained after natural gridding of the raw visibilities. Shear measurements are expected to be affected by `noise bias': we estimate the bias in the method as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We obtain additive and multiplicative bias values that are comparable to SKA1 requirements for SNR > 18 and SNR > 30, respectively. The multiplicative bias for SNR >10 is comparable to that found in ground-based optical surveys such as CFHTLenS, and we anticipate that similar shear measurement calibration strategies to those used for optical surveys may be used to good effect in the analysis of SKA radio interferometer data.

  9. Short channel effects in graphene-based field effect transistors targeting radio-frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijoo, Pedro C.; Jiménez, David; Cartoixà, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Channel length scaling in graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) is key in the pursuit of higher performance in radio frequency electronics for both rigid and flexible substrates. Although two-dimensional (2D) materials provide a superior immunity to short channel effects (SCEs) than bulk materials, they could dominate in scaled GFETs. In this work, we have developed a model that calculates electron and hole transport along the graphene channel in a drift-diffusion basis, while considering the 2D electrostatics. Our model obtains the self-consistent solution of the 2D Poisson’s equation coupled to the current continuity equation, the latter embedding an appropriate model for drift velocity saturation. We have studied the role played by the electrostatics and the velocity saturation in GFETs with short channel lengths L. Severe scaling results in a high degradation of GFET output conductance. The extrinsic cutoff frequency follows a 1/{L}n scaling trend, where the index n fulfills n≤slant 2. The case n=2 corresponds to long-channel GFETs with low source/drain series resistance, that is, devices where the channel resistance is controlling the drain current. For high series resistance, n decreases down to n=1, and it degrades to values of n\\lt 1 because of the SCEs, especially at high drain bias. The model predicts high maximum oscillation frequencies above 1 THz for channel lengths below 100 nm, but, in order to obtain these frequencies, it is very important to minimize the gate series resistance. The model shows very good agreement with experimental current voltage curves obtained from short channel GFETs and also reproduces negative differential resistance, which is due to a reduction of diffusion current.

  10. Radio Emission in Atmospheric Air Showers Measured by LOPES-30

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, P. G.

    2008-01-24

    When Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) interact with particles in the Earth's atmosphere, they produce a shower of secondary particles propagating towards the ground. These relativistic particles emit synchrotron radiation in the radio frequency range when passing the Earth's magnetic field. The LOPES (LOFAR Prototype Station) experiment investigates the radio emission from these showers in detail and will pave the way to use this detection technique for large scale applications like in LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) and the Pierre Auger Observatory. The LOPES experiment is co-located and measures in coincidence with the air shower experiment KASCADE-Grande at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. LOPES has an absolute amplitude calibration array of 30 dipole antennas (LOPES-30). After one year of measurements of the single East-West polarization by all 30 antennas, recently, the LOPES-30 set-up was configured to perform dual-polarization measurements. Half of the antennas have been configured for measurements of the North-South polarization. Only by measuring at the same time both, the E-W and N-S polarization components of the radio emission, the geo-synchrotron effect as the dominant emission mechanism in air showers can be verified. The status of the measurements, including the absolute calibration procedure of the dual-polarized antennas as well as analysis of dual-polarized event examples are reported.

  11. Channel direction information probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Villardi, Gabriel Porto; Kojima, Fumihide; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the problem of channel direction information (CDI) probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system. The CDI of the channel from the secondary transmitter (ST) to primary receiver (PR) is elementary information in designing the beamforming at the ST for mitigating the interference to the PR. However, lacking the explicit cooperation between primary and secondary systems, the CDI has to be acquired by probing at the ST, which is challenging. To solve this, we consider the line of sight (LoS) channel between the ST and the PR, and propose one CDI probing scheme for the ST. Specifically, the ST sends two types of probing signals by beamforming towards an interested region where both the secondary receiver (SR) and the PR are located and then actively learns the hidden feedback information from the primary system to acquire the CDI. The proposed scheme has a closed-form solution, and avoids the iteration between the probing and acquisition, which is desirable for practical system. Moreover, we show that the proposed probing scheme can be extended for primary systems working under multi-access channel and broadcasting channel. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can improve the accuracy of the acquired CDI at the ST in cognitive ratio system remarkably.

  12. Application of the Hardman methodology to the Single Channel Ground-Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The HARDMAN methodology was applied to the various configurations of employment for an emerging Army multipurpose communications system. The methodology was used to analyze the manpower, personnel and training (MPT) requirements and associated costs, of the system concepts responsive to the Army's requirement for the Single Channel Ground-Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS). The scope of the application includes the analysis of two conceptual designs Cincinnati Electronics and ITT Aerospace/Optical Division for operating and maintenance support addressed through the general support maintenance echelon.

  13. A novel transform domain processing based channel estimation method for OFDM radio-over-fiber systems.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Yu, Jianjun; Yang, Qi; Shao, Yufeng; Zhang, Junwen; Chi, Nan

    2013-03-25

    In this paper, a transform domain processing (TDP) based channel estimation method for orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) systems is proposed. Theoretically investigation shows that TDP can greatly reduce the number of required training symbols. An 8 x 4.65 Gb/s multi-user OFDM RoF system over 40 km fiber link and 60 GHz wireless link is experimentally demonstrated utilizing TDP scheme. Compared with conventional time domain averaging (TDA) scheme, the overhead can be reduced from several tens of training symbols to merely one symbol and the receiver sensitivity has been improved by 1.8 dB at BER of 3.8 x 10(-3). The calculated BER performance for 8 wireless users clearly validates the feasibility of this TDP-based channel estimation method.

  14. Rocket radio measurement of electron density in the nighttime ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    One experimental technique based on the Faraday rotation effect of radio waves is presented for measuring electron density in the nighttime ionosphere at midlatitudes. High frequency linearly-polarized radio signals were transmitted to a linearly-polarized receiving system located in a spinning rocket moving through the ionosphere. Faraday rotation was observed in the reference plane of the rocket as a change in frequency of the detected receiver output. The frequency change was measured and the information was used to obtain electron density data. System performance was evaluated and some sources of error were identified. The data obtained was useful in calibrating a Langmuir probe experiment for electron density values of 100/cu cm and greater. Data from two rocket flights are presented to illustrate the experiment.

  15. Surface measurements of radio antenna panels with white-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinellato, S.; Pernechele, C.; Carmignato, S.; Manzan, F.

    2010-07-01

    Typical radio telescopes have the primary reflector surface which is composed of several single panels that have dimensions of a meter a side. The manufacturing of these radio panels yield a micrometric precision over the volume on the single panel, hence the surface roughness of the panels can be measured with very high accuracy by means of the low coherence interferometry (LCI) technique which reaches micrometric spatial and depth resolution and has the advantage of being contact-less. We have developed a multi-channel partially coherent light interferometer to realize non contact 3D surface topography. The technique is based on the LCI principle, for which a bi-dimensional sensor - a CMOS - has been developed to directly acquire images. Tri-dimensional measures are recovered with a single scanning along the depth direction in a millimetric range, and every single pixel of the bi-dimensional sensor measures a point on the object, this allows a fast analysis in real time on square centimeter areas. In this paper we show the results obtained by applying the LCI technique method to analyze the surface roughness of the panels of a large radio antenna of 64 m of width and used for astronomical observations at 100 GHz; by measuring their 3D structure at micrometric resolution it is possible to verify their fabrication errors.

  16. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  17. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed that cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  18. SARAS MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIO BACKGROUND AT LONG WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Nipanjana; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Sethi, Shiv; Shankar, N. Udaya; Raghunathan, A.

    2015-03-10

    SARAS is a correlation spectrometer connected to a frequency independent antenna that is purpose-designed for precision measurements of the radio background at long wavelengths. The design, calibration, and observing strategies admit solutions for the internal additive contributions to the radiometer response, and hence a separation of these contaminants from the antenna temperature. We present here a wideband measurement of the radio sky spectrum by SARAS that provides an accurate measurement of the absolute brightness and spectral index between 110 and 175 MHz. Accuracy in the measurement of absolute sky brightness is limited by systematic errors of magnitude 1.2%; errors in calibration and in the joint estimation of sky and system model parameters are relatively smaller. We use this wide-angle measurement of the sky brightness using the precision wide-band dipole antenna to provide an improved absolute calibration for the 150 MHz all-sky map of Landecker and Wielebinski: subtracting an offset of 21.4 K and scaling by a factor of 1.05 will reduce the overall offset error to 8 K (from 50 K) and scale error to 0.8% (from 5%). The SARAS measurement of the temperature spectral index is in the range −2.3 to −2.45 in the 110–175 MHz band and indicates that the region toward the Galactic bulge has a relatively flatter index.

  19. Energy efficiency in cognitive radio network: Study of cooperative sensing using different channel sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chenxuan

    When cognitive radio (CR) operates, it starts by sensing spectrum and looking for idle bandwidth. There are several methods for CR to make a decision on either the channel is occupied or idle, for example, energy detection scheme, cyclostationary detection scheme and matching filtering detection scheme [1]. Among them, the most common method is energy detection scheme because of its algorithm and implementation simplicities [2]. There are two major methods for sensing, the first one is to sense single channel slot with varying bandwidth, whereas the second one is to sense multiple channels and each with same bandwidth. After sensing periods, samples are compared with a preset detection threshold and a decision is made on either the primary user (PU) is transmitting or not. Sometimes the sensing and decision results can be erroneous, for example, false alarm error and misdetection error may occur. In order to better control error probabilities and improve CR network performance (i.e. energy efficiency), we introduce cooperative sensing; in which several CR within a certain range detect and make decisions on channel availability together. The decisions are transmitted to and analyzed by a data fusion center (DFC) to make a final decision on channel availability. After the final decision is been made, DFC sends back the decision to the CRs in order to tell them to stay idle or start to transmit data to secondary receiver (SR) within a preset transmission time. After the transmission, a new cycle starts again with sensing. This thesis report is organized as followed: Chapter II review some of the papers on optimizing CR energy efficiency. In Chapter III, we study how to achieve maximal energy efficiency when CR senses single channel with changing bandwidth and with constrain on misdetection threshold in order to protect PU; furthermore, a case study is given and we calculate the energy efficiency. In Chapter IV, we study how to achieve maximal energy efficiency when CR

  20. Montblanc1: GPU accelerated radio interferometer measurement equations in support of Bayesian inference for radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, S. J.; Marais, P. C.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Natarajan, I.; Tasse, C.; Smirnov, O.

    2015-09-01

    We present Montblanc, a GPU implementation of the Radio interferometer measurement equation (RIME) in support of the Bayesian inference for radio observations (BIRO) technique. BIRO uses Bayesian inference to select sky models that best match the visibilities observed by a radio interferometer. To accomplish this, BIRO evaluates the RIME multiple times, varying sky model parameters to produce multiple model visibilities. χ2 values computed from the model and observed visibilities are used as likelihood values to drive the Bayesian sampling process and select the best sky model. As most of the elements of the RIME and χ2 calculation are independent of one another, they are highly amenable to parallel computation. Additionally, Montblanc caters for iterative RIME evaluation to produce multiple χ2 values. Modified model parameters are transferred to the GPU between each iteration. We implemented Montblanc as a Python package based upon NVIDIA's CUDA architecture. As such, it is easy to extend and implement different pipelines. At present, Montblanc supports point and Gaussian morphologies, but is designed for easy addition of new source profiles. Montblanc's RIME implementation is performant: On an NVIDIA K40, it is approximately 250 times faster than MEQTREES on a dual hexacore Intel E5-2620v2 CPU. Compared to the OSKAR simulator's GPU-implemented RIME components it is 7.7 and 12 times faster on the same K40 for single and double-precision floating point respectively. However, OSKAR's RIME implementation is more general than Montblanc's BIRO-tailored RIME. Theoretical analysis of Montblanc's dominant CUDA kernel suggests that it is memory bound. In practice, profiling shows that is balanced between compute and memory, as much of the data required by the problem is retained in L1 and L2 caches.

  1. The Combined Effects of Radio Frequency and Gamma Irradiation on P-Channel MOSFETS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    characteristics of a p-channel MOSFET .................................... 9 5. C-V measurement of a p-channel MOSFET modeled as (a) ideal... modeled as (a) ideal (b) common production impurities (c) radiation damaged or poorly manufactured [23] The regions are marked for the curve...labeled (a). The following assumptions are used to model the curves shown in Figure 5 [23]. Curve (a) assumes an ideal MOSFET. Curve (b) includes

  2. Measurement of stream channel habitat using sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flug, M.; Seitz, H.; Scott, J.

    1998-01-01

    An efficient and low cost technique using a sonar system was evaluated for describing channel geometry and quantifying inundated area in a large river. The boat-mounted portable sonar equipment was used to record water depths and river width measurements for direct storage on a laptop computer. The field data collected from repeated traverses at a cross-section were evaluated to determine the precision of the system and field technique. Results from validation at two different sites showed average sample standard deviations (S.D.s) of 0.12 m for these complete cross-sections, with coefficient of variations of 10%. Validation using only the mid-channel river cross-section data yields an average sample S.D. of 0.05 m, with a coefficient of variation below 5%, at a stable and gauged river site using only measurements of water depths greater than 0.6 m. Accuracy of the sonar system was evaluated by comparison to traditionally surveyed transect data from a regularly gauged site. We observed an average mean squared deviation of 46.0 cm2, considering only that portion of the cross-section inundated by more than 0.6 m of water. Our procedure proved to be a reliable, accurate, safe, quick, and economic method to record river depths, discharges, bed conditions, and substratum composition necessary for stream habitat studies. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Stochastic Wireless Channel Modeling, Estimation and Identification from Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Li, Yanyan

    2008-07-01

    This paper is concerned with stochastic modeling of wireless fading channels, parameter estimation, and system identification from measurement data. Wireless channels are represented by stochastic state-space form, whose parameters and state variables are estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm and Kalman filtering, respectively. The latter are carried out solely from received signal measurements. These algorithms estimate the channel inphase and quadrature components and identify the channel parameters recursively. The proposed algorithm is tested using measurement data, and the results are presented.

  4. Measuring the Symmetry of Supernova Remnants in the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Jennifer; Lopez, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 300 supernova remnants (SNRs) are known in the MIlky Way galaxy, and they offer an important means to study the explosions and interactions of supernovae at sub-pc scales. In this poster, we present analysis of the morphology of Galactic SNRs at radio wavelengths. Specifically, we measure the symmetry of several tens of SNRs in 6- and 20-cm Very Large Array images using a multipole expansion technique, the power-ratio method. We explore how the SNRs' morphology changes as a function of their size and estimated dynamical ages, with the aim of probing how SNR shapes evolve with time.

  5. Adaptive threshold determination for efficient channel sensing in cognitive radio network using mobile sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, M. N.; Khatun, S.; Kamarudin, L. M.; Aljunid, S. A.; Ahmad, R. B.; Zakaria, A.; Fakir, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    Spectrum saturation problem is a major issue in wireless communication systems all over the world. Huge number of users is joining each day to the existing fixed band frequency but the bandwidth is not increasing. These requirements demand for efficient and intelligent use of spectrum. To solve this issue, the Cognitive Radio (CR) is the best choice. Spectrum sensing of a wireless heterogeneous network is a fundamental issue to detect the presence of primary users' signals in CR networks. In order to protect primary users (PUs) from harmful interference, the spectrum sensing scheme is required to perform well even in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. Meanwhile, the sensing period is usually required to be short enough so that secondary (unlicensed) users (SUs) can fully utilize the available spectrum. CR networks can be designed to manage the radio spectrum more efficiently by utilizing the spectrum holes in primary user's licensed frequency bands. In this paper, we have proposed an adaptive threshold detection method to detect presence of PU signal using free space path loss (FSPL) model in 2.4 GHz WLAN network. The model is designed for mobile sensors embedded in smartphones. The mobile sensors acts as SU while the existing WLAN network (channels) works as PU. The theoretical results show that the desired threshold range detection of mobile sensors mainly depends on the noise floor level of the location in consideration.

  6. Dynamic Pilot Channel Transmission with Adaptive Receive Filter Configuration for Cognitive Radio System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Ren; Tomioka, Tazuko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    When a cognitive radio system dynamically utilizes a frequency band, channel control information must be communicated over the network in order for the currently available carrier frequencies to be shared. In order to keep efficient spectrum utilization, this control information should also be dynamically transmitted through channels such as cognitive pilot channels based on the channel conditions. If transmitters dynamically select carrier frequencies, receivers must receive the control signal without knowledge of its carrier frequencies. A novel scheme called differential code parallel transmission (DCPT) enables receivers to receive low-rate information without any knowledge of the carrier frequency. The transmitter simultaneously transmits two signals whose carrier frequencies are separated by a predefined value. The absolute values of the carrier frequencies can be varied. When the receiver receives the DCPT signal, it multiplies the signal by a frequency-shifted version of itself; this yields a DC component that represents the data signal, which is then demodulated. However, the multiplication process results in the noise power being squared, necessitating high received signal power. In this paper, to realize a bandpass filter that passes only DCPT signals of unknown frequency and that suppresses noise and interference at other frequencies, a DCPT-adaptive bandpass filter (ABF) that employs an adaptive equalizer is proposed. In the training phase, the received signal is the filter input and the frequency-shifted signal is the training input. Then, the filter is trained to pass the higher-frequency signal of the two DCPT signals. The performance of DCPT-ABF is evaluated through computer simulations. We find that DCPT-ABF operates successfully even under strong interference.

  7. Interference measurements on amplitude compandored single sideband (ACSB) land mobil radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, H.

    1983-06-01

    The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) funded the ECAC to conduct adjacent-signal interference tests on a new radio system technology that shows promise of allowing smaller channel spacing in the Government land mobile radio band (162-174 MHz). The system tested was an amplitude compandored single-sideband radio (ACSB) manufactured by Sideband Technology, Inc. This report presents the adjacent-signal interference (ASI) result which will be employed by NTIA in evaluation of the potential usage of the ACSB technology in the Government land mobile radio band.

  8. Indoor radio channel modeling and mitigation of fading effects using linear and circular polarized antennas in combination for smart home system at 868 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, S.; Welpot, M.; Gaspard, I.

    2014-11-01

    The markets for smart home products and services are expected to grow over the next years, driven by the increasing demands of homeowners considering energy monitoring, management, environmental controls and security. Many of these new systems will be installed in existing homes and offices and therefore using radio based systems for cost reduction. A drawback of radio based systems in indoor environments are fading effects which lead to a high variance of the received signal strength and thereby to a difficult predictability of the encountered path loss of the various communication links. For that reason it is necessary to derive a statistical path loss model which can be used to plan a reliable and cost effective radio network. This paper presents the results of a measurement campaign, which was performed in six buildings to deduce realistic radio channel models for a high variety of indoor radio propagation scenarios in the short range devices (SRD) band at 868 MHz. Furthermore, a potential concept to reduce the variance of the received signal strength using a circular polarized (CP) patch antenna in combination with a linear polarized antenna in an one-to-one communication link is presented.

  9. Software-defined Radio Based Measurement Platform for Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chao, I-Chun; Lee, Kang B.; Candell, Richard; Proctor, Frederick; Shen, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shinn-Yan

    2015-01-01

    End-to-end latency is critical to many distributed applications and services that are based on computer networks. There has been a dramatic push to adopt wireless networking technologies and protocols (such as WiFi, ZigBee, WirelessHART, Bluetooth, ISA100.11a, etc.) into time-critical applications. Examples of such applications include industrial automation, telecommunications, power utility, and financial services. While performance measurement of wired networks has been extensively studied, measuring and quantifying the performance of wireless networks face new challenges and demand different approaches and techniques. In this paper, we describe the design of a measurement platform based on the technologies of software-defined radio (SDR) and IEEE 1588 Precision Time Protocol (PTP) for evaluating the performance of wireless networks. PMID:27891210

  10. Software-defined Radio Based Measurement Platform for Wireless Networks.

    PubMed

    Chao, I-Chun; Lee, Kang B; Candell, Richard; Proctor, Frederick; Shen, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shinn-Yan

    2015-10-01

    End-to-end latency is critical to many distributed applications and services that are based on computer networks. There has been a dramatic push to adopt wireless networking technologies and protocols (such as WiFi, ZigBee, WirelessHART, Bluetooth, ISA100.11a, etc.) into time-critical applications. Examples of such applications include industrial automation, telecommunications, power utility, and financial services. While performance measurement of wired networks has been extensively studied, measuring and quantifying the performance of wireless networks face new challenges and demand different approaches and techniques. In this paper, we describe the design of a measurement platform based on the technologies of software-defined radio (SDR) and IEEE 1588 Precision Time Protocol (PTP) for evaluating the performance of wireless networks.

  11. PAD-MAC: Primary User Activity-Aware Distributed MAC for Multi-Channel Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Piran, Md. Jalil; Kim, Hansoo; Yun, Jihyeok; Suh, Doug Young

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) has emerged as a promising technology to solve problems related to spectrum scarcity and provides a ubiquitous wireless access environment. CR-enabled secondary users (SUs) exploit spectrum white spaces opportunistically and immediately vacate the acquired licensed channels as primary users (PUs) arrive. Accessing the licensed channels without the prior knowledge of PU traffic patterns causes severe throughput degradation due to excessive channel switching and PU-to-SU collisions. Therefore, it is significantly important to design a PU activity-aware medium access control (MAC) protocol for cognitive radio networks (CRNs). In this paper, we first propose a licensed channel usage pattern identification scheme, based on a two-state Markov model, and then estimate the future idle slots using previous observations of the channels. Furthermore, based on these past observations, we compute the rank of each available licensed channel that gives SU transmission success assessment during the estimated idle slot. Secondly, we propose a PU activity-aware distributed MAC (PAD-MAC) protocol for heterogeneous multi-channel CRNs that selects the best channel for each SU to enhance its throughput. PAD-MAC controls SU activities by allowing them to exploit the licensed channels only for the duration of estimated idle slots and enables predictive and fast channel switching. To evaluate the performance of the proposed PAD-MAC, we compare it with the distributed QoS-aware MAC (QC-MAC) and listen-before-talk MAC schemes. Extensive numerical results show the significant improvements of the PAD-MAC in terms of the SU throughput, SU channel switching rate and PU-to-SU collision rate. PMID:25831084

  12. Indoor radio measurement and planning for UMTS/HSDPA with antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eheduru, Marcellinus

    Over the last decade, mobile communication networks have evolved tremendously with a key focus on providing high speed data services in addition to voice. The third generation of mobile networks in the form of Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is already offering revolutionary mobile broadband experience to its users by deploying High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) as its packet-data technology. With data speeds up to 14.4 Mbps and ubiquitous mobility, HSDPA is anticipated to become a preferred broadband access medium for end-users via mobile phones, laptops etc. While majority of these end-users are located indoors most of the time, approximately 70-80% of the HSDPA traffic is estimated to originate from inside buildings. Thus for network operators, indoor coverage has become a necessity for technical and business reasons. Macro-cellular (outdoor) to indoor coverage is a natural inexpensive way of providing network coverage inside the buildings. However, it does not guarantee sufficient link quality required for optimal HSDPA operation. On the contrary, deploying a dedicated indoor system may be far too expensive from an operator's point of view. In this thesis, the concept is laid for the understanding of indoor radio wave propagation in a campus building environment which could be used to plan and improve outdoor-to-indoor UMTS/HSDPA radio propagation performance. It will be shown that indoor range performance depends not only on the transmit power of an indoor antenna, but also on the product's response to multipath and obstructions in the environment along the radio propagation path. An extensive measurement campaign will be executed in different indoor environments analogous to easy, medium and hard radio conditions. The effects of walls, ceilings, doors and other obstacles on measurement results would be observed. Chapter one gives a brief introduction to the evolution of UMTS and HSDPA. It goes on to talk about radio wave propagation

  13. Super-Sharp Radio "Vision" Measures Galaxy's Motion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have measured the motion across the sky of a galaxy nearly 2.4 million light-years from Earth. While scientists have been measuring the motion of galaxies directly toward or away from Earth for decades, this is the first time that the transverse motion (called proper motion by astronomers) has been measured for a galaxy that is not a satellite of our own Milky Way Galaxy. M33 Radio/Optical Image of M33 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, NOAO/AURA/NSF (Click on image for more files) An international scientific team analyzed VLBA observations made over two and a half years to detect minuscule shifts in the sky position of the spiral galaxy M33. Combined with previous measurements of the galaxy's motion toward Earth, the new data allowed the astronomers to calculate M33's movement in three dimensions for the first time. "A snail crawling on Mars would appear to be moving across the surface more than 100 times faster than the motion we measured for this galaxy," said Mark Reid, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. M33 is a satellite of the larger galaxy M31, the well-known Andromeda Galaxy that is the most distant object visible to the naked eye. Both are part of the Local Group of galaxies that includes the Milky Way. In addition to measuring the motion of M33 as a whole, the astronomers also were able to make a direct measurement of the spiral galaxy's rotation. Both measurements were made by observing the changes in position of giant clouds of molecules inside the galaxy. The water vapor in these clouds acts as a natural maser, strengthening, or amplifying, radio emission the same way that lasers amplify light emission. The natural masers acted as bright radio beacons whose movement could be tracked by the ultra-sharp radio "vision" of the VLBA. Reid and his colleagues plan to continue measuring M33's motion and also to make similar measurements of M31's motion

  14. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto's Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, David P.; Linscott, Ivan; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Bird, Mike; Ennico, Kimberly; Gladstone, Randy; Olkin, Catherine B.; Pätzold, Martin; Strobel, Darrell F.; Summers, Michael; Tyler, G. Leonard; Weaver, Harold A.; Woods, Will; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons in July 2015 included a radio occultation at Pluto. The observation was performed with signals transmitted simultaneously by four antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network, two at the Goldstone complex in California and two at the Canberra complex in Australia. Each antenna radiated 20 kW without modulation at a wavelength of 4.17 cm. New Horizons received the four signals with its 2.1-m high-gain antenna, where the signals were split into pairs and processed independently by two identical REX radio science instruments. Each REX relied on a different ultra-stable oscillator as its frequency reference. The signals were digitized and filtered, and the data samples were stored on the spacecraft for later transmission to Earth. Six months elapsed before all data had arrived on the ground, and the results reported here are the first to utilize the complete set of observations. Pluto's tenuous atmosphere is a significant challenge for radio occultation sounding, which led us to develop a specialized method of analysis. We began by calibrating each signal to remove effects not associated with Pluto's atmosphere, including the diffraction pattern from Pluto's surface. We reduced the noise and increased our sensitivity to the atmosphere by averaging the results from the four signals, while using other combinations of the signals to characterize the noise. We then retrieved profiles of number density, pressure, and temperature from the averaged phase profiles at both occultation entry and exit. Finally, we used a combination of analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations to determine the accuracy of the measurements. The REX profiles provide the first direct measure of the surface pressure and temperature structure in Pluto's lower atmosphere. There are significant differences between the structure at entry (193.5°E, 17.0°S, sunset) and exit (15.7°E, 15.1°N, sunrise), which arise from spatial variations in surface

  15. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J.R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J.P.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for 163 individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to the zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from (3.3± 1.0)% for very inclined air showers at 25 m to (20.3± 1.3)% for almost vertical showers at 225 m. Both dependencies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  16. Potential radio frequency interference with the GPS L5 band for radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, A. M.; Akos, D. M.; Lo, S.

    2014-05-01

    New Radio Occultation (RO) receivers are planned to utilize the newly implemented Global Positioning System (GPS) L5 signal centered at 1176.45 MHz. Since there are currently no operational GPS L5 receivers used for space-based RO applications, the interference environment is unclear. Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) and Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) stations share the same frequency band as the GPS L5 signal. DME/TACAN signals have been identified to be a means of interference for any GPS L5 receiver. This study focuses on implementing a Systems Tools Kit (STK) simulation to gain insight into the power received by a RO satellite in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) from a DME/TACAN transmission. In order to confirm the validity of utilizing STK for communication purposes, a theoretical scenario was recreated as a simulation and the results were confirmed. Once the method was validated, STK was used to output a received power level aboard a RO satellite from a DME/TACAN station as well as a tool to predict the number of interfering DME/TACAN stations at any point in time. Taking a conservative approach, the signal power received was much greater than the typical power level received by a RO satellite from a GPS satellite transmission. This relatively high received power along with a high number of interfering DME/TACAN stations as an RO satellite passes over North America or Western Europe indicate that DME/TACAN interference may conflict with RO receivers.

  17. Potential radio frequency interference with the GPS L5 band for radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, A. M.; Akos, D. M.; Lo, S.

    2014-11-01

    Future radio occultation (RO) receivers are planned to utilize the newly implemented Global Positioning System (GPS) L5 band centered at 1176.45 MHz. Since there are currently no operational GPS L5 receivers used for space-based RO applications, the interference environment is unclear. Distance measuring equipment (DME) and tactical air navigation (TACAN) stations share the same frequency band as GPS L5. The signals from these stations have been identified as possible sources of interference for any GPS L5 receiver, including those used in RO applications. This study utilizes Systems Tools Kit (STK) simulations to gain insight into the power received by a RO satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO) from a DME-TACAN transmission as well as the amount of interfering stations. In order to confirm the validity of utilizing STK for communication purposes, a theoretical scenario was recreated as a simulation and the results were confirmed. Once the method was validated, STK was used to output a received power level aboard a RO satellite from a DME-TACAN station as well as a tool to detail the number of interfering DME-TACAN stations witnessed by a space-based RO receiver over time. The results indicated a large number of DME-TACAN stations transmitting at similar orientations as a receiving RO satellite, thereby leading to the possibility of signal degradation in an unclear interference environment.

  18. Comparison of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation measurements with radio tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Lin, Charles; Liu, Huixin

    2011-05-01

    The paper reports a comparison between the continuous tomographic observations of the ionosphere during July-August 2008 and radio occultation (RO) measurements made by the Formosa Satellite 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC or F3/C). The two sets of observations agree well qualitatively and bring out the main features of the low-latitude to midlatitude ionosphere: (1) The electron density enhancements observed at ˜26°N-31°N geographic (˜16°N-21°N magnetic) latitudes during daytime are related to the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), and (2) the enhancements observed at night at latitudes poleward of ˜35°N geographic are related to the midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly. The comparison shows that the EIA crest densities are highly underestimated in the RO inversions that use F3/C data. It is also seen that the agreement is better in the midlatitude region, with overall features represented quite well in the RO data, highlighting its usefulness as the two techniques capture similar electron density structure, although there are some magnitude differences.

  19. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an

  20. Measuring Method for Lightning Channel Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, J; Chen, L; Xue, Q; Zhu, R

    2016-09-26

    In this paper, we demonstrate the temperature of lightning channel utilizing the theory of lightning spectra and the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The impulse current generator platform (ICGS) was used to simulate the lightning discharge channel, and the spectral energy of infrared spectroscopy (930 nm) and the visible spectroscopy (648.2 nm) of the simulated lightning has been calculated. Results indicate that the peaks of luminous intensity of both infrared and visible spectra increase with the lightning current intensity in range of 5-50 kA. Based on the results, the temperature of the lightning channel is derived to be 6140.8-10424 K. Moreover, the temperature of the channel is approximately exponential to the lightning current intensity, which shows good agreement with that of the natural lightning cases.

  1. Measuring Method for Lightning Channel Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Chen, L.; Xue, Q.; Zhu, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the temperature of lightning channel utilizing the theory of lightning spectra and the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The impulse current generator platform (ICGS) was used to simulate the lightning discharge channel, and the spectral energy of infrared spectroscopy (930 nm) and the visible spectroscopy (648.2 nm) of the simulated lightning has been calculated. Results indicate that the peaks of luminous intensity of both infrared and visible spectra increase with the lightning current intensity in range of 5–50 kA. Based on the results, the temperature of the lightning channel is derived to be 6140.8–10424 K. Moreover, the temperature of the channel is approximately exponential to the lightning current intensity, which shows good agreement with that of the natural lightning cases. PMID:27665937

  2. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto's Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Woods, W. W.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Retherford, K. D.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Tsang, C.; Versteeg, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto's lower atmosphere. Preliminary analysis yields a surface pressure of about 10 microbars, smaller than expected. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters.

  3. Outage Capacity of Spectrum Sharing Cognitive Radio with Channel Estimation Errors and Feedback Delay in Rayleigh Fading Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Feng, Z.; Zhang, P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper considers a spectrum sharing cognitive radio (CR) network consisting of one secondary user (SU) and one primary user (PU) in Rayleigh fading environments. The channel state information (CSI) between the secondary transmitter (STx) and the primary receiver (PRx) is assumed to be imperfect. Particularly, this CSI is assumed to be not only having channel estimation errors but also outdated due to feedback delay, which is different from existing work. We derive the closed-form expression for the outage capacity of the SU with this imperfect CSI under the average interference power constraint at the PU. Analytical results confirmed by simulations are presented to show the effect of the imperfect CSI. Particularly, it is shown that the outage capacity of the SU is robust to the channel estimation errors and feedback delay for low outage probability and high channel estimation errors and feedback delay.

  4. Optimal Power Allocation for CC-HARQ-based Cognitive Radio with Statistical CSI in Nakagami Slow Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ding; Li, Qun

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the power allocation problem for cognitive radio (CR) based on hybrid-automatic-repeat-request (HARQ) with chase combining (CC) in Nakagamimslow fading channels. We assume that, instead of the perfect instantaneous channel state information (CSI), only the statistical CSI is available at the secondary user (SU) transmitter. The aim is to minimize the SU outage probability under the primary user (PU) interference outage constraint. Using the Lagrange multiplier method, an iterative and recursive algorithm is derived to obtain the optimal power allocation for each transmission round. Extensive numerical results are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Radio interferometer measurements of turbulence in the inner solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Coles, William A.; Grall, R. R.; Harmon, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements can be made of Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) phase scintillations due to plasma turbulence in the solar corona and solar wind. These measurements provide information on the spectrum and intensity of density fluctuations with scale sizes of a few hundred to several thousand kilometers. If we model the spatial power spectrum of the density fluctuations as P(sub delta n)(q) = C(sup 2)(sub N) q(sup -alpha), where q is the spatial wavenumber, these observations yield both alpha and the path-integrated value of C(sup 2)(sub N). The recently completed Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is capable of making such measurements over the heliocentric distance range from a few solar radii to 60 solar radii and beyond. This permits the determination with the same technique and instrument of the radial evolution of turbulent characteristics, as well as their dependence on solar wind transients, sector structure, etc. In this paper we present measurements of 13 sources observed at a wide range of solar elongations, and at different times. These observations show that the coefficient C(sup 2(sub N), depends on heliocentric distance as approximately C(sup 2)(sub N) varies as (R/Solar Radius)(sup -3.7). The radio derived power spectral characteristics are in agreement with in situ measurements by the Helios spacecraft for regions of slow solar wind, but fast solar wind does not have large enough density fluctuations to account for the magnitude of the observed scintillations. The observed radial dependence is consistent with a WKB-type evolution of the turbulence with heliocentric distance. Our data also show indication of turbulence enhancement associated with solar wind transients.

  6. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  7. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  8. Spectroscopic Measurements of Radio Frequency Plasmas in Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Kawashima, Ayato

    2010-10-29

    Spectroscopic measurements of radio frequency (rf) plasma were performed under high pressure CO{sub 2} conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc)CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). The temperatures evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands increased from 3600 K to 4600 K with increasing pressure. The broadening and shifting of the O I line profile ({approx}777 nm) of rf plasma was observed under scCO{sub 2} conditions. The width of the line profile increased with increasing pressure. The reason for the broadening and shifting is still unclear because the present theory used to explain them is not valid for such high pressure conditions. Further, the broadening of the Ar I line profile ({approx}811.5 nm) in rf plasmas was observed under atmospheric Ar (0.1 MPa), high pressure Ar conditions (1-4 MPa), and scAr condition (5 MPa); the observation of the O I line profile in CO{sub 2} plasmas is difficult in this pressure range owing to its weak intensity therein. Similar to the case of the O I line in CO{sub 2} plasmas, the reason for the broadening of the Ar I line profile at 5 MPa is unclear.

  9. Radio Frequency (RF) Attenuation Measurements of the Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, R. C.; Kent, B. M.; Kempf, D. R.; Johnk, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Following the loss of Columbia, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) provided recommendations to be addressed prior to Return To Flight (RTF). As a part of CAIB Recommendation 3.4.1 - Ground Based Imagery, new C-band and X-band radars were added to the array of ground-based radars and cameras already in-situ at Kennedy Space Center. Because of higher power density considerations and new operating frequencies, the team of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) assembled to investigate the technical details of introducing the new radars recommended a series of radio frequency (RF) attenuation tests be performed on the Space Shuttle vehicle to establish the attenuation of the vehicle outer mold line structure with respect to its external RF environment. Because of time and complex logistical constraints, it was decided to split the test into two separate efforts. The first of these would be accomplished with the assistance of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), performing RF attenuation measurements on the aft section of OV-103 (Discovery) while in-situ in Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) 3, located at Kennedy Space Center. The second would be accomplished with the assistance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) laboratory out of the Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, Maryland (PAX River), performing RF attenuation measurements on OV-105 (Endeavour) in-situ inside the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) hangar, also located at Kennedy Space Center. This paper provides a summary description of these efforts and their results.

  10. A Broadcast Channel Assignment Mechanism based on The Broadcast Tree for Multi-radio Multi-channel Wireless Mesh Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Zeng, Yingzhi

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposed a broadcast Channel Assignment Mechanism on base of optimized Broadcast Tree for wireless Mesh network (WMN), which is created by Branch and Bound Method. The simulations show that our algorithm not only reduces the broadcast redundancy but also avoids the potential channel interferences produced by unnecessary relay nodes.

  11. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  12. Analysis of satellite measurements of terrestrial radio noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, G.; Caruso, J. A.; Vargas-Vila, R.; Ziemba, E.

    1974-01-01

    Worldwide distributions of terrestrial radio noise as monitored by Radio Astronomy Explorer 1 (RAE 1) generated and compared with CCIR predictions. These contour maps show the global morphology of radio noise at 6.55 and 9.18 MHz for fall, winter, spring and summer during the local time blocks of 00-08 LT and 16-24 LT. These computer produced maps show general agreement with CCIR predictions over large land masses. The RAE and CCIR maps diverge at high latitudes over Asia and frequently over ocean regions. Higher noise levels observed by RAE at high latitudes are attributed to magnetospheric emission while higher noise levels observed by RAE over Asia are attributable to high power transmitters. Analysis of RAE noise observations in conjunction with various geophysical phenomena showed no obvious correlation.

  13. At-sea distribution of radio-marked Ashy Storm-Petrels Oceanodroma homochroa captured on the California Channel Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, J.; Takekawa, J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Small, rare and wide-ranging pelagic birds are difficult to locate and observe at sea; little is therefore known regarding individual movements and habitat affinities among many of the world's storm-petrels (Family Hydrobatidae). We re-located 57 of 70 radio-marked Ashy Storm-Petrels Oceanodroma homochroa captured at three colonies in the California Channel Islands: Scorpion Rocks (2004, 2005), Santa Barbara Island (2004) and Prince Island (2005). Between 23 July and 22 September 2004, and 5 July and 4 August 2005, we flew 29 telemetry surveys, covered more than 65 000 km2 (2004) and 43 000 km2 (2005) of open ocean from San Nicolas Island north to the Farallon Islands and obtained 215 locations from 57 storm-petrels at sea. In both years, radio-marked storm-petrels were aggregated over the continental slope from Point Conception to Point Buchon, within the western Santa Barbara Channel, and over the Santa Cruz Basin between Santa Cruz, San Nicolas and Santa Barbara islands. Individuals captured in the Channel Islands ranged more than 600 km and were located as far north as Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. This is the first study to use radiotelemetry to determine the at-sea distribution and movements for any storm-petrel species.

  14. Some Results of Coordinate Measurements of Local Radio Sources on the Sun.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-03

    7 AD-A VS@ 186 SOME RESULTS OF COORDINATE MEASUREMENTS OF LOCAL RADIO iSOURCES ON THE SUN (U) NAVRL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SRN1) DIEGO CR Y N BOROYIK ET...MEASUREMENTS OF LOCAL RADIO !C~i SOURCES ON THE SUN ell Translated by CM Bigger from an article by VN Borovik and AV Temirova Edited by MP Bleiweiss C...COORDINATE MEASUREMENTS OF LOCAL RADIO SOURCES ON THE SUN 12 PERSOML AJT"ORS V.N. Borovik, A.V. Temirova 1l W 0 REPORT l3b VM COVIRED 4 SAlE 09 9504 f . 4 j

  15. Radio Frequency Hearing Aids: The Need for Complementary and Compatible Channel Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Vic; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The article discusses the use of radio frequency hearing aids, which provide a practical means of improving the signal-to-noise ratio of conventional hearing aids used by the aurally handicapped. (Author/DLS)

  16. Optimal throughput for cognitive radio with energy harvesting in fading wireless channel.

    PubMed

    Vu-Van, Hiep; Koo, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    Energy resource management is a crucial problem of a device with a finite capacity battery. In this paper, cognitive radio is considered to be a device with an energy harvester that can harvest energy from a non-RF energy resource while performing other actions of cognitive radio. Harvested energy will be stored in a finite capacity battery. At the start of the time slot of cognitive radio, the radio needs to determine if it should remain silent or carry out spectrum sensing based on the idle probability of the primary user and the remaining energy in order to maximize the throughput of the cognitive radio system. In addition, optimal sensing energy and adaptive transmission power control are also investigated in this paper to effectively utilize the limited energy of cognitive radio. Finding an optimal approach is formulated as a partially observable Markov decision process. The simulation results show that the proposed optimal decision scheme outperforms the myopic scheme in which current throughput is only considered when making a decision.

  17. Measured channel parameters for the disturbed wide-bandwidth HF channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Christopher A.; Bello, Phillip A.

