Science.gov

Sample records for radio science conference

  1. Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Radio science experiments use electromagnetic waves to probe or study the solar system. Three major research areas were identified within this discipline: radio astronomy, radar astronomy, and celestial mechanics. Radio astronomy (or radiometry) is the detection and measurement of naturally produced radio frequency emissions. Sources include surfaces, atmospheres, rings, and plasmas. Radar astronomy is the observation of man-made signals after their interaction with a target. Both imaging and non-imaging results. Celestial mechanics includes all studies related to the motions of (and gravity fields of) bodies within the solar system. These should not be considered rigid separations, but aid in the discussion of the data sets.

  2. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  3. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  4. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzold, M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Wennmacher, A.; Aksnes, K.; Anderson, J. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Tinto, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Yeomans, D. K.; Barriot, J. -P.; hide

    1996-01-01

    The Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment was selected by the European Space Agency to be included in the International Rosetta Mission to comet P/Wirtanen (launch in 2003, arrival and operational phase at the comet 2011-2013). The RSI science objectives address fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, the gravity field, non-gravitational forces, the size and shape, the internal structure, the composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains and the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux on the orbiter. RSI will make use of the radio system of the Rosetta spacecraft.

  5. The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference: Technology and Policy Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, new radio technologies and services are poised to change the ways we communicate. Radio waves already make possible a wide range of services considered commonplace--AM and FM radio broadcasting, television, cellular telephones, remote garage-door openers, and baby monitors. Advances in radio technology are giving birth to even more new products and services, including pocket-sized telephones that may allow people to make and receive calls anywhere in the world, high-definition televisions (HDTV) with superior quality pictures and sound, and static-free digital radios. The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-92) authorized frequencies for many of these new radio communication services, and granted additional frequencies for many existing services, including international broadcasting, satellite-based mobile communications, and communications in space. The effects of these changes will be felt well into the 21st century as countries around the world develop and deploy new communications systems to serve the needs of consumers, businesses, and governments. For the United States, the decisions made at the conference will critically affect how we develop new radio technologies and applications, how competitive this country will be in radio communications equipment and services, and how effectively the United States can exercise its role as a leader in world radio communication policymaking. This study of the outcomes and implications of WARC-92 was requested by the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. OTA was asked to evaluate the success of U.S. proposals at the conference, discuss the implications of the decisions made for U.S. technology and policy development, and identify options for improving U.S. participation in future world radio communication conferences.

  6. The DSN radio science system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckles, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Radio Science experiments at Voyager 1 Saturn encounter which included two atmospheric occultations, a planetary ring occultation, and ring scattering experiment were supported by Deep Space Stations in Australia (DSS 43) and Spain (DSS 63). The DSN Radio Science System data flow from receipt of the radio signals at the antenna to delivery of the recorded data to the project are described.

  7. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  8. The Viking Radio Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Tolson, R. H.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Stelzried, C. T.; Grossi, M. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Tyler, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    The Viking radio science investigations utilize data from the radio tracking and communications systems of the orbiters and landers. The primary areas of research are: (1) dynamical, surface, and internal properties of Mars, (2) atmospheric and ionospheric properties of Mars, and (3) solar system properties. The instrumentation and facilities used are those required for trajectory and orbit determination, spacecraft control, and data transmission. The X-band downlink on the orbiters is also used for communications experiments and for the improvement of radio science capabilities.

  9. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Seventy years of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Troitsk, Moscow region) was held in the conference hall of IZMIRAN on 25 November 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Moscow) "The role of cosmic rays and runaway electron breakdown in atmospheric lightning discharges"; (2) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research"; (3) Dorman L I (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region, CR & SWC, Israel) "Cosmic ray variations and space weather"; (4) Mareev E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects"; (5) Tereshchenko E D, Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Research Center, RAS, Murmansk) "Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects"; (6) Gulyaev Yu V, Armand N A, Efimov A I, Matyugov S S, Pavelyev A G, Savich N A, Samoznaev L N, Smirnov V V, Yakovlev O I (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region) "Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods"; (7) Kunitsyn V E (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Satellite radio probing and the radio tomography of the ionosphere"; (8) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space Research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences." Papers based on reports 2-8 are published below. The main contents of report 1 are reproduced in A V Gurevich's review, "Nonlinear effects in the ionosphere" [Phys. Usp. 50

  10. Allocations by the 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference is presented with viewgraphs. Allocations of radio frequency spectrum are addressed. Mobile satellite service, broadcast satellite service, and uplink power control beacons are also addressed.

  11. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Walker, C. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 10-11, 1996 at the Von Braun Civic Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the second NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 80 investigations and 69 principal investigators in FY96, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) scheduled for release in late 1996 by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the MSFC microgravity research facilities was held on June 12, 1996. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference and presentations made by various NASA microgravity science managers.

  12. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  13. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Aksnes, Kaare; Anderson, John D.; Asmar, Sami W.; Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Bird, Michael K.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Eidel, Werner; Grün, Eberhardt; Ip, Wing H.; Marouf, Essam; Morley, Trevor; Neubauer, Fritz M.; Rickman, Hans; Thomas, Nicolas; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Wallis, Max K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Mysen, Eirik; Olson, Oystein; Remus, Stefan; Tellmann, Silvia; Andert, Thomas; Carone, Ludmila; Fels, Markus; Stanzel, Christina; Audenrieth-Kersten, Iris; Gahr, Alexander; Müller, Anna-Liane; Stupar, Dusan; Walter, Christina

    2007-02-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft has been successfully launched on 2nd March 2004 to its new target comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The science objectives of the Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment address fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, its gravity field, its interplanetary orbit perturbed by nongravitational forces, its size and shape, its internal structure, the composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains, the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux. The masses of two asteroids, Steins and Lutetia, shall be determined during flybys in 2008 and 2010, respectively. Secondary objectives are the radio sounding of the solar corona during the superior conjunctions of the spacecraft with the Sun during the cruise phase. The radio carrier links of the spacecraft Telemetry, Tracking and Command (TT&C) subsystem between the orbiter and the Earth will be used for these investigations. An Ultrastable oscillator (USO) connected to both transponders of the radio subsystem serves as a stable frequency reference source for both radio downlinks at X-band (8.4 GHz) and S-band (2.3 GHz) in the one-way mode. The simultaneous and coherent dual-frequency downlinks via the High Gain Antenna (HGA) permit separation of contributions from the classical Doppler shift and the dispersive media effects caused by the motion of the spacecraft with respect to the Earth and the propagation of the signals through the dispersive media, respectively. The investigation relies on the observation of the phase, amplitude, polarization and propagation times of radio signals transmitted from the spacecraft and received with ground station antennas on Earth. The radio signals are affected by the medium through which the signals propagate (atmospheres, ionospheres, interplanetary medium, solar corona), by the gravitational influence of the planet on the spacecraft and

  14. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  15. Inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-01-01

    AGU will present its inaugural Science Policy Conference, 30 April to 3 May 2012, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, located in downtown Washington, D. C. This conference will bring together leading scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, press, and other stakeholders to discuss natural hazards, natural resources, oceans, and Arctic science and the role these sciences play in serving communities. To bridge the science and policy fields, AGU plans to host this conference every 2 years and focus on the applications of Earth and space sciences to serve local and national communities. "Our nation faces a myriad of challenges such as the sustainability of our natural resources, current and future energy needs, and the ability to mitigate and adapt to natural and manmade hazards," said Michael McPhaden, president of AGU. "It is essential that policies to address these challenges be built on a solid foundation of credible scientific knowledge."

  16. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, M.; Hagermann, A.; Rsi Team

    2003-04-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft, to be launched sometime in the near future, will be equipped with the Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment. This experiment addresses fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, its gravity field as well as nongravitational forces, nucleus size and shape, internal structure, composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains, the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux. RSI does not have a dedicated instrument on the Rosetta spacecraft. Instead, it uses the onboard radio subsystem responsible for communication between the spacecraftand the ground stations on Earth. The Rosetta radio subsystem is specially equipped with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) which significantly improves the sensitivity and accuracy of the measurements. The spacecraft is capable of receiving two uplink signals at S-band via the Low Gain Antennas (LGAs), or non-simultaneously receiving at either X-band (7100 MHz) or S-band via the HGA. The downlink transmission via the High Gain Antenna (HGA) can occur simultaneously at S-band and X-band or at S-band only via the LGAs. RSI is interested in the nondispersive frequency shifts (classical Doppler) anddispersive frequency shifts (due to the ionized propagation medium), the signal power and the polarization of the radio carrier waves.Variations in these parameters will yield information on the motion of the spacecraft, theperturbing forces acting on the spacecraft and the propagation medium. The primary and secondary science objectives of RSI at the comet, the asteroid flybys (planned in the original mission scenario) and during cruise are divided into categories begin{itemize} cometary gravity field investigations, comet nucleus investigations, cometary coma investigations asteroid mass and bulk density as the prime science objectives, and begin{itemize} solar corona sounding as secondary science

  17. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, M.

    The Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment addresses fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, its gravity field, nucleus size and shape, internal structure, composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains, the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux. RSI does not have a dedicated instrument on the Rosetta spacecraft but makes use of the onboard radio subsystem which is responsible for communication between the spacecraft and the ground stations on Earth. The Rosetta radio subsystem is specially equipped with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) which significantly improves the sensitivity and accuracy of the measurements. The spacecraft is capable of receiving two uplink signals non-simultaneously at either X-band (7100 MHz) or S-band via the High Gain Antenna (HGA). The downlink transmission via the HGA can occur simultaneously at S-band and X-band. RSI is interested in the nondispersive frequency shifts (classical Doppler) and dispersive frequency shifts (due to the ionized propagation medium), the signal power and the polarization of the radio carrier waves. Variations in these parameters will yield information on the motion of the spacecraft, the perturbing forces acting on the spacecraft and the propagation medium. The RSI science objectives are divided into the primary science objectives (a) cometary gravity field investigations, (b) comet nucleus investigations, (c) cometary coma investigations, (d) asteroid mass and bulk density and the secondary science objectives (e) solar corona sounding, (f) a search for gravitational waves at the comet, the asteroids flybys and during cruise.

  18. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  19. Radio Jove: Citizen Science for Jupiter Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, C. A.; Thieman, J.; Reyes, F. J.; Typinski, D.; Flagg, R. F.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Ashcraft, T.; Sky, J.; Cecconi, B.; Garcia, L. N.

    2016-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) has been operating as an educational activity for 18 years to introduce radio astronomy activities to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Recently some of our dedicated citizen science observers have upgraded their systems to better study radio emission from Jupiter and the Sun by adding dual-polarization spectrographs and wide-band antennas in the frequency range of 15-30 MHz. Some of these observations are being used in conjunction with professional telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), the Nancay Decametric Array, and the Ukrainian URAN2 Radio Telescope. In particular, there is an effort to support the Juno Mission radio waves instrument at Jupiter by using citizen science ground-based data for comparison and polarization verification. These data will be archived through a Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access (VESPA) archive (https://voparis-radiojove.obspm.fr/radiojove/welcome) for use by the amateur and professional radio science community. We overview the program and display recent observations that will be of interest to the science community.

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    John Grant, geologist, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, speaks at a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    NASA chief scientist, Dr. Waleed Abdalati, speaks at a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    Dawn Sumner, geologist, University of California, Davis speaks at a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  4. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  5. Radio science measurements with suppressed carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S.; Divsalar, D.; Oudrhiri, K.; Hamkins, J.

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early deep space missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. The type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of the CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that is presented here. Some numerical results are provided for a coded system.

  6. The Different Wavelengths of Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malecha, Jessica L.

    2005-01-01

    Radio Science covers many different avenues. This summer I attempted to work in each of the different avenues to learn the full range of subjects covered by Radio Science. I began my summer by traveling to Greece for the 3rd International Planetary Probe Workshop (IPPW-3). I went as a co-author of the Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) team paper. My first job when I returned from Greece was to update the Radio Science activities webpage. I then used Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to find radio signals in recorded Radio Science experimental data and determine frequencies and powers. I read about and ran Fortran code being used to determine wind measurements on Huygens. I formatted and revised the abstracts and data lengths for the DVD data sets. By performing these tasks, I also learned the Unix operating system as well as a small amount of shell programming.

  7. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    Michael Watkins (third from left), mission manager and project engineer, Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena, Calif., speaks at a press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. From left to right, Watkins is joined by Dwayne Brown, NASA Headquarters public affairs officer; Michael Meyer, lead scientist Mars Exploration Program, NASA Headquarters; Watkins; John Grant, geologist, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington; Dawn Sumner, geologist, University of California, Davis and John Grotzinger, MSL project scientist, JPL. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    John Grotzinger, Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project scientist, Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., answers a reporter's question at a press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The MSL is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    John Grotzinger, Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project scientist, Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., holds up a model of the MSL, or Curiosity, at a press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The MSL is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Radio interferometry: Techniques for Geodesy. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the development and application of radio interferometry as a tool for geophysical research is reported and discussed. Among the topics reviewed are: Surveys of is the Seventies, Movements, Terrestrial and Celestial, Degrees Kelvin and Degrees of Phase, the Mark 3 VLBI System, Waves of the Future and other Emissions, and Adherence and Coherence in Networks, and Plans.

  11. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  12. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  13. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  14. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    Michael Watkins (right), mission manager and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) engineer, Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena, Calif., speaks at a press conference, as Michael Meyer, Mars Exploration Program lead scientist looks on, at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The MSL, or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. U.K. radio science reviews available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coincident with its triennial general assemblies, the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) publishes an international review of the most significant scientific developments over the previous 3 years in the nine subject areas covered by URSI's commissions. To produce this review, international editors distill reviews from each member country of national scientific developments. For those scientists who wish to know more details about the significant scientific developments in radio science in the United Kingdom from 1981 to 1984, the British National Committee for Radio Science has made its reviews available.Unless otherwise noted, the following surveys are available from the Royal Society, 6 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG, Attention: C.R. Argent.

  17. The 11th Topical Conference on Radio frequency Power in Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Chan, V.S.

    1996-03-01

    The Eleventh Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas was held in Palm Springs, California under the sponsorship of General Atomics and the American Physical Society. These proceedings represent the papers presented at the Conference. The topics discussed included mode conversion heating and current drive experiments in TFTR, the coupling of high ICRF power in JT{minus}60U(through a 15 cm gap between the antenna and the plasma) as required for ITER, and the H{minus}mode in ASDEX{minus}U, antenna design and technology was discussed in some detail as well as the interaction of plasmas and radio frequency waves for fusion and non{minus}fusion applications. There are 102 papers published in the proceedings and 101 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  18. AGU supports Earth science radio show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephen

    Radio listeners across the country will soon get a daily introduction to the Earth and space sciences when a new syndicated radio program, “Earth and Sky,” debuts this fall. Produced by Deborah Byrd and Joel Block of Austin, Texas, the creative team behind the long-running “Star Date” radio program, “Earth and Sky” premieres on September 30. The program is being produced in association with the American Geophysical Union.“‘Earth and Sky’ is a new vehicle for the dissemination of accurate and up-to-date information on Earth and space sciences,” says AGU Executive Director Fred Spilhaus. “It has tremendous potential to advance one of AGU's fundamental missions: to make the results of scientific research available to the public.”

