Science.gov

Sample records for radio polarimetry signatures

  1. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  2. Understanding radio polarimetry. III. Interpreting the IAU/IEEE definitions of the Stokes parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaker, J. P.; Bregman, J. D.

    1996-05-01

    In two companion papers (Paper I, Hamaker et al. 1996; Paper II, Sault et al. 1996), a new theory of radio-interferometric polarimetry and its application to the calibration of interferometer arrays are presented. To complete our study of radio polarimetry, we examine here the definition of the Stokes parameters adopted by Commission 40 of the IAU (1974) and the way this definition works out in the mathematical equations. Using the formalism of Paper I, we give a simplified derivation of the frequently-cited `black-box' formula originally derived by Morris et al. (1964). We show that their original version is in error in the sign of Stokes V, the correct sign being that given by Weiler (1973) and Thompson et al. (1986).

  3. Radio Astronomical Polarimetry and Point-Source Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straten, W.

    2004-05-01

    A mathematical framework is presented for use in the experimental determination of the polarimetric response of observatory instrumentation. Elementary principles of linear algebra are applied to model the full matrix description of the polarization measurement equation by least-squares estimation of nonlinear, scalar parameters. The formalism is applied to calibrate the center element of the Parkes Multibeam receiver using observations of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and the radio galaxy 3C 218 (Hydra A).

  4. Polarimetry and Unification of Low-Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Marshall H.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Tran, Hien D.; Goodrich, Robert W.; Miller, Joseph S.

    1999-11-01

    We have made high-quality measurements of the polarization spectra of 13 FR II radio galaxies and taken polarization images for 11 of these with the Keck telescopes. Seven of the eight narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) are polarized, and six of the seven show prominent broad Balmer lines in polarized light. The broad lines are also weakly visible in total flux. Some of the NLRGs show bipolar regions with roughly circumferential polarization vectors, revealing a large reflection nebula illuminated by a central source. Our observations powerfully support the hidden quasar hypothesis for some NLRGs. According to this hypothesis, the continuum and broad lines are blocked by a dusty molecular torus, but can be seen by reflected, hence polarized, light. Classification as a NLRG, a broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG), or a quasar therefore depends on orientation. However, not all objects fit into this unification scheme. Our sample is biased toward objects known in advance to be polarized, but the combination of our results with the 1996 findings of Hill, Goodrich, and DePoy show that at least six out of a complete, volume and flux-limited sample of nine FR II NLRGs have broad lines, seen either in polarization or P{alpha}.The BLRGs in our sample range from 3C 382, which has a quasar-like spectrum, to the highly reddened IRAS source FSC 2217+259. This reddening sequence suggests a continuous transition from unobscured quasar to reddened BLRG to NLRG. Apparently the obscuring torus does not have a distinct edge. The BLRGs have polarization images that are consistent with a point source broadened by seeing and diluted by starlight. We do not detect extended nebular or scattered emission, perhaps because it is swamped by the nuclear source. Our starlight-corrected BLRG spectra can be explained with a two-component model: a quasar viewed through dust and quasar light scattered by dust. The direct flux is more reddened than the scattered flux, causing the polarization to rise

  5. Earthshine Polarimetry to Extract Signatures of Earth-like Atmosphere and Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, J.; Itoh, Y.; Akitaya, H.; Okazaki, A.; Kawabata, K.; Oasa, Y.; Isogai, M.; Niwa, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of our polarimetric observations of Earthshine on the Moon. We have carried out two Earthshine polarimetry projects. The first one is comparison of Earthshine polarization from land- and ocean-dominant surfaces. Polarimetry may be a method to search a planet with a liquid surface because specular reflection from a liquid surface is expected to produce a greater polarization degree than reflection from a rough surface does. This project aims to evaluate the difference between Earthshine polarization contributed by reflection at a land-dominant surface and that by an ocean-dominant surface. As viewing from Japan, we can observe Earthshine with contribution from a land-dominant surface in waxing phases of the Moon, whereas we can study that from an ocean-dominant surface in the waning phases. We utilized the 60 cm reflecting telescope at the Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory located in Hyogo, Japan and the simultaneous imaging/spectrometric polarimeter which enables a simultaneous measurement of four polarized components with a single exposure. In a series of observations from May 2010 to March 2012, twelve data sets were obtained for the waxing phases and seven data sets for the waning. The observations were conducted in V band. The measured polarization degrees increased as the Earth phase approaches a quadrature phase. The maximum polarization degree was roughly ˜8 % for the both phases. Fitting with a function for Rayleigh scattering have yielded the polarization maximum of 7.7×0.4% and 8.4×0.7% for the waxing and waning phases, respectively. Although a larger value has been derived for the waning phases when the Earthshine is contributed by an ocean-dominant surface, the difference is not significant considering uncertainty of the result. The second project is optical spectropolarimetry of Earthshine for Earth phase angles ranging from 49° to 96°. This project aims to derive the phase variation of polarization spectra of the Earth

  6. BROADBAND RADIO POLARIMETRY AND FARADAY ROTATION OF 563 EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-10

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1′ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  7. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1‧ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  8. Radio signatures of lightning discharges in exoplanets and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane; Vorgul, Irena

    2014-05-01

    Lightning related signatures can be found in the whole spectral range from radio to gamma-rays. While for example UV, visible or IR molecular emission (as the lightning discharge causes changes in the local chemistry) depends on the composition of the atmosphere of the extrasolar body, radio signatures do not have this limitation, which means they may give us a universal tool for lightning observations outside the Solar System, both on exoplanets and brown dwarfs. Lightning induced radio signatures have three main types. Sferics emit in the low-frequency (LF) range with a power density peak at 10 kHz on Earth. (Aplin, K. L., 'Electrifying atmospheres', Springer 2013) Whistlers are electromagnetic waves propagating along magnetic field lines and emitting in the very low-frequency (VLF) range. (Desch, S. J. et al. 2002, Rep. Prog. Phys. 65, 955) While Schumann-resonances are VLF lightning discharge-induced electromagnetic oscillations of the earth-ionosphere cavity. (Simões, F. et al. 2012, LPICo 1683, 1052) There are certain factors that limit the observability of radio signatures. Every object with an ionosphere has a low cutoff frequency. This means radio waves with frequencies below this peak-frequency cannot propagate through the atmosphere. For Earth this value is about 5-10 MHz. However, the values for extrasolar atmospheres remain to be determined. Besides that, natural background noises like the galactic radio background or photo-electron noises give a limitation. (Zarka et al. 2012, PSS 74, 156) Putting all together, radio signatures with frequency below 10 MHz might only be observable from space. Waves below 30 kHz would not be able to reach the inner Solar System. (Zarka et al. 2012, PSS 74, 156) We show a general summary of radio signatures and their properties. A table of other lightning discharge signatures that have been observed either on Earth or other Solar System planets is also included. This table, also contains a list of different instruments

  9. Astronomical Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinbergen, Jaap

    1996-09-01

    This handy volume provides a clear, comprehensive and concise introduction to astronomical polarimetry at all wavelengths. Starting from first principles and a simple physical picture of polarized radiation, the author introduces the reader to all the key topics, including Stokes parameters, applications of polarimetry in astronomy, polarization algebra, polarization errors and calibration methods, and a selection of instruments (from radio to X-ray). The author rounds off the book with a number of useful case studies, a collection of exercises, an extensive list of further reading and an informative index. This review of all aspects of astronomical polarization provides both an essential introduction for graduate students, and a valuable reference for practicing astronomers.

  10. Near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope polarimetry of a complete sample of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, E. A.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Axon, D.; Batcheldor, D.; Packham, C.; Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Sparks, W.; Young, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an analysis of 2.05 μm Hubble Space Telescope polarimetric data for a sample of 13 nearby Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) 3CR radio sources (0.03 < z < 0.11) that are classified as narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRG) at optical wavelengths. We find that the compact cores of the NLRG in our sample are intrinsically highly polarized in the near-infrared (near-IR) (6 < P2.05 μm < 60 per cent), with the electric vector (E-vector) perpendicular to the radio axis in 54 per cent of the sources. The levels of extinction required to produce near-IR polarization by the dichroic extinction mechanism are consistent with the measured values recently reported in Ramírez et al., provided that this mechanism has its maximum efficiency. This consistency suggests that the nuclear polarization could be due to dichroic extinction. In this case, toroidal magnetic fields that are highly coherent would be required in the circumnuclear tori to align the elongated dust grains responsible for the dichroic extinction. However, it is not entirely possible to rule out other polarization mechanisms (e.g. scattering, synchrotron emission) with our observations at only one near-IR wavelength. Therefore, further polarimetry observations at mid-IR and radio wavelengths will be required to test whether all the near-IR polarization is due to dichroic extinction.

  11. The geometry of radio-quiet AGN studied with X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Our current X-ray view of AGN in the local Universe is based on spectroscopic, imaging and timing data. In this talk I will discuss the importance of adding the polarimetric view. The geometry of the matter around the black hole (from the X-ray emitting corona to more distant circumnuclear matter) can be probed by X-ray polarimetry. Observational perspectives in view of the X-ray polarimetric missions currently under study at NASA and ESA will be also discussed.

  12. X-ray Flares and their Type III Radio Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Reid, H.

    2012-12-01

    Oppositely directed accelerated electron beams in solar flares can produce Hard X-rays in the chromosphere and radio emission from the low corona to the interplanetary medium. The temporal and inferred spectral correlation of these electron beams indicates a common acceleration region. We used the RHESSI X-ray flare catalogue and the PHOENIX catalogue of radio bursts to select a list of events with impulsive X-ray signatures that was correlated in time with type III radio emission in the decimetric range. We furthermore selected events for which the Nançay Radioheliograph had spatially resolved information in the 450-150 MHz range. We investigate the percentage of decimetric/metric type III radio bursts that have a counterpart at lower frequencies (14 - 1 MHz) observed with Wind/Waves. We will discuss the electron beam characteristics deduced from X-ray observations that affect the relationship between coronal and interplanetary type III bursts. Moreover, we will use the combined images in radio and X-ray frequencies to deduce the role of the local coronal environment.

  13. HIGH-FIDELITY RADIO ASTRONOMICAL POLARIMETRY USING A MILLISECOND PULSAR AS A POLARIZED REFERENCE SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Van Straten, W.

    2013-01-15

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long timescales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semimajor axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it also places PSR J1022+1001 among the 10 best pulsars regularly observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. It is shown that the timing accuracy of a large fraction of the pulsars in the PPTA is currently limited by the systematic timing error due to instrumental polarization artifacts. More importantly, long-term variations of systematic error are correlated between different pulsars, which adversely affects the primary objectives of any pulsar timing array experiment. These limitations may be overcome by adopting the techniques presented in this work, which relax the demand for instrumental polarization purity and thereby have the potential to reduce the development cost of next-generation telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  14. Single-Dish Radio Polarimetry in the F-GAMMA Program with the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuchert, Tobias; Kadler, Matthias; Wilms, Jörn; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Fuhrmann, Lars; Myserlis, Ioannis; Nestoras, Ioannis; Kraus, Alex; Bach, Uwe; Ros, Eduardo; Grossberger, Christoph; Schulz, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Studying the variability of polarized AGN jet emission in the radio band is crucial for understanding the dynamics of moving shocks as well as the structure of the underlying magnetic field. The 100-m Effelsberg Telescope is a high-quality instrument for studying the long-term variability of both total and polarized intensity as well as the electric-vector position angle. Since 2007, the F-GAMMA program has been monitoring the linear polarized emission of roughly 60 blazars at 11 frequencies between 2.7 and 43 GHz. Here, we describe the calibration of the polarimetric data at 5 and 10 GHz and the resulting F-GAMMA full-Stokes light curves for the exemplary case of the radio galaxy 3C 111.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio pulsars multifrequency polarimetry (Gould+, 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, D. M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2000-06-01

    Polarimetric observations of 300 pulsars have been conducted with the 76-m Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank at radio frequencies centred around 230, 400, 600, 920, 1400 and 1600MHz. More than half of the pulsars have no previously published polarization profiles and this compilation represents about three times the sum of all previously published pulsar polarization data. A selection of integrated polarization profiles is provided. Tables of pulse widths and the degree of both linear and circular polarization are given for all pulsars, and these act as an index for all the data, which are available by anonymous ftp in numerical and graphical form. (3 data files).

  16. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Paladino, R.; Hull, C. L. H.; Cortes, P.; Moellenbrock, G.; Fomalont, E.; Asada, K.; Hada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C 286 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south-west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17%; this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or electric vector position angle (EVPA)) in the core is ˜39◦, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report a serendipitous detection of a sub-mJy source in the field of view, which is likely to be a submillimeter galaxy.

  17. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Paladino, R.; Hull, C. L. H.; Cortes, P.; Moellenbrock, G.; Fomalont, E.; Asada, K.; Hada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C 286 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south–west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17%; this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or electric vector position angle (EVPA)) in the core is ˜39◦, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report a serendipitous detection of a sub-mJy source in the field of view, which is likely to be a submillimeter galaxy.

  18. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  19. Asteroid polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.

    2014-07-01

    The discovery of the polarization of moonlight by Arago in 1811 was the first step in the polarization studies of atmosphereless bodies. In the last 20 years, the optical polarimetry of Solar System bodies has had a fast development due to the availability of new equipment, and the efforts of several research groups to study different objects and to increase the database of polarimetric observations. These efforts led to the discovery of objects with anomalous polarimetric properties and the polarimetric characterization of many taxonomic types. Since several theoretical aspects of the polarimetric phenomena will be addressed in other talks, I will present here the recent achievements in asteroid polarimetry from the observational point of view and the role of polarimetry in the overall scenario of asteroid science.

  20. Radio Searches for Signatures of Advanced Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, Andrew

    Over the last several decades, observational astronomy has produced a flood of discoveries that suggest that the building blocks and circumstances that gave rise to life on Earth may be the rule rather than the exception. It has now been conclusively shown that planets are common and that some 5-15% of FGKM stars host planets existing in their host star's habitable zone. Further, terrestrial biology has demonstrated that life on our own planet can thrive in extraordinarily extreme environments, dramatically extending our notion of what constitutes habitability. The deeper question, yet unanswered, is whether or not life in any form has ever existed in an environment outside of the Earth. As humans, we are drawn to an even more profound question, that of whether or not extraterrestrial life may have evolved a curiosity about the universe similar to our own and the technology with which to explore it. Radio astronomy has long played a prominent role in searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), beginning with the first suggestions by Cocconi and Morrison (1959) that narrow-band radio signals near 1420 MHz might be effective tracers of advanced technology and early experiments along these lines by Frank Drake in 1961, continuing through to more recent investigations searching for several types of coherent radio signals indicative of technology at a wider range of frequencies. The motivations for radio searches for extraterrestrial intelligence have been throughly discussed in the literature, but the salient arguments are the following: 1. coherent radio emission is commonly produced by advanced technology (judging by Earth’s technological development), 2. electromagnetic radiation can convey information at the maximum velocity currently known to be possible, 3. radio photons are energetically cheap to produce, 4. certain types of coherent radio emissions are easily distinguished from astrophysical background sources, especially within the so

  1. Radio and hard X-ray signatures of flare accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N. R.

    2003-12-01

    While imaging and spectral radio observations in the decimetric-dekametric domain provide signatures of non-thermal electrons in the middle and upper corona, hard X-rays as well as microwaves trace flare accelerated electrons in the low corona and the chromosphere. Radio observations combined with hard X-ray observations thus allow to analyse the signature of energetic electrons in a whole range of coronal heights. We shall present here the results of multiwavelength studies primarily based on the analysis of HXR and decimetric/metric spatially resolved observations from RHESSI and the Nançay Radioheliograph. We shall outline how these combined observations provide information on the magnetic structures at different spatial scales in which energetic electrons are accelerated and injected as well as on the link between the production of energetic electrons interacting at the Sun and the injection of escaping electrons giving rise to the radio emissions at the lowest frequencies.

  2. Radio emission signature of Saturn immersions in Jupiter's magnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    During the interval from about May through August 1981, when Voyager 2 was inbound to Saturn, the Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument measured repeated, dramatic decreases in the intensity of the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR). The emission dropouts averaged two orders of magnitude below mean energy levels and varied from about 1 to 10 Saturn rotations in duration. Comparison with pre-Saturn encounter Voyager 1 observations (June to November, 1980) shows that the SKR dropouts were unique to the Voyager 2 observing interval, consistent with the closer proximity of Saturn to Jupiter's distant magnetotail in 1981. Further, the dropouts occurred on the average at times when Voyager 2 is known to have been within or near Jupiter's magnetic tail.

  3. Interaction Between Two CMEs During 14 - 15 February 2011 and Their Unusual Radio Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Prasanna Subramanian, S.; Vrsnak, Bojan; Ibrahim, M. Syed

    2014-12-01

    We report a detailed analysis of an interaction between two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were observed on 14 - 15 February 2011 and the corresponding radio enhancement, which was similar to the "CME cannibalism" reported by Gopalswamy et al. ( Astrophys. J. 548, L91, 2001). A primary CME, with a mean field-of-view velocity of 669 km s-1 in the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), was more than as twice as fast as the slow CME preceding it (326 km s-1), which indicates that the two CMEs interacted. A radio-enhancement signature (in the frequency range 1 MHz - 400 kHz) due to the CME interaction was analyzed and interpreted using the CME data from LASCO and from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) HI-1, radio data from Wind/ Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (WAVES), and employing known electron-density models and kinematic modeling. The following results are obtained: i) The CME interaction occurred around 05:00 - 10:00 UT in a height range 20 - 25 R⊙. An unusual radio signature is observed during the time of interaction in the Wind/WAVES dynamic radio spectrum. ii) The enhancement duration shows that the interaction segment might be wider than 5 R⊙. iii) The shock height estimated using density models for the radio enhancement region is 10 - 30 R⊙. iv) Using kinematic modeling and assuming a completely inelastic collision, the decrease of kinetic energy based on speeds from LASCO data is determined to be 0.77×1023 J, and 3.67×1023 J if speeds from STEREO data are considered. vi) The acceleration, momentum, and force are found to be a=-168 m s-2, I=6.1×1018 kg m s-1, and F=1.7×1015 N, respectively, using STEREO data.

  4. Absolutely calibrated radio polarimetry of the inner Galaxy at 2.3 and 4.8 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Gaensler, B. M.; Carretti, E.; Purcell, C. R.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Bernardi, G.; Haverkorn, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present high-sensitivity and absolutely calibrated images of diffuse radio polarization at a resolution of about 10 arcmin covering the range 10° < l < 34° and |b| < 5° at 2.3 GHz from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey and at 4.8 GHz from the Sino-German λ6 cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. Strong depolarization near the Galactic plane is seen at 2.3 GHz, which correlates with strong Hα emission. We ascribe the depolarization to spatial Faraday rotation measure fluctuations of about 65 rad m-2 on scales smaller than 6-9 pc. We argue that most (about 90 per cent) of the polarized emission seen at 4.8 GHz originates from a distance of 3-4 kpc in the Scutum arm and that the random magnetic field dominates the regular field there. A branch extending from the North Polar Spur towards lower latitudes can be identified from the polarization image at 4.8 GHz but only partly from the polarization image at 2.3 GHz, implying that the branch is at a distance larger than 2-3 kpc. We show that comparison of structure functions of complex polarized intensity with those of polarized intensity can indicate whether the observed polarized structures are intrinsic or caused by Faraday screens. The probability distribution function of gradients from the polarization images at 2.3 GHz indicates that the turbulence in the warm ionized medium is transonic.

  5. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  6. Precision electron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  7. Radio active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters: Feedback, merger signatures, and cluster tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel Beth

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the universe, are composed of 50-1000s of galaxies, hot X-ray emitting gas, and dark matter. They grow in size over time through cluster and group mergers. The merger history of a cluster can be imprinted on the hot gas, known as the intracluster medium (ICM). Merger signatures include shocks, cold fronts, and sloshing of the ICM, which can form spiral structures. Some clusters host double-lobed radio sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). First, I will present a study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2029, which is very relaxed on large scales and has one of the largest continuous sloshing spirals yet observed in the X-ray, extending outward approximately 400 kpc. The sloshing gas interacts with the southern lobe of the radio galaxy, causing it to bend. Energy injection from the AGN is insufficient to offset cooling. The sloshing spiral may be an important additional mechanism in preventing large amounts of gas from cooling to very low temperatures. Next, I will present a study of Abell 98, a triple system currently undergoing a merger. I will discuss the merger history, and show that it is causing a shock. The central subcluster hosts a double-lobed AGN, which is evacuating a cavity in the ICM. Understanding the physical processes that affect the ICM is important for determining the mass of clusters, which in turn affects our calculations of cosmological parameters. To further constrain these parameters, as well as models of galaxy evolution, it is important to use a large sample of galaxy clusters over a range of masses and redshifts. Bent, double-lobed radio sources can potentially act as tracers of galaxy clusters over wide ranges of these parameters. I examine how efficient bent radio sources are at tracing high-redshift (z>0.7) clusters. Out of 646 sources in our high-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) sample, 282 are candidate new, distant clusters of galaxies based on

  8. Large Scale Assessment of Radio Frequency Interference Signatures in L-band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Nicoll, J.

    2011-12-01

    Imagery of L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems such as the PALSAR sensor on board the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has proven to be a valuable tool for observing environmental changes around the globe. Besides offering 24/7 operability, the L-band frequency provides improved interferometric coherence, and L-band polarimetric data has shown great potential for vegetation monitoring, sea ice classification, and the observation of glaciers and ice sheets. To maximize the benefit of missions such as ALOS PALSAR for environmental monitoring, data consistency and calibration are vital. Unfortunately, radio frequency interference (RFI) signatures from ground-based radar systems regularly impair L-band SAR data quality and consistency. With this study we present a large-scale analysis of typical RFI signatures that are regularly observed in L-band SAR data over the Americas. Through a study of the vast archive of L-band SAR data in the US Government Research Consortium (USGRC) data pool at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) we were able to address the following research goals: 1. Assessment of RFI Signatures in L-band SAR data and their Effects on SAR Data Quality: An analysis of time-frequency properties of RFI signatures in L-band SAR data of the USGRC data pool is presented. It is shown that RFI-filtering algorithms implemented in the operational ALOS PALSAR processor are not sufficient to remove all RFI-related artifacts. In examples, the deleterious effects of RFI on SAR image quality, polarimetric signature, SAR phase, and interferometric coherence are presented. 2. Large-Scale Assessment of Severity, Spatial Distribution, and Temporal Variation of RFI Signatures in L-band SAR data: L-band SAR data in the USGRC data pool were screened for RFI using a custom algorithm. Per SAR frame, the algorithm creates geocoded frame bounding boxes that are color-coded according to RFI intensity and converted to KML files for analysis in Google Earth. From

  9. In search of the radio signatures on SEP-productive solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun Beltran, Samuel D.; Laming, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Solar active regions may produce a wide variety of transients in the meter-decameter wavelength range.Some of these bursts result from mildly relativistic electron beams traveling along closed (type I) or open (type III) magnetic field lines or from energized electrons trapped in coronal magnetic fields (IV). The energization of these electron populations may be achieved through magnetic field reconnection. Reconnection may also be the driver which creates populations of suprathermal electrons. These suprathermals are now viewed as a prerequisite for the efficient production of solar energetic particles through shock-driven acceleration. We here present work done towards deriving a radio indicator for levels of reconnection correlated with large SEP storms. Working mostly with data from the Nançay Radioheliograph, spatio-spectral analysis is carried out on SEP-rich AR and a control group that is not. We discuss the most promising candidates of the sought after signature.

  10. Optical and radio signatures of negative gigantic jets: Cases from Typhoon Lionrock (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sung-Ming; Hsu, Rue-Rou; Lee, Li-Jou; Su, Han-Tzong; Kuo, Cheng-Ling; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Jung-Kuang; Chang, Shu-Chun; Wu, Yen-Jung; Chen, Alfred B.

    2012-08-01

    On 31 August 2010, more than 100 transient luminous events were observed to occur over Typhoon Lionrock when it passed at ˜210 km to the southwest of the NCKU site in Taiwan. Among them, 14 negative gigantic jets (GJs) with clear recognizable morphologies and radio frequency signals are analyzed. These GJs are all found to have negative discharge polarity and thus are type I GJs. Morphologically, they are grouped into three forms: tree-like, carrot-like, and a new intermediate type called tree-carrot-like GJs. The ULF and ELF/VLF band signals of these events contain clear signatures associated with GJ development stages, including the initiating lightning, the leading jet, the fully developed jet, and the trailing jet. Though the radio waveform for each group of GJs always contains a fast descending pulse linked with the surge current upon the GJ-ionosphere contact, the detailed waveforms actually vary substantially. Cross analysis of the optical and radio frequency signals for these GJs indicates that a large surge current moment (CM) (>60 kA-km) appears to be essentially associated with the tree-like GJs. In contrast, the carrot-like and the tree-carrot-like GJs are both related to a surge CM less than 36 kA-km, and a continuing CM less than 27 kA-km further separates the carrot-like GJs from the tree-carrot-like GJs. Furthermore, on the peak CM versus charge moment change diagram for the initiating lightning, different groups of GJs seem to exhibit different trends. This feature suggests that the eventual forms of negative GJs may have been determined at the initiating lightning stage.

  11. Detecting signatures of cosmological recombination and reionization in the cosmic radio background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Shankar Narayana Rao, Udaya; Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Singh, Saurabh

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of the baryons during the Epochs of cosmological Recombination and Reionization has left traces in the cosmic radio background in the form of spectral distortions (Sunyaev & Chluba 2008 Astron. Nachrichten, 330, 657; Pritchard & Loeb 2012 Rep Prog Phys 75(8):086901). The spectral signature depends on the evolution in the ionization state in hydrogen and helium and on the spin temperature of hydrogen. These probe the physics of energy release beyond the last scattering surface at redshifts exceeding 1090 and the nature of the first sources and gas evolution down to redshift about 6. The spectral distortions are sensitive to the nature of the first stars, ultra-dwarf galaxies, accreting compact objects, and the evolving ambient radiation field: X-rays and UV from the first sources. Detection of the all-sky or global spectral distortions in the radio background is hence a probe of cosmological recombination and reionization.We present new spectral radiometers that we have purpose designed for precision measurements of spectral distortions at radio wavelengths. New antenna elements include frequency independent and electrically small fat-dipole (Raghunathan et al. 2013 IEEE TAP, 61, 3411) and monopole designs. Receiver configurations have been devised that are self-calibratable (Patra et al. 2013 Expt Astron, 36, 319) so that switching of signal paths and of calibration noise sources provide real time calibration for systematics and receiver noise. Observing strategies (Patra et al. arXiv:1412.7762) and analysis methods (Satyanarayana Rao et al. arXiv:1501.07191) have been evolved that are capable of discriminating between the cosmological signals and the substantially brighter foregrounds. We have also demonstrated the value of system designs that exploit advantages of interferometer detection (Mahesh et al. arXiv:1406.2585) of global spectral distortions.Finally we discuss how the Square Kilometer Array stations may be outfitted with precision spectral

  12. RADIO SIGNATURES OF CORONAL-MASS-EJECTION-STREAMER INTERACTION AND SOURCE DIAGNOSTICS OF TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Song, H. Q.; Feng, X. S.; Liu Ying

    2012-07-01

    It has been suggested that type II radio bursts are due to energetic electrons accelerated at coronal shocks. Radio observations, however, have poor or no spatial resolutions to pinpoint the exact acceleration locations of these electrons. In this paper, we discuss a promising approach to infer the electron acceleration location by combining radio and white light observations. The key assumption is to relate specific morphological features (e.g., spectral bumps) of the dynamic spectra of type II radio bursts to imaging features (e.g., coronal mass ejection (CME) going into a streamer) along the CME (and its driven shock) propagation. In this study, we examine the CME-streamer interaction for the solar eruption dated on 2003 November 1. The presence of spectral bump in the relevant type II radio burst is identified, which is interpreted as a natural result of the shock-radio-emitting region entering the dense streamer structure. The study is useful for further determinations of the location of type II radio burst and the associated electron acceleration by CME-driven shock.

  13. Polarimetry, Exoplanets and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    A fundamental topic in astronomy is the study of extrasolar planets, the ultimate goal of which is to image and characterize Earth-like planets around other stars and determine whether they host life. Polarization and spectropolarization observations provide unique diagnostic information and can contribute to both the detection and characterization phases of extasolar planet astronomy. Ultimately polarization may even be able to help us to determine whether life is present. Polarimetry can be used in several ways to facilitate planetary detection, and can influence mission design by providing an effective discriminant for true companions shining by reflected light against background objects. This may be particularly effective when coupled to other differential methods such as integral field spectroscopy (Sparks and Ford 2002). Spectropolarimetry can play an important role in the characterization phase of extrasolar planets in general, probing aerosols and surface and atmospheric scattering. In the search for life, time resolved spectropolarimetry can be used to seek evidence of special features such as a strongly polarized specular reflection, "glint", that would arise from the liquid surface of an extrasolar ocean, or rainbows from liquid droplets (Bailey 2007; Zugger et al 2010; Karalidi et al 2011). Looking further into the future, precision circular spectropolarimetry may offer a direct probe of the presence of microbial photosynthesis or vegetation. The unique homochirality of biological material coupled to the optical activity of biological compounds means that biological matter can influence the polarization, circular polarization in particular, of reflected light. Homochirality arises as a consequence of self-replication hence is likely to be generic to all forms of biological life and has the potential to produce a macroscopic signature. We have shown that a variety of photosynthetic microbial organisms, as well as macroscopic vegetation, yield significant

  14. Radio AGN signatures in massive quiescent galaxies out to z=1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Allison

    2016-08-01

    This work represents the first multi-wavelength analysis of the average IR and radio emission in 14200 quiescent galaxies out to z=3. By stacking 24um, Herschel and VLA imaging data, we reveal the widespread presence of low-luminosity radio AGN among massive galaxies of Mstar>10^11Msun out to at least z=1.5, reciprocating the fact that massive quiescent galaxies are the preferential hosts of low-lumionsity AGN. Combined with the result of low average 24um emission, we infer that only radio-mode feedback, but not (obscured) quasar-mode feedback, is at work in keeping star formation inefficient in these galaxies.

  15. Modeling the radio signature of the orbital parameters, rotation, and magnetic field of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Zarka, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Since the first extra-solar planet discovery in 1995, several hundreds of these planets have been discovered. Most are hot Jupiters, i.e. massive planets orbiting close to their star. These planets may be powerful radio emitters. Aims: We simulate the radio dynamic spectra resulting from various interaction models between an exoplanet and its parent star, i.e. exoplanet-induced stellar emission and three variants of the exoplanet's magnetospheric auroral radio emission (full auroral oval, active sector fixed in longitude, and active sector fixed in local time). Methods: We show the physical information about the system that can be drawn from radio observations, and how this can be achieved. This information includes the magnetic field strength and the rotation period of the emitting body (planet or star), the orbital period, the orbit's inclination, and the magnetic field tilt relative to the rotation axis or offset relative to the center of the planet. For most of these parameters, radio observations provide a unique means of measuring them. Results: Our results should provide the proper framework of analysis and interpretation for future detections of radio emissions from exoplanetary systems - or from magnetic white dwarf-planet or white dwarf-brown dwarf systems -, that are expected to commence soon as part of extensive programs at large radiotelescopes such as LOFAR, UTR2 or the GMRT. Our methodology can be easily adapted to simulate specific observations, once effective detection is achieved.

  16. The prospects of X-ray polarimetry for Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosmann, René W.

    2016-08-01

    Polarimetry at optical and other wavelength continues to play an important role in our struggle to develop (super-)unification schemes for active galactic nuclei (AGN). Therefore, radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN are important targets for the future small and medium-size X-ray polarimetry missions that are currently under phase A study at NASA and ESA. After briefly pointing out the detection principle of polarization imaging in the soft X-ray band, I am going to review the prospects of X-ray polarimetry for our understanding of AGN ejection (winds and blazar jets) and accretion flows (accretion disk and corona). The X-ray polarimetry signal between 2 and 8 keV is going to give us important new constraints on the geometry of the central engine as well as on the acceleration effects in AGN jets, in particular when combined with spectral and/or polarization information at other wavelengths.

  17. Radio AGN signatures in massive quiescent galaxies out to z=1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, Emilia

    2016-08-01

    Detection of gamma-rays from narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) by Fermi confirmed the presence of powerful relativistic jets in them, and thus challenged our understanding of active galactic nuclei (AGN). In the current AGN paradigm powerful relativistic jets are produced in massive elliptical galaxies with supermassive black holes. NLS1s differ from them significantly; they harbour lower mass black holes accreting at higher Eddington ratios, have preferably compact radio morphology, reside mostly in spiral galaxies, and were thought to be radio-quiet.Fermi's discovery invokes questions about the AGN evolution; what triggers and maintains the AGN activity, and what are the evolutionary lines of the different populations? It is also necessary to revise the AGN unification schemes to fit in NLS1s. They convolute the whole AGN scenario, but offer us a new look on the jet phenomena and will help us construct a more comprehensive big picture of AGN.Despite their importance, NLS1s are rather poorly studied as a class. For example, some NLS1s seem to be totally radio-silent, but a considerable fraction are radio-loud and thus probably host jets. This, along with other observational evidence, implies that they do not form a homogeneous class. However, it remains unclear what is triggering the radio loudness in some of them, but, for example, the properties of the host galaxy and the large-scale environment might play a role. Also the parent population of NLS1s remains an open question.We used various statistical methods, for example, multiwavelength correlations and principal component analysis to study a large sample of NLS1 sources. We will present the results and discuss the interplay between their properties, such as emission properties, black hole masses, large-scale environments, and their effect on radio loudness. We will also introduce the Metsähovi Radio Observatory NLS1 galaxy observing programme, which is the first one dedicated to systematical observations

  18. Stokes-polarimetry imaging of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul J.

    A novel Stokes-polarimetry imaging system and technique was developed to quantify fully the polarization properties of light remitted from tissue. The uniqueness of the system and technique is established in the incident polarization. Here, the diffuse illumination is varied and controlled with the intention to improve the visibility of tissue structures. Since light retains some polarization even after multiple-scattering events, the polarization of remitted light depends upon the interactions within the material. Differentiation between tissue structures is accomplished by two-dimensional mapping of the imaged area using metrics such as the degree of linear polarization, degree of circular polarization, ellipticity, and Stokes parameters. While Stokes-polarimetry imaging can be applied to a variety of tissues and conditions, this thesis focuses on tissue types associated with the disease endometriosis. The current standard in diagnosing endometriosis is visual laparoscopy with tissue biopsy. The documented correlation between laparoscopy inspection and histological confirmation of suspected lesions was at best 67%. Endometrial lesions vary greatly in their appearance and depth of infiltration. Although laparoscopy permits tissue to be assessed by color and texture, to advance beyond the state-of-the-art, a new imaging modality involving polarized light was investigated; in particular, Stokes-polarimetry imaging was used to determine the polarization signature of light that interacted with tissue. Basic science studies were conducted on rat tails embedded within turbid gelatin. The purpose of these experiments was to determine how identification of sub-surface structures could be improved. Experimental results indicate image contrast among various structures such as tendon, soft tissue and intervertebral discs. Stokes-polarimetry imaging experiments were performed on various tissues associated with endometriosis to obtain a baseline characterization for each

  19. IOT Overview Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageorges, N.

    This contribution concentrates on the polarimetric modes offered by different instruments at ESO. In the introduction, I will demonstrate the importance of polarimetry, the kind of science it permits to achieve and list the instruments which offer these modes. Sects. 2 and 3 will present the involved modes in more details as well as the currently related calibrations, as part of the calibration plans.ESO does not offer any pure polarimetric instrument. As a consequence the polarimetric modes are just one (or more) mode(s) of the given instruments. Polarimetric modes might be mentioned in the related IOT but are not followed up thoroughly as is e.g. spectroscopy.

  20. Active Wollaston polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, R. M.; Dayton, David; Gonglewski, John

    2005-10-01

    Active imaging polarimetry is a unique imaging technique in which a particular scene of interest is illuminated by a laser source with a known polarization state. Changes in the state of polarization of the received light yields information beyond what is available in conventional intensity imaging. This approach has an advantage over passive polarimetry in that one has control over the polarization state of the illumination with the potential of determining all sixteen elements of the associated Mueller matrix. While determining the entire Mueller matrix is the most comprehensive method for describing the polarization changing properties of the scene, for most cases it does not yield significantly more information than simply determining the 4 diagonal elements of the Mueller matrix. The Active Wollaston Polarimeter is based around the ability of the Wollaston prism to split orthogonal polarization states into two beams propagating at slightly different angles allowing two images to be formed on a single camera. The Wollaston prism, combined with a series of liquid crystal variable retarders allows monopulse determination of any polarization contrast image (PCI), which is directly related to a specific Muller matrix element. This technique results in a fast, compact polarization measurement system. This paper presents the continued investigation and analysis of the performance of the polarimeter and possible viability as a practical polarization measurement system.

  1. Uncovering Exoplanets using Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first discovery of a planet around a solar-type star by Mayor & Queloz in 1995, more than 700 of these exoplanets have been detected. Most of these are giant, gaseous planets, but small, presumably solid, exoplanets, that are much harder to detect, have also been found. Among the latter are even some that orbit in their star's habitable zone, where temperatures could be just right to allow liquid water on a planet's surface. Liquid water is generally considered to be essential for the existence of life. Whether liquid water actually exists on a planet depends strongly on the atmosphere's thickness and characteristics, such as the surface pressure and composition. Famous examples in the Solar System are Venus and the Earth, with similar sizes, inner compositions and orbital radii, but wildly different surface conditions. The characterization of the atmospheres of giant, gaseous exoplanets, and of the atmospheres and/or surfaces of small, solid exoplanets will allow a comparison with Solar System planets and it will open up a treasure trove of knowledge about the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, thanks to the vast range of orbital distances, planet sizes and ages that can be studied. Characterization will also allow studying conditions for life and ultimately the existence of life around other stars. Some information about the upper atmospheric properties has already been derived for a few close-in, hot, giant exoplanets, whose thermal flux can be derived from measurements of the combined flux of the star and the planet. This method has also provided traces of an atmosphere around a large solid planet orbiting red dwarf star GJ1214. Characterization of the atmosphere and/or surface of exoplanets in wide orbits, resembling the cool planets in our Solar System, and in particular of small, solid, Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, is virtually impossible with transit observations. Indeed, polarimetry

  2. Compton polarimetry revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, D.

    2015-11-01

    We compute the average polarisation asymmetry from the Klein-Nishina differential cross-section on free electrons at rest. As expected from the expression for the asymmetry, the average asymmetry is found to decrease like the inverse of the incident photon energy asymptotically at high energy. We then compute a simple estimator of the polarisation fraction that makes optimal use of all the kinematic information present in an event final state, by the use of "moments" method, and we compare its statistical power to that of a simple fit of the azimuthal distribution. In contrast to polarimetry with pair creation, for which we obtained an improvement by a factor of larger than two in a previous work, here for Compton scattering the improvement is only of 10-20%.

  3. Staring MWIR, LWIR and 2-color and scanning LWIR polarimetry technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Neil R.; Kennedy, Adam; Graham, Roger; Thai, Yen; Stark, Justin; Sienicki, Joe; Fest, Eric

    2011-09-01

    Polarimetry sensor development has been in work for some time to determine the best use of polarimetry to differentiate between manmade objects and objects made by nature. Both MWIR and LWIR and 2-color staring Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) and LWIR scanning FPAs have been built at Raytheon Vision Systems each with exceedingly higher performance. This paper presents polarimetric performance comparisons between staring 2562 MWIR, 2562 LWIR, 5122 LWIR/LWIR staring FPAs and scanning LWIR FPAs. LWIR polarimetry has the largest polarimetric signal level and a larger emissive polarimetric signature than MWIR which makes LWIR less dependent on sun angles. Polished angled glass and metal objects are easily detected using LWIR polarimetry. While single band 9-11 um LWIR polarimetry has advantages adding another band between 3 and 7 um improves the capability of the sensor for polarization and spectral phenomenology. In addition the 3-7 um band has improved NEDT over the 9-11 um band due to the shorter detector cutoff reducing the Noise Equivalent Degree of Linear Polarization. (NEDOLP). To gain acceptance polarimetric sensors must provide intelligence signatures that are better than existing nonpolarimetric Infrared sensors. This paper shows analysis indicating the importance of NEDOLP and Extinction ratios.

  4. Two Centuries of Solar Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    In 1811, François Arago observed the disk of the Sun with his "lunette polariscopique". From the absence of detectable polarization compared with his laboratory observations of glowing solids, liquids, and flames he concluded that the Sun's visible surface is an incandescent gas. From this beginning, thanks to orders of magnitude technology improvements, a remarkable amount of what we know about the physics of the Sun has continued to flow from solar polarimetry. This short review compares some selected polarimetric discoveries with subsequent recent observations to illustrate the tremendous progress of solar polarimetry during the last two centuries.

  5. Probes of Fundamental Physics using X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    The advent of X-ray polarimetry as an astronomical discipline is on the near horizon. Prospects of Explorer class missions currently under study in the NASA SMEX program, the Xipe mission under ESA study in Europe, and beyond to initiatives under development in Asia, indicate that the worldwide high energy astrophysics community view this as a high priority. The focal goal of X-ray polarization measurements is often to discern the geometry of a source, for example an accreting black hole, pulsing neutron star or a relativistic jet; these are addressed in other talks in this HEAD special session. In this talk, I discuss a parallel agenda, to employ X-ray polarimetry to glean insights into fundamental physics that is presently difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Much of this is centered around neutron stars, and I willaddress theoretically-expected signatures of vacuum birefringence and photon splitting, predictions of QED theory in the strong magnetic fields possessed by pulsars and magnetars. Of particular note is that time-dependent polarimetry coupled with spectroscopy can help disentangle purely geometrical effects and fundamental physics ones. A brief discussion of possible tests of Lorentz invariance violation, expected in some theories of quantum gravity, will also be presented. Instrument requirements to realize such science goals will also be briefly covered.

  6. Scanning laser polarimetry - a review.

    PubMed

    Da Pozzo, Stefano; Marchesan, Roberta; Ravalico, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Retinal ganglion cells and their axons represent the selective target of the disease. When visual function is still intact on standard automated perimetry and optic disc appearance is suspicious, an early diagnosis may be supported by the identification of a retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) defect in the peripapillary area. At present days, computer-based, real-time imaging of the peripapillary RNFL is available through instruments of easy use and with high levels of accuracy and reproducibility. Scanning laser polarimetry is performed by a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope with an integrated polarimeter (GDx-VCC). There is a considerable amount of scientific evidence about the role of this imaging technique for glaucoma diagnosis. The aim of this review is to describe the principles of operation, the examination procedure, the clinical role, the results of main diagnostic studies and the future development of the software for the scanning laser polarimetry. PMID:19138311

  7. Wavelet-based polarimetry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Harrity, Kyle; Farag, Waleed; Alford, Mark; Ferris, David; Blasch, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Wavelet transformation has become a cutting edge and promising approach in the field of image and signal processing. A wavelet is a waveform of effectively limited duration that has an average value of zero. Wavelet analysis is done by breaking up the signal into shifted and scaled versions of the original signal. The key advantage of a wavelet is that it is capable of revealing smaller changes, trends, and breakdown points that are not revealed by other techniques such as Fourier analysis. The phenomenon of polarization has been studied for quite some time and is a very useful tool for target detection and tracking. Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) polarization is beneficial for detecting camouflaged objects and is a useful approach when identifying and distinguishing manmade objects from natural clutter. In addition, the Stokes Polarization Parameters, which are calculated from 0°, 45°, 90°, 135° right circular, and left circular intensity measurements, provide spatial orientations of target features and suppress natural features. In this paper, we propose a wavelet-based polarimetry analysis (WPA) method to analyze Long Wave Infrared Polarimetry Imagery to discriminate targets such as dismounts and vehicles from background clutter. These parameters can be used for image thresholding and segmentation. Experimental results show the wavelet-based polarimetry analysis is efficient and can be used in a wide range of applications such as change detection, shape extraction, target recognition, and feature-aided tracking.

  8. Optical Polarimetry Campaign on Markarian 421 during the 2012 Large Flaring Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barres de Almeida, Ulisses; Jermak, Helen; Lindfors, Elina; Mundell, Carole; Nilsson, Kari; Steele, Iain

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, Fermi/LAT gamma-ray and radio observations registered the largest flaring episodes ever recorded from the blazar Markarian 421. The unprecedented activity state of the source has remained high and much above the normal emission state seem from the source also for the year 2013, characterising a dramatic and long-lasting, albeit puzzling, change of behaviour in the emission of this object. This unique event has been followed by observations over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, showing extreme signatures in all bands, from radio to VHE gamma-rays. Polarisation monitoring of the source has nevertheless been somewhat more scarce, and direct observation of the peak activity in 2012 was prevented by the source's proximity to the Sun at that time. As part of our continuous monitoring programme of VHE-emitting blazars in optical polarimetry at the Liverpool Telescope, which used the RINGO2 fast polarimeter and lasted from 2010 to 2013, we have observed Mkn 421 with regular coverage and a sub-weekly cadence for over two years. This continued monitoring allowed us to continually follow the polarisation behaviour of the source for a long time and up to the days preceding the dramatic flare event in 2012. In the weeks before the extreme 2012 outbursts, Mrk 421 underwent an unprecedented increase in its degree of polarisation, which rose by a factor of 5, not witnessed in decades from this object. The source also showed a large rotation of its polarisation angle, by over 180 degrees, which has never been registered before for this objetc. In this talk we will present our entire dataset on Mkn 421, concentrating in discussing the unprecedented events in optical polarisation that preceded the high-energy outburst. The main question we put ourselves is if what we have seen could be regarded as a polarimetric precursor to the high activity that followed. And if yes, what connections can we establish between them, and what remains mysterious to us about it?