    2003-04-01

    The wideband HF (WBHF) channel impulse response measurements presented here were taken over a high-latitude auroral path using the MITRE experimental WBHF test facility. A nominal instantaneous bandwidth of 1 MHz was used for the majority of the tests. These tests took place from 14 March through 1 April 1992 over a path from Sondrestrom AFB, Greenland, to Bedford, Massachusetts, a distance of approximately 3,100 km. The measurements were made using a direct-sequence pseudo-noise (DSPN) channel probe with a (±180°) chip modulation and chip rate of 1024 kchips/second. Complex channel impulse response values at increments of 500 nanoseconds in delay were derived by correlating the received signal with a set of local DSPN references uniformly spaced in delay over a delay range of 2 ms. Each of these channel impulse response values was sampled in time at a rate of up to 62.5 samples per second, resulting in the ability to observe (one-sided) Doppler spectra and shifts of up to 31.25 Hz. From these measurements, the channel scattering function, rms (2σ) Doppler spread, rms (2σ) Delay spread, Doppler shift, and rms (2σ) spread factor were calculated. In addition, for the first time, the impulse response correlation along the delay axis was calculated. These latter measurements support the use of an uncorrelated scattering hypothesis in modeling the disturbed WBHF channel.

  18. Quantum states tomography with noisy measurement channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Yu. I.; Bantysh, B. I.; Bogdanova, N. A.; Kvasnyy, A. B.; Lukichev, V. F.

    2016-12-01

    We consider realistic measurement systems, where measurements are accompanied by decoherence processes. The aim of this work is the construction of methods and algorithms for precise quantum measurements with fidelity close to the fundamental limit. In the present work the notions of ideal and non-ideal quantum measurements are strictly formalized. It is shown that non-ideal quantum measurements could be represented as a mixture of ideal measurements. Based on root approach the quantum state reconstruction method is developed. Informational accuracy theory of non-ideal quantum measurements is proposed. The monitoring of the amount of information about the quantum state parameters is examined, including the analysis of the information degradation under the noise influence. The study of achievable fidelity in non-ideal quantum measurements is performed. The results of simulation of fidelity characteristics of a wide class of quantum protocols based on polyhedrons geometry with high level of symmetry are presented. The impact of different decoherence mechanisms, including qubit amplitude and phase relaxation, bit-flip and phase-flip, is considered.

  19. Analysis of Wireless Sensor Network Topology and Estimation of Optimal Network Deployment by Deterministic Radio Channel Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the implementation and design of context-aware scenarios is the adequate deployment strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), mainly due to the strong dependence of the radiofrequency physical layer with the surrounding media, which can lead to non-optimal network designs. In this work, radioplanning analysis for WSN deployment is proposed by employing a deterministic 3D ray launching technique in order to provide insight into complex wireless channel behavior in context-aware indoor scenarios. The proposed radioplanning procedure is validated with a testbed implemented with a Mobile Ad Hoc Network WSN following a chain configuration, enabling the analysis and assessment of a rich variety of parameters, such as received signal level, signal quality and estimation of power consumption. The adoption of deterministic radio channel techniques allows the design and further deployment of WSNs in heterogeneous wireless scenarios with optimized behavior in terms of coverage, capacity, quality of service and energy consumption. PMID:25664434

  20. Analysis of wireless sensor network topology and estimation of optimal network deployment by deterministic radio channel characterization.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-02-05

    One of the main challenges in the implementation and design of context-aware scenarios is the adequate deployment strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), mainly due to the strong dependence of the radiofrequency physical layer with the surrounding media, which can lead to non-optimal network designs. In this work, radioplanning analysis for WSN deployment is proposed by employing a deterministic 3D ray launching technique in order to provide insight into complex wireless channel behavior in context-aware indoor scenarios. The proposed radioplanning procedure is validated with a testbed implemented with a Mobile Ad Hoc Network WSN following a chain configuration, enabling the analysis and assessment of a rich variety of parameters, such as received signal level, signal quality and estimation of power consumption. The adoption of deterministic radio channel techniques allows the design and further deployment of WSNs in heterogeneous wireless scenarios with optimized behavior in terms of coverage, capacity, quality of service and energy consumption.

  1. Seventy Years of Radio Science, Technology, Standards, and Measurement at the National Bureau of Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmor, C. Stewart

    This large volume describes all the forms of radio research done at the National Bureau of Standards (now, National Institute of Standards and Technology) from its founding in 1901 until about 1980. The volume truly reflects its subtitle; it describes in great detail research in radio propagation and all its connections with geophysics and geospace, but also radio as instrument for discovery and application in meteorology, navigation, and in standards of measurement and testing in electronics.The book is a bit unwieldy and some of its chapters will be of most interest to former NBS employees. For example, there is a lengthy chapter on the transfer of radio research work from Washington, D.C, to Boulder, Colo., in the early 1950s, complete with photostat of the quit claim deed to NBS from the Boulder Chamber of Commerce. On the other hand, radio research developed and flourished in this country in the early days at industrial (Bell Telephone, General Electric, Westinghouse) and government (NBS, Naval Research Laboratory) labs more than in academia, and it is very interesting to learn how the labs interacted and to read details of the organizational structure. I can attest personally to the great difficulties in locating materials concerning radio history. While we have numerous volumes devoted to certain popular radio heroes, little is available concerning government radio pioneers such as L. W. Austin, who directed the U.S. Navy's radio research for many years while situated physically at the Bureau of Standards, or J. H. Dellinger, long-time chief of the Radio Section and head spokesman on radio for the U.S. government until the 1930s.

  2. Radio Occultation Measurements of the Lower Troposphere: A Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, K. J.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    We use simulations to investigate the ability of the Radio Occultation technique to capture the vertical refractivity structure within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. We first generate a suite of atmospheric profiles of pressure, temperature, water content, and boundary layer height, calculate a suite of forward models to get phase variations which are then run through standard Abel transform-based inversion methods to retrieve the input parameters. We are interested to see if the structure between the bottom and top of the ABL can be resolved in spite of the well known negative bias caused by the large refractivity gradients at the top of the ABL. This study can be used as a basis for comparison with other experimental radio occultation inversion methods.

  3. Digital beacon receiver for ionospheric TEC measurement developed with GNU Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.

    2008-11-01

    A simple digital receiver named GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) was developed for the satellite-ground beacon experiment to measure the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). The open-source software toolkit for the software defined radio, GNU Radio, is utilized to realize the basic function of the receiver and perform fast signal processing. The software is written in Python for a LINUX PC. The open-source hardware called Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP), which best matches the GNU Radio, is used as a front-end to acquire the satellite beacon signals of 150 and 400 MHz. The first experiment was successful as results from GRBR showed very good agreement to those from the co-located analog beacon receiver. Detailed design information and software codes are open at the URL http://www.rish.kyoto-u.ac.jp/digitalbeacon/.

  4. Measurement of multipath delay profile in land mobile satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi; Arakaki, Yoshiya; Wakana, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Ryutaro

    1993-01-01

    Mobile satellite communication channel has been evaluated mainly with fading statistics of signal. When bandwidth of transmitting signal becomes wider, frequency selectivity of fading becomes a significant factor of the channel. Channel characteristics, not only signal variation but multipath delay spread should be evaluated. A multipath measurement system is proposed and developed for mobile satellite applications. With this system and ETS-V satellite, multipath delay profiles are measured in various environments including Tokyo metropolis and Sapporo city at 1.5 GHz. Results show that the maximum excess delay is within 1 microsec and the maximum delay spread is 0.2 microsecs at elevation angles of 40 to 47 degrees. In wideband signal transmission of about 1 MHz and more, designers should consider the effect of selective fading due to the multipath of land mobile satellite channel.

  5. Multi-channel multi-radio using 802.11 based media access for sink nodes in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Carlene E-A; Khan, Shafiullah; Singh, Dhananjay; Loo, Kok-Keong

    2011-01-01

    The next generation surveillance and multimedia systems will become increasingly deployed as wireless sensor networks in order to monitor parks, public places and for business usage. The convergence of data and telecommunication over IP-based networks has paved the way for wireless networks. Functions are becoming more intertwined by the compelling force of innovation and technology. For example, many closed-circuit TV premises surveillance systems now rely on transmitting their images and data over IP networks instead of standalone video circuits. These systems will increase their reliability in the future on wireless networks and on IEEE 802.11 networks. However, due to limited non-overlapping channels, delay, and congestion there will be problems at sink nodes. In this paper we provide necessary conditions to verify the feasibility of round robin technique in these networks at the sink nodes by using a technique to regulate multi-radio multichannel assignment. We demonstrate through simulations that dynamic channel assignment scheme using multi-radio, and multichannel configuration at a single sink node can perform close to optimal on the average while multiple sink node assignment also performs well. The methods proposed in this paper can be a valuable tool for network designers in planning network deployment and for optimizing different performance objectives.

  6. A wireless multi-channel bioimpedance measurement system for personalized healthcare and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Javier; Ausín, José Luis; Lorido, Antonio Manuel; Redondo, Francisco; Duque-Carrillo, Juan Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized, noninvasive, wearable sensors constitute a fundamental prerequisite for pervasive, predictive, and preventive healthcare systems. In this sense, this paper presents the design, realization, and evaluation of a wireless multi-channel measurement system based on a cost-effective high-performance integrated circuit for electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The resulting on-chip spectrometer provides high measuring EBI capabilities and together with a low-cost, commercially available radio frequency transceiver device. It provides reliable wireless communication, constitutes the basic node to build EBI wireless sensor networks (EBI-WSNs). The proposed EBI-WSN behaves as a high-performance wireless multi-channel EBI spectrometer, where the number of channels is completely scalable and independently configurable to satisfy specific measurement requirements of each individual. A prototype of the EBI node leads to a very small printed circuit board of approximately 8 cm2 including chip-antenna, which can operate several years on one 3-V coin cell battery and make it suitable for long-term preventive healthcare monitoring.

  7. Technique to determine location of radio sources from measurements taken on spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    The procedure developed to extract average source direction and average source size from spin-modulated radio astronomy data measured on the IMP-6 spacecraft is described. Because all measurements are used, rather than just finding maxima or minima in the data, the method is very sensitive, even in the presence of large amounts of noise. The technique is applicable to all experiments with directivity characteristics. It is suitable for onboard processing on satellites to reduce the data flow to Earth. The application to spin-modulated nonpolarized radio astronomy data is made and includes the effects of noise, background, and second source interference. The analysis was tested with computer simulated data and the results agree with analytic predictions. Applications of this method with IMP-6 radio data have led to: (1) determination of source positions of traveling solar radio bursts at large distances from the Sun; (2) mapping of magnetospheric radio emissions by radio triangulation; and (3) detection of low frequency radio emissions from Jupiter and Saturn.

  8. HF radio signal fading and atmospheric radio noise measurements at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Rao, T. Rama; Reddy, V. Gunasekhara; Lakshmi, D. R.; Veenadhari, B.; Dabas, R. S.; Ahmed, Iqbal; Gupta, M. M.; Reddy, B. M.

    2002-10-01

    Two HF broadcast transmissions, one originating from Sri Lanka (7.1°N, 79.9°E) at 11.800 MHz around the geomagnetic equator and the other from BBC, Masirah (20.6°N, 58.9°E), at 15.310 MHz several degrees north of the geomagnetic equator were monitored at Tirupati (13.5°N, 79.5°E) in southern India to compare the fading characteristics of the links. It is found that the link over the geomagnetic equator exhibits much higher fade rates as compared to the other link. The fade ranges also are, in general, higher for Sri Lanka. Fade allowances derived from these data do indicate that margins higher than those recommended by the International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) need to be provided at these latitudes. The diurnal variation in the atmospheric radio noise (ARN), which sets a lower limit to the satisfactory reception of signal, over the Indian subcontinent is in total disagreement with the variations obtained at higher latitudes. This rather puzzling phenomenon has been interpreted as being due to path attenuation differentials between the LOS mode and the ionospheric mode from the lightning source because of significantly greater cloud height in the Indian region.

  9. The algorithm of construction of a multiring model for the radio image of non-coherent radio sources based on the measured visibility function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshovij, V. V.; Lozins'kij, A. B.; Romanishin, I. M.; Romanchev, Yu. V.

    1998-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of constructing a centrosymmetrical model of the radio image of a noncoherent radio source based on the van Cittert-Zernike theorem. They show that it is enough to know the visibility function modulus determined on the (u,v) plane. A new multiring model for the radio image restoration of radio sources based on visibility function measured by radiointerferometric method is proposed. The authors give the algorithm for determination of the number of rings, their angular radii, and flux densities based on Fourier-Bessel series. The radio image of Cas A was restored from measurements performed with the short-base (up to 2000 D/λ) interferometer URAN-3. The model of the large-scale structure deduced from measurements in the metre range, is consistent with results obtained in decametre wavelengths.

  10. Turbulent Channel Flow Measurements Using Matched Hot-Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estejab, Baraheh; Bailey, Sean

    2011-11-01

    We present an experimental study conducted in a turbulent channel flow facility using hot-wire probes with both constant and varying viscous-scaled wire length. The objectives of the study were threefold: first, to validate the flow produced by the channel flow facility; second, to investigate the validity of recently proposed spatial filtering corrections for Reynolds stress profiles; and third, to extend the investigation of the near-wall peak Reynolds number dependence in turbulent pipe flow conducted by Hultmark, Bailey and Smits (see J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 649, pp. 103-113). We found that in channel flow, unlike in the pipe flow experiments, the near-wall peak exhibited the same Reynolds number dependence observed in turbulent boundary layer studies and channel flow DNS. Since the same measurement techniques and procedures were used in the current study as used in the pipe flow study, this demonstrated that the near-wall Reynolds number independence observed in the pipe study was not due to error introduced by measurement methodology. Furthermore, comparison of results from wires of different length verified that spatial filtering corrections work in channel flow as well as pipe and boundary layer flows. Corrected results were in good agreement with channel flow DNS, thus verifying that the flow in the facility approximates one-dimensional turbulent Poiseuille flow.

  11. Summary of interference measurements at selected radio observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, Jill

    Radiofrequency interference (RFI) will pose the greatest technical challenge to observational programs that propose to listen for weak electromagnetic signals at microwave frequencies in order to search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). Because these types of searches are attempting to detect evidence of an extraterrestrial technology, they are optimized for detecting signals in the frequency/time domain that exhibit characteristics distinctly different from the natural emissions of astrophysical sources. It should therefore come as no surprise that they are extremely efficient at detecting the relatively strong signals generated by our own terrestrial technology! The computational effort and additional observing time required to distinguish between terrestrial and potential extraterrestrial technological signals must be minimized if automated systematic searches of the entire microwave window are to be feasible. One obvious strategy is to choose an observing site where the local and orbital RFI environment is as benign as possible. This paper describes a series of RFI observations conducted at selected radio astronomy observatories. These observations were intended to characterize the RFI environment at those sites from 1 to 10 GHz by making use of the radio astronomy antennas, feeds and receivers, SETI signal processors, and stand-alone equipment built specifically for this purpose.

  12. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  13. Marine information systems and new measuring channels for hydrophysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, G. V.; Olenin, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    The results of the development and implementation of oceanographic information-measuring systems in the 1960s to 1970s and 1980s to 1990s are analytically treated and the basic principles of present-day systems for collecting data on oceanographic parameters are considered. We present the design of a technological platform for multichannel complexes aimed at concurrent measurements of hydrological, optical, and chemical characteristics. The platform allows one to combine the conventional and new channels for measuring oceanographic parameters.

  14. Measurement of horizontal air showers with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambeitz, Olga

    2017-03-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA), at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, measures the radio emission of extensive air showers in the 30-80 MHz frequency range. AERA consists of more than 150 antenna stations distributed over 17 km2. Together with the Auger surface detector, the fluorescence detector and the underground muon detector (AMIGA), AERA is able to measure cosmic rays with energies above 1017 eV in a hybrid detection mode. AERA is optimized for the detection of air showers up to 60° zenith angle, however, using the reconstruction of horizontal air showers with the Auger surface array, very inclined showers can also be measured. In this contribution an analysis of the AERA data in the zenith angle range from 62° to 80° will be presented. CoREAS simulations predict radio emission footprints of several km2 for horizontal air showers, which are now confirmed by AERA measurements. This can lead to radio-based composition measurements and energy determination of horizontal showers in the future and the radio detection of neutrino induced showers is possible.

  15. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Francisco J; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J; Paris, José F

    2016-02-19

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression.

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Francisco J.; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J.; Paris, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  17. Measurement and visualization of impingement cooling in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, E.

    Experimental measurement techniques such as naphthalene sublimation, liquid crystal thermography and real-time holographic interferometry are standard. Their application in narrow channels causes problems and is therefore limited. The channel width must not change too much because the naphthalene sublimation and the liquid crystal coating necessary for the thermography may cause non-negotiable variations. The interferometry fails in turbulent flow area. The diffraction along the channel edges is an additional difficulty. A comparison of the results obtained from the application of all three techniques, which has not been considered in earlier publications, is made here. The methods were used to measure and visualize the heat transfer characteristics of an array of 1.2mm diameter impinging jets in an enclosed channel (>=2.2mm) with single-sided flow-off at Reynolds numbers of about Rez 20,000. Scale-up ratios as low as 2.4 have been used in order to maintain similarity as it has not been previously reported. The naphthalene technique provided a high spatially resolved measurement of the Sherwood number along a downstream line. The liquid crystal thermography technique provided 2D contours of the Nusselt number. The temperature distribution within dead water zones was visualized with holographic interferometry. The cross-flow effects caused a shift in the stagnation point and a monotone decrease in the Nusselt number in the downstream direction.

  18. Measurement, Information Channels, and Discretization: Exploring the Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domotor, Zoltan; Batitsky, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a unified algebraic-analytic framework for (static and dynamic) deterministic measurement theory, which we find to be fully adequate in engineering and natural science applications. The starting point of this paradigm is the notion of a quantity algebra of a measured system and that of a measuring instrument, underlying the causal linkages in classical ‘system + instrument’ interactions. This approach is then further enriched by providing a superimposed data lattice of measurement outcomes, intended to handle the information flow from the measured system to its measurand's designated instrument. We argue that the language of Banach and von Neumann algebras is ideally suited for the treatment of quantities, encountered in theoretical and experimental science. These algebras and convex spaces of expectation functionals thereon together with information (co)channels between them provide a comprehensive information-theoretic framework for measurement theory. Concrete examples and applications to length and position measurements are also discussed and rigorously framed within the proposed quantity algebra and associated information channel paradigms. In modeling physical systems, investigators routinely rely on the assumption that state spaces and time domains form a continuum (locally homeomorphic to the real line or its Cartesian powers). But in sharp contrast, measurement and prediction outcomes pertaining to physical systems under consideration tend to be presented in terms of small discrete sets of rational numbers. We investigate this conceptual gap between theoretical and finitary data models from the perspectives of temporal, spatial and algebraic discretization schemes. The principal innovation in our approach to classical measurement theory is the

  19. The influence of the atmospheric refractive index on radio Xmax measurements of air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corstanje, Arthur; Buitink, Stijn; Bonardi, Antonio; Falcke, Heino; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Mitra, Pragati; Mulrey, Katie; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Jörg Paul; Rossetto, Laura; Schellart, Pim; Scholten, Olaf; Thoudam, Satyendra; Trinh, Gia; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    The refractive index of the atmosphere, which is n ≈ 1:0003 at sea level, varies with altitude and with local temperature, pressure and humidity. When performing radio measurements of air showers, natural variations in n will change the radio lateral intensity distribution, by changing the Cherenkov angle. Using CoREAS simulations, we have evaluated the systematic error on measurements of the shower maximum Xmax due to variations in n. It was found that a 10% increase in refractivity (n - 1) leads to an underestimation of Xmax between 8 and 22 g/cm2 for proton-induced showers at zenith angles from 15 to 45 degrees, respectively.

  20. Source and event selection for radio-planetary frame-tie measurements using the Phobos Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R.; Ulvestad, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Soviet Phobos Lander mission will place two spacecraft on the Martian moon Phobos in 1989. Measurements of the range from Earth-based stations to the landers will allow an accurate determination of the ephemerides of Phobos and Mars. Delta Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) between the landers and compact radio sources nearby on the sky will be used to obtain precise estimates of the angular offset between the radio and planetary reference frames. The accuracy of this frame-tie estimate is expected to be in the vicinity of 10 mrad, depending on how well several error sources can be controlled (calibrated or reduced). Many candidate radio sources for VLBI measurements were identified, but additional work is necessary to select those sources which have characteristics appropriate to the present application. Strategies for performing the source selection are described.

  1. Dynamic wall shear stress measurements in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2010-11-01

    To quantify and understand the dynamics of near wall momentum transfer, high spatial resolution, time-resolved measurements of wall shear stress distribution are essential. In this study, a film-based shear stress sensor has been used to measure the time-resolved local wall shear stress distribution in a turbulent channel flow. Measurements have been undertaken in a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers up to 130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel height. The measured fluctuating wall shear stress distribution provides spatio-temporal information of the characteristics of near wall structures by detecting their footprints. The span-wise extent of the positive two-point correlation of the stream-wise shear stress fluctuations provides the average width in the order of 100 wall units for the near-wall coherent structures. An investigation of the topological features of the velocity gradient and rate of strain tensors enables us to show an intrinsic characteristic of the near wall flow, which follows a two-dimensional flow pattern.

  2. Occupational exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment: measurements and simulation.

    PubMed

    Paljanos, Annamaria; Miclaus, Simona; Munteanu, Calin

    2015-09-01

    Technical literature provides numerous studies concerning radiofrequency exposure measurements for various radio communication devices, but there are few studies related to exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment. In order to evaluate exposure and identify cases when safety requirements are not entirely met, both measurements and simulations are needed for accurate results. Moreover, given the technical characteristics of the radio devices used in the military, personnel mainly operate in the near-field region so both measurements and simulation becomes more complex. Measurements were made in situ using a broadband personal exposimeter equipped with two isotropic probes for both electric and magnetic components of the field. The experiment was designed for three different operating frequencies of the same radio equipment, while simulations were made in FEKO software using hybrid numerical methods to solve complex electromagnetic field problems. The paper aims to discuss the comparative results of the measurements and simulation, as well as comparing them to reference levels specified in military or civilian radiofrequency exposure standards.

  3. Strain tensors in layer systems by precision ion channeling measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trinkaus, H.; Buca, D.; Hollaender, B.; Minamisawa, R. A.; Mantl, S.; Hartmann, J. M.

    2010-06-15

    A powerful method for analyzing general strain states in layer systems is the measurement of changes in the ion channeling directions. We present a systematic derivation and compilation of the required relations between the strain induced angle changes and the components of the strain tensor for general crystalline layer systems of reduced symmetry compared to the basic (cubic) crystal. It is shown that, for the evaluation of channeling measurements, virtually all layers of interest may be described as being 'pseudo-orthorhombic'. The commonly assumed boundary conditions and the effects of surface misorientations on them are discussed. Asymmetric strain relaxation in layers of reduced symmetry is attributed to a restriction in the slip system of the dislocations inducing it. The results are applied to {l_brace}110{r_brace}SiGe/Si layer systems.

  4. Surface figure measurements of radio telescopes with a shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Serabyn, E; Phillips, T G; Masson, C R

    1991-04-01

    A new technique for determining the surface figure of large submillimeter wavelength telescopes is presented, which is based on measuring the telescope's focal plane diffraction pattern with a shearing interferometer. In addition to the instrumental theory, results obtained using such an interferometer on the 10.4-m diam telescope of the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory are discussed. Using wavelengths near 1 mm, a measurement accuracy of 9 microm, or lambda/115, has been achieved, and the rms surface accuracy has been determined to be just under 30 microm. The distortions of the primary reflector with changing elevation angle have also been measured and agree well with theoretical predictions of the dish deformation.

  5. Radio Frequency (RF) Measurements for Human Detection, Tracking, and Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    any given day for any measurement will be a single session of 1 hour and a maximum amount of time of 2 hours for 2 sessions on a single day. Your...amount of time you would be required on any given day for any measurement will be a single session of 1.5 hours and a maximum amount of time of 3 hours

  6. An analysis of source structure effects in radio interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    To begin a study of structure effects, this report presents a theoretical framework, proposes an effective position approach to structure corrections based on brightness distribution measurements, and analyzes examples of analytical and measured brightness distributions. Other topics include the effect of the frequency dependence of a brightness distribution on bandwidth synthesis (BWS) delay, the determination of the absolute location of a measured brightness distribution, and structure effects in dual frequency calibration of charged particle delays. For the 10 measured distributions analyzed, it was found that the structure effect in BWS delay at X-band (3.6 cm) can reach 30 cm, but typically falls in the range of 0 to 5 cm. A trial limit equation that is dependent on visibility was successfully tested against the 10 measured brightness distributions (seven sources). If the validity of this particular equation for an upper limit can be established for nearly all sources, the structure effect in BWS delay could be greatly reduced without supplementary measurements of brightness distributions.

  7. Frame synchronization methods based on channel symbol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.; Cheung, K.-M.

    1989-01-01

    The current DSN frame synchronization procedure is based on monitoring the decoded bit stream for the appearance of a sync marker sequence that is transmitted once every data frame. The possibility of obtaining frame synchronization by processing the raw received channel symbols rather than the decoded bits is explored. Performance results are derived for three channel symbol sync methods, and these are compared with results for decoded bit sync methods reported elsewhere. It is shown that each class of methods has advantages or disadvantages under different assumptions on the frame length, the global acquisition strategy, and the desired measure of acquisition timeliness. It is shown that the sync statistics based on decoded bits are superior to the statistics based on channel symbols, if the desired operating region utilizes a probability of miss many orders of magnitude higher than the probability of false alarm. This operating point is applicable for very large frame lengths and minimal frame-to-frame verification strategy. On the other hand, the statistics based on channel symbols are superior if the desired operating point has a miss probability only a few orders of magnitude greater than the false alarm probability. This happens for small frames or when frame-to-frame verifications are required.

  8. Traffic-Aware Channel Allocation and Routing in Multichannel, Multi-Radio Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    of the channel (2 MHz) is used. Accordingly, the maximum data rate of 54 Mbps achieved using a 64- QAM modulation using a 3/4 coding rate on a 20 MHz...ABSTRACT Modern day wireless network applications exhibit varying service demands to satisfy user requirements, while di ering in the nature of tra c... applications , such as VoIP and interactive gaming. To address this, we propose SHORT (Static-Hybrid approach for rOuting Real Time applications ), a joint

  9. Propagation measurements on a line-of-sight over-water radio link in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Per; Henne, Ingvar

    2014-07-01

    Propagation measurements have been carried out on a 43 km long 13 GHz 128 QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation) over-water path in the coastal regions of Norway. The measurements lasted for 18 months. The intention with the measurements on this in-service radio link was to compare results with models given by the (Recommendation International Telecommunication Union) Rec. ITU-R P. 530-15. The attenuation due to combined rain and wet snow was of special interest, since the radio link is situated in an area—Trondheimsfjorden—that has a significant amount of wet snow in winter. The radio link experienced outages due to multipath, rain and wet snow, where the latter were the predominant outage cause. The fading due to combined rain and wet snow resembled the shape of the model given in Rec. ITU-R P. 530-15, but the model underpredicts the amount of fading. In addition to outages (performance degradation and unavailability) and fading, various other parameters such as fading speed, enhancement, average fade duration, and number of fade events have been measured and compared to Rec. ITU-R P. 530-15. The radio link activity has also been compared to the weather conditions at the time for the most severe fading incidents.

  10. VHF Omnidirectional Radio Range (VOR) Electromagnetic Spectrum Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-18

    EFFECTS IN SPECTRUM DISPLAYS 9-25 9.4 DOPPLER VOR ( DVOR ) 9-27 9.4.1 DVOR SPECTRUMS 9-28 9.4.2 DVOR SPECTRUM COMPONENT AMPLITUDES AS A FUNCTION OF...SPECTRUM ANALYZER BW 9-30 I 9.4.3 DIFFERENCES IN DVOR MODULATION PRODUCT AMPLITUDE ROLL-OFFS AT VARIOUS FACILITIES 9-32 9.4.4 SWITCHING TRANSIENTS 9-32 9.5...OF VOR AND DVOR EMISSIONS 9-40 9.7 IMPORTANCE OF RADIATED SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS FOR ANALYTICAL AND ADJUSTMENT PURPOSES TO ASSIST INSTALLATION

  11. Radio observations of the planets - The importance of laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.; Mitchell, D. L.

    1993-03-01

    Laboratory data on the line broadening parameters of H2S gas under Uranian/Neptunian conditions, on the far wings of the H2S and NH3 line profiles, and on the dielectric properties of CH4-, NH3-, H2S-, and NH4SH-ice are needed to constrain elemental abundances and understand the dynamics and cloud physics in the atmospheres of the giant planets. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of gaseous H2SO4 at millimeter wavelengths are needed in order to obtain a better understanding of Venus' atmosphere. To determine wind velocity fields in Venus' and Mars' atmospheres, accurate measurements of the center frequencies of the CO lines are necessary. The absorption and scattering properties of lunar soils and/or terrestrial rock powders at frequencies from approximately 1 to 200 GHz, determined in laboratory experiments, would provide a valuable addition to existing data at 450 MHz, 35 GHz, and far infrared frequencies. These data would be used to analyze the microwave spectra of planetary surfaces. Such studies may be helpful in distinguishing the effects of radiative transfer from those of nonlinear heat conduction and internal heat sources.

  12. The Accuracy of Radio Interferometric Measurements of Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Spieth, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of very long base interferometry earth rotation (UT1) measurements is examined by intercomparing TEMPO and POLARIS data for 1982 and the first half of 1983. None of these data are simultaneous, and so a proper intercomparison requires accounting for the scatter introduced by the rapid, unpredictable, UT1 variations driven by exchanges of angular momentum with the atmosphere. A statistical model of these variations, based on meteorological estimates of the Atmospheric Angular Momentum is derived, and the optimal linear (Kalman) smoother for this model is constructed. The scatter between smoothed and independent raw data is consistent with the residual formal errors, which do not depend upon the actual scatter of the UT1 data. This represents the first time that an accurate prediction of the scatter between UT1 data sets were possible.

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.

    1999-09-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using six candidate events for the process pp¯-->tt¯+X-->l+νbl-ν¯b¯+X, observed in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab pp¯ collider. Using maximum likelihood fits to the dynamics of the decays, we measure a mass for the top quark of mt=168.4+/-12.3(stat)+/-3.6(syst) Gev. We combine this result with our previous measurement in the tt¯-->l+jets channel to obtain mt=172.1+/-7.1 GeV as the best value of the mass of the top quark measured by D0.

  14. Cassegrainian/Gregorian-type null correctors for surface measurements of radio telescope reflectors.

    PubMed

    Greve, A

    1997-08-01

    The (sub)millimeter wavelength radio observatory of the next generation will probably be an interferometer array of some 50 telescopes with parabolic reflectors 10-15 m in diameter. At this scale of mass production it is convenient to have at hand for workshop assembly a reflector surface measurement technique that is precise and easy to operate. We discuss the possibility of reflector measurements based on 10.6-microm CO2 laser interferometry using Cassegrainian/Gregorian-type null correctors.

  15. Magnetization of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars: Results from radio occultation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R.; Kliore, A.J. )

    1991-07-01

    In situ measurements by the Pioneer Venus orbiting spacecraft, conducted during solar maximum only, have shown that magnetization (permeation of large-scale magnetic fields) of the ionosphere of Venus occurs under high solar wind dynamic pressure and that this takes place most frequently near the subsolar region. In this paper, the authors use remote sensing radio occultation measurements to study magnetization of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars based on these characteristics. For Venus they take advantage of the unique data set consisting of 148 electron density profiles deduced from Pioneer Venus radio occultation measurements. They demonstrate that radio occultation measurements yield results on frequency of occurrence of magnetization during solar maximum that are similar to those obtained from the Pioneer Venus in situ magnetic field measurements. During solar minimum, for which direct ionospheric measurements have never been made, they find that magnetization of the Venus ionosphere is more pervasive than at solar maximum. Magnetization extends to higher solar zenith angles (SZA) and appears stronger than at solar maximum. These results confirm that during solar minimum, the high solar wind dynamic pressure state is more prevalent at Venus because the ionospheric plasma pressure is weaker than at solar maximum. Comparison of a large number of electron density profiles of Mars (deduced from radio occultation measurements by the Viking 1 and 2 and Mariner 9 spacecraft for SZA > 46{degrees}) with those of Venus shows an absence of the ledge and disturbed topside plasma observed in the Venus profiles. These results, however, do not constitute evidence against magnetization of the ionosphere of Mars, as Shinagawa and Cravens (1989) have shown on their one-dimensional MHD models that, even when the ionosphere of Mars is highly magnetized, the magnetic structure differs from that at Venus, and a ledge does not form in its electron density profiles.

  16. Wireless radio channel for intramuscular electrode implants in the control of upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Stango, Antonietta; Yazdandoost, Kamya Yekeh; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years the use of implanted devices has been considered also in the field of myoelectric hand prostheses. Wireless implanted EMG (Electromyogram) sensors can improve the functioning of the prosthesis, providing information without the disadvantage of the wires, and the usability by amputees. The solutions proposed in the literature are based on proprietary communication protocols between the implanted devices and the prosthesis controller, using frequency bands that are already assigned to other purposes. This study proposes the use of a standard communication protocol (IEEE 802.15.6), specific for wireless body area networks (WBANs), which assign a specific bandwidth to implanted devices. The propagation losses from in-to-on body were investigated by numerical simulation with a 3D human model and an electromagnetic solver. The channel model resulting from the study represents the first step towards the development of myoelectric prosthetic hands which are driven by signals acquired by implanted sensors. However these results can provide important information to researchers for further developments, and manufacturers, which can decrease the production costs for hand prostheses having a common standard of communication with assigned frequencies of operation.

  17. Weighted sum-rate maximization for multi-user SIMO multiple access channels in cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peter; Zhao, Lian; Lu, Jianhua

    2013-12-01

    In this article, an efficient distributed and parallel algorithm is proposed to maximize the sum-rate and optimize the input distribution policy for the multi-user single input multiple output multiple access channel (MU-SIMO MAC) system with concurrent access within a cognitive radio (CR) network. The single input means that every user has a single antenna and multiple output means that base station(s) has multiple antennas. The main features are: (i) the power distribution for the users is updated by using variable scale factors which effectively and efficiently maximize the objective function at each iteration; (ii) distributed and parallel computation is employed to expedite convergence of the proposed distributed algorithm; and (iii) a novel water-filling with mixed constraints is investigated, and used as a fundamental block of the proposed algorithm. Due to sufficiently exploiting the structure of the proposed model, the proposed algorithm owns fast convergence. Numerical results verify that the proposed algorithm is effective and fast convergent. Using the proposed approach, for the simulated range, the required number of iterations for convergence is two and this number is not sensitive to the increase of the number of users. This feature is quite desirable for large scale systems with dense active users. In addition, it is also worth noting that the proposed algorithm is a monotonic feasible operator to the iteration. Thus, the stop criterion for computation could be easily set up.

  18. Estimating water vapour along the radio path between two LEO satellites through multifrequency differential power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facheris, Luca; Cuccoli, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The Normalized Differential Spectral Attenuation (NDSA) concept was proposed in 2002 by the authors for tropospheric water vapour sounding by means of a couple of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellites (one carrying a transmitter, the other a receiver and operating in the Ku/K bands) in limb geometry. In those years, in the course of the ACE+ mission studies (second call for proposal of the ESA Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission), the problem arose of the severe impact of scintillation due to tropospheric turbulence on the water vapour estimates provided by radio occultation measurements made in limb mode between two LEO satellites. In following ESA studies (AlmetLeo - 2004, ACTLIMB -2009) it was demonstrated that NDSA, thanks to its normalised differential approach, is effective for limiting scintillation and for estimating the Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) along the propagation path between the two LEO satellites. NDSA relies on the conversion of a spectral parameter (the spectral sensitivity S), into the IWV through IWV-S relationships. S is a finite-difference approximation of the derivative of the spectral attenuation at a given frequency fo, normalized to the spectral attenuation itself. To measure Sat fo,it is required that two tone signals with equal power at relatively close frequencies f1 and f2 (f1 > f2) symmetrically placed around fo are simultaneously transmitted. The two pertinent received powers P1 and P2 are simultaneously measured and S is provided by: S = -P2--P1- (f1 - f2 )P2 From the very beginning of the NDSA studies, it was evident that in ideal measurement conditions (no disturbance at the receiver nor propagation impairments) S is tightly correlated to the IWV. To verify this, we accounted for natural variations of the atmospheric conditions by generating simulated spherically symmetric atmospheres using real radiosonde profiles. We computed IWV along the radio path and simulated S separately obtaining IWV-S relationships at various altitudes

  19. Direction-finding measurements of type 3 radio bursts out of the ecliptic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumback, M. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Direction-finding measurements with the plasma wave experiments on the HAWKEYE 1 and IMP 8 satellites are used to find the source locations of type 3 solar radio bursts in heliocentric latitude and longitude in a frequency range from 31.1 kHz to 500 kHz. Using an empirical model for the emission frequency as a function of radial distance from the sun the three-dimensional trajectory of the type 3 radio source can be determined from direction-finding measurements at different frequencies. Since the electrons which produce these radio emissions follow the magnetic field lines from the sun these measurements provide information on the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field in the solar wind. The source locations projected into the ecliptic plane follow an Archimedian spiral. Perpendicular to the ecliptic plane the source locations usually follow a constant heliocentric latitude. With direction-finding measurements of this type it is also possible to determine the source size from the modulation factor of the received signals.

  20. Ranging algorithm based on process measurement for low-altitude radio fuzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolu; Xu, Tao; Chen, Biao; Tao, Ronghua

    2015-02-01

    A ranging algorithm based on process measurement was proposed for low-altitude radio fuzes with wide range of action and low request of absolute ranging precision. For those particular applications, a conception of relative burst height was given to control the initiation point of a fuze instead of the absolute burst height. The received echo power was analyzed and its relationship with the relative burst height was derived. The basic principle and implementation of the ranging algorithm were discussed and the simulation results were given including anti-white Gaussian noise performance and anti-active jamming performance. The results proved the feasibility of the ranging algorithm based on process measurement. It could be used to help the further researches of low altitude radio fuzes.

  1. An electrodeless system for measurement of liquid sample dielectric properties in radio frequency band.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, V; Giovannetti, G; Vanello, N; Costantino, M; Landini, L; Benassi, A

    2006-01-01

    An electrodeless measurement system based on a resonant circuit is proposed for the measurement of dielectric properties of liquid samples at RF (radio frequency). Generally, properties as dielectric constant, loss factor and conductivity are measured by parallel plate capacitor cells: this method has several limitations in the case of particular liquid samples and in the range of radiofrequencies. Our method is based on the measurements of resonance frequency and quality factor of a LC resonant circuit in different measuring conditions, without and with the liquid sample placed inside a test tube around which the home made coil is wrapped. The measurement is performed using a network analyzer and a dual loop probe, inductively coupled with the resonant circuit. One of the advantages of this method is the contactless between the liquid sample and the measurement electrodes. In this paper the measurement system is described and test measurements of conventional liquids dielectric properties are reported.

  2. Detection of Low-Lattitude Plumes in the Outer Corona by Ulysses Radio Ranging Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard; Bird, Michael K.; Pold, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Plumes have been detected beyond the field of view of coronagraphs in the range of 23-42 R(sub o) in an equatorial coronal hole by Ulysses radio ranging measurements conducted in 1991 at 13 and 3.6 cm wavelengths. These results show that plumes are not exclusive to polar regions, but appear to be intrinsic to open magnetic field regions at any latitude.

  3. VLBI measurements of radio source positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Fanselow, J. L.; Thomas, J. B.; Cohen, E. J.; Rogstad, D. H.; Sovers, O. J.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of approximately 1300 observations of 67 radio sources are presented. Most of the measurements were made at the stations of the Deep Space Network in California, Spain, and Australia at wavelengths of 13.1 and 3.6 cm, between 1971 and 1978. The formal errors in the derived source positions are generally in the neighborhood of 0.01 seconds of arc and the positions agree fairly well with those previously published.

  4. A Study of the Short-Term Stability of Energy Characteristics of the Ionospheric Radio Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabashov, B. G.; Ogar, A. S.; Pelevin, O. Yu.; Radio, L. P.

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of the results of long-term measurements on the calibrated mid-latitude highfrequency paths, it is concluded that the processes responsible for the energy characteristics of the high-frequency wave field have inertial properties. Slow (one-hour) absolute variations in the average signal and effective-noise levels in the daytime and the night-time hours do not exceed 2 .0 dB. Similar variations in the average signal levels in the twilight hours after removal of the trend, which is caused by the diurnal variation in the ionospheric characteristics, are also below 2 .0 dB. Analysis of the time behavior of the relative error-appearance frequency during transmission of the binary sequences with the amplitude manipulation indicates that the above frequency varies in the range 20 -75 % for an hour if the reception results are averaged for 20 min.

  5. Experimental Measurements and Diagnosis of Radio/Frequency Space High Power and Electromagnetic Compatibility Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boria, V. E.; Nuno, L.; Monerris, O.; Smacchia, D.; Argiles, D.; Raboso, D.

    2016-05-01

    Radio-Frequency (RF) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) effects are becoming a major issue for the aerospace industry, especially due to the ever increasing demand of more communication channels, operating at higher operational frequencies with broader bandwidths, and to stringent requirements in terms of reduced mass, volume and footprint for satellite payload components. Additionally, RF breakdown phenomena (such as Multipactor, Corona and Power Handling), as well as Passive Inter-Modulation (PIM) effects, that can imply malfunctioning of satellite communication equipment and undesired interferences, are a common concern for the satellite industry. In order to mitigate all these undesired effects, or even to prevent them, experimental testing and diagnosis techniques are widely requested. In this contribution, state-of-the-art testing facilities and diagnosis techniques for successfully coping with all these effects will be presented, including the most recent advancements and future guidelines in the area.