  19. The Portable Radio Science Receiver (RSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogstad, S.; Navarro, R.; Finley, S.; Goodhart, C.; Proctor, R.; Asmar, S.

    2009-08-01

    The radio science receiver (RSR) is an open-loop receiver that has been used in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) facilities for almost a decade and is a valuable resource used to record data for radio science experiments, radio astronomy observations, and very long baseline interferometry. In the last few years, NASA has needed to send RSRs to non-DSN facilities such as the Greenbank Telescope and Australia's Parkes and Narrabri antenna array for special events such as the Mars Exploration Rover entry, descent, and landing maneuver and the Huygens probe landing on Titan. The need to quickly and cost effectively ship and set up an RSR without taking away valuable existing DSN resources has led to the development of a prototype portable RSR (PRSR). The PRSR maintains most of the capabilities of a full RSR and greatly exceeds it in many ways while only a fraction of the cost and weight.

  20. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference %%,its to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance

  1. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Bennett, Nancy; McCauley, Dannah; Murphy, Karen; Poindexter, Samantha

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was close

  2. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 1 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Material Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in materials science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was

  3. A Versatile Planetary Radio Science Microreceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a low-power. programmable radio "microreceiver" that combines the functionality of two science instruments: a Relative Ionospheric Opacity Meter (riometer) and a swept-frequency, VTF/HF radio spectrometer. The radio receiver, calibration noise source, data acquisition and processing, and command and control functions are all contained on a single circuit board. This design is suitable for miniaturizing as a complete flight instrument. Several of the subsystems were implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), including the receiver detector, the control logic, and the data acquisition and processing blocks. Considerable efforts were made to reduce the power consumption of the instrument, and eliminate or minimize RF noise and spurious emissions generated by the receiver's digital circuitry. A prototype instrument was deployed at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, and operated in parallel with a traditional riometer instrument for approximately three weeks. The attached paper (accepted for publication by Radio Science) describes in detail the microreceiver theory of operation, performance specifications and test results.

  4. The National Educational Science Planning Conference.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-27

    7D-A126 184 THE NATIONAL IEDUCATIONAL SCIENCE PLANNING CONFEENCE- i/i (U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV &IIGHT-P TTERSON AFB ON U gS 2? JAN 83 FTD-ID(RS)T...OF STANDARDS-1963-A =7 FTD-ID(RS)T-1606-82 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION THE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SCIENCE PLANNING CONFERENCE DTIC EECTE %%C.. D...copy available.’ "ii * * GAP.CS-DSCLIME .o * F • .. ’ : ... THE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SCIENCE PLANNING CONFERENCE* Author unknown The Ministry of

  5. Math/science education action conference report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    On October 8--10, 1989, the US Department of Energy, the Lawrence Hall of Science, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory sponsored a Math/Science Education Action Conference in Berkeley, California. The conference was co-chaired by Admiral James D. Watkins, Secretary of Energy, and Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg Chairman of the Lawrence Hall of Science. Nearly 250 scientists, educators, business executives, and government leaders came together to develop a concrete plan of action for restructuring and revitalizing mathematics and science education. Their target was to improve education for an entire cohort of children--the Class of 2007, the children born this school year--and their governing principle was one of collaboration, both between Federal agencies, and between public and private sectors. The report of the conference co-chairmen and participants is provided in this document. 41 figs.

  6. Establishing the National Polar Radio Science Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-30

    the Prime Contractor to represent the NPRSC. Since the HAARP facility will be built in Alaska , the GI-UAF can provide various logistic support...tributIo , . . . s e i,2 =TIC QUALT INSPECTED 1 ,94 5 C 03 4. Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 99775.060 PHONE: 907474...objective of the NPRCS is to represent the radio science community’s interest in the HAARP (High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program) and to provide

  7. Atmospheric Calibration for Cassini Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Keihm, S.; Kroger, P.; Linfield, R.; Mahoney, M. J.; Tanner, A.; Teitelbaum, L.

    1996-01-01

    The signals from the Cassini spacecraft that will be affected by delay fluctuations in the Earth's atmosphere. These fluctuations are dominated by water vapor in the troposphere, and in the case of Gravitaional Wave Experiment (GWE), they are likely to be a limiting error source. A passive remote sensing system, centered around a water vapor radiometer (WVR), has been developed to provide calibrations of water vapor fluctuations during radio science experiments.

  8. Radio-science performance analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D. D.; Asmar, S. W.

    1995-02-01

    The Radio Science Systems Group (RSSG) provides various support functions for several flight project radio-science teams. Among these support functions are uplink and sequence planning, real-time operations monitoring and support, data validation, archiving and distribution functions, and data processing and analysis. This article describes the support functions that encompass radio-science data performance analysis. The primary tool used by the RSSG to fulfill this support function is the STBLTY program set. STBLTY is used to reconstruct observable frequencies and calculate model frequencies, frequency residuals, frequency stability in terms of Allan deviation, reconstructed phase, frequency and phase power spectral density, and frequency drift rates. In the case of one-way data, using an ultrastable oscillator (USO) as a frequency reference, the program set computes the spacecraft transmitted frequency and maintains a database containing the in-flight history of the USO measurements. The program set also produces graphical displays. Some examples and discussions on operating the program set on Galileo and Ulysses data will be presented.

  9. Radio-science performance analysis software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.; Asmar, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Radio Science Systems Group (RSSG) provides various support functions for several flight project radio-science teams. Among these support functions are uplink and sequence planning, real-time operations monitoring and support, data validation, archiving and distribution functions, and data processing and analysis. This article describes the support functions that encompass radio-science data performance analysis. The primary tool used by the RSSG to fulfill this support function is the STBLTY program set. STBLTY is used to reconstruct observable frequencies and calculate model frequencies, frequency residuals, frequency stability in terms of Allan deviation, reconstructed phase, frequency and phase power spectral density, and frequency drift rates. In the case of one-way data, using an ultrastable oscillator (USO) as a frequency reference, the program set computes the spacecraft transmitted frequency and maintains a database containing the in-flight history of the USO measurements. The program set also produces graphical displays. Some examples and discussions on operating the program set on Galileo and Ulysses data will be presented.

  10. 2013 Robotics Science & Systems Conference Travel Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-21

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The 2013 Robotics : Science and Systems Conference will bring together researchers working on algorithmic or mathematical...foundations of robotics , robotics applications, and analysis of robotic systems. High quality, original papers are solicited in all areas of robotics ...conference will be single track to allow attendees an opportunity to experience the best research in all areas of robotics . The program will include

  11. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

  12. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

  13. Bridging Science and Policy: The AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, E. R.; Uhlenbrock, K.; Landau, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, science has become inextricably linked to the political process. As such, it is more important now than ever for science to forge a better relationship with politics, for the health of both science and society. To help meet this need, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to engage its members, shape policy, and inform society about the excitement of Earth and space science and its role in developing solutions for the sustainability of the planet. In June 2013, AGU held its second annual Science Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. The goal of the conference is to provide a new forum for diverse discussions and viewpoints on the challenges and opportunities of science policy, with a focus on applications of Earth and space science that serve local, national, and international communities. The meeting brought together more than 300 scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, members of the press, and other stakeholders to discuss the topics concerning the Arctic, climate change, oceans, energy, technology and infrastructure, and natural hazards science as they relate to challenges impacting society. Sessions such as 'The Water-Energy Nexus,' 'Potential for Megadisasters,' 'The Changing Ocean and Impacts on Human Health,' and 'Drowning and Drought: Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change' are examples of some of the intriguing and timely science policy issues addressed at the conference. The findings from the conference were used to develop a summary report. The report highlights key facts and figures to be used as a resource in discussions with policy makers and other stakeholders regarding the conference topics. This presentation will discuss the goals and outcomes of the conference and how the event represents one of the many ways AGU is approaching its 'Science and Society' priority objective as part of the Union's strategic plan; namely by increasing the effectiveness and recognition of AGU among policy makers as an authoritative

  14. The Giotto radio-science experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Bird, M. K.; Buschert, H.; Esposito, P. B.; Porsche, H.; Volland, H.

    1986-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Giotto Radio Science Experiment (GRE) are to determine the columnar electron content of Comet Halley/s ionosphere and the cometary mass fluence from atmospheric drag by using the radio signals from Giotto during the Halley encounter. The radio science data (S and X-band Doppler and range measurements) will be collected at NASA/s deep-space 64 m tracking antenna at Tidbinbilla near Canberra, in Australia. In order to separate the effects of the terrestrial ionosphere and the interplanetary plasma, S-band Doppler measurements will also be taken at Tidbinbilla along the line-of-sight of Japan/s cometary probe Sakigake during the Giotto-Halley Encounter. The measurements of cometary electron content and mass fluence will be inverted to derive the spatial distribution of the electron and mass (dust and gas) density within Halley/s coma. The GRE is the only experiment on Giotto capable of measuring the low-energy (10 eV) electron bulk population of Halley/s ionosphere and the total cometary mass flow impacting upon the spacecraft.

  15. The Giotto radio-science experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Bird, M. K.; Buschert, H.; Esposito, P. B.; Porsche, H.; Volland, H.

    1986-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Giotto Radio Science Experiment (GRE) are to determine the columnar electron content of Comet Halley/s ionosphere and the cometary mass fluence from atmospheric drag by using the radio signals from Giotto during the Halley encounter. The radio science data (S and X-band Doppler and range measurements) will be collected at NASA/s deep-space 64 m tracking antenna at Tidbinbilla near Canberra, in Australia. In order to separate the effects of the terrestrial ionosphere and the interplanetary plasma, S-band Doppler measurements will also be taken at Tidbinbilla along the line-of-sight of Japan/s cometary probe Sakigake during the Giotto-Halley Encounter. The measurements of cometary electron content and mass fluence will be inverted to derive the spatial distribution of the electron and mass (dust and gas) density within Halley/s coma. The GRE is the only experiment on Giotto capable of measuring the low-energy (10 eV) electron bulk population of Halley/s ionosphere and the total cometary mass flow impacting upon the spacecraft.

  16. International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2014-03-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013) took place in Wuhan, P R China from 26-27 October 2013 at the Military Economics Academy. The conference is regularly organized, alternately in Romania and in P R China, by ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P R China, with the aim to serve as a platform for the exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The conference has been organized for the first time in 15-16 June 2012 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara, Romania. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: Economical sciences Engineering sciences Fundamental sciences Medical sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in economics, defense, medicine, etc. The number of registered participants was nearly 90 from 5 countries. During the two days of the conference 4 invited and 36 oral talks were delivered. A few of the speakers deserve a special mention: Mircea Octavian Popoviciu, Academy of Romanian Scientist — Timişoara Branch, Correlations between mechanical properties and cavitation erosion resistance for stainless steels with 12% chromium and variable contents of nickel; Carmen Eleonora Hărău, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, SWOT analysis of Romania's integration in EU; Ding Hui, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, Design and engineering analysis of material procurement mobile operation platform; Serban Rosu, University of Medicine and Pharmacy ''Victor Babeş'' Timişoara, Cervical and facial infections — a real life threat, among others. Based on the work presented at the conference, 14 selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers

  17. Radio Science from an Optical Communications Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Asmar, Sami; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    NASA is currently developing the capability to deploy deep space optical communications links. This creates the opportunity to utilize the optical link to obtain range, doppler, and signal intensity estimates. These may, in turn, be used to complement or extend the capabilities of current radio science. In this paper we illustrate the achievable precision in estimating range, doppler, and received signal intensity of an non-coherent optical link (the current state-of-the-art for a deep-space link). We provide a joint estimation algorithm with performance close to the bound. We draw comparisons to estimates based on a coherent radio frequency signal, illustrating that large gains in either precision or observation time are possible with an optical link.

  18. Radio Science from an Optical Communications Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Asmar, Sami; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    NASA is currently developing the capability to deploy deep space optical communications links. This creates the opportunity to utilize the optical link to obtain range, doppler, and signal intensity estimates. These may, in turn, be used to complement or extend the capabilities of current radio science. In this paper we illustrate the achievable precision in estimating range, doppler, and received signal intensity of an non-coherent optical link (the current state-of-the-art for a deep-space link). We provide a joint estimation algorithm with performance close to the bound. We draw comparisons to estimates based on a coherent radio frequency signal, illustrating that large gains in either precision or observation time are possible with an optical link.

  19. An Overview of Cassini Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A.; Rappaport, N.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Armstrong, J.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Johnston, D.; Fleischman, D.; Rochblatt, D.; Anderson, J.; Marouf, E.; Wong, K.; Thomson, F.; Flasar, F. M.; Schinder, P.; French, R.; McGhee, C.; Mohammed, P.; Steffes, P.; Nagy, A.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.; Ambrosini, R.; Flamini, E.

    2005-08-01

    The Cassini spacecraft, which has been in orbit about Saturn for over a year, is the first Radio Science platform to provide three downlink frequencies. In addition to the X-band telemetry link (3,56 cm w.l.), two other frequencies, S-band (13.04 cm), and Ka-band (0.94 cm) are available. This, plus the high SNR (>50 dBHz at X-band) afforded by the 4 m diameter s/c high gain antenna in combination with the excellent low noise receivers of the DSN, as well as overall system stabilities of 1 x 10-13 when referenced to the on-board ultra-stable oscillator (USO) in one-way operation, and 1 x 10-15 for a two-way link, make Cassini an unprecedented instrument of radio science. In addition to Gravitational Wave Search and Solar Conjunction experiments conducted during the cruise phase, the orbital tour phase of the mission has as its main radio science objectives: a) determination of the masses and gravity fields of Saturn's icy satellites, Titan, and Saturn through two-way tracking during fly-bys. To date, the masses of Phoebe, Iapetus, Dione and Enceladus have been measured, and will be reported here. b) Measurement of the structure and other properties of Saturn's rings through three-band occultation. Several near-diametric occultations at a high ring opening angle have been completed, and the results will be presented here. c) Measurement of the vertical structure of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Saturn. The same series of occultations have provided nearly equatorial occultations, and the results on the atmosphere structure, the ionosphere, and the abundances of microwave-absorbing gases in Saturn's atmosphere will be described here. In the remaining years of the Cassini mission, these results will be expanded to include the atmosphere, ionosphere, surface, and gravity field of Titan, the gravity field and masses of Saturn and the remaining icy satellites, and the completion of the Saturn objectives described above. The Cassini Radio Science Team wishes to express

  20. 78 FR 10180 - Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference AGENCY... public conference entitled ``The FDA/PhUSE Annual Computational Science Symposium.'' The purpose of the conference is to help the broader community align and share experiences to advance computational science. At...