  9. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  10. Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdi, James Salvatore; Kessler, Otto; Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    1996-01-01

    Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry (WISIP) has become an important, indispensible tool in wide area military surveillance and global environmental monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. It enables dynamic, real time optimal feature extraction of significant characteristics of desirable targets and/or target sections with simultaneous suppression of undesirable background clutter and propagation path speckle at hitherto unknown clarity and never before achieved quality. WISIP may be adopted to the detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) of any stationary, moving or vibrating targets or distributed scatterer segments versus arbitrary stationary, dynamical changing and/or moving geo-physical/ecological environments, provided the instantaneous 2x2 phasor and 4x4 power density matrices for forward propagation/backward scattering, respectively, can be measured with sufficient accuracy. For example, the DRI of stealthy, dynamically moving inhomogeneous volumetric scatter environments such as precipitation scatter, the ocean/sea/lake surface boundary layers, the littoral coastal surf zones, pack ice and snow or vegetative canopies, dry sands and soils, etc. can now be successfully realized. A comprehensive overview is presented on how these modern high resolution/precision, complete polarimetric co-registered signature sensing and imaging techniques, complemented by full integration of novel navigational electronic tools, such as DGPS, will advance electromagnetic vector wave sensing and imaging towards the limits of physical realization. Various examples utilizing the most recent image data take sets of airborne, space shuttle, and satellite imaging systems demonstrate the utility of WISIP.

  11. Polarimetry of the transient relativistic jet of GRB 110328/Swift J164449.3+573451

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Karjalainen, R.; Kamble, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Metzger, B. D.; Russell, D. M.; Skillen, I.; Starling, R. L. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2012-04-01

    We present deep infrared (Ks-band) imaging polarimetry and radio (1.4- and 4.8-GHz) polarimetry of the enigmatic transient Swift J164449.3+573451. This source appears to be a short-lived jet phenomenon in a galaxy at redshift z= 0.354, activated by a sudden mass accretion on to the central massive black hole, possibly caused by the tidal disruption of a star. We aim to find evidence for this scenario through linear polarimetry, as linear polarization is a sensitive probe of jet physics, source geometry and the various mechanisms giving rise to the observed radiation. We find a formal Ks-band polarization measurement of Plin= 7.4 ± 3.5 per cent (including systematic errors). Our radio observations show continuing brightening of the source, which allows sensitive searches for linear polarization as a function of time. We find no evidence of linear polarization at radio wavelengths of 1.4 and 4.8 GHz at any epoch, with the most sensitive 3σ limits as deep as 2.1 per cent. These upper limits are in agreement with expectations from scenarios in which the radio emission is produced by the interaction of a relativistic jet with a dense circumsource medium. We further demonstrate how polarization properties can be used to derive properties of the jet in Swift J164449.3+573451, exploiting the similarities between this source and the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Radio sociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, George W., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    A work was conducted, using radio telemetry, to locate a migrating, radio-tagged, sharp-shinned hawk. The hawk was monitored through the noise radiation it created. The hawk was found. During this study, it was found that the concentration of population corresponds with areas of increased noise temperature. Through this study, a bigger study was planned. The study would involved the relationship between a place's radiation signature and its other attributes, such as economic type, population, geographic concentration. The method of radio sociology would be used to track the sources of radio noise.

  13. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the NGC 2071 Star-Forming Region with SIRPOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Nakajima, Yasushi; Sato, Shuji; Nagashima, Chie; Kurita, Mikio; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nagayama, Takahiro; Hough, James H.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Chrysostomou, Antonio

    2007-06-01

    We conducted deep JHKs imaging polarimetry of a ˜ 8' × 8' area of the NGC 2071 star-forming region. Our polarization data revealed various infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe) associated with the central IR young star cluster NGC 2071IR and identified their illuminating sources. There are at least 4 IRNe in NGC 2071IR, and several additional IRNe were identified around nearby young stars in the same field-of-view. Each illuminating source coincides with a known near-IR source, except for IRS 3, which is only a part of IRN 2 and is illuminated by the radio source 1c. Aperture polarimetry of each cluster source was used to detect unresolved circumstellar disk/outflow systems. Aperture polarimetry of the other point-like sources within the field was conducted in this region for the first time. The magnetic field structures (from ˜ 1 pc down to ˜ 0.1 pc) were derived using both aperture polarimetry of the point-like sources and imaging polarimetry of the shocked H2 emission that is seen as the dominant knotty nebulae in the Ks band image; both are of dichroic origin and the derived field directions are consistent with each other. The magnetic field direction projected on the sky is also consistent with that inferred from the 850μm thermal continuum emission polarimetry of the central 0.2 pc region, but is running roughly perpendicular (˜ 75°) to the direction of the large-scale outflow. We argue that the field strength is too weak to align the outflow in the large-scale field direction via magnetic braking.

  14. Imaging radar polarimetry - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a tutorial review of the broad sweep of topics relating to imaging radar polarimetry, ranging from mathematical foundations to hardware and from implementation approaches to signal processing and calibration. The authors examine current developments in sensor technology and implementation for recording polarimetric measurements, and describe techniques and areas of application for this form of remotely sensed data. Those aspects of ground signal processing and calibration peculiar to the polarimetric signals are addressed. Several of the currently operating instruments and some of the implementations planned for future use are discussed.

  15. Imaging radar polarization signatures - Theory and observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Zebker, Howard A.; Elachi, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Radar polarimetry theory is reviewed, and comparison between theory and experimental results obtained with an imaging radar polarimeter employing two orthogonally polarized antennas is made. Knowledge of the scattering matrix permits calculation of the scattering cross section of a scatterer for any transmit and receive polarization combination, and a new way of displaying the resulting scattering cross section as a function of polarization is introduced. Examples of polarization signatures are presented for several theoretical models of surface scattering, and these signatures are compared with experimentally measured polarization signatures. The coefficient of variation, derived from the polarization signature, may provide information regarding the amount of variation in scattering properties for a given area.

  16. Polarimetry in astrophysics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lingzhen

    Astrophysicists are mostly limited to passively observing electromagnetic radiation from a distance, which generally shows some degree of polarization. Polarization often carries a wealth of information on the physical state and geometry of the emitting object and intervening material. In the microwave part of the spectrum, polarization provides information about galactic magnetic fields and the physics of interstellar dust. The measurement of this polarized radiation is central to much modern astrophysical research. The first part of this thesis is about polarimetry in astrophysics. In Chapter 1, I review the basics of polarization and summarize the most important mechanisms that generate polarization in astrophysics. In Chapter 2, I describe the data analysis of polarization observation on M17 (a young, massive star formation region in the Galaxy) from Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and show the physics that we learn about M17 from the polarimetry. Polarimetry also plays an important role in modern cosmology. Inflation theory predicts two types of polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, called E-modes and B-modes. Measurements to date of the E-mode signal are consistent with the predictions of anisotropic Thompson scattering, while the B-mode signal has yet to be detected. The B-mode power spectrum amplitude can be parameterized by the relative amplitude of the tensor to scalar modes r. For the simplest inflation models, the expected deviation from scale invariance (ns = 0.963 ± 0.012) is coupled to gravitational waves with r ≈ 0.1. These considerations establish a strong motivation to search for this remnant from when the universe was about 10-32 seconds old. The second part of this thesis is about the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment, that is designed to have an unprecedented ability to detect the B-mode polarization to the level of r ≤ 0.01. Chapter 3 is an introduction to cosmology, including the

  17. Scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Tanuj; Sharma, Reetika; Angmo, Dewang; Sinha, Gautam; Bhartiya, Shibal; Mishra, Sanjay K; Panda, Anita; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an acquired progressive optic neuropathy which is characterized by changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). White-on-white perimetry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of glaucoma. However, it can detect defects in the visual field only after the loss of as many as 40% of the ganglion cells. Hence, the measurement of RNFL thickness has come up. Optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) are the techniques that utilize the evaluation of RNFL for the evaluation of glaucoma. SLP provides RNFL thickness measurements based upon the birefringence of the retinal ganglion cell axons. We have reviewed the published literature on the use of SLP in glaucoma. This review elucidates the technological principles, recent developments and the role of SLP in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, in the light of scientific evidence so far. PMID:25494244

  18. Radar polarimetry for geoscience applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, Fawwaz T. (Editor); Elachi, Charles (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on radar polarimetry for geoscience applications discusses wave properties and polarization, scattering matrix representation for simple targets, scattering models for point and distributed targets, polarimetric scatterometer systems and measurements, polarimetric radar system design, and polarimetric SAR applications. Attention is given to plane waves in a lossless homogeneous medium-wave polarization, polarization synthesis and response, and coordinate system transformations. Topics addressed include high- and low-frequency scattering, rough-surface scattering models, radiative transfer theory and deficiencies thereof, solutions for the radiative transfer equation, and a radiative transfer model for a forest canopy. Also discussed are network analyzer-based polarimetric scatterometers, calibration of polarimetric scatterometers, synthesized polarization response of distributed targets, and measurement of the propagation parameters of a forest canopy.

  19. Put X-Ray Polarimetry on the MAP!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    difficult than narrow-line spectroscopy. X-ray polarimetry thus requires a dedicated mission that can, without programmatic pressures from other instruments/users, devote the integration time to perform meaningful measurements. The recently cancelled GEMS might have been such a mission. At least it was dedicated to polarimetry. Performing meaningful measurements is not going to be easy. In part because of the long hiatus and lack of experience, there appears to be too much pressure to "sell" polarimetry missions by the number of sources for which one might answer the simple question is, or is not, the integrated and time averaged emission from the source polarized at some confidence level? This was a fine question for the 1970 s but, I maintain, it is not today. One simply doesn't want to measure the time averaged polarization of the Crab s pulsar, but one wants to know the polarization as a function of energy and pulse phase to compare, e.g. to optical and radio measurements which divide even the primary pulse into dozens of phase bins. Such observations can distinguish amongst competing theories for the pulsed emission. The Roadmap should define what meaningful experiments are. I will pose some suggestions. Note that , because X-rays are usually believed originate in either non-thermal or highly aspherical situations we expect X-ray polarimetry to be much more important and rich in astrophysical information as opposed to the visible, where starlight often dominates the emission. One has often dreamt about an instrument that does polarimetry whilst it does other things, and I will discuss this. Even in this case, one needs to realize that the observing time will be driven by the polarimetry, otherwise no useful polarization measurements will be made. Finally, I will discuss some misconceptions that have appeared in the literature and at conferences which indicate to me that certain fundamental principles of polarimeter design and performance are not clearly understoodt is

  20. Signatures support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.

    2009-05-01

    The Signatures Support Program (SSP) leverages the full spectrum of signature-related activities (collections, processing, development, storage, maintenance, and dissemination) within the Department of Defense (DOD), the intelligence community (IC), other Federal agencies, and civil institutions. The Enterprise encompasses acoustic, seismic, radio frequency, infrared, radar, nuclear radiation, and electro-optical signatures. The SSP serves the war fighter, the IC, and civil institutions by supporting military operations, intelligence operations, homeland defense, disaster relief, acquisitions, and research and development. Data centers host and maintain signature holdings, collectively forming the national signatures pool. The geographically distributed organizations are the authoritative sources and repositories for signature data; the centers are responsible for data content and quality. The SSP proactively engages DOD, IC, other Federal entities, academia, and industry to locate signatures for inclusion in the distributed national signatures pool and provides world-wide 24/7 access via the SSP application.

  1. Synchrotron Heating by a Fast Radio Burst in a Self-absorbed Synchrotron Nebula and Its Observational Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are mysterious transient sources. If extragalactic, as suggested by their relative large dispersion measures, their brightness temperatures must be extremely high. Some FRB models (e.g., young pulsar model, magnetar giant flare model, or supra-massive neutron star collapse model) suggest that they may be associated with a synchrotron nebula. Here we study a synchrotron-heating process by an FRB in a self-absorbed synchrotron nebula. If the FRB frequency is below the synchrotron self-absorption frequency of the nebula, electrons in the nebula would absorb FRB photons, leading to a harder electron spectrum and enhanced self-absorbed synchrotron emission. In the meantime, the FRB flux is absorbed by the nebula electrons. We calculate the spectra of FRB-heated synchrotron nebulae, and show that the nebula spectra would show a significant hump in several decades near the self-absorption frequency. Identifying such a spectral feature would reveal an embedded FRB in a synchrotron nebula.

  2. Infrared Stokes polarimetry and spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudenov, Michael William

    In this work, three methods of measuring the polarization state of light in the thermal infrared (3-12 mum) are modeled, simulated, calibrated and experimentally verified in the laboratory. The first utilizes the method of channeled spectropolarimetry (CP) to encode the Stokes polarization parameters onto the optical power spectrum. This channeled spectral technique is implemented with the use of two Yttrium Vanadate (YVO4) crystal retarders. A basic mathematical model for the system is presented, showing that all the Stokes parameters are directly present in the interferogram. Theoretical results are compared with real data from the system, an improved model is provided to simulate the effects of absorption within the crystal, and a modified calibration technique is introduced to account for this absorption. Lastly, effects due to interferometer instabilities on the reconstructions, including non-uniform sampling and interferogram translations, are investigated and techniques are employed to mitigate them. Second is the method of prismatic imaging polarimetry (PIP), which can be envisioned as the monochromatic application of channeled spectropolarimetry. Unlike CP, PIP encodes the 2-dimensional Stokes parameters in a scene onto spatial carrier frequencies. However, the calibration techniques derived in the infrared for CP are extremely similar to that of the PIP. Consequently, the PIP technique is implemented with a set of four YVO4 crystal prisms. A mathematical model for the polarimeter is presented in which diattenuation due to Fresnel effects and dichroism in the crystal are included. An improved polarimetric calibration technique is introduced to remove the diattenuation effects, along with the relative radiometric calibration required for the BPIP operating with a thermal background and large detector offsets. Data demonstrating emission polarization are presented from various blackbodies, which are compared to data from our Fourier transform infrared

  3. Spectral line polarimetry with a channeled polarimeter.

    PubMed

    van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans; Rietjens, Jeroen H H; Martijn Smit, J; Keller, Christoph U

    2014-07-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry or spectral polarization modulation is an accurate technique for measuring the continuum polarization in one shot with no moving parts. We show how a dual-beam implementation also enables spectral line polarimetry at the intrinsic resolution, as in a classic beam-splitting polarimeter. Recording redundant polarization information in the two spectrally modulated beams of a polarizing beam-splitter even provides the possibility to perform a postfacto differential transmission correction that improves the accuracy of the spectral line polarimetry. We perform an error analysis to compare the accuracy of spectral line polarimetry to continuum polarimetry, degraded by a residual dark signal and differential transmission, as well as to quantify the impact of the transmission correction. We demonstrate the new techniques with a blue sky polarization measurement around the oxygen A absorption band using the groundSPEX instrument, yielding a polarization in the deepest part of the band of 0.160±0.010, significantly different from the polarization in the continuum of 0.2284±0.0004. The presented methods are applicable to any dual-beam channeled polarimeter, including implementations for snapshot imaging polarimetry. PMID:25089978

  4. Probability of detection of downed aircraft using SAR polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotoo, Kancham; Huxtable, Barton D.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Rais, Houra

    2000-08-01

    In developing a beaconless search and rescue capability to quickly locate small aircraft that have crashed in remote areas, NASA's Search and Rescue Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR2) program brings together advanced polarimetric synthetic aperture radar processing, field and laboratory tests, and state-of-the-art automated target detection algorithms. The fundamental idea underlying the search and rescue (S&R) approach is use of an airborne polarimetric radar. The downed aircraft is partly composed of metal, and consists of regular geometric shapes such as flat plates, dihedrals, trihedrals, etc., which produce a polarization signature expected to be distinct from that of surrounding terrain and foliage. Onboard polarimetric SAR image formation combined with automatic image exploitation will ultimately cue the S&R team to candidate crash sites in near real-time. We empirically examine the probability of detection (PD) and false alarm rate (FAR) for crash site detection using polarimetry to discriminate between aircraft target signatures within natural clutter. This briefing will present the latest results from the S&R Program activities, providing an update to the last program presentation to the SPIE Meeting in 1999.

  5. Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Chudakov; Vladimir Luppov

    2003-10-19

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. The feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed.

  6. Laser Polarimetry: Review And Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Dennis H.

    1990-01-01

    Polarimetry, or transmission ellipsometry, is an important experimental technique for the determination of polarization properties of bulk materials. In this technique, source radiation of known polarization is passed through bulk samples to determine, for example, natural or induced birefringence and dichroism. The laser is a particularly appropriate source for this technique because of its monochromaticity, collimation, and radiant intensity. Lasers of many different wavelengths in different spectral regions are now available. Laser polarimetry can be done in any of these wavelength regions where polarizing elements are available. In this paper, polari-metry is reviewed with respect to applications, sources used, and polarization state generator and analyzer configurations. Scattering ellipsometry is also discussed insofar as the forward scattering measurement is related to polarimetry. We then describe an infrared laser polarimeter which we have designed and constructed. This instrument can operate over large wavelength regions with only a change in source. Polarization elements of the polarimeter are in a dual rotating retarder configuration. Computer controlled rotary stages and computer moni-tored detectors automate the data collection. The Mueller formulation is used to process the polarization infor-mation. Issues and recent progress with this instrument are discussed.

  7. New methods for precision Møller polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gaskell; D.G. Meekins; C. Yan

    2007-07-01

    Precision electron beam polarimetry is becoming increasingly important as parity violation experiments attempt to probe the frontiers of the standard model. In the few GeV regime, Møller polarimetry is well suited to high-precision measurements, however is generally limited to use at relatively low beam currents (< 10 μA). We present a novel technique that will enable precision Møller polarimetry at very large currents, up to 100μA.

  8. Tomography of Galaxy Clusters through Low-frequency Radio Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzo, Roberto Francesco

    2010-02-01

    De mens heeft altijd willen weten wat zijn oorsprong is en hoe deze is gerelateerd aan het heelal. Hij heeft dit op verschillende manieren geprobeerd: is er een religieuze achtergrond of een wetenschappelijke? Vaak heeft de mens zijn vragen en antwoorden in de literatuur en beeldende kunst uitgedrukt door middel van gedichten en verhalen, het maken van tekeningen, schilderijen en sculpturen van geweldige omvang en schoonheid. De wetenschappelijke aanpak is natuurlijk een van de beste benaderingen om goede en directe antwoorden te vinden. Dit is de reden waarom ik ongeveer negen jaar geleden de wetenschap ben gaan bestuderen met als resultaat de onderwerpen die in dit proefschrift beschreven zijn. Deze samenvatting heeft als doel in het kort de resultaten weer te geven van mijn werk van de afgelopen vier jaar, waarbij ik de onderwerpen van dit proefschrift in een voor iedereen begrijpelijk en makkelijk leesbaar geheel probeer samen te vatten. Om de details van mijn werk te begrijpen, is het zeer nuttig eerst een globaal idee te geven van hoe het universum waarin we leven is georganiseerd. ... Zie: Samenvatting

  9. Infrared photometry and polarimetry of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Howard, Eric M.

    1994-01-01

    We present photometry and linear polarimetry of Cygnus X-3 at K (2.2 micrometers) obtained over a 5 yr period. Photometry and polarimetry at J, H, and K of nearby field stars is also presented. From an analysis of these data we find: (1) Using the x-ray ephemeris of Kitamoto et al. (ApJ, 384, 263 (1992), including the first and second derivatives of the period, the leading edge of the decline to minimum in the quiescent K light curve has not changed in phase since 1974. The duration of the minimum in the light curve has changed significantly between different epochs, becoming much broader in 1993 than it was previously. (2) In addition to an interstellar polarization component, it is likely Cyg X-3 has an intrinsic polarization component that is variable. The variations in the polarization do not show any diagnostic pattern with orbital phase. A crude analysis of the polarization suggests the intrinsic polarization of Cyg X-3 has a mean position angle of approximately 12 deg, nearly the same as the direction of the expanding radio lobes. This is consistent with circumstellar electrons scattering in an equatorial disk that is perpendicular to the lobe axis. (3) The mean position angle for the interstellar polarization in the direction of Cyg X-3 is 150 deg. This is nearly perpendicular to the axis of interstellar radio scattering seen in the extended (Very Long Baseline Inteferometry (VLBI) images. Since the position angle of interstellar polarization is the same as the projected magnetic field direction, this suggests the interstellar (not circumstellar) scattering must be taking place perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field lines. (4) Cyg X-3 was observed at K during a flare on 1992 September 30 with a temporal resolution of 6 s. The flaring had rise and fall times of approximately 50 s with peak intensities up to 80 mJy. The flux between individual flare events never dropped to quiescent levels for the duration of our observations (approximately 2000 s).

  10. Recent Advances in Radar Polarimetry and Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    2005-01-01

    The development of Radar Polarimetry and Radar Interferometry is advancing rapidly, and these novel radar technologies are revamping Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging decisively. In this exposition the successive advancements are sketched; beginning with the fundamental formulations and high-lighting the salient points of these diverse remote sensing techniques. Whereas with radar polarimetry the textural fine-structure, target-orientation and shape, symmetries and material constituents can be recovered with considerable improvements above that of standard amplitude-only Polarization Radar ; with radar interferometry the spatial (in depth) structure can be explored. In Polarimetric-Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POL-IN-SAR) Imaging it is possible to recover such co-registered textural plus spatial properties simultaneously. This includes the extraction of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) from either fully Polarimetric (scattering matrix) or Interferometric (dual antenna) SAR image data takes with the additional benefit of obtaining co-registered three-dimensional POL-IN-DEM information. Extra-Wide-Band POL-IN-SAR Imaging - when applied to Repeat-Pass Image Overlay Interferometry - provides differential background validation and measurement, stress assessment, and environmental stress-change monitoring capabilities with hitherto unattained accuracy, which are essential tools for improved global biomass estimation. More recently, by applying multiple parallel repeat-pass EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging along stacked (altitudinal) or displaced (horizontal) flight-lines will result in Tomographic (Multi- Interferometric) Polarimetric SAR Stereo-Imaging , including foliage and ground penetrating capabilities. It is shown that the accelerated advancement of these modern EWB-POL-D(RP)-IN-SAR imaging techniques is of direct relevance and of paramount priority to wide-area dynamic homeland security surveillance and local-to-global environmental ground-truth measurement

  11. Polarimetry of uncoupled light on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, D; Moody, J D; Michel, P; Ralph, J E; Divol, L

    2014-11-01

    Polarimetry has been added to the full aperture backscatter diagnostic on the NIF. Wollaston prisms are used to sample a small region of a beam's backscatter, effectively separating it into two linear polarizations, one of which is parallel to the incident beam. A time-averaged measurement of each polarization is obtained by imaging the separated spots off of a scatter plate. Results have improved understanding of crossed beam energy transfer, glint, and sidescatter, and motivated plans to upgrade to a time-resolved polarimeter measuring the full Stokes vector. PMID:25430349

  12. Polarimetry of uncoupled light on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, D; Moody, J D; Michel, P; Ralph, J E; Divol, L

    2014-11-01

    Polarimetry has been added to the full aperture backscatter diagnostic on the NIF. Wollaston prisms are used to sample a small region of a beam's backscatter, effectively separating it into two linear polarizations, one of which is parallel to the incident beam. A time-averaged measurement of each polarization is obtained by imaging the separated spots off of a scatter plate. Results have improved understanding of crossed beam energy transfer, glint, and sidescatter, and motivated plans to upgrade to a time-resolved polarimeter measuring the full Stokes vector.

  13. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  14. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Girogio; Kaspi, Vicky; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful - yet inexpensive - dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --- particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsiz:e the important physical and astrophysical questions such as mission would address.

  15. Polarimetry of uncoupled light on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, D. Moody, J. D.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J. E.; Divol, L.

    2014-11-15

    Polarimetry has been added to the full aperture backscatter diagnostic on the NIF. Wollaston prisms are used to sample a small region of a beam's backscatter, effectively separating it into two linear polarizations, one of which is parallel to the incident beam. A time-averaged measurement of each polarization is obtained by imaging the separated spots off of a scatter plate. Results have improved understanding of crossed beam energy transfer, glint, and sidescatter, and motivated plans to upgrade to a time-resolved polarimeter measuring the full Stokes vector.

  16. Diffusing-wave polarimetry for tissue diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Callum; Doronin, Alexander; Peña, Adrian F.; Eccles, Michael; Meglinski, Igor

    2014-03-01

    We exploit the directional awareness of circularly and/or elliptically polarized light propagating within media which exhibit high numbers of scattering events. By tracking the Stokes vector of the detected light on the Poincaŕe sphere, we demonstrate its applicability for characterization of anisotropy of scattering. A phenomenological model is shown to have an excellent agreement with the experimental data and with the results obtained by the polarization tracking Monte Carlo model, developed in house. By analogy to diffusing-wave spectroscopy we call this approach diffusing-wave polarimetry, and illustrate its utility in probing cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samplesin vitro for diagnostic purposes.

  17. Neutron electric form factor via recoil polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Madey, Richard; Semenov, Andrei; Taylor, Simon; Aghalaryan, Aram; Crouse, Erick; MacLachlan, Glen; Plaster, Bradley; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Tireman, William; Yan, Chenyu; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Anderson, Brian; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, O; Baldwin, Alan; Breuer, Herbert; Carlini, Roger; Christy, Michael; Churchwell, Steve; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Day, Donal; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Fenker, Howard; Finn, John; Gan, Liping; Garrow, Kenneth; Gueye, Paul; Howell, Calvin; Hu, Bitao; Jones, Mark; Kelly, James; Keppel, Cynthia; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Kowalski, Stanley; Lung, Allison; Mack, David; Manley, D; Markowitz, Pete; Mitchell, Joseph; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Opper, Allena; Perdrisat, Charles; Punjabi, Vina; Raue, Brian; Reichelt, Tilmann; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Sato, Yoshinori; Seo, Wonick; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Samuel; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Tang, Liguang; Ulmer, Paul; Vulcan, William; Watson, John; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Yang, Seunghoon; Yuan, Lulin; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Hong Guo; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2003-05-01

    The ratio of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, G_En/G_Mn, was measured via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic d({pol-e},e'{pol-n)p reaction at three values of Q^2 [viz., 0.45, 1.15 and 1.47 (GeV/c)^2] in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Preliminary data indicate that G_En follows the Galster parameterization up to Q^2 = 1.15 (GeV/c)^2 and appears to rise above the Galster parameterization at Q^2 = 1.47 (GeV/c)^2.

  18. JVLA S- and X-band polarimetry of the merging cluster Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takeaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Akahori, Takuya; Anraku, Kenta; Takizawa, Motokazu; Takahashi, Ikumi; Onodera, Sachiko; Tsuda, Yuya; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We report on polarimetry results of a merging cluster of galaxies, Abell 2256, with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). We performed new observations with JVLA at the S band (2051-3947 MHz) and X band (8051-9947 MHz) in the C array configuration, and detected significant polarized emissions from the radio relic, Source A, and Source B in this cluster. We calculated the total magnetic-field strengths toward the radio relic using revised equipartition formula, which is 1.8-5.0 μG. With dispersions of Faraday rotation measure, the magnetic-field strengths toward Sources A and B are estimated to be 0.63-1.26 μG and 0.11-0.21 μG, respectively. An extremely high degree of linear polarization, as high as ˜ 35%, about a half of the maximum polarization, was detected toward the radio relic, which indicates highly ordered magnetic lines of force over the beam sizes (˜ 52 kpc). The fractional polarization of the radio relic decreases from ˜ 35% to ˜ 20% at around 3 GHz as the frequency decreases, and is nearly constant between 1.37 and 3 GHz. Both analyses with depolarization models and Faraday tomography suggest multiple depolarization components toward the radio relic and imply the existence of turbulent magnetic fields.

  19. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-11-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  20. WHT, DIPOL-2 polarimetry of Nova Sgr 2015b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Eamonn; Berdyugin, Andrei; Redman, Matt

    2015-09-01

    We report polarimetry data from three nights observing of Nova Sgr 2015b (also PNV J18365700-2855420 or V5668 Sgr) with the William Herschel Telescope in the BVR passbands using the DIPOL-2 instrument.

  1. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  2. Polarimetry with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael; Doeleman, Sheperd; Fish, Vincent L.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Kosowsky, Michael; Wardle, John F. C.; Lu, Rusen

    2014-06-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is an effort to develop millimeter and submillimeter VLBI to image nearby black holes at resolutions comparable to their event horizons. Past work with the EHT has measured compact emission on such scales for Sgr A* and M87, and has also measured sub-parsec structure in more distant quasars. Polarimetry with the EHT enables a powerful extension of this work, mapping magnetic field structures via the highly polarized synchrotron emission. Polarization is also an excellent probe of rapid variability, especially for Sgr A*, and can convey rich astrometric information even with incomplete imaging. We report on results from our 2013 campaign, which demonstrate a sharp increase in the linear polarization fraction and variability with increasing baseline, and we demonstrate that current EHT data can potentially achieve microarcsecond relative astrometry of flaring regions on timescales of minutes.

  3. Imaging Polarimetry of Protoplanetary and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarrott, S. M.; Scarrott, R. M. J.

    1995-11-01

    Imaging polarimetry maps are presented for a sample of bipolar proto-planetary and planetary nebulae (Frosty Leo, Roberts 22, Hen 401, MZ 3, NGC 2346, IC 4406 and J 320). Each of the highly polarized proto-planetary nebulae possesses a `polarization disc' which has been observed more frequently in nebulae associated with star forming regions. In order to account for the observed high levels of polarization in protoplanetary nebulae we consider the effects of a thin coating of a volatile material on refractory grains with an original size distribution typical of the interstellar medium. The planetary nebulae are seen in a mixture of reflected and emission light and their polarization patterns suggest that, in many instances, they are emission nebulae surrounded by an extensive envelope of reflection nebulosity. The origin of the skew-symmetry and ansae in the isophotal maps of proto-planetary and planetary nebulae are discussed in terms of binary stars and magnetic fields.

  4. Extrapolation procedures in Mott electron polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, T. J.; Khakoo, M. A.; Brand, J. A.; Furst, J. E.; Wijayaratna, W. M. K. P.; Meyer, W. V.; Dunning, F. B.

    1992-01-01

    In standard Mott electron polarimetry using thin gold film targets, extrapolation procedures must be used to reduce the experimentally measured asymmetries A to the values they would have for scattering from single atoms. These extrapolations involve the dependent of A on either the gold film thickness or the maximum detected electron energy loss in the target. A concentric cylindrical-electrode Mott polarimeter, has been used to study and compare these two types of extrapolations over the electron energy range 20-100 keV. The potential systematic errors which can result from such procedures are analyzed in detail, particularly with regard to the use of various fitting functions in thickness extrapolations, and the failure of perfect energy-loss discrimination to yield accurate polarizations when thick foils are used.

  5. OPTICAL I-BAND LINEAR POLARIMETRY OF THE MAGNETAR 4U 0142+61 WITH SUBARU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Wang, Chen; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke

    2015-12-01

    Magnetars are known to have optical and/or infrared (IR) emission, but the origin of the emission is not well understood. In order to fully study their emission properties, we have carried out for the first time optical linear polarimetry of the magnetar 4U 0142+61, which has been determined from different observations to have a complicated broadband spectrum over optical and IR wavelengths. From our I-band imaging polarimetric observation, conducted with the 8.2-m Subaru telescope, we determine the degree of linear polarization to be P = 1.0 ± 3.4%, or P ≤ 5.6% (90% confidence level). Considering models that were suggested for optical emission from magnetars, we discuss the implications of our result. The upper limit measurement indicates that, differing from radio pulsars, magnetars probably would not have strongly polarized optical emission if the emission arises from their magnetosphere as suggested.

  6. Signatures and Characteristics of Internal Gravity Waves in the Venus' and Mars' Atmospheres as Revealed by the Radio Occultation Temperature Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Andreev, Vitali; Salimzyanov, Rishat; Pavelyev, Alexey

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that internal gravity waves (IGWs) affect the structure and mean circulation of the Earth' middle and upper atmosphere by transporting energy and horizontal momentum upward from the lower atmosphere. The IGWs modulate the background atmospheric structure, producing a periodic pattern of spatial and temporal variations in the wind velocity, temperature and density. Similar effects are anticipated for the Venus and Mars since IGWs are a characteristic of stably stratified atmosphere. For instance, Yakovlev et al. (1991) and Gubenko et al. (2008a) used the radio occultation (RO) data from Venera 15 and 16 missions to investigate the thermal structure and layering of the Venus' middle atmosphere. They noted that a wavelike periodic structure commonly appears in retrieved vertical profiles at altitudes above 60 km in the atmosphere where the static stability is large. Through comparisons between Magellan RO observations in the Venus' atmosphere, Hinson and Jenkins (1995) have demonstrated that small scale variations in retrieved temperature profiles at altitudes from 60 to 90 km are caused by a spectrum of vertical propagating IGWs. Temperature profiles from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) measurements reveal vertical wavelike structures assumed to be atmospheric IGWs in the Mars' lower atmosphere (Creasey et al., 2006). The very large IGW amplitudes inferred from MGS RO data imply a very significant role for IGWs in the atmospheric dynamics of Mars as well. There is one general problem inherent to all measurements of IGWs. Observed wavelike variations may alternatively be caused by the IGWs, turbulence or persistent layers in the atmosphere, and it is necessary to have an IGW identification criterion for the correct interpretation of obtained results. In this context, we have developed an original method for the determination of internal gravity wave parameters from a single vertical temperature profile measurement in a planetary atmosphere (Gubenko et

  7. Thermal noise removal in hybrid polarimetry SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suneela Mishra, J. V. D.; Misra, Tapan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the estimation of noise, techniques for noise removal in Single Look Complex (SLC) as well as hybrid polarimetry decomposed images and the effects of noise removal in SAR images, using RISAT-1 data. Thermal noise affects the signal to noise ratio as well as radiometry of the SAR images. Different approaches adopted for estimating the thermal noise using onboard noise measurements and from the noise equivalent area of the images like calm reservoirs, lakes, etc., for RISAT-1 SAR are discussed. Subsequent to noise removal, its effect on minimum detectable noise and SNR of the images is addressed. Traditional noise removal methods affect the phase of the data, which in turn affect advanced SAR applications. A brief overview of the hybrid polarimetry configuration of RISAT-1 SAR, one of the emerging trends in polarimetry domain, is given and the effect of using noise removed single look complex (SLC) images for polarimetry decomposition is brought out. Thereby, a new technique for thermal noise removal in polarimetry decomposed data is presented.

  8. Fisher analysis on wide-band polarimetry for probing the intergalactic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Kumazaki, Kohei; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the capability of current radio telescopes for probing Faraday rotation measure (RM) due to the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in the large-scale structure of the universe, which is expected to be of order O (1) rad m-2. We consider polarization observations of a compact radio source such as quasars behind a diffuse source such as the Galaxy, and calculate Stokes parameters Q and U assuming a simple model of the Faraday dispersion functions with Gaussian shape. Then, we perform the Fisher analysis to estimate the expected errors in the model parameters from QU-fitting of polarization intensity, accounting for the sensitivities and frequency bands of Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder, Low Frequency Array, and the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. Finally, we examine the conditions on the source intensities which are required to detect the IGMF. Our analysis indicates that the QU-fitting is promising for forthcoming wideband polarimetry to explore RM due to the IGMF in filaments of galaxies.

  9. Stacked subwavelength gratings for imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguzman, Panfilo Castro

    The stacking of subwavelength gratings (SWG) in an integrated structure is presented for an application in imaging polarimetry. Imaging polarimetry extends the capability of conventional imaging by providing polarization information about a scene, in addition to variations in intensity. In this dissertation, a novel approach is introduced to develop a real-time imaging polarimeter. Subwavelength gratings are implemented as linear and circular polarization filters that are directly mounted onto the focal plane array of an infrared (IR) camera. Wire grid polarizers are used as linear polarization filters. The stacked structure, consisting of a wire grid polarizer and a form birefringent quarter-wave plate (QWP), implements the circular polarization filter and is the focus of this dissertation. Initial investigations of the development of the individual SWG components and their integration are presented. Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) was used to design the SWG structures. A broadband form birefringent quarter-wave plate for the 3.5 to 5 μm wavelength range was designed as a grating structure patterned directly into the substrate. Two fabrication methods for the wire grid polarizer were investigated. A 0.5 μm period polarizer was patterned by interference lithography. A 1 μm period polarizer was patterned by contact printing. The stacking of the subwavelength grating structures was analyzed using the Jones Matrix calculus and a new RCWA method (developed by fellow graduate student Jianhua Jiang). Stacked SWG's were fabricated as large area (1.3 cm x 1.3 cm) filters and as a 256 x 256 array of small aperture (15 μm x 15 μm) pixels. Two stack designs were investigated, referred to as Stack I and Stack II. Stack I consisted of the 0.5 μm period polarizer and the form birefringent QWP. Stack II consisted of the I μm grid period polarizer and the form birefringent QWP. Simulation and measured results are presented to compare the cases of samples with and

  10. Application of radar polarimetry to forestry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S. L.; Zebker, H. A.; Vanzyl, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    In order to understand L-band multipolarization radar measurements of forested areas, a model for the forest polarization signature was developed. The model is based on backscatter from dielectric cylinders which represent branches and trunks. In the model the Stokes matrices corresponding to several different scattering mechanisms is calculated, combining the results to get the total Stokes matrix. Comparison of model predictions with radar measurements shows that the model can accurately predict the forest polarization signature.

  11. Modelling feedback and magnetic fields in radio galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters contains magnetic fields on Mpc scales. The main probe of these cluster magnetic fields (CMFs) is the Faraday rotation of the polarized emission from radio sources that are either embedded in, or behind the ICM. Several questions are open concerning the structure and evolution of the magnetic fields in both the ICM and the radio sources. We present three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations to study randomly tangled magnetic fields in the core of a cluster under the effects of light and hypersonic AGN jets. We investigate the power of the jets and carry out synthetic observations to explore the observational signatures of our model radio sources. Our polarization maps agree with the observations, and show that the magnetic structure inside the sources is shaped by the backflow of the jets. Filaments in the synthetic synchrotron emissivity maps suggest that turbulence develops in evolved sources. The polarimetry statistics correlate with time, with the viewing angle and with the jet-to-ambient density contrast. As the sources expand, the linear polarization fraction decreases and the magnetic structure inside thin sources seems more uniform than inside fat ones. Moreover, we see that the jets distort and amplify the CMFs especially at the head of the jets and that this effect correlates with the power and evolution of the jets. We find good agreement with the RM fluctuations of Hydra A. One of the most important results is that the jet-produced RM enhancements may lead to an overestimate of the strength of the CMFs by a factor of about 70%. The physics of radio source expansion may explain the flattening of the RM structure functions at large scales. The advection of metals from a central active galaxy to the ICM in a cool-core cluster is also investigated with an additional suite of hydrodynamical simulations. These metals provide information about the ICM dynamical history and of the CMFs as well

  12. Polarimetries for the Polarized 3 He Target at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ton, Nguyen; Jefferson Lab Polarized 3 He Target Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a Polarized 3 He Target has been used as an effective polarized neutron target for studying nucleon spin structure. For the 12 GeV program at JLab, the first stage upgrade of the target aim to increase luminosity by a factor of 2 (to luminosity ~ 2 ×1036 cm-2s-1) while keep maximum in-beam polarization at 60 % with 30 μA beam current and reach a systematic uncertainty of polarimetry below 3 %. During the 6 GeV era, the target polarization was measured by two polarimetries: adiabatic fast passage-nuclear magnetic resonance (AFP-NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). With the upgrade, a new polarimetry, Pulse-NMR, is being studied in the lab for the up-coming metal coated target. In this talk, we will discuss the detail study of AFP-NMR, EPR, Pulsed-NMR measurements and their corresponding uncertainties.

  13. Multispectral Stokes polarimetry for dermatoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillejos, Y.; Martínez-Ponce, Geminiano; Mora-Nuñez, Azael; Castro-Sanchez, R.

    2015-12-01

    Most of skin pathologies, including melanoma and basal/squamous cell carcinoma, are related to alterations in external and internal order. Usually, physicians rely on their empirical expertise to diagnose these ills normally assisted with dermatoscopes. When there exists skin cancer suspicion, a cytology or biopsy is made, but both laboratory tests imply an invasive procedure. In this regard, a number of non-invasive optical techniques have been proposed recently to improve the diagnostic certainty and assist in the early detection of cutaneous cancer. Herein, skin optical properties are derived with a multispectral polarimetric dermatoscope using three different illumination wavelength intervals centered at 470, 530 and 635nm. The optical device consist of two polarizing elements, a quarter-wave plate and a linear polarizer, rotating at a different angular velocity and a CCD array as the photoreceiver. The modulated signal provided by a single pixel in the acquired image sequence is analyzed with the aim of computing the Stokes parameters. Changes in polarization state of selected wavelengths provide information about the presence of skin pigments such as melanin and hemoglobin species as well as collagen structure, among other components. These skin attributes determine the local physiology or pathology. From the results, it is concluded that optical polarimetry will provide additional elements to dermatologists in their diagnostic task.

  14. Stokes polarimetry imaging of dog prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Johnston, William K., III; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. Radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate) is the most common treatment for prostate cancer, however, differentiating prostate tissue from adjacent bladder, nerves, and muscle is difficult. Improved visualization could improve oncologic outcomes and decrease damage to adjacent nerves and muscle important for preservation of potency and continence. A novel Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system was developed and evaluated using a dog prostate specimen in order to examine the feasibility of the system to differentiate prostate from bladder. The degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination at different visible wavelengths (475, 510, and 650 nm) were constructed. The SPI system used the polarization property of the prostate tissue. The DOLP images allowed advanced differentiation by distinguishing glandular tissue of prostate from the muscular-stromal tissue in the bladder. The DOLP image at 650 nm effectively differentiated prostate and bladder by strong DOLP in bladder. SPI system has the potential to improve surgical outcomes in open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic removal of the prostate. Further in vivo testing is warranted.

  15. On demand polarimetry using a movable microgrid polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Page E.; Fest, Eric C.

    2015-09-01

    A movable pixelated filter array is proposed to provide low cost, on demand polarimetry and wavefront sensing. With this concept, an optical system can turn polarimetry on and off by using a shutter to move a microgrid polarizer array in and out of the optical path of the system. This allows an optical system to operate in two modes, a non-polarimetric mode in which sensor range is maintained, and a polarimetric mode in which it is reduced. In implementing this concept, adequate knowledge of the position of the filter in the optical path and calibration procedures become critical topics. This paper discusses simulated and hardware-tested results of this invention.

  16. Optical linear polarimetry of Solar System bodies using a Wedged Double Wollaston.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; García Muñoz, A.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.; Pérez Hoyos, S.

    2015-05-01

    The gases and aerosols contained in a planetary atmosphere leave characteristic signatures on the reflected radiation. Hence we could use the polarization state of emergent radiation to investigate the atmospheric optical properties of the planet. We report on the first polarimetric tests of Jupiter and Saturn recently carried out with a Wedged Double Wollaston (WeDoWo) prism attached to the ALFOSC instrument mounted at NOT. A WeDoWo is composed of a suitable combination of two glass wedges and two Wollaston prisms in the parallel beam ALFOSC. The edges split the beam and feed the Wollaston prims with axes rotated by 45 deg. Thus, the relative intensities of the output light provides the angle and degree of the input photons. The four images are taken simultaneously and hence at identical planet rotation and atmospheric conditions. In order avoid overlap of the 4 images in the CCD, a 10" wide slit is placed on the telescope focal plane. Polarimetry complements the extended technique of photometry by probing different atmospheric altitudes, characterizing the particles in suspension in the atmosphere. In observations with spatial resolution of the planet disk, polarimetry may be sensitive to the phenomenon of limb polarization and to the occurrence of polar hazes (as for Jupiter). We plan to complement the observational work with modelling. For that purpose, we are using a novel Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm that computes the full Stokes vector for multiple scattering. We are also developing a new calibration code in order to systematize the data reduction. Despite the potentialities of the technique, there has been no systematic survey of the Solar System planets in polarimetric mode. In the medium term we plan to extend the WeDoWo use to other objects of the Solar System.

  17. Polarimetry of the binary PDS 144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Magalhães, A. M.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: Our goal is to study the circumstellar environment associated with each component of the wide intermediate-mass pre-main sequence binary system PDS 144 using broadband polarimetry. Methods: We present near-infrared (NIR) linear polarimetric observations of PDS 144 gathered with the IAGPOL imaging polarimeter along with the CamIV infrared camera at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias (OPD). In addition, we re-analyzed OPD archive optical polarization to separate the binary and estimate the interstellar polarization using foreground stars. Results: After discounting the interstellar component, we found that both stars of the binary system are intrinsically polarized. The polarization vectors at optical and NIR bands of both components are aligned with the local magnetic field and the jet axis. These findings indicate an interplay between the interstellar magnetic field and the formation of the binary system. We also found that the PDS 144N is less polarized than its southern companion in the optical. However, in the NIR PDS 144N is more polarized. Our polarization data can only be explained by high inclinations (i ≳ 80°) for the disks of both members. In particular, comparisons of our NIR data with young stellar objects disk models suggest predominantly small grains in the circumstellar environment of PDS 144N. In spite of the different grain types in each component, the infrared spectral indexes indicate a coeval system. We also found evidence of coplanarity between the disks. Based on observations obtained at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias, LNA/MCT, Itajubá, Brazil.

  18. Imaging polarimetry and spectro-polarimetry of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G.; Bagnulo, S.; Nikolov, P.; Bonev, T.