  6. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nuñez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  7. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  8. The New Horizons Bistatic Radio Science Experiment to Measure Pluto's Surface Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.; Vincent, M.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for principally occultation and radiometric measurement of Pluto and Charon during the flyby in July 2015. The REX subsystem is contained, together with the NH X-Band radio, in the Integrated Electronics Module (IEM) in the New Horizons spacecraft. REX samples and records in two polarizations both total RF power in a 4.5 MHz bandwidth, and radio signal waveforms in a narrow, 1.25 kHz band. During the encounter, and at closest approach to Pluto, the spacecraft's high gain antenna (HGA) will scan Pluto's equatorial latitudes, intercepting the specular zone, a region near Pluto's limb that geometrically favors reflection from the earth's direction. At the same time, a powerful 80 kW uplink beacon will have been transmitted from earth by the DSN to arrive at Pluto during spacecraft closest approach. Reflection from the specular zone is expected to be sufficiently strong to observe the bistatic uplink in the REX narrowband record. Measurements in both polarizations will then be combined to yield surface reflectivity, roughness and limits on the dielectric constant in the specular zone.

  9. Noninvasive fluid flow measurements in microfluidic channels with backscatter interferometry.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitry A; Dotson, Stephen; Wood, Scott; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2004-11-01

    The ability to measure fluid velocity within picoliter volumes or on-chip noninvasively, is important toward fully realizing the potential of microfluidics and micrototal analysis systems, particularly in applications such as micro-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or in metering mixing where the flow rate must be quantified. Additionally, these measurements need to be performed directly on moving fluids in a noninvasive fashion. We presented here the proof of principle experiments showing nonintrusive fluid flow measurements can be accomplished on-chip using a pump and probe configuration with backscattering interferometry. The on-chip interferometric backscatter detector (OCIBD) is based on a fiber-coupled HeNe laser that illuminates a portion of an isotropically etched 40 microm radius channel and a position sensitive transducer to measure fringe pattern shifts. An infrared laser with a mechanical shutter is used to heat a section of a flowing volume and the resulting refractive index (RI) change is detected with the OCIBD downstream as a time-dependent RI perturbation. Fluid velocity is quantified as changes in the phase difference between the shutter signal and the OCIBD detected signal in the Fourier domain. The experiments are performed in the range of 3-6 microL/h with 3sigma detection limits determined to be 0.127 nL/s. Additionally, the RI response of the system is calibrated using temperature changes as well as glycerol solutions.

  10. Channel Measurement and Modeling for 5G Urban Microcellular Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Michael; Weiler, Richard J.; Göktepe, Barış; Keusgen, Wilhelm; Sakaguchi, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of channel models for higher frequency bands, multiple urban microcellular measurement campaigns have been carried out in Berlin, Germany, at 60 and 10 GHz. In this paper, the collected data is uniformly analyzed with focus on the path loss (PL) and the delay spread (DS). It reveals that the ground reflection has a dominant impact on the fading behavior. For line-of-sight conditions, the PL exponents are close to free space propagation at 60 GHz, but slightly smaller (1.62) for the street canyon at 10 GHz. The DS shows a clear dependence on the scenario (median values between 16 and 38 ns) and a strong distance dependence for the open square and the wide street canyon. The dependence is less distinct for the narrow street canyon with residential buildings. This behavior is consistent with complementary ray tracing simulations, though the simplified model tends to overestimate the DS. PMID:27556462

  11. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2006-09-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel based on approximately 370 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We employ two different methods to extract the top quark mass. We show that both methods yield consistent results using ensemble tests of events generated with the D0 Monte Carlo simulation. We combine the results from the two methods to obtain a top quark mass m{sub t} = 178.1 {+-} 8.2 GeV. The statistical uncertainty is 6.7 GeV and the systematic uncertainty is 4.8 GeV.

  12. VLF Radio Field Strength Measurement of power line carrier system in San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertel, H. K.

    1981-01-01

    The radio frequency interference (RFI) potential was evaluated for a Powerline Carriet (PLC) installed in San Diego which monitors the performance of an electrical power system. The PLC system generated 30 amperes at 5.79 kHz. The RF radiations were measured to be (typically) 120 dBuV/m at the beginning of the 12 kV powerline and 60 dBuV/m at the end of the powerline. The RF fields varied inversely as the distance squared. Measurements were also performed with a 45 kHz PLC system. The RF fields were of similar amplitude.

  13. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  14. Low-noise correlation measurements based on software-defined-radio receivers and cooled microwave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Tan, Zhenbing; Cox, Daniel; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a microwave correlation measurement system based on two low-cost USB-connected software defined radio dongles modified to operate as coherent receivers by using a common local oscillator. Existing software is used to obtain I/Q samples from both dongles simultaneously at a software tunable frequency. To achieve low noise, we introduce an easy low-noise solution for cryogenic amplification at 600-900 MHz based on single discrete HEMT with 21 dB gain and 7 K noise temperature. In addition, we discuss the quantization effects in a digital correlation measurement and determination of optimal integration time by applying Allan deviation analysis.

  15. Low-noise correlation measurements based on software-defined-radio receivers and cooled microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Tan, Zhenbing; Cox, Daniel; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2016-11-01

    We present a microwave correlation measurement system based on two low-cost USB-connected software defined radio dongles modified to operate as coherent receivers by using a common local oscillator. Existing software is used to obtain I/Q samples from both dongles simultaneously at a software tunable frequency. To achieve low noise, we introduce an easy low-noise solution for cryogenic amplification at 600-900 MHz based on single discrete HEMT with 21 dB gain and 7 K noise temperature. In addition, we discuss the quantization effects in a digital correlation measurement and determination of optimal integration time by applying Allan deviation analysis.

  16. Near-Sun solar wind consequences of solar structure and dynamic phenomena observed by radio scintillation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Since radio propagation measurements using either natural or spacecraft radio signals are used for probing the solar wind in the vicinity of the sun, they represent a key tool for studying the interplanetary consequences of solar structure and dynamic phenomena. New information on the near sun consequences was obtained from radio scintillation observations of coherent spacecraft signals. The results covering density fluctuations, fractional density fluctuations, coronal streamers, heliospheric current sheets, coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks are reviewed. A joint ICE S-band (13 cm wavelength) Doppler scintillation measurement with the SOHO white-light coronograph (LASCO) is described.

  17. A nonlinear optimal estimation inverse method for radio occultation measurements of temperature, humidity, and surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Paul I.; Barnett, J. J.; Eyre, J. R.; Healy, S. B.

    2000-07-01

    An optimal estimation inverse method is presented which can be used to retrieve simultaneously vertical profiles of temperature and specific humidity, in addition to surface pressure, from satellite-to-satellite radio occultation observations of the Earth's atmosphere. The method is a nonlinear, maximum a posteriori technique which can accommodate most aspects of the real radio occultation problem and is found to be stable and to converge rapidly in most cases. The optimal estimation inverse method has two distinct advantages over the analytic inverse method in that it accounts for some of the effects of horizontal gradients and is able to retrieve optimally temperature and humidity simultaneously from the observations. It is also able to account for observation noise and other sources of error. Combined, these advantages ensure a realistic retrieval of atmospheric quantities. A complete error analysis emerges naturally from the optimal estimation theory, allowing a full characterization of the solution. Using this analysis, a quality control scheme is implemented which allows anomalous retrieval conditions to be recognized and removed, thus preventing gross retrieval errors. The inverse method presented in this paper has been implemented for bending angle measurements derived from GPS/MET radio occultation observations of the Earth. Preliminary results from simulated data suggest that these observations have the potential to improve numerical weather prediction model analyses significantly throughout their vertical range.

  18. An interlaboratory comparison programme on radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements: the second round of the scheme.

    PubMed

    Nicolopoulou, E P; Ztoupis, I N; Karabetsos, E; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2015-04-01

    The second round of an interlaboratory comparison scheme on radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements has been conducted in order to evaluate the overall performance of laboratories that perform measurements in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations and broadcast antenna facilities. The participants recorded the electric field strength produced by two high frequency signal generators inside an anechoic chamber in three measurement scenarios with the antennas transmitting each time different signals at the FM, VHF, UHF and GSM frequency bands. In each measurement scenario, the participants also used their measurements in order to calculate the relative exposure ratios. The results were evaluated in each test level calculating performance statistics (z-scores and En numbers). Subsequently, possible sources of errors for each participating laboratory were discussed, and the overall evaluation of their performances was determined by using an aggregated performance statistic. A comparison between the two rounds proves the necessity of the scheme.

  19. Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Radio science experiments use electromagnetic waves to probe or study the solar system. Three major research areas were identified within this discipline: radio astronomy, radar astronomy, and celestial mechanics. Radio astronomy (or radiometry) is the detection and measurement of naturally produced radio frequency emissions. Sources include surfaces, atmospheres, rings, and plasmas. Radar astronomy is the observation of man-made signals after their interaction with a target. Both imaging and non-imaging results. Celestial mechanics includes all studies related to the motions of (and gravity fields of) bodies within the solar system. These should not be considered rigid separations, but aid in the discussion of the data sets.

  20. The radio waves & thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BepiColombo/MMO/PWI and the importance of radio HF measurements at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Issautier, K.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    SORBET (Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio & du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (PWI) onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in-situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5 kHz - 640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500kHz-10.2MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜ 30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. It is noteworthy that the QTN technique is weakly sensitive to spacecraft potential and photoelectron perturbations, a point highly in favour of this technique at Mercury. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O ...) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜ 10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ~10 MHz, in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We propose to further discuss these scientific objectives and to underline that such radio HF measurements are a clue for understanding the

  1. Measurement and analysis of channel attenuation characteristics for an implantable galvanic coupling human-body communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Qin, Yu-Ping; Liu, Yi-He; Vai, Mang I

    2016-11-14

    In this study, an experiment was designed to verify the low power consumption of galvanic coupling human-body communication. A silver electrode (silver content: 99%) is placed in a pig leg and a sine wave signal with the power of 0 dBm is input. Compared with radio frequency communication and antenna transmission communication, attenuation is reduced by approximately 10 to 15 dB, so channel characteristics are highly improved.

  2. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3  mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds.

  3. The detection of the ionospheric irregularities by GNSS signal and the incoherent scatter radio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Shagimuratov, Irk; Krankowski, Andrzej; Sieradsky, Rafal; Zakharenkova, Irina; Rietveld, Michael; Kapcia, Jacek

    2013-04-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere has a very complicated structure and high dynamics. The ionospheric irregularities can produce scintillations of radio waves that occur predominantly in the ionosphere F-layer. The strong fluctuations can influence on the performance of the different space communication and navigation radio systems. The fluctuations of GPS/GLONASS signals are caused by the ionospheric irregularities with spatial dimensions more than 10 km. These structures can be detected by high potential incoherent scatter radars. It was proposed and carried out at the beginning of June 2012 experiment for a detailed study of the nature of the ionospheric irregularities, influencing on GPS/GLONASS signals parameters, by incoherent scatter and trans-ionospheric radio measurements simultaneously. The EISCAT facilities position provides the unique opportunity to study the ionospheric irregularities' parameters associated with TEC fluctuations and GPS/GLONASS signals scintillations. The EISCAT heating facility provides unique possibility to generate the artificial ionospheric irregularities and to estimate the impact factor of these irregularities on GPS/GLONASS signals transionospheric propagation. In order to detect the ionosphere irregularities it is used the IS radar measurements (electron density and plasma temperatures profiles) and simultaneously registered on EISCAT site amplitude and phase fluctuations in GPS/GLONASS signals by use of the Javad multi-constellation GPS/GLONASS receiver with high samples rate (100 Hz) and special scintillation GPS receiver PolaRxS PRO that dedicated to ionospheric monitoring and space weather applications and provides TEC and S4 scintillation index measurements. The low frequency fluctuations can be directly measured due to the electron density changes along the radio ray path between a GPS/GLONASS satellite and a ground-based receiver on EISCAT site. The raw data (under scintillating conditions) obtained by use of the high samples

  4. Measurement of the Coulomb logarithm in a radio-frequency Paul trap.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Hudson, Eric R

    2013-04-26

    Samples of ultracold 174Yb+ ions, confined in a linear radio-frequency Paul trap, are heated via micromotion interruption, while their temperature, density, and therefore structural phase are monitored and simulated. The observed time evolution of the ion temperature is compared to a theoretical model for ion-ion heating allowing a direct measurement of the Coulomb logarithm in a linear Paul trap. This result permits a simple, yet accurate, analytical description of ion cloud thermodynamic properties, e.g., density, temperature, and structural phase, as well as suggests limits to and improvements for ongoing trapped-ion quantum information efforts.

  5. First simultaneous measurements of thermospheric winds and zonal ion drifts from the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriwether, John; Baker, Brooke; Twork, Greg; Chau, Jorge; Veliz, Oskar; Woodman, Ronald; Hedden, Russell; Hysell, David

    The first simultaneous observations of thermospheric winds and zonal ion drifts have been ob-tained at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory using a new Fabry-Perot interferometer observatory installed on a mountain ridge overlooking the valley where the JRO radar is located. The re-sults show that the neutral winds and ion drifts generally have the same speed and temporal variation characteristics. These results illustrate the simultaneous detection of the midnight temperature maximum as well. The paper will also describe efforts to obtain common volume measurements of thermospheric winds and temperatures utilizing the FPI Arequipa observatory which is located 4 degrees south of the geomagnetic equator.

  6. Design of Discrete Time Radio Receiver for the Demodulation of Power-Separated Co-Channel Satellite Communication Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    satellite modulators and demodulators that allow frequency reuse over satellite communications links. There are two methods to demodulate these co- channel ...demodulators that allow frequency reuse over satellite communications links. There are two methods to demodulate these co- channel signals. The first...QPSK channel has the same bit duration as the BPSK signal. Since the BER performance of each orthogonal QPSK channel is ( )2 /b oQ E N , the BER

  7. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  8. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Virgin Islands, channels in the 154.04-154.46 MHz and 161.40-161.85 MHz frequency ranges may be... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone... Conventional Rural Radiotelephone Stations § 22.725 Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations...

  9. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Virgin Islands, channels in the 154.04-154.46 MHz and 161.40-161.85 MHz frequency ranges may be... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone... Conventional Rural Radiotelephone Stations § 22.725 Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations...

  10. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Virgin Islands, channels in the 154.04-154.46 MHz and 161.40-161.85 MHz frequency ranges may be... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone... Conventional Rural Radiotelephone Stations § 22.725 Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations...

  11. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Virgin Islands, channels in the 154.04-154.46 MHz and 161.40-161.85 MHz frequency ranges may be... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone... Conventional Rural Radiotelephone Stations § 22.725 Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations...

  12. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Virgin Islands, channels in the 154.04-154.46 MHz and 161.40-161.85 MHz frequency ranges may be... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone... Conventional Rural Radiotelephone Stations § 22.725 Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations...

  13. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  14. Molecular origins of conduction channels observed in shot-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of shot noise from single molecules have indicated the presence of various conduction channels. We present three descriptions of these channels in molecular terms showing that the number of conduction channels is limited by bottlenecks in the molecule and that the channels can be linked to transmission through different junction states. We introduce molecular-conductance orbitals, which allow the transmission to be separated into contributions from individual orbitals and contributions from interference between pairs of orbitals.

  15. Direction of Arrival Measurements of Auroral Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J. W.; Hughes, J. M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Ye, S.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2007-12-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin detected by ground-based instruments approximately between 1,300 and 3,700 kHz, and associated with substorm onsets. Its exact generation mechanism is unknown, though it has been speculated that it arises from mode conversion radiation. To discover the generation mechanism and the relation of MF burst to auroral processes, Dartmouth has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed at Toolik Lake Field Station in Alaska in 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes, and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events occurring between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These represent the first DOA measurements ever reported for the impulsive MF burst phenomenon. Preliminary analysis shows that the events originated from a wide range of directions in the sky, with all azimuths represented in the distribution of DOA's. The DOA of each individual event is well-defined, however. Many events show apparent motion, with southward motions more common than northward among the subset of events analyzed so far. Some of the events were detected simultaneously on an interferometer deployed at Kaktovik, Alaska, 400 km away. The all-sky imager at Toolik Lake was also operational for some events. Further analysis of these data promises to reveal first information about the locations and motions of MF burst sources, a first step towards discovering the generation mechanism of this mysterious radio emission and its relation to auroral processes.

  16. HF Channel Availability under Ionospheric Disturbances: Model, Method and Measurements as Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulunay, E.; Senalp, E. T.; Tulunay, Y.; Warrington, E. M.; Sari, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    variation of group range and line-of-sight Doppler velocity of the HF Radar echo signal were investigated. HF radar system under ionospheric disturbances has been identified globally and some operational suggestions have been presented. It is possible for the HF radar operator to estimate the possible skip distance and possible single hop group ranges for the given frequencies of 11 MHz and 14 MHz [Buyukpabuscu, 2007]. (iii) The measurements over the HF band during the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse in Antalya (36° N; 30° E) Turkey was conducted from the channel occupancy and atmospheric noise points of view. The whole HF band ranging from 1 to 30 MHz has been swept using 10 kHz peak and 200 Hz average detectors of a certified EMI receiver equipped with a calibrated active monopole antenna. The changes in the atmospheric noise during the eclipse were reported [Tulunay, 2006]. The model based, theoretical and experimental works mentioned are promising and have potential for future research and developments. References Buyukpabuscu S.O. (2007), System Identification with Particular Interest On The High Frequency Radar Under Ionospheric Disturbances, MS Thesis, Electrical and Electronics Eng., Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara, Turkey, February 2007. Sari M.O. (2006), A New Approach For The Assessment Of Hf Channel Availability Under Ionospheric Disturbances, MS Thesis, Electrical and Electronics Eng., Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara, Turkey, September 2006. Tulunay E., E. M. Warrington, Y. Tulunay, Y. Bahadırlar, A.S. Türk, R. Çaputçu, T. Yapıcı , E.T. Şenalp (2006), Propagation Related Measurements during Three Solar Eclipses in Turkey, IET 10th International Conference on Ionospheric Radio Systems & Techniques, IRST 2006, 18-21 July 2006, London, UK.

  17. Noninvasive Measurement of the Pressure Distribution in a Deformable Micro-Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsun, Ozgur; Yakhot, Victor; Ekinci, Kamil L.

    2013-11-01

    Direct and noninvasive measurement of the pressure drop in test sections of a rigid micro-channel is a challenging task. In a micro-channel with compliant walls, however, it is possible to determine the pressure field under flow from the local deflection of the channel walls. Here, we present a robust analytical approach for determining the pressure distribution in a deformable micro-channel under flow. In this method, we first measure the channel deflection profile as a function of applied hydrostatic pressure; this initial measurement provides the constitutive curves for the deformable channel. We then match the deflection profile under flow to the constitutive curves, obtaining the hydrodynamic pressure distribution. We have tested and validated the developed mapping on planar micro-fluidic channels. This method remains accurate in a broad parameter space, and can find possible applications in microfluidics and for characterizing biological flows. We acknowledge generous support from the US NSF through Grant No. CMMI-0970071.

  18. Measurement of the solar gravitational deflection of radio waves using geodetic very-long-baseline interferometry data, 1979-1999.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, S S; Davis, J L; Lebach, D E; Gregory, J S

    2004-03-26

    We used very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) to measure the deflection by the Sun of radio waves emanating from distant compact radio sources. This bending is characterized in the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism by gamma, which is unity in general relativity. Using a large geodetic VLBI data set, we obtained gamma=0.9998(3)+/-0.0004(5) (estimated standard error). We found no systematic biases from our analysis of subgroups of data.

  19. Historic Rio Grande Channel Change: Relating Channel Adjustments Measured from Aerial Photography to Human and Climate Induced Changes in Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, G. A.; Swanson, B. J.; Coonrod, J.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last century, flow regulation, changes in land and water use, and climate change, including severe droughts, have altered geomorphic processes along the Middle Rio Grande. In association with the USACE Urban Flood Demonstration Program, we investigated changes in channel and island widths and areas as measured on 1972-2006 aerial photographs in relation to average and peak flows in the Rio Grande through Bernalillo County, NM (Albuquerque). We employed all recent (1992-2006) photographs, which were often taken annually or biannually. Digitized and georeferenced photographs were analyzed using a GIS, with particular attention paid to quantifying potential measurement error and its propagation through estimates of channel areas and bank erosion rates. Average total channel widths decreased from 169 m in 1972 to 130 m in 2006. Narrowing was concentrated in the upper and lower sections of the study reach where tributary sediment inputs and degradation related to dam operations constrict the active channel. Decreases in channel width and area coincide with periods of low flows, although the area changes are associated with large errors. Vegetated island areas have greatly increased since 1972, although islands per se were also lost during the later study period by bank attachment. Bank erosion estimates also have large associated errors. Nonetheless, erosion rates appear to be generally decreasing over time, but accelerated during the 2005 high flows. Additional research will compare geomorphic change along the Rio Grande study reach to channel adjustments along the Rio Chama, both below and above El Vado Dam, to better understand regional channel responses to dam operations and drought cycles. Initial investigations reveal that channel responses to these perturbations along the Rio Chama, a major Rio Grande tributary, are similar to the adjustments observed along the Rio Grande through Albuquerque, but the magnitude of the change is not as dramatic.

  20. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Cleary, K.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T.; Dickinson, C.; Gundersen, J. O.; Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  1. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Miller, A. D.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; QUIET Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ˜480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30-40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%-20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  2. The occultation of Mariner 10 by Mercury. [planetary radius and atmospheric radio measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjeldbo, G.; Kliore, A.; Sweetnam, D.; Esposito, P.; Seidel, B.; Howard, T.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of Mariner 10 dual-frequency radio-occultation recordings has yielded new information on the radius and atmosphere of Mercury. The ingress measurements, which were conducted near 1.1 deg north latitude and 67.4 deg east longitude on the night side of the planet, gave a value for the radius of 2439.5 + or - 1 km. Egress near 67.6 deg north latitude and 258.4 deg east longitude on the sunlit side yielded a radius of 2439.0 + or - 1 km. The atmospheric measurements showed the electron density to be less than 1000 per cu cm on both sides of the planet. From the latter result one may infer an upper limit to the dayside surface gas density of 1 million molecules per cu cm.

  3. The hot electrons in the innermost Saturn's magnetosphere from the HF radio measurements on Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, P.; Moncuquet, M.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the large-scale structure of the hot electrons in Saturn's innermost magnetosphere obtained from the HF radio measurements acquired with the Cassini/RPWS electric dipole antenna. The temperatures are deduced by two different ways (Moncuquet et al., 2005) from: 1) the quasi-thermal noise (QTN) maximum level identified in the electric power spectra and 2) the QTN in Bernstein waves, which are electrostatic waves propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field and enhanced at frequencies between the electron cyclotron frequency harmonics. These waves are observed in strong magnetized environment where the thermal noise is dominated by the gyro-motion of the particles. We compare the results with the hot electron measurements acquired by the Cassini electron spectrometer CAPS/ELS.

  4. New expansion rate measurements of the Crab nebula in radio and optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, M. F.; Nugent, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present new radio measurements of the expansion rate of the Crab nebula's synchrotron nebula over a ˜30-yr period. We find a convergence date for the radio synchrotron nebula of CE 1255 ± 27. We also re-evaluated the expansion rate of the optical-line-emitting filaments, and we show that the traditional estimates of their convergence date are slightly biased. Using an unbiased Bayesian analysis, we find a convergence date for the filaments of CE 1091 ± 34 (˜40 yr earlier than previous estimates). Our results show that both the synchrotron nebula and the optical-line-emitting filaments have been accelerated since the explosion in CE 1054, but that the synchrotron nebula has been relatively strongly accelerated, while the optical filaments have been only slightly accelerated. The finding that the synchrotron emission expands more rapidly than the filaments supports the picture that the latter are the result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between the pulsar-wind nebula and the surrounding freely expanding supernova ejecta, and rules out models where the pulsar-wind bubble is interacting directly with the pre-supernova wind of the Crab's progenitor.

  5. Method of measuring nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells grown in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, S.; Liu, A. C.; Barakat, A. I.; Choy, J. C.; Gray, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a simple and versatile method is presented which enables detection of nitric oxide (NO) released from vascular endothelial cells (ECs) cultured in microfluidic structures. The culturing system and NO measurement method allow cell shape to be controlled in a non-invasive manner using microfluidic structures while NO release is monitored for cell shape versus function studies. The culturing system consists of arrays of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic channels 120 micrometers in depth and ranging from 100 micrometers to 3 mm in width. The number of channels in each array is varied to yield a constant cell culture surface area (75 mm2) independent of channel width. The channel surfaces are collagen-coated and ECs are cultured to confluence within the channels. A cell scraper is then used to scrape extraneous cells cultured between channels, and NO measurements are made 18 to 24 hours later. A chemiluminescence-based sensor system (NOA 280i, Sievers NO Analyzer) is utilized to measure sample NO. Initial results indicate that NO concentrations can be measured from different microfluidic channel-containing samples using this method. It is shown that there is no significant difference in NO concentration derived from channels of different widths even though the degree of cell elongation varies due to physical constraint by microfluidic channel walls. However, cells treated with TNFα release more NO than untreated cells in fluidic channels, which is comparable to the function of ECs cultured in conventional culturing systems such as culturing dishes.

  6. Near-bed turbulence and sediment flux measurements in tidal channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.A.; Whealdon-Haught, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamics and sediment transport dynamics in tidal channels is important for studies of estuary geomorphology, sediment supply to tidal wetlands, aquatic ecology and fish habitat, and dredging and navigation. Hydrodynamic and sediment transport data are essential for calibration and testing of numerical models that may be used to address management questions related to these topics. Herein we report preliminary analyses of near-bed turbulence and sediment flux measurements in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, a large network of tidal channels and wetlands located at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, California, USA (Figure 1). Measurements were made in 6 channels spanning a wide range of size and tidal conditions, from small channels that are primarily fluvial to large channels that are tidally dominated. The results of these measurements are summarized herein and the hydrodynamic and sediment transport characteristics of the channels are compared across this range of size and conditions.

  7. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  8. Stability measurements of the radio science system at the 34-m high-efficiency antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Breidenthal, J. C.; Peng, T. K.; Abbate, S. F.; Rockwell, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    From 1991 to 1993 the fractional frequency stability of the operational Radio Science System was measured at DSS's 15, 45, and 65. These stations are designed to have the most stable uplink and downlink equipment in the Deep Space Network (DSN). Some measurements were performed when the antenna was moving and the frequency was ramped. The stability, including contributions of all elements in the station except for the antenna and the hydrogen maser, was measured to be 0.3 to 1.3 x 10(exp -15) when the frequency was fixed, and 0.6 to 6.0 x 10(exp -15) when the frequency was ramped (sample interval, 1000 sec). Only one measurement out of fifteen exceeded specification. In all other cases, when previous measurements on the antenna and the hydrogen maser were added, a total system stability requirement of 5.0 x 10(exp -15) as met. In addition, ambient temperature was found to cause phase variation in the measurements at a rate of 5.5 deg of phase per deg C.

  9. Sub-micrometer fluidic channel for measuring photon emitting entities

    DOEpatents

    Stavis, Samuel M; Edel, Joshua B; Samiee, Kevan T; Craighead, Harold G

    2014-11-18

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  10. Spatial Reuse through Dynamic Power and Routing Control in Common-Channel Random-Access Packet Radio Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    environment and the thoughtful discussions about packet radio networks. In addition, many thoughtful comments were provided by Mel Bebee , Dr. Ray Bittel, and...the AT&T Network IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC), June 1987, pages 19B.5.1-19B.5.7 Bebee88 Mel Bebee Personal Communications

  11. Rapid estimation of recharge potential in ephemeral-stream channels using electromagnetic methods, and measurements of channel and vegetation characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Leenhouts, J.M.; Paretti, N.V.; Jones, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    To classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity (??a). Recharge potential is not independently measurable, but is instead formulated as a site-specific, qualitative parameter. We used data from 259 transects across two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona, a location with a semiarid climate. Seven data types were collected: ??a averaged over two depth intervals (0-3 m, and 0-6 m), channel incision depth and width, diameter-at-breast-height of the largest tree, woody-plant and grass density. A two-tiered system was used to classify a transect's RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by estimates of near-surface-sediment hydraulic permeability as low, moderate, or high using measurements of 0-3 m-depth ??a. Each of these categories was subdivided into low, medium, or high RCP classes using the remaining six data types, thus yielding a total of nine RCP designations. Six sites in the study area were used to compare RCP and ??a with previously measured surrogates for hydraulic permeability. Borehole-averaged percent fines showed a moderate correlation with both shallow and deep ??a measurements, however, correlation of point measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity, percent fines, and cylinder infiltrometer measurements with ??a and RCP was generally poor. The poor correlation was probably caused by the relatively large measurement volume and spatial averaging of ??a compared with the spatially-limited point measurements. Because of the comparatively large spatial extent of measurement transects and variety of data types collected, RCP estimates can give a more complete picture of the major factors affecting recharge at a site than is possible through point or borehole-averaged estimates of hydraulic permeability alone. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid estimation of recharge potential in ephemeral-stream channels using electromagnetic methods, and measurements of channel and vegetation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, James B.; Leenhouts, James M.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2007-09-01

    SummaryTo classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity ( σa). Recharge potential is not independently measurable, but is instead formulated as a site-specific, qualitative parameter. We used data from 259 transects across two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona, a location with a semiarid climate. Seven data types were collected: σa averaged over two depth intervals (0-3 m, and 0-6 m), channel incision depth and width, diameter-at-breast-height of the largest tree, woody-plant and grass density. A two-tiered system was used to classify a transect's RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by estimates of near-surface-sediment hydraulic permeability as low, moderate, or high using measurements of 0-3 m-depth σa. Each of these categories was subdivided into low, medium, or high RCP classes using the remaining six data types, thus yielding a total of nine RCP designations. Six sites in the study area were used to compare RCP and σa with previously measured surrogates for hydraulic permeability. Borehole-averaged percent fines showed a moderate correlation with both shallow and deep σa measurements, however, correlation of point measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity, percent fines, and cylinder infiltrometer measurements with σa and RCP was generally poor. The poor correlation was probably caused by the relatively large measurement volume and spatial averaging of σa compared with the spatially-limited point measurements. Because of the comparatively large spatial extent of measurement transects and variety of data types collected, RCP estimates can give a more complete picture of the major factors affecting recharge at a site than is possible through point or borehole-averaged estimates of hydraulic permeability alone.

  13. Rapid Estimation of Recharge Potential in Ephemeral-Stream Channels Using Electromagnetic Methods, and Measurements of Channel and Vegetation Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, J. B.; Leenhouts, J. M.; Paretti, N. V.; Jones, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    In order to classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity ('a). About 400 transects along two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona were studied. Seven data types were collected at each transect: 'a at two depth intervals, channel incision height and width, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH) of the largest tree, density of woody plants, and density of grasses. Apparent electrical conductivity was measured in the channel thalweg during the month of June, the hottest, driest month of the year. As was the case in 2005, June typically follows several months of relatively dry weather. Bed-sediment water content was expected to be at an annual minimum, maximizing the contrast between high and low clay content. Because 'a is proportional to clay content and clay is the primary factor affecting permeability during saturated flow in unconsolidated media, 'a values are inversely proportional to permeability. Apparent electrical conductivity was measured by using a low-induction-number frequency-domain electromagnetic-induction (LIN FEM) instrument at two intervals bracketing 0-3 m and 0-6 m depths. Vegetation characteristics were measured in 10 by 10 meter plots on each bank. As DBH, woody plant density and grass density increase, evapotranspiration also increases. Increases in any of these three factors, therefore, should decrease RCP. Incision height and width were measured in reference to the break in slope between the channel and floodplain or first major terrace. An increase in channel width provides greater area for infiltration, and greater incision height allows for increased flow depth. Increases in these two factors increase RCP. A two-tiered system was used to classify transect RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by the permeability of near-surface sediments based on

  14. Extracting Host Galaxy Dispersion Measure and Constraining Cosmological Parameters using Fast Radio Burst Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    The excessive dispersion measures (DMs) and high Galactic latitudes of fast radio bursts (FRBs) hint toward a cosmological origin of these mysterious transients. Methods of using measured DM and redshift z to study cosmology have been proposed, but one needs to assume a certain amount of DM contribution from the host galaxy ({{DM}}{HG}) in order to apply those methods. We introduce a slope parameter β (z)\\equiv d{ln}< {{DM}}{{E}}> /d{ln}z (where {{DM}}{{E}} is the observed DM subtracting the Galactic contribution), which can be directly measured when a sample of FRBs have z measured. We show that < {{DM}}{HG}> can be roughly inferred from β and the mean values, \\overline{< {{DM}}{{E}}> } and \\bar{z}, of the sample. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the mean value of local host galaxy DM, < {{DM}}{HG,{loc}}> , along with other cosmological parameters (mass density {{{Ω }}}m in the ΛCDM model, and the IGM portion of the baryon energy density {{{Ω }}}b{f}{IGM}), can be independently measured through Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting to the data.

  15. The atmosphere of Titan - an analysis of the Voyager 1 radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindal, G. F.; Wood, G. E.; Hotz, H. B.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Eshleman, V. R.; Tyler, G. L.

    1983-02-01

    The equatorial atmosphere of Titan was probed by means of two coherently related radio signals transmitted from Voyager 1 at 13.0 and 3.6 cm wavelengths during the November 12, 1980 occultation of the spacecraft by the Saturn satellite. An analysis of the differential dispersive frequency measurements did not reveal any ionization layers in the upper atmosphere of Titan. The gas refractivity data, which extend from the surface to about 200 km altitude, were interpreted in two different ways. In the first, it is assumed that N2 makes up virtually all of the atmosphere, with small amounts of CH4 and other hydrocarbons present. In the second interpretation of the refractivity data, it is assumed that the 3.5 km altitude level corresponds to the bottom of a CH4 cloud layer and that N2 and CH4 were perfectly mixed below this level.

  16. The magnetic field and turbulence of the cosmic web measured using a brilliant fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, V.; Shannon, R. M.; Bailes, M.; Bannister, K.; Bhandari, S.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Caleb, M.; Flynn, C.; Jameson, A.; Johnston, S.; Keane, E. F.; Kerr, M.; Tiburzi, C.; Tuntsov, A. V.; Vedantham, H. K.

    2016-12-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration events thought to originate beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Uncertainty surrounding the burst sources, and their propagation through intervening plasma, has limited their use as cosmological probes. We report on a mildly dispersed (dispersion measure 266.5 ± 0.1 parsecs per cubic centimeter), exceptionally intense (120 ± 30 janskys), linearly polarized, scintillating burst (FRB 150807) that we directly localize to 9 square arc minutes. On the basis of a low Faraday rotation (12.0 ± 0.7 radians per square meter), we infer negligible magnetization in the circum-burst plasma and constrain the net magnetization of the cosmic web along this sightline to <21 nanogauss, parallel to the line-of-sight. The burst scintillation suggests weak turbulence in the ionized intergalactic medium.

  17. Atmosphere and ionosphere of venus from the mariner v s-band radio occultation measurement.

    PubMed

    Kliore, A; Levy, G S; Cain, D L; Fjeldbo, G; Rasool, S I

    1967-12-29

    Measurements of the frequency, phase, and amplitude of the S-band radio signal of Mariner V as it passed behind Venus were used to obtain the effects of refraction in its atmosphere and ionosphere. Profiles of refractivity, temperature, pressure, and density in the neutral atmosphere, as well as electron density in the daytime ionosphere, are presented. A constant scale height was observed above the tropopause, and the temperature increased with an approximately linear lapse rate below the tropopause to the level at which signal was lost, presumably because heavy defocusing attenuation occurred as critical refraction was approached. An ionosphere having at least two maxima was observed at only 85 kilometers above the tropopause.

  18. The magnetic field and turbulence of the cosmic web measured using a brilliant fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Ravi, V; Shannon, R M; Bailes, M; Bannister, K; Bhandari, S; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keane, E F; Kerr, M; Tiburzi, C; Tuntsov, A V; Vedantham, H K

    2016-12-09

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration events thought to originate beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Uncertainty surrounding the burst sources, and their propagation through intervening plasma, has limited their use as cosmological probes. We report on a mildly dispersed (dispersion measure 266.5 ± 0.1 parsecs per cubic centimeter), exceptionally intense (120 ± 30 janskys), linearly polarized, scintillating burst (FRB 150807) that we directly localize to 9 square arc minutes. On the basis of a low Faraday rotation (12.0 ± 0.7 radians per square meter), we infer negligible magnetization in the circum-burst plasma and constrain the net magnetization of the cosmic web along this sightline to <21 nanogauss, parallel to the line-of-sight. The burst scintillation suggests weak turbulence in the ionized intergalactic medium.

  19. Temporally resolved ion velocity distribution measurements in a radio-frequency plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Barnes, M.

    2011-05-15

    The ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) above and within a radio-frequency (RF) biased plasma sheath is studied experimentally with a pulsed laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic in an industrial plasma etch tool. Temporally resolved measurements taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz bias waveform show that the ion dynamics vary dramatically throughout the RF cycle (the ratio of the average ion transit time through the sheath to the RF period is {tau}{sub ion}/{tau}{sub RF} = 0.3). The position of the presheath/sheath edge is constant throughout the RF cycle and the time-averaged ion flux is conserved within the sheath region. The characteristic bimodal structure of the time-averaged ion distributions found in previous experiments is observed to arise from the time-dependent ion dynamics, in accord with existing theory. The large temporal variation of the IVDF has implications for the plasma chemistry and etching quality.

  20. Measurement of the circular polarization in radio emission from extensive air showers confirms emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, O.; Trinh, T. N. G.; Bonardi, A.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; Corstanje, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Mitra, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.; Winchen, T.

    2016-11-01

    We report here on a novel analysis of the complete set of four Stokes parameters that uniquely determine the linear and/or circular polarization of the radio signal for an extensive air shower. The observed dependency of the circular polarization on azimuth angle and distance to the shower axis is a clear signature of the interfering contributions from two different radiation mechanisms, a main contribution due to a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and a secondary component due to the build-up of excess charge at the shower front. The data, as measured at LOFAR, agree very well with a calculation from first principles. This opens the possibility to use circular polarization as an investigative tool in the analysis of air shower structure, such as for the determination of atmospheric electric fields.

  1. Portable Wireless LAN Device and Two-way Radio Threat Assessment for Aircraft Navigation Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Smith, Laura J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement processes, data and analysis are provided to address the concern for Wireless Local Area Network devices and two-way radios to cause electromagnetic interference to aircraft navigation radio systems. A radiated emission measurement process is developed and spurious radiated emissions from various devices are characterized using reverberation chambers. Spurious radiated emissions in aircraft radio frequency bands from several wireless network devices are compared with baseline emissions from standard computer laptops and personal digital assistants. In addition, spurious radiated emission data in aircraft radio frequency bands from seven pairs of two-way radios are provided, A description of the measurement process, device modes of operation and the measurement results are reported. Aircraft interference path loss measurements were conducted on four Boeing 747 and Boeing 737 aircraft for several aircraft radio systems. The measurement approach is described and the path loss results are compared with existing data from reference documents, standards, and NASA partnerships. In-band on-channel interference thresholds are compiled from an existing reference document. Using these data, a risk assessment is provided for interference from wireless network devices and two-way radios to aircraft systems, including Localizer, Glideslope, Very High Frequency Omnidirectional Range, Microwave Landing System and Global Positioning System. The report compares the interference risks associated with emissions from wireless network devices and two-way radios against standard laptops and personal digital assistants. Existing receiver interference threshold references are identified as to require more data for better interference risk assessments.

  2. Analysis of the tropopause parameters over the Iranian region using GPS radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, S.; Sharifi, M. A.; Sam-Khaniani, A.; Joghataei, M.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.; McClusky, S.

    2013-12-01

    Near-tropopause phenomena like upper level fronts and cyclones, penetrative cumulus convection and mesoscale mechanisms of exchange make important contributions to the mixing processes in the atmosphere. The dynamic atmospheric processes in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere are of significant interest due to their important role and impact on cirrus cloud formation and top of atmosphere radiative balance. Spatio-temporal monitoring of the tropopause height and its evolution over time provides important constraints on the atmospheric processes contributing to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. In this study, GPS radio occultation measurements are used to investigate the fluctuations of the tropopause heights and temperatures over the Iranian region. By applying the least-squares harmonic estimation (LS-HE) to the unevenly spaced time series of the tropopause parameters, annual and diurnal components are detected together with their higher harmonics. Multivariate LS-HE is shown to estimate the main periodic signals, particularly diurnal and semidiurnal cycles, more clearly than the univariate LS-HE. A bimodal pattern is observed in the frequency histograms of the tropopause parameters, in which the primary modes for the southern and northern parts of Iran correspond to subtropical and extra-tropical tropopause heights. Mixing in the values of the tropopause height and temperature is seen to occur in winter at lower latitudes (around 30°) as a result of subtropical jet, and in summer at higher latitudes (above 36°) as an effect of subtropical high. Consistency of the mixing region from the radio occultation data and the total ozone measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) is also observed.

  3. Radio Measurements of the Stellar Proper Motions in the Core of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Gómez, Laura; Forbrich, Jan; Menten, Karl M.; Kounkel, Marina A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Hartmann, Lee; Tobin, John J.; Rivera, Juana L.

    2017-01-01

    Using multi-epoch Very Large Array observations, covering a time baseline of 29.1 years, we have measured the proper motions of 88 young stars with compact radio emission in the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the neighboring BN/KL region. Our work increases the number of young stars with measured proper motion at radio frequencies by a factor of 2.5 and enables us to perform a better statistical analysis of the kinematics of the region than was previously possible. Most stars (79 out of 88) have proper motions consistent with a Gaussian distribution centered on \\overline{{μ }α \\cos δ }=1.07+/- 0.09 mas yr‑1, and \\overline{{μ }δ }=-0.84+/- 0.16 mas yr‑1, with velocity dispersions of {σ }α =1.08+/- 0.07 mas yr‑1, {σ }δ =1.27+/- 0.15 mas yr‑1. We looked for organized movements of these stars but found no clear indication of radial expansion/contraction or rotation. The remaining nine stars in our sample show peculiar proper motions that differ from the mean proper motions of the ONC by more than 3σ. One of these stars, V 1326 Ori, could have been expelled from the Orion Trapezium 7000 years ago. Two could be related to the multi-stellar disintegration in the BN/KL region, in addition to the previously known sources BN, I and n. The others either have high uncertainties (so their anomalous proper motions are not firmly established) or could be foreground objects.