  1. Radio science investigations with Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Balmino, Georges; Hinson, David P.; Sjogren, William L.; Smith, David E.; Woo, Richard; Asmar, Sami W.; Connally, Michael J.; Hamilton, Carole L.; Simpson, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    Mars Observer radio science investigations focus on two major areas of study: the gravity field and the atmosphere of Mars. Measurement accuracies expressed as an equivalent spacecraft velocity are expected to be of the order of 100 microns/s (for both types of investigations) from use of an improved radio transponder for two-way spacecraft tracking and a highly stable on-board oscillator for atmospheric occultation measurements. Planned gravity investigations include a combination of classical and modern elements. A spherical harmonic (or equivalent) field model of degree and order in the range 30-50 will be obtained, while interpretation will be in terms of internal stress and density models for the planet, using the topography to be obtained from the Mars Observer laser altimeter. Atmospheric investigations will emphasize precision measurement of the thermal structure and dynamics in the polar regions, which are regularly accessible as a result of the highly inclined orbit. Studies based on the measurements will include polar processes, cycling of the atmosphere between the poles, traveling baroclinic disturbances, small-scale waves and turbulence, the planetary boundary layer, and (possibly) the variability and altitude of the ionosphere.

  2. Radio science investigations with Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Balmino, Georges; Hinson, David P.; Sjogren, William L.; Smith, David E.; Woo, Richard; Asmar, Sami W.; Connally, Michael J.; Hamilton, Carole L.; Simpson, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    Mars Observer radio science investigations focus on two major areas of study: the gravity field and the atmosphere of Mars. Measurement accuracies expressed as an equivalent spacecraft velocity are expected to be of the order of 100 microns/s (for both types of investigations) from use of an improved radio transponder for two-way spacecraft tracking and a highly stable on-board oscillator for atmospheric occultation measurements. Planned gravity investigations include a combination of classical and modern elements. A spherical harmonic (or equivalent) field model of degree and order in the range 30-50 will be obtained, while interpretation will be in terms of internal stress and density models for the planet, using the topography to be obtained from the Mars Observer laser altimeter. Atmospheric investigations will emphasize precision measurement of the thermal structure and dynamics in the polar regions, which are regularly accessible as a result of the highly inclined orbit. Studies based on the measurements will include polar processes, cycling of the atmosphere between the poles, traveling baroclinic disturbances, small-scale waves and turbulence, the planetary boundary layer, and (possibly) the variability and altitude of the ionosphere.

  3. SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-01

    The Second SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering was held in San Diego from February 10-12, 2003. Total conference attendance was 553. This is a 23% increase in attendance over the first conference. The focus of this conference was to draw attention to the tremendous range of major computational efforts on large problems in science and engineering, to promote the interdisciplinary culture required to meet these large-scale challenges, and to encourage the training of the next generation of computational scientists. Computational Science & Engineering (CS&E) is now widely accepted, along with theory and experiment, as a crucial third mode of scientific investigation and engineering design. Aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, semiconductor, and other industrial sectors now rely on simulation for technical decision support. For federal agencies also, CS&E has become an essential support for decisions on resources, transportation, and defense. CS&E is, by nature, interdisciplinary. It grows out of physical applications and it depends on computer architecture, but at its heart are powerful numerical algorithms and sophisticated computer science techniques. From an applied mathematics perspective, much of CS&E has involved analysis, but the future surely includes optimization and design, especially in the presence of uncertainty. Another mathematical frontier is the assimilation of very large data sets through such techniques as adaptive multi-resolution, automated feature search, and low-dimensional parameterization. The themes of the 2003 conference included, but were not limited to: Advanced Discretization Methods; Computational Biology and Bioinformatics; Computational Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Computational Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Computational Electromagnetics; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Computational Medicine and Bioengineering; Computational Physics and Astrophysics; Computational Solid Mechanics and Materials; CS

  4. The Deep Space Network: An instrument for radio science research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Doppler and ranging data routinely generated at the Deep Space Stations of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory Deep Space Network serve as an excellent source of radio science information. Important radio science experiments based on Deep Space Network generated radio metric data have included confirmation of Einstein's Theory of Relativity, measurement of the masses and gravitational harmonics of the planets out to Saturn, and measurement of electron density distribution and turbulence in the solar corona. In response to an increased level of radio science requirements, the Deep Space Network chose in 1976 to implement a new radio science system, which was completed in late 1978. Key features include (1) highly phase stable open loop receivers, (2) reduction of recorded data bandwidth through use of programmed local oscillators, and (3) real time digitization and recording on computer compatible tape.

  5. Broadcasting-satellite and fixed-satellite service considerations after the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akima, H.

    1981-04-01

    The revisions of World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) of the inter-national radio regulations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) including the international table of frequency allocations are reviewed. The revised Radio Regulations will govern internationally the use of the radiofrequency spectrum and the geostationary satellite orbit for the rest of this century. Restricting its scope to the topics related to the broadcasting satellite and fixed satellite services in ITU Region 2 are reported.

  6. Amateur Planetary Radio Data Archived for Science and Education: Radio Jove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Cecconi, B.; Sky, J.; Garcia, L. N.; King, T. A.; Higgins, C. A.; Fung, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build simple radio telescopes, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth usually with simple dipole antennas. Some of the amateur observers have upgraded their receivers to spectrographs and their antennas have become more sophisticated as well. The data records compare favorably to more sophisticated professional radio telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Nancay Decametric Array. Since these data are often carefully calibrated and recorded around the clock in widely scattered locations they represent a valuable database useful not only to amateur radio astronomers but to the professional science community as well. Some interesting phenomena have been noted in the data that are of interest to the professionals familiar with such records. The continuous monitoring of radio emissions from Jupiter could serve as useful "ground truth" data during the coming Juno mission's radio observations of Jupiter. Radio Jove has long maintained an archive for thousands of Radio Jove observations, but the database was intended for use by the Radio Jove participants only. Now, increased scientific interest in the use of these data has resulted in several proposals to translate the data into a science community data format standard and store the data in professional archives. Progress is being made in translating Radio Jove data to the Common Data Format (CDF) and also in generating new observations in that format as well. Metadata describing the Radio Jove data would follow the Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) standard. The proposed archive to be used for long term preservation would be the Planetary Data System (PDS). Data sharing would be achieved through the PDS and the Paris Astronomical Data Centre (PADC) and the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO

  7. Thank you to 2016 reviewers of Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Phil; Salous, Sana

    2017-03-01

    On behalf of Radio Science, AGU, and the scientific community, the Editors and Associate Editors would like to thank everybody who reviewed manuscripts for Radio Science in 2016. Peer review is widely accepted as an indispensable part of science. The hours spent reading and commenting on manuscripts not only improves the manuscripts themselves, but it also ensures the scientific rigor of future research in our field. These contributions are vital. Many of those listed below went further and reviewed three or more manuscripts for Radio Science, and they are indicated in italics. Overall, Radio Science had 547 individuals provide reviews of 382 manuscripts. Thank you once again to all our reviewers for contributing your valuable time to this essential task. We look forward to a 2017 of exciting advances in our field and communicating those advances to our community and to the broader public.

  8. The Radio Jove Project: Citizen Science Contributes to Jupiter Decametric Radio Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Higgins, C. A.; Sky, J.; Cecconi, B.; Garcia, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build a simple radio telescope, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth. Regular monitoring of Jupiter and solar radio storms is typical, and Radio Jove amateur observations have improved in their scientific utility. Some observers have upgraded their equipment to make spectroscopic observations in the frequency band from 15-30 MHz. These observations can be particularly useful when made in conjunction with professional telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), the Nancay Decametric Array, the Ukrainian UTR-2 Radio Telescope, etc. The coming Juno mission to Jupiter will observe the radio emissions while in orbit at Jupiter and will benefit from the Earth-based perspective provided by frequent monitoring of the emissions. With these goals in mind work is now underway to provide simple methods of archiving the Radio Jove observations for use by the amateur and professional radio science community in scientifically useful and easily analyzed formats. The data will be ingested to both Radio Jove specific databases and to archives containing a variety of "waves" data. Methods are being developed to assure the scientific validity of contributed data such as certification of the observers. Amateur scientists have made overwhelming contributions to optical astronomy and we believe the same is possible within the radio astronomy community as well.

  9. DSN radio science system description and requirements. [for satellite radio astronomy experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulhall, B. D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The data system created to collect the functions performed by the Deep Space Network in support of spacecraft radio science experiments is described. Some of the major functional requirements presently being considered for the system are delineated.

  10. Implementation of the radio science subsystem in the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    The functional characteristics of a subsystem for support of radio science data acquisition requirements are described. The factors that were of major importance in the design and implementation approach are considered.

  11. Special Issue: European Conference on Surface Science 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opila, Robert L.; Ertas, Gulay

    2015-11-01

    The present Special Issue of Applied Surface Science is intended to provide a collection of peer-reviewed contributions presented at the Symposium "European Conference on Surface Science" held in Antalya (Turkey), August 31-September 5, 2014. This conference is organized annually through the joint efforts of the Surface Science Division of IUVSTA and the Surface and Interface Section of the European Physical Society (EPS). The ECOSS conference series started in 1978 in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and has been held in various cities throughout Europe during the past years. This is the first time that an ECOSS conference was held in Turkey, with the chairmanship of Prof. Sefik Suzer of Bilkent University, Ankara.

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2015-06-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2014) took place in Hunedoara, Romania from 2-4 October 2014 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara. The conference takes place alternately in Romania and in P.R. China and is organized by "Politehnica" University of Timisoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P.R. China, with the aim to serve as a platform for exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences and to promote the communication between scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: 1. Economical Sciences 2. Engineering Sciences 3. Fundamental Sciences 4. Medical Sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has the potential for application in economics, defense, medicine, etc. There were nearly 100 registered participants from six countries, and four invited and 56 oral talks were delivered during the two days of the conference. Based on the work presented at the conference, selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new research in the various fields of Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Mathematical Engineering. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering to the scientific community to promote further research in these areas. We sincerely hope that the papers published in this volume will contribute to the advancement of knowledge in their respective fields.

  13. Educating Tomorrow's Science Teachers: STEM ACT Conference Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternheim, Morton M.; Feldman, Allan; Berger, Joseph B.; Zhao, Yijie

    2008-01-01

    This document reports on the findings of an NSF-funded conference (STEM ACT) on the alternative certification of science teachers. The conference explored the issues that have arisen in science education as a result of the proliferation of alternative certification programs in the United States, and to identify the research that needs to be done…

  14. HamSCI: The Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Moses, M. L.; Earle, G. D.; McGwier, R. W.; Miller, E. S.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Silver, H. W.; Ceglia, F.; Pascoe, D.; Sinanis, N.; Smith, P.; Williams, R.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Gerrard, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Amateur (or "ham") radio operators are individuals with a non-pecuniary interest in radio technology, engineering, communications, science, and public service. They are licensed by their national governments to transmit on amateur radio frequencies. In many jurisdictions, there is no age requirement for a ham radio license, and operators from diverse backgrounds participate. There are more than 740,000 hams in the US, and over 3 million (estimated) worldwide. Many amateur communications are conducted using transionospheric links and thus affected by space weather and ionospheric processes. Recent technological advances have enabled the development of automated ham radio observation networks (e.g. the Reverse Beacon Network, www.reversebeacon.net) and specialized operating modes for the study of weak-signal propagation. The data from these networks have been shown to be useful for the study of ionospheric processes. In order to connect professional researchers with the volunteer-based ham radio community, HamSCI (Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation, www.hamsci.org) has been established. HamSCI is a platform for publicizing and promoting projects that are consistent with the following objectives: (1) Advance scientific research and understanding through amateur radio activities. (2) Encourage the development of new technologies to support this research. (3) Provide educational opportunities for the amateur community and the general public. HamSCI researchers are working with the American Radio Relay League (ARRL, www.arrl.org) to publicize these objectives and recruit interested hams. The ARRL is the US national organization for amateur radio with a membership of over 170,000 and a monthly magazine, QST. HamSCI is currently preparing to support ionospheric research connected to the 21 Aug 2017 Total Solar Eclipse by expanding coverage of the Reverse Beacon Network and organizing a large-scale ham radio operating event ("QSO Party") to generate data during the

  15. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference - A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed description of a Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software package for communication satellite systems planning is presented. This software provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC - 88) on the use of the GEO and the planning of space services utilizing GEO. The features of the NASARC software package are described, and detailed information is given about the function of each of the four NASARC program modules. The results of a sample world scenario are presented and discussed.

  16. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference - A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed description of a Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software package for communication satellite systems planning is presented. This software provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC - 88) on the use of the GEO and the planning of space services utilizing GEO. The features of the NASARC software package are described, and detailed information is given about the function of each of the four NASARC program modules. The results of a sample world scenario are presented and discussed.

  17. Radiofrequency use and management. Impacts from the World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    The impacts on the United States of key decisions taken at the general World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-79) and options for preparation and participation in future international telecommunication conferences were evaluated. Congressional concern for the adequacy of existing machinery and procedures for U.S. policymaking and preparation for such conferences were reflected. WARC-79 and related international conferences demonstrate that contention for access to the radio spectrum and its important collateral element, the geostationary orbit for communication satellites, presents new and urgent challenges to vital U.S. national interests. Given the complexities of spectrum management in a changing world environment and the increased importance of telecommunications to both developed and developing nations, it is unlikely that traditional U.S. approaches to these issues are sufficient to protect vital U.S. interests in the future. Problems require strategies not yet developed or tested.

  18. Radio Sounding Science at High Powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Markus, T.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions like the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) planned to orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa can fully utilize a variable power radio sounder instrument. Radio sounding at 1 kHz to 10 MHz at medium power levels (10 W to kW) will provide long-range magnetospheric sounding (several Jovian radii) like those first pioneered by the radio plasma imager instrument on IMAGE at low power (less than l0 W) and much shorter distances (less than 5 R(sub E)). A radio sounder orbiting a Jovian icy moon would be able to globally measure time-variable electron densities in the moon ionosphere and the local magnetospheric environment. Near-spacecraft resonance and guided echoes respectively allow measurements of local field magnitude and local field line geometry, perturbed both by direct magnetospheric interactions and by induced components from subsurface oceans. JIMO would allow radio sounding transmissions at much higher powers (approx. 10 kW) making subsurface sounding of the Jovian icy moons possible at frequencies above the ionosphere peak plasma frequency. Subsurface variations in dielectric properties, can be probed for detection of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  19. The Radio Meteor Zoo: a citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calders, S.; Verbeeck, C.; Lamy, H.; Martínez Picar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scientists from the BRAMS radio meteor network have started a citizen science project called Radio Meteor Zoo in collaboration with Zooniverse in order to identify meteor reflections in BRAMS spectrograms. First, a small-scale version of the Radio Meteor Zoo was carried out with a sample of meteor identifications in 12 spectrograms by 35 volunteers. Results are presented here and allowed us to define a method that reliably detects meteor reflections based on the identifications by the volunteers. It turns out that, if each spectrogram is inspected by 10 volunteers, hit and false detection percentages of 95% respectively 6% are expected. The Radio Meteor Zoo is online at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/radio-meteor-zoo. Citizen scientists are kindly invited to inspect spectrograms.