    2014-07-01

    Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) was observed during a multi-instrument campaign with the 2-m Ritchey-Chrétien-Coudé (RCC) telescope of the Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory (BNAO) in Rozhen, during Christmas and New Year's holidays, from 20 Dec 2013 until 07 Jan 2014. Imaging and spectropolarimetric data were obtained on December 28 and January 2, respectively, with the 2-Channel-Focal-Reducer Rozhen (FoReRo2) (Jockers et al. 2000) attached at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. In polarimetric mode, FoReRo2 is equipped with a Wollaston prism placed before a dichroic that splits the signals into two different channels, allowing one to reconstruct polarimetric maps of extended objects in two filters simultaneously. By replacing the filters with two grisms, one can perform spectropolarimetric measurements. All our measurements were obtained using the beam-swapping technique. Imaging polarimetry was obtained in two dust continuum filters covering wavelength intervals clear from molecular emission and centred at 443 nm and 684 nm, hereafter called BC and RC, respectively. In imaging mode, we measured 17.0 % in BC and 18.8 % in RC, which is in very good agreement with measurements of other comets at the same phase angle of 64 deg (Mishchenko et al. 2010, see the figure for details). We have also obtained polarization maps both in BC and RC. Spectropolarimetry of the nucleus region was found consistent with narrow-band filter polarimetry, i.e., the polarisation increases with wavelength. Molecular emission lines clearly depolarise the continuum. We will compare depolarisation of the molecules with the expected theoretical value of 1/7 from Feofilov (1961).

  19. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  20. Imaging radar polarimetry from wave synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Vanzyl, Jacob J.; Held, Daniel N.

    1986-01-01

    It was shown that it is possible to measure the complete scattering matrix of an object using data acquired on a single aircraft pass, and can combine the signals later in the data processor to generate radar images corresponding to any desired combination of transmit and receive polarization. Various scattering models predict different dependence on polarization state of received power from an object. The imaging polarimeter permits determination of this dependence, which is called the polarization signature, of each point in a radar image. Comparison of the theoretical predictions and observational data yield identification of possible scattering mechanisms for each area of interest. It was found that backscatter from the ocean is highly polarized and well-modeled by Bragg scattering, while scattering from trees in a city park possesses a considerable unpolarized component. Urban regions exhibit the characteristics expected from dihedral corner reflectors and their polarization signatures are quite different from the one-bounce Bragg model.

  1. Imaging radar polarimetry from wave synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Vanzyl, J. J.; Held, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to measure the complete scattering matrix of an object using data acquired on a single aircraft pass, and combine the signals later in the data processor to generate radar images corresponding to any desired combination of transmit and receive polarization. Various scattering models predict different dependence on polarization state of received power from an object. The imaging polarimeter permits determination of this dependence, the polarization signature, of each point in a radar image. Comparison of predictions and observational data reveals scattering mechanisms for each area of interest. Backscatter from the ocean is highly polarized and well-modeled by Bragg scattering, while scattering from trees in a city park possesses a considerable unpolarized component. Urban regions exhibit the characteristics expected from dihedral corner reflectors, and their polarization signatures are quite different from the on-bounce Bragg model.

  2. Reflection nebulae in the Galactic center: soft X-ray imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The origin of irradiation and fluorescence of the 6.4 keV bright giant molecular clouds surrounding Sgr A∗, the central supermassive black hole of our Galaxy, remains enigmatic despite numerous attempts to decipher it with spectroscopic and timing analyses. Aims: Testing the theory of a past active period of Sgr A∗ requires opening a new observational window: X-ray polarimetry. In this paper, we aim to show how modern imaging polarimeters could revolutionize our understanding of the Galactic center (GC). Methods: Through Monte Carlo modeling, we produced a 4-8 keV polarization map of the GC. We focused on the polarimetric signature produced by Sgr B1, Sgr B2, G0.11-0.11, Bridge E, Bridge D, Bridge B2, MC2, MC1, Sgr C3, Sgr C2, and Sgr C1. We estimated the resulting polarization that arises from these scattering targets, included polarized flux dilution by the diffuse plasma emission detected toward the GC, and simulated the polarization map that modern polarimetric detectors would obtain assuming the performances of a mission prototype. Results: The eleven reflection nebulae we investigated present a variety of polarization signatures, ranging from nearly unpolarized to highly polarized (~77%) fluxes. Their polarization position angle is found to be normal to the scattering plane, as expected from previous studies. A major improvement in our simulation is the addition of a diffuse, unpolarized plasma emission that strongly affects soft X-ray polarized fluxes. The dilution factor is in the range 50%-70%, making the observation of the Bridge structure unlikely even in the context of modern polarimetry. The best targets are the Sgr B and Sgr C complexes and the G0.11-0.11 cloud, arranged in the order of decreasing detectability. Conclusions: An exploratory observation of a few hundred kilo-seconds of the Sgr B complex would allow a significant detection of the polarization and be sufficient to derive indications of the primary radiation source. A more

  3. Radio Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  4. Solar Polarimetry - from Turbulent Magnetic Fields to Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Polarimetric measurements are essential to investigate the solar magnetic field. Scattering polarization and the Hanle effect allow us to probe the turbulent magnetic field and the still open questions of its strength and variability. Directed magnetic fields can be detected via the Zeeman effect. To derive their orientation and strength, so-called inversion codes are used, which iteratively modify a model atmosphere and calculate the resulting polarization profiles that are then compared to the observations. While photospheric polarimetry is well-established, chromospheric polarimetry is still in its infancy, especially because it requires a treatment in non-LTE, making it a complex non-linear problem. But some of the most important open questions concern the strength and geometry of the chromospheric magnetic field. In this talk, I will review different polarimetric analysis techniques and recent advances in magnetic field measurements going from the small scales of turbulent magnetic fields to changes of magnetic fields in an active region during flares.

  5. XIPE The X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffitta, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    XIPE (the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer) is now in the study phase for ESA M4 down-selection in mid-2017. XIPE will be operated as a conventional X-ray observatory but providing polarimetry simultaneously to the usual imaging, temporal and spectral information. 75 % of the time will be available through a competitive Guest Observer Program This is made possible by its unique payload configuration consisting of three GPDs at the focus of three large, albeit low-weight, X-ray telescopes and fitting in the Vega launcher. In this talk I will review the major aspects involved with this kind of measurement, the scientific target, the mission and payload profile of XIPE.

  6. Imaging radar polarimetry from wave synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Held, Daniel N.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach is reported to the measurement of the complete polarization signature of each resolution element in an image implemented with an airborne synthetic aperture radar system. Signals recorded on one data pass from orthogonal linearly polarized antennas are utilized. The signals are combined in a data processor to synthesize any desired combination of transmit and receive polarizations. The technique permits measurement of the complex, multichannel reflectivity of a scene on a single aircraft pass and to late reprocess the data to provide multiple image maps, with each representing the backscattered energy from the scene measured with a different combination of observational transmit and recieve polarizations. The resulting polarization signature measurements indicate optimum polarizations for observations of certain classes of objects and give insight into the identification of dominant scattering mechanisms for each kind of object. The mathematical model for polarization synthesis is summarized, and some theoretical polarization measurements are illustrated for several types of targets. The overall radar system implementation is described in detail. Some analyses of data acquired on three aircraft flights are presented. The technique has been applied to mapping and differentiation of lava flows and to differentiation of forested and clear-cut areas.

  7. Surface geometry of protoplanetary disks inferred from near-infrared imaging polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Michihiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Gu, Pin-Gao; Karr, Jennifer L.; Chapillon, Edwige; Tang, Ya-Wen; Muto, Takayuki; Dong, Ruobing; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Kwon, Jungmi; Itoh, Youchi; Carson, Joseph; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Sitko, Michael; Janson, Markus; Grady, Carol A.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; and others

    2014-11-01

    We present a new method of analysis for determining the surface geometry of five protoplanetary disks observed with near-infrared imaging polarimetry using Subaru-HiCIAO. Using as inputs the observed distribution of polarized intensity (PI), disk inclination, assumed properties for dust scattering, and other reasonable approximations, we calculate a differential equation to derive the surface geometry. This equation is numerically integrated along the distance from the star at a given position angle. We show that, using these approximations, the local maxima in the PI distribution of spiral arms (SAO 206462, MWC 758) and rings (2MASS J16042165-2130284, PDS 70) are associated with local concave-up structures on the disk surface. We also show that the observed presence of an inner gap in scattered light still allows the possibility of a disk surface that is parallel to the light path from the star, or a disk that is shadowed by structures in the inner radii. Our analysis for rings does not show the presence of a vertical inner wall as often assumed in studies of disks with an inner gap. Finally, we summarize the implications of spiral and ring structures as potential signatures of ongoing planet formation.

  8. ACTIVE GALAXY UNIFICATION IN THE ERA OF X-RAY POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.

    2010-03-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs), Seyfert galaxies, and quasars are powered by luminous accretion and often accompanied by winds that are powerful enough to affect the AGN mass budget, and whose observational appearance bears an imprint of processes that are happening within the central parsec around the black hole (BH). One example of such a wind is the partially ionized gas responsible for X-ray and UV absorption (warm absorbers). Here, we show that such gas will have a distinct signature when viewed in polarized X-rays. Observations of such polarization can test models for the geometry of the flow and the gas responsible for launching and collimating it. We present calculations that show that the polarization depends on the hydrodynamics of the flow, the quantum mechanics of resonance-line scattering, and the transfer of polarized X-ray light in the highly ionized moving gas. The results emphasize the three-dimensional nature of the wind for modeling spectra. We show that the polarization in the 0.1-10 keV energy range is dominated by the effects of resonance lines. We predict a 5%-25% X-ray polarization signature of type-2 objects in this energy range. These results are generalized to flows that originate from a cold torus-like structure, located {approx}1 pc from the BH, which wraps the BH and is ultimately responsible for the apparent dichotomy between type 1 and type 2 AGNs. Such signals will be detectable by future dedicated X-ray polarimetry space missions, such as the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer.

  9. Probing Inflation via Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been a rich source of information about the early Universe. Detailed measurements of its spectrum and spatial distribution have helped solidify the Standard Model of Cosmology. However, many questions still remain. Standard Cosmology does not explain why the early Universe is geometrically flat, expanding, homogenous across the horizon, and riddled with a small anisotropy that provides the seed for structure formation. Inflation has been proposed as a mechanism that naturally solves these problems. In addition to solving these problems, inflation is expected to produce a spectrum of gravitational waves that will create a particular polarization pattern on the CMB. Detection of this polarized signal is a key test of inflation and will give a direct measurement of the energy scale at which inflation takes place. This polarized signature of inflation is expected to be -9 orders of magnitude below the 2.7 K monopole level of the CMB. This measurement will require good control of systematic errors, an array of many detectors having the requisite sensitivity, and a reliable method for removing polarized foregrounds, and nearly complete sky coverage. Ultimately, this measurement is likely to require a space mission. To this effect, technology and mission concept development are currently underway.

  10. Imaging linear polarimetry using a single ferroelectric liquid crystal modulator.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Luc; Foulonneau, Alban; Bigué, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    In the field of polarimetry, ferroelectric liquid crystal cells are mostly used as bistable polarization rotators suitable to analyze crossed polarizations. This paper shows that, provided such a cell is used at its nominal wavelength and correctly driven, its behavior is close to that of a tunable half-wave plate, and it can be used with much benefit in lightweight imaging polarimetric setups. A partial Stokes polarimeter using a single digital video camera and a single ferroelectric liquid crystal modulator is designed and implemented for linear polarization analysis. Polarization azimuthal angle and degree of linear polarization are available at 150 frames per second with a good accuracy. PMID:20820209

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Near-infrared imaging polarimetry of GGD 27 (Kwon+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.; Tamura, M.; Hough, J. H.; Nagata, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Saito, H.

    2016-08-01

    Observations in the direction of GGD 27 IRS were carried out using the SIRPOL imaging polarimeter at the Infrared Survey Facility (IRSF) 1.4m telescope at SAAO in South Africa. The Facility enables deep wide-field (7.7'x7.7' at a scale of 0.453"/pixel) simultaneous imaging polarimetry in the JHKs bands. Linear polarimetry was performed on the night of 2006 March 14. Circular polarimetry observations of the GGD 27 IRS regions were made on the nights of 2008 July 24 and 2014 March 21. (2 data files).

  12. The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2016-07-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is a mission undergoing an 11-month Phase A study for possible selection as a NASA Small Explorer. As the name implies, IXPE will uses X-ray imaging polarimetry to dramatically expand observation space and to provide new input to our understanding as to how X-ray emission is produced in objects where physics under extreme conditions dominates: neutron stars, pulsar wind nebulae, and stellar and supermassive black holes. IXPE will combine 30-arcseond half-power-diameter optics with polarization-sensitive gas pixel detectors to provide two-orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over past instruments. After launch, the first year of operation would be devoted to a survey of representative samples of various categories of targets. More detailed studies of selected individual sources would then follow. If selected, IXPE would be flight ready by late 2020. This presentation will describe the IXPE payload, its expected sensitivity, and its science objectives.

  13. X-ray Polarimetry. A tool for Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    X-ray Polarimetry is a window about to be disclosed in Astrophysics. From an extended literature, we expect a significant step forward in the understanding of astrophysical systems emitting X-rays. This includes the study of physics in extreme conditions and, in particular, of General Relativity and Quantum Electrodynamics in extreme conditions. An even more ambitious target could be the search for effects of propagation on long distances as predicted from some theories of New Physics. An example is the rotation of the polarization angle proportional to the distance and to the square of Energy predicted by some specifications of Loop Quantum Gravity. Another example is the change of the polarization status of the flux of far-away sources by the photon-Axion Like Particle conversion in domain-like intergalactic magnetic fields. In absence of a solid picture of the status of polarization of X-ray sources in their reference frame the viability of such measurements is only matter of conjectures. But we can already select a set of presumably polarized sources (within the AGN zoo) or of totally unpolarized sources (such as clusters) and evaluate the sensitivity to such measurements with a sensitive mission of polarimetry like XIPE under study by ESA.

  14. Intrinsic coincident linear polarimetry using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Roy, S Gupta; Awartani, O M; Sen, P; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2016-06-27

    Polarimetry has widespread applications within atmospheric sensing, telecommunications, biomedical imaging, and target detection. Several existing methods of imaging polarimetry trade off the sensor's spatial resolution for polarimetric resolution, and often have some form of spatial registration error. To mitigate these issues, we have developed a system using oriented polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb linearly polarized light. Additionally, the OPV cells can be made semitransparent, enabling multiple detectors to be cascaded along the same optical axis. Since each device performs a partial polarization measurement of the same incident beam, high temporal resolution is maintained with the potential for inherent spatial registration. In this paper, a Mueller matrix model of the stacked OPV design is provided. Based on this model, a calibration technique is developed and presented. This calibration technique and model are validated with experimental data, taken with a cascaded three cell OPV Stokes polarimeter, capable of measuring incident linear polarization states. Our results indicate polarization measurement error of 1.2% RMS and an average absolute radiometric accuracy of 2.2% for the demonstrated polarimeter.

  15. Imaging Fourier Transform Spectro-polarimetry in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgenson, C. A.; Stencel, R. E.; Stout, J.

    2004-12-01

    Imaging spectro-polarimetry has the capability to trace polarization changes in dust grains throughout an extended region of interest. An instrument that has the capability to achieve moderately high resolution (R = 2000 at 10 microns) via a stepping Fourier transform spectrometer, while preserving imaging polarimetry capabilities (TNTCAM2, Jurgenson et al. 2003), is set to achieve first light during early 2005. Motion control of the interferometer, as well as array control/readout is accomplished via an FPGA card programmed in LabVIEW(c). Mid-IR polarization studies are useful in approximating grain shapes and sizes in dusty environments. Correlation studies between mid and near-IR features can be used to test the core-mantle arrangement of grain growth. Polarization analysis is currently only possible between 8-13 microns, but the interferometer, as well as TNTCAM2, can operate at selected bandpasses in the near-IR region. A wire grid and waveplate would need to be purchased for work in the near-IR. Laboratory calibration results, both spectral and polarization, are reported. We are seeking collaborators in shared-risk science with this instrument, so please contact the authors if interested. Sigma Xi Grants In Aid of Research as well as the estate of William Herschel Womble provided funding for this endeavor.

  16. A Diamond Micro-strip Electron Detector for Compton Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Amrendra

    2012-03-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to measure the weak charge of the proton with a precision of 4.1% by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in polarized electron-proton elastic scattering. Beam polarimetry is the largest experimental contribution to the error budget. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in Fall 2010 for a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. This is the first use of diamond micro-strip detectors as a tracking device in a physics experiment. These detectors are read out using custom built electronic modules that include a pre-amplifier, a pulse shaping amplifier and a discriminator for each detector micro-strip. We use Field Programmable Gate Array based general purpose logic modules for event selection and histogramming. This polarimeter is being used for online monitoring of beam polarization in the experiment. We have achieved the design goals of 1% statistical uncertainity per hour and expect to achieve 1% systematic uncertainity. We will discuss the details of our polarimetry setup, the analysis approach and the preliminary results.

  17. Intrinsic coincident linear polarimetry using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Roy, S Gupta; Awartani, O M; Sen, P; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2016-06-27

    Polarimetry has widespread applications within atmospheric sensing, telecommunications, biomedical imaging, and target detection. Several existing methods of imaging polarimetry trade off the sensor's spatial resolution for polarimetric resolution, and often have some form of spatial registration error. To mitigate these issues, we have developed a system using oriented polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb linearly polarized light. Additionally, the OPV cells can be made semitransparent, enabling multiple detectors to be cascaded along the same optical axis. Since each device performs a partial polarization measurement of the same incident beam, high temporal resolution is maintained with the potential for inherent spatial registration. In this paper, a Mueller matrix model of the stacked OPV design is provided. Based on this model, a calibration technique is developed and presented. This calibration technique and model are validated with experimental data, taken with a cascaded three cell OPV Stokes polarimeter, capable of measuring incident linear polarization states. Our results indicate polarization measurement error of 1.2% RMS and an average absolute radiometric accuracy of 2.2% for the demonstrated polarimeter. PMID:27410627

  18. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations.

  19. Optical polarimetry: Instrumentation and applications; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, Calif., August 23, 24, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzam, R. M. A. (Editor); Coffeen, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation used in optical polarimetry is discussed with reference to high-resolution spectropolarimetry, an orbiter cloud photopolarimeter, X-ray polarimeters, and the design of a self-nulling ellipsometer. Consideration is given to surface and thin-film ellipsometry noting studies of electrochemical surface layers, surface anisotropy, polish layers on infrared window materials, and anodic films. Papers on biological, chemical, and physical polarimetry are presented including birefringence in biological materials, vibrational optical activity, and the optical determination of the thermodynamic phase diagram of a metamagnet. Remote sensing is discussed in terms of polarization imagery, the optical polarimetry of particulate surfaces, and techniques and applications of elliptical polarimetry in astronomy and atmospheric studies.

  20. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  1. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  2. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  3. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  4. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  5. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  6. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  7. X-ray Polarimetry with a Micro-Pattern Gas Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joe

    2005-01-01

    Topics covered include: Science drivers for X-ray polarimetry; Previous X-ray polarimetry designs; The photoelectric effect and imaging tracks; Micro-pattern gas polarimeter design concept. Further work includes: Verify results against simulator; Optimize pressure and characterize different gases for a given energy band; Optimize voltages for resolution and sensitivity; Test meshes with 80 micron pitch; Characterize ASIC operation; and Quantify quantum efficiency for optimum polarization sensitivity.

  8. A Study of Laser System Requirements for Application in Beam Diagnostics And Polarimetry at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S.; Delerue, N.; Foster, B.; Howell, D.F.; Peach, K.; Quelch, G.; Qureshi, M.; Reichold, A.; Hirst, G.; Ross, I.; Urakawa, J.; Soskov, V.; Variola, A.; Zomer, F.; Blair, G.A.; Boogert, S.T.; Boorman, G.; Bosco, A.; Driouichi, C.; Karataev, P.; Brachmann, A.; /SLAC

    2007-02-12

    Advanced laser systems will be essential for a range of diagnostics devices and polarimetry at the ILC. High average power, high beam quality, excellent stability and reliability will be crucial in order to deliver the information required to attain the necessary ILC luminosity as well as for efficient polarimetry. The key parameters are listed together with the R & D required to achieve the necessary laser system performance.

  9. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' considering their stellar mass than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. This correlation is only seen in AGN host galaxies with SFR >100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  10. Near-infrared polarimetry of the edge-on galaxy NGC 891

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. D.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2014-05-01

    The edge-on galaxy NGC 891 was probed using near-infrared (NIR) imaging polarimetry in the H band (1.6 μm) with the Mimir instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Polarization was detected with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than three out to a surface brightness of 18.8 mag arcsec{sup –2}. The unweighted average and dispersion in polarization percentage (P) across the full disk were 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively, and the same quantities for polarization position angle (P.A.) were 12° and 19°, respectively. At least one polarization null point, where P falls nearly to zero, was detected in the northeast disk but not the southwest disk. Several other asymmetries in P between the northern and southern disk were found and may be related to spiral structure. Profiles of P and P.A. along the minor axis of NGC 891 suggest a transition from magnetic (B) field tracing dichroic polarization near the disk mid-plane to scattering dominated polarization off the disk mid-plane. A comparison between NIR P.A. and radio (3.6 cm) synchrotron polarization P.A. values revealed similar B-field orientations in the central-northeast region, which suggests that the hot plasma and cold, star-forming interstellar medium may share a common B-field. Disk-perpendicular polarizations previously seen at optical wavelengths are likely caused by scattered light from the bright galaxy center and are unlikely to be tracing poloidal B-fields in the outer disk.

  11. Uranus as a radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Leblanc, Y.; Aubier, M.; Ortega-Molina, A.

    1991-01-01

    The complex nature of the Uranus radio emissions, both magnetospheric and atmospheric, is reviewed, with emphasis on the identification of distinct components and the determination of their source locations. Seven radii components were discovered in addition to the RF signature of lightning in the planet's atmosphere. Six of the seven magnetospheric components are freely propagating emissions; one component, the nonthermal continuum, is trapped in the density cavity between the magnetopause and the dense inner magnetosphere. The radio components are divided into two types according to their emission signature: bursty emission and smooth emission. The inferred source location for the dominant nightside emission is above the nightside magnetic pole, largely overlapping the UV auroral region and the magnetic polar cap. The N-burst component appears to be associated with solar-wind enhancements at Uranus, consistent with the idea that the solar wind was triggering magnetospheric substormlike activity during the encounter.

  12. Imaging and polarimetry with the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Cloud Photopolarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the Orbiter Cloud Photopolarimeter (OCPP) on board the Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft is twofold: (1) to determine the physical properties, vertical and horizontal distribution and the temporal variability of the haze and cloud aerosols on Venus; and (2) to record in images made in the near ultraviolet the varying cloud morphology and the short- and long-term character of the apparent cloud motions. Early images exhibit numerous cloud features and apparent circulation patterns similar to those observed by Mariner 10 in 1974. Features of the polar regions are identified. Polarimetry measurements indicate that the main visible cloud layer of 1-micron-radius sulfuric acid droplets is covered at least in the morning terminator region with a thin haze layer consisting of submicron-size particles. The OCPP performance appears to be excellent.

  13. Chromatographic detection of sugar cane samples via polarimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan Carlos; Fajer, Victor; Rodríguez, Carlos W.; Naranjo, Salvador; Mora, Luis; Ravelo, Justo; Cossio, Gladys; Avila, Norma

    2004-03-01

    The combination of molecular exclusion cromatography with the laser polarimetry has become a powerful technique to separate and evaluate some carbohydrates of sugar cane plants. In the following work it has been obtained chromatograms of carbohydrates standards, which has been used as comparison patterns in the studies of the juice quality in different cane varieties of different physiological stadiums and stress conditions. By means of the employment of this technique, it has also been determined the influence of carbohydrates of medium molecular mass in the determination of the apparent sucrose in the routine sugar analysis. On the other hand, discreet determination of the fractions causes time consuming and a troublesome manipulation. In the present work some modifications to the system are shown, obtaining a small volume sample (less than 1 ml) and angular readings on line, avoiding the employment of fraction collectors.

  14. Near-Infrared Polarimetry of the Eagle Nebula (M 16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, Koji; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Hough, James H.; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nakajima, Yasushi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagashima, Chie; Kato, Daisuke; Fukuda, Naoya

    2007-06-01

    We carried out deep and wide (˜ 8 × 8) JHKs imaging polarimetry in the southern region of the Eagle Nebula (M 16). The polarization intensity map reveals that two YSOs with near-IR reflection nebulae are located at the tips of two famous molecular pillars (Pillars 1 and 2) facing toward the exciting stars of M 16. The centrosymmetric polarization pattern are consistent with those around Class I objects having circumstellar envelopes, confirming that star formation is now taking place at the two tips of the pillars under the influence of UV radiation from the exciting stars. Polarization measurements of point sources show that magnetic fields are aligned along some of the pillars, but in a direction that is quite different to the global structure in M 16.

  15. Microwave polarimetry system in the CDX-U tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.S.; Fredriksen, A.; Qin, H.; Forest, C.B.; Ono, M. )

    1995-01-01

    An existing microwave interferometer system is modified to add the capability of polarimetry in the CDX-U tokamak. Though this interferometer system can scan vertically and radially, only the vertical view channel is modified to accomodate Faraday rotation measurements, with its radial scanning capability preserved. For our relatively long microwave wavelength, the signal amplitude variation due to refraction is more important than effects due to vibration. An amplitude independent design of Faraday rotation diagnostics has been developed. By using a linearly polarized beam as input and putting a rotating polarizer in the beam after the plasma, birefringency effects are minimized. A digital phase detection technique has been developed for better resolution of the Faraday rotation angle.

  16. The Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian; O’Dell, Stephen; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Soffita, Paolo; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Kaspi, Victoria; Mulieri, Fabio; Marshall, Herman; Matt, Giorgio; Romani, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is an exciting international collaboration for a scientific mission that dramatically brings together the unique talents of the partners to expand observation space by simultaneously adding polarization measurements to the array of source properties currently measured (energy, time, and location). IXPE uniquely brings to the table polarimetric imaging. IXPE will thus open new dimensions for understanding how X-ray emission is produced in astrophysical objects, especially systems under extreme physical conditions-such as neutron stars and black holes. Polarization singularly probes physical anisotropies-ordered magnetic fields, aspheric matter distributions, or general relativistic coupling to black-hole spin-that are not otherwise measurable. Hence, IXPE complements all other investigations in high-energy astrophysics by adding important and relatively unexplored information to the parameter space for studying cosmic X-ray sources and processes, as well as for using extreme astrophysical environments as laboratories for fundamental physics.

  17. Nano-fabricated pixelated micropolarizer array for visible imaging polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhigang; Cheng, Teng; Qiu, Kang; Zhang, Qingchuan E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn; Wu, Xiaoping; Dong, Fengliang; Chu, Weiguo E-mail: wgchu@nanoctr.cn

    2014-10-15

    Pixelated micropolarizer array (PMA) is a novel concept for real-time visible imaging polarimetry. A 320 × 240 aluminum PMA fabricated by electron beam lithography is described in this paper. The period, duty ratio, and depth of the grating are 140 nm, 0.5, and 100 nm, respectively. The units are standard square structures and the metal nanowires of the grating are collimating and uniformly thick. The extinction ratio of 75 and the maximum polarization transmittance of 78.8% demonstrate that the PMA is suitable for polarization imaging. When the PMA is applied to real-time polarization imaging, the degree of linear polarization image and the angle of linear polarization image are calculated from a single frame image. The polarized target object is highlighted from the unpolarized background, and the surface contour of the target object can be reflected by the polarization angle.

  18. Stokes-vector and Mueller-matrix polarimetry [Invited].

    PubMed

    Azzam, R M A

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews the current status of instruments for measuring the full 4×1 Stokes vector S, which describes the state of polarization (SOP) of totally or partially polarized light, and the 4×4 Mueller matrix M, which determines how the SOP is transformed as light interacts with a material sample or an optical element or system. The principle of operation of each instrument is briefly explained by using the Stokes-Mueller calculus. The development of fast, automated, imaging, and spectroscopic instruments over the last 50 years has greatly expanded the range of applications of optical polarimetry and ellipsometry in almost every branch of science and technology. Current challenges and future directions of this important branch of optics are also discussed. PMID:27409699

  19. Hard x-ray polarimetry with HX-POL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, Alfred B., III; Lee, Kuen; Martin, Jerrad; Beilicke, Matthias; Wulf, Eric; Novikova, Elena; Krawczynski, Henric S.

    2010-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry offers a unique vantage to investigate particle acceleration from compact objects and relativistic outflows. The HX-POL concept uses a combination of Si and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors to measure the polarization of 50 keV - 500 keV X-rays from cosmic sources through the azimuthal distribution of Compton scattered events. HX-POL would allow us to measure the polarization degrees of Crab-like sources well below 10% for a one day balloon flight. A longer (15-30 day) flight would improve the polarization degree sensitivity to a few percent. In this contribution, we discuss the sensitivity of a space-borne HX-POL payload, and present new results from laboratory tests of the HX-POL Si and CZT detectors.

  20. Photometry and polarimetry study of cataclysmic variables (cvs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Arti

    2016-07-01

    We present time-resolved photometry and linear polarimetry of the two cataclysmic variables (CVs) 2MASS J01303186+6221324 and 2MASS J03451159+533514. We classify the system 2MASS J01303186+6221324 as a deeply eclipsing intermediate polar which exhibits a deep eclipse of 1.8 mag with orbital period of 3.58 hr. However, the orbital period of the system 2MASS J03451159+533514 is found to be 7.8 hr. We also report the polarimetric observations of these two systems, where the polarization data reveals same periods with those obtained from photometrically. The variations of linear polarization from 1.0-6.0 per cent are seen over an orbital cycle, with a minimum around the time of eclipse for both system.

  1. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  2. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  3. Broadband, radio spectro-polarimetric observations of radiative-mode and jet-mode AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Shane P.; Purcell, C. R.; Farnes, J. S.; Sun, X. H.; Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-08-01

    Observations of polarised synchrotron emission from radio-loud AGN, along with the associated Faraday rotation, provides a highly sensitive probe of magneto-ionic material in AGN environments. Here we present the results from our investigation of the environments of two broad classes of radio-loud AGN (radiative-mode & jet mode) using broadband radio spectro-polarimetry, from 1 to 10 GHz. By spectrally resolving the spatial unresolved polarised emission, we directly probe the different magneto-ionic environments of radiative-mode and jet-mode AGN. We also present results for the dependence of the polarisation and Faraday rotation properties of the two AGN types based on the number of polarised emission components, the spectral index, and the intrinsic magnetic field structure. Finally, we outline the prospects for future Faraday rotation studies of radio-loud AGN with the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope, and present some preliminary results from the early science observations.

  4. What X-ray polarimetry can teach us about the central supermassive black hole of the Milky Way galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Frédéric; Karas, Vladimir; Muleri, Fabio; Soffitta, Paolo; Kunneriath, Devaky

    2016-07-01

    Was Sgr A*, the central supermassive black hole of our own Galaxy, a low luminosity AGN in the past? Despite numerous attempts with spectroscopic and timing analyses, the question remains opened as the origin of irradiation and fluorescence of the 6.4 keV bright giant molecular clouds surrounding Sgr A* is still debated. A possible interpretation, based on Compton scattering processes, implies that the high X-ray luminosity of the nebulae arise from reprocessing of a past outburst of Sgr A*. If true, the reflection nebulae should show strong scattering-induced polarization signatures. Detecting such imprints requires opening a new observational window: X-ray polarimetry. In this presentation, I will summarize the results from past and present polarimetric simulations of the Galactic Center in order to show how a future X-ray polarimeter equipped with imaging detectors, such as XIPE (ESA M4) or IXPE (NASA-SMEX), could prove or rejected the hypothesis of the past active phase of Sgr A*.

  5. Multichroic Bolometric Detector Architecture for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Aritoki

    Characterization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) B-mode polarization signal will test models of inflationary cosmology, as well as constrain the sum of the neutrino masses and other cosmological parameters. The low intensity of the B-mode signal combined with the need to remove polarized galactic foregrounds requires a sensitive millimeter receiver and effective methods of foreground removal. Current bolometric detector technology is reaching the sensitivity limit set by the CMB photon noise. Thus, we need to increase the optical throughput to increase an experiment's sensitivity. To increase the throughput without increasing the focal plane size, we can increase the frequency coverage of each pixel. Increased frequency coverage per pixel has additional advantage that we can split the signal into frequency bands to obtain spectral information. The detection of multiple frequency bands allows for removal of the polarized foreground emission from synchrotron radiation and thermal dust emission, by utilizing its spectral dependence. Traditionally, spectral information has been captured with a multi-chroic focal plane consisting of a heterogeneous mix of single-color pixels. To maximize the efficiency of the focal plane area, we developed a multi-chroic pixel. This increases the number of pixels per frequency with same focal plane area. We developed multi-chroic antenna-coupled transition edge sensor (TES) detector array for the CMB polarimetry. In each pixel, a silicon lens-coupled dual polarized sinuous antenna collects light over a two-octave frequency band. The antenna couples the broadband millimeter wave signal into microstrip transmission lines, and on-chip filter banks split the broadband signal into several frequency bands. Separate TES bolometers detect the power in each frequency band and linear polarization. We will describe the design and performance of these devices and present optical data taken with prototype pixels and detector arrays. Our

  6. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  7. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  8. Linear and circular polarimetry observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.

    2013-07-01

    Follow-up observations of large numbers of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, facilitated by the Swift satellite, have produced a large sample of spectral energy distributions and light curves, from which the basic micro- and macrophysical parameters of afterglows may be derived. However, a number of phenomena have been observed that defy explanation by simple versions of the standard fireball model, leading to a variety of new models. Polarimetry has shown great promise as a diagnosis of afterglow physics, probing the magnetic field properties of the afterglow and geometrical effects (e.g. jet breaks). Unfortunately, high quality polarimetry of a significant sample of afterglows is difficult to acquire, requiring specialised instrumentation and observing modes. In this talk I will review the recent successes in afterglow polarimetry, also showing first results of new instruments and observing campaigns. I will particularly focus on jet breaks.

  9. Using Polarimetry to Determine the CEBAF Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.

    2014-06-01

    As Jefferson Lab begins operations with its upgraded CEBAF a ccelerator, the lab once again needs to experimentally determine the absolute beam energy of the machine. Previously, the CE- BAF beam energy was determined using precision measurement s of the bending magnet integral fields along with beam position information. The result obta ined from this technique was cross- checked with elastic scattering from hydrogen where knowle dge of the scattering angles of the electron and proton allow the beam energy to be determined. Wh ile the field integral method will still work with the upgraded machine, the elastic cross sect ion becomes too small to make preci- sion measurements at angles that are large enough to be easil y accessible; thus a new technique for energy determination has been sought. It will be shown th at by making use of polarimetry, one can use CEBAF’s polarized electrons’ g-2 spin precessio n to determine the absolute beam energy. This can be done in a single hall if the parameters of t he machine, such as the injector energy and linac imbalance, are known or with two halls witho ut any knowledge of the machine parameters

  10. Lunar Surface Imaging Polarimetry: I. Roughness and Grain Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, Audouin

    1998-11-01

    Imaging polarimetry characterizes the physical nature of the lunar surface by the median size of the grains and by the roughness of the surface. A video-polarimeter was designed at Observatoire de Paris to produce at the telescope images of planetary surfaces in intensity, degree of linear polarization, flux of polarized light, and other relevant photo-polarimetric images. With these images, the median grain sizeMdand mean roughness slope angle θ have been derived and mapped over characteristic lunar features. The method is explained. Terrains of anomalous surface textures have been discovered. The Imbrian and Eratosthenian mare surfaces, worked by the long term accumulation of impacts and by space exposure, produce a “mature” morphology characterized byMd= 47 μm and θ = 10°, irrespective of the composition of the material. Ejecta blankets around craters of Copernican age or younger show smoother surfaces and larger grains. Pyroclastic deposits have the same roughness, θ = 10°, but consist of grains too small to have been produced by mechanical impact comminution. Very specific terrain types have been discovered along the cliff of Rupes Recta and the crater Birt, which indicate clean rocks depleted of dust. These anomalies may result from seismic action when an impact formed the recent nearby crater Thebit A.

  11. POET: a SMEX mission for gamma ray burst polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Baring, Matthew; Bloser, Peter; Dwyer, Joseph F.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Ertley, Camden D.; Greiner, Jochen; Harding, Alice K.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Hill, Joanne E.; Kaaret, Philip; Kippen, R. M.; Mattingly, David; McBreen, Sheila; Pearce, Mark; Produit, Nicolas; Ryan, James M.; Ryde, Felix; Sakamoto, Takanori; Toma, Kenji; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Zhang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    Polarimeters for Energetic Transients (POET) is a mission concept designed to t within the envelope of a NASA Small Explorer (SMEX) mission. POET will use X-ray and gamma-ray polarimetry to uncover the energy release mechanism associated with the formation of stellar-mass black holes and investigate the physics of extreme magnetic ields in the vicinity of compact objects. Two wide-FoV, non-imaging polarimeters will provide polarization measurements over the broad energy range from about 2 keV up to about 500 keV. A Compton scatter polarimeter, using an array of independent scintillation detector elements, will be used to collect data from 50 keV up to 500 keV. At low energies (2{15 keV), data will be provided by a photoelectric polarimeter based on the use of a Time Projection Chamber for photoelectron tracking. During a two-year baseline mission, POET will be able to collect data that will allow us to distinguish between three basic models for the inner jet of gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Real-time dual wavelength polarimetry for glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2009-02-01

    Proper treatment of diabetes includes maintenance of near normal blood glucose levels, which can only be achieved with frequent blood glucose monitoring. Current blood finger-stick methods for glucose sensing are invasive, often resulting in low patient compliance and poor disease control. The development of a noninvasive glucose sensor has the potential to provide optimal management of diabetes. Our proposed noninvasive approach is based on an optical polarimetry system for probing the anterior chamber of the eye. The sensor would eventually be used to measure the aqueous humor glucose concentration as a means to determine the blood glucose concentration. In this report, we present the development of a near real-time (less than 1 second) dual wavelength closed-loop polarimetric system to minimize glucose prediction error in the presence of varying birefringence due to motion artifact. The new dual wavelength polarimetric system and in vitro glucose measurement results will be presented which demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system in the presence of varying birefringence.

  13. K-space polarimetry of bullseye plasmon antennas.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Clara I; Mohtashami, Abbas; Koenderink, A Femius

    2015-04-30

    Surface plasmon resonators can drastically redistribute incident light over different output wave vectors and polarizations. This can lead for instance to sub-diffraction sized nanoapertures in metal films that beam and to nanoparticle antennas that enable efficient conversion of photons between spatial modes, or helicity channels. We present a polarimetric Fourier microscope as a new experimental tool to completely characterize the angle-dependent polarization-resolved scattering of single nanostructures. Polarimetry allows determining the full Stokes parameters from just six Fourier images. The degree of polarization and the polarization ellipse are measured for each scattering direction collected by a high NA objective. We showcase the method on plasmonic bullseye antennas in a metal film, which are known to beam light efficiently. We find rich results for the polarization state of the beamed light, including complete conversion of input polarization from linear to circular and from one helicity to another. In addition to uncovering new physics for plasmonic groove antennas, the described technique projects to have a large impact in nanophotonics, in particular towards the investigation of a broad range of phenomena ranging from photon spin Hall effects, polarization to orbital angular momentum transfer and design of plasmon antennas.

  14. Astrophysical implications and observational prospects of X-ray polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.; Novick, R.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Chanan, G.A.; Weisskopf, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry is a prime tool for investigating the physics of compact objects, which has not been adequately exploited thus far. However, current low-cost technology and modest launch requirements could provide a large number of positive observations with a sensitivity factor at least 100 greater than 10 years ago. The amount of astrophysical information potentially to be gained from this is enormous. The introduction of polarimetric information (direction and degree) would bring a quantum jump in the parameter space used to investigate compact objects, from the current two (spectra and time variability) to four independent parameters that models need to satisfy. This should greatly improve our ability to discriminate between various possible models. Such observations could lead to an elucidation of the rotation-powered and accretion-powered pulsar radiation mechanisms, could help clinch the identification of black hole canditates, and could decide between thermal and nonthermal AGN radiation models, as well as pin down the geometry of the accretion flows in both galactic and extragalactic sources. 56 references.

  15. Noise Studies of Polarimetry Systems for Polarized 3 He Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katugampola, Sumudu K.; Matyas, Daniel J.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Wang, Yunxiao; Cates, Gordon D.

    2015-04-01

    The NMR technique of adiabatic fast passage (AFP) plays an important role in 3 He targets polarized using spin-exchange optical pumping. Since AFP signals before amplification are generally small, identifying these signals amidst noise caused by external electromagnetic interference and micro-phonics can be challenging. When using thermally polarized water samples for absolute calibration of AFP signals, electromagnetic and micro-phonic noise can easily dominate. Although both types of interference have often been cited as the predominant sources of noise during AFP, few studies of these effects have been done under the conditions that are typical for a polarized 3 He target. This talk will describe studies of electromagnetic and micro-phonic noise using a small-scale prototype NMR system similar to those we use to study polarized 3 He targets. We will describe the effect of using aluminum metal shielding and other methods to minimize noise. We are using these studies to inform the design of a full-scale set up that will be used to test next-generation targets for use at Jefferson Lab, and measure atomic parameters relevant to polarimetry.

  16. Observational Aspects of Hard X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    Sensitive polarization measurements in X-ray may address a wealth of astrophysical phenomena, which so far remain beyond our understanding through available X-ray spectroscopic, imaging, and timing studies. Though scientific potential of X-ray polarimetry was realized long ago, there has not been any significant advancement in this field for the last four decades since the birth of X-ray astronomy. The only successful polarization measurement in X-rays dates back to 1976, when a Bragg polarimeter onboard OSO-8 measured polarization of Crab nebula. Primary reason behind the lack in progress is its extreme photon hungry nature, which results in poor sensitivity of the polarimeters. Recently, in the last decade or so, with the advancement in detection technology, X-ray polarimetry may see a significant progress in near future, especially in soft X-rays with the invention of photoelectron tracking polarimeters. Though photoelectric polarimeters are expected to provide sensitive polarization measurements of celestial X-ray sources, they are sensitive only in soft X-rays, where the radiation from the sources is dominated by thermal radiation and therefore expected to be less polarized. On the other hand, in hard X-rays, sources are ex-pected to be highly polarized due to the dominance of nonthermal emission over its thermal counterpart. Moreover, polarization measurements in hard X-rays promises to address few interesting scientific issues regarding geometry of corona for black hole sources, emission mechanism responsible for the higher energy peak in the blazars, accretion geometry close to the magnetic poles in accreting neutron star systems and acceleration mechanism in solar flares. Compton polarimeters provide better sensitivity than photoelectric polarimeters in hard X-rays with a broad energy band of operation. Recently, with the development of hard X-ray focusing optics e.g. NuSTAR, Astro-H, it is now possible to conceive Compton polarimeters at the focal plane

  17. Spectroscopic Stokes polarimetry based on Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yeng-Cheng; Lo, Yu-Lung; Li, Chang-Ye; Liao, Chia-Chi

    2015-02-01

    Two methods are proposed for measuring the spectroscopic Stokes parameters using a Fourier transform spectrometer. In the first method, it is designed for single point measurement. The parameters are extracted using an optical setup comprising a white light source, a polarizer set to 0°, a quarter-wave plate and a scanning Michelson interferometer. In the proposed approach, the parameters are extracted from the intensity distributions of the interferograms produced with the quarter-wave plate rotated to 0°, 22.5°, 45° and -45°, respectively. For the second approach, the full-field and dynamic measurement can be designed based upon the first method with special angle design in a polarizer and a quarter-wave plate. Hence, the interferograms of two-dimensional detection also can be simultaneously extracted via a pixelated phase-retarder and polarizer array on a high-speed CCD camera and a parallel read-out circuit with a multi-channel analog to digital converter. Thus, a full-field and dynamic spectroscopic Stokes polarimetry without any rotating components could be developed. The validity of the proposed methods is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. To the authors' knowledge, this could be the simplest optical arrangement in extracting the spectral Stokes parameters. Importantly, the latter one method avoids the need for rotating components within the optical system and therefore provides an experimentally straightforward means of extracting the dynamic spectral Stokes parameters.

  18. TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-04-10

    This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150 Degree-Sign ) with 17 pointings of the 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' field of view between -75 Degree-Sign < b < 10 Degree-Sign , with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to -6 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign .

  19. High Precision Polarimetry of the Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane

    2013-07-01

    Polarimetry of the epsilon Aurigae eclipse has the potential to discern the stellar latitude occulted by the companion's dusty disk, which may directly test interferometric results. In addition, the limb polarization of the primary star may be measured, which is an effect predicted by S. Chandrasekhar and verified by spatially resolved observations of the Sun. I will present B band, polarimetric observations of epsilon Aurigae taken over six nights in September and October 2009 using the POLISH high precision polarimeter at the Lick 3-m telescope. Polarimetric precision achieved during each night is of order 1 part in 10^5. Extensive post-eclipse observations have been taken with the significantly upgraded POLISH2 polarimeter at Lick Observatory. This instrument simultaneously measures all four Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, and V) and achieves precision within 2.0 times the photon shot noise limit over an entire observing run. This work is supported by a NExScI Sagan Fellowship, UC Lab Fees Research Grant, and UCO/Lick Observatory.