  4. Shallow water radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) measurements in urban environment: A case study from Stockholm city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Suman; Bastani, Mehrdad; Malehmir, Alireza; Wang, Shunguo; Pedersen, Laust

    2014-05-01

    The Radio-MagnetoTelluric (RMT) method uses the electromagnetic signal from distant radio transmitters in the frequency range 15 to 250 kHz. RMT applications in near-surface studies have already been well established. Two components of electric field and three components of magnetic field are measured. These measured components are related to each other via transfer functions which contain detailed information about the variation of electrical resistivity of the subsurface. The present study is carried out in the frame of TRUST (TRansparent Underground STructure) project supported by several research and public organizations as well as industry. The study area is located close to central Stockholm in Sweden where the Swedish traffic authority has planned to construct a 21-km long motorway to bypass the city. In order to reduce the impact on natural and cultural environments, 18 km of the motorway will be located in tunnels. The main objective of this study is thus to identify potential fracture zones and faults as well as the general geological settings. The proposed path of the tunnel partly passes under the Lake Mälaren at a depth of about 60 m. Thus a challenge was posed on the applicability of RMT method in shallow water environments. Successful applications of RMT measurements using the Uppsala University's EnviroMT system on land encouraged us to modify the system to acquire data over lake water especially in urban areas. Pioneered by the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), RMT data were collected over the Lake Mälaren in spring 2012. The prototype acquisition system did not only turn out to be appropriate for such a challenging environment, but it was also much more efficient as compared with land surveys. Fifty two lines including 1160 stations with an average spacing of 15 m were covered in three days. Cultural noise associated with the city-related environment had to be identified and filtered out before inversion could be carried out. Reliable estimates

  5. Radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscopy: Instrumentation and applications to physical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemiktarak, Utku

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) relies upon localized electron tunneling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. Perhaps the most serious obstacle in front of realizing the full potential of the STM is its inadequate temporal resolution, limited by the bandwidth of STM current detectors (˜1 kHz). To overcome this limitation, we developed a radically new approach: we embedded the tunnel junction into an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit and measured the reflection of radio-frequency waves from this circuit. Our new apparatus, which we call a radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscope (Rf-STM), allowed us to achieve 100-fold bandwidth increase upon the state-of-the-art. The bandwidth increase resulted in a number of ultrafast and sensitive measurements in nanoscale systems. First, the large bandwidth of the Rf-STM allowed acquisition of surface topography images at high speeds. In a conventional STM scan, it takes from minutes to hours to create a typical image. As the circuit bandwidth increases, one can shorten this time considerably. We showed that the Rf-STM images, collected at a rate of 100 line/s, had comparable resolution to conventional STM images taken at a rate of 1 line/s. Second, we used the Rf-STM to perform broadband electronic noise measurements. Intrinsic current fluctuations in a tunnel junction, called shot noise, gives important in formation about electron transport mechanisms. We used shot noise measurements as an absolute calibration tool for Rf-STM. Conversely, we also demonstrated how the Rf-STM could be used as a local primary thermometer. Finally, using the Rf-STM, we established the very high displacement sensitivity of a tunnel displacement detector. On a driven micro-mechanical membrane, we detected the first ten mechanical resonances, ranging in frequency from 1 MHz to 3 MHz. We also measured the displacements of a Au surface shaken by a calibrated piezoelectric actuator

  6. A Comprehensive Assessment of Radio Occultation Ionospheric Measurements at Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keele, C.; Brum, C. G. M.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Aponte, N.; Sulzer, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS radio occultation (RO) has become a widely used technique for global measurements of the ionospheric electron density (Ne). To advance our understanding of the accuracy of the RO profiles at mid latitudes, we performed a comprehensive comparison of RO measurements made by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites and observations of Ne profiles made by the Arecibo Observatory incoherent scatter radar (ISR). COSMIC is formed by six satellites in circular, 800 km altitude low-Earth orbit (LEO) at 72° inclination. The satellites orbit in their own plane, approximately 24° apart in ascending node. The satellites are equipped with dual-frequency GPS receivers capable of making measurements of the total electron content (TEC) along the signal path and, therefore, RO observations. The Arecibo ISR, located at(18.35°N, 66.75°W; ˜28.25°N dip latitude), operates at a frequency of 430 MHz with a maximum bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The large collecting area provided by the 300 m dish antenna combined with high peak power transmitters (2.0-2.5 MW) allows the radar to make accurate Ne measurements throughout the entire ionospheric F-region and topside heights. We analyzed 74 and 89 days of line feed and Gregorian data, respectively, collected between 2006 and 2014. There were 638 RO profiles measured within 10° of latitude and 20° of longitude from Arecibo Observatory and within ±10 minutes of the radar measurements. Preliminary analyses of the observations show patterns in the relationship between densities measured by the Arecibo ISR and densities estimated from the COSMIC ROs. We will present and discuss the behavior of the patterns. We will also present results of a numerical model representing the patterns and discuss the possibility of using this model to improve RO estimates of density profiles.

  7. Measurements of Ion Drifts and Thermospheric Neutral Winds at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriwether, J. W.; Navarro, L.; Chau, J. L.; Fejer, B. G.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of ion drifts and thermospheric neutral winds obtained simultaneously with zonal and vertical ion drift measurements of F-region plasma have been made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory at different times during the year since August, 2009. This period is coincident with an anomalous period of extremely low solar activity. For campaigns taking place in September, 2009, March, 2010, and September, 2010, the Jicamarca 50 MHz radar operated to measure both vertical ion drifts and horizontal neutral winds from 200 to 800 km. The Jicamarca Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) was installed in August, 2009, and measurements have been ongoing since first light on 15 August, 2010. The FPI instrument is located in an observatory installed on a hill overlooking the Jicamarca valley and located above the cloud inversion layer, which improved the chances of observing during local summer. This instrument after an upgrade in August 2010 is able to make zonal and meridional thermospheric wind and temperature measurements with an accuracy of 5 to 10 ms-1 and 15 to 30 K. Also obtained during the measurement campaigns with the JRO radar facility were simultaneous measurements of thermospheric winds from the FPI observatory located in Arequipa, Peru, which is located 4 degrees latitude to the south of Jicamarca. The results obtained generally showed good agreement between the observed neutral winds and ion drifts. The vertical variation of the ion drifts is significant from the early evening twilight period to midnight suggesting that the transition from the E-region dynamo to the F-region dynamo takes place rather slowly as compared with more active solar flux periods.

  8. Measuring the drinking behaviour of individual pigs housed in group using radio frequency identification (RFID).

    PubMed

    Maselyne, J; Adriaens, I; Huybrechts, T; De Ketelaere, B; Millet, S; Vangeyte, J; Van Nuffel, A; Saeys, W

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the drinking behaviour of pigs may indicate health, welfare or productivity problems. Automated monitoring and analysis of drinking behaviour could allow problems to be detected, thus improving farm productivity. A high frequency radio frequency identification (HF RFID) system was designed to register the drinking behaviour of individual pigs. HF RFID antennas were placed around four nipple drinkers and connected to a reader via a multiplexer. A total of 55 growing-finishing pigs were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) ear tags, one in each ear. RFID-based drinking visits were created from the RFID registrations using a bout criterion and a minimum and maximum duration criterion. The HF RFID system was successfully validated by comparing RFID-based visits with visual observations and flow meter measurements based on visit overlap. Sensitivity was at least 92%, specificity 93%, precision 90% and accuracy 93%. RFID-based drinking duration had a high correlation with observed drinking duration (R 2=0.88) and water usage (R 2=0.71). The number of registrations after applying the visit criteria had an even higher correlation with the same two variables (R 2=0.90 and 0.75, respectively). There was also a correlation between number of RFID visits and number of observed visits (R 2=0.84). The system provides good quality information about the drinking behaviour of individual pigs. As health or other problems affect the pigs' drinking behaviour, analysis of the RFID data could allow problems to be detected and signalled to the farmer. This information can help to improve the productivity and economics of the farm as well as the health and welfare of the pigs.

  9. The Role of Helium Metastable States in Radio-Frequency Helium-Oxygen Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Measurement and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Kari; Waskoenig, Jochen; Sadeghi, Nader; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He atoms were measured line-of sight integrated along the plasma channel of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in helium oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. Dependencies of the He metastable density with oxygen admixtures up to 1 percent were investigated. Results are compared to a 1-d numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (20 species, 184 reactions), and very good agreement is found. The main formation mechanisms for the helium metastables are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  10. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-15

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  11. Conductive Sphere in a Radio Frequency Field: Theory and Applications to Positioners, Heating, and Noncontact Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Watkins, J. L.; Chung, S.; Wagner, P.

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conductive spherical sample located in an electromagnetic field excited by rf (radio frequency) current in a system of coaxial coils is treated theoretically. Maxwell's equations are solved exactly and all integrals in the formulas for the fields are evaluated analytically for the case where the sphere is on the axis and the coil system is modeled by a stack of filamentary circular loops. Formulas are also derived for electromagnetic force exerted on the sphere, excess impedance in the coil system due to the presence of the sphere, and power absorbed by the sphere. All integrals in those formulas have been evaluated analytically. Force measurements are presented and they are in excellent agreement with the new theory. A low-power electromagnetic levitator that is accurately described by the theory has been demonstrated and is discussed. Experimental measurements of excess impedance are presented and compared with theory, and those results are used to demonstrate an accurate noncontact method for determining electrical conductivity. Theoretical formulas for power absorption are evaluated numerically and their usefulness in both rf heating and in making noncontact measurements of a number of thermophysical properties of materials is discussed.

  12. Intrinsic noise measurement of an ultra-sensitive radio-frequency single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, W. W.; Ji, Z.; Pan, Feng; Rimberg, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    The radio-frequency single electron transistor (rf-SET) has been the focus of intense interest since its invention in 1998[1]. Using cryogenic ultra-thin film evaporation techniques [2] and an improved on-chip superconducting matching network [3], we have consistently fabricated rf-SETs with charge sensitivity of 1.7--5μe/√Hz and uncoupled energy sensitivity 1.1--5. Using our 1GHz resonant circuit, intrinsic noise in the SET arising from a dc voltage bias was measured in the white noise limit. We measured the offset charge dependence of the intrinsic noise in the vicinity of the Josephson-quasiparticle and double Josephson-quasiparticle transport cycles. In regions for which the offset charge and resistance noise are strongly suppressed, we can determine the SET shot noise in the sup-gap regime. We discuss the effects of correlations between charge carriers on the measured Fano factor. [1] R.J.Schoelkopf et al., Science 280,1238 (1998); [2] N.A.Court et al., Cond-mat 0706.4150 (2007); [3] W.W.Xue et al., Appl.Phys.Lett. 91, 093511 (2007).

  13. High Resolution Measurements In U-Channel Technique And Implications For Sedimentological Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namık; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Biltekin, Demet; Akcer, Sena; Meydan Gokdere, Feray; Makaroglu, Ozlem; Bulkan, Ozlem; Arslan, Tugce; Albut, Gulum; Yalamaz, Burak; Yakupoglu, Nurettin; Sabuncu, Asen; Fillikci, Betul; Yıldız, Guliz

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical features in-stu drilling for sediment cores and vacuum forces that affect while obtaining the sediments to the core tube are formed concave shaped deformations. Even in the half sections, concave deformation form still appears. During MCSL measurements, Laminae which forms concave shaped deformation, show interference thus, values indicate overall results for several laminae instead of single lamina. These interferenced data is not appropriate for paleoceanography studies which require extend accuracy and high frequency data set to describe geochemical and climatological effects in high resolution. U-Channel technique provides accurate location and isolated values for each lamina. In EMCOL Laboratories, U-channel provide well saturated and air-free environment for samples and, by using these technique U-channels are prepared with modificated MCSL for data acquisition. Even below millimeter scale sampling rate provides the separation of each lamina and, physical properties of every each lamina. Cover of u-channel is made by homogenous plastic in shape of rectangular prism geometry. Thus, during measurement, MSCL sensors may harm the sediment; however u-channel covers the sediment from this unwanted deformation from MSCL itself. U-channel technique can present micro scale angular changes in the laminae. Measurements that have been taken from U-channel are compared with the traditional half core measurements. Interestingly, accuracy of the positions for each lamina is much more detailed and, the resolution is progressively higher. Results from P Wave and Gamma ray density provide removed interference effects on each lamina. In this technique, it is high recommended that U-channel widens the resolution of core logging and generates more cleansed measurements in MCSL. For P- Wave Used Synthetic seismograms that modelled by MSCL data set which created from U-channel technique dictates each anomalies related with climatological and geological changes. Keywords

  14. Measuring the Impact on Farmers of Agricultural Radio and Television Programs in Southwest Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahaya, Mohammed Kuta; Badiru, Olabode Idris

    2002-01-01

    A survey examined the effectiveness of two long-running Nigerian agricultural programs on television and radio as perceived by 198 farmers. Results indicate a positive assessment of their value for improving agricultural production. Although more listen to the radio, the television program also received high marks. (Contains 17 references.) (JOW)

  15. A High Frequency Radio Technique for Measuring Plasma Drifts in the Ionosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    of the iono- sphere is relatively recent in the history of physics. Guglielmo Marconi’s successful trans-Atlantic radio trans- mission in 1901...the Heaviside Layer In 1901, Marconi transmitted a radio signal beyond the curvature of the earth. MacDonald’s revision of the dif- fraction theory to

  16. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Expected Performance in Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Woods, W. W.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for investigating key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the upcoming flyby in July 2015. REX flight equipment augments the NH radio transceiver used for spacecraft communications and tracking. The REX hardware implementation requires 1.6 W and 160 g. This presentation will focus on the final design and the predicted performance of two high-priority observations. First, REX will receive signals from a pair of 70-m antennas on Earth - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. The data recorded by REX will reveal the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius. Second, REX will measure the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2-cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the nightside are visible, allowing the surface temperature and its spatial variations to be determined. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of about 10 pixels; one bisects Pluto whereas the second crosses the winter pole. We will illustrate the capabilities of REX by reviewing the method of analysis and the precision achieved in a lunar occultation observed by New Horizons in May 2011. Re-analysis of radio occultation measurements by Voyager 2 at Triton is also under way. More generally, REX objectives include a radio occultation search for Pluto's ionosphere; examination of Charon through both radio occultation and radiometry; a search for a radar echo from Pluto's surface; and improved knowledge of the Pluto system mass and the Pluto-Charon mass ratio from a combination of two-way and one-way Doppler frequency measurements.

  17. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  18. Polarization Methods of Measuring the Roll Angle of an Object in Motion in Radio Beacon Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulko, V. L.; Mescheryakov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Polarization methods of measuring the roll angle of an object in motion with the help of radio beacon systems are considered. The polarization properties of the beacon signals received on board the object and amplitude-phase processing of their orthogonal polarized components are used to accomplish this goal.

  19. Peak radiated power measurement of the DOE Mark II container tag with integrated ST-676 sensor radio frequency identification device.

    SciTech Connect

    Jursich, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The total peak radiated power of the Department of Energy Mark II container tag was measured in the electromagnetic reverberation chamber facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The tag's radio frequency content was also evaluated for possible emissions outside the intentional transmit frequency band. No spurious emissions of any significance were found, and the radiated power conformed to the manufacturer's specifications.

  20. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  1. Real-time HF Radio Absorption Maps Incorporating Riometer and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil; Honary, Farideh; Warrington, Mike; Stocker, Alan; Danskin, Donald

    2016-04-01

    A real-time model of HF radio propagation conditions is being developed as a service for aircraft communications at high latitudes. An essential component of this is a real-time map of the absorption of HF (3-30 MHz) radio signals in the D-region ionosphere. Empirical, climatological Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) models in common usage cannot account for day-to-day variations in ionospheric composition and are inaccurate during the large changes in recombination rate at twilight. However, parameters of such models may be optimised using an age-weighted regression to absorption measurements from riometers in Canada and Scandinavia. Such parameters include the day- and night-time sensitivity to proton flux as measured on a geostationary satellite (GOES). Modelling the twilight transition as a linear or Gauss error function over a range of solar-zenith angles (χl < χ < χu) is found to provide greater accuracy than 'Earth shadow' methods (as applied in the Sodankylä Ionospheric Chemistry (SIC) model, for example) due to a more gradual ionospheric response for χ < 90° . The fitted χl parameter is found to be most variable, with smaller values (as low as 60°) post-sunrise compared with pre-sunset. Correlation coefficients of model parameters between riometers are presented and these provide a means of appropriately weighting individual riometer contributions in an assimilative PCA model. At times outside of PCA events, the probability of absorption in the auroral zones is related to the energetic electron flux inside the precipitation loss cone, as measured on the polar-orbiting POES satellites. This varies with magnetic local time, magnetic latitude and geomagnetic activity, and its relation to the real-time solar wind - magnetospheric coupling function [Newell et al., 2007] will be presented. Reference: Newell, P. T., T. Sotirelis, K. Liou, C.-I. Meng, and F. J. Rich (2007), A nearly universal solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function inferred from 10

  2. Radio-echo sounding at Dome C, East Antarctica: A comparison of measured and modeled data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Anna; Eisen, Olaf; Steinhage, Daniel; Zirizzotti, Achille; Urbini, Stefano; Cavitte, Marie; Blankenship, Donald D.; Wolff, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The internal layering architecture of ice sheets, detected with radio-echo sounding (RES), contains clues to past ice-flow dynamics and mass balance. A common way of relating the recorded travel time of RES reflections to depth is by integrating a wave-speed distribution. This results in an increasing absolute error with depth. We present a synchronization of RES-internal layers of different radar systems (Alfred Wegener Institute, Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, British Antarctic Survey and University of Texas Institute for Geophysics) with ice-core records from the Antarctic deep drill site Dome C. Synthetic radar traces are obtained from measurements of ice-core density and conductivity with a 1D model of Maxwell's equations. The reflection peaks of the different radar systems' measurements are shifted by a wiggle-matching algorithm, so they match the synthetic trace. In this way, we matched pronounced internal reflections in the RES data to conductivity peaks with considerably smaller depth uncertainties, and assigned them with the ice-core age. We examine the differences in shifts and resolution of the different RES data to address the question of their comparability and combined analysis for an extensive age-depth distribution.

  3. Radio acoustic measurement of temperature profile in the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuura, N.; Masuda, Y.; Inuki, H.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.; Tsuda, T.

    1986-10-01

    The radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) uses radar to measure the temperature profile in the atmosphere. In the standard technique of atmospheric radar, the radar backscatter results from electrical permittivity variations due to natural phenomena such as turbulence and precipitation. In the RASS technique, the radar backscatter results from periodical permittivity variations due to density/temperature variations imposed on the atmosphere by an acoustic wave artificially generated in such a way that the acoustic wavelength is half the radar (electromagnetic) wavelength. This `Bragg condition' is necessary for efficient backscattering. The backscatter echo of the RASS is affected by the Doppler frequency shift arising both from the speed at which the longitudinal acoustic perturbations propagate (the sound speed), and from the radial bulk velocity in the common volume of the atmosphere-the latter can be measured by the standard technique of turbulence scatter. The observed sound speed is reduced to give the local atmospheric temperature. Here we report an experiment using the RASS, carried out on 1-3 August 1985, which consisted of a high-power, very-high-frequency (VHF) Doppler radar at Shigaraki, Shiga, Japan and a movable high-power acoustic transmitter, and which gave the first experimental proof of the possibility of temperature profiling in the troposphere and stratosphere up to an altitude of ~20 km.

  4. The Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment - Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. K.; Dutta-Roy, R.; Heyl, M.; Allison, M.; Asmar, S. W.; Folkner, W. M.; Preston, R. A.; Atkinson, D. H.; Edenhofer, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Wohlmuth, R.; Iess, L.; Tyler, G. L.

    2002-07-01

    A Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) will be performed during the Titan atmospheric descent of the ESA Huygens Probe. The direction and strength of Titan's zonal winds will be determined with an accuracy better than 1 m s-1 from the start of mission at an altitude of ˜160 km down to the surface. The Probe's wind-induced horizontal motion will be derived from the residual Doppler shift of its S-band radio link to the Cassini Orbiter, corrected for all known orbit and propagation effects. It is also planned to record the frequency of the Probe signal using large ground-based antennas, thereby providing an additional component of the horizontal drift. In addition to the winds, DWE will obtain valuable information on the rotation, parachute swing and atmospheric buffeting of the Huygens Probe, as well as its position and attitude after Titan touchdown. The DWE measurement strategy relies on experimenter-supplied Ultra-Stable Oscillators to generate the transmitted signal from the Probe and to extract the frequency of the received signal on the Orbiter. Results of the first in-flight checkout, as well as the DWE Doppler calibrations conducted with simulated Huygens signals uplinked from ground (Probe Relay Tests), are described. Ongoing efforts to measure and model Titan's winds using various Earth-based techniques are briefly reviewed.

  5. The Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment - Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. K.; Dutta-Roy, R.; Heyl, M.; Allison, M.; Asmar, S. W.; Folkner, W. M.; Preston, R. A.; Atkinson, D. H.; Edenhofer, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Wohlmuth, R.; Iess, L.; Tyler, G. L.

    2002-07-01

    A Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) will be performed during the Titan atmospheric descent of the ESA Huygens Probe. The direction and strength of Titan's zonal winds will be determined with an accuracy better than 1 m s-1 from the start of mission at an altitude of ~160 km down to the surface. The Probe's wind-induced horizontal motion will be derived from the residual Doppler shift of its S-band radio link to the Cassini Orbiter, corrected for all known orbit and propagation effects. It is also planned to record the frequency of the Probe signal using large ground-based antennas, thereby providing an additional component of the horizontal drift. In addition to the winds, DWE will obtain valuable information on the rotation, parachute swing and atmospheric buffeting of the Huygens Probe, as well as its position and attitude after Titan touchdown. The DWE measurement strategy relies on experimenter-supplied Ultra-Stable Oscillators to generate the transmitted signal from the Probe and to extract the frequency of the received signal on the Orbiter. Results of the first in-flight checkout, as well as the DWE Doppler calibrations conducted with simulated Huygens signals uplinked from ground (Probe Relay Tests), are described. Ongoing efforts to measure and model Titan's winds using various Earth-based techniques are briefly reviewed.

  6. Measurement of the radius of Mercury by radio occultation during the MESSENGER flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Mark E.; Kahan, Daniel S.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Oberst, Jürgen; Asmar, Sami W.

    2011-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009. During the first and third of those flybys, MESSENGER passed behind the planet from the perspective of Earth, occulting the radio-frequency (RF) transmissions. The occultation start and end times, recovered with 0.1 s accuracy or better by fitting edge-diffraction patterns to the RF power history, are used to estimate Mercury's radius at the tangent point of the RF path. To relate the measured radius to the planet shape, we evaluate local topography using images to identify the high-elevation feature that defines the RF path or using altimeter data to quantify surface roughness. Radius measurements are accurate to 150 m, and uncertainty in the average radius of the surrounding terrain, after adjustments are made from the local high at the tangent point of the RF path, is 350 m. The results are consistent with Mercury's equatorial shape as inferred from observations by the Mercury Laser Altimeter and ground-based radar. The three independent estimates of radius from occultation events collectively yield a mean radius for Mercury of 2439.2±0.5 km.

  7. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-frequency Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias A.; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek Renee A.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Ivison, R. J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Edward J.; Zemcov, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect associated with the halos that host them. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) has conducted a survey at 148 GHz, 218 GHz and 277 GHz along the celestial equator. Using samples of radio sources selected at 1.4 GHz from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) Survey and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS), we measure the stacked 148, 218 and 277 GHz flux densities for sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities ranging from 5 to 200 mJy. At these flux densities, the radio source population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), with both steep and at spectrum populations, which have combined radio-to-millimeter spectral indices ranging from 0.5 to 0.95, reecting the prevalence of steep spectrum sources at high flux densities and the presence of at spectrum sources at lower flux densities. The thermal Sunyaev-Zelapos;dovich (SZ) eect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 level through its spectral signature. When we compare the SZ eect with weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies, we find that the relation between the two is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. We present a detection of the SZ eect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approx. equals 10(exp 13) solar M h(sup-1) (sub 70) ) studied to date. This detection is particularly important in the context of galaxy evolution models, as it confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. With Herschel* observations, we show that the SZ detection is not significantly contaminated by dusty galaxies or by dust associated with the AGN or galaxies hosting the AGN. We show that 5 mJy < S(sub 1:4) < 200 mJy radio sources contribute l(l +1)C(sub l)/(2 pi ) = 0:37+/- 0:03 micro K(exp 2) to the angular

  8. Morphology of solar wind fluctuations and structure in the vicinity of the Sun from radio propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.

    1995-01-01

    Radio propagation measurements represent a powerful means for remote probing of electron density and solar wind speed in the acceleration region of the solar wind not yet explored by in situ measurements. Recent investigations based on radio propagation measurements have led to considerable progress in our knowledge of the general morphology of solar wind fluctuations and structure, especially in terms of their relationship to solar wind properties that have been observed directly by fields and particles measurements, and to coronal features observed in white-light measurements. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the latest results on quasi-stationary structure covering the large scale variation of solar wind speed over the streamer belt and coronal hole regions, coronal streamers (source of slow solar wind) and their associated small-scale electron density structure, plumes, density and fractional or relative density fluctuations, and the spectral characteristics of the electron density fluctuations. The radio propagation measurements not only reveal new information on the structure near the Sun, but also show that the structure appears to undergo substantial evolution on its way to 0.3 AU, the closest radial distance for which direct in situ spacecraft measurements are available.

  9. Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takabayashi, Y.

    2010-06-23

    We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

  10. Improved measurement of the spectral index of the diffuse radio background between 90 and 190 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozdzen, T. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Monsalve, R. A.; Rogers, A. E. E.

    2017-02-01

    We report absolutely calibrated measurements of diffuse radio emission between 90 and 190 MHz from the Experiment to Detect the Global EoR Signature (EDGES). EDGES employs a wide beam zenith-pointing dipole antenna centred on a declination of -26.7°. We measure the sky brightness temperature as a function of frequency averaged over the EDGES beam from 211 nights of data acquired from 2015 July to 2016 March. We derive the spectral index, β, as a function of local sidereal time (LST) and find -2.60 > β > -2.62 ± 0.02 between 0 and 12 h LST. When the Galactic Centre is in the sky, the spectral index flattens, reaching β = -2.50 ± 0.02 at 17.7 h. The EDGES instrument is shown to be very stable throughout the observations with night-to-night reproducibility of σβ < 0.003. Including systematic uncertainty, the overall uncertainty of β is 0.02 across all LST bins. These results improve on the earlier findings of Rogers & Bowman by reducing the spectral index uncertainty from 0.10 to 0.02 while considering more extensive sources of errors. We compare our measurements with spectral index simulations derived from the Global Sky Model (GSM) of de Oliveira-Costa et al. and with fits between the Guzmán et al. 45 MHz and Haslam et al. 408 MHz maps. We find good agreement at the transit of the Galactic Centre. Away from transit, the GSM tends to overpredict (GSM less negative) by 0.05 < Δβ = βGSM - βEDGES < 0.12, while the 45-408 MHz fits tend to overpredict by Δβ < 0.05.

  11. Error analysis for intrinsic quality factor measurement in superconducting radio frequency resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnychuk, O.; Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss error analysis for intrinsic quality factor (Q0) and accelerating gradient (Eacc) measurements in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) resonators. The analysis is applicable for cavity performance tests that are routinely performed at SRF facilities worldwide. We review the sources of uncertainties along with the assumptions on their correlations and present uncertainty calculations with a more complete procedure for treatment of correlations than in previous publications [T. Powers, in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27]. Applying this approach to cavity data collected at Vertical Test Stand facility at Fermilab, we estimated total uncertainty for both Q0 and Eacc to be at the level of approximately 4% for input coupler coupling parameter β1 in the [0.5, 2.5] range. Above 2.5 (below 0.5) Q0 uncertainty increases (decreases) with β1 whereas Eacc uncertainty, in contrast with results in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27], is independent of β1. Overall, our estimated Q0 uncertainty is approximately half as large as that in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27].

  12. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daksha, M.; Berger, B.; Schuengel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Koepke, M.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (γ-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient γ. This sensitvity, in turn, allows γ to be determined by comparing experimental excitation profiles and simulation data obtained with various γ-coefficients. The diagnostic, tested here in a geometrically symmetric argon discharge, yields an effective secondary electron emission coefficient of γ =0.066+/- 0.01 for stainless steel electrodes.

  13. Error analysis for intrinsic quality factor measurement in superconducting radio frequency resonators.

    PubMed

    Melnychuk, O; Grassellino, A; Romanenko, A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss error analysis for intrinsic quality factor (Q0) and accelerating gradient (Eacc) measurements in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) resonators. The analysis is applicable for cavity performance tests that are routinely performed at SRF facilities worldwide. We review the sources of uncertainties along with the assumptions on their correlations and present uncertainty calculations with a more complete procedure for treatment of correlations than in previous publications [T. Powers, in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27]. Applying this approach to cavity data collected at Vertical Test Stand facility at Fermilab, we estimated total uncertainty for both Q0 and Eacc to be at the level of approximately 4% for input coupler coupling parameter β1 in the [0.5, 2.5] range. Above 2.5 (below 0.5) Q0 uncertainty increases (decreases) with β1 whereas Eacc uncertainty, in contrast with results in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27], is independent of β1. Overall, our estimated Q0 uncertainty is approximately half as large as that in Powers [in Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, SuP02 (Elsevier, 2005), pp. 24-27].

  14. RECONCILING MODELS OF LUMINOUS BLAZARS WITH MAGNETIC FLUXES DETERMINED BY RADIO CORE-SHIFT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    2014-11-20

    Estimates of magnetic field strength in relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei, obtained by measuring the frequency-dependent radio core location, imply that the total magnetic fluxes in those jets are consistent with the predictions of the magnetically arrested disk (MAD) scenario of jet formation. On the other hand, the magnetic field strength determines the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation, which forms the low-energy bump of the observed blazar spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs of the most powerful blazars are strongly dominated by the high-energy bump, which is most likely due to the external radiation Compton mechanism. This high Compton dominance may be difficult to reconcile with the MAD scenario, unless (1) the geometry of external radiation sources (broad-line region, hot-dust torus) is quasi-spherical rather than flat, or (2) most gamma-ray radiation is produced in jet regions of low magnetization, e.g., in magnetic reconnection layers or in fast jet spines.

  15. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN DISPERSION MEASURE AND X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY FROM RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    He, C.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density N{sub H} using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of N{sub H} (10{sup 20} cm{sup -2})= 0.30{sup +0.13}{sub -0.09} DM (pc cm{sup -3}), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10{sup +4}{sub -3}%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per 10 neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different N{sub H} estimates and note that some N{sub H} values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic H I column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best N{sub H} predictions.

  16. Quantitative Measurement of Vocal Fold Vibration in Male Radio Performers and Healthy Controls Using High-Speed Videoendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, Samantha; McCabe, Patricia; Heard, Rob; Yiu, Edwin; Wang, Gaowu; Madill, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Acoustic and perceptual studies show a number of differences between the voices of radio performers and controls. Despite this, the vocal fold kinematics underlying these differences are largely unknown. Using high-speed videoendoscopy, this study sought to determine whether the vocal vibration features of radio performers differed from those of non-performing controls. Method Using high-speed videoendoscopy, recordings of a mid-phonatory/i/ in 16 male radio performers (aged 25–52 years) and 16 age-matched controls (aged 25–52 years) were collected. Videos were extracted and analysed semi-automatically using High-Speed Video Program, obtaining measures of fundamental frequency (f0), open quotient and speed quotient. Post-hoc analyses of sound pressure level (SPL) were also performed (n = 19). Pearson's correlations were calculated between SPL and both speed and open quotients. Results Male radio performers had a significantly higher speed quotient than their matched controls (t = 3.308, p = 0.005). No significant differences were found for f0 or open quotient. No significant correlation was found between either open or speed quotient with SPL. Discussion A higher speed quotient in male radio performers suggests that their vocal fold vibration was characterised by a higher ratio of glottal opening to closing times than controls. This result may explain findings of better voice quality, higher equivalent sound level and greater spectral tilt seen in previous research. Open quotient was not significantly different between groups, indicating that the durations of complete vocal fold closure were not different between the radio performers and controls. Further validation of these results is required to determine the aetiology of the higher speed quotient result and its implications for voice training and clinical management in performers. PMID:24971625

  17. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-Frequency Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee A.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Ivison, R.J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect associated with the halos that host them. We stack data at 148, 218 and 277 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at the positions of a large sample of radio AGN selected at 1.4 GHz. The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 sigma level through its spectral signature, representing a statistical detection of the SZ effect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approximately equals 10(sup 13) solar mass h(sub 70)(exp -1) ) studied to date. The relation between the SZ effect and mass (based on weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies) is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. In the context of galaxy evolution models, this study confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. Adding Herschel observations allows us to show that the SZ signal is not significantly contaminated by dust emission. Finally, we analyze the contribution of radio sources to the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  18. Measurement of the t-channel single top quark production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    The D0 collaboration reports direct evidence for electroweak production of single top quarks through the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson. This is the first analysis to isolate an individual single top quark production channel. We select events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and two, three or four jets from 2.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. One or two of the jets are identified as containing a b hadron. We combine three multivariate techniques optimized for the t-channel process to measure the t- and s-channel cross sections simultaneously. We measure cross sections of 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb for the t-channel and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb for the s-channel. The measured t-channel result is found to have a significance of 4.8 standard deviations and is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  19. Multipoint viscosity measurements in microfluidic channels using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Keen, Stephen; Yao, Alison; Leach, Jonathan; Di Leonardo, Roberto; Saunter, Chris; Love, Gordon; Cooper, Jonathan; Padgett, Miles

    2009-07-21

    We demonstrate the technique of multipoint viscosity measurements incorporating the accurate calibration of micron sized particles. We describe the use of a high-speed camera to measure the residual motion of particles trapped in holographic optical tweezers, enabling us to calculate the fluid viscosity at multiple points across the field-of-view of the microscope within a microfluidic system.

  20. In-situ absolute calibration of electric-field amplitude measurements with the LPDA radio detector stations of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briechle, Florian

    2017-03-01

    With the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) located at the Pierre Auger Observatory, radio emission of extensive air showers is observed. To exploit the physics potential of AERA, electric-field amplitude measurements with the radio detector stations need to be well-calibrated on an absolute level. A convenient tool for far-field calibration campaigns is a flying drone. Here we make use of an octocopter to place a calibrated source at freely chosen positions above the radio detector array. Special emphasis is put on the reconstruction of the octocopter position and its accuracy during the flights. The antenna response pattern of the radio detector stations was measured in a recent calibration campaign. Results of these measurements are presented and compared to simulations. It is found that measurements and simulations are in good agreement.

  1. Remote, PCM-controlled, multi-channel radio frequency FM telemetry system for cryogenic wind tunnel application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A telemetry system used in the NASA-Langley cryogenic transonic wind tunnel to obtain rotational strain and temperature data is described. The system consists of four FM transmitters allowing for a remotely controlled PCM combination. A rotating four-contact mercury slip-ring is used as an interface between the fixed and rotating mechnical structures. Over 60 channels of data on the main fan disk and blade structures have been obtained. These data are studied to verify computer predictions and mechanical life. A series of block diagrams are included.

  2. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.

    2008-12-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of √s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t$\\bar{t}$ pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: Mtop = 171.9 ± 1.7 (stat. + JES) ± 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c2 = 171.9 ± 2.0 GeV/c2. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  3. Optimal Policy of Cross-Layer Design for Channel Access and Transmission Rate Adaptation in Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Shaoqian

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the cross-layer design of joint channel access and transmission rate adaptation in CR networks with multiple channels for both centralized and decentralized cases. Our target is to maximize the throughput of CR network under transmission power constraint by taking spectrum sensing errors into account. In centralized case, this problem is formulated as a special constrained Markov decision process (CMDP), which can be solved by standard linear programming (LP) method. As the complexity of finding the optimal policy by LP increases exponentially with the size of action space and state space, we further apply action set reduction and state aggregation to reduce the complexity without loss of optimality. Meanwhile, for the convenience of implementation, we also consider the pure policy design and analyze the corresponding characteristics. In decentralized case, where only local information is available and there is no coordination among the CR users, we prove the existence of the constrained Nash equilibrium and obtain the optimal decentralized policy. Finally, in the case that the traffic load parameters of the licensed users are unknown for the CR users, we propose two methods to estimate the parameters for two different cases. Numerical results validate the theoretic analysis.

  4. Far-Field Plume Measurements of a Nested-Channel Hall-Effect Thruster (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-13

    nude Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer, and ExB probe. Data from these probes were used to calculate utilization efficiencies from existing...USA Far-field plume measurements were performed on the X2 nested-channel Hall-effect thruster using an ar- ray of diagnostics, including a nude Faraday...mode to nested-channel mode by utilizing a traditional array of far-field diagnostics, which include a nude Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer

  5. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Belov, K; Mulrey, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T C; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R J; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2016-04-08

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  6. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, K.; Mulrey, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Wissel, S. A.; Zilles, A.; Bechtol, K.; Borch, K.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Hyneman, R.; Jobe, K.; Kuwatani, K.; Lam, J.; Liu, T. C.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C.; Nichol, R. J.; Rauch, B. F.; Rotter, B.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Seckel, D.; Strutt, B.; Vieregg, A. G.; Williams, C.; T-510 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  7. Venus: ionosphere and atmosphere as measured by dual-frequency radio occultation of mariner v.

    PubMed

    1967-12-29

    Venus has daytime and nighttime ionospheres at the positions probed by radio occulation. The main layers are thin by terrestrial standards, with the nighttime peak concentration of electrons being about two orders of magnitude below that of the daytime peak. Above the nighttime peak were several scale-height regimes extending to a radius of at least 7500, and probably to 9700, kilometers from the center of Venus. Helium and hydrogen at plasma temperatures of 600 degrees to 1100 degrees K seem indicated in the regimes from 6300 to 7500 kilometers, with cooler molecular ions in lower regions. Above the daytime peak a sharp plasmapause was discovered, marking a sudden transition from appreciable ionization concentrations near Venus to the tenuous conditions of the solar wind. This may be indicative of a kind of interaction of the magnetized solar wind with a planetary body that differs from the two different kinds of interaction characterized by Earth and by Moon. For Venus and probably for Mars, the magnetic field of the solar wind may pile up in front of the conducting ionosphere, form an induced magnetosphere that ends at the plasmapause, above which any ionosphere that tends to form is swept away by the shocked solar wind that flows between the stand-off bow-shock and the magnetopause. The neutral atmosphere was also probed and a surface reflection may have been detected, but the data have not yet been studied in detail. Results are consistent with a super-refractive atmosphere, as expected from Soviet measurements near the surface. Thus, two unusual features of Venus can be described in terms of a light trap in the lower atmosphere, and a magnetic trap in the conducting ionosphere.

  8. On the sensitivity of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager channels to overland rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yalei; Liu, Guosheng; Wang, Yu; Cao, Jie

    2011-06-01

    The response of brightness temperatures at different microwave frequencies to overland precipitation is investigated by using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and Microwave Imager (TMI) data. The Spearman correlation coefficients between observations at TMI channels or channel combinations and PR-measured near-surface rain are computed using 3 years of TRMM data. The results showed that the brightness temperature combinations from 19 and 37 GHz, that is, V19-V37 (the letter V denotes vertical polarization, and the numbers denote frequency in GHz) or V21-V37, can explain ˜10% more variance of near-surface rainfall rate than can the V85 brightness temperature. Also, the global distribution of the above correlation revealed that over almost all of the tropical land area covered by TRMM satellite, the V19-V37 channel has a closer response to the overland rainfall than does the V85 channel. This result is somewhat counterintuitive, because it has been long believed that the dominant signature of overland rainfall is the brightness temperature depression caused by ice scattering at high microwave frequencies (e.g., 85 GHz). To understand the underlying physics of this better low-frequency response, data analysis and radiative transfer modeling have been conducted to assess the influence on brightness temperatures from clouds with different ice and liquid water partitions. The results showed that under the condition of low frozen water and medium liquid water in the atmospheric column, the signal from the V19-V37 channel responded better to rainfall rate than did the one from the V85 channel. A plausible explanation to this result is that in addition to ice scattering signature, the V19-V37 channel contains liquid water information as well, which is more directly related to surface rain than to ice water aloft. At heavy rainfall conditions, the V19-V37, V37, and V85 channels all are correlated with near-surface rain reasonably well

  9. Wideband optical propagation measurement system for characterization of indoor optical wireless channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehrad, Mohsen; Fadlullah, Jarir

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the presented research is to characterize an indoor wireless optical communication channel. Until recently, there have not been any comprehensive published measurements results presenting characteristics of this channel for high data rates, e. g. 1Gbit/s. To this end, a measurement setup is implemented, with a high-power laser diode acting as the optical transmitter and an avalanche photodiode acting as the receiver. Using a network analyzer, the laser is modulated by CW frequencies up to 1 GHz, which is the bandwidth of the receiver, as limited by the intrinsic capacitance and the response-time of the avalanche photodiode. A single collimated optical spot with a small elliptical shape on the ceiling is tested. The impacts of receiver orientation and configuration on the channel frequency response are investigated. These measurements will enable us to explore the possibility of higher data transmission rates, potentially beyond 1 Gbps, on indoor optical wireless channels. These channels can be a viable alternative to inherently insecure and interference-prone RF wireless channels, and therefore, could be the basis of next-generation high data rate wireless local area networks.