  20. Planeta Vivo Radio: a 365 chapter story between science and radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, David; Villalba, Eustaquio; Rodríguez, Fátima; Álvarez, Domingo; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    PLANETA VIVO RADIO (http://www.planetavivoradio.es/) is a joint effort of the Spanish National Public Radio in the Canary Islands (RNE-Canarias) and Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN) to broadcast scientific and technological advances related to Earth Sciences and the Earth Planet. This initiative was born in a very special year, 2008, the International Year of the Planet Earth, and is actually co-financed by the Parque Científico y Tecnológico de Tenerife (PCTT) and co-financed by the PROCIVMAC project. This 50 minutes weekly radio program broadcast scientists' interviews and scientific/technological reports related to the state of the art of several topics of scientific and social interest in addition to a weekly report of natural hazards that have occurred in the Earth Planet during the last week turning "PLANETAVIVORADIO" as a milestone of the Earth Sciences for the society. Since that moment, Planeta Vivo Radio has been broadcasted through 365 weeks in a continuous way. Several modifications have been added to the program, being divided today into eight different parts, a mix with interviews, reports, ephemerals, bios, agenda and the review to the most prominent natural hazards occurring through the last seven days. Since October 2015, Planeta Vivo Radio is the longest science radio program ever broadcasted in the Canary Islands.

  1. A Deep Space Network Portable Radio Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre P.; Sigman, Elliott H.; Chandra, Kumar; Trinh, Joseph T.; Navarro, Robert; Rogstad, Stephen P.; Goodhart, Charles E.; Proctor, Robert C.; Finley, Susan G.; White, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    The Radio Science Receiver (RSR) is an open-loop receiver installed in NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN), which digitally filters and records intermediate-frequency (IF) analog signals. The RSR is an important tool for the Cassini Project, which uses it to measure perturbations of the radio-frequency wave as it travels between the spacecraft and the ground stations, allowing highly detailed study of the composition of the rings, atmosphere, and surface of Saturn and its satellites.

  2. Applications of correlator chips in radio science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral line observations in radio astronomy require simultaneous power estimation in many (often hundreds to thousands) frequency bins. Digital autocorrelation spectrometers, which appeared thirty years ago, are now being implemented in VLSI. The same architecture can be used to implement transversal digital filters. This was done at the Arecibo Observatory for pulse compression in radar observations of Venus.

  3. Editorial: Special Issue (SI): International Conference on Science Education (ICSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Zhang, BaoHui

    2014-04-01

    In the context of science education globalization, the International Conference on Science Education was held in Nanjing, China, in October 2012. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for science education researchers from China and from the rest of the world to exchange research ideas and best practices in science education. A call for papers for a special issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology was made to all conference participants, and a set of six articles was resulted from a standard peer review process. This set of six articles provides a snapshot of research in China and in some other countries, and represents a dialogue between Chinese science education researchers and science education researchers from other countries. We call for more exchange and collaboration in science education between China and the rest of the world.

  4. The World Administrative Radio Conference 1992 and its impact on ESA's programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, G. F.; Fromm, H.-H.; Galligan, K. P.; Rogard, R.; Otter, M.

    1992-08-01

    The World Administrative Radio Conference 1992, known familiarly as WARC-92, was held in Malaga-Torremolinos between 3 February and 3 March this year. This WARC, attended by more than 1400 delegates from 127 Member Countries of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and numerous observer organizations such as ESA, may well have been the last of the large WARCs of recent decades.

  5. Remote Radio Sounding Science for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Gallagher, D.

    2003-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's top side ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments, and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the moon surfaces vary in response to magnetic field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans. Radio sounding at 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide globally-determined electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. Subsurface variations in conductivity, can be investigated by radio sounding from 10 MHz to 40 MHz allowing the determination of the presence of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  6. Remote Radio Sounding Science for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Gallagher, D.

    2003-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's top side ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments, and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the moon surfaces vary in response to magnetic field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans. Radio sounding at 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide globally-determined electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. Subsurface variations in conductivity, can be investigated by radio sounding from 10 MHz to 40 MHz allowing the determination of the presence of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  7. Impact of the 1985 Space World Administrative Radio Conference on frequency/orbit planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-ORB-85) was held to determine which space radio services should be planned and which planning methods should be used. The second session of this Conference (WARC-ORB-88) will meet to develop the required plans. This paper presents the results of WARC-ORB-85, assesses the impact of those decisions, and identifies the intersessional work to be conducted by administrations and the CCIR (Consultative Committee on International Radio). The major decisions of WARC-ORB-85 were: (1) the restriction of additional planning to the fixed satellite service at identified frequencies; and (2) the selection of a planning method consisting of two parts (a) an allotment plan, and (b) improved procedures. The paper also discusses WARC-ORB-85 decisions relative to the Region 2 broadcast satellite service plans at 12 GHz, feederlink planning for Regions 1 and 3 broadcast satellites at 12 GHz, and sound broadcast satellite service.

  8. Radio Science Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Castillo, J. C.; Folkner, W. M.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schubert, G.; Spilker, T. R.; Tyler, G. L.

    2003-01-01

    Radio Science experiments have been conducted on most deep space missions leading to numerous scientific discoveries. A set of concepts and approaches are proposed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) to apply Radio Science tools to investigate the interior structures of the Galilean Satellites and address key questions on their thermal and dynamical evolution. Measurements are identified that utilize the spacecraft's telecommunication system. Additional instruments can augment these measurements in order to leverage observational synergies. Experiments are also offered for the purpose of investigating the atmospheres and surfaces of the satellites.

  9. Exploration of the Saturnian System with Cassini Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliore, Arvydas J.

    1999-01-01

    The ongoing Galileo mission has provided many new insights into the Jovian system. Among them are new discoveries from the Radio Science investigations , including multiple measurements of the Jovian ionosphere, the ionospheres and plasma environments of Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, and the internal structure of the Galilean satellites. The Cassini spacecraft, which will be placed in orbit about Saturn in 2004, will conduct Radio Science investigations of many aspects of the Saturnian system with a radio instrument of unprecedented stability and versatility. It will use radio links at three wavelengths : S-band(13 cm), X-band (3.5 cm), and Ka-band (1 cm) to probe the atmospheres and ionospheres of Saturn and Titan and Saturn's rings by means of radio occultations, and to measure the masses and gravity fields of Saturn, Titan, and selected icy satellites by precision tracking. In addition, the stability of the radio instrument will be utilized to conduct a search for gravitational waves during solar oppositions, and to precisely measure general relativistic effects during solar conjunctions during the interplanetary cruise prior to arrival at Saturn.

  10. Undergraduate Teaching in the Animal Sciences, Proceedings of a Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of a conference which reviewed the content of undergraduate animal science curricula, content of courses in the animal sciences, and methods and materials used in undergraduate teaching in the animal sciences are presented in this bulletin. These individual papers are included: Trends in Animal Agriculture and the Future of…

  11. PREFACE: Tsukuba International Conference on Materials Science 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijima, Masashi; Ohshima, Kenichi; Kojima, Seiji; Nagasaki, Yukio; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Kim, Hee Young; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Nakamura, Junji; Yamamoto, Yohei; Goto, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Tsukuba International Conference on Materials Science (TICMS) was held from 28th August to 6th September, 2013 for the celebration of 40th year anniversary of the University of Tsukuba. The conference was organized by the Division of Materials Science, in cooperation with the Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, and Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science. The purpose of the conference was to provide a unique forum for researchers and students working in various fields of materials science, which have been progressing so rapidly that no single society could cover. The conference consists of following seven workshops to cover various fields. The organizing committee believed that the conference gave all participants new insights into the widespread development of materials science and enhanced the circulation, among them, of information released at the conference. The organizers are grateful for the financial support from University of Tsukuba. This volume contains 25 selected papers from invited and contributed papers, all of which have been screened on the basis of the standard review process of the program committee. The editors express their thanks to those authors who contributed the papers published in this proceedings, which reflects the scientific value of the conference. Nov. 20, 2013 Seiji Kojima, Prof. Dr. Chair, Division of Materials Science Chair, Doctoral Program in Materials Science TICMS 2013 (http://www.ticonfms.tsukuba.ac.jp/) Workshop list The 13th Japan-Korea Joint Workshop on Materials Science Summer School of Biomaterials Science The Japan-Korea Joint Workshop on Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies The 2nd Workshop on THz Radiation from Intrinsic Josephson Junctions The 3rd German-Japan Nanoworkshop TICMS and IWP Joint Workshop on Conjugated Polymers International Workshop on Science and Patents (IWP) 2013

  12. MPS Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Melvin; Castelaz, M. W.; Moffett, D.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.

    2006-12-01

    The intent of the “Sensing the Radio Sky” program is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year program began in the summer of 2004 and was completed in December 2006. The program involved a team of 12 undergraduate physics and multimedia majors and four faculty mentors from Furman University, University of North Carolina-Asheville and Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). One component of the program is the development and production of a projection cylinder for the portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The final draft is complete and will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  13. Puerto Ricans in Science and Biomedicine: Report of a Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC.

    Twelve divisions and institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cosponsored this conference to examine the barriers to participation of Puerto Ricans in the United States to careers in science and biomedicine. Areas addressed during the conference included: (1) perspectives from the NIH; (2) historical and modern perspectives of…

  14. NSF Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, L.; Boltuch, D.; Fultz, C.; Buck, S.; Smith, T.; Harris, R.; Moffett, D.; LaFratta, M.; Walsh, L.; Castelaz, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The intent of the "Sensing the Radio Sky" project is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year project began in the summer of 2004. A total of twelve interns and four faculty mentors from Furman University and UNCA have participated at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute to develop the Radio Sky project. The project united physics and multimedia majors and allowed these students to apply their knowledge of different disciplines to a common goal. One component of the project is the development and production of a cylinder to be displayed in portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The project is near completion and the final draft will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. The development of the Radio Sky project has also provided a template for potential similar projects that examine our universe in different wavelengths, such as gamma ray, x-ray, and infrared. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  15. AGU Science Policy Conference: 2012 Recap and 2013 Preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, E. R.; Landau, E. A.; Uhlenbrock, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, science has become inextricably linked to the political process. As such, it is more important now than ever for science to forge a better relationship with politics, for the health of both science and society. To help meet this need, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) strives to engage its members, shape policy, and inform society about the excitement of Earth and space science and its role in developing solutions for the sustainability of the planet. In the spring of 2012, AGU held its inaugural Science Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. The goal of this new conference is to ensure diverse discussions and viewpoints on the challenges and opportunities of Earth and space science policy. The meeting brought together more than 300 scientists, policymakers, industry professionals, members of the press, and other stakeholders to discuss Arctic, oceans, natural resources, and natural hazards science as they relate to challenges impacting society. Sessions such as Hydraulic Fracturing, Mitigation and Resiliency to Severe Weather, Governance and Security in the Arctic, and Ocean Acidification are examples of some of the intriguing science policy issues addressed at the conference. The AGU Science Policy Conference will be an annual spring event in Washington, D.C.

  16. Radio and Plasma Waves Synergistic Science Opportunities with EJSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; André, Nicolas; Bougeret, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    The radio and plasma wave (RPW) diagnostics provide a unique access to critical parameters of space plasma, in particular in planetary and satellite environments. Concerning giant planets, this has been demonstrated by major results obtained by the radio investigation on the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, but also during the Ulysses, Voyager, and Pioneer flybys of Jupiter. Several other missions, past or in flight, demonstrate the uniqueness and relevance of RPW diagnostics to basic problems of astrophysics. The EJSM mission consists of two platforms operating in the Jupiter environment: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO will execute a choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. The EJSM mission architecture hence offers unique opportunities for synergistic and complementary observations that significantly enhance the overall science return of the mission. In this paper, we will first review new and unique science aspects of the Jupiter system that may benefit from different capabilities of RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO: spectral and polarization information, mapping of radio sources, measurements of in situ plasma waves, currents, thermal noise, dust and nano-particle detection and characterization. We will then illustrate unique synergistic and complementary science opportunities offered by RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO, both in terms of Satellite science and in terms of Magnetospheric Science.

  17. Thank you to 2015 reviewers of Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Phil; Salous, Sana

    2016-04-01

    On behalf of Radio Science, AGU, and the scientific community, the editors and associate editors would like to thank everybody who reviewed manuscripts for Radio Science in 2015. Peer review is widely accepted as an indispensable part of science. The hours spent reading and commenting on manuscripts not only improve the manuscripts themselves, but also ensure the scientific rigor of future research in our field. These contributions are vital. Many of those listed below went further and reviewed three or more manuscripts for our journal, and they are indicated in italics. Overall, reviewers contributed 591 individual reviews of 282 manuscripts. Thank you once again to all our reviewers for contributing your valuable time to this essential task. We look forward to a 2016 of exciting advances in our field and communicating those advances to our community and to the broader public.

  18. 2017 International Conference on Space Science and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-05-01

    radio networks O B Abdulghafoor, M M.R. Shaat, M Ismail, R Nordin, T Yuwono and O N A Alwahedy Analysis of non-rainy attenuation on earth-space path in Ota, Southwest Nigeria T V Omotosho, S A Akinwumi, M R Usikalu, O O Ometan, M O Adewusi and M Abdullah Installing the earth station of Ka-band satellite frequency in Malaysia: conceptual framework for site decision M R Mahmud, M N M Reba, S W Jaw, A Arsyad and M A M Ibrahim Interdisciplinary Space Science Estimation water vapor content using the mixing ratio method and validated with the ANFIS PWV model W Suparta, K M Alhasa and M S J Singh Measurements of radioactivity levels in part of Ota Southwestern Nigeria: Implications for radiological hazards indices and excess lifetime cancer-risks K D Oyeyemi, M R Usikalu, A P Aizebeokhai, J A Achuka and O Jonathan Micro - ring resonator with variety of gap width for acid rain sensing application: preliminary study B Mulyanti, H Ramza, R E Pawinanto, J A Rahman, M S Ab-Rahman, W S Putro, L Hasanah and A B Pantjawati Development of a solar charged laboratory bench power supply W A Ayara, T V Omotosho, M R Usikalu, M S J Singh and W Suparta Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs M R Usikalu, O O Ola, J A Achuka, I O Babarimisa and W A Ayara Impacts of ionospheric electric fields on the GPS tropospheric delays during geomagnetic storms in Antarctica Wayan Suparta Photographs from the conference can be found in the PDF

  19. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.:

  20. Superlubricity and friction
  21. Electronic and phononic contributions to friction
  22. Friction on the atomic and molecular scales
  23. van der Waals friction and Casimir force
  24. Molecular motor and friction
  25. Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems
  26. Wear and crack on the nanoscale
  27. Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation
  28. Friction and chaos
  29. Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts
  30. Friction of powder
  31. The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  32. Plutonium Futures -- The Science. Topical Conference on Plutonium and Actinides. AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 532 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, K.K.S.; Kim, K.C.

    2000-12-31

    Presentations at this conference covered the topics of materials science/nuclear fuels, condensed matter physics, actinides in the environment/separation and analysis, actinides/processing, actinides/TRU wastes, materials science, TRU waste forms, nuclear fuels/isotopes, separations and process chemistry, actinides in the environment, detection and analysis, Pu and Pu compounds, actinide compounds and complexes.