  20. UBVR POLARIMETRY OF EVOLVED CARBON STARS NEAR THE GALACTIC EQUATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, J. M.; Hiriart, D. E-mail: hiriart@astrosen.unam.mx

    2011-07-15

    We present polarimetry and photometry in the UBVR bands of nine low Galactic latitude carbon stars (|b{sup II} | {<=} 15{sup 0}) over a period of one year: V384 Per, ST Cam, S Aur, CL Mon, HV Cas, Y Tau, TT Cyg, U Cyg, and V1426 Cyg. We have corrected the observed values for the effects of extinction and polarization by the interstellar medium to obtain the intrinsic polarization and photometry of the stars. All the observed objects present polarization in at least two bands. There is a statistical correlation between the temporal mean polarization (p) at each filter band and the IR color K - [12] with the redder stars tending to be more polarized. A related trend is found between polarization and mass-loss rate in gas. The degree of polarization increases with the mass-loss rate at around M-dot{sub gas}{approx}3.6x10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We found two stars-TT Cyg and ST Cam-that increase polarization with decreasing mass-loss rate below this value. Multiple observations of TT Cyg, U Cyg, and V1426 Cyg during the campaign show no correlation between polarization and luminosity in any of the UBVR bands. Therefore, the distribution of the scatterers shall vary with time in a very irregular way.

  1. K-space polarimetry of bullseye plasmon antennas

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Clara I.; Mohtashami, Abbas; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonators can drastically redistribute incident light over different output wave vectors and polarizations. This can lead for instance to sub-diffraction sized nanoapertures in metal films that beam and to nanoparticle antennas that enable efficient conversion of photons between spatial modes, or helicity channels. We present a polarimetric Fourier microscope as a new experimental tool to completely characterize the angle-dependent polarization-resolved scattering of single nanostructures. Polarimetry allows determining the full Stokes parameters from just six Fourier images. The degree of polarization and the polarization ellipse are measured for each scattering direction collected by a high NA objective. We showcase the method on plasmonic bullseye antennas in a metal film, which are known to beam light efficiently. We find rich results for the polarization state of the beamed light, including complete conversion of input polarization from linear to circular and from one helicity to another. In addition to uncovering new physics for plasmonic groove antennas, the described technique projects to have a large impact in nanophotonics, in particular towards the investigation of a broad range of phenomena ranging from photon spin Hall effects, polarization to orbital angular momentum transfer and design of plasmon antennas. PMID:25927570

  2. Mapping the Upper Subsurface of MARS Using Radar Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, L. M.; Rincon, R.; Berkoski, L.

    2012-01-01

    Future human exploration of Mars will require detailed knowledge of the surface and upper several meters of the subsurface in potential landing sites. Likewise, many of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey science goals, such as understanding the history of Mars climate change, determining how the surface was altered through processes like volcanism and fluvial activity, and locating regions that may have been hospitable to life in the past, would be significantly advanced through mapping of the upper meters of the surface. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is the only remote sensing technique capable of penetrating through meters of material and imaging buried surfaces at high (meters to tens-of-meters) spatial resolution. SAR is capable of mapping the boundaries of buried units and radar polarimetry can provide quantitative information about the roughness of surface and subsurface units, depth of burial of stratigraphic units, and density of materials. Orbital SAR systems can obtain broad coverage at a spatial scale relevant to human and robotic surface operations. A polarimetric SAR system would greatly increase the safety and utility of future landed systems including sample caching.

  3. Astrophysical implications and observational prospects of X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Novick, R.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Chanan, G. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry is a prime tool for investigating the physics of compact objects, which has not been adequately exploited thus far. However, current low-cost technology and modest launch requirements could provide a large number of positive observations with a sensitivity factor at least 100 greater than 10 years ago.The amount of astrophysical information potentially to be gained from this is enormous. The introduction of polarimetric information (direction and degree) would bring a quantum jump in the parameter space used to investigate compact objects, from the current two (spectra and time variability) to four independent parameters that models need to satisfy. This should greatly improve our ability to discriminate between various possible models. Such observations could lead to an elucidation of the rotation-powered and accretion-powered pulsar radiation mechanisms, could help clinch the identification of black hole canditates, and could decide between thermal and nonthermal AGN radiation models, as well as pin down the geometry of the accretion flows in both galactic and extragalactic sources.

  4. Toward the detection of exoplanet transits with polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2014-11-01

    In contrast to photometric transits, whose peak signal occurs at mid-transit due to occultation of the brightest region of the disk, polarimetric transits provide a signal upon ingress and egress due to occultation of the polarized stellar limb. Limb polarization, the bright corollary to limb darkening, arises from the 90° scattering angle and low optical depth experienced by photons at the limb. In addition to the ratio R {sub p}/R {sub *}, the amplitude of a polarimetric transit is expected to be controlled by the strength and width of the stellar limb polarization profile, which depend on the scattering-to-total opacity ratio at the stellar limb. We present a short list of the systems providing the highest expected signal-to-noise ratio for detection of this effect, and we draw particular attention to HD 80606b. This planet is spin/orbit misaligned, has a three-hour ingress, and has a bright parent star, which make it an attractive target. We report on test observations of an HD 80606b ingress with the POLISH2 polarimeter at the Lick Observatory Shane 3 m telescope. We conclude that unmodeled telescope systematic effects prevented polarimetric detection of this event. We outline a roadmap for further refinements of exoplanet polarimetry, whose eventual success will require a further factor of ten reduction in systematic noise.

  5. Polarimetry and Schlieren diagnostics of underwater exploding wires

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov-Gefen, A. V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2009-11-01

    Nondisturbing laser-probing polarimetry (based on the Faraday and Kerr effects) and Schlieren diagnostics were used in the investigation of underwater electrical wire explosion. Measuring the polarization plane rotation angle of a probing laser beam due to the Faraday effect allows one to determine an axially resolved current flowing through the exploding wire, unlike commonly used current probes. This optical method of measuring current yields results that match those obtained using a current viewing resistor within an accuracy of 10%. The same optical setup allows simultaneous space-resolved measurement of the electric field using the Kerr effect. It was shown that the maximal amplitude of the electric field in the vicinity of the high-voltage electrode is approx80 kV/cm and that the radial electric field is <1 MV/cm during the wire explosion. Finally, it was shown that the use of Schlieren diagnostics allows one to obtain qualitatively the density distribution behind the shock wave front, which is important for the determination of the energy transfer from the discharge channel to the generated water flow.

  6. Polarization in a snap: imaging polarimetry with micropolarizer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Gartley, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Polarization, flux, and the spectral energy distribution of light are the fundamental parameters that we measure in order to infer properties of the sources of electromagnetic radiation, such as intensity, temperature, chemical composition and physical geometry. Recently, the fabrication of microgrid polarizer arrays (MPAs) facilitated the development of a new class of division-of-focal plane polarimeters. These devices are capable of measuring the degree and angle of polarization across a scene with a single exposure. We present the design of the Rochester Institute of Technology Polarization Imaging Camera (RITPIC), a snapshot polarimeter for visible and near-infrared remote sensing applications. RITPIC is a compact, light-weight and mechanically robust imaging polarimeter that is deployable on terrestrial, naval, airborne and space-based platforms. RITPIC is developed using commercially available components and is capable of fast cadence imaging polarimetry of a wide variety of scenes. We derive the expected performance of RITPIC using the first high resolution 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) models of these hybrid focal planes and simulated observations of synthetic scenes rendered with the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model. Furthermore, we explore applications in remote sensing for which RITPIC, and devices like it, provide unique advantages.

  7. Imaging Polarimetry With Polarization-Sensitive Focal Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We present a compact, lightweight, snapshot imaging polarimeter designed for operation in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). Flux, polarization and spectral energy distribution are the fundamental measurements through which we infer properties of the sources of radiation such as intensity, temperature, chemical composition, emission mechanisms and structure. In recent decades, many scientific fields that utilize radiometry and spectroscopy have benefited from revolutionary improvements in instrumentation, for example, charge-coupled devices, hybridized infrared arrays, multi-object spectrometers and adaptive optics. Advances in polarimetric instrumentation have been more modest. Recently, the fabrication of microgrid polarizer arrays (MGPAs), facilitated the development of polarization-sensitive focal planes. These devices have inherent capability to measure the degree and angle of polarization across a scene (i.e., imaging polarimetry) instantaneously, without the need for multiple exposures and moving optics or multiple detectors. MGPA-based devices are compact, lightweight, and mechanically robust and perfectly suited for deployment on space-based and airborne platforms. We describe the design, operation and expected performance of MGPA-based imaging polarimeters and identify the applications for which these polarimeters are best suited.

  8. Cryocup - Compact spherical neutron polarimetry device for small angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhao

    In my thesis I describe my research work of developing a compact device for Spherical Neutron Polarimetry (SNP) measurements at small neutron scattering angles. The thesis first introduced the purpose of this research project, which is developing an easy to use and maintain version of an advanced neutron experiment technique (SNP). After the introduction, the design principle and construction detail of the prototype device is demonstrated. The design principle is based on our finite element simulation of the device's magnetic field profile, and is later verified by the performance test experiment. The prototype device is tested at the SESAME neutron beamline at Indiana University and the HB-2D beamline at Oak Ridge National laboratory. The performance test data are analyzed and proof that the design is successful and the prototype is capable of perform accurate SNP measurement. Based on the test result, the prototype device is utilized to perform SNP measurement on two types of magnetic film sample: Permalloy and Metglas. Combined with other characterization method such as SQUID and MFM, I study the magnetization of these two samples both at zero magnetic field environment and in external field. The SNP data provided by the prototype device is discussed in the thesis and provide detailed information about the magnetization, which is also not accessible through other method. In the end, the possible improvement and the future application of the device is discussed.

  9. Observational Aspects of Hard X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    Sensitive polarization measurements in X-ray may address a wealth of astrophysical phenomena, which so far remain beyond our understanding through available X-ray spectroscopic, imaging, and timing studies. Though scientific potential of X-ray polarimetry was realized long ago, there has not been any significant advancement in this field for the last four decades since the birth of X-ray astronomy. The only successful polarization measurement in X-rays dates back to 1976, when a Bragg polarimeter onboard OSO-8 measured polarization of Crab nebula. Primary reason behind the lack in progress is its extreme photon hungry nature, which results in poor sensitivity of the polarimeters. Recently, in the last decade or so, with the advancement in detection technology, X-ray polarimetry may see a significant progress in near future, especially in soft X-rays with the invention of photoelectron tracking polarimeters. Though photoelectric polarimeters are expected to provide sensitive polarization measurements of celestial X-ray sources, they are sensitive only in soft X-rays, where the radiation from the sources is dominated by thermal radiation and therefore expected to be less polarized. On the other hand, in hard X-rays, sources are ex-pected to be highly polarized due to the dominance of nonthermal emission over its thermal counterpart. Moreover, polarization measurements in hard X-rays promises to address few interesting scientific issues regarding geometry of corona for black hole sources, emission mechanism responsible for the higher energy peak in the blazars, accretion geometry close to the magnetic poles in accreting neutron star systems and acceleration mechanism in solar flares. Compton polarimeters provide better sensitivity than photoelectric polarimeters in hard X-rays with a broad energy band of operation. Recently, with the development of hard X-ray focusing optics e.g. NuSTAR, Astro-H, it is now possible to conceive Compton polarimeters at the focal plane

  10. Probing the Galactic center with X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.; Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Galactic center (GC) holds the closest-to-Earth supermassive black hole (SMBH), which makes it the best laboratory to study the close environment of extremely massive compact objects. Polarimetry is sensitive to geometry of the source, which makes it a particularly suitable technique to probe the medium surrounding the GC SMBH. The detection of hard X-ray spectra and prominent iron Kα fluorescence features coincident with localized gas clouds (e.g. Sgr B2, Sgr C) is known for nearly twenty years now and is commonly associated with a past outburst of the SMBH whose radiation is reprocessing onto the so-called ``reflection nebulae''. Since scattering leads to polarization, the re-emitted signal from the giant molecular clouds in the first 100 pc of the GC is expected to be polarized. X-ray polarization measurement is thus particularly adapted to probe the origin of the diffuse X-ray emission from the GC reflection nebulae and reveal the past activity of the central SMBH. In this research note, we summarize the results from past and current polarimetric simulations in order to show how a future X-ray polarimeter equipped with imaging detectors could improve our understanding of high-energy astrophysics.

  11. Toward the Detection of Exoplanet Transits with Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2014-11-01

    In contrast to photometric transits, whose peak signal occurs at mid-transit due to occultation of the brightest region of the disk, polarimetric transits provide a signal upon ingress and egress due to occultation of the polarized stellar limb. Limb polarization, the bright corollary to limb darkening, arises from the 90° scattering angle and low optical depth experienced by photons at the limb. In addition to the ratio R p/R *, the amplitude of a polarimetric transit is expected to be controlled by the strength and width of the stellar limb polarization profile, which depend on the scattering-to-total opacity ratio at the stellar limb. We present a short list of the systems providing the highest expected signal-to-noise ratio for detection of this effect, and we draw particular attention to HD 80606b. This planet is spin/orbit misaligned, has a three-hour ingress, and has a bright parent star, which make it an attractive target. We report on test observations of an HD 80606b ingress with the POLISH2 polarimeter at the Lick Observatory Shane 3 m telescope. We conclude that unmodeled telescope systematic effects prevented polarimetric detection of this event. We outline a roadmap for further refinements of exoplanet polarimetry, whose eventual success will require a further factor of ten reduction in systematic noise.

  12. Polarimetry diagnostic on OMEGA EP using a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Haberberger, D; Boni, R; Ivancic, S; Brown, R; Froula, D H

    2014-11-01

    A polarimetry diagnostic was built and characterized for magnetic-field measurements in laser-plasma experiments on the OMEGA EP laser. This diagnostic was built into the existing 4ω (263-nm) probe system that employs a 10-ps laser pulse collected with an f/4 imaging system. The diagnostic measures the rotation of the probe beam's polarization. The polarimeter uses a Wollaston prism to split the probe beam into orthogonal polarization components. Spatially localized intensity variations between images indicate polarization rotation. Magnetic fields can be calculated by combining the polarimetry data with the measured plasma density profile obtained from angular filter refractometry. PMID:25430357

  13. Evaluation of Soil Moisture Estimation in Vegetated Areas Using Compact Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jian; Chen, Lin; Yin, Qiang; Li, Yang; Hong, Wen

    2010-12-01

    Within the framework of the DRAGON project, in this paper, we preliminarily analyze the soil moisture estimation performance in vegetated areas based on Water-Cloud model and Dubois model using compact polarimetry. We compare the inversion results of the compact polarimetry (CP) data to those of the dual polarimetric data (DP, HH and VV) and to the in-situ data. The comparison indicates that the retrieved parameters from original DP data are mainly in consistence with ground measured values, but the estimated parameters from the reconstructed data of CP are not quite consistent with the in-situ values, especially for the moisture.

  14. Scanning laser polarimetry of the peripapillar retinal nerve fiber layer in glaucoma cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiec, Slawomir; Rzendkowski, Marek; Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanislawa; Szymkowiak, Monika; Momot-Kawalska, Barbara

    1998-10-01

    Scanning laser polarimetry is the method of evaluating the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Different pathologies damage retinal fibers, but in glaucoma the damage is present very often before other symptoms reveal. As the earliest possible diagnosis of glaucoma is essential for treatment results, scanning laser polarimetry offers a very useful diagnostic tool for ophthalmology. This paper describes the principles of the method and discusses the results obtained in 50 glaucomatous eyes in conjunction with 2- and 3-D topographical parameters of the optic disc.

  15. Performance uniformity analysis of a wire-grid polarizer in imaging polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun

    2005-09-10

    The polarimetric performance nonuniformity of a wire-grid polarizer (WGP) used in imaging polarimetry is investigated with a simple numerical model. The simulation results based on rigorous coupled-wave analysis show that the aperture ratio between the entrance pupil and the WGP significantly affects the uniformity among pixels of a WGP. Even with a WGP smaller than an imaging aperture, the results suggest that the design avoids incurring a Rayleigh anomaly, which causes a substantial increase in polarimetric nonuniformity. Minimizing the variation due to the characteristics of a WGP is important to reduce the likelihood of an error in imaging polarimetry.

  16. Performance uniformity analysis of a wire-grid polarizer in imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun

    2005-09-01

    The polarimetric performance nonuniformity of a wire-grid polarizer (WGP) used in imaging polarimetry is investigated with a simple numerical model. The simulation results based on rigorous coupled-wave analysis show that the aperture ratio between the entrance pupil and the WGP significantly affects the uniformity among pixels of a WGP. Even with a WGP smaller than an imaging aperture, the results suggest that the design avoids incurring a Rayleigh anomaly, which causes a substantial increase in polarimetric nonuniformity. Minimizing the variation due to the characteristics of a WGP is important to reduce the likelihood of an error in imaging polarimetry.

  17. Polarimetry diagnostic on OMEGA EP using a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, A. Haberberger, D.; Boni, R.; Ivancic, S.; Brown, R.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-11-15

    A polarimetry diagnostic was built and characterized for magnetic-field measurements in laser-plasma experiments on the OMEGA EP laser. This diagnostic was built into the existing 4ω (263-nm) probe system that employs a 10-ps laser pulse collected with an f/4 imaging system. The diagnostic measures the rotation of the probe beam's polarization. The polarimeter uses a Wollaston prism to split the probe beam into orthogonal polarization components. Spatially localized intensity variations between images indicate polarization rotation. Magnetic fields can be calculated by combining the polarimetry data with the measured plasma density profile obtained from angular filter refractometry.

  18. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  19. Opening the Field of Soft X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert; Windt, David; Gullikson, Eric

    2015-08-01

    We present development of a telescope for measuring linear X-ray polarization over the 0.2-0.8 keV band. We employ multilayer-coated mirrors as Bragg reflectors at the Brewster angle. By matching to the dispersion of a spectrometer, one may take advantage of high multilayer reflectivities and achieve polarization modulation factors over 90%. We have constructed a source of polarized X-rays that operates at a wide range of energies with a selectable polarization angle. Previously, we demonstrated that the polarimetry beam-line provides 100% polarized X-rays at 0.525 keV (Marshall et al. 2013). Recently, we upgraded the source by installing a mirror with a laterally graded multilayer (LGML) coating, providing a wide energy range. Here, we will present results from continued development that includes LGMls of new material combinations (C/CrCo and La/B4C) with high efficiencies in different soft X-ray bands. We have also sponsored the development of new gratings and anticipate showing results from testing these new gratings. Finally, we will present a design for a small telescope for suborbital or orbital missions. A suborbital mission would be limited to measuring the polarization of a blazar such as Mk 421 to a few percent while an orbital version could measure the polarizations of neutron stars, active galactic nuclei, and blazars.Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through grant NNX12AH12G and by Research Investment Grants from the MIT Kavli Institute.

  20. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  1. General formalism for partial spatial coherence in reflection Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Hingerl, Kurt

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the first principles, we derive the expressions governing partially coherent Mueller matrix reflection polarimetry on spatially inhomogeneous samples. These are reported both in their general form and in the practically important specific form for two juxtaposed media. PMID:27607968

  2. Algebraic invariants for reflection Mueller polarimetry via uncompensated double pass illumination-collection optics.

    PubMed

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Vizet, Jérémy

    2016-07-01

    We report on the identification of the two algebraic invariants inherent to Mueller matrix polarimetry measurements performed through double pass illumination-collection optics (e.g., an optical fiber or an objective) of unknown polarimetric response. The practical use of the invariants, potentially applicable to the characterization of nonreciprocal media, is illustrated on experimental examples.

  3. Rapid Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging based on four photoelastic modulators with no moving parts (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, Adam; Alali, Sanaz; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its composition, both structural and functional. For example, the polarimetry-derived metric of linear retardance (birefringence) is dependent on tissue structural organization (anisotropy) and can be used to diagnose myocardial infarct; circular birefringence (optical rotation) can measure glucose concentrations. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. To derive this 4x4 matrix it is necessary to observe how a tissue interacts with different polarizations. A well-suited approach for tissue polarimetry is to use photoelastic modulators (PEMs), which dynamically modulate the polarization of light. Previously, we have demonstrated a rapid time-gated Stokes imaging system that is capable of characterizing the state of polarized light (the Stokes vector) over a large field, after interacting with any turbid media. This was accomplished by synchronizing CCD camera acquisition times relative to two PEMs using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Here, we extend this technology to four PEMs, yielding a polarimetry system that is capable of rapidly measuring the complete sample Mueller matrix over a large field of view, with no moving parts and no beam steering. We describe the calibration procedure and evaluate the accuracy of the measurements. Results are shown for tissue-mimicking phantoms, as well as initial biological samples.

  4. Polarization information processing and software system design for simultaneously imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yahui; Liu, Jing; Jin, Weiqi; Wen, Renjie

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous imaging polarimetry can realize real-time polarization imaging of the dynamic scene, which has wide application prospect. This paper first briefly illustrates the design of the double separate Wollaston Prism simultaneous imaging polarimetry, and then emphases are put on the polarization information processing methods and software system design for the designed polarimetry. Polarization information processing methods consist of adaptive image segmentation, high-accuracy image registration, instrument matrix calibration. Morphological image processing was used for image segmentation by taking dilation of an image; The accuracy of image registration can reach 0.1 pixel based on the spatial and frequency domain cross-correlation; Instrument matrix calibration adopted four-point calibration method. The software system was implemented under Windows environment based on C++ programming language, which realized synchronous polarization images acquisition and preservation, image processing and polarization information extraction and display. Polarization data obtained with the designed polarimetry shows that: the polarization information processing methods and its software system effectively performs live realize polarization measurement of the four Stokes parameters of a scene. The polarization information processing methods effectively improved the polarization detection accuracy.

  5. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Roger J.

    2008-10-15

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B{sub pol} diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and B{sub ||} along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n{sub e}B{sub ||} product and higher n{sub e} and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  6. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  7. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  8. Controlling radar signature

    SciTech Connect

    Foulke, K.W. )

    1992-08-01

    Low observable technologies for military and tactical aircraft are reviewed including signature-reduction techniques and signal detection/jamming. Among the applications considered are low-signature sensors and the reduction of radar cross section in conjunction with radar-absorbing structures and materials. Technologies for reducing radar cross section are shown to present significant technological challenges, although they afford enhanced aircraft survivability.

  9. Polarimetry of an intermediate-age open cluster: NGC 5617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsatti, A. M.; Feinstein, C.; Vergne, M. M.; Martínez, R. E.; Vega, E. I.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We present polarimetric observations in the UBVRI bands of 72 stars located in the direction of the medium age open cluster NGC 5617. Our intention is to use polarimetry as a tool in membership identification, by building on previous investigations intended mainly to determine the cluster's general characteristics rather than provide membership suitable for studies such as stellar content and metallicity, as well as study the characteristics of the dust lying between the Sun and the cluster. Methods: The obsevations were carried out using the five-channel photopolarimeter of the Torino Astronomical Observatory attached to the 2.15 m telescope at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO; Argentina). Results: We are able to add 32 stars to the list of members of NGC 5617, and review the situation for others listed in the literature. In particular, we find that five blue straggler stars in the region of the cluster are located behind the same dust as the member stars are and we confirm the membership of two red giants. The proposed polarimetric memberships are compared with those derived by photometric and kinematical methods, with excellent results. Among the observed stars, we identify 10 with intrinsic polarization in their light. NGC 5617 can be polarimetrically characterized with Pmax = 4.40 % and θv = 73.1 deg. The spread in polarization values for the stars observed in the direction of the cluster seems to be caused by the uneven distribution of dust in front of the cluster's face. Finally, we find that in the direction of the cluster, the interstellar medium is apparently free of dust, from the Sun's position up to the Carina-Sagittarius arm, where NGC 5617 seems to be located at its farthest border. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  10. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  11. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Polarimetry in the Chamaeleon I Dark Cloud (McGregor+, 1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, P. J.; Harrison, T. E.; Hough, J. H.; Bailey, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    H band polarimetry is presented for 66 stars in the direction of the Chamaeleon I dark cloud. K band polarimetry is presented for a further two stars. The data were obtained with the Mark II Hatfield polarimeter on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. Equatorial coordinates are provided for the 68 stars. These were not presented in the original paper. (2 data files).

  13. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  14. Learning radio astronomy by doing radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo Gallego, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is an educational program that allows high school and undergraduate students to control a 34 meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the internet. High-school teachers who join the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna as an educational resource. Also, teachers are provided with learning activities they can do with their students and focused on the classroom implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. PARTNeR provides students with firsthand experience in radio astronomy science. Thus, remote radio astronomical observations allow students to learn with a first rate scientific equipment the basics of radio astronomy research, aiming to arouse scientific careers and positive attitudes toward science. In this contribution we show the current observational programs and some recent results.

  15. UV Signature Mutations †

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  16. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  17. An archaeal genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Graham, D E; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    2000-03-28

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  18. Constraining blazar physics with polarization signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Boettcher, Markus; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are active galactic nuclei whose jets are directed very close to our line of sight. They emit nonthermal-dominated emission from radio to gamma-rays, with the radio to optical emissions known to be polarized. Both radiation and polarization signatures can be strongly variable. Observations have shown that sometimes strong multiwavelength flares are accompanied by drastic polarization variations, indicating active participation of the magnetic field during flares. We have developed a 3D multi-zone time-dependent polarization-dependent radiation transfer code, which enables us to study the spectral and polarization signatures of blazar flares simultaneously. By combining this code with a Fokker-Planck nonthermal particle evolution scheme, we are able to derive simultaneous fits to time-dependent spectra, multiwavelength light curves, and time-dependent optical polarization signatures of a well-known multiwavelength flare with 180 degree polarization angle swing of the blazar 3C279. Our work shows that with detailed consideration of light travel time effects, the apparently symmetric time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures can be naturally explained by a straight, helically symmetric jet pervaded by a helical magnetic field, without the need of any asymmetric structures. Also our model suggests that the excess in the nonthermal particles during flares can originate from magnetic reconnection events, initiated by a shock propagating through the emission region. Additionally, the magnetic field should generally revert to its initial topology after the flare. We conclude that such shock-initiated magnetic reconnection event in an emission environment with relatively strong magnetic energy can be the driver of multiwavelength flares with polarization angle swings. Future statistics on such observations will constrain general features of such events, while magneto-hydrodynamic simulations will provide physical scenarios for the magnetic field evolution

  19. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  20. Ultrasonic Doppler methods to extract signatures of a walking human.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of Doppler signatures that characterize human motion has attracted a growing interest in recent years. These Doppler signatures are generated by various components of the human body while walking, and contain unique features that can be used for human detection and recognition. Although, a significant amount of research has been done in radio frequency regime for human Doppler signature extraction, considerably less has been done in acoustics. In this work, 40 kHz ultrasonic sonar is employed to measure the Doppler signature generated by the motion of body segments using different electronic and signal processing schemes. These schemes are based on both analog and digital demodulation with homodyne and heterodyne receiver circuitry. The results and analyses from these different schemes are presented.

  1. Ultrasonic Doppler methods to extract signatures of a walking human.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of Doppler signatures that characterize human motion has attracted a growing interest in recent years. These Doppler signatures are generated by various components of the human body while walking, and contain unique features that can be used for human detection and recognition. Although, a significant amount of research has been done in radio frequency regime for human Doppler signature extraction, considerably less has been done in acoustics. In this work, 40 kHz ultrasonic sonar is employed to measure the Doppler signature generated by the motion of body segments using different electronic and signal processing schemes. These schemes are based on both analog and digital demodulation with homodyne and heterodyne receiver circuitry. The results and analyses from these different schemes are presented. PMID:22979839

  2. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  3. A Review of the Applications of SAR Polarimetry and Polarimetric Interferometry - an ESA-funded study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, D. G.; Cloude, S. R.; Ferro-Famil, L.; Hoekman, D. H.; Partington, K.; Pottier, E.; Rodrigues, A.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a literature review conducted under an ESA funded study entitled "Applications of SAR Polarimetry". This study was jointly conducted by QinetiQ, AELc, University of Rennes 1, SarVision and Vexcel UK. The overall study aim was to review, assess and validate the benefits of using polarimetry for land cover classification and sea ice classification. The potential of polarimetric interferometry for vegetation parameter retrieval was also assessed and demonstrated. A literature review on classification techniques for polarised SAR data was undertaken. The objective of this review was to choose the most promising techniques prior to their evaluation for land and sea ice applications. This paper presents the objectives, the key issues, the conclusions and recommendations of the review.

  4. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2015-09-01

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  5. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  6. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces. PMID:26374026

  7. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  8. The asteroid albedo scale. II - Laboratory polarimetry of dark carbon-bearing silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.; Lebertre, T.; Day, K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory reflection polarimetry is presented for eight samples of artificial, poorly crystalline magnesian silicates with varying admixtures of carbon black. The polarimetric slope-albedo law saturates for geometric albedos lower than about 0.05, and good agreement with the telescopic polarization-phase curves of C-type asteroids is found for albedos as low as 0.02. Thus the conclusion from thermal radiometry is confirmed that the C objects are very dark, darker than any known carbonaceous chondrite.

  9. Combining polarimetry and spectropolarimetry techniques in diagnostics of cancer changes in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, Sergey; Ivashko, Pavlo; Gruia, Ion; Gruia, Maria; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Voloshynskyi, Dmytro; Fedoruk, Olexander; Zimnyakov, Dmitry; Alonova, Marina

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study is combining polarimetry and spectropolarimetry techniques for identifying the changes of opticalgeometrical structure in different kinds of biotissues with solid tumours. It is researched that a linear dichroism appears in biotissues (human esophagus, muscle tissue of rats, human prostate tissue, cervical smear) with cancer diseases, magnitude of which depends on the type of the tissue and on the time of cancer process development.

  10. Polarimetry as a tool to find and characterise habitable planets orbiting white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Luca; Bagnulo, Stefano; Haswell, Carole A.; Patel, Manish R.; Busuttil, Richard; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Shukyak, Denis V.; Sterzik, Michael F.; Valyavin, Gennady

    2015-10-01

    There are several ways planets can survive the giant phase of the host star, hence one can consider the case of Earth-like planets orbiting white dwarfs. As a white dwarf cools from 6000 K to 4000 K, a planet orbiting at 0.01 AU from the star would remain in the continuous habitable zone (CHZ) for about 8 Gyr. Polarisation due to a terrestrial planet in the CHZ of a cool white dwarf (CWD) is 102 (104) times larger than it would be in the habitable zone of a typical M-dwarf (Sun-like star). Polarimetry is thus a powerful tool to detect close-in planets around white dwarfs. Multi-band polarimetry would also allow one to reveal the presence of a planet atmosphere, even providing a first characterisation. With current facilities a super-Earth-sized atmosphereless planet is detectable with polarimetry around the brightest known CWD. Planned future facilities render smaller planets detectable, in particular by increasing the instrumental sensitivity in the blue. Preliminary habitability study show also that photosynthetic processes can be sustained on Earth-like planets orbiting CWDs and that the DNA-weighted UV radiation dose for an Earth-like planet in the CHZ is less than the maxima encountered on Earth, hence white dwarfs are compatible with the persistence of complex life from the perspective of UV irradiation.

  11. Systematic comparison between line integrated densities measured with interferometry and polarimetry at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Zilli, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Boboc, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    A systematic comparison between the line integrated electron density derived from interferometry and polarimetry at JET has been carried out. For the first time the reliability of the measurements of the Cotton-Mouton effect has been analyzed for a wide range of main plasma parameters and the possibility to evaluate the electron density directly from polarimetric data has been studied. The purpose of this work is to recover the interferometric data with the density derived from the measured Cotton-Mouton effect, when the fringe jump phenomena occur. The results show that the difference between the line integrated electron density from interferometry and polarimetry is with one fringe (1.143x10{sup 19} m{sup -2}) for more than 90% of the cases. It is possible to consider polarimetry as a satisfactory alternative method to interferometry to measure the electron density and it could be used to recover interferometric signal when a fringe jumps occurs, preventing difficulties for the real-time control of many experiments at the JET machine.

  12. ON THE COMBINATION OF IMAGING-POLARIMETRY WITH SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF UPPER SOLAR ATMOSPHERES DURING SOLAR ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. Q.; Deng, L. H.; Dun, G. T.; Chang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cheng, X. M.; Qu, Z. N.; Xue, Z. K.; Ma, L.; Allington-Smith, J.; Murray, G.

    2013-09-01

    We present results from imaging polarimetry (IP) of upper solar atmospheres during a total solar eclipse on 2012 November 13 and spectropolarimetry of an annular solar eclipse on 2010 January 15. This combination of techniques provides both the synoptic spatial distribution of polarization above the solar limb and spectral information on the physical mechanism producing the polarization. Using these techniques together we demonstrate that even in the transition region, the linear polarization increases with height and can exceed 20%. IP shows a relatively smooth background distribution in terms of the amplitude and direction modified by solar structures above the limb. A map of a new quantity that reflects direction departure from the background polarization supplies an effective technique to improve the contrast of this fine structure. Spectral polarimetry shows that the relative contribution to the integrated polarization over the observed passband from the spectral lines decreases with height while the contribution from the continuum increases as a general trend. We conclude that both imaging and spectral polarimetry obtained simultaneously over matched spatial and spectral domains will be fruitful for future eclipse observations.

  13. Forest classification using extracted PolSAR features from Compact Polarimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghabalaei, Amir; Maghsoudi, Yasser; Ebadi, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the ability of extracted Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture RADAR (PolSAR) features from Compact Polarimetry (CP) data for forest classification. The CP is a new mode that is recently proposed in Dual Polarimetry (DP) imaging system. It has several important advantages in comparison with Full Polarimetry (FP) mode such as reduction ability in complexity, cost, mass, data rate of a SAR system. Two strategies are employed for PolSAR feature extraction. In first strategy, the features are extracted using 2 × 2 covariance matrices of CP modes simulated by RADARSAT-2 C-band FP mode. In second strategy, they are extracted using 3 × 3 covariance matrices reconstructed from the CP modes called Pseudo Quad (PQ) modes. In each strategy, the extracted PolSAR features are combined and optimal features are selected by Genetic Algorithm (GA) and then a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier is applied. Finally, the results are compared with the FP mode. Results of this study show that the PolSAR features extracted from π / 4 CP mode, as well as combining the PolSAR features extracted from CP or PQ modes provide a better overall accuracy in classification of forest.

  14. On the Combination of Imaging-polarimetry with Spectropolarimetry of Upper Solar Atmospheres during Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z. Q.; Deng, L. H.; Dun, G. T.; Chang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cheng, X. M.; Allington-Smith, J.; Murray, G.; Qu, Z. N.; Xue, Z. K.; Ma, L.

    2013-09-01

    We present results from imaging polarimetry (IP) of upper solar atmospheres during a total solar eclipse on 2012 November 13 and spectropolarimetry of an annular solar eclipse on 2010 January 15. This combination of techniques provides both the synoptic spatial distribution of polarization above the solar limb and spectral information on the physical mechanism producing the polarization. Using these techniques together we demonstrate that even in the transition region, the linear polarization increases with height and can exceed 20%. IP shows a relatively smooth background distribution in terms of the amplitude and direction modified by solar structures above the limb. A map of a new quantity that reflects direction departure from the background polarization supplies an effective technique to improve the contrast of this fine structure. Spectral polarimetry shows that the relative contribution to the integrated polarization over the observed passband from the spectral lines decreases with height while the contribution from the continuum increases as a general trend. We conclude that both imaging and spectral polarimetry obtained simultaneously over matched spatial and spectral domains will be fruitful for future eclipse observations.

  15. Near-infrared Circular and Linear Polarimetry of Monoceros R2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Nagata, Tetsuya; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2016-09-01

    We have conducted simultaneous JHK s -band imaging circular and linear polarimetry of the Monoceros R2 (Mon R2) cluster. We present results from deep and wide near-infrared linear polarimetry of the Mon R2 region. Prominent and extended polarized nebulosities over the Mon R2 field are revisited, and an infrared reflection nebula associated with the Mon R2 cluster and two local reflection nebulae, vdB 67 and vdB 69, is detected. We also present results from deep imaging circular polarimetry in the same region. For the first time, the observations show relatively high degrees of circular polarization (CP) in Mon R2, with as much as approximately 10% in the K s band. The maximum CP extent of a ring-like nebula around the Mon R2 cluster is approximately 0.60 pc, while that of a western nebula, around vdB 67, is approximately 0.24 pc. The extended size of the CP is larger than those seen in the Orion region around IRc2, while the maximum degree of CP of ∼10% is smaller than those of ∼17% seen in the Orion region. Nonetheless, both the CP size and degree of this region are among the largest in our infrared CP survey of star-forming regions. We have also investigated the time variability of the degree of the polarization of several infrared sources and found possible variations in three sources.

  16. Power spectra trends in imaging polarimetry of outdoor solar illuminated scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupinski, Meredith; Chipman, Russell

    2016-05-01

    The 1=∫2 power law (where ∫ is spatial frequency) characterizes the spatial power spectrum of non-polarimetric images of outdoor scenes when averaged over an appropriately large ensemble. This empirical result has been repeatedly verified in diverse imaging applications. In this work we compare the ensemble-averaged power spectrum of radiance and polarized radiance images. Outdoor scenes have been imaged over the past three-years using JPL's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (Ground-MSPI)[1] at the University of Arizona (UA). Ground-MSPI is an eight-band spectropolarimetric camera mounted on a rotating gimbal to acquire pushbroom imagery of solar illuminated outdoor landscapes. This Ground-MSPI image library offers a unique opportunity to quantify the statistical trends between polarimetric and non-polarimetric measurements. From power spectrum analysis of 1,975 images in our collection we report that the magnitude of the 1=∫-exponent is lower for the polarized radiance image than the corresponding radiance image. This result quantifies the contrast mechanism difference for imaging polarimetry, indicates higher spatial frequency content in passive polarimetry of outdoor environments, and supports the assertion that polarimetry offers unique detection capabilities.

  17. Analysis of Volcanic Deposits on Venus Using Radar Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M.; Carter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The atmosphere of Venus is relatively transparent at radio wavelengths, providing an opportunity to examine its volcanic planetary surface using radar. The highest resolution radar images come from the Magellan mission, which mapped 98% of Venus's surface by transmitting and receiving unidirectionally polarized radio waves. Upgrades to the ground-based Arecibo telescope in 1999 allowed further imaging of the surface of Venus at conjunction in 1999, 2001, and 2004 by the transmission of a circularly polarized beam at 12.6cm wavelength and then the reception of two orthogonal circular polarization components [Carter et al., 2006]. We apply the Stokes vector method to the Arecibo measurements to calculate the circular polarization ratio (CPR), an indication of surface roughness, and the degree of linear polarization (DLP), a measure of whether there is subsurface scattering of the radar wave. We combine both the CPR and DLP datasets to enable a more holistic geologic interpretation of Magellan images. This allows us to examine geographic variations in high-altitude, high-emissivity regions such Beta Regio, and to investigate regions that may contain young lava flows such as Themis Regio. Our approach permits a more precise geologic mapping of the textures of coronas and lava flow fields, including the identification of abnormally rugged lava flows. The data were also used to search for pyroclastics emanating from large and intermediate sized volcanoes within the region visible to Arecibo.

  18. Polarimetry of Solar System Objects: Observations vs. Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    The overarching goals for the remote sensing and robotic exploration of planetary systems are: (1) understanding the formation of planetary systems and their diversity; and (2) search for habitability. Since all objects have unique polarimetric signatures inclusion of spectrophotopolarimetry as a complementary approach to standard techniques of imaging and spectroscopy, provides insight into the scattering properties of the planetary media. Specifically, linear and circular polarimetric signatures of the object arise from different physical processes and their study proves essential to the characterization of the object. Linear polarization of reflected light by various solar system objects provides insight into the scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and hazes? and surficial properties of atmosphereless bodies. Many optically active materials are anisotropic and so their scattering properties differ with the object's principal axes (such as dichroic or birefringent materials) and are crystalline in structure instead of amorphous, (eg., the presence of olivines and silicates in cometary dust and circumstellar disks? Titan, etc.). Ices (water and other species) are abundant in the system indicated in their near - infrared spectra. Gas giants form outside the frost line (where ices condense), and their satellites and ring systems exhibit signature of water ice? clathrates, nonices (Si, C, Fe) in their NIR spectra and spectral dependence of linear polarization. Additionally, spectral dependence of polarization is important to separate the macroscopic (bulk) properties of the scattering medium from the microscopic (particulate) properties of the scattering medium. Circular polarization, on the other hand, is indicative of magnetic fields and biologically active molecules, necessary for habitability. These applications suffer from lack of detailed observations, instrumentation, dedicated missions and numericalretrieval methods. With recent discoveries and

  19. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  20. Soft X-Ray Polarimetry with a CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We describe an instrument capable of measuring the polarization of astrophysical sources in soft X-rays that can be accomplished at modest cost by exploiting CubeSats as novel vehicles for high energy astrophysics. The instrument would re-use technologies that will be demonstrated on the HaloSat cubesat that is currently under construction. Potential target include thermally-emitting isolated neutron stars and blazars. Measurement of the polarization of X-rays emitted from the surface of a highly magnetized neutron star provides a means to test a unique signature of strong-field quantum electrodynamics and probe the neutron star magnetic field and X-ray emission geometry. Polarization measurements of blazars should strongly constrain jet emission models.

  1. POLARIMETRY WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER: METHODS, PERFORMANCE AT FIRST LIGHT, AND THE CIRCUMSTELLAR RING AROUND HR 4796A

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul G.; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; De Rosa, Robert J.; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; and others

    2015-02-01

    We present the first results from the polarimetry mode of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), which uses a new integral field polarimetry architecture to provide high contrast linear polarimetry with minimal systematic biases between the orthogonal polarizations. We describe the design, data reduction methods, and performance of polarimetry with GPI. Point-spread function (PSF) subtraction via differential polarimetry suppresses unpolarized starlight by a factor of over 100, and provides sensitivity to circumstellar dust reaching the photon noise limit for these observations. In the case of the circumstellar disk around HR 4796A, GPI's advanced adaptive optics system reveals the disk clearly even prior to PSF subtraction. In polarized light, the disk is seen all the way in to its semi-minor axis for the first time. The disk exhibits surprisingly strong asymmetry in polarized intensity, with the west side ≳ 9 times brighter than the east side despite the fact that the east side is slightly brighter in total intensity. Based on a synthesis of the total and polarized intensities, we now believe that the west side is closer to us, contrary to most prior interpretations. Forward scattering by relatively large silicate dust particles leads to the strong polarized intensity on the west side, and the ring must be slightly optically thick in order to explain the lower brightness in total intensity there. These findings suggest that the ring is geometrically narrow and dynamically cold, perhaps shepherded by larger bodies in the same manner as Saturn's F ring.

  2. Polarimetry with the Gemini Planet Imager. Methods, performance at first light, and the circumstellar ring around HR 4796A

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Kalas, Paul G.; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Ingraham, Patrick; Kerley, Daniel; Konapacky, Quinn; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; Marois, Christian; Mittal, Tushar; Morzinski, Katie M.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Palmer, David W.; Patience, Jennifer; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wang, Jason J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2015-01-28

    We report he first results from the polarimetry mode of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), which uses a new integral field polarimetry architecture to provide high contrast linear polarimetry with minimal systematic biases between the orthogonal polarizations. We describe the design, data reduction methods, and performance of polarimetry with GPI. Point-spread function (PSF) subtraction via differential polarimetry suppresses unpolarized starlight by a factor of over 100, and provides sensitivity to circumstellar dust reaching the photon noise limit for these observations. In the case of the circumstellar disk around HR 4796A, GPI’s advanced adaptive optics system reveals the disk clearly even prior to PSF subtraction. In polarized light, the disk is seen all the way in to its semi-minor axis for the first time. The disk exhibits surprisingly strong asymmetry in polarized intensity, with the west side ≳9 times brighter than the east side despite the fact that the east side is slightly brighter in total intensity. Based on a synthesis of the total and polarized intensities, we now believe that the west side is closer to us, contrary to most prior interpretations. Forward scattering by relatively large silicate dust particles leads to the strong polarized intensity on the west side, and the ring must be slightly optically thick in order to explain the lower brightness in total intensity there. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the ring is geometrically narrow and dynamically cold, perhaps shepherded by larger bodies in the same manner as Saturn’s F ring.

  3. Polarimetry with the Gemini Planet Imager: methods, performance at first light, and the circumstellar ring around HR 4796A

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Kalas, Paul G.; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Ingraham, Patrick; Kerley, Daniel; Konapacky, Quinn; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; Marois, Christian; Mittal, Tushar; Morzinski, Katie M.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Palmer, David W.; Patience, Jennifer; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wang, Jason J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2015-01-28

    We present the first results from the polarimetry mode of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), which uses a new integral field polarimetry architecture to provide high contrast linear polarimetry with minimal systematic biases between the orthogonal polarizations. We describe the design, data reduction methods, and performance of polarimetry with GPI. Point spread function subtraction via di erential polarimetry suppresses unpolarized starlight by a factor of over 100, and provides sensitivity to circumstellar dust reaching the photon noise limit for these observations. In the case of the circumstellar disk around HR 4796A, GPI's advanced adaptive optics system reveals the disk clearly even prior to PSF subtraction. In polarized light, the disk is seen all the way in to its semi-minor axis for the first time. The disk exhibits surprisingly strong asymmetry in polarized intensity, with the west side ≳ 9 times brighter than the east side despite the fact that the east side is slightly brighter in total intensity. Based on a synthesis of the total and polarized intensities, we now believe that the west side is closer to us, contrary to most prior interpretations. Forward scattering by relatively large silicate dust particles leads to the strong polarized intensity on the west side, and the ring must be slightly optically thick in order to explain the lower brightness in total intensity there. These findings suggest that the ring is geometrically narrow and dynamically cold, perhaps shepherded by larger bodies in the same manner as Saturn's F ring.