  10. Measuring the speed of light with ultra-compact radio quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Jackson, John; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhao, Yuhang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, based on a 2.29 GHz VLBI all-sky survey of 613 milliarcsecond ultra-compact radio sources with 0.0035measured for quasars extending to high redshifts (0z~ 3.), we reconstruct the DA(z) function using the technique of Gaussian processes. This allows us to identify the redshift corresponding to the maximum of the DA(z) function: 0zm=1.7 and the corresponding angular diameter distance DA(zm)=1719.01±43.46 Mpc. Similar reconstruction of the expansion rate function H(z) based on the data from cosmic chronometers and BAO gives us H(zm)=176.77±6.11 km sec‑1 Mpc‑1. These measurements are used to estimate the speed of light: c=3.039(±0.180)× 105 km/s. This is the first measurement of the speed of light in a cosmological setting referring to the distant past.

  11. Measurement of the PPN Parameter (gamma) with radio signals from the Cassini Spacecraft at X- and Ka-Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John D.; Lau, Eunice L.; Giampieri, Giacomo

    2005-01-01

    Radio Doppler data from the Cassini spacecraft during its solar conjunction in June 2002 can be used to measure the bending of light by solar gravitation. In terms of the standard post-Newtonian parameter (gamma), we find that (gamma) - 1 = (-1.3 +/- 5.2)x10^-5 in agreement with the theory of General Relativity. This result implies that the parameter (omega) in the Brans-Dicke theory is greater than 9000 at a 95% confidence level.

  12. A New Top Mass Measurement in The Dilepton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, Marco; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U.

    2008-01-01

    The top quark discovery completed the present picture of the fundamental constituents of the nature. Since then, the Collider Detector at Fermilab and D0 Collaborations have been spending great efforts to measure its properties better. About 30 times larger than the second heaviest quark, the mass of the top has been measured with increased statistic and more and more sophisticated techniques in order to reduce as much as possible its uncertainty. This is because the top is expected to play a fundamental role in the Standard Model. The value of its mass sets boundaries on the mass of the unobserved Higgs boson, and perhaps more appealing, studies of its properties might lead to the discovery of new physics.

  13. Laser time-of-flight measurement based on multi-channel time delay estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Man, Tian

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a novel method based on multichannel time delay estimation with linear fitting correction for laser time-of-flight (TOF) measurement is described. The laser TOF measurement system is constructed with a laser source, a stop receiver channel, a reference receiver multichannel, an ADC sampling unit and a digital signal processing unit. Limited by the sampling rate, the precision of laser TOF measurement is restricted no more than the ADC sampling period in conventional methods. As this problem is considered, multi-channel correlation time delay estimation with linear fitting correction is devised. It is shown that the measuring precision is better than 2ns with multi-channel time delay estimation and not influenced by SNR. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and stable.

  14. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  15. Temperature and Pressure Measurements and Visualization of He II Cavitation Flow through Venturi Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.; Harada, K.

    2004-06-23

    He II cavitation flow through a Venturi channel was experimentally investigated through temperature and pressure measurements and optical visualization. So far some distinctive features of cavitation between He II and He I flows were clarified. Then, detailed measurements were added for further investigation, such as the measurements of the temperature drop distribution throughout the flow channel and the void fraction. Further considerations were given on the cavitation inception with emphasis on the superheating of liquid helium, and the effect of the flow separation on cavitation.

  16. MF Radio Field Strength Measurements in Desert Terrain Near Yuma, Arizona,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    determining the propagation of llF over ridges. 10. Berry, L.A. (1967) Radio propagation over a Gaussian -shaped ridge, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag . AP-15(No...404. 10. Berry, L.A. (1967) Radio propagation over a Gaussian -shaped ridge, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag . AP-15(No. 5):701-702. S11. FAO-Unesco, Soil...foreign nations. RADC-TR-80-359 has been reviewed and is approved for publication. APPROVED: J-- lfg TERENCE J. ELKINS, Acting Chief Propagation

  17. Analysis of the Capability and Limitations of Relativistic Gravity Measurements Using Radio Astronomy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Counselman, C. C., III

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radar observations of planets and very-long-baseline radio interferometric observations of extragalactic objects to test theories of gravitation are described in detail with special emphasis on sources of error. The accuracy achievable in these tests with data already obtained, can be summarized in terms of: retardation of signal propagation (radar), deflection of radio waves (interferometry), advance of planetary perihelia (radar), gravitational quadrupole moment of sun (radar), and time variation of gravitational constant (radar). The analyses completed to date have yielded no significant disagreement with the predictions of general relativity.

  18. Laser measurement of H{sup -} ions in a field-effect-transistor based radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Ando, A.; Tauchi, Y.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Hydrogen negative ion density measurements are required to clarify the characteristics of negative ion production and ion source performance. Both of laser photodetachment and cavity ring down (CRD) measurements have been implemented to a field-effect-transistor based radio-frequency ion source. The density ratio of negative hydrogen ions to electrons was successfully measured by laser photodetachment and effect of magnetic filter field on negative ion density was confirmed. The calculated CRD signal showed that CRD mirrors with >99.990% reflectivity are required and loss of reflectivity due to cesium contamination should be minimized.

  19. A Basic Study About Multi Channel Measurement of Skin Impedance Vector Loci on the Acupuncture Points

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Agency Name(s) and Address(es) US Army Research, Development & Standardization Group (UK) PSC 802 Box 15 FPO AE 09499-1500 Sponsor/Monitor’s Acronym(s...each measurement we perform. Additionally, we applied the results obtained to per- foming 4 channel measurments of skin impedance vector loci around

  20. Measurement of heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Ibrahim, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic rib turbulators were used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. The objective of the present project was to investigate the combined effects of the rib angle of attack and the channel aspect ratio on the local heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with two opposite ribbed walls for Reynolds number varied from 10,000 to 60,000. The channel aspect ratio (W/H) was varied from 1 to 2 to 4. The rib angle of attack (alpha) was varied from 90 to 60 to 45 to 30 degree. The highly detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on both the smooth side and the ribbed side walls from the channel sharp entrance to the downstream region were measured. The results showed that, in the square channel, the heat transfer for the slant ribs (alpha = 30 -45 deg) was about 30% higher that of the transverse ribs (alpha = 90 deg) for a constant pumping power. However, in the rectangular channels (W/H = 2 and 4, ribs on W side), the heat transfer at alpha = 30 -45 deg was only about 5% higher than 90 deg. The average heat transfer and friction correlations were developed to account for rib spacing, rib angle, and channel aspect ratio over the range of roughness Reynolds number.

  1. Research on measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution based on an air-water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Xu, Hua-bin; Cheng, Kang

    2016-11-01

    A measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) method with an air-water channel is researched. In this method, the underwater vehicle and satellite are the legitimate parties, and the third party is at the airwater interface in order to simplify the unilateral quantum channel to water or air. Considering the condition that both unilateral transmission distance and transmission loss coefficient are unequal, a perfect model of the asymmetric channel is built. The influence of asymmetric channel on system loss tolerance and secure transmission distance is analyzed. The simulation results show that with the increase of the channel's asymmetric degree, the system loss tolerance will descend, one transmission distance will be reduced while the other will be increased. When the asymmetric coefficient of channel is between 0.068 and 0.171, MDI-QKD can satisfy the demand of QKD with an air-water channel, namely the underwater transmission distance and atmospheric transmission distance are not less than 60 m and 12 km, respectively.

  2. Interplay between Appearance and Disappearance Channels for Precision Measurements of θ₂₃ and δ

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss how the CP violating phase δ and the mixing angle θ₂₃ can be measured precisely in an environment where there are strong correlations between them. This is achieved by paying special attention to the mutual roles and the interplay between the appearance and the disappearance channels in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We analyze and clarify the general structure of the θ₂₃ - θ₁₃ - δ degeneracy for both the appearance and disappearance channels in a more complete fashion than what has previously been discussed in the literature. A full understanding of this degeneracy is of vital importance if θ₂₃ is close to maximal mixing. The relative importance between the appearance and disappearance channels depends upon the particular setup and how close to maximal mixing Nature has chosen the value for θ₂₃. For facilities that operate with a narrow band beam or a wide band beam centered on the first oscillation extremum, the contribution of the disappearance channel depends critically on the systematic uncertainties assumed for this channel. Whereas for facilities that operate at energies above the first oscillation extremum or at the second oscillation extremum the appearance channels dominate. On the other hand, for δ we find that the disappearance channel usually improves the sensitivity, modestly for facilities around the first oscillation extremum and more significantly for facilities operating at an energy above the first oscillation extremum, especially near δ ~ ± π/2.

  3. Characteristics of the global thermal tropopause derived from multiple radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yuan, Yun-bin; Chai, Yan-Ju; Liou, Yuei-An; Ou, Ji-kun; Zhong, Shi-ming

    2017-03-01

    Thermal tropopause represents the region of the atmosphere where the environmental lapse rate changes from tropospheric positive to stratospheric negative. It also defines the altitude of the atmosphere beneath which significant weather perturbations occur except occasional overshooting thunderstorms in the tropical regions. Accordingly, how the temporal and spatial variability of thermal tropopause behaves is of great concern in atmospheric research and, hence, investigated in this study by using radio occultation (RO) observations obtained from seven space missions during the period from May 2001 to April 2013 (with a total of 6,075,359 occultations). While RO observations have been demonstrated to provide precise measurements of temperature profiles of the atmosphere, their results are inter-compared before further use in our analysis, showing expected high-precision observations with mean differences < 0.06 K and standard deviations < 1.6 K in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Given a rather large data set of multi- space-mission RO measurements taken globally, a very detailed description of spatial structure and variability of the tropopause is revealed, and monthly mean zonal mean tropopause parameters in each 2° latitude band from 90°S to 90°N can be obtained. Many interesting features of seasonal cycle, spatial distribution, interannual variation, and diurnal variation of the thermal tropopause are observed. For examples, except for the primary minimum in January, the equatorial tropopause temperature exhibits a secondary minimum in April, possibly caused by the strongly combined wave forcing from two hemispheres; During the boreal winter over the tropics, the distribution of tropopause temperature extrema do not totally coincide with the altitude extrema spatially, and the former has a better agreement with the locations of strong tropical convection systems; Notable zonal asymmetries in interannual characteristics are observed in both

  4. A Radio-Polarisation and Rotation Measure Study of the Gum Nebula and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X. H.; Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Haverkorn, M.; Kesteven, M. J.; Poppi, S.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36°-wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only ˜450 pc. It has been hypothesized to be an old supernova remnant, fossil H ii region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H α data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionized gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H α data to constrain average electron density in the shell ne. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in rotation measure, we find {{n}e}=1.3-0.4+0.4 c{{m}-3}, angular radius {{φ }outer}=22\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7-0.1+0.1, shell thickness dr=18.5-1.4+1.5 pc, ambient magnetic field strength {{B}0}=3.9-2.2+4.9 μ G, and warm gas filling factor f=0.3-0.1+0.3. We constrain the local, small-scale (˜260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to +7{}^\\circ ≲ \\wp ≲ +44{}^\\circ , which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (˜-7.°2). The moderate compression factor X=6.0-2.5+5.1 at the edge of the H α shell implies that the “old supernova remnant” origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a H ii region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarization in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.

  5. Rényi entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel.

    PubMed

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Delahaies, Agnès

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyzes a binary channel by means of information measures based on the Rényi entropy. The analysis extends, and contains as a special case, the classic reference model of binary information transmission based on the Shannon entropy measure. The extended model is used to investigate further possibilities and properties of stochastic resonance or noise-aided information transmission. The results demonstrate that stochastic resonance occurs in the information channel and is registered by the Rényi entropy measures at any finite order, including the Shannon order. Furthermore, in definite conditions, when seeking the Rényi information measures that best exploit stochastic resonance, then nontrivial orders differing from the Shannon case usually emerge. In this way, through binary information transmission, stochastic resonance identifies optimal Rényi measures of information differing from the classic Shannon measure. A confrontation of the quantitative information measures with visual perception is also proposed in an experiment of noise-aided binary image transmission.

  6. New Radio and Optical Expansion Rate Measurements of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, M. F.; Nugent, R. L.

    2016-06-01

    We present new JVLA radio observations of the Crab nebula, which we use, along with older observations taken over a ~30 yr period, to determined the expansion rate of the synchrotron nebula. We find a convergence date for the radio synchrotron nebula of AD 1255 +/- 27. We also re-evaluated the expansion rate of the optical line emitting filaments, and we show that the traditional estimates of their convergence date are slightly biased. We find an un-biased convergence date of AD 1091 +/- 34, ~40 yr earlier than previous estimates. Our results show that both the synchrotron nebula and the optical line-emitting filaments have been accelerated since the explosion in AD 1054, but former more strongly than the latter. This finding supports the picture that the filaments are the result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between the pulsar-wind nebula and the surrounding freely-expanding supernova ejecta, and rules out models where the pulsar wind bubble is interacting directly with the pre-supernova wind of the Crab's progenitor. Our new observations were taken ~2 months after the gamma-ray flare of 2012 July, and also allow us to put a sensitive limit on any radio emission associated with the flare of <0.0002 times the radio luminosity that of the nebula.

  7. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Performance and Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Bird, M. K.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft payload contained the Radio Science Experiment (REX) for determining key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the July 14, 2015, flyby of the Pluto/Charon system. The REX flight equipment augments the NH X-band radio transceiver by providing a high precision, narrow band recording of high power uplink transmissions from Earth stations, as well as a record of broadband radiometric power. This presentation will review the performance and initial results of two high- priority observations. First, REX received two pair of 20-kW signals, one pair per polarization, transmitted from the DSN at 4.2-cm wavelength during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. REX recorded these uplink signals and determined precise measurement of the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius of Pluto. The ingress portion of one polarization was played back from the spacecraft in July and processed to obtain the pressure and temperature structure of Pluto's atmosphere. Second, REX measured the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2- cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the night side are visible. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of one-tenth Pluto's disk and temperature resolution of 0.1 K. Occultation and radiometric temperature results presented here will encompass additional data scheduled for playback in September.

  8. Initial comparison of energy measures for neural stimulation in a single conductance channel.

    PubMed

    Stahl, John; Miller, Damon A

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the utility of several alternative energy measures to reduce the energy required by a stimulation current source to charge a neuron membrane capacitance to a prescribed value in the case of a single sodium channel. For a simple case, minimizing the energy of the nonlinear channel conductance provides improved efficiency in terms of stimulator energy as compared to minimizing a squared-integral measure of the stimulation current. This work lays the foundation for expanding this investigation to a full conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley model.

  9. Analysis of Tracking Measuring Method of Focus Cabin of Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope(FAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hui; Zhu, Lichun

    2015-08-01

    FAST (Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope) project is one of the Chinese mega-Science Projects to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. FAST has three outstanding innovation aspects: in the karst depression which is large to host the 500-meter telescope, an active main reflector correcting for spherical aberration on the ground to achieve a full polarization is being built, the light-weight feed focus cabin in which a parallel robot as a secondary adjustable system to move with high precision is driven by cables and servomechanism plus. The part of main reflector which is illuminated by the feed is continually adjusted to fit the paraboloid of revolution in real time when tracking the radio source. How to get high precise real-time feedback data of moving focus cabin’s position when tracking the source is one of the crucial problems for the astronomical observation.At present 24 steady basis pillars for measurement whose position coordinates are already known, have been built in the construction field of FAST. Total stations will be installed on one of those pillars, and prisms will be installed on focus cabin. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of two measuring method: the space distance intersection calculation method and polar measuring method. The space distance intersection calculation method is only using multiple measuring distances between three pillars and prism and known coordinates of pillars to calculate the prism’s coordinates, the polar measurement is using the measuring distance and angles to get the prism’s coordinate.

  10. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cirelli, Marco; Taoso, Marco

    2016-07-25

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by dark matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and dark matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including PLANCK measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  11. Comparison of total electron content measurements made with the ATS-6 radio beacon over the U.S. and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K.; Degenhardt, W.; Hartmann, G. K.; Leitinger, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ATS-6 radio beacon measurements made at three stations in the U.S.A. are compared and contrasted with similar measurements made in Europe the following year at two locations. It is shown that over the U.S.A. the winter plasmaspheric content reaches its maximum near 0300 LT whereas in Europe the maximum occurs near noon. The plasmaspheric content decreases with increase of magnetic activity in both continents. Winter night maxima are observed in ionospheric content in both hemispheres. Marked differences occurred in magnetic storm effects and in the day-to-night ratio of ionospheric electron content.

  12. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Dilepton Decay Channel at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Jayatilaka, Bodhitha A.

    2006-01-01

    The top quark, the most recently discovered quark, is the most massive known fundamental fermion. Precision measurements of its mass, a free parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics, can be used to constrain the mass of the Higgs Boson. In addition, deviations in the mass as measured in different channels can provide possible evidence for new physics. We describe a measurement of the top quark mass in the decay channel with two charged leptons, known as the dilepton channel, using data collected by the CDF II detector from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convolving the leading order matrix element describing q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ → bℓv$\\bar{b}$ℓ'vℓ' with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, we observe 78 candidate events and measure Mt = 164.5 ± 3.9(stat.) ± 3.9(syst.) GeV/c2, the most precise measurement of the top quark mass in this channel to date.

  13. Measurement of Field Aligned Electron and Ion Densities and Ducts from the Whistler and Z Mode Radio Sounding from IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Hazra, S.; Mayank, K.; Reddy, A.; Liu, Y.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent results from the application of whistler mode (WM) and Z mode (ZM) radio sounding experiments from the IMAGE satellite to the magnetospheric plasma diagnostics. A recently developed WM radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 116, A11210, doi:10.1029/2011JA016759, 2011] was applied to 200 cases of WM echoes observed within the plasmasphere to measure field aligned electron density (Ne) and ion densities (NH+, NHe+, NO+) for L~1.6 -4, altitude <5000 km, Kp ~1-7, and F10.7 ~ 72-110 (low solar activity). The measured plasma parameters are in general consistent with the past space borne (e.g. CHAMP, DMSP, Alouette, ISIS, AE) and ground (e.g. ionosonde) measurements, but show significant differences from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM models. We believe our measurements will lead to an improved model of electron and ion densities at <5000 km within the plasmasphere. The WM radio sounding method was applied to a case study of the variation of plasma parameters at L~2 during the development of a major storm, from quiet conditions and subsequent recovery, followed by a moderate and minor storm. Our study showed that relative to the preceding quiet time: (1) There was depletion in electron density, H+, He+ and enhancement in O+ ions leading to increase in O+-H+ transition height; (2) The recovery period of electrons and individual ions was different; (3) A similar trend in the variation of electron density, H+, O+ was observed after the moderate storm and the minor storm but He+ was not affected. Following a ray tracing technique originally developed for whistler mode sounding, we analyzed the fast nonducted and ducted Z mode echoes to obtain field aligned electron density and duct parameters (duct width and enhancement) from the measured dispersion of Z mode echoes. With the help of two case studies, we illustrate that fast Z mode echoes provide measurement of electron density at altitudes <10,000 km and duct width and enhancement within an

  14. The role of helium metastable states in radio-frequency driven helium-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jets: measurement and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, K.; Waskoenig, J.; Sadeghi, N.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He(23S1) atoms were measured line-of-sight integrated along the discharge channel of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in technologically relevant helium-oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. The dependences of the He(23S1) density in the homogeneous-glow-like α-mode plasma with oxygen admixtures up to 1% were investigated. The results are compared with a one-dimensional numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the pronounced electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (in total 20 species and 184 reactions). Very good agreement between measurement and simulation is found. The main formation mechanisms for metastable helium atoms are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  15. The atmosphere of Saturn - An analysis of the Voyager radio occultation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindal, G. F.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 probes' radio links were used to study both the northern and southern latitudes of Saturn during occultation by that planet, yielding electron number density profiles for the ionosphere, and gas refractivity, number density, pressure, temperature, and ammonia abundance data for the troposphere and stratosphere. From the vertical pressure profiles obtained at different latitudes, it is possible to determine the size and shape of Saturn's isobaric surfaces.

  16. Ionizing radiation effects on a 64-channel charge measurement ASIC designed in CMOS 0.35 μm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; Mazza, G.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2008-08-01

    A 64-channel circuit Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for charge measurement has been designed in CMOS 0.35 μm technology and characterized with electrical tests. The ASIC has been conceived to be used as a front-end for dosimetry and beam monitoring detector read-out. For that application, the circuitry is housed at a few centimeters from the irradiated area of the detectors and therefore radiation damages can affect the chip performances. The ASIC has been tested on an X-ray beam. In this paper, the results of the test and an estimate of the expected lifetime of the ASIC in a standard radio-therapeutical treatment environment are presented. An increase of the background current of 2 fA/Gy has been observed at low doses, whilst the gain changes by less than 3% when irradiated up to 15 kGy. Furthermore it has been assessed that, when used as an on-line beam monitor and the annealing effect has been taken into account, the background current increase is ˜440 fA/year.

  17. A Technique for Simultansous Measurement of Circular and Linear Polarization with a Single-Channel Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, S. V.; Breus, V. V.; Kiselev, N. N.; Andronov, I. L.

    We present a technique for simultaneous measurement of circular and linear polarization with the single-channel polarimeter, that is used in Crimean astrophysical observatory for many years. Methods and a computer program for data reduction is described. The algorithm is described, which have been used for photo-polarimetric monitoring of various astronomical objects cataclysmic variables, asteroids, comets.

  18. A revisit to self-excited push pull vacuum tube radio frequency oscillator for ion sources and power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlondo, L. R.; Lalremruata, B.; Punte, L. R. M.; Rebecca, L.; Lalnunthari, J.; Thanga, H. H.

    2016-04-01

    Self-excited push-pull vacuum tube oscillator is one of the most commonly used oscillators in radio frequency (RF)-ion plasma sources for generation of ions using radio frequency. However, in spite of its fundamental role in the process of plasma formation, the working and operational characteristics are the most frequently skip part in the descriptions of RF ion sources in literatures. A more detailed treatment is given in the present work on the RF oscillator alone using twin beam power tetrodes 829B and GI30. The circuit operates at 102 MHz, and the oscillation conditions, stability in frequency, and RF output power are studied and analyzed. A modified form of photometric method and RF peak voltage detection method are employed to study the variation of the oscillator output power with plate voltage. The power curves obtained from these measurements are quadratic in nature and increase with increase in plate voltage. However, the RF output power as measured by photometric methods is always less than the value calculated from peak voltage measurements. This difference is due to the fact that the filament coil of the ordinary light bulb used as load/detector in photometric method is not a perfect inductor. The effect of inductive reactance on power transfer to load was further investigated and a technique is developed to estimate the amount of power correction needed in the photometric measurement result.

  19. A revisit to self-excited push pull vacuum tube radio frequency oscillator for ion sources and power measurements.

    PubMed

    Hlondo, L R; Lalremruata, B; Punte, L R M; Rebecca, L; Lalnunthari, J; Thanga, H H

    2016-04-01

    Self-excited push-pull vacuum tube oscillator is one of the most commonly used oscillators in radio frequency (RF)-ion plasma sources for generation of ions using radio frequency. However, in spite of its fundamental role in the process of plasma formation, the working and operational characteristics are the most frequently skip part in the descriptions of RF ion sources in literatures. A more detailed treatment is given in the present work on the RF oscillator alone using twin beam power tetrodes 829B and GI30. The circuit operates at 102 MHz, and the oscillation conditions, stability in frequency, and RF output power are studied and analyzed. A modified form of photometric method and RF peak voltage detection method are employed to study the variation of the oscillator output power with plate voltage. The power curves obtained from these measurements are quadratic in nature and increase with increase in plate voltage. However, the RF output power as measured by photometric methods is always less than the value calculated from peak voltage measurements. This difference is due to the fact that the filament coil of the ordinary light bulb used as load/detector in photometric method is not a perfect inductor. The effect of inductive reactance on power transfer to load was further investigated and a technique is developed to estimate the amount of power correction needed in the photometric measurement result.

  20. Measurements on the satellite-mobile channel at L and S bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H.; Gardiner, J. G.; Barton, S. K.

    An experiment is described in which measurements are made on the satellite-mobile channel at L and S bands. A light aircraft carrying a c.w. beacon is flown at elevation angles of 40, 60 and 80 degrees to a mobile receiver. The signal strength at the mobile is recorded in open, urban, suburban and tree shadowed environments. This data is then analyzed to produce statistics for the channel with respect to frequency, elevation angle, and environment. Results are presented together with a brief discussion, suggested interpretation, and conclusion.

  1. Radio-frequency measurements of UNiX compounds (X= Al, Ga, Ge) in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Charles H; Mcdonald, David R; Zapf, Vivien; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Lacerda, Alex H; Adak, Sourav; Karunakar, Kothapalli; Nakotte, Heinrich; Chang, S; Alsmadi, A M; Alyones, S

    2009-01-01

    We performed radio-frequency (RF) skin-depth measurements of antiferromagnetic UNiX compounds (X=Al, Ga, Ge) in magnetic fields up to 60 T and at temperatures between 1.4 to {approx}60 K. Magnetic fields are applied along different crystallographic directions and RF penetration-depth was measured using a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) circuit. The sample is coupled to the inductive element of a TDO resonant tank circuit, and the shift in the resonant frequency {Delta}f of the circuit is measured. The UNiX compounds exhibit field-induced magnetic transitions at low temperatures, and those transitions are accompanied by a drastic change in {Delta}f. The results of our skin-depth measurements were compared with previously published B-T phase diagrams for these three compounds.

  2. Gain and Polarization Properties of a Large Radio Telescope from Calculation and Measurement: The John A. Galt Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X.; Landecker, T. L.; Robishaw, T.; Gray, A. D.; Douglas, K. A.; Wolleben, M.

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of the brightness temperature of extended radio emission demands knowledge of the gain (or aperture efficiency) of the telescope and measurement of the polarized component of the emission requires correction for the conversion of unpolarized emission from sky and ground to apparently polarized signal. Radiation properties of the John A. Galt Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory were studied through analysis and measurement in order to provide absolute calibration of a survey of polarized emission from the entire northern sky from 1280 to 1750 MHz, and to understand the polarization performance of the telescope. Electromagnetic simulation packages CST and GRASP-10 were used to compute complete radiation patterns of the telescope in all Stokes parameters, and thereby to establish gain and aperture efficiency. Aperture efficiency was also evaluated using geometrical optics and ray tracing analysis and was measured based on the known flux density of Cyg A. Measured aperture efficiency varied smoothly with frequency between values of 0.49 and 0.54; GRASP-10 yielded values 6.5% higher but with closely similar variation with frequency. Overall error across the frequency band is 3%, but values at any two frequencies are relatively correct to ∼1%. Dominant influences on aperture efficiency are the illumination taper of the feed radiation pattern and the shadowing of the reflector from the feed by the feed-support struts. A model of emission from the ground was developed based on measurements and on empirical data obtained from remote sensing of the Earth from satellite-borne telescopes. This model was convolved with the computed antenna response to estimate conversion of ground emission into spurious polarized signal. The computed spurious signal is comparable to measured values, but is not accurate enough to be used to correct observations. A simpler model, in which the ground is considered as an unpolarized emitter with a brightness

  3. Transcontinental baselines and the rotation of the earth measured by radio interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Robertson, D. S.; Knight, C. A.; Counselman, C. C., III; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Lippincott, S.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.; Niell, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    Nine separate very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, carried out in 1972 and 1973 with radio telescopes 3900 kilometers apart, yielded values for the baseline length with an rms deviation about the mean of less than 20 centimeters. The corresponding fractional spread is about five parts in 100,000,000. Changes in universal time and in polar motion were also determined accurately from these data. The rms scatter of these results with respect to those based on optical methods was 2.9 msec and 1.3 m, respectively. Solid-earth tides were apparently detected, but no useful estimate of their amplitude was extracted.

  4. Solar gravitational deflection of radio waves measured by very-long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Kent, S. M.; Knight, C. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Clark, T. A.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Utilizing a four-antenna technique, simultaneous observations were made, at each end of an 845-km baseline, of the radio sources 3C279 and 3C273B, which are 10 deg apart in the sky. Differences in interferometric phases at 3.7-cm wavelength monitored near the time of the 1972 occultation of 3C279 by the sun, yielded a gravitational deflection of 0.99 plus or minus 0.03 times the value predicted by general relativity, corresponding to gamma = 0.98 plus or minus 0.06 (standard error).

  5. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  6. Ultra-compact 32-channel system for time-correlated single-photon counting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioli, S.; Cuccato, A.; Miari, L.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2013-05-01

    Modern Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting applications require to detect spectral and temporal fluorescence data simultaneously and from different areas of the analyzed sample. These rising quests have led the development of multichannel systems able to perform high count rate and high performance analysis. In this work we describe a new 32-channel TCSPC system designed to be used in modern setups. The presented module consists of four independent 8-channel TCSPC boards, each of them including two 4-channel Time-Amplitude Converter arrays. These TAC arrays are built-in 0.35 μm Si-Ge BiCMOS technology and are characterized by low crosstalk, high resolution, high conversion rate and variable full-scale range. The 8-channel TCSPC board implements an 8-channel ADC to sample the TAC outputs, an FPGA to record and organize the measurement results and a USB 2.0 interface to enable real-time data transmission to and from an external PC. Experimental results demonstrate that the acquisition system ensures high performance TCSPC measurements, in particular: high conversion rate (5 MHz), good time resolution (down to 30 psFWHM with the full scale range set to 11 ns) and low differential non-linearity (rms value lower than 0.15% of the time bin width). We design the module to be very compact and, thanks to the reduced dimensions of the 8-channel TCSPC board (95×40 mm), the whole system can be enclosed in a small aluminum case (160×125×30 mm).

  7. Polarized foreground removal at low radio frequencies using rotation measure synthesis: uncovering the signature of hydrogen reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Paul M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2011-11-01

    Measurement of redshifted 21-cm emission from neutral hydrogen promises to be the most effective method for studying the reionization history of hydrogen and, indirectly, the first galaxies. These studies will be limited not by raw sensitivity to the signal, but rather, by bright foreground radiation from Galactic and extragalactic radio sources and the Galactic continuum. In addition, leakage due to gain errors and non-ideal feeds conspire to further contaminate low-frequency radio observations. This leakage leads to a portion of the complex linear polarization signal finding its way into Stokes I, and inhibits the detection of the non-polarized cosmological signal from the epoch of reionization. In this work, we show that rotation measure synthesis can be used to recover the signature of cosmic hydrogen reionization in the presence of contamination by polarized foregrounds. To achieve this, we apply the rotation measure synthesis technique to the Stokes I component of a synthetic data cube containing Galactic foreground emission, the effect of instrumental polarization leakage and redshifted 21-cm emission by neutral hydrogen from the epoch of reionization. This produces an effective Stokes I Faraday dispersion function for each line of sight, from which instrumental polarization leakage can be fitted and subtracted. Our results show that it is possible to recover the signature of reionization in its late stages (z≈ 7) by way of the 21-cm power spectrum, as well as through tomographic imaging of ionized cavities in the intergalactic medium.

  8. Interpretation of measured data and the resolution analysis of the RTP 4-channel pulsed radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlo, Pavol

    1993-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of a four-channel pulsed radar for a tokamak; the radar's accuracies are dependent on time-of-flight measurements and number of sampling frequencies. Because the configuration is already established, emphasis is here placed on the interpretation of measured data and overall error minimization. The central density considered is above the critical density of all four frequencies, but not so high as to restrict measurements to the edge of the plasma. The overall error in estimating the reflection point position is obtained by balancing the inversion error and the time-measurement error.

  9. THE RADIO-2 mm SPECTRAL INDEX OF THE CRAB NEBULA MEASURED WITH GISMO

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, R. G.; George, J. V.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Maher, S. F.; Moseley, S. H.; Sharp, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Irwin, K. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, T. M.; Kovacs, A.; Mason, B. S.; Navarro, S.; Sievers, A.; Sievers, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    We present results of 2 mm observations of the Crab Nebula, obtained using the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) bolometer camera on the IRAM 30 m telescope. Additional 3.3 mm observations with the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope are also presented. The integrated 2 mm flux density of the Crab Nebula provides no evidence for the emergence of a second synchrotron component that has been proposed. It is consistent with the radio power-law spectrum, extrapolated up to a break frequency of log ({nu}{sub b}[GHz]) = 2.84 {+-} 0.29 or {nu}{sub b} = 695{sup +651}{sub -336} GHz. The Crab Nebula is well resolved by the {approx}16.''7 beam (FWHM) of GISMO. Comparison to radio data at comparable spatial resolution enables us to confirm significant spatial variation of the spectral index between 21 cm and 2 mm. The main effect is a spectral flattening in the inner region of the Crab Nebula, correlated with the toroidal structure at the center of the nebula that is prominent in the near-IR through X-ray regime.

  10. The BepiColombo mission to Mercury and the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) role in the Radio Science Experiments measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D. M.; Lucente, M.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Santoli, F.; Argada, A.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Magnafico, C.

    2011-10-01

    The BepiColombo mission to Mercury [1, 10] of the European Space Agency (ESA) aims to perform a set of experiments, the so called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), that will be devoted to the study of the gravity field and rotational state of Mercury [8] as well as to verify the theory of general relativity to an unprecedented level of accuracy [9]. One of the key ingredients in order to reach the very ambitious objectives of this mission, in the context of the RSE, is represented by the measurements of the onboard accelerometer [5, 2]. The Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) has been selected by ESA to measure and then allow to remove, a posteriori, the disturbing nongravitational accelerations acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) surface. This paper is devoted to describe the accelerometer characteristics and performance and to introduce some of the experimental procedures in order to calibrate its measurements on ground and during the nominal phase of the mission.

  11. Wireless Charge Based Capacitance Measurement Circuits with On-Chip Spiral Inductor for Radio Frequency Identification Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boram; Uno, Shigeyasu; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2012-04-01

    A wireless measuring system of charge based capacitance measurement (CBCM) circuit has been designed and demonstrated for biomedical applications. The radio frequency identification (RFID) chip that includes on-chip spiral inductor tag antenna, and RFID circuit, and CBCM sensor chip are fabricated within standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The capacitance change caused by DNA detection can be converted into the voltage output using capacitance-to-voltage conversion circuit. To confirm the transmission of the capacitance, the poly-capacitor of fixed capacitance and on-chip spiral inductor tag antenna were fabricated using 1.2 µm, 2-metal, 2-poly CMOS technology. As a result of measurement, three different capacitances (34, 141, 564 fF) were detected wirelessly.

  12. System integration and radiation pattern measurements of a phased array antenna employing an integrated photonic beamformer for radio astronomy applications.

    PubMed

    Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Zhuang, Leimeng; Marpaung, David; Khan, Muhammad Rezaul; Maat, Peter; Dijkstra, Klaas; Leinse, Arne; Hoekman, Marcel; Heideman, René

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we describe the system integration and the experimental demonstration of a photonically beamformed four-element receiving array antenna for radio astronomy applications. To our knowledge, the work described here is the first demonstration of the squint-free, continuously tunable beamsteering capability offered by an integrated photonic beamformer based on optical ring resonator true-time-delay units, with measured radiation patterns. The integrated beamformer is realized in a low loss, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible optical waveguide technology. The measurements show a wideband, continuous beamsteering operation over a steering angle of 23.5 degrees and an instantaneous bandwidth of 500 MHz limited only by the measurement setup.

  13. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  14. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurement in wavy channels with flow disturbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, S.; Veronesi, R.; Hryniewicz, E.V.

    1999-07-01

    In the current work, the transient method was employed to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient for a 6 in. x 3/8 in. x 12 in. (15.24cm x .9525cm x 30.48cm) Plexiglas {reg_sign} wavy channel with and without flow disturbers. A short duration transient test was performed to measure the heat transfer coefficient by introducing heated air over test specimen that had been sprayed with calibrated thermochromic liquid crystals. This technique allowed the experimenter to observe the temperature changes using a video camera. because a Plexiglas surface has a low thermal diffusivity, a one-dimensional assumption is a reasonable approximation because the surface temperature response is limited to a thin layer near the surface and lateral conduction is small. The heat transfer coefficient using the transient technique is then determined from the response of the surface temperature to a step change in the local temperature. Using this method, the axial variation in the heat transfer coefficient for Reynolds numbers in the laminar (1100) and turbulent region (2900) were obtained. These Reynolds numbers were based on the hydraulic diameter at the inlet of the wavy channel. Also, in this investigation, the region of greatest heat transfer and the pressure drop were both experimentally and analytically determined and the friction factor across an in-phase corrugated wall channel (wavy channel) at Reynolds numbers of 1100 and 2900 were obtained. A manometer and a pressure transducer were employed to measure pressure drop across the channel. The effect of flow disturbers mounted on each peak, alternate peaks and the first six peaks of a twelve-peak channel were also investigated. For all cases, the pressure drop and friction factor were shown to moderately increase with rib placement in the test section when compared to the results obtained from a similar smooth wavy channel without ribs. Additionally, for all cases, the friction factor also decreased with an increase in the

  15. High fidelity wireless network evaluation for heterogeneous cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Sagduyu, Yalin; Yackoski, Justin; Azimi-Sadjadi, Babak; Li, Jason; Levy, Renato; Melodia, Tammaso

    2012-06-01

    We present a high fidelity cognitive radio (CR) network emulation platform for wireless system tests, measure- ments, and validation. This versatile platform provides the configurable functionalities to control and repeat realistic physical channel effects in integrated space, air, and ground networks. We combine the advantages of scalable simulation environment with reliable hardware performance for high fidelity and repeatable evaluation of heterogeneous CR networks. This approach extends CR design only at device (software-defined-radio) or lower-level protocol (dynamic spectrum access) level to end-to-end cognitive networking, and facilitates low-cost deployment, development, and experimentation of new wireless network protocols and applications on frequency- agile programmable radios. Going beyond the channel emulator paradigm for point-to-point communications, we can support simultaneous transmissions by network-level emulation that allows realistic physical-layer inter- actions between diverse user classes, including secondary users, primary users, and adversarial jammers in CR networks. In particular, we can replay field tests in a lab environment with real radios perceiving and learning the dynamic environment thereby adapting for end-to-end goals over distributed spectrum coordination channels that replace the common control channel as a single point of failure. CR networks offer several dimensions of tunable actions including channel, power, rate, and route selection. The proposed network evaluation platform is fully programmable and can reliably evaluate the necessary cross-layer design solutions with configurable op- timization space by leveraging the hardware experiments to represent the realistic effects of physical channel, topology, mobility, and jamming on spectrum agility, situational awareness, and network resiliency. We also provide the flexibility to scale up the test environment by introducing virtual radios and establishing seamless signal

  16. Assessing the performance of multi-purpose channel management measures at increasing scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Addy, Steve

    2016-04-01

    In addition to hydroclimatic drivers, sediment deposition from high energy river systems can reduce channel conveyance capacity and lead to significant increases in flood risk. There is an increasing recognition that we need to work with the interplay of natural hydrological and morphological processes in order to attenuate flood flows and manage sediment (both coarse and fine). This typically includes both catchment (e.g. woodland planting, wetlands) and river (e.g. wood placement, floodplain reconnection) restoration approaches. The aim of this work was to assess at which scales channel management measures (notably wood placement and flood embankment removal) are most appropriate for flood and sediment management in high energy upland river systems. We present research findings from two densely instrumented research sites in Scotland which regularly experience flood events and have associated coarse sediment problems. We assessed the performance of a range of novel trial measures for three different scales: wooded flow restrictors and gully tree planting at the small scale (<1 km2), floodplain tree planting and engineered log jams at the intermediate scale (5-60 km2), and flood embankment lowering at the large scale (350 km2). Our results suggest that at the smallest scale, care is needed in the installation of flow restrictors. It was found for some restrictors that vertical erosion can occur if the tributary channel bed is disturbed. Preliminary model evidence suggested they have a very limited impact on channel discharge and flood peak delay owing to the small storage areas behind the structures. At intermediate scales, the ability to trap sediment by engineered log jams was limited. Of the 45 engineered log jams installed, around half created a small geomorphic response and only 5 captured a significant amount of coarse material (during one large flood event). As scale increases, the chance of damage or loss of wood placement is greatest. Monitoring

  17. Langmuir Probe Measurements of Capacitive Radio Frequency Discharge for Mixture Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanisli, Murat; Sahin, Neslihan; Demir, Suleyman

    2016-10-01

    Radio frequency discharges at low pressure have been used for very much applications, but their properties have not well-known for plasma diagnostics. In this study, mixture discharges are obtained at the quartz glass reactor for different powers and flow rates under the laboratory conditions, and then the optical properties of gas discharges are examined by means of Langmuir probe. When the flow rates of gases and power values are changed, it can be investigated that how the plasma parameters change. Debye length is one of the important plasma parameters. Thus, the relationship between the mixture amount of two different gases and Debye length is determined from Langmuir probe data. The graphs obtained by using these data will give information about generating the discharge of mixture gases, in detail. Therefore, the results may be the useful reference for future works of industrial applications.

  18. Monitoring the width of the tropical belt with GPS radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Chi O.; Hajj, Amanda J.

    2013-12-01

    GPS radio occultation data collected over the period 2002-2011 were analyzed to examine the possible expansion of the tropical belt due to climate change. By the use of high vertical-resolution temperature profiles, monthly averages of the lapse rate tropopause were obtained and used to derive a decade-long time series of the tropical edge latitude (TEL) in each hemisphere and its linear trends. Two different TEL criteria were examined. Our analysis shows that a statistically significant widening trend of ≈1° latitude/decade was found in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) by either criterion. This contrasts strongly with the Southern Hemisphere (SH), where no statistically significant trends were found. Comparison with ECMWF reanalysis shows good agreement, but the agreement is worse over SH. Substantial differences in seasonal trends were found between NH and SH, with the latter showing strong widening in the austral summer countered by contraction over the austral winter and spring.

  19. Measurement of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in the All-Jets Decay Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tong; Ito, A. S.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Moromisato, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Wu, Z.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoshikawa, C.

    1999-09-01

    We present a measurement of tt¯ production in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV from 110 pb-1 of data collected in the all-jets decay channel with the D0 detector at Fermilab. A neural network analysis yields a cross section of 7.1+/-2.8\\(stat\\)+/-1.5\\(syst\\) pb at a top quark mass \\(mt\\) of 172.1 GeV/c2. Using previous D0 measurements from dilepton and single lepton channels, the combined D0 result for the tt¯ production cross section is 5.9+/-1.2\\(stat\\)+/-1.1\\(syst\\) pb for mt = 172.1 GeV/c2.