  1. Atmospheric, Ionospheric, Surface and Radio Propagation Studies With The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment Vera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, B.; Pätzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Treumann, R. A.; Simpson, R. A.; Hinson, D.

    The Venus Radio Science experiment (VeRa) onboard the proposed Venus Express Orbiter will make use of the spacecraft radio carrier signals at X/S-band and an ultrastable oscillator reference frequency source (USO, Allan deviation 10 ­13 ) integrated into the onboard transponder system. VeRa will perform : radio sounding of the Venusian ionosphere from 80 km up to the ionopause (300km to 600 km), radio sounding of the neutral atmosphere from the cloud deck (35km to 40 km) to 100 km altitude, measurements of dielectric properties and roughness of the Venusian surface, studies of the propagation of radio waves in the inner solar system at superior and inferior solar conjunctions. We shall discuss the experimental methods (spacecraft occultation and bistatic radar) and conclude on the achievable accuracies and sensitivities. We shall indicate where improvements in comparison to the Pioneer Venus observations can be expected and examine VeRa`s contribution to the understanding of plasmaphysical processes in the solar wind and planetary ionospheric environment. Effects of the solar coronal plasma and the gravitational field of the Sun on the observables (Doppler, group delay) will also be addressed.

  2. Harmonization based on regulatory science between scientific and commercial radio uses in a case of ultrawideband radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Ryuji; Iinatti, Jari; Sameshima, Keiko

    2016-12-01

    Harmonization for scientific and commercial radio uses is one of the unsolved problems in academia, industry, and regulatory bodies. The demands for commercial radio, mobile communications, and broadcasting have significantly increased over the past few decades; therefore, interference has become a major concern. There is an increasing need to prevent such interferences, for example, between commercial radio systems and other potentially sensitive radio systems such as those used for radio astronomy or studies. When discussing the fairness in resolving such conflicts, regulatory science may be a useful multidisciplinary approach as it scientifically investigates the advantages and disadvantages of a new application or technology for conflicts between different stakeholders through a mathematical analysis of risks versus benefits of the given technology. Such an analysis enables fair rules or regulations to be made. In this study, we apply the above-mentioned concept to harmonize the scientific and commercial uses of radio. After a brief introduction to regulatory science, a case study about the coexistence between ultrawideband commercial radio systems and radio astronomy is considered. Finally, a proposal by International Union of Radio Science, Japan, to the Science Council of Japan in the Cabinet Office to establish a "Center for Coexistence and Harmonization of Scientific and Commercial Uses of Radio Waves" is explained.

  3. Reflections on a Career in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peden, Irene C.

    2006-12-01

    Why would a WWII-generation teenager select an engineering career? Dr. Peden outlines the background, motivations and patterns of personal interest that led to her choice in the wartime “climate” of that period, including the influence of teachers and parents. She remembers experiencing the need to undertake graduate studies 10 years later, and recalls why she chose an academic career. She later became a leader in campus and national efforts to improve the professional climate for women, and will comment on the variation s in campus attitudes toward diversity over the years. Finally, she offers her thoughts on the special challenges for faculty that are presented by student views of their own responsibilities and roles in engineering education, and reflects on the impact of these factors on the science/mathematics/engineering “pipeline” .

  4. Digital signal processing in the radio science stability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Telecommunications Division has built a stability analyzer for testing Deep Space Network installations during flight radio science experiments. The low-frequency part of the analyzer operates by digitizing wave signals with bandwidths between 80 Hz and 45 kHz. Processed outputs include spectra of signal, phase, amplitude, and differential phase; time series of the same quantities; and Allan deviation of phase and differential phase. This article documents the digital signal-processing methods programmed into the analyzer.

  5. FOREWORD: Proceedings of the Nordic Conference on Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessa, V. M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The present issue of Physica Scripta contains the Proceedings of the Nordic Conference on Surface Science. This meeting was held in Tampere, Finland 18-20 August, 1982. The original motivation for the conference was to bring together the various Nordic research groups engaged in surface science and related activities. However, soon after the initial announcement the conference attracted considerable interest also beyond the Nordic area, and it eventually obtained a truly international character: more than half of the 150 participants came from non-Nordic countries. At least to some extent this reflects the high international esteem of surface physics and chemistry in the Nordic area, which hosts some of the strongest research centers in this exciting and important branch of science. The conference provided an opportunity to exchange information in this rapidly moving field, to establish new contacts and strengthen old ones. It showed that there certainly is scope for increased collaboration between various groups, both within the Nordic countries and also more internationally. The opinion was expressed by several participants that this conference was a particularly successful one, both in scientific content and in format. It is the hope of the organizers of the Nordic Conference on Surface Science that this would serve as an incentive to consider having this kind of meetings on a more or less regular basis, as an established event in the Nordic surface science community. The cross-disciplinary nature of surface science is clearly reflected in these proceedings. The topics discussed range from those close to more traditional condensed matter spectroscopy through physical chemistry to biology. The formidable array of sophisticated techniques developed for surface investigations is given ample attention, but nevertheless the proceedings also show the trend towards more problem-oriented instead of technique-oriented emphasis. The proceedings are organized in accordance

  6. XVII International AIDS Conference: From Evidence to Action - Basic science

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the sessions in which basic science research was presented at the XVII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2008). It also provides an analysis of basic science issues which generated significant discussion and debate at the conference and are likely to have implications for future laboratory and clinical research. Data presented at AIDS 2008 confirmed the speed with which HIV establishes latent viral reservoirs following infection and the resulting challenges to viral eradication given how effectively HIV proviral RNA inserts itself into human DNA within these reservoirs. Studies also raised questions about the source of residual viremia and how these might be targeted by novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:19811669

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on Applied Sciences 2015 (ICAS2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences ICAS2015 took place in Wuhan, China on June 3-5, 2015 at the Military Economics Academy of Wuhan. The conference is regularly organized, alternatively in Romania and in P.R. China, by Politehnica University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P.R. China, with the joint aims to serve as a platform for exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The topics of the conference cover a comprehensive spectrum of issues from: >Economical Sciences and Defense: Management Sciences, Business Management, Financial Management, Logistics, Human Resources, Crisis Management, Risk Management, Quality Control, Analysis and Prediction, Government Expenditure, Computational Methods in Economics, Military Sciences, National Security, and others... >Fundamental Sciences and Engineering: Interdisciplinary applications of physics, Numerical approximation and analysis, Computational Methods in Engineering, Metallic Materials, Composite Materials, Metal Alloys, Metallurgy, Heat Transfer, Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics, Reliability, Electrical Engineering, Circuits and Systems, Signal Processing, Software Engineering, Data Bases, Modeling and Simulation, and others... The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in Engineering, Economics, Defense, etc. The number of participants was 120 from 11 countries (China, Romania, Taiwan, Korea, Denmark, France, Italy, Spain, USA, Jamaica, and Bosnia and Herzegovina). During the three days of the conference four invited and 67 oral talks were delivered. Based on the work presented at the conference, 38 selected papers have been included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new research

  8. Visions for a sustainable world: A conference on science, technology and social responsibility. Conference report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes the organization, activities, and outcomes of Student Pugwash USA`s 1992 International Conference, Visions for a Sustainable World: A Conference on Science, Technology and Social Responsibility. The conference was held June 14--20, 1992 at Emory University, and brought together 94 students and over 65 experts from industry, academe, and government. The conference addressed issues ranging from global environmental cooperation to the social impacts of the Human Genome Project to minority concerns in the sciences. It provided a valuable forum for talented students and professionals to engage in critical dialogue on many interdisciplinary issues at the juncture of science, technology and society. The conference challenged students -- the world`s future scientists, engineers, and political leaders -- to think broadly about global problems and to devise policy options that are viable and innovative. The success of the conference in stimulating interest, understanding, and enthusiasm about interdisciplinary global issues is clearly evident from both the participants` feedback and their continued involvement in Student Pugwash USA programs. Six working groups met each morning. The working group themes included: environmental challenges for developing countries; energy options: their social and environmental impact; health care in developing countries; changing dynamics of peace and global security; educating for the socially responsible use of technology; ethics and the use of genetic information. The conference was specifically designed to include mechanisms for ensuring its long-term impact. Participants were encouraged to focus on their individual role in helping resolve global issues. This was achieved through each participant`s development of a Personal Plan of Action, a plan which mapped out activities the student could undertake after the conference to continue the dialogue and work towards the resolution of global and local problems.

  9. DSN radio science system Mark III-78 real-time display capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The current plane to provide radio science real-time display capability in response to multimission radio science requirements is described. Topics discussed include the display of Doppler frequency and high-resolution graphical display of all closed-loop radio metric parameters, and spectrum displays of open-loop receiver output.

  10. DSN radio science system Mark III-78 real-time display capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The current plane to provide radio science real-time display capability in response to multimission radio science requirements is described. Topics discussed include the display of Doppler frequency and high-resolution graphical display of all closed-loop radio metric parameters, and spectrum displays of open-loop receiver output.

  11. International Halley Watch: Discipline specialists for radio science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Gerard, E.; Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P.

    1986-01-01

    Some 34 radio observatories in 18 countries are participating in the Radio Science Net of the International Halley Watch. Approximately 100 radio astronomers are contributing to this effort, which has included observations of comets P/Crommelin and P/Giacobini-Zinner as well as P/Halley. It is clear that the record of data for the 18 cm OH ground state lambda doublet, which provides fundamental information on the gas production rate, kinematics, and potentially the magnetic field in the coma, will be vastly more complete and of higher accuracy than has even been obtained on any previous comet. The coverage by a number of radio observatories will enable short period variations to be studied and correlated with simultaneous data obtained at other wavelengths. Likewise, the first definitive detection of the important parent molecule hydrogen cyanide in a comet was obtained and is being studied by groups in the United States, Sweden, and France. The first detection of the comet with the Very Large Array telescope operated by NRAO was achieved and has produced exciting results for the distribution of emission at high angular resolution from the OH radical. At this writing data are still being obtained and being processed, and there are still strong indications that exciting information will be obtained from radar studies of P/Halley and from searches for additional parent molecules.

  12. The Third Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lev, Brian S. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) User Support Office (USO) sponsored the Third Annual NSI User Working Group (NSIUWG) Conference March 30 through April 3, 1992, in Greenbelt, MD. Approximately 130 NSI users attended to learn more about the NSI, hear from projects which use NSI, and receive updates about new networking technologies and services. This report contains material relevant to the conference; copies of the agenda, meeting summaries, presentations, and descriptions of exhibitors. Plenary sessions featured a variety of speakers, including NSI project management, scientists, and NSI user project managers whose projects and applications effectively use NSI, and notable citizens of the larger Internet community. The conference also included exhibits of advanced networking applications; tutorials on internetworking, computer security, and networking technologies; and user subgroup meetings on the future direction of the conference, networking, and user services and applications.

  13. Radio science experiments - The Viking Mars Orbiter and Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Levy, G. S.; Davies, J. G.; Grossi, M. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    The objective of the radio science investigations is to extract the maximum scientific information from the data provided by the radio and radar systems on the Viking Orbiters and Landers. Unique features of the Viking missions include tracking of the landers on the surface of Mars, dual-frequency S- and X-band tracking data from the orbiters, lander-to-orbiter communications system data, and lander radar data, all of which provide sources of information for a number of scientific investigations. Post-flight analyses will provide both new and improved scientific information on physical and surface properties of Mars, on atmospheric and ionospheric properties of Mars, and on solar system properties.

  14. Radio science experiments - The Viking Mars Orbiter and Lander.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Cain, D. L.; Fjeldbo, G.; Levy, G. S.; Davies, J. G.; Grossi, M. D.; Shapiro, I. I.; Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    The objective of the radio science investigations is to extract the maximum scientific information from the data provided by the radio and radar systems on the Viking Orbiters and Landers. Unique features of the Viking missions include tracking of the landers on the surface of Mars, dual-frequency S- and X-band tracking data from the orbiters, lander-to-orbiter communications system data, and lander radar data, all of which provide sources of information for a number of scientific investigations. Post-flight analyses will provide both new and improved scientific information on physical and surface properties of Mars, on atmospheric and ionospheric properties of Mars, and on solar system properties.

  15. PREFACE: 6th European Thermal Sciences Conference (Eurotherm 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Daniel; Le Niliot, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    About EUROTHERM The aim of the EUROTHERM Committee (www.eurothermcommittee.eu) is to promote and foster European cooperation in Thermal Sciences and Heat Transfer by gathering together scientists and engineers working in specialized areas. The Committee consists of members representing and appointed by national bodies in the EU countries. The current President of EUROTHERM is Professor Anton van Steenhoven from the University of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). The Committee organizes and coordinates European scientific events such as the EUROTHERM Seminars (about 4 per year) and the European Thermal Sciences Conference (every 4 years). About the conference This sixth in the series of European Thermal Sciences Conferences (www.eurotherm2012.com) took place in France, in the Conference Centre of Poitiers, Futuroscope. We address special thanks to the 225 reviewers, coming from different European countries, who have evaluated these papers. We also thank the scientific committee, consisting of some EUROTHERM Committee members together with other internationally recognized experts. Their role has been to manage the evaluation of abstracts and the papers selection process as co-coordinators for specific topics. This conference is the joint effort of two laboratories: the PPRIME Institute in Poitiers and the IUSTI laboratory in Marseille. It could not be organized without the efficient help of our secretaries and our technician for the IT support. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 180 articles presented at the conference. Professor Daniel PETIT Chairman, PPRIME Poitiers, France Institut P'(UPR CNRS 3346) ENSMA 1 av. Clément Ader - BP40109 86961 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil France daniel.petit@ensma.fr Professor Christophe LE NILIOT Co-chairman, IUSTI Marseille, France Laboratoire IUSTI UMR CNRS 6595 Technopôle de Chateau-Gombert 5, rue Enrico Fermi 13 453 MARSEILLE CEDEX 13 France christophe.leniliot@polytech.univ-mrs.fr

  16. Sea Changes in Social Science Education: Woods Hole 2000. The Social Science Education Consortium Conference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles S., Ed.

    The agenda for the Social Science Education Consortium conference at Woods Hole (Massachusetts) was designed to continue a tradition of examining scholarship relative to the social sciences in K-12 education. The content focus for this volume, is political science, economics, and sociology. Following a "Foreword" (Matthew T. Downey; Joseph P.…

  17. Sea Changes in Social Science Education: Woods Hole 2000. The Social Science Education Consortium Conference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles S., Ed.

    The agenda for the Social Science Education Consortium conference at Woods Hole (Massachusetts) was designed to continue a tradition of examining scholarship relative to the social sciences in K-12 education. The content focus for this volume, is political science, economics, and sociology. Following a "Foreword" (Matthew T. Downey; Joseph P.…

  18. On the Ocean, Communicating Science Through Radio Broadcasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, M.; Campbell, L.