  4. Polarimetry with the Gemini Planet Imager: Methods, Performance at First Light, and the Circumstellar Ring around HR 4796A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Kalas, Paul G.; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Ingraham, Patrick; Kerley, Daniel; Konapacky, Quinn; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; Marois, Christian; Mittal, Tushar; Morzinski, Katie M.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Palmer, David W.; Patience, Jennifer; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wang, Jason J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first results from the polarimetry mode of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), which uses a new integral field polarimetry architecture to provide high contrast linear polarimetry with minimal systematic biases between the orthogonal polarizations. We describe the design, data reduction methods, and performance of polarimetry with GPI. Point-spread function (PSF) subtraction via differential polarimetry suppresses unpolarized starlight by a factor of over 100, and provides sensitivity to circumstellar dust reaching the photon noise limit for these observations. In the case of the circumstellar disk around HR 4796A, GPI's advanced adaptive optics system reveals the disk clearly even prior to PSF subtraction. In polarized light, the disk is seen all the way in to its semi-minor axis for the first time. The disk exhibits surprisingly strong asymmetry in polarized intensity, with the west side >~ 9 times brighter than the east side despite the fact that the east side is slightly brighter in total intensity. Based on a synthesis of the total and polarized intensities, we now believe that the west side is closer to us, contrary to most prior interpretations. Forward scattering by relatively large silicate dust particles leads to the strong polarized intensity on the west side, and the ring must be slightly optically thick in order to explain the lower brightness in total intensity there. These findings suggest that the ring is geometrically narrow and dynamically cold, perhaps shepherded by larger bodies in the same manner as Saturn's F ring.

  5. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  6. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  7. Current signature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Ihlefeld, Curtis (Inventor); Burns, Bradley (Inventor); Bassignani, Karin E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A solenoid health monitoring system uses a signal conditioner and controller assembly in one embodiment that includes analog circuitry and a DSP controller. The analog circuitry provides signal conditioning to the low-level raw signal coming from a signal acquisition assembly. Software running in a DSP analyzes the incoming data (recorded current signature) and determines the state of the solenoid whether it is energized, de-energized, or in a transitioning state. In one embodiment, the software identifies key features in the current signature during the transition phase and is able to determine the health of the solenoid.

  8. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an "overall" mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  9. Electron Acceleration and Radio Noise Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Trottet, G.

    2008-05-01

    Radio noise storms are radiated by suprathermal electrons accelerated continuously over time scales of hours to days in the vicinity of active regions. Such long-duration electron acceleration may be related to emerging magnetic loops interacting with overlying loops leading to magnetic reconfiguration in the corona. A close spatial and temporal relationship is also sometimes observed between noise storm onsets or enhancements and white light transient activity. For a few cases, noise storm enhancements were found to be associated with flare like sudden energy release in the active region, either as a fully developed flare or, more often as a microwave or soft X-ray brightening without Halpha signature. A few cases have also been reported in which 10-30 keV X-rays from a superhot flaring plasma or from non-thermal electrons have been observed at the onset of the noise storm confirming that a flare-like signature in the low corona could be a necessary condition for noise storms to start. Most of these results were however obtained with no spatial resolution at X-ray wavelengths allowing us to confirm that the flare-like signature was indeed related to the radio noise storm onset. We shall present here some results of a search of X-ray counterparts (observed by RHESSI) at the onset or enhancements of a few radio noise storms observed with the Nançay Radioheliograph. We shall investigate whether X-ray flare-like signatures are seen in close temporal and spatial association with the appearance of the noise storm and briefly discuss the thermal or non thermal nature of the emission as well as its energy content.

  10. Radio Monitoring of Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubach, Catarina; Tahli Maddison, Sarah; Wright, Chris M.; Wilner, David J.; Lommen, Dave J. P.; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2015-01-01

    We present new results from a radio monitoring survey conducted with ATCA where we measured the flux variability for 11 protoplanetary disks in the Chameoleon and Lupus star forming regions at 7 and 15 mm and 3+6 cm. We determined the source of the excess flux and discuss its effect on grain growth to cm-size pebbles. We found that for most targets the 7 mm flux variability is consistent with the presence of thermal free-free emission and that the targets with excess emission above thermal dust emission also have signatures of grain growth to cm-size pebbles. Our results indicate that the presence of other emission mechanisms does not seem to negatively affect the grain growth process.

  11. Extended Cyclostationary Signatures for OFDM in the Presence of Hardware Imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Johannes; Zivkovic, Milan; Mathar, Rudolf

    2012-09-01

    Cyclostationary signatures have been shown to be an effective method for OFDM network synchronization and Cognitive Radio coordination. In this article, an extended method that utilizes cyclostationary signatures for signal parameter identification of OFDM-based Cognitive Radio nodes is presented. The scenario, implemented on a GNU Radio based evaluation platform, shows how different signal parameters, e.g. carrier frequency, occupied bandwidth and the used modulation scheme can be identified at the receiver side using the described approach. A major drawback of cyclostationary detection in OFDM systems is its sensitivity to frequency offset and sampling rate mismatches between oscillators at the transmitter and the receiver. An analytical model that characterizes this impairments is derived, followed by a discussion of implementation issues and the performance evaluation of proposed cyclostationary signature detection, both in a simulation environment and through RF experiments.

  12. Development of a tunable filter for coronal polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, S.; Mathew, S. K.; Gallagher, D.

    2016-07-01

    Measuring magnetic fields in the solar corona is crucial to understanding and predicting the Sun's generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory Large Coronagraph (COSMO LC) is a proposed 1.5 m aperture coronagraph designed to synoptically observe magnetic fields and plasma properties in the large-scale corona to improve our understanding of solar processes that cause space weather. The LC will observe coronal emission lines over the wavelength range from 500 to 1100 nm with a field of view of 1° and a spatial resolution of 2 arcsec. A spectral resolution greater than 8000 over the wavelength range is needed to resolve the polarization signatures of magnetic fields in the emission line profiles. The aperture and field of view of the LC set an étendue requirement of 1.39 m2 deg2 for the postfocus instrumentation. We find that a tunable wide-field birefringent filter using Lithium Niobate crystals can meet the étendue and spectral resolution requirements for the LC spectrometer. We have tested a number of commercially available crystals and verify that crystals of the required size and birefringence uniformity are available. We also evaluate electro-optical tuning of a Lithium Niobate birefringent filter by the application of high voltage. This tunable filter represents a key enabling technology for the COSMO LC.

  13. A Signature Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin V.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses Dr. Amalia Amaki and her approach to art as her signature style by turning everyday items into fine art. Amaki is an assistant professor of art, art history, and Black American studies at the University of Delaware. She loves taking unexpected an object and redefining it in the context of art--like a button, a fan, a faded…

  14. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  15. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  16. Imaging polarimetry in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Ann E; Weber, Anke; Cheney, Michael C; VanNasdale, Dean A; Miura, Masahiro

    2007-05-01

    Imaging polarimetry was used to examine different components of neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration. Retinal images were acquired with a scanning laser polarimeter. An innovative pseudocolor scale, based on cardinal directions of color, displayed two types of image information: relative phases and magnitudes of birefringence. Membranes had relative phase changes that did not correspond to anatomical structures in reflectance images. Further, membrane borders in depolarized light images had significantly higher contrasts than those in reflectance images. The retinal birefringence in neovascular membranes indicates optical activity consistent with molecular changes rather than merely geometrical changes. PMID:17429494

  17. Studying Large and Small Scale Wind Asymmetries with Spectroscopy and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis, N.

    In this paper, I review observational evidence from spectroscopy and polarimetry for the presence of small and large scale structure in the winds of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Clumping is known to be ubiquitous in the winds of these stars and many of its characteristics can be deduced from spectroscopic time-series and polarisation lightcurves. Conversely, a much smaller fraction of WR stars have been shown to harbour larger scale structures in their wind (˜ 1/5) while they are thought to be present is the winds of most of their O-star ancestors. The reason for this difference is still unknown.

  18. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10{sup −10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (∼10{sup 28}m{sup −3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  19. A multifunctional automated system of 2D laser polarimetry of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotna, Natalia I.; Radchenko, Kostiantyn O.

    2014-09-01

    Multifunctional automated system of 2D laser polarimetry of biological tissues with enhanced functional capabilities is proposed. Two-layer optically thin (attenuation coefficient τ <= 0,1 ) biological structures, formed by "muscle tissue (MT) - the dermis of the skin (DS)" histological cryosections for the two physiological states (normal - dystrophy) were investigated. Complex of objective indexes which characterized by 2D polarization reproduced distributions under the following criteria: histograms of the distributions; statistical moments of the 1st - 4th order; autocorrelation functions; correlation moments; power spectra logarithmic dependencies of the distributions; fractal dimensions of the distributions; spectra moments are presented.

  20. The MESA polarimetry chain and the status of its double scattering polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Aulenbacher, K.; Bartolomé, P. Aguar; Molitor, M.; Tioukine, V.

    2013-11-07

    We plan to have two independent polarimetry systems at MESA based on totally different physical processes. A first one tries to minimize the systematic uncertainties in double polarized Mo/ller scattering, which is to be achieved by stored hydrogen atoms in an atomic trap (Hydro-Mo/ller-Polarimeter). The other one relies on the equality of polarizing and analyzing power which allows to measure the effective analyzing power of a polarimeter with very high accuracy. Since the status of Hydro-Mo/ller is presented in a separate paper we concentrate on the double scattering polarimeter in this article.

  1. Terahertz spectroscopic polarimetry of generalized anisotropic media composed of Archimedean spiral arrays: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschaffenburg, Daniel J.; Williams, Michael R. C.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopic polarimetry has been used to measure the polarization state of all spectral components in a broadband THz pulse upon transmission through generalized anisotropic media consisting of two-dimensional arrays of lithographically defined Archimedean spirals. The technique allows a full determination of the frequency-dependent, complex-valued transmission matrix and eigenpolarizations of the spiral arrays. Measurements were made on a series of spiral array orientations. The frequency-dependent transmission matrix elements as well as the eigenpolarizations were determined, and the eigenpolarizations were found be to elliptically corotating, as expected from their symmetry. Numerical simulations are in quantitative agreement with measured spectra.

  2. Quasi-Isotropic Approximation of Geometrical Optics Method as Adequate Electrodynamical Basis for Tokamak Plasma Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieg, Bohdan; Chrzanowski, Janusz; Kravtsov, Yury A.; Orsitto, Francesco

    Basic principles and recent findings of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of a geometrical optics method are presented in a compact manner. QIA was developed in 1969 to describe electromagnetic waves in weakly anisotropic media. QIA represents the wave field as a power series in two small parameters, one of which is a traditional geometrical optics parameter, equal to wavelength ratio to plasma characteristic scale, and the other one is the largest component of anisotropy tensor. As a result, "" QIA ideally suits to tokamak polarimetry/interferometry systems in submillimeter range, where plasma manifests properties of weakly anisotropic medium.

  3. On the viability of exploiting L-shell fluorescence for X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Sutherland, P. G.; Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that one may build an X-ray polarimeter by exploiting the polarization dependence of the angular distribution of L-shell fluorescence photons. In this paper the sensitivity of this approach to polarimetry is examined theoretically. The calculations are applied to several detection schemes using imaging proportional counters that would have direct application in X-ray astronomy. It is found, however, that the sensitivity of this method for measuring X-ray polarization is too low to be of use for other than laboratory applications.

  4. The MESA polarimetry chain and the status of its double scattering polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, K.; Bartolomé, P. Aguar; Molitor, M.; Tioukine, V.

    2013-11-01

    We plan to have two independent polarimetry systems at MESA based on totally different physical processes. A first one tries to minimize the systematic uncertainties in double polarized Mo/ller scattering, which is to be achieved by stored hydrogen atoms in an atomic trap (Hydro-Mo/ller-Polarimeter). The other one relies on the equality of polarizing and analyzing power which allows to measure the effective analyzing power of a polarimeter with very high accuracy. Since the status of Hydro-Mo/ller is presented in a separate paper we concentrate on the double scattering polarimeter in this article.

  5. Outer planet Grand Tour missions photometry/polarimetry experiment critical components study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellicori, S. F.; Russell, E. E.; Watts, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Work performed during this effort was limited to two primary areas of technical concern: optical design optimization, and sensor selection. An optical system concept was established, and various system components were evaluated through experimental test sequences. Photodetectors were investigated for the applicability in meeting OPGT requirements as constrained by the photometry/polarimetry team directives. The most promising (gallium arsenide PMT) was further experimentally tested to ascertain its behavior with respect to anticipated environmental conditions. Results of testing and summary of the preceding tradeoff study effort are presented.

  6. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  7. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  8. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  9. Polarimetry of the polarized hydrogen deuteride HDice target under an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, Vivien E.

    2013-10-01

    The study of the nucleon structure has been a major research focus in fundamental physics in the past decades and still is the main research line of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). For this purpose and to obtain statistically meaningful results, having both a polarized beam and a highly efficient polarized target is essential. For the target, this means high polarization and high relative density of polarized material. A Hydrogen Deuteride (HD) target that presents both such characteristics has been developed first at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and brought to the Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2008. The HD target has been shown to work successfully under a high intensity photon beam (BNL and Jefferson Lab). However, it remained to be seen if the target could stand an electron beam of reasonably high current (nA). In this perspective, the target was tested for the first time in its frozen spin mode under an electron beam at Jefferson Lab in 2012 during the g14 experiment. This dissertation presents the principles and usage procedures of this HD target. The polarimetry of this target with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) during the electron beam tests is also discussed. In addition, this dissertation also describes another way to perform target polarimetry with the elastic scattering of electrons off a polarized target by using data taken on helium-3 during the E97-110 experiment that occurred in Jefferson Lab's Hall A in 2003.

  10. Assembly and test of the gas pixel detector for X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Feng, H.; Muleri, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Soffitta, P.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Pinchera, M.; Sgró, C.; Baldini, L.; She, R.; Costa, E.

    2015-12-01

    The gas pixel detector (GPD) dedicated for photoelectric X-ray polarimetry is selected as the focal plane detector for the ESA medium-class mission concept X-ray Imaging and Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE). Here we show the design, assembly, and preliminary test results of a small GPD for the purpose of gas mixture optimization needed for the phase A study of XIPE. The detector is assembled in house at Tsinghua University following a design by the INFN-Pisa group. The improved detector design results in a good uniformity for the electric field. Filled with pure dimethyl ether (DME) at 0.8 atm, the measured energy resolution is 18% at 6 keV and inversely scales with the square root of the X-ray energy. The measured modulation factor is well consistent with that from simulation, up to ~0.6 above 6 keV. The residual modulation is found to be 0.30 ± 0.15 % at 6 keV for the whole sensitive area, which can be translated into a systematic error of less than 1% for polarization measurement at a confidence level of 99%. The position resolution of the detector is about 80 μm in FWHM, consistent with previous studies and sufficient for XIPE requirements.

  11. Optical polarimetry applied to the development of a noninvasive in-vivo glucose monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Brent D.; Baba, Justin S.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2000-05-01

    The application of optical polarimetry, using the anterior chamber of the eye as the sensing site, is being investigated as a potential method to develop a noninvasive physiological glucose monitor. First, we present results characterizing the optical rotatory dispersion of the main optically active analytes found within the aqueous humor of the eye including, glucose, albumin, and ascorbic acid. This information is used in conjunction with multiple linear regression to demonstrate how multispectral polarimetry can be used to minimize glucose prediction error in samples containing varying physiological concentrations of glucose and albumin. For this multispectral study, a novel dual wavelength (532 nm and 635 nm) polarimeter was designed and constructed. This sensor is novel in that it provides simultaneous measurements using a 532 nm laser in an open- loop configuration and a 635 nm laser in a closed-loop configuration. In addition, we present in vivo results using New Zealand White rabbits that indicate the time delay between blood and aqueous human glucose levels is below ten minutes. Lastly, we provide preliminary in vivo polarimetric results and discuss the main issues currently hindering the measurement of glucose.

  12. The use of laterally graded multilayer mirrors for soft x-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Windt, David L.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Craft, Marshall; Blake, Eric; Ross, Connor

    2015-09-01

    We present continued development of laterally graded multilayer mirrors (LGMLs) for a telescope design capable of measuring linear X-ray polarization over a broad spectral band. The multilayer-coated mirrors are used as Bragg reflectors at the Brewster angle. By matching to the dispersion of a spectrometer, one may take advantage of high multilayer reflectivities and achieve modulation factors near 100%. In Phase II of the polarimetry beam- line development, we demonstrated that the system provides 100% polarized X-rays at 0.525 keV (Marshall et al. 2013). In Phase III of the polarimetry beam-line development, we installed an LGML in the source to polarize a wide range of energies between 0.15 and 0.70 keV (Marshall et al. 2014). Here, we present results from continued development of the LGMLs to improve reflectivity in the band of interest, a blazed reflection grating that is suitable for a small flight instrument, and a new detector with a directly deposited optical blocking filter. We also present updated plans for a suborbital rocket experiment designed to detect a polarization level of better than 10% for an active galactic nucleus.

  13. Why are carbonaceous grains unaligned in the ISM? - HAWC+ polarimetry of IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.

    2015-10-01

    Polarization due to aligned dust grains is a well-known tool for probing interstellar magnetic fields. The detailed physics of the grain alignment mechanism has, however, been poorly understood and it's only in the last decade that the promise of a quantitative, observationally supported, theory has emerged. A well-tested alignment theory would allow dust polarimetry to more securely probe the magnetic fields, but also to address issues of grain size distributions, mineralogy, and environmental parameters. Radiative Alignment Torque (RAT) theory predicts that asymmetric dust grain are spun up and, if paramagnetic, aligned with the magnetic field, through interaction with the radiation field. The theory provides a number of quantitative predictions, many of which are supported by observations. One - as of yet untested - prediction would resolve the conundrum of why carbonaceous dust does not contribute to ISM polarization. Under RAT alignment carbonaceous grains are spun-up by the radiation but, because such dust is diamagnetic, does not align with the magnetic field. The theory, however, also predicts that for an intense, highly anisotropic radiation field, the grains will align with the radiation. We will test this prediction by performing HAWC+ polarimetry of the carbon rich circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216.

  14. Exploiting the Photoelectric effect for X-ray Polarimetry using Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith; Black, Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The promise of photoelectric X-ray polarimetry has now been realized in laboratory demonstrations and may soon be used for astrophysical observations. Photoelectric polarimetry in gas filled proportional counters achieves high sensitivity through a combination of broad band width and good modulation. The band can be tuned by careful choice of gas composition and pressure. The measurements rely on imaging the tracks of photoelectrons. The initial direction of each track carries information about the electric field of the X-ray photon, and an ensemble of such measurements thus measures the net polarization of the source. A novel readout geometry using time projection chambers (TPC) allows deep (i.e. high efficiency) detectors, albeit without the ability to image the sky. Polarimeters which exploit the TPC geometry can be optimized for use behind telescopes, to study faint persistent sources, or as wide field of view instruments, designed to study bright transient events such as gamma-ray bursts or solar flares. We present the conceptual design of both types of TPC polarimeter. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that these polarimeters can achieve substantial gains in the polarization sensitivity achievable in experiments of modest size.

  15. Wide-field Infrared Polarimetry of the ρ Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Shogo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Nagata, Tetsuya; Kandori, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    We conducted wide and deep simultaneous JHKs-band imaging polarimetry of the ρ Ophiuchi cloud complex. Aperture polarimetry in the JHKs band was conducted for 2136 sources in all three bands, of which 322 sources have significant polarizations in all the JHKs bands and have been used for a discussion of the core magnetic fields. There is a positive correlation between degrees of polarization and H - Ks color up to H - Ks ≈ 3.5. The magnetic field structures in the core region are revealed up to at least AV ≈ 47 mag and are unambiguously defined in each sub-region (core) of Oph-A, Oph-B, Oph-C, Oph-E, Oph-F, and Oph-AC. Their directions, degrees of polarization, and polarization efficiencies differ but their changes are gradual; thus, the magnetic fields appear to be connected from core to core, rather than as a simple overlap of the different cloud core components. Comparing our results with the large-scale field structures obtained from previous optical polarimetric studies, we suggest that the magnetic field structures in the core were distorted by the cluster formation in this region, which may have been induced by shock compression due to wind/radiation from the Scorpius-Centaurus association.

  16. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF THE ρ OPHIUCHI CLOUD CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hough, James H.; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Kandori, Ryo

    2015-09-15

    We conducted wide and deep simultaneous JHK{sub s}-band imaging polarimetry of the ρ Ophiuchi cloud complex. Aperture polarimetry in the JHK{sub s} band was conducted for 2136 sources in all three bands, of which 322 sources have significant polarizations in all the JHK{sub s} bands and have been used for a discussion of the core magnetic fields. There is a positive correlation between degrees of polarization and H − K{sub s} color up to H − K{sub s} ≈ 3.5. The magnetic field structures in the core region are revealed up to at least A{sub V} ≈ 47 mag and are unambiguously defined in each sub-region (core) of Oph-A, Oph-B, Oph-C, Oph-E, Oph-F, and Oph-AC. Their directions, degrees of polarization, and polarization efficiencies differ but their changes are gradual; thus, the magnetic fields appear to be connected from core to core, rather than as a simple overlap of the different cloud core components. Comparing our results with the large-scale field structures obtained from previous optical polarimetric studies, we suggest that the magnetic field structures in the core were distorted by the cluster formation in this region, which may have been induced by shock compression due to wind/radiation from the Scorpius–Centaurus association.

  17. Solar flares X-ray polarimetry in a wide energy band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Campana, Riccardo; Costa, Enrico; Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Soffitta, Paolo; Del Monte, Ettore; Rubini, Alda

    2012-07-01

    Polarimetry of solar flares X-ray emission is an additional tool for investigating particles dynamics within the solar atmosphere. Accelerated electrons by magnetic reconnection in the corona produce bremsstrahlung radiation as primary emission in the footpoints of a solar flare which has moreover the possibility to be Compton backscattered resulting in albedo emission. Non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission is expected to be a significant above 15 keV and highly polarized. The albedo component peaks between 20 and 50 keV, its polarization properties depend on the Compton scattering angle. Such a diffusion modifies the spectrum and the polarization of the primary bremsstrahlung emission. Hard X-ray polarimetry, spectroscopy and imaging are therefore necessary to disentangle and modeling the different components in a solar flare. We present a non imaging Compton polarimeter sensitive from 20 keV designed as a single scattering unit surrounded by absorbers of high atomic number. A photelectric polarimeter based on the Gas Pixel Detector technology sensitive in the 15-35 keV energy band can be coupled for imaging.

  18. X-ray polarimetry: A new window on the high energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, R.; Muleri, F.

    2010-11-01

    Polarimetry is widely considered a powerful observational technique in X-ray astronomy, useful to enhance our understanding of the emission mechanisms, geometry and magnetic field arrangement of many compact objects. However, the lack of suitable sensitive instrumentation in the X-ray energy band has been the limiting factor for its development in the last three decades. Up to now, polarization measurements have been made exclusively with Bragg diffraction at 45∘ or Compton scattering at 90∘ and the only unambiguous detection of X-ray polarization has been obtained for one of the brightest object in the X-ray sky, the Crab Nebula. Only recently, with the development of a new class of high sensitivity imaging detectors, the possibility to exploit the photoemission process to measure the photon polarization has become a reality. We will report on the performance of an imaging X-ray polarimeter based on photoelectric effect. The device derives the polarization information from the track of the photoelectrons imaged by a finely subdivided Gas Pixel Detector. It has a great sensitivity even with telescopes of modest area and can perform simultaneously good imaging, moderate spectroscopy and high rate timing. Being truly 2D it is non-dispersive and does not require any rotation. This device is included in the scientific payload of many proposals of satellite mission which have the potential to unveil polarimetry also in X-rays in a few years.

  19. Towards polarimetry as a tool for the detection of extra-terrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnulo, Stefano; Sterzik, Michael F.; Cellino, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Linear broadband polarimetry is used to characterize the objects of our solar system, and has also been proposed as a diagnostic tool for the atmospheres of exo-solar planets. Homochirality characterizes life as we know it and induces circular polarization in the diffuse reflectance spectra of biotic material. Hence it has been suggested that circular polarimetry may be used as a remote sensing tool for the search of extra-terrestrial life. With this motivation in mind we have decided to explore the potential of both linear and circular spectropolarimetry as a diagnostic tool for remote sensing of biotic material. We have used the calibration unit of the EFOSC2 instrument of the La Silla Observatory to obtain low resolution, but high signal to noise circular and linear spectropolarimetric measurements of a number of inorganic and organic materials. We then compare our "laboratory data" with spectropolarimetric observations of atmosphere-less bodies of our solar system and of Earthshine obtained with instruments very similar to that one used for our laboratory samples. We conclude that linear polarization measurements are more suitable than circular polarization measurements for the characterization of planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and for the search of extra-terrestrial life.

  20. DETECTION OF RADIO EMISSION FROM FIREBALLS

    SciTech Connect

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Dowell, J.; Henning, P. A.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K.; Hartman, J. M.; Ellingson, S. W.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Wilson, T. L.; Kavic, M.; Simonetti, J. H.

    2014-06-20

    We present the findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager, a back end correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, which has recorded over 11,000 hr of all-sky images at frequencies between 25 and 75 MHz. In a search of this data for radio transients, we have found 49 long-duration (10 s of seconds) transients. Ten of these transients correlate both spatially and temporally with large meteors (fireballs), and their signatures suggest that fireballs emit a previously undiscovered low frequency, non-thermal pulse. This emission provides a new probe into the physics of meteors and identifies a new form of naturally occurring radio transient foreground.

  1. Polarimetry with the Gemini Planet Imager. Methods, performance at first light, and the circumstellar ring around HR 4796A

    DOE PAGES

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Kalas, Paul G.; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; et al

    2015-01-28

    We report he first results from the polarimetry mode of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), which uses a new integral field polarimetry architecture to provide high contrast linear polarimetry with minimal systematic biases between the orthogonal polarizations. We describe the design, data reduction methods, and performance of polarimetry with GPI. Point-spread function (PSF) subtraction via differential polarimetry suppresses unpolarized starlight by a factor of over 100, and provides sensitivity to circumstellar dust reaching the photon noise limit for these observations. In the case of the circumstellar disk around HR 4796A, GPI’s advanced adaptive optics system reveals the disk clearly evenmore » prior to PSF subtraction. In polarized light, the disk is seen all the way in to its semi-minor axis for the first time. The disk exhibits surprisingly strong asymmetry in polarized intensity, with the west side ≳9 times brighter than the east side despite the fact that the east side is slightly brighter in total intensity. Based on a synthesis of the total and polarized intensities, we now believe that the west side is closer to us, contrary to most prior interpretations. Forward scattering by relatively large silicate dust particles leads to the strong polarized intensity on the west side, and the ring must be slightly optically thick in order to explain the lower brightness in total intensity there. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the ring is geometrically narrow and dynamically cold, perhaps shepherded by larger bodies in the same manner as Saturn’s F ring.« less

  2. Radio source evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucho, M.

    2016-02-01

    Baldwin (1982) wrote that {``the distribution of sources in the radio luminosity, P, overall physical size, D, diagram''} could be considered as {``the radio astronomer's H-R diagram''}. However, unlike the case of stars, not only the intrinsic properties of the jets, but also those of the host galaxy and the intergalactic medium are relevant to explain the evolutionary tracks of radio radio sources. In this contribution I review the current status of our understanding of the evolution of radio sources from a theoretical and numerical perspective, using the P-D diagram as a framework. An excess of compact (linear size {≤ 10} kpc) sources could be explained by low-power jets being decelerated within the host galaxy, as shown by recent numerical simulations. Finally, I discuss the possible tracks that radio sources may follow within this diagram, and the physical processes that can explain the different tracks.

  3. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grueff, G.; Alvito, G.; Ambrosini, R.; Bolli, P.; D'Amico, N.; Maccaferri, A.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Mureddu, L.; Natale, V.; Olmi, L.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Poma, A.; Porceddu, I.; Rossi, L.; Zacchiroli, G.

    We describe the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT), a new general purpose, fully steerable antenna of the National Institute for Astrophysics. The radio telescope is under construction near Cagliari (Sardinia). With its large aperture (64m diameter) and its active surface, SRT is capable of operations up to ˜100GHz, it will contribute significantly to VLBI networks and will represent a powerful single-dish radio telescope for many science fields. The radio telescope has a Gregorian optical configuration with a supplementary beam-waveguide (BWG), which provides additional focal points. The Gregorian surfaces are shaped to minimize the spill-over and standing wave. After the start of the contract for the radio telescope structural and mechanical fabrication in 2003, in the present year the foundation construction will be completed. The schedule foresees the radio telescope inauguration in late 2006.

  4. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  5. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  6. STEM on the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  7. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  8. Radio Disappearance of the Magnetar XTE J1810-197 and Continued X-ray Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, F.; Ransom, S. M.; Halpern, J. P.; Alford, J. A. J.; Cognard, I.; Reynolds, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Sarkissian, J.; van Straten, W.

    2016-04-01

    We report on timing, flux density, and polarimetric observations of the transient magnetar and 5.54 s radio pulsar XTE J1810-197 using the Green Bank, Nançay, and Parkes radio telescopes beginning in early 2006, until its sudden disappearance as a radio source in late 2008. Repeated observations through 2016 have not detected radio pulsations again. The torque on the neutron star, as inferred from its rotation frequency derivative \\dot{ν }, decreased in an unsteady manner by a factor of three in the first year of radio monitoring, until approximately mid-2007. By contrast, during its final year as a detectable radio source, the torque decreased steadily by only 9%. The period-averaged flux density, after decreasing by a factor of 20 during the first 10 months of radio monitoring, remained relatively steady in the next 22 months, at an average of 0.7 ± 0.3 mJy at 1.4 GHz, while still showing day-to-day fluctuations by factors of a few. There is evidence that during this last phase of radio activity the magnetar had a steep radio spectrum, in contrast to earlier flat-spectrum behavior. No secular decrease presaged its radio demise. During this time, the pulse profile continued to display large variations; polarimetry, including of a new profile component, indicates that the magnetic geometry remained consistent with that of earlier times. We supplement these results with X-ray timing of the pulsar from its outburst in 2003 up to 2014. For the first 4 years, XTE J1810-197 experienced non-monotonic excursions in frequency derivative by at least a factor of eight. But since 2007, its \\dot{ν } has remained relatively stable near its minimum observed value. The only apparent event in the X-ray record that is possibly contemporaneous with the radio shutdown is a decrease of ≈20% in the hot-spot flux in 2008-2009, to a stable, minimum value. However, the permanence of the high-amplitude, thermal X-ray pulse, even after the (unexplained) radio demise, implies

  9. Multimodal signature modeling of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian; Prussing, Keith; Lane, Sarah; Thomas, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Georgia Tech been investigating method for the detection of covert personnel in traditionally difficult environments (e.g., urban, caves). This program focuses on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. The difficult nature of these personnel-related problems dictates a multimodal sensing approach. Human signature data of sufficient and accurate quality and quantity do not exist, thus the development of an accurate signature model for a human is needed. This model should also simulate various human activities to allow motion-based observables to be exploited. This paper will describe a multimodal signature modeling approach that incorporates human physiological aspects, thermoregulation, and dynamics into the signature calculation. This approach permits both passive and active signatures to be modeled. The focus of the current effort involved the computation of signatures in urban environments. This paper will discuss the development of a human motion model for use in simulating both electro-optical signatures and radar-based signatures. Video sequences of humans in a simulated urban environment will also be presented; results using these sequences for personnel tracking will be presented.

  10. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  11. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958 are…

  12. Writing for Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,…

  13. Frequencies for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, F G

    1970-10-31

    At present the scope of research in radio astronomy is limited by the allocation of frequencies, some of which have to be shared with other radio services. When the International Telecommunications Union reconsiders all frequency allocations next year, astronomers are hoping for an improvement.

  14. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  15. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  16. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  17. Signatures of Reputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethencourt, John; Shi, Elaine; Song, Dawn

    Reputation systems have become an increasingly important tool for highlighting quality information and filtering spam within online forums. However, the dependence of a user's reputation on their history of activities seems to preclude any possibility of anonymity. We show that useful reputation information can, in fact, coexist with strong privacy guarantees. We introduce and formalize a novel cryptographic primitive we call signatures of reputation which supports monotonic measures of reputation in a completely anonymous setting. In our system, a user can express trust in others by voting for them, collect votes to build up her own reputation, and attach a proof of her reputation to any data she publishes, all while maintaining the unlinkability of her actions.

  18. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  19. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  20. Multisensors signature prediction workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latger, Jean; Cathala, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Guidance of weapon systems relies on sensors to analyze targets signature. Defense weapon systems also need to detect then identify threats also using sensors. The sensors performance is very dependent on conditions e.g. time of day, atmospheric propagation, background ... Visible camera are very efficient for diurnal fine weather conditions, long wave infrared sensors for night vision, radar systems very efficient for seeing through atmosphere and/or foliage ... Besides, multi sensors systems, combining several collocated sensors with associated algorithms of fusion, provide better efficiency (typically for Enhanced Vision Systems). But these sophisticated systems are all the more difficult to conceive, assess and qualify. In that frame, multi sensors simulation is highly required. This paper focuses on multi sensors simulation tools. A first part makes a state of the Art of such simulation workbenches with a special focus on SE-Workbench. SEWorkbench is described with regards to infrared/EO sensors, millimeter waves sensors, active EO sensors and GNSS sensors. Then a general overview of simulation of targets and backgrounds signature objectives is presented, depending on the type of simulation required (parametric studies, open loop simulation, closed loop simulation, hybridization of SW simulation and HW ...). After the objective review, the paper presents some basic requirements for simulation implementation such as the deterministic behavior of simulation, mandatory to repeat it many times for parametric studies... Several technical topics are then discussed, such as the rendering technique (ray tracing vs. rasterization), the implementation (CPU vs. GP GPU) and the tradeoff between physical accuracy and performance of computation. Examples of results using SE-Workbench are showed and commented.

  1. Compact symmetric objects and supermassive binary black holes in the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, S. E.; Taylor, G. B.; Ortiz, A. A.; Tremblay, C. D.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Romani, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    We present multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) follow-up observations of VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey sources identified as likely compact symmetric objects (CSOs) or supermassive binary black holes (SBBHs). We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 11 sources observed with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. While no new SBBHs can be confirmed from these observations, we have identified 24 CSOs in the sample, 15 of which are newly designated, and refuted 52 candidates leaving 33 unconfirmed candidates. This is the first large uniform sample of CSOs which can be used to elicit some of the general properties of these sources, including morphological evolution and environmental interaction. We have detected polarized emission from two of these CSOs the properties of which are consistent with active galactic nuclei unification schemes.

  2. PRECISE ABSOLUTE ASTROMETRY FROM THE VLBA IMAGING AND POLARIMETRY SURVEY AT 5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, L.

    2011-09-15

    We present accurate positions for 857 sources derived from the astrometric analysis of 16 eleven-hour experiments from the Very Long Baseline Array imaging and polarimetry survey at 5 GHz (VIPS). Among the observed sources, positions of 430 objects were not previously determined at milliarcsecond-level accuracy. For 95% of the sources the uncertainty of their positions ranges from 0.3 to 0.9 mas, with a median value of 0.5 mas. This estimate of accuracy is substantiated by the comparison of positions of 386 sources that were previously observed in astrometric programs simultaneously at 2.3/8.6 GHz. Surprisingly, the ionosphere contribution to group delay was adequately modeled with the use of the total electron content maps derived from GPS observations and only marginally affected estimates of source coordinates.

  3. A Pair Production Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Depaola, Gerardo; Dion, Michael P.; DeNolfo, Georgia A.; Hanu, Andrei; Iparraguirre, Marcos; Legere, Jason; Longo, Francesco; McConnell, Mark L.; Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Ryan, James M.; Son, Seunghee; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the science motivation and development of a pair production telescope for medium-energy (approximately 5-200 Mega electron Volts) gamma-ray polarimetry. Our instrument concept, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope (AdEPT), takes advantage of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager, a low-density gaseous time projection chamber, to achieve angular resolution within a factor of two of the pair production kinematics limit (approximately 0.6 deg at 70 Mega electron Volts), continuum sensitivity comparable with the Fermi-LAT front detector (is less than 3 x 10(exp -6) Mega electron Volts per square centimeter per second at 70 Mega electron Volts), and minimum detectable polarization less than 10% for a 10 milliCrab source in 10(exp 6) s.

  4. Nanotwin Detection and Domain Polarity Determination via Optical Second Harmonic Generation Polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ming-Liang; Agarwal, Rahul; Nukala, Pavan; Liu, Wenjing; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-07-13

    We demonstrate that optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be utilized to determine the exact nature of nanotwins in noncentrosymmetric crystals, which is challenging to resolve via conventional transmission electron or scanned probe microscopies. Using single-crystalline nanotwinned CdTe nanobelts and nanowires as a model system, we show that SHG polarimetry can distinguish between upright (Cd-Te bonds) and inverted (Cd-Cd or Te-Te bonds) twin boundaries in the system. Inverted twin boundaries are generally not reported in nanowires due to the lack of techniques and complexity associated with the study of the nature of such defects. Precise characterization of the nature of defects in nanocrystals is required for deeper understanding of their growth and physical properties to enable their application in future devices.

  5. Classification of agricultural fields using time series of dual polarimetry TerraSAR-X images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, S.; Motagh, M.; Arefi, H.; Nooryazdan, M.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its special imaging characteristics, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has become an important source of information for a variety of remote sensing applications dealing with environmental changes. SAR images contain information about both phase and intensity in different polarization modes, making them sensitive to geometrical structure and physical properties of the targets such as dielectric and plant water content. In this study we investigate multi temporal changes occurring to different crop types due to phenological changes using high-resolution TerraSAR-X imagers. The dataset includes 17 dual-polarimetry TSX data acquired from June 2012 to August 2013 in Lorestan province, Iran. Several features are extracted from polarized data and classified using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Training samples and different features employed in classification are also assessed in the study. Results show a satisfactory accuracy for classification which is about 0.91 in kappa coefficient.

  6. High-speed dual-wavelength optical polarimetry for glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunden, Daniel T.; Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-02-01

    Optical polarimetry in the anterior chamber of the eye has emerged as a potential technique to non-invasively measure glucose levels for diabetes. Time varying corneal birefringence due to eye motion artifact confounds the optical signal ultimately limiting the polarimetric technique from accurately predicting glucose concentrations. In this study, a high speed dual-wavelength optical polarimetric approach was developed and in vitro phantom studies were performed with and without motion. The glucose concentrations ranged from 0-600 mg/dL at 100 mg/dL increments. The polarimeter produced glucose measurements with less than a 10 msec stabilization time and yielding standard errors of less than 10 mg/dL without motion and standard errors less than 26 mg/dL with motion. The results indicate a high speed dual-wavelength polarimetric approach has the potential to be used for non-invasive glucose measurements.

  7. Modeling of scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina for progression detection of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Koen A; Vos, Frans M; Lo, Barrick; Zhou, Qienyuan; Lemij, Hans G; Vossepoel, Albert M; van Vliet, Lucas J

    2006-05-01

    The development of methods to detect slowly progressing diseases is often hampered by the time-consuming acquisition of a sufficiently large data set. In this paper, a method is presented to model the change in images acquired by scanning laser polarimetry, for the detection of glaucomatous progression. The model is based on image series of 23 healthy eyes and incorporates colored noise, incomplete cornea compensation and masking by the retinal blood vessels. Additionally, two methods for detecting progression, taking either one or two follow-up visits into account, are discussed and tested on these simulated images. Both methods are based on Student's t-tests, morphological operations and anisotropic filtering. The images simulated by the model are visually pleasing, show corresponding statistical properties to the real images and are used to optimize the detection methods. The results show that detecting progression based on two follow-up visits greatly improves the sensitivity without adversely affecting the specificity.

  8. High-resolution space-shuttle polarimetry for farm crop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Walter G.; Israel, S.; Johnson, W. R.; Whitehead, V. S.

    1992-01-01

    A significant advance is reported in imaging the polarimetry of a terrestrial area of earth located along the Mississippi River near New Madrid, Missouri. Color imagery was obtained with twin Hasselblad cameras with mutually perpendicular polarization analyzers. Digitization of the imagery in three colors (red, green, and blue) was accomplished at the Johnson Space Center Video Digital Analysis System Laboratory, Houston, Texas. A ground resolution of 80-90 m was achieved in the high-resolution imagery. Percent polarization was superior to photometry for recognition and characterization of farm crops such as rice, milo, cotton, and soybeans and of fallow areas. Statistical analyses of the percent-polarization data permit a unique classification of crops. Atmospheric effects may be deduced. Space-shuttle window distortion and viewing angle-sun geometry must be taken into account in analyzing the data.

  9. On-chip polarimetry for high-throughput screening of nanoliter and smaller sample volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornhop, Darryl J. (Inventor); Dotson, Stephen (Inventor); Bachmann, Brian O. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A polarimetry technique for measuring optical activity that is particularly suited for high throughput screening employs a chip or substrate (22) having one or more microfluidic channels (26) formed therein. A polarized laser beam (14) is directed onto optically active samples that are disposed in the channels. The incident laser beam interacts with the optically active molecules in the sample, which slightly alter the polarization of the laser beam as it passes multiple times through the sample. Interference fringe patterns (28) are generated by the interaction of the laser beam with the sample and the channel walls. A photodetector (34) is positioned to receive the interference fringe patterns and generate an output signal that is input to a computer or other analyzer (38) for analyzing the signal and determining the rotation of plane polarized light by optically active material in the channel from polarization rotation calculations.

  10. Interaction between Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects in polarimetry modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Carter, T. A.; Kubota, S.; Peebles, W. A.

    2010-10-15

    The evolution of electromagnetic wave polarization is modeled for propagation in the major radial direction in the National Spherical Torus Experiment with retroreflection from the center stack of the vacuum vessel. This modeling illustrates that the Cotton-Mouton effect-elliptization due to the magnetic field perpendicular to the propagation direction-is shown to be strongly weighted to the high-field region of the plasma. An interaction between the Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects is also clearly identified. Elliptization occurs when the wave polarization direction is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the local transverse magnetic field. Since Faraday rotation modifies the polarization direction during propagation, it must also affect the resultant elliptization. The Cotton-Mouton effect also intrinsically results in rotation of the polarization direction, but this effect is less significant in the plasma conditions modeled. The interaction increases at longer wavelength and complicates interpretation of polarimetry measurements.

  11. Magnetic domains in multiferroic YMn$2O5 probed by Spherical Neutron Polarimetry under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchini, Carlo; Chapon, Laurent; Radaelli, Paolo; Daoud-Aladine, Aziz; Brown, Jane; Chatterji, Tapan; Park, Soonyong; Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2008-03-01

    Precise determination of the magnetic structures in multiferroics RMn2O5 (R: Y, Ho, Bi) have been obtained by single crystal neutron diffraction. The analysis shows the presence of zig-zag antiferromagnetic chains in the ab-plane. An additional weak magnetic component parallel to the c-axis was detected which is modulated in phase quadrature with the a-b components. The nature and population of the coexisting antiferromagnetic domains in YMn2O5 have been determined by Spherical Neutron Polarimetry under an external electric field. We have proved that reversing the electrical polarity results in the inversion of the population of two types of antiferromagnetic domains, with opposite in-plane spin components. This analysis strongly supports theories in which the coupling of the magnetic configuration to the ferroelectric polarisation is due to magnetic exchange striction and likely not related to the small cycloidal modulation in the bc-plane.

  12. Solar Maximum Mission Experiment - Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Polarimetry on the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Cheng, C. C.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Gurman, J. B.; Hyder, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described. It is pointed out that the instrument, which operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A, has a spatial resolution of 2-3 arcsec and a spectral resolution of 0.02 A FWHM in second order. A Gregorian telescope, with a focal length of 1.8 m, feeds a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter comprising rotating Mg F2 waveplates can be inserted behind the spectrometer entrance slit; it permits all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Among the observing modes are rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry. Examples of initial observations made since launch are presented.

  13. Photothermoelectric p-n junction photodetector with intrinsic broadband polarimetry based on macroscopic carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Wang, Xuan; Nanot, Sébastien; Cong, Kankan; Jiang, Qijia; Kane, Alexander A; Goldsmith, John E M; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-08-27

    Light polarization is used in the animal kingdom for communication, navigation, and enhanced scene interpretation and also plays an important role in astronomy, remote sensing, and military applications. To date, there have been few photodetector materials demonstrated to have direct polarization sensitivity, as is usually the case in nature. Here, we report the realization of a carbon-based broadband photodetector, where the polarimetry is intrinsic to the active photodetector material. The detector is based on p-n junctions formed between two macroscopic films of single-wall carbon nanotubes. A responsivity up to ~1 V/W was observed in these devices, with a broadband spectral response spanning the visible to the mid-infrared. This responsivity is about 35 times larger than previous devices without p-n junctions. A combination of experiment and theory is used to demonstrate the photothermoelectric origin of the responsivity and to discuss the performance attributes of such devices.

  14. X-ray polarimetry and new prospects in high-energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgrò, C.

    2016-07-01

    Polarimetry is universally recognized as one of the new frontiers in X-ray astrophysics. It is a powerful tool to investigate a variety of astrophysical processes, as well as a mean to study fundamental physics in space. A renewed interest is testified by dedicated missions approved for phase A by ESA and NASA. The main advance is the availability of a gas pixel detector that is able to add polarization measurement to imaging and spectroscopy, and can be used at the focus of a conventional X-ray optics. The detector exploits the photoelectric effect in gas and a finely segmented ASIC as a collecting anode. In this work I will describe in detail the experimental technique and the detector concept, and illustrate the scientific prospects of these new missions.