  20. Measurements of mixed convective heat transfer to low temperature helium in a horizontal channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeroshenko, V. M.; Kuznetsov, Y. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Hendricks, R. C.; Daney, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A horizontal 2.85 m long, 19 mm i.d. stainless steel heated circular channel was employed to measure coefficients of heat transfer to low temperature helium flow. Experimental parameters range from 6.5 to 15 K, from 0.12 to 0.3 MPa at heat fluxes up to 1000 W/m square and Reynolds numbers from 9,000 to 20,000. A significantly nonuniform distribution of heat transfer coefficients over the tube periphery is observed. Difference between temperatures on the upper and lower surfaces of the stainless steel channel wall was found to reach 9 K. It was noted that the highest temperature on the wall outer surface is displaced from its uppermost point. Measurements of local flow temperatures revealed vortical structure of the flow. The displacement of the point with the highest temperature is attributable to the effect of vortices. The relationships for calculating local and averaged coefficients of heat transfer are proposed.

  1. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is usedmore » to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.« less

  2. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-13

    Our first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. Furthermore, a differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44.

  3. Measurement of top quark polarisation in t-channel single top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.

    2016-04-01

    A first measurement of the top quark spin asymmetry, sensitive to the top quark polarisation, in t-channel single top quark production is presented. It is based on a sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. A high-purity sample of t-channel single top quark events with an isolated muon is selected. Signal and background components are estimated using a fit to data. A differential cross section measurement, corrected for detector effects, of an angular observable sensitive to the top quark polarisation is performed. The differential distribution is used to extract a top quark spin asymmetry of 0.26 ± 0.03(stat) ± 0.10(syst), which is compatible with a p-value of 4.6% with the standard model prediction of 0.44. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Isothermal mass flow measurements in microfabricated rectangular channels over a very wide Knudsen range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John M.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Brown, Jason R.; Hochrein, James M.; Thornberg, Steven M.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Gallis, Michael A.; Torczynski, John R.; Khraishi, Tariq; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2014-05-01

    Measurement and modeling of gas flows in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scale channels are relevant to the fundamentals of rarefied gas dynamics (RGD) and the practical design of MEMS-based flow systems and micropumps. We describe techniques for building robust, leak-free, rectangular microchannels which are relevant to micro- and nanofluidic devices, while the channels themselves are useful for fundamental RGD studies. For the first time, we report the isothermal steady flow of helium (He) gas through these channels from the continuum to the free-molecular regime in the unprecedented Knudsen range of 0.03-1000. On the high end, our value is 20-fold larger than values previously reported by Ewart et al (2007 J. Fluid Mech. 584 337-56). We accomplished this through a dual-tank accumulation technique which enabled the monitoring of very low flow rates, below 10-14 kg s-1. The devices were prebaked under vacuum for 24 h at 100 °C in order to reduce outgassing and attain high Kn. We devised fabrication methods for controlled-depth micro-gap channels using silicon for both channel ceiling and floor, thereby allowing direct comparisons to models which utilize this simplifying assumption. We evaluated the results against a closed-form expression that accurately reproduces the continuum, slip, transition, and free-molecular regimes developed partly by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The observed data were in good agreement with the expression. For Kn > ˜100, we observed minor deviations between modeled and experimental flow values. Our fabrication processes and experimental data are useful to fundamental RGD studies and future MEMS microflow devices with respect to extremely low-flow measurements, model validation, and predicting optimal designs.

  5. Automatic correction of static characteristics of measurement channel of digital oscillograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkutov, A. M.; Matyukhin, Y. D.

    1984-09-01

    The measurement channel of a digital oscillograph is examined and a method is proposed for correcting its static characteristic. As a mathematical model of the static characteristic it is proposed to use a piecewise polynomial interpolant based on a Newton polynomial and a three point cubic spline. The definition of the three point cubic spline and a formula for the residual member (without derivation) are given. An example is cited in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the correction.

  6. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, from Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; LeVine, D. M.; Idone, V. P.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions of six rocket-triggered lightning channels are derived from stereo photographs. These reconstructed channels are used to infer the behavior of the current in return strokes above the ground from current waveforms measured at the channel base and electric-field-change waveforms measured at a range of 5.2 kilometers for 24 return strokes in these channels. Streak photographs of 14 of the same strokes are analyzed to determine the rise times, propagation speeds, and amplitudes of relative light intensity for comparison with the electrical inferences. Results include the following: 1) The fine structure of the field-change waveforms that were radiated by these subsequent return strokes can be explained, in large part, by channel geometry. 2) The average 10 - 90% rise time of the stroke current increased by about a factor of seven in our sample, from an observed 0.31 plus or minus 0.17 microseconds at the surface to an inferred 2.2 plus or minus 0.5 microcseconds at 1 kilometer path length above the surface. 3) The three-dimensional propagation speed of the current front averaged 1.80 plus or minus 0.24 X 10(exp 8) meters per second over channel lengths typically greater than 1 kilometer. 4) Assuming that the measured current was entirely due to the return stroke forced an unreasonably large and abrupt reduction in inferred current amplitude over the first few tens of meters above the surface, especially in cases when the leader was bright relative to its stroke. Therefore, a significant fraction of the current at the surface was probably due to the leader, at least in such cases. 5) Peak return-stroke currents decreased by approximately 37 plus or minus 12% from 100 meters to 1 kilometer of path length above the surface. Because of uncertainty about how to partition the measured current between leader and return stroke, we are unable to infer the variation of current amplitude near the ground.

  7. The nighttime ionosphere of Mars from Mars-4 and Mars-5 radio occultation dual-frequency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savich, N. A.; Samovol, V. A.; Vasilyev, M. B.; Vyshlov, A. S.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Sidorenko, A. I.; Shtern, D. Y.

    1976-01-01

    Dual frequency radio sounding of the Martian nighttime ionosphere was carried out during the exits from behind the planet of the Mars-4 spacecraft on February 2, 1974 and the Mars-5 spacecraft on February 18, 1974. In these experiments, the spacecraft transmitter emitted two coherent monochromatic signals in decimeter and centimeter wavelength ranges. At the Earth receiving station, the reduced phase difference (or frequencies) of these signals was measured. The nighttime ionosphere of Mars measured in both cases had a peak electron density of approximately 5 X 1,000/cu cm at an altitude of 110 to 130 km. At the times of spacecraft exit, the solar zenith angles at the point of occultation were 127 deg and 106 deg, respectively. The height profiles of electron concentration were obtained assuming spherical symmetry of the Martian ionosphere.

  8. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  9. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  10. Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kohata, Daisuke; Shao, Jun; Kudo, Nobuki; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2000-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

  11. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  12. Measuring flood discharge in unstable stream channels using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, K.R.; Costa, J.E.; Placzek, G.

    1997-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to test the ability of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to measure stream-channel cross sections at high flows without the necessity of placing instruments in the water. Experiments were conducted at four U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations in southwest Washington State. With the GPR antenna suspended above the water surface from a bridge or cableway, traverses were made across stream channels to collect radar profile plots of the streambed. Subsequent measurements of water depth were made using conventional depth-measuring equipment (weight and tape) and were used to calculate radar signal velocities. Other streamflow-parameter data were collected to examine their relation to radar signal velocity and to claritv of streambed definition. These initial tests indicate that GPR is capable of producing a reasonably accurate (??20%) stream-channel profile and discharge far more quickly than conventional stream-gaging procedures, while avoiding the problems and hazards associated with placing instruments in the water.

  13. Precipitation measurements with GNSS polarimetric Radio Occultations: Status of the ROHP-PAZ mission and anticipated retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padullés, Ramon; Cardellach, Estel; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Tomás, Sergio; Turk, F. Joseph; Ao, Chi O.; Rius, Toni; Oliveras, Santi

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming ROHP-PAZ (Radio Occultations and Heavy Precipitation experiment aboard the spanish PAZ satellite) mission aims to detect, for the first time, precipitation using Global Navigation Satellite System Radio Occultations (GNSS-RO). The electromagnetic signals coming from the GNSS satellites travel tangentially through the atmosphere and will be collected in the PAZ Low Earth Orbiter at two polarizations (vertical and horizontal). This sounding-like technique of the atmosphere will measure all the atmospheric phenomena that are inducing depolarization effects, in addition to all the thermodynamic profiles that standard RO are nowadays providing. The main contributors to depolarization in the troposphere are known to be the hydrometeors, both rain drops from heavy precipitation events and horizontally oriented ice particles in the top of clouds. Their effects on the GNSS signals were predicted in Cardellach et. al. 2015 (IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens.), and measured in the ROHP-PAZ field campaign Padullés et. al. 2016 (Atmos. Chem. Phys.). Prior to the launch, a complete characterization of all the possible effects, including hydrometeors but also taking into account other elements was needed. To do so, actual data from the COSMIC - FORMOSAT 3 mission (Radio Occultation events) have been collocated with the TRMM, GPM and CloudSat missions (precipitation and clouds missions). Thousands of events have been analyzed, in terms of SNR and phase delays. For the same events, the effect of hydrometeors has been simulated as well as the most known ionospheric effects, such as Faraday Rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects. And finally, the predicted noise, actual measurements of the antenna pattern and some tolerance in the purity of the emitted signal have been included. This has resulted in an extensive data base that is key in the understanding of the upcoming actual data, as well as for the characterization of all the unpredicted effects. We will discuss here the

  14. Radio determination satellite service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1990-07-01

    The capabilities and measured performance of a geosynchronous satellite-based service called the radio determination satellite service (RDSS), which operates at radio frequencies allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and is licensed in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are discussed. Plans for both improvement in capability and expansion to nearly global coverage are described. Since RDSS can also provide radio navigation, some comparisons of this service with the Global Positioning System (GPS) are made.

  15. Exploiting artificial intelligence for in-situ analysis of high-resolution radio emission measurements on a CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isham, Brett; Bergman, Jan; Krause, Linda; Rincon-Charris, Amilcar; Bruhn, Fredrik; Funk, Peter; Stramkals, Arturs

    2016-07-01

    CubeSat missions are intentionally constrained by the limitations of their small platform. Mission payloads designed for low volume, mass, and power, may however be disproportionally limited by available telemetry allocations. In many cases, it is the data delivered to the ground which determines the value of the mission. However, transmitting more data does not necessarily guarantee high value, since the value also depends on data quality. By exploiting fast on-board computing and efficient artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for analysis and data selection, the usage of the telemetry link can be optimized and value added to the mission. This concept is being implemented on the Puerto Rico CubeSat, which will make measurements of ambient ionospheric radio waves and ion irregularities and turbulence. Principle project goals include providing aerospace and systems engineering experiences to students. Science objectives include the study of natural space plasma processes to aid in better understanding of space weather and the Sun to Earth connection, and in-situ diagnostics of ionospheric modification experiments using high-power ground-based radio transmitters. We hope that this project might point the way to the productive use of AI in space and other remote, low-data-bandwidth environments.

  16. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  17. Measurement of two dimensional refractive index profiles of channel waveguides using an interferometric technique.

    PubMed

    Oven, R

    2009-10-20

    Two dimensional refractive index profiles of ion exchanged channel waveguides in glass have been measured using an interferometric method. In order to obtain depth data, a shallow bevel is produced in the glass by polishing. A regularization algorithm for the extraction of the phase data from the interferometer image is presented. The method is applied to waveguides formed by the electric field assisted diffusion of Cu+ ions into a borosilicate glass. The index change obtained from the interferometer is in good agreement with that obtained from measurements on planar waveguides.

  18. Measurement of bovine body and scrotal temperature using implanted temperature sensitive radio transmitters, data loggers and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Wallage, A L; Gaughan, J B; Lisle, A T; Beard, L; Collins, C W; Johnston, S D

    2017-03-23

    Synchronous and continuous measurement of body (BT) and scrotal temperature (ST) without adverse welfare or behavioural interference is essential for understanding thermoregulation of the bull testis. This study compared three technologies for their efficacy for long-term measurement of the relationship between BT and ST by means of (1) temperature sensitive radio transmitters (RT), (2) data loggers (DL) and (3) infrared imaging (IRI). After an initial pilot study on two bulls to establish a surgical protocol, RTs and DLs were implanted into the flank and mid-scrotum of six Wagyu bulls for between 29 and 49 days. RT frequencies were scanned every 15 min, whilst DLs logged every 30 min. Infrared imaging of the body (flank) and scrotum of each bull was recorded hourly for one 24-h period and compared to RT and DL data. After a series of subsequent heat stress studies, bulls were castrated and testicular tissue samples processed for evidence of histopathology. Radio transmitters were less reliable than DLs; RTs lost >11 % of data, whilst 11 of the 12 DLs had 0 % data loss. IRI was only interpretable in 35.8 % of images recorded. Pearson correlations between DL and RT were strong for both BT (r > 0.94, P < 0.001) and ST (r > 0.80, P < 0.001). Surgery produced temporary minor inflammation and scrotal hematoma in two animals post-surgery. Whilst scar tissue was observed at all surgical sutured sites when bulls were castrated, there was no evidence of testicular adhesion and normal active spermatogenesis was observed in six of the eight implanted testicles. There was no significant correlation of IRI with either DL or RT. We conclude that DLs provided to be a reliable continuous source of data for synchronous measurement of BT and ST.

  19. Least-squares harmonic estimation of the tropopause parameters using GPS radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Sam Khaniani, Ali; Masoumi, Salim; Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    In order to investigate temporal variations of the tropopause parameters, Least-Squares Harmonic Estimation (LS-HE) is applied to the time series of the tropopause temperatures and heights derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPS RO) atmospheric profiles of CHAMP, GRACE and COSMIC missions from January 2006 until May 2010 in different regions of Iran. By applying the univariate LS-HE to the completely unevenly spaced time series of the tropopause temperatures and heights, annual and diurnal components are detected together with their higher harmonics. The multivariate LS-HE estimates the main periodic signals, particularly diurnal and semidiurnal cycles, more clearly than the univariate LS-HE. Mixing in the values of the tropopause height and temperature is seen to occur in winter at lower latitudes (around 30°) as a result of subtropical jet, and in summer at higher latitudes (36°-42°) as an effect of subtropical high. A bimodal pattern is observed in the frequency histograms of the tropopause heights, in which the primary modes for the southern and northern parts of Iran correspond to subtropical and extratropical heights, respectively.

  20. Effect of Ducting on Radio Occultation Measurements: An Assessment Based on High-Resolution Radiosonde Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ao, C. O

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of elevated ducts in the lower atmosphere has an adverse effect on the inversion of GPS radio occultation data. The problem arises because the microwave refractivity within and below an elevated duct is no longer uniquely determined by the bending angle profile. Applying Abel inversion without a priori knowledge of the duct will introduce a negative bias in the retrieved refractivity profile within and below the duct. In this work, high vertical resolution radiosonde data are used to give a quantitative assessment of the characteristics and effects of ducts, including their frequency of occurrences, heights, and thicknesses at different latitudes and seasons. The negative bias from the Abel-retrieved refractivity profiles resulting from these ducts is also computed. The results give a strong indication that ducting in the lower troposphere is a frequent phenomenon over the tropics and midlatitudes. The ducts are shown to be predominantly caused by sharp changes in the vertical structure of water vapor. The majority of the ducts are found to be below 2 km, with a median duct layer thickness of about 100 m. The negative refractivity bias is shown to be largest below 2 km, with a median value of about 0.5-1% in the tropics and 0.2-0.5% in midlatitudes. The bias is about a factor of 2-3 smaller between 2 to 3 km and is negligible above 4 km.

  1. An intercomparison technique for measuring thermal attachment cross sections and rate constants in distinct final channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alajajian, S. H.; Chutjian, A.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique is introduced for comparing negative-ion signal rates in which a common ion is produced by dissociative attachment in a series of molecules. Measurements are carried out at electron energies less than 100 MeV and at resolutions of 6-8 MeV (FWHM). The technique is demonstrated by detection of the Cl(-) signal in CFCl3, CCl4, CF2Cl2, 1,1,2-C2Cl3F3, 1,1,1-C2Cl3F3 and C2Cl4. Measurements for 1,1,1-C2Cl3F3 show that there is a significant open channel, other than Cl(-) formation, which accounts for about 60 percent of negative-ion formation in thermal-multiple-collision (swarm) experiments. Channel cross sections and rate constants are given for the process Cl(-)/1,1,1-Cl2Cl3F3, as well as in C2Cl4, for the separate channels Cl(-)/C2Cl4 and C2Cl4(-)/C2Cl4.

  2. Apparatus for measuring pressure-driven transport through channels at high Knudsen numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakitsiou, S.; Holst, B.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The pressure-driven gas flow through micro- and nano-porous structures is particularly interesting for innovative technologies such as microelectromechanical and nano-mechanical-electrical systems. The classical continuum assumption breaks down for rarefied flow through channels with a characteristic dimension comparable to the mean free path of the gas. Theories based on molecular interactions have been formulated to predict the flow at high Knudsen numbers. Measuring rarefied gas flow experimentally is a challenge since only a few studies have been able to determine flowrates in the molecular flow regime. Here we present the design of an experimental apparatus, which can be used to measure the flow of gases through nano- and microscale channels in the flow regimes where molecular effects are critical. The equations used to design the apparatus are given, focusing on the slip and transition flow regimes (together sometimes called "Intermediate flow regime"). A channel with a diameter of 325 μm ± 5μm and a length of 2 mm was tested experimentally with the apparatus for a wide range of Knudsen numbers (10-2 < Kn < 1 × 105) demonstrating its suitability through the slip and transition regime (2.23 × 10-2 < Kn < 2.26).

  3. Phase distribution measurements in narrow rectangular channels using image-processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.L.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1992-06-01

    Phase distribution of air-water flow in a narrow rectangular channel is examined using image-processing techniques. Ink is added to the water, and clear channel walls were used to allow high-speed, still photographs and video tape to be taken of the air-water flow field. Flow field images are digitized and stored in a Macintosh IIci computer using a frame grabber board. Local grey levels are related to liquid thickness in the flow channel using a calibration fixture. Image-processing shareware is used to calculate the spatially averaged liquid thickness from the image of the flow field. Time-averaged spatial liquid distributions are calculated using image calculation algorithms. The spatially averaged liquid distribution is calculated from the time-averaged spatial liquid distribution to formulate the combined temporally and spatially averaged liquid fraction values. The temporally and spatially averaged liquid fractions measured using this technique compare well to those predicted from pressure gradient measurements at zero superficial liquid velocity. 11 refs.

  4. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  5. Direct determination of the thickness of stratospheric layers from single-channel satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The direct use of measured radiances for determining the thickness of stratospheric layers is investigated. Layers based at 100-10 mb, with upper boundaries at 10-0.5 mb, are investigated using a carefully selected family of stratospheric temperature profiles and computed radiances. On the basis of physical reasoning, a high correlation of thickness with radiance is anticipated for deep layers, such as the 100- to 2-mb layer (from about 15 to 43 km), that emit a substantial part of the infrared energy reaching a satellite radiometer in a particular channel. Empirical regression curves relating thickness and radiance are developed and are compared with blackbody curves obtained by substituting the blackbody temperature in the hydrostatic equation. Maximum thickness-radiance correlation is found, for each infrared channel, for the layer having the best agreement of empirical and blackbody curves.

  6. High-frequency noise and spectrum occupancy measurements for Virginia and Texas with comparisons to International Radio Consultative Committee predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Serafin P.

    1997-09-01

    There is ongoing interest in the high-frequency (HF) band of the spectrum, both in terms of the noise levels and the available spectrum bandwidth. In particular, current HF radar systems such as the U.S. Navy's Relocatable Over-the-Horizon Radar (ROTHR) or the Australian Jindalee radar must operate against the external noise and share the spectrum with other HF band users. Current estimates of external noise levels are based on International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) [1988]. These predictions are based primarily on measurements made several decades ago at a few sites around the world. There are no current generally accepted estimates for available spectrum bandwidth. The Radar Division at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of the U.S. Navy's ROTHR, developed a semiportable HF spectrum monitoring system to make HF noise and available bandwidth measurements. HF measurements were made over the 5- to 28-MHz frequency range at three locations. Measurements were made in Virginia at the end of August 1994, in Texas at the end of November 1994, and aboard the U.S.S. Ashland off the coast of Virginia in May 1995. These measurements are presented, as well as comparisons with CCIR predictions for the same period.

  7. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Sea Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David; Sun, Rouyu

    2014-01-01

    This report describes results from flight tests conducted in an over-sea environment, for the purpose of characterizing the air-to-ground (AG) channel, for future unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communication system analysis and design. These results are for the first of a set of several flight tests conducted in different ground site (GS) environments. An ultimate aim of all these tests is the development of models for the AG channel that can be used in communication system evaluation. In this report we provide measured results for propagation path loss, root-mean square delay spread (RMS-DS), and the correlation coefficient of the primary received signal components on the four antennas (two antennas for C-band, two for L-band). For path loss, the curved-earth two-ray model provides a reasonable fit to the measured data, altered by several dB at the shortest link distances by aircraft antenna pattern effects. This two-ray model also accounts for the majority of measured RMS-DS results of a few tens of nanoseconds, except for the occasional intermittent reflections from surface objects. These intermittent reflections yield RMS-DS values up to several hundred nanoseconds. For portions of the flight path that were over a harbor area highly populated with boats, the channel was found to be more "continuously dispersive," with RMS-DS reaching approximately 250 ns. A separate model will be developed for this over-harbor setting. The correlation coefficient results are still undergoing analysis; preliminary observations are that correlation between signals on the same-band antennas is generally large (>0.6) for the C-band straight flight paths, whereas for the L-band signals and for the oval-shaped flight paths the correlation is generally small (below 0.4). Inter-band correlations are typically very small, and are well modeled as zero-mean Gaussian in distribution, with a standard deviation less than 0.2. Hence the over-sea channel effects in the two bands can be

  8. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958…

  9. Detailed plasma potential measurements in a radio-frequency expanding plasma obtained from various electrostatic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2009-04-15

    On-axis plasma potential measurements have been made with an emissive probe in a low pressure (0.044 Pa) rf expanding plasma containing an ion beam. The beam is detected with a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), and is seen to disappear at high pressure (0.39 Pa). The emissive probe measurements are in very good agreement with corresponding measurements made with two separate RFEAs, and the results indicate that the floating potential of the strongly emitting probe gives an accurate measure of the plasma potential under the present conditions.

  10. Robust state transfer in the quantum spin channel via weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Yao, Chunmei; Zou, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Using the weak measurement (WM) and quantum measurement reversal (QMR) approach, robust state transfer and entanglement distribution can be realized in the spin-(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain. We find that the ultrahigh fidelity and long distance of quantum state transfer with certain success probability can be obtained using proper WM and QMR, i.e., the average fidelity of a general pure state from 80% to almost 100%, which is almost size independent. We also find that the distance and quality of entanglement distribution for the Bell state and the general Werner mixed state can be obviously improved by the WM and QMR approach.

  11. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, From Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; LeVine, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Direct current measurements are available near the attachment point from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning, but little is known about the rise time and peak amplitude of return-stroke currents aloft. We present, as functions of height, current amplitudes, rise times, and effective propagation velocities that have been estimated with a novel remote-sensing technique from data on 24 subsequent return strokes in six different lightning flashes that were triggering at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, during 1987. The unique feature of this data set is the stereo pairs of still photographs, from which three-dimensional channel geometries were determined previously. This has permitted us to calculate the fine structure of the electric-field-change (E) waveforms produced by these strokes, using the current waveforms measured at the channel base together with physically reasonable assumptions about the current distributions aloft. The computed waveforms have been compared with observed E waveforms from the same strokes, and our assumptions have been adjusted to maximize agreement. In spite of the non-uniqueness of solutions derived by this technique, several conclusions seem inescapable: 1) The effective propagation speed of the current up the channel is usually significantly (but not unreasonably) faster than the two-dimensional velocity measured by a streak camera for 14 of these strokes. 2) Given the deduced propagation speed, the peak amplitude of the current waveform often must decrease dramatically with height to prevent the electric field from being over-predicted. 3) The rise time of the current wave front must always increase rapidly with height in order to keep the fine structure of the calculated field consistent with the observations.

  12. A single-channel SQUID magnetometer for measuring magnetic field of human fetal heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachir, Wesam; Grot, Przemyslaw; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2004-07-01

    A non-invasive single-channel SQUID magnetometer for fetal magnetocardiography has been developed. The signal is picked-up with a wire wound third order gradiometer. The optimal configuration of the flux transformer is a trade-off between sufficient sensitivity for the magnetic field originated in fetal heart and effective immunity against the ambient magnetic noise. The over all system performance together with the measuring probe and SQUID electronics is described. The balancing of the third order flux transformer is discussed as well as the signal processing of fetal magnetocardiogram recordings.

  13. Multi-channel optical pyrometer for sub-nanosecond temperature measurements at NDCX-I/II

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Waldron, W.L.

    2011-04-13

    We present a detailed technical description of a fast multi-channel pyrometer designed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments with intense heavy ion beams at the neutralized-drift-compression-experiment linear accelerator (NDCX-I/II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The unique features of the described instrument are its sub-nanosecond temporal resolution (100 ps rise-time) and a broad range, 1,500 K - 12,000 K of measurable brightness temperatures in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The working scheme, calibration procedure, experimental data obtained with the pyrometer and future applications are presented.

  14. Using a novel flood prediction model and GIS automation to measure the valley and channel morphology of large river networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for measuring river valley and channel morphology require intensive ground-based surveys which are often expensive, time consuming, and logistically difficult to implement. The number of surveys required to assess the hydrogeomorphic structure of large river n...

  15. Radio measurements of the energy and the depth of the shower maximum of cosmic-ray air showers by Tunka-Rex

    SciTech Connect

    Bezyazeekov, P.A.; Budnev, N.M.; Gress, O.A.; Kazarina, Y.; Konstantinov, E.N.; Mirgazov, R.R.; Monkhoev, R.; Pakhorukov, A.; Pankov, L.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Huege, T.; Kostunin, D.; Kleifges, M.; Krömer, O.; Korosteleva, E.E.; Kuzmichev, L.A.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Prosin, V.V.; Rubtsov, G.I.; and others

    2016-01-01

    We reconstructed the energy and the position of the shower maximum of air showers with energies E ∼> 100 PeV applying a method using radio measurements performed with Tunka-Rex. An event-to-event comparison to air-Cherenkov measurements of the same air showers with the Tunka-133 photomultiplier array confirms that the radio reconstruction works reliably. The Tunka-Rex reconstruction methods and absolute scales have been tuned on CoREAS simulations and yield energy and X{sub max} values consistent with the Tunka-133 measurements. The results of two independent measurement seasons agree within statistical uncertainties, which gives additional confidence in the radio reconstruction. The energy precision of Tunka-Rex is comparable to the Tunka-133 precision of 15%, and exhibits a 20% uncertainty on the absolute scale dominated by the amplitude calibration of the antennas. For X{sub max}, this is the first direct experimental correlation of radio measurements with a different, established method. At the moment, the X{sub max} resolution of Tunka-Rex is approximately 40 g/cm{sup 2}. This resolution can probably be improved by deploying additional antennas and by further development of the reconstruction methods, since the present analysis does not yet reveal any principle limitations.

  16. Low temperature radio-frequency transverse susceptibility measurements using a CMOS oscillator circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Bartolomé, J.; García del Pozo, J. M.; Arauzo, A.; Guerrero, E.; Téllez, P.; Bartolomé, F.; García, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    A transverse susceptibility (TS) measurement system based on a simple inverter CMOS cell oscillator cross-coupled to a LC tank is presented. The system has been implemented to operate at a Quantum Design Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS). We introduce several improvements with respect to similar currently operating TS measurement equipments. The electronics have been redesigned to use CMOS transistors as active devices, which simplifies the circuit design and enlarge the tuning range, thus making the proposed electronic block more feasible, predictable, and precise. Additionally, we propose a newly designed sample holder, which facilitates the procedure to change a sample and improves reproducibility of the circuit. Our design minimizes the thermal leak of the measuring probe by one order of magnitude, allowing to measure from 1.8 K in standard PPMS systems, thanks to the use of a low temperature beryllium-copper coaxial cable instead of the conventional RG402 Cu coaxial cable employed in the insert for the PPMS in similar systems. The data acquisition method is also simplified, so that the measuring sequences are implemented directly in the PPMS controller computer by programming them in the Quantum Design MultiVu software that controls the PPMS. We present the test measurements performed on the system without sample to study the background signal and stability of the circuit. Measurements on a Gd2O3 calibrating sample yield to the estimation of the system sensitivity, which is found to be on the order of 10-6 emu. Finally, measurements on a TmCo2 Laves phase sample with a ferrimagnetic transition temperature around 4 K are described, demonstrating that the developed system is well suited to explore interesting magnetic phenomena at this temperature scale.

  17. A novel method for measuring the polarization angle of satellite radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniadis, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for the study of the physics of the ionosphere is the columnar electron content. This can be obtained indirectly by measuring the Faraday rotation of signals emitted from satellites. Many different types of polarimeters have been developed for this purpose. Efforts to develop a new type of polarimeter, suitable for extensive network operation, led to a novel technique for measuring the polarization angle.

  18. Radio Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Neil

    1998-01-01

    Thousands of today's high school students run FM radio stations at school, carrying on a tradition that began 50 years ago. Radio helps students learn to work with others and develop a strong sense of responsibility. A sidebar gives advice on starting a high school radio station. (MLF)

  19. 78 FR 37474 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado AGENCY: Federal Communications..., allots FM Channel 229C3 as a first local transmission service at Dove Creek, Colorado. Channel 229C3 can... CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Chief,...

  20. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... FM Channel 258A at Willow Creek, California. Channel 258A can be allotted at Willow Creek, consistent... Congressional Review Act, see U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio...

  1. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive set of ground-based measurements of the diurnal variation of medium frequency radio wave adsorption and virtual height is analyzed in terms of current understanding of the D- and lower E-region ion production and loss process. When this is done a gross discrepancy arises, the source of which is not known.

  2. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.; Takahashi, K.

    2011-08-15

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  3. Phase-resolved measurements of ion velocity in a radio-frequency sheath.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brett; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Pat; Barnes, Michael

    2010-08-13

    The time-dependent argon-ion velocity distribution function above and within the plasma sheath of an rf-biased substrate has been measured using laser-induced fluorescence in a commercial plasma processing tool. Discharge parameters were such that the 2.2 MHz rf-bias period was on the order of the ion transit time through the sheath (τ{ion}/τ{rf}=0.3). This work embodies the first time-resolved measurement of ion velocity distribution functions within an rf-biased sheath over a large area (30 cm diameter) silicon wafer substrate.

  4. Time resolved measurements of particle lift off from the wall in a turbulent water channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hout, Rene; Rabencov, Boris; Arca, Javier

    2011-11-01

    Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) and digital holography measurements were carried out in a dilute particle-laden flow tracking both Polystyrene Spheres (PS, ~0.583 mm, d+ ~ 10) as well as resolving the instantaneous velocity field of the turbulent flow. Measurements were performed in a closed loop, transparent, square channel facility (50x50 mm2) at 127.5cm from the inlet with bulk water velocity 0.3 m/s (Reh = 7353) and friction velocity 0.0174 m/s. Data were captured at 1 kHz, corresponding to a time scale 5x smaller than the flow's viscous scale. Single view digital holographic cinematography was used to track the 3D PS motion inside the VOI (17x17x50 mm3) including the wall bottom. TR-PIV in a vertical plane (29.3x29.3 mm2) oriented along the channel's centerline imaged PS together with flow tracers. Discrimination was based on their size difference. Instantaneous sequences of PS plotted on the spatial velocity, vorticity and swirling strength maps showed the effect of turbulent flow structures and resulting particle movement. Results are presented for particles that lift off from the bottom wall as a result of complex interaction with ejection and sweep motions.

  5. Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2012-11-12

    An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHE{nu} detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

  6. Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2012-11-01

    An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHEν) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHEν shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHEν detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

  7. Measurements of relative BCl density in BCl3-containing inductively coupled radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, C. B.; Hebner, G. A.

    1998-04-01

    The relative density of BCl radicals in inductively coupled plasmas has been studied using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and the BCl excited state has been studied using plasma-induced emission (PIE). Measurements were made as a function of input power, pressure, position, and as a function of gas ratio for industry-relevant metal-etch gas mixtures containing BCl3, Cl2, Ar, and N2. LIF was used to measure the ground state BCl population, whereas PIE monitored the BCl A1Π excited state; the LIF and PIE intensities varied differently as the plasma parameters were changed. Between 150 and 400 W input power at 20 mTorr pressure, there was no variation in BCl density, indicating that the dissociation fraction for BCl3 to BCl was constant with power. No significant interactions between BCl3 and Cl2 or Ar were evident in the LIF measurements. However, the BCl density was suppressed by addition of nitrogen to the plasma. The BCl density was radially uniform for all gas mixtures, but axial measurements showed a slight decrease in BCl density near the upper electrode. After running the reactor with a BCl3/N2 mixture, BCl was observed for up to an hour after the discharge was switched to Cl2: this is attributed to buildup of BN films on reactor surfaces and subsequent etching of the film by Cl.

  8. Assessing Chicken Meat Freshness through Measurement of Radio-Frequency Dielectric Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Change in freshness of chicken meat was assessed through measurement of the dielectric properties with a vector network analyzer and an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at 23 oC. Chicken meat samples were stored in a refrigerator for 8 days at 4 oC. Changes in dielectric cons...

  9. Delay time measurements of the propagation of radio waves in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, F.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and operation of the Geodetic Secor System are described. The precision of the ionospheric radiation measurements was determined by a collocation experiment. The EGRS-13 satellite, which was used in the experiment, is discussed. The geodetic network is shown in a diagram form. Conclusions resulting from the experiments are reported.

  10. A Model of the Crab Nebula Derived from Dual-Frequency Radio Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The total intensity and linearly polarized emission from the Crab Nebula (Taurus A) were synthesized to a resolution of approximately 1 arc-minute at both 1420 and 2880 MHz. From these data were calculated the spectral index, rotation measure, intrinsic position angle, and depolarization ratio distributions. Then, combined with a source model, the

  11. A new emissive-probe method for electron temperature measurement in radio-frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kusaba, Kouta; Shindo, Haruo

    2007-12-15

    A new method to measure electron temperature by an emissive probe has been proposed. The method is based on measurement of the functional relationship between the floating potential and the heating voltage of emissive probe. From the measured data of the floating potential change as a function of the heating voltage, the electron temperature could be determined by comparing with the theoretical curve obtained under the assumption of Maxwellian distribution. The overall characteristic of the floating potential change could be explained as a function of the heating voltage. The electron temperatures obtained by the present method were consistent with those measured by the rf-compensated Langmuir probe within the error. These experimental verifications were made in the electron density range of 2.6x10{sup 11}-2.8x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. It was stressed that the present method is advantageous in that the probe is operated in a floating condition, hence applicable to plasmas produced in an insulated container.

  12. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  13. Two-dimensional profile measurement of plasma parameters in radio frequency-driven argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.

    2015-09-15

    The two-dimensional profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, neutral translational temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet, which is driven by the radio frequency of 13.56 MHz by means of the laser scattering methods of Thomson, Rayleigh, and Raman. All measured parameters have maximum values at the center of the discharge and decrease toward the plasma edge. The results for the electron temperature profile are contrary to the results for the microwave-driven plasma. From our experimental results, the profiles of the plasma parameters arise from the radial contraction of plasmas and the time averaged profile of the electric field, which is obtained by a microwave simulation performed under identical conditions to the plasma jet. In the case of the neutral temperature, a higher translational temperature than the rotational temperature is measured, and its discrepancy is tentatively explained in terms of the low ion-neutral charge exchange rate and the additional degrees of freedom of the molecules. The description of our experimental results and the underlying physics are addressed in detail.

  14. Initial simulation study on high-precision radio measurements of the depth of shower maximum with SKAI-low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilles, Anne; Buitink, Stijn; Huege, Tim

    2017-03-01

    As LOFAR has shown, using a dense array of radio antennas for detecting extensive air showers initiated by cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere makes it possible to measure the depth of shower maximum for individual showers with a statistical uncertainty less than 20g/cm2. This allows detailed studies of the mass composition in the energy region around 1017 eV where the transition from a Galactic to an Extragalactic origin could occur. Since SKA1-low will provide a much denser and very homogeneous antenna array with a large bandwidth of 50 - 350 MHz it is expected to reach an uncertainty on the Xmax reconstruction of less than 10g/cm2. We present first results of a simulation study with focus on the potential to reconstruct the depth of shower maximum for individual showers to be measured with SKA1-low. In addition, possible influences of various parameters such as the numbers of antennas included in the analysis or the considered frequency bandwidth will be discussed.

  15. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet–triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet–triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot–lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  16. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at D0.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-08-19

    We measure the top quark mass (m(t)) in p ̄p collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV using dilepton t ̄t→W(+)bW(-) ̄b→ℓ(+)ν(ℓ)bℓ(-) ̄ν(ℓ) ̄b events, where ℓ denotes an electron, a muon, or a tau that decays leptonically. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb(-1) collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We obtain m(t)=174.0±1.8(stat)±2.4(syst) GeV, which is in agreement with the current world average m(t)=173.3±1.1 GeV. This is currently the most precise measurement of m(t) in the dilepton channel.

  17. Measurement of the conductance of the sodium channel from current fluctuations at the node of Ranvier.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Hille, B; Neumcke, B; Nonner, W; Stämpfli, R

    1976-01-01

    Single myelinated nerve fibres of Rana esculenta were investigated under voltage clamp conditions at 13 degrees C. Fluctuations of steady-state membrane current were measured during the last 152 msec of 190-225 msec pulses depolarizing the membrane by 8-48 mV. Noise power spectral densities were calculated in the frequency range of 6-6-6757 Hz. 2. External application of 150 nM tetrodotoxin (TTX) and/or 10 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA) ion reduced the current fluctuations. The difference of current noise spectra measured in the presence and absence of TTX (TEA) was not changed by the presence of TEA (TTX) during both measurements, and was taken as the spectrum of the Na (K) current fluctuations. 3. Residual current noise during application of both TTX and TEA was, except for some excess noise at the low and high frequency ends of the spectrum, similar to the noise measured from a passive nerve model and could be understood in terms of Nyquist noise of the known resistances and the amplifier noise. 4. Na current fluctuation spectra were interpreted as the sum N/f+SNa(f) where SNa(F) represents the spectrum expected for a set of equal, independent Na channels with only two conductance states (open or closed) which follow Hodgkin-Huxley kinetics. With values of hinfinity, tauh and minfinity measured from macroscopic Na currents, the measured spectra were fitted well by optimizing N, SNa(0) and taum. Values of taum obtained by this method were in fair agreement with values found from macroscopic currents. 5. The 1/f component of Na current noise was roughly proportional to the square of the steady-state Na current, I2. The mean value of N/I2 was (1-1 +/- 0-3) X 10(-4). 6. The current carried by a single Na channel was calculated from fitted spectra and steady-state Na currents measured simultaneously with the current fluctuations. The single channel conductance gamma normalized to zero absolute membrane potential was calculated. The average gamma from twelve measurements

  18. Measurement system for the characterization of the human body as a communication channel at low frequency.

    PubMed

    Wegmueller, Marc; Felber, Norbert; Fichtner, Wolfgang; Lehner, Adrian; Hess, Otto; Froehlich, Juerg; Kuster, Niels; Reutemann, Robert; Oberle, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Electronic data transfer by capacitive and galvanic coupling through the human body has been proposed by research and industry as a novel but highly promising technology for ultra low power wireless body LANs. Investigation on the most challenging questions considering data communication becomes enabled with a highly versatile measurement system for frequencies in the range of 10 kHz to 1 MHz. The human body is characterized as a transmission medium for electrical current by means of measurements and is investigated as communication channel for biomedical parameter monitoring by using different modulation schemes at low frequency. Excellent transmission was achieved on the thorax while the attenuation increases along the extremities. The injected current is 10 times below the maximum allowed contact current and more than 25 times below nerve stimulation. The new technology has shown its feasibility in clinical trials.

  19. Purity of Gaussian states: Measurement schemes and time evolution in noisy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Matteo G.A.; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Serafini, Alessio; De Siena, Silvio

    2003-07-01

    We present a systematic study of the purity for Gaussian states of single-mode continuous variable systems. We prove the connection of purity to observable quantities for these states, and show that the joint measurement of two conjugate quadratures is necessary and sufficient to determine the purity at any time. The statistical reliability and the range of applicability of the proposed measurement scheme are tested by means of Monte Carlo simulated experiments. We then consider the dynamics of purity in noisy channels. We derive an evolution equation for the purity of general Gaussian states both in thermal and in squeezed thermal baths. We show that purity is maximized at any given time for an initial coherent state evolving in a thermal bath, or for an initial squeezed state evolving in a squeezed thermal bath whose asymptotic squeezing is orthogonal to that of the input state.