    2016-02-01

    The outcomes of oceanic research are of critical importance to the general public. Communicating these results in a relatable and efficient manner however, is no simple task. To further the cause of scientific outreach done for the benefit of society, a weekly radio show was created at Texas A&M University, taking cutting edge research and translating it into applicable, interesting radio segments. The show, named "On the Ocean", was created by the Department of Oceanography to inform and entertain listeners of the general public on marine issues affecting their lives. On the Ocean is an effort to present high-level research without sacrificing the complexity of the science conducted. On the Ocean is a uniquely designed module with a systematic approach in teaching a new oceanographic concept each month. On the Ocean has a format of monthly topics with a two minute show each week. The first monthly installment is general, introducing the topic and its relevancy. The second and third shows are cause or effect, or possibly something very interesting the public would not already know. The fourth installment highlights how researchers study the topic, with the contributing professor's specific research methods emphasized. All shows are co-created with, and inspected for validity, by Texas A&M University professors, and edited for radio adaption by graduate students. In addition to airing on public broadcast radio to the College Station/Bryan TX area, the show also includes a globally accessible interactive website with podcasts, additional figures, and links to better elaborate on the material presented, as well as credit the contributing professors. The website also allows these professors the opportunity to present their research visually and link to their current work. Overall, On the Ocean is a new tool to deliver applicable science.

  19. The First International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of articles that have been accepted for presentation at the First International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration. Articles about the geology of the Martian Polar regions were presented, and analogs from Earth's geology were also presented. Presentations also were given about the probable contents of the Martian polar caps

  20. Proceedings of the eighteenth lunar and planetary science conference

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, G. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the Proceedings of the 18th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Topics covered include: Petrogensis and chemistry of lunar samples; geology and petrogensis of the Apollo 15 landing site; Lunar geology and applications; and Extraterrestrial grains: observations and theories.

  1. Minority Students in Allied Health and Science. A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Inst. for Higher Educational Opportunity.

    Papers presented at a conference/workshop that focused on the subject of increasing minority representation in the fields of allied health and science are provided. The role of undergraduate education in preparing students for allied health careers and suggestions for curriculum planning and development are given in the first two papers by Mary E.…

  2. PHYTOREMEDIATION: STATE OF THE SCIENCE CONFERENCE AND OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is a pleasure to present six papers in this issue, selected from presentations at the USEPA conference, Phytoremediation: State of the Science, 5/1-2/2000, Boston, MA. These papers highlight some of the many advances reported in representative areas of phytoremediation. In add...

  3. The impact of WARC '79 on space applications and research. [World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiebler, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Prior to the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), no frequency bands were allocated for remote sensing measurements. Actions taken by the WARC insure that frequencies will be available for such use, and that operations can be conducted without harmful interference on a worldwide basis for the benefit of all nations. New global allocations for Space Research will permit worldwide acquisition of research data via relay satellites. Wideband allocations for deep-space research will allow more accurate position determination of deep-space probes and transmission of higher resolution data. The WARC had an impact on a number of other applications and research areas such as: meteorological satellites, land-mobile satellites, search and rescue systems, solar power satellites, standard-frequency satellites, radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The actions taken at the WARC affecting these services and applications will be described in the paper.

  4. The impact of WARC '79 on space applications and research. [World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiebler, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Prior to the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), no frequency bands were allocated for remote sensing measurements. Actions taken by the WARC insure that frequencies will be available for such use, and that operations can be conducted without harmful interference on a worldwide basis for the benefit of all nations. New global allocations for Space Research will permit worldwide acquisition of research data via relay satellites. Wideband allocations for deep-space research will allow more accurate position determination of deep-space probes and transmission of higher resolution data. The WARC had an impact on a number of other applications and research areas such as: meteorological satellites, land-mobile satellites, search and rescue systems, solar power satellites, standard-frequency satellites, radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The actions taken at the WARC affecting these services and applications will be described in the paper.

  5. International Conference on Materials Science and Technology (ICMST 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Ginson P.

    2015-02-01

    FROM THE CONVENOR'S DESK The Department of Physics, St. Thomas College Pala, is highly privileged to organize an International Conference on Materials Science and Technology (ICMST 2012) during 10-14 June 2012, and as Convenor of the conference it is with legitimate pride and immense gratitude to God that I remember the most enthusiastic responses received for this from scientists all over the world. In a time of tremendous revolutionary changes in Materials Science and Technology, it is quite in keeping with the tradition of a pioneering institute that St. Thomas College is, to have risen to the occasion to make this conference a reality. We have no doubt that this proved to be a historic event, a real breakthrough, not only for us the organizers but also for all the participants. A conference of this kind provides a nonpareil, a distinctly outstanding platform for the scholars, researchers and the scientists to discuss and share ideas with delegates from all over the world. This had been most fruitful to the participants in identifying new collaborations and strengthening existing relations. That experts of diverse disciplines from across the world were sitting under one roof for five days, exchanging views and sharing findings, was a speciality of this conference. The event has evoked excellent responses from all segments of the Materials Science community worldwide. 600 renowned scholars from 28 countries participated in this. We were uniquely honoured to have Prof. C.N.R. Rao, Chairman, Scientific Advisory Council to the Prime Minister of India, to inaugurate this conference. May I take this opportunity to thank all those who have contributed their valuable share, diverse in tone and nature, in the making of this conference. My whole hearted gratitude is due to the international and national members of the advisory committee for their valuable guidance and involvement. I place on record my heartfelt gratitude to our sponsors. I am sure that this conference has

  6. SIAM Conference on Life Sciences Portland, OR July 11-14, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-09-13

    The conference brought together researchers seeking to develop and apply mathematical and computational methods in all areas of the life sciences. This conference provided a crossdisciplinary forum for catalyzing mathematical research relevant to the life sciences.

  7. Voyager radio science observations of Neptune and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Anderson, J. D.; Borutzki, S. E.; Campbell, J. K.; Kursinski, E. R.; Levy, G. S.; Lindal, G. F.; Lyons, J. R.; Wood, G. E.

    1989-01-01

    Voyager 2 undertook radio science investigations of the Neptune and Triton masses and densities, as well as of their atmospheric and ionospheric vertical structures, the atmospheric composition and low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, and ring material characteristics. Upon probing the atmosphere of Neptune to a pressure level of about 500,000 Pa, the effects of a methane cloud region and of ammonia absorption below the cloud have become apparent. The tenuous neutral atmosphere of Triton produced distinct signatures in the occultation data; it is inferred that the Triton atmosphere is controlled by water-pressure equilibrium with surface ices.

  8. "Adventures in Science": Casting Scientifically Talented Youth as National Resources on American Radio, 1942-1958

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Sevan G.

    2008-01-01

    From 1942 to 1958, a national weekly programme on CBS radio and presented by Science Service, Inc. devoted 37 of its broadcasts to profiling American high school students' achievements in science talent searches, clubs and fairs. These "Adventures in Science" radio programmes cast scientifically talented youth as potential contributors to national…

  9. "Adventures in Science": Casting Scientifically Talented Youth as National Resources on American Radio, 1942-1958

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzian, Sevan G.

    2008-01-01

    From 1942 to 1958, a national weekly programme on CBS radio and presented by Science Service, Inc. devoted 37 of its broadcasts to profiling American high school students' achievements in science talent searches, clubs and fairs. These "Adventures in Science" radio programmes cast scientifically talented youth as potential contributors to national…

  10. 2007 Pacific Operational Science and Technology Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-04

    protection Rex.Blair@us.army.mil Mar 2007 SCIENCE: Amplifying Fluorescing Polymer (AFP) developed by MIT ISN Prof Swager glows green, but quenches...transmitting polymer (fiber optics inside polymer matrix) CNT-reinforced polymer matrix Embedded FiberWeb fiber sensors • Possible protective materials...Wednesday, 4 April 2007 Near Term Solutions to Current Challenges – How the World will Change: FY07-FY09 Military Services Research and Development

  11. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference: A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    The Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) on the Use of the Geostationary Satellite Orbit and the Planning of Space Services Utilizing It. Through careful selection of the predetermined arc (PDA) for each administration, flexibility can be increased in terms of choice of system technical characteristics and specific orbit location while reducing the need for coordination among administrations. The NASARC software determines pairwise compatibility between all possible service areas at discrete arc locations. NASARC then exhaustively enumerates groups of administrations whose satellites can be closely located in orbit, and finds the arc segment over which each such compatible group exists. From the set of all possible compatible groupings, groups and their associated arc segments are selected using a heuristic procedure such that a PDA is identified for each administration. Various aspects of the NASARC concept and how the software accomplishes specific features of allotment planning are discussed.

  12. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference: A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) on the Use of the Geostationary Satellite Orbit and the Planning of Space Services Utilizing It. Through careful selection of the predetermined arc (PDA) for each administration, flexibility can be increased in terms of choice of system technical characteristics and specific orbit location while reducing the need for coordination among administrations. The NASARC software determines pairwise compatibility between all possible service areas at discrete arc locations. NASARC then exhaustively enumerates groups of administrations whose satellites can be closely located in orbit, and finds the arc segment over which each such compatible group exists. From the set of all possible compatible groupings, groups and their associated arc segments are selected using a heuristic procedure such that a PDA is identified for each administration. Various aspects of the NASARC concept and how the software accomplishes specific features of allotment planning are discussed.

  13. THE NEW SCHOOL SCIENCE, A REPORT TO SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS ON REGIONAL ORIENTATION CONFERENCES IN SCIENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VIALL, WILLIAM P.; AND OTHERS

    INFORMATION ON RECENT CURRICULUM REVISIONS IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCIENCE IS PRESENTED. THE CHAPTERS INCLUDE MATERIALS FROM PAPERS THAT WERE PRESENTED AT NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE. THE INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER RELATES CURRICULUM MODIFICATION TO CHANGING SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND CONCOMITANT…

  14. Citizen Science Opportunity With the NASA Heliophysics Education Consortium (HEC)-Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Higgins, C.; Thieman, J.; Garcia, L. N.; Young, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Radio JOVE project has long been a hands-on inquiry-based educational project that allows students, teachers and the general public to learn and practice radio astronomy by building their own radio antenna and receiver system from an inexpensive kit that operates at 20.1 MHz and/or using remote radio telescopes through the Internet. Radio JOVE participants observe and analyze natural radio emissions from Jupiter and the Sun. Within the last few years, several Radio JOVE amateurs have upgraded their equipment to make semi-professional spectrographic observations in the frequency band of 15-30 MHz. Due to the widely distributed Radio JOVE observing stations across the US, the Radio JOVE observations can uniquely augment observations by professional telescopes, such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) . The Radio JOVE project has recently partnered with the NASA Heliophysics Education Consortium (HEC) to work with students and interested amateur radio astronomers to establish additional spectrograph and single-frequency Radio JOVE stations. These additional Radio JOVE stations will help build a larger amateur radio science network and increase the spatial coverage of long-wavelength radio observations across the US. Our presentation will describe the Radio JOVE project within the context of the HEC. We will discuss the potential for citizen scientists to make and use Radio JOVE observations to study solar radio bursts (particularly during the upcoming solar eclipse in August 2017) and Jovian radio emissions. Radio JOVE observations will also be used to study ionospheric radio scintillation, promoting appreciation and understanding of this important space weather effect.

  15. Twenty-Third Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of papers from the Twenty-Third Lunar and Planetary Science Conference that were chosen for having the greatest potential interest for the general reading public. The presentations avoid jargon and unnecessarily complex terms. Topics covered include electron microscopy studies of a circumstellar rock, the fractal analysis of lava flows, volcanic activity on Venus, the isotopic signature of recent solar wind nitrogen, and the implications of impact crater distribution on Venus.

  16. Second International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that were presented at the Second International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration, August 21-25, 2000. The abstracts of the presentations given are listed. Presentations were given on the advances in technology, data analysis of past and current missions, and new instruments destined for Mars. Particular attention was paid to the polar regions and what they reveal about Mars.

  17. ACSPRI 2014 4th International Social Science Methodology Conference Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    and to present best practice standards and innovation within a range of disciplines. A member of the Technology Forecasting and Futures (TFF...interest to the Technology Forecasting and Futures (TFF) Group of JOAD presented at the ACSPRI 4th International Social Science Methodology conference...the dynamics of manual vs automated data analysis. Research findings related to these themes are contextualised for the TFF S&T forecasting

  18. The Future of Planetary Atmospheric, Surface, and Interior Science Using Radio and Laser Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Atkinson, D. H.; Bell, D. J.; Bird, M. K.; Dehant, V.; Iess, L.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Linscott, I. R.; Mannucci, A. J.; Mazarico, E.; Park, R. S.; Patzold, M.; Preston, R. A.; Simpson, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    Radio science experiments have been conducted on almost every planetary mission in the past five decades and led to numerous discoveries. More science breakthroughs are expected that fit Planetary Vision 2050 themes with described technical advances.

  19. Science on Film, Radio, and Television in the People's Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Jeffrey W.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a report on broadcast media popularization of science in the People's Republic of China. Personal observations are recorded about the present quality and future directions of Chinese science communication via films, radio, and television. (CS)

  20. Lunar Radio Telescopes: A Staged Approach for Lunar Science, Heliophysics, Astrobiology, Cosmology, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    Observations with radio telescopes address key problems in cosmology, astrobiology, heliophysics, and planetary science including the first light in the Universe (Cosmic Dawn), magnetic fields of extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the lunar ionosphere. The Moon is a unique science platform because it allows access to radio frequencies that do not penetrate the Earth's ionosphere and because its far side is shielded from intense terrestrial emissions. The instrument packages and infrastructure needed for radio telescopes can be transported and deployed as part of Exploration activities, and the resulting science measurements may inform Exploration (e.g., measurements of lunar surface charging). An illustrative roadmap for the staged deployment of lunar radio telescopes

  1. Lunar Radio Telescopes: A Staged Approach for Lunar Science, Heliophysics, Astrobiology, Cosmology, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    Observations with radio telescopes address key problems in cosmology, astrobiology, heliophysics, and planetary science including the first light in the Universe (Cosmic Dawn), magnetic fields of extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the lunar ionosphere. The Moon is a unique science platform because it allows access to radio frequencies that do not penetrate the Earth's ionosphere and because its far side is shielded from intense terrestrial emissions. The instrument packages and infrastructure needed for radio telescopes can be transported and deployed as part of Exploration activities, and the resulting science measurements may inform Exploration (e.g., measurements of lunar surface charging). An illustrative roadmap for the staged deployment of lunar radio telescopes

  2. MicroRNA-190b confers radio-sensitivity through negative regulation of Bcl-2 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changzheng; Qiao, Chuanhu

    2017-04-01

    To determine the role of miR-190b in radio-sensitivity of gastric cancer (GC). In radio-resistant GC cells, down-regulation of miR-190b and up-regulation of Bcl-2 were observed. The protein expression of Bcl-2 was negatively regulated by miR-190b. Overexpression of miR-190b significantly decreased cell viability and enhanced radio-sensitivity of GC cells. Of note, these effects of miR-190b on GC cells radio-sensitivity were abolished by Bcl-2. miR-190b confers radio-sensitivity of GC cells, possibly via negative regulation of Bcl-2.