  15. Merged vector gratings recorded in a photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystal film for polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Wada, Takumi; Noda, Kohei; Ono, Hiroshi; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-14

    A merged vector grating, which is holographically fabricated in an anisotropic medium by irradiation with interference light with intensity modulation and polarization modulation, was designed to detect the polarization of light. The merged vector grating is recorded by the interference of two elliptically polarized beams with equal intensities, parallel azimuths, equal ellipticities, and different directions of rotation. We clarified theoretically that the Stokes parameters of the incident light beam are described by the diffraction efficiency of the merged vector grating. Also, to apply this property to formation of a polarimeter without any moving parts or mechanisms, two merged vector gratings with different grating vectors were recorded in a photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystal film by angle-multiplexed holography. By investigation of the diffraction properties of the gratings obtained, we demonstrated the applicability of the merged vector gratings for use in polarimetry.

  16. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  17. A Pair Production Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter , Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Depaola, Gerardo O.; Dion, Michael P.; DeNolfo, Georgia A.; Hanu, Andrei; Iparraguirre, Marcos; Legere, Jason; Longo, Francesco; McConnell, Mark L.; Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Ryan, James M.; Son, Seunghee; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-08-01

    We describe the science motivation and development of a pair production telescope for medium-13 energy gamma-ray polarimetry. Our instrument concept, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope 14 (AdEPT), takes advantage of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager, a low-density gaseous time 15 projection chamber, to achieve angular resolution within a factor of two of the pair production 16 kinematics limit (~0.6° at 70 MeV), continuum sensitivity comparable with the Fermi-LAT front 17 detector (<3×10-6 MeV cm-2 s-1 at 70 MeV), and minimum detectable polarization less than 10% 18 for a 10 millicrab source in 106 seconds.

  18. THE X-RAY POLARIZATION SIGNATURE OF QUIESCENT MAGNETARS: EFFECT OF MAGNETOSPHERIC SCATTERING AND VACUUM POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-04-01

    In the magnetar model, the quiescent non-thermal soft X-ray emission from anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters is thought to arise from resonant Comptonization of thermal photons by charges moving in a twisted magnetosphere. Robust inference of physical quantities from observations is difficult, because the process depends strongly on geometry, and current understanding of the magnetosphere is not very deep. The polarization of soft X-ray photons is an independent source of information, and its magnetospheric imprint remains only partially explored. In this paper, we calculate how resonant cyclotron scattering would modify the observed polarization signal relative to the surface emission, using a multidimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that accounts for the gradual coupling of polarization eigenmodes as photons leave the magnetosphere. We employ a globally twisted, self-similar, force-free magnetosphere with a power-law momentum distribution, assume a blackbody spectrum for the seed photons, account for general relativistic light deflection close to the star, and assume that vacuum polarization dominates the dielectric properties of the magnetosphere. The latter is a good approximation if the pair multiplicity is not much larger than unity. Phase-averaged polarimetry is able to provide a clear signature of the magnetospheric reprocessing of thermal photons and to constrain mechanisms generating the thermal emission. Phase-resolved polarimetry, in addition, can characterize the spatial extent and magnitude of the magnetospheric twist angle at {approx}100 stellar radii, and discern between uni- or bidirectional particle energy distributions, almost independently of every other parameter in the system. We discuss prospects for detectability with the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism (GEMS) mission.

  19. The X-ray Polarization Signature of Quiescent Magnetars: Effect of Magnetospheric Scattering and Vacuum Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-04-01

    In the magnetar model, the quiescent non-thermal soft X-ray emission from anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters is thought to arise from resonant Comptonization of thermal photons by charges moving in a twisted magnetosphere. Robust inference of physical quantities from observations is difficult, because the process depends strongly on geometry, and current understanding of the magnetosphere is not very deep. The polarization of soft X-ray photons is an independent source of information, and its magnetospheric imprint remains only partially explored. In this paper, we calculate how resonant cyclotron scattering would modify the observed polarization signal relative to the surface emission, using a multidimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that accounts for the gradual coupling of polarization eigenmodes as photons leave the magnetosphere. We employ a globally twisted, self-similar, force-free magnetosphere with a power-law momentum distribution, assume a blackbody spectrum for the seed photons, account for general relativistic light deflection close to the star, and assume that vacuum polarization dominates the dielectric properties of the magnetosphere. The latter is a good approximation if the pair multiplicity is not much larger than unity. Phase-averaged polarimetry is able to provide a clear signature of the magnetospheric reprocessing of thermal photons and to constrain mechanisms generating the thermal emission. Phase-resolved polarimetry, in addition, can characterize the spatial extent and magnitude of the magnetospheric twist angle at ~100 stellar radii, and discern between uni- or bidirectional particle energy distributions, almost independently of every other parameter in the system. We discuss prospects for detectability with the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism (GEMS) mission.

  20. Radio-Mode Feedback in Massive Galaxies at Redshift 0 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Ching, John H. Y.; Johnston, Helen M.; Cannon, Russell D.; Mauch, Tom

    2010-05-01

    We have carried out a large observational study of the radio luminosities, stellar populations, and environments of massive galaxies over the redshift range 0 < z < 1. Radio jets powered by an accreting central black hole are common in massive galaxies, and there is a large class of “optically quiet AGN,” with radio emission but no optical/IR signature of black-hole accretion. The central black holes in these galaxies are probably accreting in a radiatively inefficient mode, and our results suggest that “radio-mode feedback” as described by Croton et al. is likely to occur in all masssive early-type galaxies at z < 0.8. While it appears that radio-loud AGN occur episodically in all massive early-type galaxies, we also identify a sub-population of galaxies with powerful radio sources and a prominent younger (~ 108 yr) stellar population that may have undergone recent mergers.

  1. New online signature acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulefki, Adel; Mostefai, Messaoud; Abbadi, Belkacem; Djebrani, Samira; Bouziane, Abderraouf; Chahir, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    We present a nonconstraining and low-cost online signature acquisition system that has been developed to enhance the performances of an existing multimodal biometric authentication system (based initially on both voice and image modalities). A laboratory prototype has been developed and validated for an online signature acquisition.

  2. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the GG Tauri Circumbinary Ring.

    PubMed

    Silber; Gledhill; Duchêne; Ménard

    2000-06-20

    We present 1 µm Hubble Space Telescope/near-infrared camera and multiobject spectrometer resolved imaging polarimetry of the GG Tau circumbinary ring. We find that the ring displays east-west asymmetries in surface brightness as well as several pronounced irregularities but is smoother than suggested by ground-based adaptive optics observations. The data are consistent with a 37 degrees system inclination and a projected rotational axis at a position angle of 7 degrees east of north, determined from millimeter imaging. The ring is strongly polarized, up to approximately 50%, which is indicative of Rayleigh-like scattering from submicron dust grains. Although the polarization pattern is broadly centrosymmetric and clearly results from illumination of the ring by the central stars, departures from true centrosymmetry and the irregular flux suggest that binary illumination, scattering through unresolved circumstellar disks, and shading by these disks may all be factors influencing the observed morphology. We confirm a approximately 0&farcs;25 shift between the inner edges of the near-infrared and millimeter images and find that the global morphology of the ring and the polarimetry provide strong evidence for a geometrically thick ring. A simple Monte Carlo scattering simulation is presented that reproduces these features and supports the thick-ring hypothesis. We cannot confirm filamentary streaming from the binary to the ring, also observed in the ground-based images, although it is possible that there is material inside the dynamically cleared region that might contribute to filamentary deconvolution artifacts. Finally, we find a faint fifth point source in the GG Tau field that, if it is associated with the system, is almost certainly a brown dwarf. PMID:10859125

  3. Retrieving Vegetation Parameters and Soil Reflection Coefficients with P-band SAR Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemohammad, S. H.; Konings, A. G.; Jagdhuber, T.; Entekhabi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is highly dependent on the water available to the plant through its roots. Therefore, measuring the root-zone-soil-moisture across large spatial scales is of great importance for crop monitoring and yield estimation as well as hydrological and ecological modeling. Unlike L-band instruments, which are sensitive to only a few centimeters of the top soil layer, P-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments have a penetration depth that can be used to retrieve soil moisture profiles in depths of several tens of centimeters (depending on soil texture and moisture content). NASA's Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission is designed to study the application of P-band SAR measurements for monitoring root-zone-soil-moisture. In this study, we introduce a new framework to retrieve vegetation parameters and smooth-surface soil reflection coefficients using SAR polarimetry and the fully polarimetric covariance matrix of the backscattering signal from AirMOSS observations. The retrieved soil reflectivities (both horizontally and vertically -polarized) can then be used to estimate the soil moisture profile. The retrieval model takes into account contributions from surface, dihedral and volume scattering coming from the vegetation and soil components, and does not require prior vegetation parameters. This approach reduces the dependency of the retrieval on allometry-based vegetation models with large numbers of uncertain parameters. The performance of this method will be validated using observations from AirMOSS field campaigns in July 2013 over Harvard Forest in Massachusetts, USA. This will enable a quality assessment of the polarimetry-based retrieval of the soil reflectivities and the estimated root-zone-soil-moisture profiles.

  4. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  5. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  6. Imaging of the magnetic field structure in megagauss plasmas by combining pulsed polarimetry with an optical Kerr effect shutter technique.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J

    2010-10-01

    Pulsed polarimetry in combination with a high speed photographic technique based on the optical Kerr effect is described. The backscatter in a pulsed polarimeter is directed through a scattering cell and photographed using an ∼1 ps shutter, essentially freezing the intensity pattern. The image provides both the local electron density and magnetic field distributions along and transverse to the laser sightline. Submillimeter spatial resolution is possible for probing wavelengths in the visible due to the high densities and strong optical activity. Pulsed polarimetry is thereby extended to centimeter-sized plasmas with n(e)>10(19)-10(20) cm(-3) and B>20-100 T (MG) produced by multiterawatt, multimega-ampere electrical drivers, wire Z pinches, and liner imploded magnetized plasmas. PMID:21033885

  7. Imaging of the magnetic field structure in megagauss plasmas by combining pulsed polarimetry with an optical Kerr effect shutter technique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. J.

    2010-10-15

    Pulsed polarimetry in combination with a high speed photographic technique based on the optical Kerr effect is described. The backscatter in a pulsed polarimeter is directed through a scattering cell and photographed using an {approx}1 ps shutter, essentially freezing the intensity pattern. The image provides both the local electron density and magnetic field distributions along and transverse to the laser sightline. Submillimeter spatial resolution is possible for probing wavelengths in the visible due to the high densities and strong optical activity. Pulsed polarimetry is thereby extended to centimeter-sized plasmas with n{sub e}>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and B>20-100 T (MG) produced by multiterawatt, multimega-ampere electrical drivers, wire Z pinches, and liner imploded magnetized plasmas.

  8. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to BCC tissue group. Histopathology indicated that these differences partially arise from BCC-related characteristic changes in tissue morphology. Wilks lambda statistics demonstrated the potential of all investigated polarimetric properties for computer assisted classification of the two tissue groups. Based on differences in polarimetric properties, partial least square (PLS) regression classified the samples with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. These findings indicate that optical polarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. PMID:27083851

  9. Imaging polarimetry of the potentially planet-forming circumstellar disk HD 142527: The NaCo view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Ménard, F.; Hales, A.; Jordán, A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Casassus, S.; Gledhill, T. M.; Pinte, C.

    2014-10-01

    HD 142527 is a unique protoplanetary disk in terms of planet formation. Its high accretion rate combined with its huge inner gap and short age make of it an ideal candidate for harboring forming planets. ALMA cycle-0 observations revealed gap crossing gas streams and showed that the millimeter-sized dust particles are distributed in a horse-shoe shape. Here we present our recent H- and Ks-band imaging polarimetry data of HD 142527 obtained with VLT/NaCo. By means of polarimetry, we remove most of the stellar light, directly imaging the disk's inner regions. Our observations allow us to constrain the dust properties (size and porosity) on the surface of the outer disk. We also detect two regions of the disk with low emission (``nulls") both in polarized and unpolarized light. Intriguingly, one of these nulls is azimuthally coincident with the maximum of the horse-shoe shape detected by ALMA.

  10. Searching for topological defect dark matter via nongravitational signatures.

    PubMed

    Stadnik, Y V; Flambaum, V V

    2014-10-10

    We propose schemes for the detection of topological defect dark matter using pulsars and other luminous extraterrestrial systems via nongravitational signatures. The dark matter field, which makes up a defect, may interact with standard model particles, including quarks and the photon, resulting in the alteration of their masses. When a topological defect passes through a pulsar, its mass, radius, and internal structure may be altered, resulting in a pulsar "quake." A topological defect may also function as a cosmic dielectric material with a distinctive frequency-dependent index of refraction, which would give rise to the time delay of a periodic extraterrestrial light or radio signal, and the dispersion of a light or radio source in a manner distinct to a gravitational lens. A topological defect passing through Earth may alter Earth's period of rotation and give rise to temporary nonzero electric dipole moments for an electron, proton, neutron, nuclei and atoms. PMID:25375699

  11. SOFIA Mid-infrared Imaging1 and CSO Submillimeter Polarimetry Observations of G034.43+00.24 MM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. J.; Gordon, Michael; Shenoy, Dinesh; Gehrz, R. D.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Krejny, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present 11.1 to 37.1 μm imaging observations of the very dense molecular cloud core MM1 in G034.43+00.24 using FORCAST on SOFIA and submillimeter (submm) polarimetry using SHARP on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We find that at the spatial resolution of SOFIA, the point-spread function (PSF) of MM1 is consistent with being a single source, as expected based on millimeter (mm) and submm observations. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of MM1 and MM2 have a warm component at the shorter wavelengths not seen in mm and submm SEDs. Examination of H(1.65 μm) stellar polarimetry from the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey shows that G034 is embedded in an external magnetic field aligned with the Galactic Plane. The SHARP polarimetry at 450 μm shows a magnetic field geometry in the vicinity of MM1 that does not line up with either the Galactic Plane or the mean field direction inferred from the CARMA interferometric polarization map of the central cloud core, but is perpendicular to the long filament in which G034 is embedded. The CARMA polarimetry does show evidence for grain alignment in the central region of the cloud core, and thus does trace the magnetic field geometry near the embedded Class 0 YSO. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart.

  12. Extended Radio Emission in MOJAVE Blazars: Challenges to Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Cooper, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    their parent population. It could also just be due to small number statistics. We find that the ratio of the radio core luminosity to the k-corrected optical luminosity (Rv ) appears to be a better indicator of orientation for this blazar sample than the traditionally used radio core prominence parameter (Rc ). Based on the assumption that the extended radio luminosity is affected by the kiloparsec-scale environment, we define the ratio of extended radio power to absolute optical magnitude (L ext/M abs) as a proxy for environmental effects. Trends with this parameter suggest that the parsec-scale jet speeds and the parsec-to-kiloparsec jet misalignments are not affected by the large-scale environment, but are more likely to depend upon factors intrinsic to the active galactic nucleus, or its local parsec-scale environment. The jet speeds could, for instance, be related to the black hole spins, while jet misalignments could arise due to the presence of binary black holes, or kicks imparted to black holes via black hole mergers, consistent with both radio morphologies resembling precessing jet models observed in some MOJAVE blazars and the signature of a 90° bump in the jet misalignment distribution, attributed to low-pitch helical parsec-scale jets in the literature. We suggest that some of the extremely misaligned MOJAVE blazar jets could be "hybrid" morphology sources, with an FRI jet on one side and an FRII jet on the other. It is tempting to speculate that environmental radio boosting (as proposed for Cygnus A) could be responsible for blurring the Fanaroff-Riley dividing line in the MOJAVE blazars, provided a substantial fraction of them reside in dense (cluster) environments.

  13. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-08-18

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules.

  14. Harmonic 'signatures' of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Blake-Coleman, B C; Hutchings, M J; Silley, P

    1994-01-01

    The frequency/amplitude effect of various microorganisms exposed to periodic (time varying) electric fields, when proximate to immersed electrodes, has been studied using a novel analytical instrument. The harmonic distribution, in complex signals caused by cells exposed to harmonic free waveforms and occupying part of the electrode/suspension interface volume, was shown to be almost entirely due to the change in the standing interfacial transfer function by the (dielectrically nonlinear) presence of cells. Thus, the characteristic interfacial non-linearity is viewed as variable, being uniquely modulated by the presence of particular cells in the interfacial region. Little can be attributed to bulk (far field) effects. The tendency for subtle (characteristic) signal distortion to occur as a function of particulate (cell or molecular) occupancy of the near electrode interfacial region under controlled current conditions leads to the method of sample characterisation by harmonic (Fourier) analysis. We report here, as a sequel to our original studies (Hutchings et al., 1993; Hutchings and Blake-Coleman, 1993), preliminary results of the harmonic analysis of microbial suspensions under controlled signal conditions using a three-electrode configuration. These data provide three-dimensional graphical representations producing harmonic 'surfaces' for various microorganisms. Thus, cell type differences are characterised by their 'harmonic signature'. The visual distinction provided by these 'surface' forming three-dimensional plots is striking and gives a convincing impression of the ability to identify and enumerate specific microorganisms by acquisition of cell-modulated electrode interfacial Fourier spectra. PMID:8060593

  15. Infrasound Rocket Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation reviews the work performed by our research group at the Geophysical Institute as we have applied the tools of infrasound research to rocket studies. This report represents one aspect of the effort associated with work done for the National Consortium for MASINT Research (NCMR) program operated by the National MASINT Office (NMO) of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Infrasound, the study of acoustic signals and their propagation in a frequency band below 15 Hz, enables an investigator to collect and diagnose acoustic signals from distant sources. Absorption of acoustic energy in the atmosphere decreases as the frequency is reduced. In the infrasound band signals can propagate hundreds and thousands of kilometers with little degradation. We will present an overview of signatures from rockets ranging from small sounding rockets such as the Black Brandt and Orion series to larger rockets such as Delta 2,4 and Atlas V. Analysis of the ignition transients provides information that can uniquely identify the motor type. After the rocket ascends infrasound signals can be used to characterize the rocket and identify the various events that take place along a trajectory such as staging and maneuvering. We have also collected information on atmospheric shocks and sonic booms from the passage of supersonic vehicles such as the shuttle. This review is intended to show the richness of the unique signal set that occurs in the low-frequency infrasound band.

  16. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  17. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-08-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules.

  18. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  19. UHECR: Signatures and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.

    2013-06-01

    The signatures of Ultra High Energy (E ≳ 1 EeV) proton propagation through CMB radiation are pair-production dip and GZK cutoff. The visible characteristics of these two spectral features are ankle, which is intrinsic part of the dip, beginning of GZK cutoff in the differential spectrum and E1/2 in integral spectrum. Measured by HiRes and Telescope Array (TA) these characteristics agree with theoretical predictions. However, directly measured mass composition remains a puzzle. While HiRes and TA detectors observe the proton-dominated mass composition, the data of Auger detector strongly evidence for nuclei mass composition becoming progressively heavier at energy higher than 4 EeV and reaching Iron at energy about 35 EeV. The models based on the Auger and HiRes/TA data are considered independently and classified using the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. The ankle cannot provide this transition. since data of all three detector at energy (1-3) EeV agree with pure proton composition (or at least not heavier than Helium). If produced in Galaxy these particles result in too high anisotropy. This argument excludes or strongly disfavours all ankle models with ankle energy Ea > 3 EeV. The calculation of elongation curves, Xmax(E), for different ankle models strengthens further this conclusion. Status of other models, the dip, mixed composition and Auger based models are discussed.

  20. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  1. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi

    2011-08-01

    We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

  2. A proposed neutral line signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxas, I.; Speiser, T. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    An identifying signature is proposed for the existence and location of the neutral line in the magnetotail. The signature, abrupt density, and temperature changes in the Earthtail direction, was first discovered in test particle simulations. Such temperature variations have been observed in ISEE data (Huang et. al. 1992), but their connection to the possible existence of a neutral line in the tail has not yet been established. The proposed signature develops earlier than the ion velocity space ridge of Martin and Speiser (1988), but can only be seen by spacecraft in the vicinity of the neutral line, while the latter can locate a neutral line remotely.

  3. Conceptual Background to Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsonby, J. E. B.

    2004-06-01

    The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) conceives the radio spectrum as primarily a resource for telecommunications. Indeed most applications of radio are for communications and other radio services, particularly the Radio Astronomy Service, are deemed to be `pretend'communication serviceas for spectrum amnagement purposes. The language of Radio Spectrum Management is permeated by the terminology ofcommunications, some derived from the physics of radio and some from aspects of information theory. This contribution touches on all the essential concepts of radiocommunications which the author thinks should be the common mental equipment of the Spectrum Manager. The fundamental capacity of a communication channel is discussed in terms of the degrees of freedom and bandwidth of a signal, and the signal to noise ratio. It is emphasized that an information bearing signal is inherently unpredictable, and must, at some level, be discontinuous. This has important consequences for the form of its power spectrum. The effect of inserting filters is discussed particularly with regard to constant amplitude signals and, in the context of non-linear power amplifiers, the phenomenon of`sideband recovery'. All the common generic forms of modulation are discussed including the very different case of `no-modulation' which applies in all forms of passive remote sensing. Whilst all are agreed that the radio spectrum should be used `efficiently', there is no quantitative measure of spectral efficiency which embraces all relevant aspects of spectral usage. These various aspects are dicussed. Finally a brief outline of some aspects of antennae are reviewed. It is pointed out that the recent introduction of so-called `active antennnae', which have properties unlike traditional passive antennae, has confused the interpretation of those ITU Radio Regulations which refer to antennae.

  4. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  5. Astrometry of southern radio sources.

    PubMed

    White, G L; Jauncey, D L; Harvey, B R; Savage, A; Gulkis, S; Preston, R A; Peterson, B A; Reynolds, J E; Nicolson, G D; Malin, D F

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogues. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarc-second radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  6. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  7. Retail applications of signature verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  8. Ballastic signature identification systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, A.; Hine, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are described of an attempt to establish a uniform procedure for documenting (recording) expended bullet signatures as effortlessly as possible and to build a comprehensive library of these signatures in a form that will permit the automated comparison of a new suspect bullet with the prestored library. The ultimate objective is to achieve a standardized format that will permit nationwide interaction between police departments, crime laboratories, and other interested law enforcement agencies.

  9. Color signatures in Amorsolo paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, Maricor N.; Palomero, Cherry May; Cruz, Larry; Yambao, Clod Marlan Krister; Dado, Julie Mae; Salvador-Campaner, Janice May

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a two-year project aimed at capturing quantifiable color signatures of oil paintings of Fernando Amorsolo, the Philippine's first National Artists. Color signatures are found by comparing CIE xy measurements of skin color in portraits and ground, sky and foliage in landscapes. The results are compared with results of visual examination and art historical data as well as works done by Amorsolo's contemporaries and mentors.

  10. Space-borne polarimetric SAR sensors or the golden age of radar polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, E.

    2010-06-01

    SAR Polarimetry represents an active area of research in Active Earth Remote Sensing. This interest is clearly supported by the fact that nowadays there exists, or there will exist in a very next future, a non negligible quantity of launched Polarimetric SAR Spaceborne sensors. The ENVISAT satellite, developed by ESA, was launched on March 2002, and was the first Spaceborne sensor offering an innovative dualpolarization Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) system operating at C-band. The second Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor is ALOS, a Japanese Earth-Observation satellite, developed by JAXA and was launched in January 2006. This mission includes an active L-band polarimetric radar sensor (PALSAR) whose highresolution data may be used for environmental and hazard monitoring. The third Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor is TerraSAR-X, a new German radar satellite, developed by DLR, EADS-Astrium and Infoterra GmbH, was launched on June 2007. This sensor carries a dual-polarimetric and high frequency X-Band SAR sensor that can be operated in different modes and offers features that were not available from space before. At least, the Polarimetric Spaceborne sensor, developed by CSA and MDA, and named RADARSAT-2 was launched in December 2007 The Radarsat program was born out the need for effective monitoring of Canada’s icy waters, and some Radarsat-2 capabilities that benefit sea- and river ice applications are the multi-polarization options that will improve ice-edge detection, ice-type discrimination and structure information. The many advances in these different Polarimetric Spaceborne platforms were developed to respond to specific needs for radar data in environmental monitoring applications around the world, like : sea- and river-ice monitoring, marine surveillance, disaster management, oil spill detection, snow monitoring, hydrology, mapping, geology, agriculture, soil characterisation, forestry applications (biomass, allometry, height…), urban mapping etc

  11. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  12. Selective polarization of dielectric materials under electromagnetic scattering at radio frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Huang, Shao Ying

    2016-08-01

    An analytical study of scattering between electromagnetic waves at radiofrequencies and the collective electromagnetic modes in dielectric solids which are generated as a result of transient polarization of the bound charges under non-equilibrium thermal interaction is presented. The fundamental observation is that the symmetry of frequency spectrum of electromagnetic modes is explicitly broken due to finite electrodynamic boundaries leading to dominance of selective modes. The near field radio scattering of the electromagnetic wave by the given dielectric material results in modulation of the existing electromagnetic modes, which lead to the generation of characteristic radio emission, having a specific radio signature of the given system.

  13. Multiple scattering of polarized light in atmosphere- ocean systems: Application to sensitivity analyses of aerosol polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Jacek

    1999-09-01

    Sunlight scattered by small particles in the atmosphere becomes partially polarized, the degree and state of which are sensitive to the physical and chemical properties of these particles. The high accuracy with which these polarization quantities can be measured causes space-borne polarimetry to be a promising remote sensing tool for retrieving tropospheric aerosols, but it also imposes strong requirements on the accuracy and efficiency of the methods used to numerically study such data. Light reflected by the lower atmospheric boundary may, in addition, become highly polarized, necessitating a careful error analysis of the latter scattering contribution to the remotely sensed signal. Part I of this work focusses, on the former requirements for an atmosphere-ocean system, and discusses an approach for treating scattering of light by water body, ocean surface, and atmosphere together in one method while employing numerically efficient techniques for each of these three components. Benchmark results are provided with an accuracy of 5 decimals for the Stokes vectors of scattering contributions to internal and external fields, and we discuss typical features seen in the bidirectional behaviour of the latter contributions. In Part II, we investigate uncertainties in the reflection properties of the ocean system and the resulting variation in degree of linear polarization observed from space. Three sources of uncertainty are identified: oceanic foam, the ocean surface roughness, and underwater light scattering. The magnitude of the latter two sources are derived from current remote sensing capabilities to retrieve the surface windspeed and oceanic pigment concentration, respectively. Simulations are carried out for the visible and near infrared part of the spectrum and two aerosol models. Our analyses indicate that the use of a priori information on the state of the ocean can provide enough constraints for aerosol polarimetry to be sufficiently accurate for climate

  14. RadioAstron space VLBI imaging of polarized radio emission in the high-redshift quasar 0642+449 at 1.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. P.; Gómez, J. L.; Bruni, G.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Anderson, J.; Bach, U.; Kraus, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Voytsik, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Polarization of radio emission in extragalactic jets at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution holds important clues for understanding the structure of the magnetic field in the inner regions of the jets and in close vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the centers of active galaxies. Aims: Space VLBI observations provide a unique tool for polarimetric imaging at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution and studying the properties of magnetic field in active galactic nuclei on scales of less than 104 gravitational radii. Methods: A space VLBI observation of high-redshift quasar TXS 0642+449 (OH 471), made at a wavelength of 18 cm (frequency of 1.6 GHz) as part of the early science programme (ESP) of the RadioAstron mission, is used here to test the polarimetric performance of the orbiting Space Radio Telescope (SRT) employed by the mission, to establish a methodology for making full Stokes polarimetry with space VLBI at 1.6 GHz, and to study the polarized emission in the target object on sub-milliarcsecond scales. Results: Polarization leakage of the SRT at 18 cm is found to be within 9% in amplitude, demonstrating the feasibility of high fidelity polarization imaging with RadioAstron at this wavelength. A polarimetric image of 0642+449 with a resolution of 0.8 mas (signifying an ~4 times improvement over ground VLBI observations at the same wavelength) is obtained. The image shows a compact core-jet structure with low (≈2%) polarization and predominantly transverse magnetic field in the nuclear region. The VLBI data also uncover a complex structure of the nuclear region, with two prominent features possibly corresponding to the jet base and a strong recollimation shock. The maximum brightness temperature at the jet base can be as high as 4 × 1013 K.

  15. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  16. Quantum messages with signatures forgeable in arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Choi, Jeong Woon; Jho, Nam-Su; Lee, Soojoon

    2015-02-01

    Even though a method to perfectly sign quantum messages has not been known, the arbitrated quantum signature scheme has been considered as one of the good candidates. However, its forgery problem has been an obstacle to the scheme becoming a successful method. In this paper, we consider one situation, which is slightly different from the forgery problem, that we use to check whether at least one quantum message with signature can be forged in a given scheme, although all the messages cannot be forged. If there are only a finite number of forgeable quantum messages in the scheme, then the scheme can be secured against the forgery attack by not sending forgeable quantum messages, and so our situation does not directly imply that we check whether the scheme is secure against the attack. However, if users run a given scheme without any consideration of forgeable quantum messages, then a sender might transmit such forgeable messages to a receiver and in such a case an attacker can forge the messages if the attacker knows them. Thus it is important and necessary to look into forgeable quantum messages. We show here that there always exists such a forgeable quantum message-signature pair for every known scheme with quantum encryption and rotation, and numerically show that there are no forgeable quantum message-signature pairs that exist in an arbitrated quantum signature scheme.

  17. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

  18. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

  19. Saturn's variable radio period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Gurnett, D. A.; Cecconi, B.

    Temporal modulations in radio emissions are often used to determine the rotation rate of the emitting body. The rotation period (presumably) of Jupiter's interior was established in this way [Burke et al., 1962] and has recently been refined by Higgins et al. [1997]. Rotation periods for the remainder of the outer planet gas giants were determined from Voyager planetary radio astronomy observations. Similar techniques have been applied to astrophysical objects, including pulsars, for which the radio period is assumed to be the rotation period of the neutron star. In 2001, however, this simple relation between the radio period and rotation period became suspect, at least for the case of Saturn. Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] reported that the radio period of Saturn had changed by as much as 1% from that determined by Voyager and, further, exhibited variations on time scales of years. More recently, Cassini observations indicate that the Saturn kilometric radiation is modulated with a period longer than that observed by Voyager and that this period is variable on a time scale of a year or less. The recent Higgins et al. result suggests that Jupiter's period is steady, within measurement accuracy. There are no additional measurements from Uranus or Neptune with which to look for time variations in their radio periods. For conservation of energy and angular momentum reasons, true variations of the rotation period of Saturn's deep interior are not believed to be a viable explanation for the variation in radio period, hence, it would appear that there is some disconnection of the radio period from the rotation period in the case of Saturn. One possible contributing factor may be that since Saturn's magnetic field is very accurately aligned with its rotational axis, there is no first-order beaming effect caused by the wobbling of the magnetic field, contrary to the situation at the other magnetized planets. Another explanation suggested by Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] and

  20. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  1. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Radio coverage statistics.

    PubMed

    Lynn, W

    1984-01-01

    The Clearinghouse on Development Communication surveyed 135 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America, for U.S.A.I.D., to determine the number of radio and television broadcast stations and receivers. Some of the data were obtained from the World Factbook, the World Radio and TV Handbook, and the World Radio and T.V. Facts and Figures, from 1979 to 1981. In those countries where stations are privately owned, audience surveys are often available. In 2 out of 3 developing countries, however, stations are government owned, and no such information is available. Numbers of receivers can sometimes be ascertained from receiver license applications. There is a need for more complete information on broadcast demographics, listening and viewing patterns by the community of world development program personnel.

  3. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  4. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  5. Visualizing phase transition behavior of dilute stimuli responsive polymer solutions via Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Amal; Chandel, Shubham; Ghosh, Nirmalya; De, Priyadarsi

    2015-09-15

    Probing volume phase transition behavior of superdiluted polymer solutions both micro- and macroscopically still persists as an outstanding challenge. In this regard, we have explored 4 × 4 spectral Mueller matrix measurement and its inverse analysis for excavating the microarchitectural facts about stimuli responsiveness of "smart" polymers. Phase separation behavior of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and pH responsive poly(N,N-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and their copolymers were analyzed in terms of Mueller matrix derived polarization parameters, namely, depolarization (Δ), diattenuation (d), and linear retardance (δ). The Δ, d, and δ parameters provided useful information on both macro- and microstructural alterations during the phase separation. Additionally, the two step action ((i) breakage of polymer-water hydrogen bonding and (ii) polymer-polymer aggregation) at the molecular microenvironment during the cloud point generation was successfully probed via these parameters. It is demonstrated that, in comparison to the present techniques available for assessing the hydrophobic-hydrophilic switch over of simple stimuli-responsive polymers, Mueller matrix polarimetry offers an important advantage requiring a few hundred times dilute polymer solution (0.01 mg/mL, 1.1-1.4 μM) at a low-volume format. PMID:26287499

  6. Optical diagnosis of dengue virus infected human blood using Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz

    2016-08-01

    Currently dengue fever diagnosis methods include capture ELISAs, immunofluorescence tests, and hemagglutination assays. In this study optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in the whole blood is presented utilizing Mueller matrix polarimetry. Mueller matrices of about 50 dengue viral infected and 25 non-dengue healthy blood samples were recorded utilizing light source from 500 to 700 nm with scanning step of 10 nm. Polar decomposition of the Mueller matrices for all the blood samples was performed that yielded polarization properties including depolarization, diattenuation, degree of polarization, retardance and optical activity, out of which, depolarization index clusters up the diseased and healthy in to different separate groups. The average depolarized light in the case of dengue infection in the whole blood at 500 nm is 18%, whereas for the healthy blood samples it is 13.5%. This suggests that depolarization index of polarized light at the wavelengths of 500, 510, 520, 530 and 540 nm, we find that in case of depolarization index values are higher for dengue viral infection as compared to normal samples. This technique can effectively be used for the characterization of the dengue virus infected at an early stage of disease.

  7. Sub-1% Electron Beam Polarimetry in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, David

    2015-10-01

    The electron beam polarization in experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab has been measured with a total uncertainty of dP / P < 0.7% at a beam energy of ~ 1 GeV. This was accomplished using two, high-precision electron beam polarimeters. The first device makes use of Møller scattering from atomic electrons polarized in a pure iron foil driven to magnetic saturation. The second uses polarized electron-photon (Compton) scattering from laser light stored in a low gain Fabry-Perot cavity. Data from both devices, as well as a direct comparison of the two will be shown. The polarization data that will be described were taken as part of the Qweak experiment in Hall C, which aimed to measure the polarization to better than 1%. Future experiments at Jefferson Lab will require knowledge of the polarization to 0.4% or better. In this talk, I will describe the lessons learned during the Qweak running and discuss prospects for improving the beam polarimetry precision to the 0.4% level.

  8. Looking inside jets: optical polarimetry as a probe of Gamma-Ray Bursts physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopac, D.; Mundell, C.

    2015-07-01

    It is broadly accepted that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered by accretion of matter by black holes, formed during massive stellar collapse, which launch ultra-relativistic, collimated outflows or jets. The nature of the progenitor star, the structure of the jet, and thus the underlying mechanisms that drive the explosion and provide collimation, remain some of the key unanswered questions. To approach these problems, and in particular the role of magnetic fields in GRBs, early time-resolved polarimetry is the key, because it is the only direct probe of the magnetic fields structure. Using novel fast RINGO polarimeter developed for use on the 2-m robotic optical Liverpool Telescope, we have made the first measurements of optical linear polarization of the early optical afterglows of GRBs, finding linear percentage polarization as high as 30% and, for the first time, making time-resolved polarization measurements. I will present the past 8 years of RINGO observations, discuss how the results fit into the GRB theoretical picture, and highlight recent data, in particular high-time resolution multi-colour optical photometry performed during the prompt GRB phase, which also provides some limits on polarization.

  9. Quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for monitoring fractal growth pattern of Bacillus thuringiensis bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K.

    2013-02-01

    It is of considerable current interest to develop various methods which help to understand and quantify the cellular association in growing bacterial colonies and is also important in terms of detection and identification of a bacterial species. A novel approach is used here to probe the morphological structural changes occurring during the growth of the bacterial colony of Bacillus thuringiensis under different environmental conditions (in normal nutrient agar, in presence of glucose - acting as additional nutrient and additional 3mM arsenate as additional toxic material). This approach combines the quantitative Mueller matrix polarimetry to extract intrinsic polarization properties and inverse analysis of the polarization preserving part of the light scattering spectra to determine the fractal parameter H (Hurst exponent) using Born approximation. Interesting differences are observed in the intrinsic polarization parameters and also in the Hurst exponent, which is a measurement of the fractality of a pattern formed by bacteria while growing as a colony. These findings are further confirmed with optical microscopic studies of the same sample and the results indicate a very strong and distinct dependence on the environmental conditions during growth, which can be exploited to quantify different bacterial species and their growth patterns.

  10. Diagnosing the Structure of the HD 163296 Protoplanetary Disk Via Coronagraphic Imaging Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Clampin, M.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Fukagawa, M.; Hines, D. C.; Katoh, E.; Whitney, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    Coronagraphic imaging polarimetry is a high contrast imaging technique which can diagnose both the spatial distribution and size distribution of dust grains which comprise primordial protoplanetary disks. It can therefore be a useful tool to test our understanding of how the structure of young disks evolves through the era of gas giant planet formation. We report our initial analysis of the H-band polarized and total intensity of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 163296, and characterize the morphology of the scattered light disk in the context of previous optical HST coronagraphic imagery. Our observations were obtained as part of a multi-epoch campaign designed to diagnose and correlate the behavior of the inner and outer regions of select protoplanetary disks. This campaign will help test recent suggestions (Sitko et al. 2008; Wisniewski et al. 2008) that that HD 163296 dis experiences the novel phenomenon of time-variable self-shadowing, whereby occasional changes in the scale height of the inner disk wall induces changes in the illumination of the outer disk.

  11. Phenological tracking og agricultural feilds investigated by using dual polarimetry tanDEM-X images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, S.; Motagh, M.; Arefi, H.; Nooryazdan, A.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing plays a key role in monitoring and assessing environmental changes. Because of its special imaging characteristics such as high-resolution, capabilities to obtain data in all weather conditions and sensitivity to geometrical and dielectric properties of the features, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology has become a powerful technique to detect small scale changes related to earth surface.SAR images contain the information of both phase and intensity in different modes like single, dual and full polarimetric states which are important in order to extract information about various targets. In this study we investigate phenological changes in an agricultural region using high-resolution X-band SAR data. The case study is located in Doroud region of Lorestan province, west of Iran. The purpose is to investigate the ability of copolar and interferometric coherence extracted from TanDEM-X dual polarimetry (HH/VV) in bistatic StripMap mode for tracking the phenological changes of crops during growing season. The data include 11 images acquired between 12.06.2012 and 02.11.2012 and 6 images acquired between 30.05.2013 and 04.08.2013 in the CoSSC format. Results show that copolar coherence is almost able to follow phenological changes but interferometric coherence has a near constant behaviour with fluctuations mainly related to baseline variations.

  12. The use of optical polarimetry as a noninvasive in vivo physiological glucose monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Anthony J.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2011-03-01

    There is a need to effectively and accurately monitor physiological glucose levels in individuals afflicted with diabetes mellitus. One promising noninvasive technique involves the use of optical polarimetry, in which the eye is commonly used as the sensing location. Since glucose is a chiral molecule, it has the ability to rotate plane polarized light by an amount that is proportional to glucose concentration. It has also been shown that glucose levels in the aqueous humor of the eye correlate well to those of blood. Therefore, we will report on an in vivo study that is conducted using a New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit model in conjunction with a custom developed Faradaybased optical polarimeter with sub-millidegree resolution. All animals used in this investigation were anesthetized with isoflurane and an insulin/dextrose protocol was used to control blood glucose concentration. A polarized laser light (632.8nm HeNe) signal was coupled through the anterior chamber of the eye using a custom designed ocular apparatus. System calibration was performed through measurement of the detected optical polarimetric signal and corresponding discrete blood glucose measurements taken with a handheld glucometer. Reference blood glucose samples were also measured using a YSI 2300+ glucose analyzer. The study results show that physiological glucose can be predicted with error levels on the order of 15%.

  13. Moøller polarimetry with polarized atomic hydrogen at MESA

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, P. Aguar; Aulenbacher, K.; Tyukin, V.

    2013-11-07

    A new generation of parity violation (PV) electron scattering experiments are planned to be carried out at the Institut für Kernphysik in Mainz. These experiments will be performed at low energies of 100-200 MeV using the new accelerator MESA (Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator). One of the main challenges of such experiments is to achieve an accuracy in beam polarization measurements that must be below 0.5%. This very high accuracy can be reached using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Mo/ller scattering. Electron spin-polarized atomic hydrogen can be stored at high densities of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}, over relatively long time periods, in a high magnetic field (8T) and at low temperatures (0.3K). The gradient force splits the ground state of the hydrogen into four states with different energies. Atoms in the low energy states are trapped in the strong magnetic field region whereas the high energy states are repelled and pumped away. The physics of ultra-cold atomic hydrogen in magnetic traps and the status of the Mainz Hydro-Mo/ller project will be presented.

  14. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT ), retardance (RT ), depolarization(ΔT ), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT , ΔL, RT ,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DTa nd DL showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues. PMID:26021717

  15. The Legacy of SCUPOL: 850 μm Imaging Polarimetry from 1997 to 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Brenda C.; McPhee, Christie A.; Fissel, Laura M.; Curran, Rachel L.

    2009-05-01

    SCUPOL, the polarimeter for SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, was the most prolific thermal imaging polarimeter built to date. Between 1997 and 2005, observations of 104 regions were made at 850 μm in the mapping mode. The instrument has produced ~50 refereed journal publications, and that number is still growing. We have systematically re-reduced all imaging polarimetry made in the standard "jiggle-map" mode from the SCUBA archive (2800+ individual observations) to produce a catalog of SCUPOL images and tables. We present the results of our analysis with figures and data tables produced for all 83 regions where significant polarization was detected. In addition, the reduced data cubes and data tables can be accessed online. In many cases, the data included in this paper have been previously published elsewhere. However, this publication includes unpublished data sets, in whole or in part, toward 39 regions, including cores in ρ Ophiuchus, Orion's OMC-2 region, several young stellar objects, and the galaxy M87.

  16. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT), retardance (RT), depolarization (ΔT), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT, ΔL, RT,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DT and D showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues.

  17. Broad Band Polarimetry with the Soft Gamma-ray Detector on board Hitomi (ASTRO-H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tsunefumi

    2016-07-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray polarization can arise from synchrotron emission in ordered magnetic fields, photon propagation in extremely strong magnetic fields and anisotropic Compton scattering. Polarization measurement provides vital information (often inaccessible even with the current best imaging instruments) on magnetic field and accretion disk around astrophysical objects, hence is a powerful probe to investigate emission mechanism and geometries of the sources. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board Hitomi (ASTRO-H) satellite is a highly-sensitive spectrometer in the 40-600 keV energy band. Since the SGD is a Si/CdTe Compton camera surrounded by a thick BGO shield, it also works as a very sensitive polarimeter in wide energy range. We have verified the SGD polarization measurement capability through extensive beam tests at a synchrotron facility SPring-8 in 2008 (Takeda et al. 2010) and 2015 (Katsuta et al. in preparation). In addition, we have examined possible sciences provided by the SGD polarimetry based on the expected performance (Coppi et al. 2014). In this contribution, we will present the SGD instrumentation, the latest beam test results and expected sciences provided by the polarization measurements. The results based on the initial observations will also be reported.

  18. A novel track reconstruction algorithm for photoelectric X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tenglin; Li, Hong; Feng, Hua; Zeng, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The key to the photoelectric X-ray polarimetry is the determination of the emission direction of photoelectrons. Due to the low mass of an electron, the ionization track is not straight and the useful information is stored only in its initial part where less energy is deposited. We present a new algorithm in order to reconstruct the electron track from a 2D track image that is blurred due to diffusion during drift in the gas chamber. The algorithm is based on the shortest path problem in graph theory, and a spatial energy filter is implemented as an improvement. Tested with simulated data, which approximate the real measurement with the gas pixel detector, we find that the new algorithm is able to trace the initial part of the track more closely and produce a higher degree of modulation than past algorithms, especially for long tracks created by high energy X-rays, in which cases the past algorithms may fail due to complicated track patterns.

  19. OPTICAL IMAGING POLARIMETRY OF THE LkCa 15 PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH SPHERE ZIMPOL

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Schmid, H. M.; Garufi, A.; Meyer, M. R.; and others

    2015-08-01

    We present the first optical (590–890 nm) imaging polarimetry observations of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the young solar analog LkCa 15, addressing a number of open questions raised by previous studies. We detect the previously unseen far side of the disk gap, confirming the highly off-centered scattered-light gap shape that was postulated from near-infrared imaging, at odds with the symmetric gap inferred from millimeter interferometry. Furthermore, we resolve the inner disk for the first time and trace it out to 30 AU. This new source of scattered light may contribute to the near-infrared interferometric signal attributed to the protoplanet candidate LkCa 15 b, which lies embedded in the outer regions of the inner disk. Finally, we present a new model for the system architecture of LkCa 15 that ties these new findings together. These observations were taken during science verification of SPHERE ZIMPOL and demonstrate this facility’s performance for faint guide stars under adverse observing conditions.