  20. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  1. Ionosphere plasma electron parameters from radio frequency sweeping impedance probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E.; Patra, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we will describe the technique of using an RF sweeping impedance probe (SIP) to measure the AC impedance of an electrically short monopole immersed in a plasma. We analyze the SIP measurements which are taken from the payload of the Storms sounding rocket, launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in 2007. The scientific objective of the Storms mission was to concentrate on whether density irregularities observed in midlatitude spread F could arise from ionospheric coupling to terrestrial weather. As such, independent measurements of the electron density profile are crucial. Since the inherent nature of the SIP technique makes it relatively insensitive to errors introduced through spacecraft charging, probe contamination, and other DC effects, it is an ideal instrument to employ under disturbed plasma conditions. The instrument measures both the magnitude and phase of the AC impedance from 100 kHz to 20 MHz in 128 frequency steps, performing 45,776 sweeps over the entire flight. From these measurements we infer both the absolute electron density ne and the electron neutral collision frequencies νen throughout the flight trajectory. The SIP data can be approximately analyzed using a fluid formulation and thin sheath approximation particularly at altitudes below 200 km, which allows us to match the measurements to quasi-static analytical formulas. At about 265 km on the upleg, the magnitude data transitioned to a highly damped response with increasing altitude. The phase data, on the other hand, continued to indicate increased plasma density and reduced collisionality as expected. For a large portion of the flight, the payload of the Storms mission exhibited an uncontrolled coning motion, making the local magnetic field orientation with respect to the dipole difficult to decipher. Despite these difficulties, we were able to obtain robust estimates of the electron density profile, using the phase information from each sweep. In addition, the electron

  2. Bulk velocity measurements by video analysis of dye tracer in a macro-rough channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilardi, T.; Franca, M. J.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    Steep mountain rivers have hydraulic and morphodynamic characteristics that hinder velocity measurements. The high spatial variability of hydraulic parameters, such as water depth (WD), river width and flow velocity, makes the choice of a representative cross-section to measure the velocity in detail challenging. Additionally, sediment transport and rapidly changing bed morphology exclude the utilization of standard and often intrusive velocity measurement techniques. The limited technical choices are further reduced in the presence of macro-roughness elements, such as large, relatively immobile boulders. Tracer tracking techniques are among the few reliable methods that can be used under these conditions to evaluate the mean flow velocity. However, most tracer tracking techniques calculate bulk flow velocities between two or more fixed cross-sections. In the presence of intense sediment transport resulting in an important temporal variability of the bed morphology, dead water zones may appear in the few selected measurement sections. Thus a technique based on the analysis of an entire channel reach is needed in this study. A dye tracer measurement technique in which a single camcorder visualizes a long flume reach is described and developed. This allows us to overcome the problem of the presence of dead water zones. To validate this video analysis technique, velocity measurements were carried out on a laboratory flume simulating a torrent, with a relatively gentle slope of 1.97% and without sediment transport, using several commonly used velocity measurement instruments. In the absence of boulders, salt injections, WD and ultrasonic velocity profiler measurements were carried out, along with dye injection technique. When boulders were present, dye tracer technique was validated only by comparison with salt tracer. Several video analysis techniques used to infer velocities were developed and compared, showing that dye tracking is a valid technique for bulk velocity

  3. Voltage noise measurements across the pancreatic beta-cell membrane: calcium channel characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, I; Dawson, C M; Eddlestone, G T; Rojas, E

    1981-01-01

    1. Membrane potential fluctuations were measured in cells from mouse Islets of Langerhans identified as beta-cells by the characteristic pattern of electrical activity induced by 11 mM-D-glucose. 2. The membrane potential was controlled by adjusting the external potassium concentration, [K+]o, keeping the sum [Na+]o plus [K+]o constant. In the absence of glucose, when [K+]o is raised, the resulting depolarization is accompanied by a significant increase in voltage noise. 3 The amplitude and time course of the voltage noise were measured under various experimental conditions. The variance of the fluctuating voltage decreased monotonically along the depolarization induced by sudden increase in [K+]o, suggesting a monotonic reduction in the number of elementary events. 4. The frequency characteristics of the excess noise could be analysed as the sum of 1/f and 1/f2 components. While the 1/f component remained unaffected by the external application of 20mM-tetraethylammonium (TEA) and either 2 mM-Mn2+ or 2 mM-Co2+, the 1/f2 component was suppressed by both Mn2+ and Co2+. 5. The corner frequency, fc, of the 1/f2 component depended on membrane potential, which was adjusted by adjusting the [K+]o jump. These results support the idea that fc in these experiments is a measure of the channel relaxation. 6. Measurements of the input resistance in the frequency range from 0 to 25 Hz were used to obtain a rough estimate of the size of the channel conductance as 5 x 10(-12) omega (-1). PMID:6273530

  4. THE ROTATION PERIOD AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE T DWARF 2MASSI J1047539+212423 MEASURED FROM PERIODIC RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.

    2015-08-01

    Periodic radio bursts from very low mass stars and brown dwarfs simultaneously probe their magnetic and rotational properties. The brown dwarf 2MASSI J1047539+212423 (2M 1047+21) is currently the only T dwarf (T6.5) detected at radio wavelengths. Previous observations of this source with the Arecibo observatory revealed intermittent, 100%-polarized radio pulses similar to those detected from other brown dwarfs, but were unable to constrain a pulse periodicity; previous Very Large Array (VLA) observations detected quiescent emission a factor of ∼100 times fainter than the Arecibo pulses but no additional events. Here we present 14 hr of VLA observations of this object that reveal a series of pulses at ∼6 GHz with highly variable profiles, showing that the pulsing behavior evolves on time scales that are both long and short compared to the rotation period. We measure a periodicity of ∼1.77 hr and identify it with the rotation period. This is just the sixth rotation period measurement in a late T dwarf, and the first obtained in the radio. We detect a pulse at 10 GHz as well, suggesting that the magnetic field strength of 2 M 1047+21 reaches at least 3.6 kG. Although this object is the coolest and most rapidly rotating radio-detected brown dwarf to date, its properties appear continuous with those of other such objects, suggesting that the generation of strong magnetic fields and radio emission may continue to even cooler objects. Further studies of this kind will help to clarify the relationships between mass, age, rotation, and magnetic activity at and beyond the end of the main sequence, where both theories and observational data are currently scarce.

  5. Quantum state measurement in double quantum dots with a radio-frequency quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Hai-Xia; Yin, Wen; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2014-02-01

    We study the dynamics of two electron spins in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) monitored by a quantum point contact (QPC) detector. Their quantum state can be measured by embedding the QPC in an LC circuit. We derive the Bloch-type rate equations of the reduced density matrix for CQDs. Special attention is paid to the numerical results for the weak measurement condintion under a strong Coulomb interaction. It is shown that the evolution of QPC current always follows that of electron occupation in the right dot. In addition, we find that the output voltage of the circuit can reflect the evolution of QPC current when the circuit and QPC are approximately equal in frequency. In particular, the wave shape of the output voltage can be improved by adjusting the circuit resonance frequency and bandwidth.

  6. Comparison of Three Measurement Techniques for Estimation of Sediment Transport Using Channel Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, S. A.; Zimmermann, A. E.; Blocka, D. L.; Hassan, M. A.; Hogan, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Documenting changes in channel morphology has traditionally been achieved through periodic resurvey of permanently monumented cross sections. In British Columbia, 197 cross sections in eight study areas of Carnation Creek have been resurveyed annually since 1970 to measure changes in bed material storage in response to forest harvesting. Spatial interpolation between cross sections allows production of a digital elevation model (DEM), and subtraction of multi-temporal DEMs in a geographical information system (GIS) enables high-resolution estimates of changes in stored sediment. However, the quality of each DEM depends on the spacing between cross sections relative to the local variability in channel morphology. Recent advancements in digital photogrammetry enable acquisition and analysis of very large data sets with the potential for increased precision and accuracy compared to conventional ground surveying techniques. In this study, independent DEMs derived from seven cross sections and from digital photogrammetry are each compared to a high-resolution total station survey of a single riffle-pool sequence of Carnation Creek. The mean error of the DEMs derived from cross sections and from photogrammetry was -0.032 and -0.035 m, respectively. Errors in the DEM derived from photogrammetry were most apparent in relatively deep water (> 0.5 m) and under overhanging vegetation. Errors in the DEM derived from cross sections were most apparent near the mid-point between cross sections and along the streambanks. Experimental removal of cross sections from the analysis suggests that errors remain relatively stable for a cross section spacing of up to about one bankfull width. The spatial distribution of errors inherent to each technique has important implications for estimates of sediment transport derived from the morphological method. Cross sections are most effective when the channel is relatively straight, bank heights are low, and the morphology is simple

  7. Radio emissions from double RHESSI TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, Andrew; Østgaard, Nikolai; Gjesteland, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Kjetil; Lehtinen, Nikolai; Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David; Cummer, Steven

    2016-07-01

    A detailed analysis of Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) is performed in association with World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) sources and very low frequency (VLF) sferics recorded at Duke University. RHESSI clock offset is evaluated and found to experience changes on the 5 August 2005 and 21 October 2013, based on the analysis of TGF-WWLLN matches. The clock offsets were found for all three periods of observations with standard deviations less than 100 μs. This result opens the possibility for the precise comparative analyses of RHESSI TGFs with the other types of data (WWLLN, radio measurements, etc.) In case of multiple-peak TGFs, WWLLN detections are observed to be simultaneous with the last TGF peak for all 16 cases of multipeak RHESSI TGFs simultaneous with WWLLN sources. VLF magnetic field sferics were recorded for two of these 16 events at Duke University. These radio measurements also attribute VLF sferics to the second peak of the double TGFs, exhibiting no detectable radio emission during the first TGF peak. Possible scenarios explaining these observations are proposed. Double (multipeak) TGFs could help to distinguish between the VLF radio emission radiated by the recoil currents in the +IC leader channel and the VLF emission from the TGF producing electrons.

  8. Instrumentation-related uncertainty of reflectance and transmittance measurements with a two-channel spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peest, Christian; Schinke, Carsten; Brendel, Rolf; Schmidt, Jan; Bothe, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Spectrophotometers are operated in numerous fields of science and industry for a variety of applications. In order to provide confidence for the measured data, analyzing the associated uncertainty is valuable. However, the uncertainty of the measurement results is often unknown or reduced to sample-related contributions. In this paper, we describe our approach for the systematic determination of the measurement uncertainty of the commercially available two-channel spectrophotometer Agilent Cary 5000 in accordance with the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurements. We focus on the instrumentation-related uncertainty contributions rather than the specific application and thus outline a general procedure which can be adapted for other instruments. Moreover, we discover a systematic signal deviation due to the inertia of the measurement amplifier and develop and apply a correction procedure. Thereby we increase the usable dynamic range of the instrument by more than one order of magnitude. We present methods for the quantification of the uncertainty contributions and combine them into an uncertainty budget for the device.

  9. Time Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Rough-Wall Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miorini, Rinaldo; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Time resolved tomographic PIV is used to study flow structures in the outer region of a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer, focusing on imprints of the roughness on the outer layer. Measurements are performed in a transparent channel installed in the JHU optically index matched facility. The roughness consists of pyramids with height, k = 0.46 mm, and wavelength, λ = 3.2 mm, satisfying h/k = 55 (h = 25.4 mm is the channel half-height), k + = 64 and Re = 40000. The TPIV setup consists of four high-speed cameras operating at 3 kHz, which view the sample volume through acrylic prisms. The flow field is illuminated by an Nd:YLF laser. Following enhancement, calibration, and reconstruction, 643 voxels interrogation volumes with 0.75 overlap provide 3D velocity fields with spacing of 0.5883 mm3. Formation and transport of near-wall 3D U-shaped vortex structures, with base in front of the pyramids, and quasi-streamwise legs extending between pyramid crest lines are evident from the data. Extended streamwise regions of high wall-normal vorticity appear ``latched'' to the roughness elements close to the wall, but are transported downstream at higher elevations. Also evident are traveling streamwise low velocity streaks, which cover many roughness elements. Sponsored by NSF CBET and ONR.

  10. Skin-Friction Measurements on Mathematically Generated Roughness in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Engineering systems are affected by surface roughness, however, predicting frictional drag has proven to be challenging. One open question is how roughness topography, whether it is idealized 2D and 3D or irregular with multi-scale features, impacts the frictional drag. A previous study from Flack and Schultz (2010) presented a new model to estimate frictional drag based on surfaces statistics. The present work takes a systematic approach by generating and manufacturing surfaces roughness where surface statistics, such as rms, skewness and power-spectral density can be controlled. Skin-friction measurements are conducted in a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow facility, where the experiments cover all roughness regimes, from hydraulic-smooth to fully-rough. The surface roughness studied herein is produced using the random Fourier modes method with a varying power-law spectral slope, whereas the rms and surface amplitude are kept constant (krms ~ 45 μm and kt ~ 200 μm) while still possessing a Gaussian probability-density-function. These surfaces are then 3D-printed and replicated using a mold/cast technique to generate the top and bottom walls of the channel flow facility. Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  11. Electrochemical impedance measurement of prostate cancer cells using carbon nanotube array electrodes in a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heung Yun, Yeo; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Schulz, Mark J.

    2007-11-01

    Highly aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized in the shape of towers and embedded into fluidic channels as electrodes for impedance measurement of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Tower electrodes up to 8 mm high were grown and easily peeled off a silicon substrate. The nanotube electrodes were then successfully soldered onto patterned printed circuit boards and cast into epoxy under pressure. After polishing the top of the tower electrodes, RF plasma was used to enhance the electrocatalytic effect by removing excess epoxy and activating the open end of the nanotubes. Electrodeposition of Au particles on the plasma-treated tower electrodes was done at a controlled density. Finally, the nanotube electrodes were embedded into a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was carried out with different conditions. Preliminary electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using deionized water, buffer solution, and LNCaP prostate cancer cells showed that nanotube electrodes can distinguish the different solutions and could be used in future cell-based biosensor development.

  12. Range difference multilateration for obtaining precision geodetic and trajectory measurements. [by radio interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Ong, K. M.; Von Roos, O. H.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of a new multilateration technique suitable for precision geodesy and orbit determination applications are examined. The multilateration technique considered herein makes use of the differential time of arrival of signals at an ensemble of ground stations from a spacecraft or aircraft as the fundamental data type. It is demonstrated that simultaneous measurements give rise to a system of equations which upon solution permits the determination of the three-dimensional vehicle coordinates plus the three-dimensional coordinates of the station net relative to an arbitrarily adopted origin (which may be taken to be one of the stations). A solution to these equations can be obtained without any a priori knowledge of the locations of the stations and vehicle. The necessary conditions for obtaining all of these coordinates in the same solution are discussed, and it is indicated that at least five stations are required in the station ensemble.

  13. Probing the solar wind with radio measurements of the second moment field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.; Ishimaru, A.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of spectral broadening on anisotropic electron-density irregularities and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind is investigated on the basis of results for a second moment mutual coherence function obtained by a parabolic-equation method. It is found that although anisotropic irregularities and wind-velocity fluctuations decrease the bandwidth of the spectrum relative to that for isotropic irregularities and no velocity fluctuations, the shape of the spectrum remains unchanged. Examination of the frequency dependence and shape of a computed angular spectrum indicates that the electron-density spectrum is consistent with a power law having a spectral index close to the value appropriate for the Kolmogorov spectrum. It is proposed that multiple-station observations of some total field be employed to measure the solar wind.

  14. Multicolor Photometric Observation of Lightning from Space: Comparison with Radio Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adachi, Toru; Cohen, Morris; Said, Ryan; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Cummer, Steven A.; Li, Jingbo; Lu, Geopeng; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong; Chen, Alfred Bing-Chih; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of spectrophotometric measurements from space in revealing properties of lightning flash. The multicolor optical waveform data obtained by FORMOSAT-2/Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning (ISUAL) were analyzed in relation to National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). As of July 2011, we found six lightning events which were observed by ISUAL and North Alabama LMA. In two of these events, NLDN showed clear positive cloud-to-ground (CG) discharges with peak current of +139.9 kA and +41.6 kA and, around that time, LMA showed continuous intra-cloud (IC) leader activities at 4-6 km altitudes. ISUAL also observed consistent optical waveforms of the IC and CG components and, interestingly, it was found that the blue/red spectral ratio clearly decreased by a factor of 1.5-2.5 at the time of CG discharges. Other four lightning events in which NLDN did not detect any CG discharges were also investigated, but such a feature was not found in any of these cases. These results suggest that the optical color of CG component is more reddish than that of IC component and we explain this as a result of more effective Rayleigh scattering in blue light emissions coming from lower-altitude light source. This finding suggests that spectral measurements could be a new useful technique to characterize ICs and CGs from space. In this talk, we will also present a result from lightning statistical analysis of ISUAL spectrophotometric data and ULF magnetic data.

  15. Coronal electron density distributions estimated from CMEs, DH type II radio bursts, and polarized brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Ok; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, R.-S.

    2016-04-01

    We determine coronal electron density distributions (CEDDs) by analyzing decahectometric (DH) type II observations under two assumptions. DH type II bursts are generated by either (1) shocks at the leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or (2) CME shock-streamer interactions. Among 399 Wind/WAVES type II bursts (from 1997 to 2012) associated with SOHO/LASCO (Large Angle Spectroscopic COronagraph) CMEs, we select 11 limb events whose fundamental and second harmonic emission lanes are well identified. We determine the lowest frequencies of fundamental emission lanes and the heights of leading edges of their associated CMEs. We also determine the heights of CME shock-streamer interaction regions. The CEDDs are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the heights from the CME leading edges (or CME shock-streamer interaction regions) and DH type II bursts. We also estimate CEDDs of seven events using polarized brightness (pB) measurements. We find the following results. Under the first assumption, the average of estimated CEDDs from 3 to 20 Rs is about 5-fold Saito's model (NSaito(r)). Under the second assumption, the average of estimated CEDDs from 3 to 10 Rs is 1.5-fold NSaito(r). While the CEDDs obtained from pB measurements are significantly smaller than those based on the first assumption and CME flank regions without streamers, they are well consistent with those on the second assumption. Our results show that not only about 1-fold NSaito(r) is a proper CEDD for analyzing DH type II bursts but also CME shock-streamer interactions could be a plausible origin for generating DH type II bursts.

  16. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of a Baseline System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a baseline system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements for aircraft engine on-line diagnostics is developed. This system is composed of a linear on-board engine model (LOBEM) and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The LOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. When the discrepancy among the triplex channels exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of the discrepancy. Through this approach, the baseline system achieves the following objectives: (1) anomaly detection, (2) component fault detection, and (3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the baseline system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components.

  17. Comparison of measurements from different radio-echo sounding systems and synchronization with the ice core at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Anna; Steinhage, Daniel; Arnold, Emily J.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Cavitte, Marie G. P.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Paden, John D.; Urbini, Stefano; Young, Duncan A.; Eisen, Olaf

    2017-03-01

    We present a compilation of radio-echo sounding (RES) measurements of five radar systems (AWI, BAS, CReSIS, INGV and UTIG) around the EPICA Dome C (EDC) drill site, East Antarctica. The aim of our study is to investigate the differences of the various systems in their resolution of internal reflection horizons (IRHs) and bed topography, penetration depth and capacity of imaging the basal layer. We address the questions of the compatibility of existing radar data for common interpretation and the suitability of the individual systems for reconnaissance surveys. We find that the most distinct IRHs and IRH patterns can be identified and transferred between most data sets. Considerable differences between the RES systems exist in range resolution and depiction of the bottom-most region. Considering both aspects, which we judge as crucial factors in the search for old ice, the CReSIS and the UTIG systems are the most suitable ones. In addition to the RES data set comparison we calculate a synthetic radar trace from EDC density and conductivity profiles. We identify 10 common IRHs in the measured RES data and the synthetic trace. We then conduct a sensitivity study for which we remove certain peaks from the input conductivity profile. As a result the respective reflections disappear from the modeled radar trace. In this way, we establish a depth conversion of the measured travel times of the IRHs. Furthermore, we use these sensitivity studies to investigate the cause of observed reflections. The identified IRHs are assigned ages from the EDC's timescale. Due to the isochronous character of these conductivity-caused IRHs, they are a means to extend the Dome C age structure by tracing the IRHs along the RES profiles.

  18. Improvement of GPS radio occultation retrieval error of E region electron density: COSMIC measurement and IRI model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kang-Hung; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we use the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model to simulate temporal and spatial distributions of global E region electron densities retrieved by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites by means of GPS radio occultation (RO) technique. Despite regional discrepancies in the magnitudes of the E region electron density, the IRI model simulations can, on the whole, describe the COSMIC measurements in quality and quantity. On the basis of global ionosonde network and the IRI model, the retrieval errors of the global COSMIC-measured E region peak electron density (NmE) from July 2006 to July 2011 are examined and simulated. The COSMIC measurement and the IRI model simulation both reveal that the magnitudes of the percentage error (PE) and root mean-square-error (RMSE) of the relative RO retrieval errors of the NmE values are dependent on local time (LT) and geomagnetic latitude, with minimum in the early morning and at high latitudes and maximum in the afternoon and at middle latitudes. In addition, the seasonal variation of PE and RMSE values seems to be latitude dependent. After removing the IRI model-simulated GPS RO retrieval errors from the original COSMIC measurements, the average values of the annual and monthly mean percentage errors of the RO retrieval errors of the COSMIC-measured E region electron density are, respectively, substantially reduced by a factor of about 2.95 and 3.35, and the corresponding root-mean-square errors show averaged decreases of 15.6% and 15.4%, respectively. It is found that, with this process, the largest reduction in the PE and RMSE of the COSMIC-measured NmE occurs at the equatorial anomaly latitudes 10°N-30°N in the afternoon from 14 to 18 LT, with a factor of 25 and 2, respectively. Statistics show that the residual errors that remained in the corrected COSMIC-measured NmE vary in a range of -20% to 38%, which are comparable to or larger than the percentage errors of the IRI-predicted NmE fluctuating in a

  19. 76 FR 42573 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma and Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma and Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications... Review filed by Rawhide Radio, LLC, Capstar TX Limited Partnership, Clear Channel Broadcasting...

  20. 1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST WITH RADIO CONTROL HOUSE (RIGHT), TRANSMITTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST WITH RADIO CONTROL HOUSE (RIGHT), TRANSMITTER TOWER (CENTER), AND NORTH BREAKWATER LIGHT IN DISTANCE AT LEFT - Frankfort Coast Guard Station, Radio Control House, Second Street at ship channel, Frankfort, Benzie County, MI

  1. Radio-Frequency Illuminated Superconductive Disks: Reverse Josephson Effects and Implications for Precise Measuring of Proposed Gravity Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. It have been indicated three essential components to achieve anomalous gravity effects, namely large, two-layer high-temperature YBCO superconductors, magnetic levitation and AC input in the form of radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. We report experiments on RF-illuminated (1-15 MHz) superconducting disks with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of approximately 3-5 x l0(exp -5)cm/sq s, above and to the side of the superconductor. In this preliminary study, RF- illumination is achieved using a series of large radius (15 cm) spiral antenna with RF power inputs equal to or greater than 90 W. The observed gravitational modification range is significantly lower than the 2.1% gravity modification. The error analyses of thermal and electromagnetic interference in a magnetically shielded gravimeter with vacuum enclosures, Faraday cages and shielded instrument leads, are outlined both experimentally and theoretically. The nearly exact correspondence between the peak gravity effects reported and the well-known peak in AC resistance in superconductors (2-7 MHz, owing to reverse Josephson quantum effects) suggests that electrical resistance will arise in this frequency range and subsequently any trapped magnetic fields in the superconductor may disperse partially into the measuring instrument's local environment. Implications for propulsion initiatives and RF-heating in superconductors will be discussed.

  2. Analysis of single pulse radio flux measurements of PSR B1133+16 at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzeszowski, K.; Maron, O.; Słowikowska, A.; Dyks, J.; Jessner, A.

    2014-05-01

    We show the results of microsecond resolution radio data analysis focused on flux measurements of single pulses of PSR B1133+16. The data were recorded at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz with 0.5- and 1.1-GHz bandwidth, respectively, using Radio Telescope Effelsberg (Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie). The most important conclusion of the analysis is that the strongest single pulse emission at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz contributes almost exclusively to the trailing part of the leading component of the pulsar mean profile, whereas studies at lower frequencies report that the contribution is spread almost uniformly, covering all phases of the pulsar mean profile. We also estimate the radio emission heights to be around 1-2 per cent of the light-cylinder radius, which is in agreement with previous studies. Additionally, these observations allowed us to add two more measurements of the flux density to the PSR B1133+16 broad-band radio spectrum, covering frequencies from 16.7 MHz up to 32 GHz. We fit two different models to the spectrum: a broken power law and a spectrum based on the flicker-noise model, which represents the spectrum in a simpler, but similarly accurate, way.

  3. The measurement of the ionospheric total content variations caused by a powerful radio emission of "Sura" facility on a network of GNSS-receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasyrov, I. A.; Kogogin, D. A.; Shindin, A. V.; Grach, S. M.; Zagretdinov, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Observations of the perturbations of total electron content (TEC) caused by a powerful radio emission of "Sura" facility (Radio Physical Research Institute, N. Novgorod) were carried out during several experimental campaigns from March of 2010 to March 2013. In this paper the data of experimental measurements of TEC-variations conducted on March, 15, 2010 and on March, 12, 2013, are presented. Parameters of TEC-variations were obtained by dual-frequency global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) diagnostics. Registration of signal parameters from GNSS-transmitters was performed at spatially separated sites along the geomagnetic latitude: Vasilsursk (56 °08‧ N, 46 °05‧ E), Zelenodolsk (55 °52‧ N, 48 °33‧ E) and Kazan (55 °48‧ N, 49 °08‧ E). In the experiments radio path from GNSS satellite to Vasilsursk passed over the disturbed region of ionosphere, but radio paths to Zelenodolsk and to Kazan did not. However, TEC-variations correlated with pumping of ionosphere by "Sura" facility were detected for all up to three ground measurements sites. Magnitudes of TEC-variations reached up to ∼ 0.6 - 0.7 TECU. The speculation that a sharp gradient of the electron density formed at the border of the main lobe of "Sura" facility may cause the generation of IGW is presented.

  4. Wuhan Atmosphere Radio Exploration (WARE) radar: System design and online winds measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyu, Zhao; Chen, Zhou; Haiyin, Qing; Guobin, Yang; Yuannong, Zhang; Gang, Chen; Yaogai, Hu

    2013-05-01

    The basic configuration of the Wuhan MST (mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere) radar, which was designed and constructed by the School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, is preliminarily described in this paper. The Wuhan MST radar operates at very high frequency (VHF) band (53.8 MHz) by observing the real-time characteristics of turbulence and the wind field vector in the height range of 3.5-90 km (not including 25-60 km) with high temporal and height resolutions. This all-solid-state, all-coherent pulse Doppler radar is China's first independent development of an MST radar focusing on atmospheric observation. The subsystems of the Wuhan MST radar include an antenna system, a feeder line system, all-solid-state radar transmitters, digital receivers, a beam control system, a signal processing system, a data processing system, a product generation system, and a user terminal. Advanced radar technologies are used, including highly reliable all-solid-state transmitters, low-noise large dynamic range digital receivers, an active phased array, high-speed digital signal processing, and real-time graphic terminals. This paper describes the design and implementation of the radar. Preliminary online wind measurements and results of the comparison to simultaneous observations by a GPS rawinsonde are presented as well.

  5. Strong field radio-frequency measurements using Rydberg states in a vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie; Anderson, David; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    There has been a growing interest in using electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell as an all-optical readout method for measuring microwave electric fields. We present results from RF-modulating the 60S1 / 2 and 58D5 / 2 Rydberg states of rubidium with 50 MHz and 100 MHz fields, respectively. Weak RF fields AC Stark-shifts the Rydberg states. As the field strength is increased, sidebands appear at even multiples of the driving frequency. When strong fields are applied, the nearby hydrogenic manifold begins to intersect with the shifted levels. Similar investigations have been performed in cesium. Due to the significant amount of state mixing and level structure, Floquet theory is required to describe the level shifts and mixing. By comparing the calculation with the experimental data, we obtain an absolute determination of the RF electric field reaching a maximum field of 296 V/m to within +/- 0 . 35 % . Additionally, we estimate the shielding of DC fields within the vapor cell.

  6. An Inflatable and Wearable Wireless System for Making 32-Channel Electroencephalogram Measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Shao-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; King, Jung-Tai; Chang, Che-Lun; Chen, Shi-An; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2016-07-01

    Potable electroencephalography (EEG) devices have become critical for important research. They have various applications, such as in brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Numerous recent investigations have focused on the development of dry sensors, but few concern the simultaneous attachment of high-density dry sensors to different regions of the scalp to receive qualified EEG signals from hairy sites. An inflatable and wearable wireless 32-channel EEG device was designed, prototyped, and experimentally validated for making EEG signal measurements; it incorporates spring-loaded dry sensors and a novel gasbag design to solve the problem of interference by hair. The cap is ventilated and incorporates a circuit board and battery with a high-tolerance wireless (Bluetooth) protocol and low power consumption characteristics. The proposed system provides a 500/250 Hz sampling rate, and 24 bit EEG data to meet the BCI system data requirement. Experimental results prove that the proposed EEG system is effective in measuring audio event-related potential, measuring visual event-related potential, and rapid serial visual presentation. Results of this work demonstrate that the proposed EEG cap system performs well in making EEG measurements and is feasible for practical applications.

  7. 75 FR 52872 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Blythe, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Blythe, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Audio Division, at the request of Prescott Valley Radio Broadcasting Company, Inc., substitutes FM Channel 247B for Channel 239B at Blythe, California. Channel 247B can...

  8. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  9. Joint Tactical Radio System Handheld, Manpack, and Small Form Fit Radios (JTRS HMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    waveforms: SRW, Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System, satellite communication, and Mobile-User Objective System. The Manpack Radio is utilized...2015 SAR March 21, 2016 18:21:36 UNCLASSIFIED 6 Executive Summary HMS is structured as a single acquisition program. The program completed the EMD...include: SRW, Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (Army managed waveform), Satellite Communications (Army managed waveform), and Mobile

  10. UAV Measurement of the 2015 Large Flood Impact in Kinugawa River on Riverine Vegetation and Channel Form Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Inoue, Toshiya; Chigasaki, Yuka

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives the results of field observation for a flood impact on riverine environment measured by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The flood we examined occurred on September 9-10, 2015 in Kinugawa River, Japan, owing to the heavy rainfall that brought tremendous volume of water on the Kanto and Tohoku regions of Japan. In Kinugawa River, the largest record flood occurred in this time, resulting in the levee failure and the corresponding flood disaster in Joso City located in the downstream part of Kinugawa River, as well as the large flood impact on the riverine environment in the Kinugawa channel network. In order to investigate the very initial state of the after-flood-impact throughout the channel network, 13 channel sections with 2 km in longitudinal length were chosen and observed in October 2015. Orthochromatic images of the river channel sections obtained by the UAV measurement with a geographic information system (GIS) were used for analyzing the changes in riverine vegetation distributions and channel form profiles. The results show that there exist three characteristic river segments having different impact-response states in vegetation and channel form changes. The river sections in the most upstream segment indicated severe damage of trees and herbs as well as large movement of gravel bed material, while those in the most downstream segment showed relatively small damage in vegetation distribution and small change in channel forms. Furthermore, relationships between the vegetation damage, channel deformation, channel slopes, and bed shear stresses calculated by a numerical simulation model were discussed in detail along the river network.

  11. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio (RJL/RL, fluidic resistance in the junction channel (RJL) to fluidic resistance in the side channel (RL)) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller RJL/RL values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional methods. The proposed

  12. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio ( R J L / R L , fluidic resistance in the junction channel ( R J L ) to fluidic resistance in the side channel ( R L )) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller R J L / R L values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional

  13. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  14. Channel probe measurements for the American sector clutter experiment, January, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1994-05-20

    The ionospheric phenomenon called Equatorial Spread F encompasses a variety of effects associated with plasma irregularities occurring in the post-sunset and nighttime ionosphere near the magnetic equator. These irregularities can seriously degrade the performance of systems which involve either of necessity or inadvertently radio propagation through the equatorial ionosphere. One such system is Over-the-Horizon (OTH) radars which operate in the high-frequency (hf) band and use ionospheric reflection for forward and backscatter propagation to ranges of thousands of kilometers. When such radars are directed towards the equator, Spread F irregularities can cause scintillation effects which may be aliased into the ranges of interest and have the effect of causing, excess clutter in which targets may be hidden. In January, 1994 Los Alamos participated in a campaign to measure Spread F effects on OTH propagation from the United States looking towards South America in conjunction with local diagnostics in Peru. During the campaign Los Alamos fielded a 1600 km bistatic path between Piura, Peru, and Arequipa, Peru-, the one-hop reflection region for this path was near the magnetic equator, We obtained four types of measurements: an oblique ionogram between Piura and Arequipa every three minutes; Doppler spread and spatial correlation for a single frequency cw path between Piura and Arequipa; Doppler spread, time-delay spread, and spatial coherence for a 10 kHz bandwidth path between Piura and Arequipa-, and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for the one-way path between the AVA radar in New York and Arequipa, Peru. This report describes the diagnostic experiments that we carried out and gives a brief description of some of the data we obtained.

  15. Application of Digital Industrial Photogrammetric Technology to Measure the Surface Accuracy of 13.7 m Millimeter-wave Radio Telescope Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Q. H.; Fang, S. H.; Zuo, Y. X.; Li, Y.; Sun, J. X.; Yang, J.; Li, J. J.; Xu, Y.; He, D. Y.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the surface accuracy of 13.7 m millimeter-wave radio telescope antenna is measured by digital industrial photogrammetric technology. In order to overcome the inconvenience introduced by local conditions, the circular orbits are used to transport the camera and wireless transmission is used to take on-line photos. Measuring targets are made of retro-reflective material. All camera stations are orientated and the homologous image points are matched automatically by the coded targets. The 3D point coordinates are calculated by the bundle adjustment method. Using the methods of CAD surface conversion algorithm and best fitting to calculate the deviation value of the surface, the RMS of the 480 points gotten from CAD best fitting algorithm is adjusted to 0.083 mm. The feasibility and superiority of photogrammetric technology, which is used to measure the radio astronomy antenna's surface, is demonstrated.

  16. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  17. Application of left- and right-looking SAR stereo to depth measurements of the Ammavaru outflow channel, Lada Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Venusian channels are too narrow to be resolved by Magellan's radar altimeter, so they are not visible in the standard topographic data products. Stereo image data, in addition to their benefit to geologic mapping of Venus structures as a whole, are indispensible in measuring the topography across the channels. These measurements can then be used in conjunction with the regional topographic maps based on the altimeter data to produce cross-sectional areas for the channels and estimate the fluid discharge through them. As an example of the application of the stereo image data to venusian channels, a number of test depth and profile measurements were made of the large outflow channel system in Lada Terra, centered at 50 deg S latitude, 21 deg E longitude (F-MIDR 50S021). These measurements were made by viewing the cycle 1 and 2 digital FMIDRs in stereo on a display monitor, so as to minimize the errors in measuring parallax displacement as much as possible. The MIDRs are produced at a scale of 75 m/pixel. This corresponds to a vertical scale of about 17 m/pixel, when calculating the height of a feature from its parallax displacement. An error in placement determination of 1 pixel was assumed to characterize the vertical accuracy as plus or minus 17 m. When this technique was applied to the outflow channel, it was noted that the walls of the collapsed terrain source and 'trough reach' of the channel are laid over in both the cycle 1 and 2 images. This is evident when examining the distance between features on the plateau and the cliff walls in the two images. The layover 'shifts' the features closer to the apparent edge of the wall relative to the oppositely illuminated image.

  18. Measurement of Channel Morphology in a Headwater Stream using Low-Altitude Photography and a 3D Model Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidaira, K.; Hiraoka, M.; Gomi, T.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a method for measuring detail channel morphology using a low elevation photographic scanning. This study was conducted in a 36-m step-pool channel segment in a headwater stream of Ooborazawa watershed located in 20 km south of Tokyo. The channels were covered by Boenninghausenia japonica and Oplismenus undulatifolius var. undulatifolius. Therefore, topographic measurement in high altitude (up to 5 m) using a drone is not applicable. D50 and D90 of channel substrates were 4 cm and 21 cm, respectively. A plastic case that equipped with two digital cameras (RICOH CX5) is mounted at the top of 2.2 m of a glass fiber pole. Photos were taken every 5 seconds from 1.8 m above ground surface. Eleven ground control points (GCP) were installed and measured coordinates. We developed digital 3D topographic model using PhotoScan Pro edition version 1.0.0 and the developed 1 cm contour map using ArcGIS version 10.2. Furthermore, we measured the number, height, and length of steps for examining the accuracy of data. Resolution of obtained topographic model was from 9 to 11 mm per pixel. 1 cm of particle was identified using photo was 1 cm. Estimated step height was agreed to the measured step height in the field. We detected maximum channel scour from October to December, 2014 with (146.5 mm/day for maximum daily rain) occurred at pools with 13cm changes , while 5 to 10 cm of changes in sediment deposition occurred from Mya to June, 2015 with 78.5 mm/day of maximum daily rain. Disposition of sediment was concentration within the sequences of step structures. Our method allows us for understanding detail sediment movement and resultant localized channel changes in steep channels.

  19. Multiband propagation experiment for narrowband characterisation of high elevation angle land mobile-satellite channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, G.; Evans, B. G.; Richharia, M.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a recent multiband propagation measurement campaign for the high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel are reported. Simultaneous narrowband sounding of the channel has been carried out in suburban, wooded and open areas of the UK using a helicopter-mounted platform to simulate the satellite signal at various elevation angles. Propagation related link degradations in the land mobile-satellite channel have been observed to be less severe when the path elevation angle is increased or radio frequency decreases.

  20. Characterization and Absolute QE Measurements of Delta-Doped N-Channel and P-Channel CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquot, Blake C.; Monacos, Steve P.; Jones, Todd J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the methodology for making absolute quantum efficiency (QE) measurements from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) through the near infrared (NIR) on delta-doped silicon CCDs. Delta-doped detectors provide an excellent platform to validate measurements through the VUV due to their enhanced UV response. The requirements for measuring QE through the VUV are more strenuous than measurements in the near UV and necessitate, among other things, the use of a vacuum monochromator, and good camera vacuum to prevent chip condensation, and more stringent handling requirements. The system used for these measurements was originally designed for deep UV characterization of CCDs for the WF/PC instrument on Hubble and later for Cassini CCDs.

  1. Estimation of turbulent channel flow based on the wall measurement with a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yosuke; Suzuki, Takao

    2016-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow at Ret au = 100 with periodic boundary conditions is estimated with linear stochastic estimation only based on the wall measurement, i.e. the shear-stress in the streamwise and spanwise directions as well as the pressure over the entire wavenumbers. The results reveal that instantaneous measurement on the wall governs the success of the estimation in y+ < 20. Degrees of agreement are equivalent to those reported by Chevalier et al. (2006) using a data-assimilation approach. This suggests that the instantaneous wall information dictates the estimation rather than the estimator solving the dynamical system. We feed the velocity components from the linear stochastic estimation via the body-force term into the Navier-Stokes system; however, the estimation slightly improves in the log layer, indicating some benefit of involving a dynamical system but over-suppression of turbulent kinetic energy beyond the viscous sublayer by the linear stochastic estimation. Motions inaccurately estimated in the buffer layer prevent from further reconstruction toward the centerline even if we relax the feedback forcing and let the flow evolve nonlinearly through the estimator. We also argue the inherent limitation of turbulent flow estimation based on the wall measurement.

  2. Large {sigma} Channel Low-Mass Enhancement in Exclusively Measured Double Pionic Fusion to 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkanov, M.; Skorodko, T.; Clement, H.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Wagner, G. J.

    2006-07-11

    The pd {yields} 3He {pi}0{pi}0 and pd {yields} 3He {pi}+{pi}- reactions have been measured exclusively at CELSIUS using the WASA 4{pi} detector with pellet target system. For the double-pionic fusion to 3He data have been taken at Tp = 0.893 GeV, where the maximum of the socalled ABC effect is expected. A very large low-mass enhancement is observed in the {pi}0{pi}0 invariant mass spectrum M{pi}0{pi}0, whereas only a moderate low-mass enhancement is seen in M{pi}+{pi}- raising thus the question of isospin invariance in this region. With both channels summed up the data agree well to previous inclusive measurements regarding the low-mass enhancement. However, they do not exhibit the high-mass enhancement seen in the inclusive measurements and predicted by theoretical calculations based on a {delta}{delta} process, which produces a double-hump structure in the M{pi}{pi} spectra.

  3. A multi-channel magnetic induction tomography measurement system for human brain model imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Luo, Haijun; He, Wei; He, Chuanhong; Song, Xiaodong; Zahng, Zhanglong

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes a multi-channel magnetic induction tomography measurement system for biological conductivity imaging in a human brain model. A hemispherical glass bowl filled with a salt solution is used as the human brain model; meanwhile, agar blocks of different conductivity are placed in the solution to simulate the intracerebral hemorrhage. The excitation and detection coils are fixed co-axially, and the axial gradiometer is used as the detection coil in order to cancel the primary field. On the outer surface of the glass bowl, 15 sensor units are arrayed in two circles as measurement parts, and a single sensor unit for cancelling the phase drift is placed beside the glass bowl. The phase sensitivity of our system is 0.204 degrees /S m(-1) with the excitation frequency of 120 kHz and the phase noise is in the range of -0.03 degrees to +0.05 degrees . Only the coaxial detection coil is available for each excitation coil; therefore, 15 phase data are collected in each measurement turn. Finally, the two-dimensional images of conductivity distribution are obtained using an interpolation algorithm. The frequency-varying experiment indicates that the imaging quality becomes better as the excitation frequency is increased.

  4. Differential spectral attenuation measurements at microwaves in a LEO-LEO satellites radio occultation geometry: a novel approach for limiting scintillation effects in tropospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facheris, Luca; Martini, Enrica; Cuccoli, Fabrizio; Argenti, Fabrizio

    2004-12-01

    The DSA (Differential Spectral Attenuation) approach, presented in a companion paper in this conference's proceedings, has the potential to provide the total content of water vapor (IWV, Integrated Water Vapor) along the propagation path between two Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites. The interest towards the DSA, based on the ratio of simultaneous measurements of the total attenuation at two relatively close frequencies in the K-Ku bands, was moved by the need for limiting the effects of tropopheric scintillation and by the fact that DSA measurements are highly correlated to the IWV along the LEO-LEO link. However, the impact of tropospheric scintillation in a LEO-LEO radio occultation geometry using frequencies above 10 GHz still has to be thoroughly investigated. In this paper we focus on the analysis of such effects, taking into account the fact that the formulations presented in the literature have to be modified in order to fit the specific problem under consideration. Specifically, an expression is derived for the variances of the amplitude and phase fluctuations of the wave, their spectrum and the correlation between fluctuations at different frequencies. In particular, the latter is extremely useful to evaluate the potential of the DSA approach through simulations whose results are reported in the last part of the paper.