  3. Initial Results of Radio Science in Akatsuki mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Akatsuki Radio Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Radio Science experiment (RS) in the Akatsuki mission of JAXA aims to determine the vertical structure of the Venus atmosphere, thereby complementing the imaging observations by onboard instruments. The physical quantities to be retrieved are the vertical distributions of the atmospheric temperature, the electron density, the sulfuric acid vapor density, and small-scale density fluctuations. The uniqueness of Akatsuki RS is quasi-simultaneous observations with multi-band cameras dedicated to meteorological study; the cameras can observe the locations probed by RS a short time before or after the occultations. An ultra-stable oscillator (USO) provides a stable reference frequency, which is used for the X-band downlink signal. The signal traverses the Venusian atmosphere near the limb and reaches the ground station, where it is sampled using an open-loop recording system. In the first radio occultation season of March-July, 2016, we plan 8 Venus occultation experiments in total (6 experiments have been done successfully till June). The temperature profiles cover the altitude region of 40-90 km, which enables studies of vertical coupling among different altitude levels and studies of the cloud system. Another target of Akatsuki RS is solar corona. During solar conjunction periods, the downlink signal that traverses the solar corona is recorded at the ground station. The data yields information on the solar wind velocity, plasma density fluctuations, and magnetic field fluctuations from Faraday rotation measurement. In the solar conjunction period of May-June, 2016, 11 occultation experiments were conducted.

  4. Planetary data system requirements: Multi-mission radio science requirements for the 1978 to 1988 era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, H. T. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The functional and performance requirements for support of multimission radio science are established. The classes of radio science investigation are described and the needed data is discussed. This document is for a sliding ten year period and will be iterated as the mission set evolves.

  5. E.B.U. International Conference on Educational Radio and Television (3rd, Paris, March 8-22, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office de Radiodiffusion-Television Francaise, Paris (France).

    A conference dealing with the problems and activities of open-circuit educational radio and television broadcasting on five continents, especially in the developing nations, was organized by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) in Paris in 1967. Technological change, especially the development of reasonably priced videotape equipment, was cited…

  6. A Report on the Exploratory Conference on the National Science Foundation's Impact on U.S. Science Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, J. David, Comp.

    This is a report on a two-day conference, held at the University of Maryland in August of 1974, to examine the impact of the National Science Foundation (NSF) on science curriculum development in the United States. The conference covered the improvement of science teaching materials and instruction development as well as the overall…

  7. Science Education Future. Proceedings of the Arctic Science Conference (39th, Fairbanks, Alaska, October 7-10, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fairbanks, AK. Arctic Div.

    This catalog includes abstracts of each of the papers delivered at the Arctic Science Conference. The conference was divided into the following symposia: (1) "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology"; (2) "An Update of Alaskan Science and Discovery"; (3) "Science Education for the Public"; (4) "Hubbard Glacier,…

  8. Science Education Future. Proceedings of the Arctic Science Conference (39th, Fairbanks, Alaska, October 7-10, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fairbanks, AK. Arctic Div.

    This catalog includes abstracts of each of the papers delivered at the Arctic Science Conference. The conference was divided into the following symposia: (1) "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology"; (2) "An Update of Alaskan Science and Discovery"; (3) "Science Education for the Public"; (4) "Hubbard Glacier,…

  9. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Camats, N; García, F; Parrilla, J J; Calaf, J; Martín-Mateo, M; Caldés, M Garcia

    2009-10-02

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F(0)) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F(1)) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  10. The Deep Space Network as an instrument for radio science research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    Radio science experiments use radio links between spacecraft and sensor instrumentation that is implemented in the Deep Space Network. The deep space communication complexes along with the telecommunications subsystem on board the spacecraft constitute the major elements of the radio science instrumentation. Investigators examine small changes in the phase and/or amplitude of the radio signal propagating from a spacecraft to study the atmospheric and ionospheric structure of planets and satellites, planetary gravitational fields, shapes, masses, planetary rings, ephemerides of planets, solar corona, magnetic fields, cometary comae, and such aspects of the theory of general relativity as gravitational waves and gravitational redshift.

  11. The Social Science Teacher. 1972. Collected Conference Papers: Social Science Concepts Classroom Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Pat, Ed.; And Others

    Papers in this publication are collected from a conference on social science concepts and classroom methods which focused on the theories of Jerome Bruner. The first article, entitled "Jerome Bruner," outlines four of Bruner's themes--structure, readiness, intuition, and interest--which relate to cognitive learning. Three…

  12. South Australian Science Teachers Association Conference and Science Fair, Salisbury Teachers College, July 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    The major papers presented at the 1971 conference of the South Australian Science Teachers Association are included in this pamphlet. Scientists from industry, research institutions, and the police forensic laboratory, and practicing teachers presented papers which included descriptions of modern scientific techniques, discussions of the role of…

  13. South Australian Science Teachers Association Conference and Science Fair, Salisbury Teachers College, July 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    The major papers presented at the 1971 conference of the South Australian Science Teachers Association are included in this pamphlet. Scientists from industry, research institutions, and the police forensic laboratory, and practicing teachers presented papers which included descriptions of modern scientific techniques, discussions of the role of…

  14. Ka-Band Transponder for Deep-Space Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Matthew S.; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Folkner, William M.; Mendoza, Ricardo; Venkatesan, Jaikrishna

    2008-01-01

    A one-page document describes a Ka-band transponder being developed for use in deep-space radio science. The transponder receives in the Deep Space Network (DSN) uplink frequency band of 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, transmits in the 31.8- to 32.3 GHz DSN downlink band, and performs regenerative ranging on a DSN standard 4-MHz ranging tone subcarrier phase-modulated onto the uplink carrier signal. A primary consideration in this development is reduction in size, relative to other such transponders. The transponder design is all-analog, chosen to minimize not only the size but also the number of parts and the design time and, thus, the cost. The receiver features two stages of frequency down-conversion. The receiver locks onto the uplink carrier signal. The exciter signal for the transmitter is derived from the same source as that used to generate the first-stage local-oscillator signal. The ranging-tone subcarrier is down-converted along with the carrier to the second intermediate frequency, where the 4-MHz tone is demodulated from the composite signal and fed into a ranging-tone-tracking loop, which regenerates the tone. The regenerated tone is linearly phase-modulated onto the downlink carrier.

  15. Radio science receiver support of the Mars Exploration Rover Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Douglas; Asmar, Sami; Chang, Christine; Estabrook, Polly; Finely, Sue; Pham, Timothy; Satorius, Edgar

    2004-01-01

    The low power levels of the communication signals during the Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) sequences of the Mars rovers prevented the transmission of telemetry at X-band signal to inform the mission operations center of the health and progress of the spacecraft. As an altemative, a series of tones were sent to indicate basic spacecraft conditions and execution of critical events. An open-loop receiver designed for Radio Science experiments was used to acquire the signal during this time. The receiver recorded over a 100 Khz bandwidth to identify the presence of the carrier and tones. The data were fed in real-time to a processing unit which detected the carrier and the frequency separation of the tones from the carrier, in order to determine which event has occurred. Up to 256 different tones were possible. During the actual events, all tones were identified, and the carrier was tracked down to the surface, and for the second rover, through the bouncing which followed, and finally, while stopped on the surface, found the carrier and tones which indicated the spacecraft was alive. In order to identify the tones, the ground receivers had to be able to respond to the bevy of events occurring in the relatively short timespan of EDL.

  16. Radio science receiver support of the Mars Exploration Rover Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Douglas; Asmar, Sami; Chang, Christine; Estabrook, Polly; Finely, Sue; Pham, Timothy; Satorius, Edgar

    2004-01-01

    The low power levels of the communication signals during the Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) sequences of the Mars rovers prevented the transmission of telemetry at X-band signal to inform the mission operations center of the health and progress of the spacecraft. As an altemative, a series of tones were sent to indicate basic spacecraft conditions and execution of critical events. An open-loop receiver designed for Radio Science experiments was used to acquire the signal during this time. The receiver recorded over a 100 Khz bandwidth to identify the presence of the carrier and tones. The data were fed in real-time to a processing unit which detected the carrier and the frequency separation of the tones from the carrier, in order to determine which event has occurred. Up to 256 different tones were possible. During the actual events, all tones were identified, and the carrier was tracked down to the surface, and for the second rover, through the bouncing which followed, and finally, while stopped on the surface, found the carrier and tones which indicated the spacecraft was alive. In order to identify the tones, the ground receivers had to be able to respond to the bevy of events occurring in the relatively short timespan of EDL.

  17. Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning: Project Kaleidoscope-Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges Conference for Science Educators.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    College and university science educators from across Connecticut gathered at Yale's West Campus in April 2010 for a Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) program entitled "Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning." Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and co-sponsored by the Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges (CCIC) and Yale's McDougal Graduate Teaching Center, the event was the latest in a PKAL series of one-day conferences aimed at equipping science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) instructors with effective approaches to engaging students and training future scientists.

  18. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference-NASARC (version 2.0) technical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Heyward, Ann O.; Ponchak, Denise S.; Spence, Rodney L.; Zuzek, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The information contained in the NASARC (Version 2.0) Technical Manual (NASA TM-100160) and NASARC (Version 2.0) User's Manual (NASA TM-100161) relates to the state of NASARC software development through October 16, 1987. The Technical Manual describes the Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) concept and the algorithms used to implement the concept. The User's Manual provides information on computer system considerations, installation instructions, description of input files, and program operating instructions. Significant revisions have been incorporated in the Version 2.0 software. These revisions have enhanced the modeling capabilities of the NASARC procedure while greatly reducing the computer run time and memory requirements. Array dimensions within the software have been structured to fit within the currently available 6-megabyte memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) computer facility. A piecewise approach to predetermined arc generation in NASARC (Version 2.0) allows worldwide scenarios to be accommodated within these memory constraints while at the same time effecting an overall reduction in computer run time.

  19. Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference-NASARC, Version 2.0: User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Heyward, Ann O.; Ponchak, Denise S.; Spence, Rodney L.; Zuzek, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The information contained in the NASARC (Version 2.0) Technical Manual (NASA TM-100160) and the NASARC (Version 2.0) User's Manual (NASA TM-100161) relates to the state of the Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software development through October 16, 1987. The technical manual describes the NASARC concept and the algorithms which are used to implement it. The User's Manual provides information on computer system considerations, installation instructions, description of input files, and program operation instructions. Significant revisions have been incorporated in the Version 2.0 software over prior versions. These revisions have enhanced the modeling capabilities of the NASARC procedure while greatly reducing the computer run time and memory requirements. Array dimensions within the software have been structured to fit into the currently available 6-megabyte memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) computer facility. A piecewise approach to predetermined arc generation in NASARC (Version 2.0) allows worldwide scenarios to be accommodated within these memory constraints while at the same time reducing computer run time.

  20. Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference-NASARC (version 4.0) technical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Heyward, Ann O.; Ponchak, Denise S.; Spence, Rodney L.; Zuzek, John E.

    1988-01-01

    The information contained in the NASARC (Version 4.0) Technical Manual and NASARC (Version 4.0) User's Manual relates to the Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software development through November 1, 1988. The Technical Manual describes the NASARC concept and the algorithms used to implement the concept. The User's Manual provides information on computer system considerations, installation instructions, description of input files, and program operation instructions. Significant revisions were incorporated in the Version 4.0 software over prior versions. These revisions have further enhanced the modeling capabilities of the NASARC procedure and provide improved arrangements of predetermined arcs within the geostationary orbits. Array dimensions within the software were structured to fit within the currently available 12 megabyte memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) computer facility. A piecewise approach to predetermined arc generation in NASARC (Version 4.0) allows worldwide planning problem scenarios to be accommodated within computer run time and memory constraints with enhanced likelihood and ease of solution.

  1. Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC), version 4.0: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Heyward, Ann O.; Ponchak, Denise S.; Spence, Rodney L.; Zuzek, John E.

    1988-01-01

    The information in the NASARC (Version 4.0) Technical Manual (NASA-TM-101453) and NASARC (Version 4.0) User's Manual (NASA-TM-101454) relates to the state of Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software development through November 1, 1988. The Technical Manual describes the NASARC concept and the algorithms used to implement the concept. The User's Manual provides information on computer system considerations, installation instructions, description of input files, and program operation instructions. Significant revisions were incorporated in the Version 4.0 software over prior versions. These revisions have further enhanced the modeling capabilities of the NASARC procedure and provide improved arrangements of predetermined arcs within the geostationary orbit. Array dimensions within the software were structured to fit within the currently available 12-megabyte memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board (IFRB) computer facility. A piecewise approach to predetermined arc generation in NASARC (Version 4.) allows worldwide planning problem scenarios to be accommodated within computer run time and memory constraints with enhanced likelihood and ease of solution.

  2. Alternative Methods for Assessing Science: Report to the States. Science & Mathematics Indicators Project. Conference Report of State Assessment Directors and State Science Supervisors (Tampa, Florida, January 13, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Rolf; Selden, Ramsay

    State assessment directors and State science supervisors discussed alternative methods for assessing student learning in science at a conference. The conference had two objectives: (1) to increase the knowledge of state science supervisors and assessment directors of recent experience at international, national, and state levels with alternative…

  3. Trends in Performance and Characteristics of Ultra-Stable Oscillators for Deep Space Radio Science Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami

    1997-01-01

    Telecommunication systems of spacecraft on deep space missions also function as instruments for Radio Science experiments. Radio scientists utilize the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine very small changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and/or polarization of radio signals to investigate a host of physical phenomena in the solar system. Several missions augmented the radio communication system with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) in order to provide a highly stable reference signal for oneway downlink. This configuration is used in order to enable better investigations of the atmospheres of the planets occulting the line-of-sight to the spacecraft; one-way communication was required and the transponders' built-in auxiliary oscillators were neither sufficiently stable nor spectrally pure for the occultation experiments. Since Radio Science instrumentation is distributed between the spacecraft and the ground stations, the Deep Space Network (DSN) is also equipped to function as a world-class instrument for Radio Science research. For a detailed account of Radio Science experiments, methodology, key discoveries, and the DSN's historical contribution to the field, see Asmar and Renzetti (1993). The tools of Radio Science can be and have also been utilized in addressing several mission engineering challenges; e.g., characterization of spacecraft nutation and anomalous motion, antenna calibrations, and communications during surface landing phases. Since the first quartz USO was flown on Voyager, the technology has advanced significantly, affording future missions higher sensitivity in reconstructing the temperature pressure profiles of the atmospheres under study as well as other physical phenomena of interest to Radio Science. This paper surveys the trends in stability and spectral purity performance, design characteristics including size and mass, as well as cost and history of these clocks in space.