  20. Near-infrared Imaging Polarimetry of GGD 27: Circular Polarization and Magnetic Field Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Nagata, Tetsuya; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Saito, Hiro

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J, H, and K s bands was carried out for GGD 27 in the dark cloud Lynds 291. Details of an infrared reflection nebula associated with the optical nebulosity GGD 27 and the infrared nebula GGD 27 IRS are presented. Aperture photometry of 1263 point-like sources, detected in all three bands, was used to classify them based on a color–color diagram, and the linear polarization of several hundred sources was determined, with the latter used to map the magnetic field structure around GGD 27. This field, around GGD 27 IRS, appears to be associated with the extended CO outflow of IRAS 18162–2048 however, there are partly distorted or bent components in the field. The Chandrasekhar–Fermi method gives an estimate of the magnetic field strength as ˜90 μG. A region associated with GGD 27 IRS is discovered to have a circular polarization in the range of ˜2%–11% in the K s band. The circular polarization has an asymmetric positive/negative pattern and extends out to ˜ 120″ or 1.0 pc. The circular and linear polarization patterns are explained as resulting from a combination of dense inner and fainter outer lobes, suggesting episodic outflow.

  1. Near-IR Imaging Polarimetry toward a Bright-rimmed Cloud: Magnetic Field in SFO 74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Yaeko; Kwon, Jungmi; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ~90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ~30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  2. Determination of the pathological state of skin samples by optical polarimetry parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Buelta, L.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetry is widely known to involve a series of powerful optical techniques that characterize the polarization behaviour of a sample. In this work, we propose a method for applying polarimetric procedures to the characterization of biological tissues, in order to differentiate between healthy and pathologic tissues on a polarimetric basis. Usually, medical morphology diseases are diagnosed based on histological alterations of the tissue. The fact that these alterations will be reflected in polarization information highlights the suitability of polarimetric procedures for diagnostic purposes. The analysis is mainly focused on the depolarization properties of the media, as long as the internal structure strongly affects the polarization state of the light that interacts with the sample. Therefore, a method is developed in order to determine the correlation between pathological ultraestructural characteristics and the subsequent variations in the polarimetric parameters of the backscattered light. This study is applied to three samples of porcine skin corresponding to a healthy region, a mole, and a cancerous region. The results show that the method proposed is indeed an adequate technique in order to achieve an early, accurate and effective cancer detection.

  3. Pulsed Polarimetry and magnetic sensing on the Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Weber, T. E.; Taylor, S. F.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-10-01

    MSX is uniquely positioned to generate the conditions for collision-less magnetized supercritical shocks with Alvenic Mach numbers (MA) of the order 10 and higher. Significant operational strides have been made in forming plasmas over wide parameter ranges: (Te + Ti) of 10-200 eV, average neof 5-60×10+21 m-3, speeds up to 150 km/s and fields up to 1T with a highest plasma flow MA of 5 to date. The MSX plasma is unique in regards to large plasma size of 10 cm and average β higher than 0.8 making the FRC and the magnetized shock structure candidates for the application of Pulsed Polarimetry, a polarization sensitive Lidar technique. The shock dynamics are presently being investigated using internal probes, interferometry and imaging. Internal probe results and an assessment of the shock parameters will dictate the use of the UW pulsed polarimeter system in which internal ne, Teand B are to be measured. Recent results will be presented. Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Funding DE-FOA-0000755.

  4. Circular polarimetry reveals helical magnetic fields in the young stellar object HH 135-136.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Antonio; Lucas, Philip W; Hough, James H

    2007-11-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to have a vital role in regulating and shaping the flow of material onto and away from protostars during their initial mass accretion phase. It is becoming increasingly accepted that bipolar outflows are generated and collimated as material is driven along magnetic field lines and centrifugally accelerated off a rotating accretion disk. However, the precise role of the magnetic field is poorly understood and evidence for its shape and structure has not been forthcoming. Here we report imaging circular polarimetry in the near-infrared and Monte Carlo modelling showing that the magnetic field along the bipolar outflow of the HH 135-136 young stellar object is helical. The field retains this shape for large distances along the outflow, so the field structure can also provide the necessary magnetic pressure for collimation of the outflow. This result lends further weight to the hypothesis--central to any theory of star formation--that the outflow is an important instrument for the removal of high-angular-momentum material from the accretion disk, thereby allowing the central protostar to increase its mass.

  5. HIGH-CONTRAST NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING POLARIMETRY OF THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND RY TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L.; Kim, Hyosun; Chou, Mei-Yin; Hashimoto, Jun; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; Wisniewski, John; Henning, Thomas; Brandner, Wolfgang; Grady, Carol A.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Yoichi; Momose, Munetake; Mayama, Satoshi; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Abe, Lyu; and others

    2013-08-01

    We present near-infrared coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of RY Tau. The scattered light in the circumstellar environment was imaged at the H band at a high resolution ({approx}0.''05) for the first time, using Subaru/HiCIAO. The observed polarized intensity (PI) distribution shows a butterfly-like distribution of bright emission with an angular scale similar to the disk observed at millimeter wavelengths. This distribution is offset toward the blueshifted jet, indicating the presence of a geometrically thick disk or a remnant envelope, and therefore the earliest stage of the Class II evolutionary phase. We perform comparisons between the observed PI distribution and disk models with (1) full radiative transfer code, using the spectral energy distribution (SED) to constrain the disk parameters; and (2) monochromatic simulations of scattered light which explore a wide range of parameters space to constrain the disk and dust parameters. We show that these models cannot consistently explain the observed PI distribution, SED, and the viewing angle inferred by millimeter interferometry. We suggest that the scattered light in the near-infrared is associated with an optically thin and geometrically thick layer above the disk surface, with the surface responsible for the infrared SED. Half of the scattered light and thermal radiation in this layer illuminates the disk surface, and this process may significantly affect the thermal structure of the disk.

  6. High-Contrast Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the Protoplanetary Disk around RY Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L.; Hashimoto, Jun; Kim, Hyosun; Wisenewski, John; Henning, Thomas; Grady, Carol; Kandori, Ryo; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Chou, Mei-yin; Itoh, Yoichi; Momose, Mumetake; Mayama, Satoshi; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Kwon, Jungmi; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Egner, Sebastian E.; McElwain, Michael W.; Serabyn, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We present near-infrared coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of RY Tau. The scattered light in the circumstellar environment was imaged at H-band at a high resolution (approx. 0.05) for the first time, using Subaru-HiCIAO. The observed polarized intensity (PI) distribution shows a butterfly-like distribution of bright emission with an angular scale similar to the disk observed at millimeter wavelengths. This distribution is offset toward the blueshifted jet, indicating the presence of a geometrically thick disk or a remnant envelope, and therefore the earliest stage of the Class II evolutionary phase. We perform comparisons between the observed PI distribution and disk models with: (1) full radiative transfer code, using the spectral energy distribution (SED) to constrain the disk parameters; and (2) monochromatic simulations of scattered light which explore a wide range of parameters space to constrain the disk and dust parameters. We show that these models cannot consistently explain the observed PI distribution, SED, and the viewing angle inferred by millimeter interferometry. We suggest that the scattered light in the near-infrared is associated with an optically thin and geometrically thick layer above the disk surface, with the surface responsible for the infrared SED. Half of the scattered light and thermal radiation in this layer illuminates the disk surface, and this process may significantly affect the thermal structure of the disk.

  7. Correlation between frequency doubling technology perimetry and scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma suspects and glaucomatous eyes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Hyun; Hong, Hunei; Koo, Hee Jo; Yang, Sung-jae; Tchah, Hungwon; Kook, Michael S

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the frequency doubling technology (FDT) screening algorithm and parapapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in the eyes of glaucoma suspects and patients with open angle glaucoma. FDT C20-1 screening program and a scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) system (GDx-NFA) was used to assess 53 glaucomatous eyes, 53 glaucoma suspects and 36 normal control eyes. In glaucomatous eyes, there were correlations between the FDT the screening algorithm and RNFL retardation values in several polarimetric indices, most significantly "inferior thickness" (r = -0.321, P = 0.029). In the eyes of glaucoma suspects, however, we observed no correlation between the FDT results and RNFL retardation values (r = 0.080, P > 0.05, "inferior thickness"). In glaucomatous eyes, the abnormal scores obtained with FDT screening program correlated negatively with RNFL retardation values, as measured by SLP. Despite poor correlation between the FDT abnormal score and RNFL retardation value in glaucoma suspects, detection of abnormality using the FDT screening protocol may aid in the assessment of early glaucomatous structural damage. PMID:15635821

  8. Dual differential polarimetry. A technique to recover polarimetric information from dual-polarization observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Muller, S.

    2016-09-01

    Current mm/submm interferometers, like the Atacama Large mm/submm Array (ALMA), use receivers that register the sky signal in a linear polarization basis. In the case of observations performed in full-polarization mode (where the cross-correlations are computed among all the polarization channels) it is possible to reconstruct the full-polarization brightness distribution of the observed sources, as long as a proper calibration of delay offsets and leakage among polarization channels can be performed. Observations of calibrators, preferably with some linear polarization, with a good parallactic angle coverage are usually needed for such a calibration. In principle, dual-polarization observations only allow us to recover the Stokes I intensity distribution of the sources, regardless of the parallactic angle coverage of the observations. In this paper, we present a novel technique of dual differential polarimetry that makes it possible to obtain information related to the full-polarization brightness distribution of the observed sources from dual-polarization observations. This technique is inspired in the Earth-rotation polarization synthesis and can be applied even to sources with complex structures.

  9. OH/IR stars near the Galactic Center: Pulsation periods, luminosities, and polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Mcgregor, Peter J.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Lawrence, Geoffrey F.

    1994-01-01

    17 stars in the direction of the Galactic Center, 15 of which are OH/IR stars, have been monitored at infrared wavelengths over a period of nearly eight years. Pulsation periods, bolometric luminosities, and light curves for 14 OH/IR stars are presented. The Galactic Center OH/IR stars range in luminosity between M(sub Bol) = -4.5 to M(sub Bol) = -6, implying main sequence progenitors with masses less than 3 solar mass. When compared to optically visible long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with similar bolometric luminosities, the Galactic Center OH/IR stars have pulsation periods on average 30% longer. This shift to longer periods is consistent with the current picture of late asymptotic giant branch evolution, placing the OH/IR stars in a phase immediately following the optically visible Mira variable phase during which the star dramatically increases its mass loss rate, becoming invisible at optical wavelength. Infrared polarimetry of 11 of the stars is also presented. The polarization for all of the stars is consistent with purely interstellar polarization, with little evidence for a significant intrinsic component. When compared to OH/IR stars in the galactic plane, the Galactic Center OH/IR stars appear similar in photometric characteristics, except none of the Galactic Center OH/IR stars shows the extremely thick dust shells or very high intrinsic polarization found in the more extreme galactic plane OH/IR stars.

  10. THE LEGACY OF SCUPOL: 850 {mu}m IMAGING POLARIMETRY FROM 1997 TO 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda C.; McPhee, Christie A.; Fissel, Laura M.; Curran, Rachel L.

    2009-05-15

    SCUPOL, the polarimeter for SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, was the most prolific thermal imaging polarimeter built to date. Between 1997 and 2005, observations of 104 regions were made at 850 {mu}m in the mapping mode. The instrument has produced {approx}50 refereed journal publications, and that number is still growing. We have systematically re-reduced all imaging polarimetry made in the standard 'jiggle-map' mode from the SCUBA archive (2800+ individual observations) to produce a catalog of SCUPOL images and tables. We present the results of our analysis with figures and data tables produced for all 83 regions where significant polarization was detected. In addition, the reduced data cubes and data tables can be accessed online. In many cases, the data included in this paper have been previously published elsewhere. However, this publication includes unpublished data sets, in whole or in part, toward 39 regions, including cores in {rho} Ophiuchus, Orion's OMC-2 region, several young stellar objects, and the galaxy M87.

  11. Moøller polarimetry with polarized atomic hydrogen at MESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolomé, P. Aguar; Aulenbacher, K.; Tyukin, V.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of parity violation (PV) electron scattering experiments are planned to be carried out at the Institut für Kernphysik in Mainz. These experiments will be performed at low energies of 100-200 MeV using the new accelerator MESA (Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator). One of the main challenges of such experiments is to achieve an accuracy in beam polarization measurements that must be below 0.5%. This very high accuracy can be reached using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Mo/ller scattering. Electron spin-polarized atomic hydrogen can be stored at high densities of 1016 cm-2, over relatively long time periods, in a high magnetic field (8T) and at low temperatures (0.3K). The gradient force splits the ground state of the hydrogen into four states with different energies. Atoms in the low energy states are trapped in the strong magnetic field region whereas the high energy states are repelled and pumped away. The physics of ultra-cold atomic hydrogen in magnetic traps and the status of the Mainz Hydro-Mo/ller project will be presented.

  12. Determination of cloud coverage of Earth-like exoplanets by polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Stam, Daphne M.

    2016-10-01

    The properties of clouds in atmospheres of exoplanets will play a key role in the processes determining their radiative balance and climate.They also complicate the detection of chemical species in the atmospheres by flattening the spectra or by creating degeneracies between observables (Kitzmann et al. 2011, Line and Parmentier 2016).Polarimetry promises to be a powerful tool to detect and study exoplanets (Stam et al. 2004). The polarisation of the light scattered by the atmospheres of those planets contains a lot of information about the vertical structure of the atmosphere and about the composition of the clouds (Karalidi et al. 2012) and has already been very successful in the retrieval of atmospheric properties of Venus (Rossi et al. 2015, 2016 in prep).We will show that the degree of polarization of the light scattered by a cloudy exoplanet can be used to discriminate between different types of cloud coverage and to quantify the amount of cloud coverage on the planetary scale. We simulated the disk-integrated polarization of light scattered by exoplanets with various patchy cloud patterns, subsolar clouds and polar cusps. We show that flux and polarization can be used to differentiate between patchy and polar clouds. Observations at various wavelengths in the visible range and of different Stokes parameters would allow to differentiate between cloud coverage and cloud top altitudes.We also propose an observational strategy that could help to retrieve orbital parameters and percentage of cloud coverage with minor ambiguities.

  13. The inner environment of Z Canis Majoris: High-contrast imaging polarimetry with NaCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Perez, S.; Dougados, C.; de Boer, J.; Ménard, F.; Casassus, S.; Schreiber, M. R.; Cieza, L. A.; Caceres, C.; Girard, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Z CMa is a binary composed of an embedded Herbig Be and an FU Ori class star separated by ~100 au. Observational evidence indicates a complex environment in which each star has a circumstellar disk and drives a jet, and the whole system is embedded in a large dusty envelope. Aims: We aim to probe the circumbinary environment of Z CMa in the inner 400 au in scattered light. Methods: We use high-contrast imaging polarimetry with VLT/NaCo at the H and Ks bands. Results: The central binary is resolved in both bands. The polarized images show three bright and complex structures: a common dust envelope, a sharp extended feature previously reported in direct light, and an intriguing bright clump located 0.3 arcsec south of the binary, which appears spatially connected to the sharp extended feature. Conclusions: We detect orbital motion when compared to previous observations, and report a new outburst driven by the Herbig star. Our observations reveal the complex inner environment of Z CMa in unprecedented detail and contrast. Based on observations made with the VLT, program 094.C-0416(A).

  14. Imaging of skin surface architecture with out of plane polarimetry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chue-Sang, Joseph; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of skin surface topography is of great importance when establishing environmental and age related skin damage. Furthermore an effective treatment protocol cannot be established without a quantitative measuring tool that is able to establish significant improvement in skin texture. We utilized an out-of-plane polarimeter for the characterization of skin surface profile non-invasively. The system consists of an imaging Stokes vector polarimeter where the light source and imaging apparatus are arranged at an angle equal to forty degrees with respect to the tissue normal. The light source is rotated at various azimuth angles about the tissue normal. For each position of the incident beam the principal angle of polarization is calculated. This parameter relates indirectly to surface profile and architecture. The system was used to image the forehead and hands of healthy volunteers between eighteen and sixty years of age. A clear separation appeared among different age groups, establishing out-of-plane polarimetry as a promising technique for skin topography quantification.

  15. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  16. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  17. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  18. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  19. A Cosmic Train Wreck: JVLA Radio Observations of the HST Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Connor; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Ogrean, Georgiana A.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Kraft, Ralph P.; Dawson, William; Brüggen, Marcus; Roediger, Elke; Bulbul, Esra; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy cluster mergers observed in the HST Frontier Fields represent some of the most energetic events in the Universe. Major cluster mergers leave distinct signatures in the ICM in the form of shocks, turbulence, and diffuse cluster radio sources. These diffuse radio sources, so-called radio relics and halos, provide evidence for the acceleration of relativistic particles and the presence of large scale magnetic fields in the ICM. Observations of these halos and relics allow us to (i) study the physics of particle acceleration and its relation with shocks and turbulence in the ICM and (ii) constrain the dynamical evolution of the merger eventsWe present Jansky Very Large Array 1-4 GHz observations of the Frontier cluster Abell 2744. We confirm the presence of the known giant radio halo and radio relic via our deep radio images. Owing to the much greater sensitivity of the JVLA compared to previous observations, we are able to detect a previously unobserved long Mpc-size filament of synchrotron emission to the south west of the cluster core. We also present a radio spectral index image of the diffuse cluster emission to test the origin of the radio relic and halo, related to the underlying particle acceleration mechanism. Finally, we carry out a search for radio emission from the 'jellyfish' galaxies in A2744 to estimate their star formation rate. These highly disturbed galaxies are likely influenced by the cluster merger event, although the precise origin of these galaxies is still being debated.

  20. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Order 1. On March 17, 2005, the Commission adopted the Cognitive Radio Report and Order, 70 FR 23032... Memorandum Opinion and Order (MO&O), 72 FR 31190, June 6, 2007, which responded to two petitions filed in... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY:...

  1. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  2. No Shock Across Part of a Radio Relic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrean, Georgiana; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus; Simionescu, Aurora; Jones, Christine; Bonafede, Annalisa; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.

    2016-06-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale, steep-spectrum synchrotron sources in the periphery of merging galaxy clusters, which are produced by particle acceleration at low-Mach number (M<3) shock waves. As expected, signatures of shocks have been found across the full length of all the relics studied to date. However, archival Chandra and XMM observations have revealed a possible exception in the merging galaxy cluster ZwCl 2341.1+0000. The cluster, at z=0.27, hosts two radio relics and a central, faint, filamentary radio structure. In the archival X-ray data, the density discontinuity near the SE relic appears to span an arc shorter than the arc spanned by the relic. This startling result is in apparent contradiction with our current understanding of the origin of radio relics.We present results from recently-completed deep Chandra and VLA observations of the cluster. These observations reveal several merging subclusters, and allow a detailed study of the connection between the radio relics and the shocks in ZwCl 2341.1+0000. We discuss the complex merger scenario that triggered the shock waves, and the implications that the physical properties of the shocks have on our understanding of particle acceleration in merging clusters.

  3. An Imaging Study of a Complex Solar Coronal Radio Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Wang, B.; Kong, X. L.

    2016-08-01

    Solar coronal radio bursts are enhanced radio emission excited by energetic electrons accelerated during solar eruptions. Studying these bursts is important for investigating the origin and physical mechanism of energetic particles and further diagnosing coronal parameters. Earlier studies suffered from a lack of simultaneous high-quality imaging data of the radio burst and the eruptive structure in the inner corona. Here we present a study on a complex solar radio eruption consisting of a type II burst and three reversely drifting type III bursts, using simultaneous EUV and radio imaging data. It is found that the type II burst is closely associated with a propagating and evolving CME-driven EUV shock structure, originated initially at the northern shock flank and later transferred to the top part of the shock. This source transfer is coincident with the presence of shock decay and enhancing signatures observed at the corresponding side of the EUV front. The electron energy accelerated by the shock at the flank is estimated to be ˜0.3 c by examining the imaging data of the fast-drifting herringbone structure of the type II burst. The reverse-drifting type III sources are found to be within the ejecta and correlated with a likely reconnection event therein. The implications for further observational studies and relevant space weather forecasting techniques are discussed.

  4. Prism beamswitch for radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Ulich, B L

    1978-12-01

    A dielectric prism and switching mechanism have been constructed for beamswitching a Cassegrain radio telescope. Spatially extended radio sources may be mapped without significant confusion utilizing the sensitivity and stability inherent in the conventional Dicke radiometer.

  5. Measurement of sniper infrared signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Bieszczad, G.

    2009-09-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of sniper IR signature measurements. Description of particular signatures for sniper and background in typical scenarios has been presented. We take into consideration sniper activities in open area as well as in urban environment. The measurements were made at field test ground. High precision laboratory measurements were also performed. Several infrared cameras were used during measurements to cover all measurement assumptions. Some of the cameras are measurement class devices with high accuracy and speed. The others are microbolometer cameras with FPA detector similar to those used in real commercial counter-sniper systems. The registration was made in SWIR and LWIR spectral bands simultaneously. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Exemplary sniper IR signatures for typical situation were presented.

  6. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  7. Materials with controllable signature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, O.; Holmberg, B.; Karlsson, T.; Savage, S.

    1995-02-01

    We have in this report considered some types of material with potential for use in signature control of structures. The material types selected for inclusion in this study were electrically conductive polymers, fullerenes, nanostructured materials and Langmuir-Blodgett films. To control the signature of a structure in real time it must be possible to vary the material emissivity, structural transmission, and reflection or absorption of electromagnetic radiation in the relevant wavelength region. This may be achieved by changes in temperature, pressure, electrical or magnetic field or by the concentration of a chemical substance within the material. It is concluded that it is feasible to develop electrically conductive polymeric materials with controllable properties for practical signature control application within 5 to 10 years.

  8. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  9. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10(-16) Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  10. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  11. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ˜  10-16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  12. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10(-16) Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields. PMID:27243368

  13. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak  ∼  10‑16 Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, including current constraints from Planck, are discussed. After recombination, primordial magnetic fields could strongly influence structure formation, especially on dwarf galaxy scales. The resulting signatures on reionization, the redshifted 21 cm line, weak lensing and the Lyman-α forest are outlined. Constraints from radio and γ-ray astronomy are summarized. Astrophysical batteries and the role of dynamos in reshaping the primordial field are briefly considered. The review ends with some final thoughts on primordial magnetic fields.

  14. Community Radio in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Broadcasting Corp., Ottawa (Ontario).

    Results are presented of a survey of 20 community radio organizations operating in Canada. For each of the 20 agencies, information is provided relating to: (1) the name and address of the organization; (2) the name and population of the community served; (3) the station's call letters, frequency, and power; (4) the date of the station's license;…

  15. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  16. Educational Broadcasting--Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahamed, Uvais; Grimmett, George

    This manual is intended for those who must conduct educational radio broadcasting training courses in Asia-Pacific countries without the resources of experienced personnel, as well as for individuals to use in self-learning situations. The selection of material has been influenced by the need to use broadcasting resources effectively in programs…

  17. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  18. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  19. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  20. Telling It by Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milander, Henry M.

    1975-01-01

    Olympic College purchased eight one-minute advertising spots per day for use seven days a week at a local independent radio station. Ten sample spots are presented. This economical approach was successful in increasing over-all enrollment and the number of FTE students; it also attracted many adults to the college. (DC)

  1. A Radio Station Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geva, Edna

    2002-01-01

    Describes a radio program in an English-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom in Israel. Classrooms of English students listen carefully to daily broadcasts, waiting to solve the brain teaser. Personal messages and catchy music follow the program. The project has encouraged students to use English actively and purposefully. Evaluation of the broadcasts…

  2. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  3. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  4. Ballistic Signature Identification System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first phase of a research project directed toward development of a high speed automatic process to be used to match gun barrel signatures imparted to fired bullets was documented. An optical projection technique has been devised to produce and photograph a planar image of the entire signature, and the phototransparency produced is subjected to analysis using digital Fourier transform techniques. The success of this approach appears to be limited primarily by the accuracy of the photographic step since no significant processing limitations have been encountered.

  5. The Nicaragua Radio Mathematics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Barbara

    The Radio Mathematics Project was funded by the Agency for International Development to design, implement, and evaluate, in conjunction with personnel of a developing country, a system for teaching primary-grade mathematics by radio. In July 1974, a project in Nicaragua began with a series of radio presentations, each followed by 20 minutes of…

  6. Ham Radio is Mir Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students communicated with U.S. and Russian astronauts via ham radio while they were in orbit on the space station Mir. Gives suggestions for other ham radio classroom activities as well as names of organizations, publications, and grant programs that teachers can access to help in bring ham radio into their…

  7. Writing the Instructional Radio Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Fossard, Esta

    This guide was developed for script writers on the Radio Language Arts Project, which was designed to develop, implement, and test the effectiveness of an instructional radio system to teach English as a second language at the primary school level in Kenya. The project was planned to produce a radio-based, English language program with…

  8. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  9. The LOFAR radio environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; van Diepen, G.; Martinez-Ruby, O.; Labropoulos, P.; Brentjens, M. A.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Jelić, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mellema, G.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R. F.; Schaye, J.; Vedantham, H.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H.; Conway, J.; de Vos, M.; Dettmar, R. J.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Frieswijk, W.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J. D.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Norden, M.; Paas, H.; Pandey, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Schoenmakers, A. P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; van Ardenne, A.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A. P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This paper discusses the spectral occupancy for performing radio astronomy with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), with a focus on imaging observations. Methods: We have analysed the radio-frequency interference (RFI) situation in two 24-h surveys with Dutch LOFAR stations, covering 30-78 MHz with low-band antennas and 115-163 MHz with high-band antennas. This is a subset of the full frequency range of LOFAR. The surveys have been observed with a 0.76 kHz/1 s resolution. Results: We measured the RFI occupancy in the low and high frequency sets to be 1.8% and 3.2% respectively. These values are found to be representative values for the LOFAR radio environment. Between day and night, there is no significant difference in the radio environment. We find that lowering the current observational time and frequency resolutions of LOFAR results in a slight loss of flagging accuracy. At LOFAR's nominal resolution of 0.76 kHz and 1 s, the false-positives rate is about 0.5%. This rate increases approximately linearly when decreasing the data frequency resolution. Conclusions: Currently, by using an automated RFI detection strategy, the LOFAR radio environment poses no perceivable problems for sensitive observing. It remains to be seen if this is still true for very deep observations that integrate over tens of nights, but the situation looks promising. Reasons for the low impact of RFI are the high spectral and time resolution of LOFAR; accurate detection methods; strong filters and high receiver linearity; and the proximity of the antennas to the ground. We discuss some strategies that can be used once low-level RFI starts to become apparent. It is important that the frequency range of LOFAR remains free of broadband interference, such as DAB stations and windmills.

  10. Software-defined radar and waveforms for studying micro-Doppler signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baokun; Chen, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of software defined radar (SDR) to analyze the micro-Doppler signatures. The first SDR we use is based on the Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP) and GNU Radio, and another SDR which has several operation modes is based on field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). Typically, the USRP-based SDR is not optimized for radar applications due to its narrow bandwidth and time-varying additional delay caused by USRP components and operating system. The FPGA-based SDR is more suitable for applications where high-resolution range information is required. Our studies indicate that both of the SDR systems are capable of producing the micro-Doppler signatures. System design challenges and measurement results will be discussed in detail.

  11. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  12. High-order polarization mode crosstalk effect: a calibration scheme of white light-based optical coherence domain polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bing; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jianzhong; Liang, Shuai; Yu, Zhangjun; Yuan, Yonggui; Peng, Feng; Zhou, Ai; Zhang, Yu; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    We propose a calibration scheme of the white light interferometer based optical coherence domain polarimetry (OCDP), which could be used to measure the ultra-weak polarization mode crosstalk (PMC) or the ultra-high polarization extinction ratio (PER) of different polarization optical devices. The calibration depends on the first and second order PMC effect of different polarization devices in series. The first and second PMCs between 0 and -90dB, established by five pieces of polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) and a Y-waveguide, is used to prove its feasibility.

  13. Rapid wide-field Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging based on four photoelastic modulators with no moving parts.

    PubMed

    Alali, Sanaz; Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, I Alex

    2016-03-01

    A new polarimetry method is demonstrated to image the entire Mueller matrix of a turbid sample using four photoelastic modulators (PEMs) and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, with no moving parts. Accurate wide-field imaging is enabled with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) optical gating technique and an evolutionary algorithm (EA) that optimizes imaging times. This technique accurately and rapidly measured the Mueller matrices of air, polarization elements, and turbid phantoms. The system should prove advantageous for Mueller matrix analysis of turbid samples (e.g., biological tissues) over large fields of view, in less than a second. PMID:26974110

  14. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viezzer, E.; Dux, R.; Dunne, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line Dα. The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  15. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  16. A real-time fast radio burst: polarization detection and multiwavelength follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Barsdell, B. R.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bian, F.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Caleb, M.; Champion, D.; Chandra, P.; Da Costa, G.; Delvaux, C.; Flynn, C.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jameson, A.; Johnston, S.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Keane, E. F.; Keller, S.; Kocz, J.; Kramer, M.; Leloudas, G.; Malesani, D.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Ng, C.; Ofek, E. O.; Perley, D. A.; Possenti, A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Shen, Yue; Stappers, B.; Tisserand, P.; van Straten, W.; Wolf, C.

    2015-02-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the most tantalizing mysteries of the radio sky; their progenitors and origins remain unknown and until now no rapid multiwavelength follow-up of an FRB has been possible. New instrumentation has decreased the time between observation and discovery from years to seconds, and enables polarimetry to be performed on FRBs for the first time. We have discovered an FRB (FRB 140514) in real-time on 2014 May 14 at 17:14:11.06 UTC at the Parkes radio telescope and triggered follow-up at other wavelengths within hours of the event. FRB 140514 was found with a dispersion measure (DM) of 562.7(6) cm-3 pc, giving an upper limit on source redshift of z ≲ 0.5. FRB 140514 was found to be 21 ± 7 per cent (3σ) circularly polarized on the leading edge with a 1σ upper limit on linear polarization <10 per cent. We conclude that this polarization is intrinsic to the FRB. If there was any intrinsic linear polarization, as might be expected from coherent emission, then it may have been depolarized by Faraday rotation caused by passing through strong magnetic fields and/or high-density environments. FRB 140514 was discovered during a campaign to re-observe known FRB fields, and lies close to a previous discovery, FRB 110220; based on the difference in DMs of these bursts and time-on-sky arguments, we attribute the proximity to sampling bias and conclude that they are distinct objects. Follow-up conducted by 12 telescopes observing from X-ray to radio wavelengths was unable to identify a variable multiwavelength counterpart, allowing us to rule out models in which FRBs originate from nearby (z < 0.3) supernovae and long duration gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Topological Signatures for Population Admixture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Topological Signatures for Population AdmixtureDeniz Yorukoglu1, Filippo Utro1, David Kuhn2, Saugata Basu3 and Laxmi Parida1* Abstract Background: As populations with multi-linear transmission (i.e., mixing of genetic material from two parents, say) evolve over generations, the genetic transmission...

  18. Graph signatures for visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pak Chung; Foote, Harlan; Chin, George; Mackey, Patrick; Perrine, Ken

    2006-01-01

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain data sets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization, but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper.

  19. Invisibly Sanitizable Digital Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kunihiko; Hanaoka, Goichiro; Imai, Hideki

    A digital signature does not allow any alteration of the document to which it is attached. Appropriate alteration of some signed documents, however, should be allowed because there are security requirements other than the integrity of the document. In the disclosure of official information, for example, sensitive information such as personal information or national secrets is masked when an official document is sanitized so that its nonsensitive information can be disclosed when it is requested by a citizen. If this disclosure is done digitally by using the current digital signature schemes, the citizen cannot verify the disclosed information because it has been altered to prevent the leakage of sensitive information. The confidentiality of official information is thus incompatible with the integrity of that information, and this is called the digital document sanitizing problem. Conventional solutions such as content extraction signatures and digitally signed document sanitizing schemes with disclosure condition control can either let the sanitizer assign disclosure conditions or hide the number of sanitized portions. The digitally signed document sanitizing scheme we propose here is based on the aggregate signature derived from bilinear maps and can do both. Moreover, the proposed scheme can sanitize a signed document invisibly, that is, no one can distinguish whether the signed document has been sanitized or not.

  20. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  1. Imaging polarimetry of comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 main fragments during its 2006 apparition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    We have observed the dust ejected by parts of the nucleus (so-called fragments or components) of comet 73 P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 during seven consecutive nights from 2006, April 27 to May 3 by imaging polarimetry using the 0.8 m telescope at OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France). Three fragments were observed, B and C main fragments on all nights and G fragment on two nights at 24 h interval. Fragment C, which almost behaves as a normal comet, presents some night-to-night evolution on polarization maps together with some sunward-jets morphology. Fragment B, as noticed by numerous observers, continues to fragment, with clues to the presence of large secondary fragments, tailward on the intensity images; an increase of activity is noticed on May 2. Jets and fans are observed sunward, with a larger extension in fragment C than in B. Fragment G is fainter and, as fragment B, it continues to fragment. A short sunward jet is detected on the rotational gradient image together with an important tailward structure. The integrated polarization for the two main fragments is typical of polarization of high-Pmax comets. An important evolution is observed from night-to-night on the polarization maps. Fragment C presents, in two nights at 48 h interval, a lower polarization in the inner coma, neither observed in the intermediate night nor later. A high polarization is also observed on the two sides of the lower polarization regions. In fragment B, the regions around the secondary fragments have a higher polarization than the surrounding coma, They are easily detected in the treated intensity images. As usually, the polarization increases when the phase angle increases. Numerous observers have found similar chemical compositions for the two main fragments together with differences in their optical properties, suggesting heterogeneities in the physical properties during the aggregation of the original nucleus and/or changes after the ejection of dust particles.

  2. High-resolution birefringence imaging in three-dimensional stressed models by fourier polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Berezhna, S; Berezhnyy, I; Takashi, M

    2001-10-01

    Recently several polarimetric techniques have been suggested, designed deliberately for automatic whole-field birefringence imaging in photoelastic models with essentially three-dimensional stresses. In general, these techniques are feasible for mapping three optical parameters that determine birefringence in a given case. However, the difficulty in attaining a high level of data accuracy over the whole image persists. There remains a problem of precise imaging in regions where the mutual interference of three given parameters inevitably causes accuracy deterioration. We show how to correct such imperfections in an imaging polarizer-sample-analyzer (PSA) Fourier polarimetry technique, as suggested earlier [Appl. Opt. 41, 644 (2001)]. The given technique (a method developed so that it maps the phase, the azimuth, and the ellipticity angles of an elliptic retarder) particularly fails to provide precise imaging in regions where the phase is either close to null or approaches pi-multiple values and in intervals where the ellipticity angle falls into the proximity of ?pi/4 values. These drawbacks can be successfully overcome by incorporation of a compensator into a PSA polarimeter arrangement. Although use of a compensator in the polarimeter makes the original technique more complicated, we demonstrate that the compensator allows two important issues to be resolved. First, it provides precise imaging for each of three optical parameters through the whole accessible intervals of the parameters regardless of the absolute value of the parameter. In addition, it gives a sign of phase that remains undefined in the PSA techniques. Theoretical considerations are presented and are followed by experimental data that illustrate the improved accuracy capabilities of the compensator-enhanced technique. PMID:18364770

  3. Selective optical scattering characterisation of tissue malignancy using Mueller matrix polarimetry: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathima, Adeeba; Sujatha, N.

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative Mueller polarimetry optically characterizes a medium and is reflected upon by the ultrastructural changes in it. Tissue morphology changes occur during advent of diseases like cancer neoplasia. This alters the Mueller matrix characterizing the tissue as an optical element. The nucleus size undergoes an approximate doubling during the development of cancer. Cell crowding during cancer increases the number density of the nuclei per unit volume. Modeling the cell nuclei as main scattering centers, a systematic computational study on how Mueller matrix elements vary for an increase in scatterer size and number density is performed. Simulation on polarized light transport of wavelength 633nm through a slab of size 3 mm comprising of spherical scatterers in a medium of refractive index 1.33 is carried out. Light propagation is modeled using Monte Carlo method and meridian plane method is adopted for tracking the polarization state change. The stokes vector of the outgoing light is tracked to calculate the Mueller matrix images of the light backscattered from the slab. The Mueller matrix elements as well as depolarization factors are derived. The depolarization index increases with scatterer size. Along with nucleus size, change in the cell number density is also expected in the different stages of the cancer growth. Volume fraction of the scatterers in medium is varied as an indicator of this number density change. Behavior of Mueller matrix with respect to change in scattering coefficient due to variation in scatterer size and volume fraction is studied. It is observed that the depolarization index derived from Mueller matrix has selective discrimination towards the change in scattering coefficient caused due to size change and volume fraction change respectively.

  4. Solar X-Ray Spectroscopy And Polarimetry By Instrument Ping-M Onboard Interhelioprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yury; Dergachev, Valentin; Kochemasov, Alexey; Yurov, Vitaly; Tyshkevich, V.; Glyanenko, Alexander; Savchenko, Mikhail; Lazutkov, Vadim; Skorodumov, Dmitry; Trofimov, Yury; Zakharov, Mikhail; Rubtsov, Igor; Kruglov, Evgeniy

    The instrument PING-M for X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry of solar full disk radiation is described. It will be the part of scientific instrument set for the InterHelioProbe space mission. Instrument consists of three detectors: the Soft X-ray detector (SXRD), the Hard X-ray detector (HXRD) and Hard X-ray polarimeter (PING-P). Spectrometer SXRD is based on a relatively novel type of semiconductor detector SDD (Silicon Drift Detector) that will operate in the energy range 1.5-25 keV, which is similar to GOES X-Ray Sensor (XRS) region. Unlike GOES the SXRD is capable to measure the energy of each photon with high resolution (better 200 eV at 5.9 keV) and operate with high count rate. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the SXRD should show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. HXRD operates in energy range 15-150 keV. Fast nonorganic scintillator (is based on LaBr3(Ce)) with good energy resolution (≤12% at 60keV and ≤3.5% at 662keV) is used. Apart from measurement of spectra the value of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes in flare would be revealed. In the talk the results of testing of laboratory models are presented. PING-P Hard X-ray polarimeter consists of active scatterer made of three organic p-terphenyl scintillators and six peripheral scattered radiation detectors made of CsI(Tl) scintillators. Effective area of polarimeter is about 5 cm2 in its energy range. Minimal measurable degree of polarization is 0.9 % for 100 sec exposition and X1 solar flare.

  5. Solar X-ray polarimetry and spectrometry instrument PING-M for the Interhelioprobe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu. D.; Yurov, V. N.; Glyanenko, A. S.; Lupar, E. E.; Kochemasov, A. V.; Trofimov, Yu. A.; Zakharov, M. S.; Faradzhaev, R. M.; Tyshkevich, V. G.; Rubtsov, I. V.; Dergachev, V. A.; Kruglov, E. M.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    The PING-M experiment is designed to investigate solar X-ray activity. The instrument includes a hard X-ray polarimeter (PING-P), a hard X-ray spectrometer (HXRS) and a soft X-ray spectrometer (SXRS). PING-P has the energy range of 20-150 keV and an effective area of about 2.5 cm2. It uses three organic scintillation detectors as active scatterers, which work in coincidence with six absorber detectors, based on CsI(Tl) scintillator. This technique allows us to considerably improve the polarimeter sensitivity. HXRS has the energy range of 20-600 keV and an effective area of about 15 cm2. It is based on a fast inorganic scintillator (LaBr3(Ce) or CeBr3) with a relatively high energy resolution of 3.5-4.5% at 662 keV. The SXRS energy range is 1.5-25 keV, and its aperture is ø0.1 mm, which provides the registration of solar flares in the range from C1 to X20 class of GOES scale. It is based on a SDD semiconductor detector with an energy resolution better than 200 eV at 5.9 keV line. The experiment will be performed onboard the Russian interplanetary mission Interhelioprobe which is planned for launch after 2025. The instrument will allow us to investigate angular and energy distributions of accelerated electrons, plasma heating processes, etc. Stereoscopic polarimetry and spectrometric observations will be possible if a similar instrument is installed onboard a near Earth satellite, or the second probe of the Interhelioprobe mission.

  6. Constraining the circumbinary envelope of Z Canis Majoris via imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Min, M.; Jeffers, S. V.; Rodenhuis, M.; Keller, C. U.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Z CMa is a complex binary system composed of a Herbig Be and an FU Ori star. The Herbig star is surrounded by a dust cocoon of variable geometry, and the whole system is surrounded by an infalling envelope. Previous spectropolarimetric observations have reported a preferred orientation of the polarization angle, perpendicular to the direction of a very extended, parsec-sized jet associated with the Herbig star. Aims: The variability in the amount of polarized light has been associated to changes in the geometry of the dust cocoon that surrounds the Herbig star. We aim to constrain the properties of Z CMa by means of imaging polarimetry at optical wavelengths. Methods: Using ExPo, a dual-beam imaging polarimeter that operates at optical wavelengths, we have obtained imaging (linear) polarimetric data of Z CMa. Our observations were secured during the return to quiescence after the 2008 outburst. Results: We detect three polarized features over Z CMa. Two of these features are related to the two jets reported in this system: the large jet associated to the Herbig star, and the micro-jet associated to the FU Ori star. Our results suggest that the micro-jet extends to a distance ten times longer than reported in previous studies. The third feature suggests the presence of a hole in the dust cocoon that surrounds the Herbig star of this system. According to our simulations, this hole can produce a pencil beam of light that we see scattered off the low-density envelope surrounding the system. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  7. NEAR-IR IMAGING POLARIMETRY TOWARD A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD: MAGNETIC FIELD IN SFO 74

    SciTech Connect

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Yaeko; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ∼90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ∼30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  8. Polarimetry of the Exoplanet Host Systems τ Boötis and 55 Cancri with PLANETPOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.; Harrison, D.; Bailey, J. A.; Tamura, M.

    2011-11-01

    Planetpol is an aperture polarimeter that was designed to search for reflected light from extrasolar planets with short orbital periods. It is sensitive to fractional linear polarizations of ˜10-6 for nearby bright stars. We present polarimetry of two of the brightest exoplanet systems, τ Boo and 55 Cnc. No periodic changes in polarization are detected that are consistent with those expected for the known planets τ Boo b and 55 Cnc e. The standard deviations in the night to night average Stokes Q/I and U/I polarization parameters are 5.1× 10-6 for τ Boo and 2.2× 10-6 for 55 Cnc. The larger scatter of the τ Boo data may be related to the magnetic activity of the star. We use Monte Carlo multiple scattering models of uniform semi-infinite atmospheres with Rayleigh-like scattering properties to investigate the relation between the broad band geometric albedo of extrasolar planets and the polarization. The single scattering albedo is treated as a free parameter to simulate the effect of absorption by dust particles or molecular absorption. Subject to these assumptions we place 4-σ upper limits on the geometric albedo of AG<0.37(R/1.2 RJup)-2pmSUP>-1 for the “hot Jupiter'' τ Boo b and AG<0.13(R/1.2R_Jup)-2pm-1 for the “hot Neptune'' 55 Cnc e, where pm is the maximum single scattering polarization at 90°. The non-detections for these planets contrast markedly with the recent report of a 3σ detection of a periodic polarization signal from the active star HD 189733 with amplitude P = 2 × 10-4, attributed to the planet HD 189733 b.

  9. Detection of partial-thickness tears in ligaments and tendons by Stokes-polarimetry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; John, Raheel; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2008-02-01

    A Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system utilizes an algorithm developed to construct degree of polarization (DoP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination. Partial-thickness tears of turkey tendons were imaged by the SPI system in order to examine the feasibility of the system to detect partial-thickness rotator cuff tear or general tendon pathology. The rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides a way to analyze different tissue types which may be sensitive to IPA variations. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) images revealed collagen fiber structure, related to partial-thickness tears, better than standard intensity images. DoLP images also revealed structural changes in tears that are related to the tendon load. DoLP images with red-wavelength-filtered incident light may show tears and related organization of collagen fiber structure at a greater depth from the tendon surface. Degree of circular polarization (DoCP) images exhibited well the horizontal fiber orientation that is not parallel to the vertically aligned collagen fibers of the tendon. The SPI system's DOLP images reveal alterations in tendons and ligaments, which have a tissue matrix consisting largely of collagen, better than intensity images. All polarized images showed modulated intensity as the IPA was varied. The optimal detection of the partial-thickness tendon tears at a certain IPA was observed. The SPI system with varying IPA and spectral information can improve the detection of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by higher visibility of fiber orientations and thereby improve diagnosis and treatment of tendon related injuries.