  5. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* MERCURY ( PLANET ), (*RADIO ASTRONOMY, EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, SKY BRIGHTNESS, ANTENNAS...EPHEMERIDES, ASTROPHYSICS, JUPITER( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), BRIGHTNESS, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, INTENSITY, MEASUREMENT.

  6. Functional Reconstitution and Channel Activity Measurements of Purified Wildtype and Mutant CFTR Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eckford, Paul D. W.; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  7. Evanescent field-based optical fiber sensing device for measuring the refractive index of liquids in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Polynkin, PaveL; Polynkin, Alexander; Peyghambarian, N; Mansuripur, Masud

    2005-06-01

    We report a simple optical sensing device capable of measuring the refractive index of liquids propagating in microfluidic channels. The sensor is based on a single-mode optical fiber that is tapered to submicrometer dimensions and immersed in a transparent curable soft polymer. A channel for liquid analyte is created in the immediate vicinity of the taper waist. Light propagating through the tapered section of the fiber extends into the channel, making the optical loss in the system sensitive to the refractive-index difference between the polymer and the liquid. The fabrication process and testing of the prototype sensing devices are described. The sensor can operate both as a highly responsive on-off device and in the continuous measurement mode, with an estimated accuracy of refractive-index measurement of approximately 5 x 10(-4).

  8. Characteristics of four-channel Cherenkov-type detector for measurements of runaway electrons in the ISTTOK tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2010-10-15

    A diagnostics capable of characterizing the runaway and superthermal electrons has been developing on the ISTTOK tokamak. In previous paper, a use of single-channel Cherenkov-type detector with titanium filter for runaway electron studies in ISTTOK was reported. To measure fast electron populations with different energies, a prototype of a four-channel detector with molybdenum filters was designed. Test-stand studies of filters with different thicknesses (1, 3, 7, 10, 20, 50, and 100 {mu}m) have shown that they should allow the detection of electrons with energies higher than 69, 75, 87, 95, 120, 181, and 260 keV, respectively. First results of measurements with the four-channel detector revealed the possibility to measure reliably different fast electrons populations simultaneously.

  9. 78 FR 25577 - Safety Zone, Figure Eight Causeway Channel; Figure Eight Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... marine information broadcasts, local notice to mariners, commercial radio stations, and area newspapers... announced via Marine Safety Radio Broadcast on VHF Marine Band Radio channel 22 (157.1 MHz) that this... at telephone number (910) 343-3882 or by radio on VHF Marine Band Radio, channels 13 and 16....

  10. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  11. Direct measurements by submersible of surge-type turbidity currents in a fjord channel, southeast Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, E.A. . Dept. of Geology); Powell, R.D. . Geology Dept.); Lawson, D.E. ); Carlson, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    High density, high-speed turbidity currents were observed and their properties measured in submarine channels in Queen Inlet, southeast Alaska during June, 1990 and 1991. A ROV submersible fitted with two video cameras, a CTD, an optical backscatter turbidity monitor (OBS), and electromagnetic current meter, and sidescan sonar was used to collect data from within and above the flows. Multiple flows were recorded during a ROV dive at 2.3 km from the delta front in a channel at 104 m depth. Flows were marked by sudden increases in turbidity and current velocity. In one flow, turbidity increased from 300 to 1,600 OBS units (instrument maximum) in 10 sec, and within 9.4 min, salinity (S) steadily decreased by 12.1 ppt, with only a 0.2 C temperature (T) increase. Density differences between the flow and ambient water require a minimum sediment concentration of 97 g/l. Maximum flow velocity exceeded 3.3 m/s. A vertical ROV profile indicated a flow thickness of 10 m. The upper surface was visually identified by billowing suspended sediment and by fluctuating OBS and T as ambient and flow water mixed in turbulent eddies. A faster S decrease and slower T increase with distance into and away from the flow indicate that thermal diffusive processes were less efficient than convective mass transfer. The S change indicates that flow water and ambient water mixed well beyond the flow defined by high turbidity. Warm water temperatures within the flow and low meltwater stream discharge suggest that these flows originated from the delta front and are not continuous underflows.

  12. The Effect of a Chandra-measured Merger-related Gas Component on the Lobes of a Dead Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Hardcastle, M. J.

    2007-04-01

    We use Chandra data to infer that an X-ray-bright component of gas is in the process of separating the radio lobes of 3C 442A. This is the first radio galaxy with convincing evidence that central gas, overpressured with respect to the lobe plasma and not simply a static atmosphere, is having a major dynamical effect on the radio structure. We speculate that the expansion of the gas also reexcites electrons in the lobes of 3C 442A through compression and adiabatic heating. Two features of 3C 442A contribute to its dynamical state. First, the radio source is no longer being powered by a detected active jet, so that the dynamical state of the radio plasma is at the mercy of the ambient medium. Second, the two early-type galaxies, NGC 7236 and NGC 7237, one of which was the original host of 3C 442A, are undergoing a merger and have already experienced a close encounter, suggesting that the X-ray-bright gas is mostly the heated combined galaxy atmospheres. The lobes have been swept apart for ~108 yr by the pressure-driven expansion of the X-ray-bright inner gas.

  13. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  14. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  15. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  16. Evaluating the use of drone photogrammetry for measurement of stream channel morphology and response to high flow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katie; Ballow, William

    2015-04-01

    Traditional high-precision survey methods for stream channel measurement are labor-intensive and require wadeability or boat access to streams. These conditions limit the number of sites researchers are able to study and generally prohibit the possibility of repeat channel surveys to evaluate short-term fluctuations in channel morphology. In recent years, unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) equipped with photo and video capabilities have become widely available and affordable. Concurrently, developments in photogrammetric software offer unprecedented mapping and 3D rendering capabilities of drone-captured photography. In this study, we evaluate the potential use of drone-mounted cameras for detailed stream channel morphometric analysis. We used a relatively low-cost drone (DJI Phantom 2+ Vision) and commercially available, user friendly software (Agisoft Photscan) for photogrammetric analysis of drone-captured stream channel photography. Our test study was conducted on Proctor Creek, a highly responsive urban stream in Atlanta, Georgia, within the crystalline Piedmont region of the southeastern United States. As a baseline, we performed traditional high-precision survey methods to collect morphological measurements (e.g., bankfull and wetted width, bankfull and wetted thalweg depth) at 11 evenly-spaced transects, following USGS protocols along reaches of 20 times average channel width. We additionally used the drone to capture 200+ photos along the same reaches, concurrent with the channel survey. Using the photogrammetry software, we generated georeferenced 3D models of the stream channel, from which morphological measurements were derived from the 11 transects and compared with measurements from the traditional survey method. We additionally explored possibilities for novel morphometric characterization available from the continuous 3D surface, as an improvement on the limited number of detailed cross-sections available from standard methods. These results showed

  17. Measurement of the radiation energy in the radio signal of extensive air showers as a universal estimator of cosmic-ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-06-14

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 ± 0.7 (stat) ± 6.7 (sys) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principle calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  18. Measurement of the radiation energy in the radio signal of extensive air showers as a universal estimator of cosmic-ray energy

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-06-14

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 ± 0.7 (stat) ± 6.7 (sys) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principle calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade ofmore » extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.« less

  19. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy.

    PubMed

    Aab, A; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Al Samarai, I; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Almela, A; Alvarez Castillo, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Alves Batista, R; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Awal, N; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blanco, M; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Brogueira, P; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; de Mello Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Diaz, J C; Díaz Castro, M L; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q; Dos Anjos, R C; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; García, B; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Golup, G; Gómez Berisso, M; Gómez Vitale, P F; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Kukec Mezek, G; Kunka, N; Kuotb Awad, A W; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Le Coz, S; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; López Casado, A; Louedec, K; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Martínez Bravo, O; Martraire, D; Masías Meza, J J; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meissner, R; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Müller, S; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrov, Y; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Salesa Greus, F; Salina, G; Sanabria Gomez, J D; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suarez Durán, M; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tepe, A; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Todero Peixoto, C J; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torralba Elipe, G; Torres Machado, D; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés Galicia, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; van den Berg, A M; van Velzen, S; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Vargas Cárdenas, B; Varner, G; Vasquez, R; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Welling, C; Werner, F; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yapici, T; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zuccarello, F

    2016-06-17

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8±0.7(stat)±6.7(syst)  MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principles calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  20. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A. W.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Welling, C.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 ±0.7 (stat)±6.7 (syst) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principles calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  1. Measurement of the top quark mass with the template method in the [Formula: see text] channel using ATLAS data.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Akiyama, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barashkou, A; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Benchouk, C; Bendel, M; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertin, A; Bertinelli, F; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bona, M; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, C N; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brown, H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; 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Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wunstorf, R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Xu, D; Xu, G; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaets, V G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zolnierowski, Y; Zsenei, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    The top quark mass has been measured using the template method in the [Formula: see text] channel based on data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of [Formula: see text] and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb(-1). The analyses in the e+jets and μ+jets decay channels yield consistent results. The top quark mass is measured to be mtop=174.5±0.6stat±2.3syst GeV.

  2. Measurement of the effect of electric field on lipid ion channel conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, P.D.; Cornell, B. CSIRO, North Ryde, New South Wales )

    1992-01-01

    This presentation reports on results from a new technique for measuring conformational changes by solid state NMR, in lipid membranes and membrane spanning ion channels, in response to the direct application of electrical field. An apparatus for applying biphasic electric field pulses of up to 20 MV/m to samples of aligned lipids held in an NMR probe, together with methods for the improvement of field homogeneity, will be described. In particular it has been found possible to obtain aligned lipid bilayers of very high impedance by substituting anhydrous glycerol for water. Measurements have been carried out on cholestric liquid crystals, on dilauryl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and on melittin in DLPC. The interaction of electric fields with aligned bilayers and powdered samples of DLPC and DOPE will be described, showing elongation of vesicles in response to the field and showing electric field induced Lalpha to powder to Hexll conversion in DOPE. The effect of electric fields on melittin incorporated into aligned lipid bilayers of DLPC will also be reported.

  3. Three-Dimensional Holographic Refractive-Index Measurement of Continuously Flowing Cells in a Microfluidic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Lue, Niyom; Hamza, Bashar; Martel, Joseph; Irimia, Daniel; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The refractive index of biological specimens is a source of intrinsic contrast that can be explored without any concerns of photobleaching or harmful effects caused by extra contrast agents. In addition, the refractive index contains rich information related to the metabolism of cells at the cellular and subcellular levels. Here, we report a no-moving-parts approach that provides three-dimensional refractive-index maps of biological samples continuously flowing in a microfluidic channel. Specifically, we use line illumination and off-axis digital holography to record the angular spectra of light scattered from flowing samples at high speed. Applying the scalar diffraction theory, we obtain accurate refractive-index maps of the samples from the measured spectra. Using this method, we demonstrate label-free three-dimensional imaging of live RKO human colon cancer cells and RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells, and obtain the volume, dry mass, and density of these cells from the measured three-dimensional refractive-index maps. Our results show that the reported method, alone or in combination with the existing flow cytometry techniques, shows promise as a quantitative tool for stain-free characterization of a large number of cells.

  4. Turbulence Measurements from a Moored Platform at Mid-Depth in a Swift Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Alex; Lueck, Rolf; Wolk, Fabian; McMillan, Justine

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from a turbulence experiment with a 3-m long streamlined floatation body, instrumented with velocity shear probes, fast-response thermistors, a 1 MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (AD2CP), and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). The system was deployed over seven tidal cycles at mid-depth in a 30-m deep tidal channel in the lower Bay of Fundy, Canada. Peak flow speeds exceeded 2 m s-1, and while 10-min time scale average speeds were similar between ebb and flood, the variances were markedly higher during flood. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rates measured with the shear probes exhibit a pronounced flood/ebb contrast: O(10-4) W kg-1 peak values during flood, but lower by an order of magnitude during ebb. Dissipation rates follow u3 scaling over a wide range of flow speeds between 0.5 and 2.5 m s-1. Below 0.5 m s-1 an asymmetry in the mounting arrangement caused the floatation body to pitch upward, biasing the measured dissipation values high. The ADV on the platform registered mean speed - used to implement Taylor's hypothesis - which was corroborated with the platform-mounted ADCP. Additional ADCPs were also deployed on a nearby bottom pod, sampling at turbulence resolving rates - up to 8 Hz. Comparisons between the shear probe and acoustic estimates of the TKE spectrum and dissipation rate - at comparable depths - are presented.

  5. Enhanced Temporal Resolution with Ion Channel-Functionalized Sensors Using a Conductance-Based Measurement Protocol.

    PubMed

    Agasid, Mark T; Comi, Troy J; Saavedra, S Scott; Aspinwall, Craig A

    2017-01-17

    The binding of a target analyte to an ion channel (IC), which is readily detected electrochemically in a label-free manner with single-molecule selectivity and specificity, has generated widespread interest in using natural and engineered ICs as transducers in biosensing platforms. To date, the majority of developments in IC-functionalized sensing have focused on IC selectivity or sensitivity or development of suitable membrane environments and aperture geometries. Comparatively little work has addressed analytical performance criteria, particularly criteria required for temporal measurements of dynamic processes. We report a measurement protocol suitable for rapid, time-resolved monitoring (≤30 ms) of IC-modulated membrane conductance. Key features of this protocol include the reduction of membrane area and the use of small voltage steps (10 mV) and short duration voltage pulses (10 ms), which have the net effect of reducing the capacitive charging and decreasing the time required to achieve steady state currents. Application of a conductance protocol employing three sequential, 10 ms voltage steps (-10 mV, -20 mV, -30 mV) in an alternating, pyramid-like arrangement enabled sampling of membrane conductance every 30 ms. Using this protocol, dynamic IC measurements on black lipid membranes (BLMs) functionalized with gramicidin A were conducted using a fast perfusion system. BLM conductance decreased by 76 ± 7.5% within 30 ms of switching from solutions containing 0 to 1 M Ca(2+), which demonstrates the feasibility of using this approach to monitor rapid, dynamic chemical processes. Rapid conductance measurements will be broadly applicable to IC-based sensors that undergo analyte-specific gating.

  6. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  7. 47 CFR 95.7 - Channel sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channel sharing. 95.7 Section 95.7... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.7 Channel sharing. (a) Channels or channel pairs (one 462... and use of channels to reduce interference and to make the most effective use of the facilities....

  8. 47 CFR 95.7 - Channel sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel sharing. 95.7 Section 95.7... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.7 Channel sharing. (a) Channels or channel pairs (one 462... and use of channels to reduce interference and to make the most effective use of the facilities....

  9. Calcium permeability of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 4 channels measured by TRPC4-GCaMP6s

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Juyeon; Myeong, Jongyun; Yang, Dongki

    2017-01-01

    Conflicting evidence has been obtained regarding whether transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC) are store-operated channels (SOCs) or receptor-operated channels (ROCs). Moreover, the Ca/Na permeability ratio differs depending on whether the current-voltage (I-V) curve has a doubly rectifying shape or inward rectifying shape. To investigate the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels, we attached GCaMP6s to TRPC4 and simultaneously measured the current and calcium signals. A TRPC4 specific activator, (–)-englerin A, induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. Muscarinic receptor stimulator, carbachol, also induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. By forming heteromers with TRPC4, TRPC1 significantly reduced the inward current with outward rectifying I-V curve, which also caused the decrease of calcium fluorescence intensity. These results suggest that GCaMP6s attached to TRPC4 can detect slight calcium changes near TRPC4 channels. Consequently, TRPC4-GCaMP6s can be a useful tool for testing the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels. PMID:28066150

  10. Multiplexing of Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Pellerano, F. A.; Stahle, C. M.; Aidala, K.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present results on wavelength division multiplexing of radio-frequency single electron transistors. We use a network of resonant impedance matching circuits to direct applied rf carrier waves to different transistors depending on carrier frequency. A two-channel demonstration of this concept using discrete components successfully reconstructed input signals with small levels of cross coupling. A lithographic version of the rf circuits had measured parameters in agreement with electromagnetic modeling, with reduced cross capacitance and inductance, and should allow 20 to 50 channels to be multiplexed.

  11. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dileptonic decay channel at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirman, Nathan

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the top quark mass (Mt) in the dileptonic decay channel using data from proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 ± 0.5 fb‑1. The analysis is based on three observables whose distributions are sensitive to the value of Mt. The Mbl invariant mass and MT2 'stransverse mass' observables are employed in a simultaneous fit to determine the value of Mt and an overall jet energy scale factor (JSF). In a complementary approach, the MT2-assisted on-shell reconstruction technique is used to construct an Mblv invariant mass observable that is combined with MT2 to measure Mt. The shapes of the observables, along with their evolutions in Mt and JSF, are modeled by a non-parametric Gaussian process regression technique. The sensitivity of the observables to the value of Mt is investigated using a Fisher information density function. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.22 ± 0.18 (stat) ± 0.91 (syst) GeV. This dissertation also presents a missing transverse momentum (MET) significance variable, which is used to estimate the compatibility of the reconstructed MET with a zero nominal value. This variable may be used to discriminate between events containing real MET due to undetected particles and spurious MET due to object misreconstruction, finite detector resolution, or detector noise. The MET significance variable is tuned using data-driven techniques, and its performance is evaluated using the CMS Run 1 and Run 2 datasets.

  12. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a recently discovered phenomenon consisting of short (few ms) bursts of radio waves that have dispersion measures that strongly suggest an extragalactic and possibly cosmological origin. Current best estimates for the rate of FRBs is several thousand per sky per day at radio frequencies near 1.4 GHz. Even with so high a rate, to date, fewer than 20 FRBs have been reported, with one source showing repeated bursts. In this talk I will describe known FRB properties including what is known about the lone repeating source, as well as models for the origin of these mysterious events. I will also describe the CHIME radio telescope, currently under construction in Canada. Thanks to its great sensitivity and unprecedented field-of-view, CHIME promises major progress on FRBs.

  13. Determining Electrical Properties Based on B1 Fields Measured in an MR Scanner Using a Multi-channel Transmit/Receive Coil: a General Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Electrical Property Tomography (EPT) is a recently developed noninvasive technology to image the electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues at Larmor frequency in Magnetic Resonance (MR) scanners. The absolute phase of the complex radio-frequency (RF) magnetic field (B1) is necessary for electrical property calculation. However, due to the lack of practical methods to directly measure the absolute B1 phases, current EPT techniques have been achieved with B1 phase estimation based on certain assumptions on object anatomy, coil structure and/or electromagnetic wave behavior associated with the main magnetic field, limiting EPT from a larger variety of applications. In this study, using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil, the framework of a new general approach for EPT has been introduced, which is independent on the assumptions utilized in previous studies. Using a human head model with realistic geometry, a series of computer simulations at 7T were conducted to evaluate the proposed method under different noise levels. Results showed that the proposed method can be used to reconstruct the conductivity and permittivity images with noticeable accuracy and stability. The feasibility of this approach was further evaluated in a phantom experiment at 7T. PMID:23743673

  14. Sodium channel subconductance levels measured with a new variance-mean analysis

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The currents through single Na+ channels were recorded from dissociated cells of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle of the mouse. At 15 degrees C the prolonged bursts of Na+ channel openings produced by application of the drug DPI 201-106 had brief sojourns to subconductance levels. The subconductance events were relatively rare and brief, but could be identified using a new technique that sorts amplitude estimates based on their variance. The resulting "levels histogram" had a resolution of the conductance levels during channel activity that was superior to that of standard amplitude histograms. Cooling the preparation to 0 degrees C prolonged the subconductance events, and permitted further quantitative analysis of their amplitudes, as well as clear observations of single-channel subconductance events from untreated Na+ channels. In all cases the results were similar: a subconductance level, with an amplitude of roughly 35% of the fully open conductance and similar reversal potential, was present in both drug-treated and normal Na+ channels. Drug-treated channels spent approximately 3-6% of their total open time in the subconductance state over a range of potentials that caused the open probability to vary between 0.1 and 0.9. The summed levels histograms from many channels had a distinctive form, with broader, asymmetrical open and substate distributions compared with those of the closed state. Individual subconductance events to levels other than the most common 35% were also observed. I conclude that subconductance events are a normal subset of the open state of Na+ channels, whether or not they are drug treated. The subconductance events may represent a conformational alteration of the channel that occurs when it conducts ions. PMID:2849627

  15. A Channelization-Based DOA Estimation Method for Wideband Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Qianqiang; Chen, Zengping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method for wideband signals with sensor arrays. The proposed method splits the wideband array output into multiple frequency sub-channels and estimates the signal parameters using a digital channelization receiver. Based on the output sub-channels, a channelization-based incoherent signal subspace method (Channelization-ISM) and a channelization-based test of orthogonality of projected subspaces method (Channelization-TOPS) are proposed. Channelization-ISM applies narrowband signal subspace methods on each sub-channel independently. Then the arithmetic mean or geometric mean of the estimated DOAs from each sub-channel gives the final result. Channelization-TOPS measures the orthogonality between the signal and the noise subspaces of the output sub-channels to estimate DOAs. The proposed channelization-based method isolates signals in different bandwidths reasonably and improves the output SNR. It outperforms the conventional ISM and TOPS methods on estimation accuracy and dynamic range, especially in real environments. Besides, the parallel processing architecture makes it easy to implement on hardware. A wideband digital array radar (DAR) using direct wideband radio frequency (RF) digitization is presented. Experiments carried out in a microwave anechoic chamber with the wideband DAR are presented to demonstrate the performance. The results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27384566

  16. Mass Flow Rate Measurements in a MicroChannel: from Hydrodynamic to Free Molecular Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graur, I. A.; Perrier, P.; Ghozlani, W.; Méolans, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Mass flow rate measurements in a single silicon micro channel were carried out for various gases in isothermal steady flows. The results obtained, from hydrodynamic to near free molecular regime by using a powerful experimental platform, allowed us to deduce interesting information, notably about the reflection/accommodation process at the wall. In the 0-0.3 Knudsen range, a continuum approximated analytic approach was derived from NS equations, associated to first or second order slip boundary conditions. Identifying the experimental mass flow rate curves to the theoretical ones the TMAC of various gases were extracted. Over all the Knudsen range [0-50] the experimental results were compared with theoretical values calculated from kinetic approaches: using variable TMAC values as fitting parameter, the theoretical curves were fitted to the experimental ones. Whatever the Knudsen range and the theoretical approach, the TMAC values are found decreasing when the molecular weights of the gas considered increase (as long as the different gases are compared using the same approach). Moreover, the values of the various accommodation coefficients are rather close one to other but sufficiently smaller than unity to conclude that the full accommodation modelling is not satisfactory to describe the gas/wall interaction.

  17. Determination of the manning coefficient from measured bed roughness in natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limerinos, John Thomas

    1970-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to test the hypothesis that basic values of the Manning roughness coefficient of stream channels may be related to (1) some characteristic size of the streambed particles and to (2) the distribution of particle size. These two elements involving particle size can be combined into a single element by weighting characteristic particle sizes. The investigation was confined to channels with coarse bed material to avoid the complication of bed-form roughness that is associated with alluvial channels composed of fine bed material. Fifty current-meter measurements of discharge and appropriate field surveys were made at 11 sites on California streams for the purpose of computing the roughness coefficient, n, by the Manning formula. The test sites were selected to give a wide range in average size of bed material, and the discharge measurements and surveys were made at such times as to provide data covering a suitable range in stream depth. The sites selected were relatively free of the extraneous flow-retarding effects associated with irregular channel conformation and streambank vegetation. The characteristic bed-particle sizes used in the analyses were the 16,- 50,- and 84-percentile sizes as obtained from a cumulative frequency distribution of the diameters of randomly sampled surficial bed material. Separate distributions were computed for the minimum and intermediate values of the three diameters of a particle. The minimum diameters of the streambed particles were used in the study because a particle at rest on the bed invariably has its minimum diameter in the vertical position; this diameter is, therefore, the most representative measure of roughness height. The intermediate diameter was also studied because this is the diameter most easily measurable-either by sieve analysis or by photographic techniques--and--because it is the diameter that had been used in previous studies by other investigators. No significant

  18. Automatic Measurement of Water Levels by Using Image Identification Method in Open Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han; Xue Yang, Jia

    2014-05-01

    Water level data is indispensable to hydrology research, and it is important information for hydraulic engineering and overall utilization of water resources. The information of water level can be transmitted to management office by the network so that the management office may well understand whether the river level is exceeding the warning line. The existing water level measurement method can only present water levels in a form of data without any of images, the methods which make data just be a data and lack the sense of reality. Those images such as the rising or overflow of river level that the existing measurement method cannot obtain simultaneously. Therefore, this research employs a newly, improved method for water level measurement. Through the Video Surveillance System to record the images on site, an image of water surface will be snapped, and then the snapped image will be pre-processed and be compared with its altitude reference value to obtain a water level altitude value. With the ever-growing technology, the application scope of image identification is widely in increase. This research attempts to use image identification technology to analyze water level automatically. The image observation method used in this research is one of non-contact water level gage but it is quite different from other ones; the image observation method is cheap and the facilities can be set up beside an embankment of river or near the houses, thus the impact coming from external factors will be significantly reduced, and a real scene picture will be transmitted through wireless transmission. According to the dynamic water flow test held in an indoor experimental channel, the results of the research indicated that all of error levels of water level identification were less than 2% which meant the image identification could achieve identification result at different water levels. This new measurement method can offer instant river level figures and on-site video so that a

  19. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of an Enhanced System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an enhanced on-line diagnostic system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements is developed for the aircraft engine application. The enhanced system is composed of a nonlinear on-board engine model (NOBEM), the hybrid Kalman filter (HKF) algorithm, and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The NOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. The NOBEM is further utilized as part of the HKF algorithm which estimates measured engine parameters. Engine parameters obtained from the dual-channel measurements, the NOBEM, and the HKF are compared against each other. When the discrepancy among the signals exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of discrepancy. Through this approach, the enhanced system achieves the following objectives: 1) anomaly detection, 2) component fault detection, and 3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the enhanced system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components, and it is compared to an existing baseline system.

  20. The ionosphere as a focusing lens - A case study involving simultaneous type III solar radio storm measurements from the ISIS 1 and 2 and ISEE 3 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, H. G.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using terrestrial ionospheric focusing to improve the directivity of electric dipoles on space missions has been investigated by comparing simultaneous observations of a solar radio storm by the ISIS 1 and ISIS 2 spacecraft, in near earth orbit, and the ISEE 3 spacecraft located beyond the magnetosphere. To this end, a three-dimensional ray tracing in a spherically stratified ionosphere has been carried out for conditions appropriate to the observations by the ISIS spacecraft of a solar radio storm in September 1983. The procedure allows Poynting flux spectral densities measured on ISIS to be converted to spectral densities well outside the ionosphere where they can be compared directly with simultaneous observations on ISEE 3. The results demonstrate good agreement over their common observing frequency range (1-2 MHz).

  1. The ionosphere as a focusing lens - A case study involving simultaneous type III solar radio storm measurements from the ISIS 1 and 2 and ISEE 3 satellites

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.G.; Benson, R.F.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R.G. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-06-01

    The possibility of using terrestrial ionospheric focusing to improve the directivity of electric dipoles on space missions has been investigated by comparing simultaneous observations of a solar radio storm by the ISIS 1 and ISIS 2 spacecraft, in near earth orbit, and the ISEE 3 spacecraft located beyond the magnetosphere. To this end, a three-dimensional ray tracing in a spherically stratified ionosphere has been carried out for conditions appropriate to the observations by the ISIS spacecraft of a solar radio storm in September 1983. The procedure allows Poynting flux spectral densities measured on ISIS to be converted to spectral densities well outside the ionosphere where they can be compared directly with simultaneous observations on ISEE 3. The results demonstrate good agreement over their common observing frequency range (1-2 MHz). 21 refs.

  2. Population exposure to electromagnetic fields generated by radio base stations: evaluation of the urban background by using provisional model and instrumental measurements.

    PubMed

    Anglesio, L; Benedetto, A; Bonino, A; Colla, D; Martire, F; Saudino Fusette, S; d'Amore, G

    2001-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation, which is used by broadcasting and mobile telephone systems to transmit information, permeates the city environment. In order to properly evaluate population exposure to electromagnetic fields, knowledge of their intensity and spectral components is necessary. In this study the results of radiofrequency field monitoring carried out in Torino, a large town located in the north-west of Italy are shown: the variation of the electromagnetic field strength is evaluated as a function of the height from the ground, the location in the urban area and the frequency. separating the contributions of the different sources (broadcasting antennas and radio base stations for mobile phones). Furthermore, the contribution of the radio base stations is theoretically evaluated, adding the emissions off all installations situated in Torino and examining the field strength maps calculated, considering the orography, for different heights. The theoretical values are also compared with those measured in the frequency range of mobile telephony emissions.

  3. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-27

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers' works.

  4. Measuring and Evaluating the Role of ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Bao, Li; Rindler, Michael J.; Hong, Miyoun; Patel, Tejaskumar; Taskin, Eylem; Coetzee, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Since ion channels move electrical charge during their activity, they have traditionally been studied using electrophysiological approaches. This was sometimes combined with mathematical models, for example with the description of the ionic mechanisms underlying the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the squid giant axon by Hodgkin and Huxley. The methods for studying ion channels also have strong roots in protein chemistry (limited proteolysis, the use of antibodies, etc). The advent of the molecular cloning and the identification of genes coding for specific ion channel subunits in the late 1980’s introduced a multitude of new techniques with which to study ion channels and the field has been rapidly expanding ever since (e.g. antibody development against specific peptide sequences, mutagenesis, the use of gene targeting in animal models, determination of their protein structures) and new methods are still in development. This review focuses on techniques commonly employed to examine ion channel function in a electrophysiological laboratory. The focus is on the KATP channel, but many of the techniques described are also used to study other ion channels. PMID:22245446

  5. Link Dependent Adaptive Radio Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    14. ABSTRACT This paper shows the optimized Link Dependent Adaptive Radio (LDAR) using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel...bit error rate (BER), Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing ( OFDM ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel conditions. The LDAR enhanced performance is illustrated by use of a flight path

  6. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  7. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  8. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Choi, M. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldstein, M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D. A.; Szabo, A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  9. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus. Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Andre, M.; Bolton, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bowen, T. A.; Burgess, D.; Cattell, C. A.; Chandran, B. D. G.; Chaston, C. C.; Chen, C. H. K.; Choi, M. K.; Connerney, J. E.; Cranmer, S.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Donakowski, W.; Drake, J. F.; Farrell, W. M.; Fergeau, P.; Fermin, J.; Fischer, J.; Fox, N.; Glaser, D.; Goldstein, M.; Gordon, D.; Hanson, E.; Harris, S. E.; Hayes, L. M.; Hinze, J. J.; Hollweg, J. V.; Horbury, T. S.; Howard, R. A.; Hoxie, V.; Jannet, G.; Karlsson, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kien, M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Krucker, S.; Lynch, J. J.; Maksimovic, M.; Malaspina, D. M.; Marker, S.; Martin, P.; Martinez-Oliveros, J.; McCauley, J.; McComas, D. J.; McDonald, T.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Moncuquet, M.; Monson, S. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Murphy, S. D.; Odom, J.; Oliverson, R.; Olson, J.; Parker, E. N.; Pankow, D.; Phan, T.; Quataert, E.; Quinn, T.; Ruplin, S. W.; Salem, C.; Seitz, D.; Sheppard, D. A.; Siy, A.; Stevens, K.; Summers, D.; Szabo, A.; Timofeeva, M.; Vaivads, A.; Velli, M.; Yehle, A.; Werthimer, D.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  10. Constraining the Post-Shock Magnetic Field Strength of SN1006 from the Rotation Measure of Radio Galaxy ESO 328-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewellen, Lilly; Dills, Sidney; Moffett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    In a radio polarization study of the supernova remnant (SNR) of SN1006, we found evidence for variable Faraday rotation toward the FR-I radio galaxy ESO 328-13. The background source lies on the eastern edge of the SNR, and its jets are aligned east to west. The core and western lobe lie within the remnant's interior, and the eastern lobe extends from the interior to the exterior of the SNR's shell. The rotation measure (RM) of the eastern lobe experiences a shift of 20 rad/m2 as it traverses the shell, then exhibits a gradient whose magnitude decreases toward the interior so that the RM is the same for the edges of the radio galaxy's eastern and western lobes. After rotating the field vectors to zero wavelength, we found that the magnetic field orientation of the SNR is radial with respect to the shell, while the magnetic vectors of the radio jets are perpendicular to their axes, a typical trait of FR-I sources. These results suggest the variation in RM is not intrinsic to the radio galaxy; rather, the variation is a direct effect of SN1006's post-shock environment.This discovery presents us with a unique opportunity to constrain the post-shock magnetic field and electron density distribution of SN1006. The SNR behaves as a magnetized plasma screen partially covering the background radio galaxy. The Faraday depth of the screen is a maximum at the edge of the shell and decreases toward the interior. Assuming an electron density of 0.20 cm-3 (estimated from IR and X-ray observations) and a path length of 6 pc through the SNR, we derive a line-of-sight magnetic field of 20 μG at the edge of the shell. For a range of aspect angles with respect to the line of sight, from zero to 80 degrees, the magnitude of the field could range from 20 to > 100 μG. This result compares well with theoretical estimates of 14 to 130 μG, extracted from SN1006's synchrotron emissivity at multiple wavelengths. While the complexity of the post-shock magnetic field and electron density

  11. Simple measures of channel habitat complexity predict transient hydraulic storage in streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream thalweg depth profiles (along path of greatest channel depth) and woody debris tallies have recently become components of routine field procedures for quantifying physical habitat in national stream monitoring efforts. Mean residual depth, standard deviation of thalweg dep...

  12. The First measurement of the top quark mass at CDF II in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton + jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. They reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a non-parametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton + jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the diletpon channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. using 332 lepton + jets candidate events and 144 diletpon candidate events, they measure the top quark mass to be m{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. First simultaneous measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1 of p pmacr collisions collected at s=1.96TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab’s Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. We reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a nonparametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton channel. We perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 332 lepton+jets candidate events and 144 dilepton candidate events, we measure the top quark mass to be Mtop=171.9±1.7(stat+JES)±1.1(othersyst)GeV/c2=171.9±2.0GeV/c2.

  14. Measurements of the cross-sectional distributions of spherical particles suspended in rectangular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Takahiro; Yabu, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Itano, Tomoaki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the inertial migration of neutrally buoyant spherical particles using millimeter-sized rectangular channels of various aspect ratios (AR = 1 - 4.2), in the range of Reynolds numbers (Re) from 100 to 2000. The Reynolds number was defined as UH/ ν, where U is the maximum flow velocity, H is the length of the shorter face of the channel cross-section, and ν is the kinematic viscosity. Dilute suspensions of polystyrene particles of diameter d = 300 - 650 μm were used. For the size ratio d / H = 0 . 1 - 0.25, the observation of particle positions at downstream cross-sections revealed that the particles were aligned in a straight or curved line nearly parallel to the longer face of the channel cross-section and their probability density function showed a sharp peak at a certain distance from the channel centerline. These focusing positions of particles were found to depend on Re, d / H and AR. They approached the channel centerline with increasing Re. As AR increased for constant Re and constant d / H , focusing positions moved closer to the channel centerline, and reached asymptotic positions for AR>2.

  15. Measurements and modeling of cosmic noise absorption changes due to radio heating of the D region ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.; Honary, F.; Singer, W.; Kosch, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    Powerful high-frequency radio waves can heat the electrons in the D region of the ionosphere. This heating increases the electron-neutral collision frequency which modifies the absorption of other radio waves propagating through the heated plasma. A high spatial resolution imaging riometer was used to observe changes in cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA) induced by heating from the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) HF facility, and the results were compared to a theoretical model using observed electron densities as an input. The model is found to overestimate the observed effect by a factor close to 2, despite different background electron density profiles and heater powers. However, the model reproduced the spatial morphology of the change in CNA rather well, and the same absorption calculation used in the heating model also reproduced the changes in CNA due to electron precipitation in the absence of heating well. When the assumption of a perfectly conducting ground is replaced with a more realistic model in the calculation of the HF radiated power, the power is reduced to about 75% of its original value, and the model overestimate of the CNA change is reduced to a factor of about 1.3.

  16. Radio quiet, please! - protecting radio astronomy from interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, W.

    2011-06-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite and increasingly precious resource for astronomical research, as well as for other spectrum users. Keeping the frequency bands used for radio astronomy as free as possible of unwanted Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is crucial. The aim of spectrum management, one of the tools used towards achieving this goal, includes setting regulatory limits on RFI levels emitted by other spectrum users into the radio astronomy frequency bands. This involves discussions with regulatory bodies and other spectrum users at several levels - national, regional and worldwide. The global framework for spectrum management is set by the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union, which has defined that interference is detrimental to radio astronomy if it increases the uncertainty of a measurement by 10%. The Radio Regulations are revised every three to four years, a process in which four organisations representing the interests of the radio astronomical community in matters of spectrum management (IUCAF, CORF, CRAF and RAFCAP) participate actively. The current interests and activities of these four organisations range from preserving what has been achieved through regulatory measures, to looking far into the future of high frequency use and giant radio telescope use.

  17. 47 CFR 95.1011 - Channel use policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1011 Channel use policy. (a) The channels... within the 68 dBu predicted contour of any low power TV or TV translator station operating on channel 13....

  18. 47 CFR 95.1011 - Channel use policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1011 Channel use policy. (a) The channels... within the 68 dBu predicted contour of any low power TV or TV translator station operating on channel 13....

  19. 47 CFR 95.1011 - Channel use policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1011 Channel use policy. (a) The channels... within the 68 dBu predicted contour of any low power TV or TV translator station operating on channel 13....

  20. 77 FR 64758 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Randsburg, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

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  1. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  2. Properties of M components from currents measured at triggered lightning channel base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thottappillil, Rajeev; Goldberg, Jon D.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Uman, Martin A.; Fisher, Richard J.; Schnetzer, George H.

    1995-12-01

    Channel base currents from triggered lightning were measured at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during summer 1990 and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during summer 1991. An analysis of the return stroke data and overall continuing current data has been published by Fisher et al. [1993]. Here an analysis is given of the impulsive processes, called M components, that occur during the continuing current following return strokes. The 14 flashes analyzed contain 37 leader-return stroke sequences and 158 M components, both processes lowering negative charge from cloud to ground. Statistics are presented for the following M current pulse parameters: magnitude, rise time, duration, half-peak width, preceding continuing current level, M interval, elapsed time since the return stroke, and charge transferred by the M current pulse. A typical M component in triggered lightning is characterized by a more or less symmetrical current pulse having an amplitude of 100-200 A (2 orders of magnitude lower than that for a typical return stroke [Fisher et al., 1993]), a 10-90% rise time of 300-500 μs (3 orders of magnitude larger than that for a typical return stroke [Fisher et al., 1993]), and a charge transfer to ground of the order of 0.1 to 0.2 C (1 order of magnitude smaller than that for a typical subsequent return stroke pulse [Berger et al., 1975]). About one third of M components transferred charge greater than the minimum charge reported by Berger et al. [1975] for subsequent leader-return stroke sequences. No correlation was found between either the M charge or the magnitude of the M component current (the two are moderately correlated) and any other parameter considered. M current pulses occurring soon after the return stroke tend to have shorter rise times, shorter durations, and shorter M intervals than those which occur later. M current pulses were observed to be superimposed on continuing currents greater than 30 A or so, with one exception out of 140 cases

  3. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Water and Hilly Terrain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.; Sun, Ruoyu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work completed over the past year on our project, entitled "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Research: The AG Channel, Robust Waveforms, and Aeronautical Network Simulations." This project is funded under the NASA project "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS)." In this report we provide the following: an update on project progress; a description of the over-freshwater and hilly terrain initial results on path loss, delay spread, small-scale fading, and correlations; complete path loss models for the over-water AG channels; analysis for obtaining parameter statistics required for development of accurate wideband AG channel models; and analysis of an atypical AG channel in which the aircraft flies out of the ground site antenna main beam. We have modeled the small-scale fading of these channels with Ricean statistics, and have quantified the behavior of the Ricean K-factor. We also provide some results for correlations of signal components, both intra-band and inter-band. An updated literature review, and a summary that also describes future work, are also included.

  4. Packet Radio Communications Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    init.ate any pending DMA channel I/O now possible as a result of the completed DMA I/O operation. For example, if the packet transmision has been...keyboard and printer b. Binary data record I/O fo/from the tape media c. Scan for unsolicited keyboard input 2-12 Software description of experimental...the station and transmit to the station packets input on the radio receivers. The goal is to provide a transparent packet transfer media to

  5. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  6. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  7. An ensemble average method to estimate absolute TEC using radio beacon-based differential phase measurements: Applicability to regions of large latitudinal gradients in plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Bagiya, Mala S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Acharya, Y. B.; Yamamoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    A GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) system for total electron content (TEC) measurements using 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites (LEOS) is fabricated in house and made operational at Ahmedabad (23.04°N, 72.54°E geographic, dip latitude 17°N) since May 2013. This system receives the 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from high-inclination LEOS. The first few days of observations are presented in this work to bring out the efficacy of an ensemble average method to convert the relative TECs to absolute TECs. This method is a modified version of the differential Doppler-based method proposed by de Mendonca (1962) and suitable even for ionospheric regions with large spatial gradients. Comparison of TECs derived from a collocated GPS receiver shows that the absolute TECs estimated by this method are reliable estimates over regions with large spatial gradient. This method is useful even when only one receiving station is available. The differences between these observations are discussed to bring out the importance of the spatial differences between the ionospheric pierce points of these satellites. A few examples of the latitudinal variation of TEC during different local times using GRBR measurements are also presented, which demonstrates the potential of radio beacon measurements in capturing the large-scale plasma transport processes in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  8. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived epi