  10. Imaging polarimetry of the fogbow: polarization characteristics of white rainbows measured in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Hegedüs, Ramón; Barta, András; Farkas, Alexandra; Åkesson, Susanne

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge on the optics of fogbows is scarce, and their polarization characteristics have never been measured to our knowledge. To fill this gap we measured the polarization features of 16 fogbows during the Beringia 2005 Arctic polar research expedition by imaging polarimetry in the red, green and blue spectral ranges. We present here the first polarization patterns of the fogbow. In the patterns of the degree of linear polarization p, fogbows and their supernumerary bows are best visible in the red spectral range due to the least dilution of fogbow light by light scattered in air. In the patterns of the angle of polarization α fogbows are practically not discernible because their α-pattern is the same as that of the sky: the direction of polarization is perpendicular to the plane of scattering and is parallel to the arc of the bow, independently of the wavelength. Fogbows and their supernumeraries were best seen in the patterns of the polarized radiance. In these patterns the angular distance δ between the peaks of the primary and the first supernumerary and the angular width σ of the primary bow were determined along different radii from the center of the bow. δ ranged between 6.08° and 13.41°, while σ changed from 5.25° to 19.47°. Certain fogbows were relatively homogeneous, meaning small variations of δ and σ along their bows. Other fogbows were heterogeneous, possessing quite variable δ- and σ-values along their bows. This variability could be a consequence of the characteristics of the high Arctic with open waters within the ice shield resulting in the spatiotemporal change of the droplet size within the fog. PMID:22016248

  11. Microwave-Spectral Signatures Would Reveal Concealed Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G.; Ngo, P.; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, K.; Stolarcyzk, L.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed technique for locating concealed objects (especially small antipersonnel land mines) involves the acquisition and processing of spectral signatures over broad microwave frequency bands. This technique was conceived to overcome the weaknesses of older narrow- band electromagnetic techniques like ground-probing radar and low-frequency electromagnetic induction. Ground-probing radar is susceptible to false detections and/or interference caused by rocks, roots, air pockets, soil inhomogeneities, ice, liquid water, and miscellaneous buried objects other than those sought. Moreover, if the radar frequency happens to be one for which the permittivity of a sought object matches the permittivity of the surrounding soil or there is an unfavorable complex-amplitude addition of the radar reflection at the receiver, then the object is not detected. Low-frequency electromagnetic induction works well for detecting metallic objects, but the amounts of metal in plastic mines are often too small to be detectable. The potential advantage of the proposed technique arises from the fact that wideband spectral signatures generally contain more relevant information than do narrow-band signals. Consequently, spectral signatures could be used to make better decisions regarding whether concealed objects are present and whether they are the ones sought. In some cases, spectral signatures could provide information on the depths, sizes, shapes, and compositions of objects. An apparatus to implement the proposed technique (see Figure 1) could be assembled from equipment already in common use. Typically, such an apparatus would include a radio-frequency (RF) transmitter/receiver, a broad-band microwave antenna, and a fast personal computer loaded with appropriate software. In operation, the counter would be turned on, the antenna would be aimed at the ground or other mass suspected to contain a mine or other sought object, and the operating frequency would be swept over the band of

  12. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  13. High stability radio links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. Robert

    1989-01-01

    Radio telecommunication links are used for communication with deep space probes. These links consist of sinusoidal carrier signals at radio frequencies (RF) modulated with information sent between the spacecraft and the earth. This carrier signal is a very pure and stable sinusoid, typically derived from an atomic frequency standard whose frequency and phase are used to measure the radial velocity of the probe and from this and other data types derive its trajectory. This same observable can be used to search for space-time distortions cased by low frequency (0.1 to 100 MHz) gravitation radiation. How such a system works, what its sensitivity limitations are, and what potential future improvements can be made are discussed.

  14. The extreme behavior of the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy J0849+5108

    SciTech Connect

    Maune, Jeremy D.; Eggen, Joseph R.; Miller, H. Richard; Marshall, Kevin; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Hovatta, Talvikki; King, Oliver

    2014-10-10

    Simultaneous radio, optical (both photometry and polarimetry), X-ray, and γ-ray observations of the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (RL-NLSy1) galaxy J0849+5108 are presented. A massive three-magnitude optical flare across five nights in 2013 April is detected, along with associated flux increases in the γ-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; no comparable event was detected in the X-rays, though this may be due to poor coverage. A spectral energy distribution (SED) for the object using quasi-simultaneous data centered on the optical flare is compared to the previously published SEDs for the object by D'Ammando et al. The flare event coincided with a high degree of optical polarization. High amplitude optical microvariability is clearly detected, and is found to be of comparable amplitude when the object is observed in both faint and bright states. The object is also seen to undergo rapid shifts in polarization in both degree and electric vector position angle within a single night. J0849+5108 appears to show even more extreme variability than that previously reported for the similar object J0948+0022. These observations appear to support the growing claim that some RL-NLSy1 galaxies constitute a sub-class of blazar-like active galactic nuclei.

  15. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Polarimetry of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Obtained During the Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Dean C.; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Hadamcik, Edith; Kaydash, Vadym; Knight, Matthew M.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Li, Jian-Yang; Lisse, Carey M.; Muinonen, Karri; Mutchler, Max; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Snodgrass, Colin; Sitko, Michael L.; Taylor, Matt G. G. T.; Videen, Gorden; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padmavati A.; Zubko, Evgenij

    2015-11-01

    We present pre- and post-perihelion, high-spatial resolution (0.05 arcsec/pixel) 0.6 micron imaging polarimetry of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The pre-perihelion observations were obtained at two epochs chosen to bracket the times when the closest orbits of Rosetta were flown (down to 10 km for extended periods: 2014-Aug-19: rh = 3.52 au, Δ = 2.76 au, α ≈ 12.0˚) and the Philae landing took place (2014-Nov-17: rh = 2.96 au, Δ = 3.43 au, α ≈ 15.7˚). Our preliminary analyses of both pre-perihelion epochs shows that the polarization position angle lies in the scattering plane, thus is negative, with a degree of polarization p% ≈ -2%. The two post-perihelion epochs were matched to the first time after perihelion that the comet was observable with HST (2015-Oct-10: rh = 1.43 au, Δ = 1.80 au, α ≈ 33.5˚), and when the comet was again viewed at small phase angle (2016-Feb-19: rh = 2.40 au, Δ = 1.49 au, α ≈ 12.0˚). We discuss our polarimetry results in context with in situ measurements of dust particles obtained with the Rosetta spacecraft.

  17. 17 CFR 232.302 - Signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Signatures. 232.302 Section 232.302 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T-GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC FILINGS Preparation of Electronic Submissions § 232.302 Signatures. (a) Required signatures to, or within,...

  18. 48 CFR 4.102 - Contractor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contractor's signature. 4... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.102 Contractor's signature. (a) Individuals. A contract with an... be signed by that individual, and the signature shall be followed by the individual's typed,...

  19. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  20. Evolutionary Signatures of River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, K.

    2014-12-01

    River networks exhibit fractal characteristics and it has long been wondered how such regular patterns have been formed. This subject has been actively investigated mainly by two great schools of thoughts, i.e., chance and organization. Along this line, several fundamental questions have partially been addressed or remained. They include whether river networks pursue certain optimal conditions, and if so what is the ultimate optimality signature. Hydrologists have traditionally perceived this issue from fluvial-oriented perspectives. Nevertheless, geological processes can be more dominant in the formation of river networks in reality. To shed new lights on this subject, it is necessary to better understand complex feedbacks between various processes over different time scales, and eventually the emerging characteristic signature. Here, I will present highlights of earlier studies on this line and some noteworthy approaches being tried recently.

  1. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  2. Signatures of a Shadow Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul C. W.; Benner, Steven A.; Cleland, Carol E.; Lineweaver, Charles H.; McKay, Christopher P.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa

    2009-03-01

    Astrobiologists are aware that extraterrestrial life might differ from known life, and considerable thought has been given to possible signatures associated with weird forms of life on other planets. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the possibility that our own planet might also host communities of weird life. If life arises readily in Earth-like conditions, as many astrobiologists contend, then it may well have formed many times on Earth itself, which raises the question whether one or more shadow biospheres have existed in the past or still exist today. In this paper, we discuss possible signatures of weird life and outline some simple strategies for seeking evidence of a shadow biosphere.

  3. Signatures of a shadow biosphere.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul C W; Benner, Steven A; Cleland, Carol E; Lineweaver, Charles H; McKay, Christopher P; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa

    2009-03-01

    Astrobiologists are aware that extraterrestrial life might differ from known life, and considerable thought has been given to possible signatures associated with weird forms of life on other planets. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the possibility that our own planet might also host communities of weird life. If life arises readily in Earth-like conditions, as many astrobiologists contend, then it may well have formed many times on Earth itself, which raises the question whether one or more shadow biospheres have existed in the past or still exist today. In this paper, we discuss possible signatures of weird life and outline some simple strategies for seeking evidence of a shadow biosphere. PMID:19292603

  4. Polarization signatures of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Prashant; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2013-07-01

    Exploratory research has been conducted with the aim of completely determining the polarization signatures of selected particulates as a function of wavelength. This may lead to a better understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and such materials, perhaps leading to the point detection of bio-aerosols present in the atmosphere. To this end, a polarimeter capable of measuring the complete Mueller matrix of highly scattering samples in transmission and reflection (with good spectral resolution from 300 to 1100 nm) has been developed. The polarization properties of Bacillus subtilis (surrogate for anthrax spore) are compared to ambient particulate matter species such as pollen, dust, and soot. Differentiating features in the polarization signatures of these samples have been identified, thus demonstrating the potential applicability of this technique for the detection of bio-aerosol in the ambient atmosphere.

  5. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  6. Ionosphere Transient Response To Solar Flares: Hf Radio Monitoring Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Telljohann, U.; Witasse, O.; Sanderson, T. R.

    We use a simple and low cost method to monitor the ionospheric reflection of commer- cial HF radio transmissions. It only requires a standard HF radio receiver with Single Side Band capability, a computer with a sound card, and appropriate audio signal spectral analysis software. We tune the radio receiver such that the carrier frequency of the transmission appears as a ~ 1kHz tone at the output of the radio receiver. The output signal of the radio receiver is processed with appropriate software that allows real time recording of high frequency resolution dynamic spectrograms of the audio spectrum in the 0-5 kHz range. Voice modulation is also present in the audio spectrum and appears as both upper and lower side bands but it is not considered in this study. HF radio signals reach the receiving station after being reflected by ionospheric layers. Any change in the ionospheric layers that affects HF wave reflection is detectable. In this paper, we particularly discuss our observations related to the transient response of the ionosphere to solar flare ionizing radiation. Enhanced ionization due to EUV and soft X-rays may produce a transient perturbation of the ionosphere which lasts typically one to few minutes. The signature of the transient response depends upon local time, solar flare intensity and the rise time of the solar flare ionizing radiation. We discuss both a few typical examples and a preliminary analysis of our 1-year sta- tistical analysis of observed events at 17.640 MHz. The method is easily accessible to amateur scientists. Possible use of the method for spaceweather-related research and outreach and educational activities is discussed.

  7. Microbial Lifestyle and Genome Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Chitra; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Microbes are known for their unique ability to adapt to varying lifestyle and environment, even to the extreme or adverse ones. The genomic architecture of a microbe may bear the signatures not only of its phylogenetic position, but also of the kind of lifestyle to which it is adapted. The present review aims to provide an account of the specific genome signatures observed in microbes acclimatized to distinct lifestyles or ecological niches. Niche-specific signatures identified at different levels of microbial genome organization like base composition, GC-skew, purine-pyrimidine ratio, dinucleotide abundance, codon bias, oligonucleotide composition etc. have been discussed. Among the specific cases highlighted in the review are the phenomena of genome shrinkage in obligatory host-restricted microbes, genome expansion in strictly intra-amoebal pathogens, strand-specific codon usage in intracellular species, acquisition of genome islands in pathogenic or symbiotic organisms, discriminatory genomic traits of marine microbes with distinct trophic strategies, and conspicuous sequence features of certain extremophiles like those adapted to high temperature or high salinity. PMID:23024607

  8. Selection signatures in Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, M; Flury, C; Leeb, T; Rieder, S; Neuditschko, M

    2016-06-01

    Shetland ponies were selected for numerous traits including small stature, strength, hardiness and longevity. Despite the different selection criteria, Shetland ponies are well known for their small stature. We performed a selection signature analysis including genome-wide SNPs of 75 Shetland ponies and 76 large-sized horses. Based upon this dataset, we identified a selection signature on equine chromosome (ECA) 1 between 103.8 Mb and 108.5 Mb. A total of 33 annotated genes are located within this interval including the IGF1R gene at 104.2 Mb and the ADAMTS17 gene at 105.4 Mb. These two genes are well known to have a major impact on body height in numerous species including humans. Homozygosity mapping in the Shetland ponies identified a region with increased homozygosity between 107.4 Mb and 108.5 Mb. None of the annotated genes in this region have so far been associated with height. Thus, we cannot exclude the possibility that the identified selection signature on ECA1 is associated with some trait other than height, for which Shetland ponies were selected. PMID:26857482

  9. Comparison of MMW ground vehicle signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Ph. D., Annie V.; Kissell, Ann

    2006-05-01

    A continuing question asked of MMW target signature and model providers is the applicability of data from one frequency band to another. Recent monopulse Ka-band ground target signature measurements made by US Army programs provide an opportunity to do an in-depth comparison of signatures of several ground vehicles. The vehicles measured correspond to those measured at W-band by another Army program. This paper provides a comparison of vehicle signatures produced by models derived by AMRDEC from the measurements. The results have implications for missile programs that do not have an extensive measurement budget but require target signatures and models for algorithm development.

  10. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  11. Locating Radio Noise from Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Watson, R.; Gaffet, S.; Astin, I.; Evans, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into exponentially growing streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010). The acceleration of the electrons to a few eV results in the radiation of a small amount of electromagnetic energy. The incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the low frequency radio noise from sprites near ~40 km height (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this theoretically predicted radiation was recently confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). To locate the radio noise from sprites in the sky, an interferometric network of low frequency radio receivers was developed (Mezentsev and Fullekrug, JGR, 2013). The key parameter for the interferometric signal processing is the frequency dependent wave propagation velocity of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere. This wave propagation velocity is determined by the wave number vector which needs to be inferred from the measurements. Here we adapt and subsequently apply array analyses which have been developed for seismic and infrasound arrays to determine the horizontal wave number vectors of ~20-24 kHz radio waves measured with an array of ten radio receivers distributed over an area of ~1 km × 1 km. It is found that the horizontal slowness of ~20-24 kHz radio waves ranges from ~2.7 ns/m to ~4.1 ns/m depending on the arrival azimuth of the radio wave. For comparison, an electromagnetic wave in vacuum has a slowness of ~3.34 ns/m. A larger slowness indicates an apparent velocity which is smaller than the speed of light and a smaller slowness indicates that the radio wave arrives at the array from an elevation angle. The observed variability of the observed slowness almost certainly results from the distance dependent superposition of the transverse electric and magnetic TEn and TMn radio wave propagation modes.

  12. Origins of Canadian Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. E.

    1988-08-01

    Radar technology after World War II was rapidly applied to the radio astronomy founded by Jansky and Reber. The first post-war discoveries in various countries from 1945 to 1950 were made with instruments built from surplus parts, and quickly led to the design of specialized equipment. The development in Ottawa at the Laboratories of the National Research Council is outlined, initially for solar radio observations and then for the early galactic observations at the Goth Hill Radio Observatory, near Ottawa.

  13. Formal Definition and Construction of Nominative Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dennis Y. W.; Wong, Duncan S.; Huang, Xinyi; Wang, Guilin; Huang, Qiong; Mu, Yi; Susilo, Willy

    Since the introduction of nominative signature in 1996, there are three problems that have still not been solved. First, there is no convincing application proposed; second, there is no formal security model available; and third, there is no proven secure scheme constructed, given that all the previous schemes have already been found flawed. In this paper, we give positive answers to these problems. First, we illustrate that nominative signature is a better tool for building user certification systems which were originally implemented using universal designated-verifier signature. Second, we propose a formal definition and adversarial model for nominative signature. Third, we show that Chaum's undeniable signature can be transformed to an efficient nominative signature by simply using a standard signature. The security of our transformation can be proven under the standard number-theoretic assumption.

  14. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a "signature pattern injury" caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile. PMID:27053813

  15. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a “signature pattern injury” caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile. PMID:27053813

  16. Decimetric radio dot emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Sawant, H. S.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We study a rare type of solar radio bursts called decimetric dot emissions. Aims: In the period 1999-2001, 20 events of decimetric dot emissions observed by the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) in the frequency range 950-2640 MHz are investigated statistically and compared with radio fine structures of zebras and fibers. Methods: For the study of the spectral characteristics of the dot emissions we use specially developed Interactive Data Language (IDL) software called BSSView and basic statistical methods. Results: We have found that the dm dot emissions, contrary to the fine structures of the type IV bursts (i.e. zebras, fibers, lace bursts, spikes), are not superimposed on any background burst emission. In the radio spectrum, in most cases the dot emissions form chains that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. Because some zebras and fibers, especially those observed with high time and high spectral resolutions, also show emission dots (but superimposed on the background burst emission), we compared the spectral parameters of the dot emissions with the dots being the fine structure of zebras and fibers. For both these dots, similar spectral characteristics were found. Some similarities of the dot emissions can be found also with the lace bursts and spikes. For some events the dot emissions show structural evolution from patterns resembling fibers to patterns resembling zebras and vice versa, or they evolve into fully chaotic patterns. Conclusions: For the first time, we present decimetric dot emissions that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. We propose that these emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism at the locations in the solar atmosphere where the double resonance condition is fulfilled.

  17. Observations of Solar Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Giorla

    2011-05-01

    A low frequency radio telescope has been recently been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and has begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of solar radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with solar burst events. We will discuss solar observations conducted with this instrument as well as an effort to conduct coincident observations with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  18. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)-BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  19. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  20. Imaging Polarimetry of Scattered Light from the Buried QSO in IRAS F15307+3252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Jeffrey; Hines, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present new imaging polarimetry observations of the Hyperluminous Infrared Galaxy and Type 2 QSO IRAS F15307+3252 (z = 0.9257). The observations were obtained with the High-Resolution Camera (HRC) of the Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The images show strongly polarized (p ≥ 20%) light extending ~8 kpc southwest from the center of the galaxy. The overall shape suggests that the extended emission has a single-sided, conical structure of apparent half-opening angle ~16 degrees and apex centered at the galaxy nucleus. The polarization position angle (at each resolution element) is perpendicular to the axis of the extended emission, implying that the structure is illuminated by a central source in the galaxy nucleus that is not seen directly. F15307+3252 is known to harbor a buried QSO that was revealed in a polarized spectrum by Hines et al. (1995); the degree of polarization and position angle of this polarized spectrum match those of the extended structure seen in our new HST/ACS data. We thus conclude that this extended emission is light from the buried QSO that is scattered (thus polarized) into our line of sight, and importantly, this object would be classified optically as a Type 1 QSO if viewed from the vantage point of the scattering material. The conical structure of the scattered light suggests that the material blocking our direct line of sight to the QSO has a spatial distribution similar to the dusty torus in lower redshift Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). Assuming that the scattered-light-cone half-opening angle is the same as the dusty torus half-opening angle, we derive a dust-covering fraction of ≥ 95%. This, and comparison between the observed spectral energy distribution of F15307+3252 and that of a composite Type 1 QSO, suggests that the majority of the luminosity in F15307+3252 is powered by the central QSO. Deep HST/ACS images in total light also show clearly that F15307+3252 sits at the center of a

  1. Study of Venus' cloud layers by polarimetry using SPICAV/VEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Marcq, Emmanuel; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Korablev, Oleg; Fedorova, Anna

    2013-04-01

    account the multiple scattering. Having more recent observations in wavelengths ranging from 650 to 1625nm, will put better constraints on the properties of both cloud and haze particles, with a primary focus on the cloud droplets characterization. Bibliography: BOHREN, C. F. AND HUMAN, D.R., in Absorption and Scattering of light by small particles, Wiley, 1983 KAWABATA, K. et al., Cloud and haze properties from Pioneer Venus Polarimetry, JGR, 1980

  2. Imaging polarimetry of glass buildings: why do vertical glass surfaces attract polarotactic insects?

    PubMed

    Malik, Péter; Hegedüs, Ramón; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-08-20

    Recently it was observed that the Hydropsyche pellucidula caddis flies swarm near sunset at the vertical glass surfaces of buildings standing on the bank of the Danube river in Budapest, Hungary. These aquatic insects emerge from the Danube and are lured to dark vertical panes of glass, where they swarm, land, copulate, and remain for hours. It was also shown that ovipositing H. pellucidula caddis flies are attracted to highly and horizontally polarized light stimulating their ventral eye region and thus have positive polarotaxis. The attraction of these aquatic insects to vertical reflectors is surprising, because after their aerial swarming, they must return to the horizontal surface of water bodies from which they emerge and at which they lay their eggs. Our aim is to answer the questions: Why are flying polarotactic caddis flies attracted to vertical glass surfaces? And why do these aquatic insects remain on vertical panes of glass after landing? We propose that both questions can be partly explained by the reflection-polarization characteristics of vertical glass surfaces and the positive polarotaxis of caddis flies. We measured the reflection-polarization patterns of shady and sunlit, black and white vertical glass surfaces from different directions of view under clear and overcast skies by imaging polarimetry in the red, green, and blue parts of the spectrum. Using these polarization patterns we determined which areas of the investigated glass surfaces are sensed as water by a hypothetical polarotactic insect facing and flying toward or landed on a vertical pane of glass. Our results strongly support the mentioned proposition. The main optical characteristics of "green," that is, environmentally friendly, buildings, considering the protection of polarotactic aquatic insects, are also discussed. Such "green" buildings possess features that attract only a small number of polarotactic aquatic insects when standing in the vicinity of fresh waters. Since vertical

  3. Planetpol polarimetry of the exoplanet systems 55Cnc and τBoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Bailey, J. A.; Tamura, M.; Hirst, E.; Harrison, D.

    2009-02-01

    We present very sensitive polarimetry of 55Cnc and τBoo in an attempt to detect the partially polarized reflected light from the planets orbiting these two stars. 55Cnc is orbited by a hot Neptune planet (55Cnce) at 0.038au, a hot Jupiter planet (55Cncb) at 0.11au and at least three more distant planets. The polarization of this system is very stable, showing no sign of the periodic variations that would be expected if a short-period planet were detected. The measured standard deviation of the nightly averaged Stokes Q/I and U/I parameters is 2.2 × 10-6. We derive upper limits on the geometric albedo, AG, and planetary radius using Monte Carlo multiple scattering simulations of a simple model atmosphere. We assume Rayleigh-like scattering and polarization behaviour (scaled by the maximum polarization, pm, at 90°) and pressure insensitive extinction. Atmospheres in which multiple scattering plays only a small role have an almost linear relation between polarization and AG. In this case, the 4σ upper limit is AG < 0.13(R/1.2RJup)-2p-1m for 55Cnce. This is most easily explained if 55Cnce is relatively small, like GJ436b, and therefore not a pure H-He planet. The data do not provide a useful upper limit for 55Cncb. τBoo is orbited by an unusually massive hot Jupiter planet. The data show a standard deviation in the night-to-night average Stokes Q/I and U/I polarization parameters of 5.1 × 10-6. The 4σ upper limit is AG < 0.37(R/1.2RJup)-2p-1m for τBoob, adopting the fairly well established orbital inclination i ~ 40°. This extends the similar upper limits reported previously for this planet to longer wavelengths. The fact that the τBoo data show more scatter, despite the smaller photon noise for this bright star, may be due to the spot activity detected photometrically by the Microvariability & Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite. These results contrast markedly with the recent claim of a 3σ detection of a periodic polarization signal from HD189733 with

  4. Imaging polarimetry of glass buildings: why do vertical glass surfaces attract polarotactic insects?

    PubMed

    Malik, Péter; Hegedüs, Ramón; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-08-20

    Recently it was observed that the Hydropsyche pellucidula caddis flies swarm near sunset at the vertical glass surfaces of buildings standing on the bank of the Danube river in Budapest, Hungary. These aquatic insects emerge from the Danube and are lured to dark vertical panes of glass, where they swarm, land, copulate, and remain for hours. It was also shown that ovipositing H. pellucidula caddis flies are attracted to highly and horizontally polarized light stimulating their ventral eye region and thus have positive polarotaxis. The attraction of these aquatic insects to vertical reflectors is surprising, because after their aerial swarming, they must return to the horizontal surface of water bodies from which they emerge and at which they lay their eggs. Our aim is to answer the questions: Why are flying polarotactic caddis flies attracted to vertical glass surfaces? And why do these aquatic insects remain on vertical panes of glass after landing? We propose that both questions can be partly explained by the reflection-polarization characteristics of vertical glass surfaces and the positive polarotaxis of caddis flies. We measured the reflection-polarization patterns of shady and sunlit, black and white vertical glass surfaces from different directions of view under clear and overcast skies by imaging polarimetry in the red, green, and blue parts of the spectrum. Using these polarization patterns we determined which areas of the investigated glass surfaces are sensed as water by a hypothetical polarotactic insect facing and flying toward or landed on a vertical pane of glass. Our results strongly support the mentioned proposition. The main optical characteristics of "green," that is, environmentally friendly, buildings, considering the protection of polarotactic aquatic insects, are also discussed. Such "green" buildings possess features that attract only a small number of polarotactic aquatic insects when standing in the vicinity of fresh waters. Since vertical

  5. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  6. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  7. Lunar Farside Radio Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2005-03-01

    It is proposed that the Farside of the Moon should be protected legally against man-made radio pollution and uncontrolled exploitation. In fact, only by establishing a radiotelescope on the Farside of the Moon it will finally be possible to cope with the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) that is now increasingly plaguing all of Radioastronomy, Bioastronomy and Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Searches done from the surface of the Earth. It is suggested to partition the Farside into 3 sectors, each 60°wide, to ensurethe creation of a future “Lunar Farside Radio Lab” inside crater Daedalus (at 180°E) with our planned Radiotelescope (in practice a Phased Array),complete freedom to exploit the Nearside as well as the four Lagrangian points L1, L3, L4 and L5 of the Earth Moon system by allowing even some International Space Stations to be located there. It is also claimed, however, thatthe “opposite” Lagrangian point L2 should possibly be kept free of spacecrafts that would flood the Farside by the RFI they produce. Realistically, it might be difficult to comply with the latter request in view of the far-future development of a Space Base located there in order to depart towards the Asteroids and the Outer Planets at very reduced fuel consumption. A more reasonable request about any future space station located at the Earth Moon L2 point is thus that this future space station should be shielded to prevent its RFI from reaching the Farside of the Moon.A number of further astrophysical, astronautical and technical issues could just be highlighted in this study and deserve much more elaboration. To mention a few:the precise size of the “Quiet Cone” extending into space above the Farside of the Moon. Also, the experimental measurement of how quiet this Cone actually is by letting a radiometer orbit the Moon (see the web site www.rli.it);the mathematical modelling of the weak ionosphere of the Moon and its possible diffraction effects at very

  8. Evidence for the charge-excess contribution in air shower radio emission observed by the CODALEMA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellétoile, A.; Dallier, R.; Lecacheux, A.; Marin, V.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Torres, D.

    2015-09-01

    CODALEMA is one of the pioneer experiments dedicated to the radio detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR), located at the radio observatory of Nançay (France). The CODALEMA experiment uses both a particle detector array and a radio antenna array. Data from both detection systems have been used to determine the ground coordinates of the core of extensive air showers (EAS). We discuss the observed systematic shift of the core positions determined with these two detection techniques. We show that this shift is due to the charge-excess contribution to the total radio emission of air showers, using the simulation code SELFAS. The dependences of the radio core shift to the primary cosmic ray characteristics are studied in details. The observation of this systematic shift can be considered as an experimental signature of the charge excess contribution.

  9. The Transient Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    The high time-resolution radio sky represents unexplored astronomical territory where the discovery potential is high. In this thesis I have studied the transient radio sky, focusing on millisecond scales. As such, this work is concerned primarily with neutron stars, the mostpopulous member of the radio transient parameter space. In particular, I have studied the well known radio pulsars and the recently identified group of neutron stars which show erratic radio emission, known as RRATs, which show radio bursts every few minutes to every few hours. When RRATs burst onto the scene in 2006, it was thought that they represented a previously unknown, distinct class of sporadically emitting sources. The difficulty in their identification implies a large underlying population, perhaps larger than the radio pulsars. The first question investigated in this thesis was whether the large projected population of RRATs posed a problem, i.e. could the observed supernova rate account for so many sources. In addition to pulsars and RRATs, the various other known neutron star manifestations were considered, leading to the conclusion that distinct populations would result in a `birthrate problem'. Evolution between the classes could solve this problem -- the RRATs are not a distinct population ofneutron stars.Alternatively, perhaps the large projected population of RRATs is an overestimate. To obtain an improved estimate, the best approach is to find more sources. The Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey, wherein the RRATs were initially identified, offered an opportunity to do just this. Abouthalf of the RRATs showing bursts during the survey were thought to have been missed, due to the deleterious effects of impulsive terrestrial interference signals. To remove these unwanted signals, so that we could identify the previously shrouded RRATs, we developed newinterference mitigation software and processing techniques. Having done this, the survey was completely re-processed, resulting in

  10. The Extragalactic Radio Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an isotropic component of the high-latitude radio sky has been recognized for nearly fifty years, but has typically been assumed to be Galactic in origin. We use recent radio observations to test whether the observed high-latitude component could originate within either an extended Galactic halo or a more local "bubble" structure. The lack of significant polarization from the isotropic component, combined with the lack of significant correlation with the Galactic far-infrared emission, rule out an origin within the Galaxy. We conclude that an extragalactic origin is the only viable alternative for the bulk of the isotropic high-latitude emission. The extragalactic component is 2-3 times brighter than local (Galactic) emission towards the Galactic poles and is consistent with a power law in frequency with amplitude T(sub r) = 24.1 plus or minus 2.1 K and spectral index beta = -2.599 plus or minus 0.036 evaluated at reference frequency 310 MHz.

  11. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F.C.

    1983-03-01

    We outline the macroscopic physics of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star. It seems likely that such systems are formed from time to time in the universe. The neutron star acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, and the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet, permitting the polar cap current to return to the neutron star and also splitting a dipolar magnetic field into two monopolar halves. Michel and Dessler have proposed that such systems are radio pulsars. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque (giving a deceleration index n = 7/3), and the next contribution is dissipation in the ''auroral'' zones, where the current returns to the star in a sheet about 5 cm thick. The latter is comparable to the observed radio luminosities and is in reasonable accord with the data. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radiofrequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring, the plausible consequence of which could be cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few seconds.

  12. Investigations of Remote Plasma Irregularites by Radio Sounding: Applications of the Radio Plasma Imager on IMAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Benson, Robert F.; Carpenter, Donald L.; Reinsch, Bodo W.; Gallagher, Dennis L.

    1999-01-01

    The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission operates like a radar by transmitting and receiving coherent electromagnetic pulses. Long-range echoes of electromagnetic sounder waves are reflected at remote plasma cutoffs. Thus, analyses of RPI observations will yield the plasma parameters and distances to the remote reflection points. These analyses assume that the reflecting plasma surfaces are cold and are sufficiently smooth that they effectively behave as plane mirrors to the incoming sounder waves, i.e., that geometric optics can be used. The RPI will employ pulse compression and spectral integration techniques, perfected in ground-based ionospheric digital sounders, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio in long-range magnetospheric sounding. When plasma irregularities exist in the remote magnetospheric plasmas that are being probed by the sounder waves, echo signatures may become complicated. Ionospheric sounding experience indicates that while topside sounding echo strengths can actually be enhanced by the presence of irregularities, ground-based sounding indicates that coherent detection techniques can still be employed. In this paper we investigate the plasma conditions that will allow coherent signals to be detected by the RPI and the signatures to be expected, such as scattering and plasma resonances, in the presence of multi-scale irregularities, may possibly have on RPI signals. Sounding of irregular plasma structures in the plasmasphere, plasmapause and magnetopause are also discussed.

  13. Probing the parsec-scale accretion flow of 3C 84 with millimeter wavelength polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Plambeck, R. L.; Bower, G. C.; Rao, Ramprasad; Marrone, D. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Johnson, M. D.

    2014-12-10

    We report the discovery of Faraday rotation toward radio source 3C 84, the active galactic nucleus in NGC 1275 at the core of the Perseus Cluster. The rotation measure (RM), determined from polarization observations at wavelengths of 1.3 and 0.9 mm, is (8.7 ± 2.3)× 10{sup 5} rad m{sup –2}, among the largest ever measured. The RM remained relatively constant over a 2 yr period even as the intrinsic polarization position angle wrapped through a span of 300°. The Faraday rotation is likely to originate either in the boundary layer of the radio jet from the nucleus or in the accretion flow onto the central black hole. The accretion flow probably is disk-like rather than spherical on scales of less than a parsec, otherwise the RM would be even larger.

  14. A high performance cost-effective digital complex correlator for an X-band polarimetry survey.

    PubMed

    Bergano, Miguel; Rocha, Armando; Cupido, Luís; Barbosa, Domingos; Villela, Thyrso; Boas, José Vilas; Rocha, Graça; Smoot, George F

    2016-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of the Milky Way radio emission is important to characterize galactic foregrounds masking extragalactic and cosmological signals. The update of the global sky models describing radio emissions over a very large spectral band requires high sensitivity experiments capable of observing large sky areas with long integration times. Here, we present the design of a new 10 GHz (X-band) polarimeter digital back-end to map the polarization components of the galactic synchrotron radiation field of the Northern Hemisphere sky. The design follows the digital processing trends in radio astronomy and implements a large bandwidth (1 GHz) digital complex cross-correlator to extract the Stokes parameters of the incoming synchrotron radiation field. The hardware constraints cover the implemented VLSI hardware description language code and the preliminary results. The implementation is based on the simultaneous digitized acquisition of the Cartesian components of the two linear receiver polarization channels. The design strategy involves a double data rate acquisition of the ADC interleaved parallel bus, and field programmable gate array device programming at the register transfer mode. The digital core of the back-end is capable of processing 32 Gbps and is built around an Altera field programmable gate array clocked at 250 MHz, 1 GSps analog to digital converters and a clock generator. The control of the field programmable gate array internal signal delays and a convenient use of its phase locked loops provide the timing requirements to achieve the target bandwidths and sensitivity. This solution is convenient for radio astronomy experiments requiring large bandwidth, high functionality, high volume availability and low cost. Of particular interest, this correlator was developed for the Galactic Emission Mapping project and is suitable for large sky area polarization continuum surveys. The solutions may also be adapted to be used at signal processing

  15. A high performance cost-effective digital complex correlator for an X-band polarimetry survey.

    PubMed

    Bergano, Miguel; Rocha, Armando; Cupido, Luís; Barbosa, Domingos; Villela, Thyrso; Boas, José Vilas; Rocha, Graça; Smoot, George F

    2016-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of the Milky Way radio emission is important to characterize galactic foregrounds masking extragalactic and cosmological signals. The update of the global sky models describing radio emissions over a very large spectral band requires high sensitivity experiments capable of observing large sky areas with long integration times. Here, we present the design of a new 10 GHz (X-band) polarimeter digital back-end to map the polarization components of the galactic synchrotron radiation field of the Northern Hemisphere sky. The design follows the digital processing trends in radio astronomy and implements a large bandwidth (1 GHz) digital complex cross-correlator to extract the Stokes parameters of the incoming synchrotron radiation field. The hardware constraints cover the implemented VLSI hardware description language code and the preliminary results. The implementation is based on the simultaneous digitized acquisition of the Cartesian components of the two linear receiver polarization channels. The design strategy involves a double data rate acquisition of the ADC interleaved parallel bus, and field programmable gate array device programming at the register transfer mode. The digital core of the back-end is capable of processing 32 Gbps and is built around an Altera field programmable gate array clocked at 250 MHz, 1 GSps analog to digital converters and a clock generator. The control of the field programmable gate array internal signal delays and a convenient use of its phase locked loops provide the timing requirements to achieve the target bandwidths and sensitivity. This solution is convenient for radio astronomy experiments requiring large bandwidth, high functionality, high volume availability and low cost. Of particular interest, this correlator was developed for the Galactic Emission Mapping project and is suitable for large sky area polarization continuum surveys. The solutions may also be adapted to be used at signal processing

  16. Is lightning a possible source of the radio emission on HAT-P-11b?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, G.; Rimmer, P. B.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-09-01

    Lightning induced radio emission has been observed on Solar system planets. There have been many attempts to observe exoplanets in the radio wavelength, however, no unequivocal detection has been reported. Lecavelier des Etangs et al. carried out radio transit observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b, and suggested that a small part of the radio flux can be attributed to the planet. Here, we assume that this signal is real, and study if this radio emission could be caused by lightning with similar energetic properties like in the Solar system. We find that a lightning storm with 3.8 × 106 times larger flash densities than the Earth-storms with the largest lightning activity is needed to produce the observed signal from HAT-P-11b. The optical emission of such thunderstorm would be comparable to that of the host star. We show that HCN produced by lightning chemistry is observable 2-3 yr after the storm, which produces signatures in the L (3.0-4.0 μm) and N (7.5-14.5 μm) infrared bands. We conclude that it is unlikely that the observed radio signal was produced by lightning, however, future, combined radio and infrared observations may lead to lightning detection on planets outside the Solar system.

  17. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  18. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  19. Gut microbiota signatures of longevity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanli; Hua, Yutong; Zeng, Bo; Ning, Ruihong; Li, Ying; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2016-09-26

    An aging global population poses substantial challenges to society [1]. Centenarians are a model for healthy aging because they have reached the extreme limit of life by escaping, surviving, or delaying chronic diseases [2]. The genetics of centenarians have been extensively examined [3], but less is known about their gut microbiotas. Recently, Biagi et al.[4] characterized the gut microbiota in Italian centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. Here, we compare the gut microbiota of Chinese long-living people with younger age groups, and with the results from the Italian population [4], to identify gut-microbial signatures of healthy aging. PMID:27676296

  20. Quantum signatures of chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, V. M.; Omelchenko, I.; Zakharova, A.; Schöll, E.; Brandes, T.

    2015-12-01

    Chimera states are complex spatiotemporal patterns in networks of identical oscillators, characterized by the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized dynamics. Here we propose to extend the phenomenon of chimera states to the quantum regime, and uncover intriguing quantum signatures of these states. We calculate the quantum fluctuations about semiclassical trajectories and demonstrate that chimera states in the quantum regime can be characterized by bosonic squeezing, weighted quantum correlations, and measures of mutual information. Our findings reveal the relation of chimera states to quantum information theory, and give promising directions for experimental realization of chimera states in quantum systems.

  1. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  2. Quantum signatures of chimera states.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, V M; Omelchenko, I; Zakharova, A; Schöll, E; Brandes, T

    2015-12-01

    Chimera states are complex spatiotemporal patterns in networks of identical oscillators, characterized by the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized dynamics. Here we propose to extend the phenomenon of chimera states to the quantum regime, and uncover intriguing quantum signatures of these states. We calculate the quantum fluctuations about semiclassical trajectories and demonstrate that chimera states in the quantum regime can be characterized by bosonic squeezing, weighted quantum correlations, and measures of mutual information. Our findings reveal the relation of chimera states to quantum information theory, and give promising directions for experimental realization of chimera states in quantum systems.

  3. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  4. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  5. Safety and Special Radio Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    Numerous radio stations across the nation perform nonbroadcast services in areas ranging from aviation, forestry protection, and telephone maintenance to amateur and citizen radio. These services can be grouped in four general categories: (1) safety, (2) industry, (3) land transportation, and (4) miscellaneous purposes. This bulletin briefly…

  6. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  7. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  8. SETI radio spectrum surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, B.; Lokshin, A.; Marina, M.; Ching, L.

    1985-01-01

    The SETI Radio Spectrum Surveillance System (SRSSS) will provide a data base for assessing the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment for SETI and minimizing RFI disruptions during the search. The system's hardware and software are described and the sensitivity of the system is discussed.

  9. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  10. Radio Imaging of a Type IVM Radio Burst on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 100-102 cm-3, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  11. Radio imaging of a type IVM radio burst on the 14th of August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-10

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} cm{sup –3}, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  12. Quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature with constant size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Li, Zhenli

    2016-09-01

    Using quantum homomorphic signature in quantum network, we propose a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme. Different from classical signature and current quantum signature schemes, the multi-signature proposed in our scheme is not generated by simply putting the individual signatures together, but by aggregating the individual signatures based on homomorphic property. Therefore, the size of the multi-signature is constant. Furthermore, based on a wide range of investigation for the security of existing quantum signature protocols, our protocol is designed to resist possible forgery attacks against signature and message from the various attack sources and disavowal attacks from participants.

  13. Quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature with constant size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Li, Zhenli

    2016-06-01

    Using quantum homomorphic signature in quantum network, we propose a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme. Different from classical signature and current quantum signature schemes, the multi-signature proposed in our scheme is not generated by simply putting the individual signatures together, but by aggregating the individual signatures based on homomorphic property. Therefore, the size of the multi-signature is constant. Furthermore, based on a wide range of investigation for the security of existing quantum signature protocols, our protocol is designed to resist possible forgery attacks against signature and message from the various attack sources and disavowal attacks from participants.

  14. Detailed optical and near-infrared polarimetry, spectroscopy and broad-band photometry of the afterglow of GRB 091018: polarization evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Krühler, T.; Melandri, A.; Rol, E.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Covino, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Goldoni, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Hjorth, J.; Klose, S.; Mundell, C. G.; O'Brien, P. T.; Palazzi, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; D'Elia, V.; Evans, P. A.; Filgas, R.; Gomboc, A.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Kaper, L.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.; Rossi, A.; Rowlinson, A.; Steele, I. A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Follow-up observations of large numbers of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, facilitated by the Swift satellite, have produced a large sample of spectral energy distributions and light curves, from which their basic micro- and macro-physical parameters can in principle be derived. However, a number of phenomena have been observed that defy explanation by simple versions of the standard fireball model, leading to a variety of new models. Polarimetry can be a major independent diagnostic of afterglow physics, probing the magnetic field properties and internal structure of the GRB jets. In this paper we present the first high-quality multi-night polarimetric light curve of a Swift GRB afterglow, aimed at providing a well-calibrated data set of a typical afterglow to serve as a benchmark system for modelling afterglow polarization behaviour. In particular, our data set of the afterglow of GRB 091018 (at redshift z = 0.971) comprises optical linear polarimetry (R band, 0.13-2.3 d after burst); circular polarimetry (R band) and near-infrared linear polarimetry (Ks band). We add to that high-quality optical and near-infrared broad-band light curves and spectral energy distributions as well as afterglow spectroscopy. The linear polarization varies between 0 and 3 per cent, with both long and short time-scale variability visible. We find an achromatic break in the afterglow light curve, which corresponds to features in the polarimetric curve. We find that the data can be reproduced by jet break models only if an additional polarized component of unknown nature is present in the polarimetric curve. We probe the ordered magnetic field component in the afterglow through our deep circular polarimetry, finding Pcirc < 0.15 per cent (2σ), the deepest limit yet for a GRB afterglow, suggesting ordered fields are weak, if at all present. Our simultaneous R- and Ks-band polarimetry shows that dust-induced polarization in the host galaxy is likely negligible.

  15. The Aligned z~1 Radio Galaxy 3C 280

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Susan E.; Stockton, Alan; Lacy, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The z~1 radio galaxy 3C 280 has a particularly striking rest-frame UV morphology, with multiple line and continuum components precisely aligned with the radio structure, including an obvious semicircular arc. Here we explore the nature of these various components by bringing together Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging, ground-based spectroscopy, and radio mapping. From plausible decompositions of the spectra, we show that the continuum of the nuclear component is likely dominated by a combination of nebular thermal continuum, quasar light, and light from old stars. A component that falls directly on the probable path of the radio jet shows mostly nebular thermal continuum and includes contributions from a relatively young stellar population with age around 100 Myr. The arc appears to be completely dominated by line emission and nebular thermal continuum, with no evidence for a significant stellar contribution. Although much of the aligned light is in UV components, the underlying old elliptical galaxy is also well aligned with the radio axis. The elliptical galaxy is well fitted by a de Vaucouleurs profile, probably has a moderately old stellar population (~3 Gyr), and is a massive system with a velocity dispersion of σ~270 km s-1 that implies that it contains a supermassive black hole. Although the arc and the extended emission surrounding the eastern lobe suggest that interactions between the radio lobe and jet must have been important in creating the UV morphology, the ionization and kinematic properties in these components are more consistent with photoionization than shock excitation. 3C 280 may be a transition object between the compact steep-spectrum radio galaxies, which seem to be shock-dominated, and the extended radio sources, which may have evolved past this phase and rarely show shock signatures. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  16. Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

  17. CONSTRAINING RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Dib, R.; Champion, D. J.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2012-01-10

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits of L{sub 1950} {approx}< 1.60 mJy kpc{sup 2} for periodic emission and L{sub 1950,single} {approx}< 7.6 Jy kpc{sup 2} for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  18. Radio outburst of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bach, U.

    2013-04-01

    We report on extremely high radio flux of BL Lacertae at 43 and 8 GHz. Observations at 43 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Noto (Italy) revealed a flux density of 10.5 +/- 0.2 Jy on 2013 April 10.65, while observations at 8 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Medicina (Italy) detected a flux density of 8.2 +/- 0.7 Jy on April 12.22. These extremely high radio fluxes show that the radio activity likely correlated to the strong optical, near-infrared, and gamma-ray activity of 2011-2012 (see ATels #4028, #4031, #4155, #4271, #4277, #4349, #4565, #4600), and X-ray activity of late 2012 (ATels #4557, #4627), is far to be exhausted.

  19. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol): Instrument and 2010 Science Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandilo, Natalie; BLAST-Pol Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLAST-Pol) is a 1.8-m telescope that observes polarized dust emission with a resolution of 1'. BLAST-Pol images the sky onto a focal plane that consists of 270 feed-horn coupled bolometers at 250, 350, and 500 microns. In January 2011, BLAST-Pol completed a successful 9.5-day flight over Antarctica. Eight science targets were observed, and a second flight is planned for December 2012. I will give an overview of the instrument performance during the first science campaign and present preliminary maps. BLAST-Pol maps will provide an excellent dataset for studying the role of magnetic fields in star formation.

  20. A streak camera based fiber optic pulsed polarimetry technique for magnetic sensing to sub-mm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J.; Weber, T. E.

    2016-11-01

    The technique of fiber optic pulsed polarimetry, which provides a distributed (local) measurement of the magnetic field along an optical fiber, has been improved to the point where, for the first time, photocathode based optical detection of backscatter is possible with sub-mm spatial resolutions. This has been realized through the writing of an array of deterministic fiber Bragg gratings along the fiber, a so-called backscatter-tailored optical fiber, producing a 34 000-fold increase in backscatter levels over Rayleigh. With such high backscatter levels, high repetition rate lasers are now sufficiently bright to allow near continuous field sensing in both space and time with field resolutions as low as 0.005 T and as high as 170 T over a ˜mm interval given available fiber materials.