  4. Trends in Performance and Characteristics of Ultra-Stable Oscillators for Deep Space Radio Science Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami

    1997-01-01

    Telecommunication systems of spacecraft on deep space missions also function as instruments for Radio Science experiments. Radio scientists utilize the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine very small changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and/or polarization of radio signals to investigate a host of physical phenomena in the solar system. Several missions augmented the radio communication system with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) in order to provide a highly stable reference signal for oneway downlink. This configuration is used in order to enable better investigations of the atmospheres of the planets occulting the line-of-sight to the spacecraft; one-way communication was required and the transponders' built-in auxiliary oscillators were neither sufficiently stable nor spectrally pure for the occultation experiments. Since Radio Science instrumentation is distributed between the spacecraft and the ground stations, the Deep Space Network (DSN) is also equipped to function as a world-class instrument for Radio Science research. For a detailed account of Radio Science experiments, methodology, key discoveries, and the DSN's historical contribution to the field, see Asmar and Renzetti (1993). The tools of Radio Science can be and have also been utilized in addressing several mission engineering challenges; e.g., characterization of spacecraft nutation and anomalous motion, antenna calibrations, and communications during surface landing phases. Since the first quartz USO was flown on Voyager, the technology has advanced significantly, affording future missions higher sensitivity in reconstructing the temperature pressure profiles of the atmospheres under study as well as other physical phenomena of interest to Radio Science. This paper surveys the trends in stability and spectral purity performance, design characteristics including size and mass, as well as cost and history of these clocks in space.

  5. Using Twitter to communicate conservation science from a professional conference.

    PubMed

    Bombaci, Sara P; Farr, Cooper M; Gallo, H Travis; Mangan, Anna M; Stinson, Lani T; Kaushik, Monica; Pejchar, Liba

    2016-02-01

    Scientists are increasingly using Twitter as a tool for communicating science. Twitter can promote scholarly discussion, disseminate research rapidly, and extend and diversify the scope of audiences reached. However, scientists also caution that if Twitter does not accurately convey science due to the inherent brevity of this media, misinformation could cascade quickly through social media. Data on whether Twitter effectively communicates conservation science and the types of user groups receiving these tweets are lacking. To address these knowledge gaps, we examined live tweeting as a means of communicating conservation science at the 2013 International Congress for Conservation Biology (ICCB). We quantified and compared the user groups sending and reading live tweets. We also surveyed presenters to determine their intended audiences, which we compared with the actual audiences reached through live tweeting. We also asked presenters how effectively tweets conveyed their research findings. Twitter reached 14 more professional audience categories relative to those attending and live tweeting at ICCB. However, the groups often reached through live tweeting were not the presenters' intended audiences. Policy makers and government and non-governmental organizations were rarely reached (0%, 4%, and 6% of audience, respectively), despite the intent of the presenters. Plenary talks were tweeted about 6.9 times more than all other oral or poster presentations combined. Over half the presenters believed the tweets about their talks were effective. Ineffective tweets were perceived as vague or missing the presenters' main message. We recommend that presenters who want their science to be communicated accurately and broadly through Twitter should provide Twitter-friendly summaries that incorporate relevant hashtags and usernames. Our results suggest that Twitter can be used to effectively communicate speakers' findings to diverse audiences beyond conference walls. © 2015

  6. Biotech 2011 conference Zurich University of applied sciences.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Caspar

    2011-01-01

    More than 160 experts from industry and academia came together this September for the Biotech 2011 at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW) in Wädenswil. As one of the main topics, the conference addressed innovations in sensor technology, where new measurement principles and methods have helped to enhance robustness and user friendliness. Another main emphasis of Biotech 2011 was the application of sensors and related analytical techniques in bioprocesses. In this area, the sensor industry needs to meet the challenges introduced by the increasing use of single-use bioreactors. With its strong focus on sensor applications, Biotech 2011 successfully promoted interaction between professionals in academic and industrial research as well as with experts who apply sensors in biopharmaceutical production.

  7. Conference Report: International Conference on Health Sciences and Medical Technologies, Tlemcen, Algeria 27–29 September 2016 ICHSMT’16

    PubMed Central

    Khelassi, Abdeldjalil

    2016-01-01

    The International Conference on Health Sciences and Medical Technologies (ICHSMT’16) was held in Tlemcen, Algeria from 27–29 September 2016. The conference was organized by the University Of Tlemcen, in partnership with Electronic Physician Journal, Mehr Publishing, and Mehrafarin Scientific Publishing. There were participants from 14 nations who presented their research in poster or oral presentations. There were also some keynote speakers who gave talks on topics such as community health, ethics of publishing medical research, and scientific writing. PMID:27957299

  8. Conference Report: International Conference on Health Sciences and Medical Technologies, Tlemcen, Algeria 27-29 September 2016 ICHSMT'16.

    PubMed

    Khelassi, Abdeldjalil

    2016-10-01

    The International Conference on Health Sciences and Medical Technologies (ICHSMT'16) was held in Tlemcen, Algeria from 27-29 September 2016. The conference was organized by the University Of Tlemcen, in partnership with Electronic Physician Journal, Mehr Publishing, and Mehrafarin Scientific Publishing. There were participants from 14 nations who presented their research in poster or oral presentations. There were also some keynote speakers who gave talks on topics such as community health, ethics of publishing medical research, and scientific writing.

  9. Voyager radio science observations of neptune and triton.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Borutzki, S E; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Gresh, D L; Gurrola, E M; Hinson, D P; Kawashima, N; Kursinski, E R; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Lyons, J R; Marouf, E A; Rosen, P A; Simpson, R A; Wood, G E

    1989-12-15

    The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptune system included radio science investigations of the masses and densities of Neptune and Triton, the low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, the vertical structures of the atmospheres and ionospheres of Neptune and Triton, the composition of the atmosphere of Neptune, and characteristics of ring material. Demanding experimental requirements were met successfully, and study of the large store of collected data has begun. The initial search of the data revealed no detectable effects of ring material with optical depth tau [unknown] 0.01. Preliminary representative results include the following: 1.0243 x 10(26) and 2.141 x 10(22) kilograms for the masses of Neptune and Triton; 1640 and 2054 kilograms per cubic meter for their respective densities; 1355 +/- 7 kilometers, provisionally, for the radius of Triton; and J(2) = 3411 +/- 10(x 10(-6)) and J(4) = -26(+12)(-20)(x10(-6)) for Neptune's gravity field (J>(2) and J(4) are harmonic coefficients of the gravity field). The equatorial and polar radii of Neptune are 24,764 +/- 20 and 24,340 +/- 30 kllometers, respectively, at the 10(5)-pascal (1 bar) pressure level. Neptune's atmosphere was probed to a pressure level of about 5 x 10(5) pascals, and effects of a methane cloud region and probable ammonia absorption below the cloud are evident in the data. Results for the mixing ratios of helium and ammonia are still being investigated; the methane abundance below the clouds is at least 1 percent by volume. Derived temperature-pressure profiles to 1.2 x 10(5) pascals and 78 kelvins (K) show a lapse rate corresponding to "frozen" equilibrium of the para- and ortho-hydrogen states. Neptune's ionosphere exhibits an extended topside at a temperature of 950 +/- 160 K if H(+) is the dominant ion, and narrow ionization layers of the type previously seen at the other three giant planets. Triton has a dense ionosphere with a peak electron concentration of 46 x 10(9) per cubic meter at an

  10. Results from the Mars Climate Sounder and Intercomparison of Data with Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Hinson, D. P.; Abdou, W. A.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on MRO has obtained a record of the vertical structure of Martian atmospheric temperature, dust, and water ice clouds extending more than 3 Mars years (MY 28-MY 31). When added to the data set acquired by the highly successful Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on MGS, a nearly continuous climate record now exists of sufficient duration (>7 Mars years) to study dominant modes of the atmospheric circulation and interannual variability. New insight into the vertical structure of dust and condensates has changed our perception of the role of aerosols and their variability in driving the global circulation. Recent work by Kleinböhl, et al (this conference) utilizes MCS coverage of local time of day to observe and model semi-diurnal tides. In this paper we discuss the robustness of inferences drawn from MCS data, our efforts to validate the observations, and explore the continuity of the data with previous and concurrent measurements. Comparison of profiles of temperature from MCS and MRO Radio Science (RS) are particularly useful because the two measurement techniques are based on different physical principles. Radio occultations sound the limb of Mars with an X-band radio signal (~4 cm wavelength), using measurements of refractive bending to derive profiles of density, temperature, and pressure versus radius. This is a physically independent mechanism from the thermal emission measurements of MCS and, unlike MCS, RS is insensitive to dust and aerosol. Also, RS investigations were conducted on both MGS and MRO providing a means of comparing the non-overlapping TES and MCS observations. On MRO, RS profiles are obtained roughly once per day on ingress occultations only. RS temperature measurements extend from 0-40 km with a vertical resolution of about 1 km, and are particularly accurate in the lower half of this range. MCS obtains temperatures from 0-80 km, and is able to use its two-axis articulation to make simultaneous and coincident

  11. State-Controlled Multimedia Education for All? Science Programs in Early German Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirrmacher, Arne

    2012-01-01

    While science education and popularization by means of print media developed in quite similar forms in many nations, the advent of radio resulted in initiatives to bring science on the air that were rather heterogeneous from country to country. The German case stands out with respect to quantity, variety and ambition, and also for its special…

  12. Producing a Radio Show about Psychological Science: The Story of "Psychological Frontiers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Emily; Sachau, Daniel; Albertson, Dawn N.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a campus-based radio show about psychological science. The authors' goals in creating the show were to inform the public about the science of psychology and to create a teaching and learning resource for faculty members and students. The show, "Psychological Frontiers," airs twice a week and consists of…

  13. State-Controlled Multimedia Education for All? Science Programs in Early German Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirrmacher, Arne

    2012-01-01

    While science education and popularization by means of print media developed in quite similar forms in many nations, the advent of radio resulted in initiatives to bring science on the air that were rather heterogeneous from country to country. The German case stands out with respect to quantity, variety and ambition, and also for its special…

  14. Producing a Radio Show about Psychological Science: The Story of "Psychological Frontiers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Emily; Sachau, Daniel; Albertson, Dawn N.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a campus-based radio show about psychological science. The authors' goals in creating the show were to inform the public about the science of psychology and to create a teaching and learning resource for faculty members and students. The show, "Psychological Frontiers," airs twice a week and consists of…

  15. State-Controlled Multimedia Education for All? . Science Programs in Early German Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirrmacher, Arne

    2012-03-01

    While science education and popularization by means of print media developed in quite similar forms in many nations, the advent of radio resulted in initiatives to bring science on the air that were rather heterogeneous from country to country. The German case stands out with respect to quantity, variety and ambition, and also for its special mechanism of planning and controlling educational programs on science and technology. Hence it is argued that a closer look at how the chances of the new medium were discussed and implemented in Weimar Germany can provide a scale of reference for the development of science communication on the radio in other countries. For this reason a brief summary of the the respective developments in the United States and Europe is presented, before discussing in some detail Germany's particular institutional organization, program structures, combination of radio broadcasts and print material into a kind of multimedia, and various formats and genres.

  16. National conference on environmental remediation science and technology: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This conference was held September 8--10, 1998 in Greensboro, North Carolina. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on methods and site characterization technologies for environmental monitoring and remedial action planning of hazardous materials. This report contains the abstracts of sixty-one papers presented at the conference.

  17. News Conference: Serbia hosts teachers' seminar Resources: Teachers TV website closes for business Festival: Science takes to the stage in Denmark Research: How noise affects learning in secondary schools CERN: CERN visit inspires new teaching ideas Education: PLS aims to improve perception of science for school students Conference: Scientix conference discusses challenges in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Conference: Serbia hosts teachers' seminar Resources: Teachers TV website closes for business Festival: Science takes to the stage in Denmark Research: How noise affects learning in secondary schools CERN: CERN visit inspires new teaching ideas Education: PLS aims to improve perception of science for school students Conference: Scientix conference discusses challenges in science education

  18. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric and Ionospheric Disturbances using Radio Science Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. M.; Paik, M.; Oudrhiri, K.; Buccino, D.; Kahan, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheres and ionospheres can have significant impacts on radio frequency signal propagation such as Deep Space Network and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS, including Global Position System (GPS)) measurements. Previous studies indicate that Earth's atmospheric, surface, and interior processes, such as seismic activities, tsunamis, meteor impacts, and volcanic eruptions, are able to trigger atmospheric acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs), which potentially induce traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the upper atmosphere. These perturbations are relatively small to the background of atmospheric and ionospheric profiles but detectable to radio frequency signals. In this research, we will demonstrate the ability of using ground- and space-based radio science techniques to detect and characterize atmospheric and ionospheric wave propagation from solid earth events including seismic activities and tsunamis. The detected wave trains with wave characteristics such as propagation speeds and wavelengths are classified through analysis of the line of sight (LOS) and radio occultation measurements made by different frequency radio waves. Dominant and different physical characteristics of AGW and TID propagations are found to be associated with specific surface wave propagations. In this research, we compare observations made by different frequency radio signals, corresponding model simulations, and other geophysical measurements of surface wave propagation such as seismometers, infrasound arrays and DART buoys. Results are shown to improve our understanding of the interactions between surface, atmosphere, and ionosphere. The better understanding of the coupling between planetary interior, surface, atmosphere, and ionosphere will benefit from innovative radio science techniques.

  19. Proceedings of the Plutonium Futures ? The Science 2006 Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M; Hobart, D; Allan, P; Jarvinen, G

    2007-07-12

    Plutonium Futures--The Science 2006 provided opportunities to examine present knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides in complex media and materials; to discuss the current and emerging science (chemistry, physics, materials science, nuclear science, and environmental effects) of plutonium and actinides relevant to enhancing global nuclear security; and to exchange ideas. This international conference also provided a forum for illustrating and enhancing capabilities and interests, and assessing issues in these areas. U.S. and international scientists, engineers, faculty, and students from universities, national laboratories, and DOE's nuclear complex were encouraged to participate and make technical contributions. The Conference ran from Sunday, July 9th through Thursday, July 13th. A popular aspect of the conference was the opening tutorial session on Sunday afternoon intended for students and scientists new to the area of plutonium research. The tutorial was well attended by novices and veterans alike, and featured such diverse topics as; plutonium metallurgy, plutonium in the environment, and international arms control and nonproliferation. Two plenary lectures began each morning and each afternoon session and highlighted the breakout sessions on coordination/organometallic chemistry, solid-state physics, environmental chemistry, materials science, separations and reprocessing, advanced fuels and waste forms, phase transformations, solution and gas-phase chemistry, compounds and complexes, electronic structure and physical properties, and more. Chemistry Highlights--Among the many chemistry highlights presented in this proceedings are the overview of concepts and philosophies on inert nuclear fuel matrices and concerns about the ever-increasing amounts of minor actinides and plutonium generated in the fuel cycle. The various ideas involve multiple reduction schemes for these materials, suggesting fuels for 'burning' or

  20. 11th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Saundry

    2012-04-17

    On January 19-21, 2011, The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) successfully convened its 11th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans in Washington, DC at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. Over 1,247 participants attended the conference, representing federal, state and local governments, university and colleges across the US, civil society organizations, the business community, and international entities. In addition, the conference was webcast to an audience across several states. The conference provided a forum to examine the profound changes our ocean will undergo over the next 25-50 years and share various perspectives on the new research, tools, and policy initiatives to protect and sustain our ocean. Conference highlights and recommendations are available to the public on NCSE's conference website, www.OurChangingOceans.org.

  1. The Callaway Gardens Conference on Building a Multiyear, Multidisciplinary, High School Science Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee.

    In addition to a summary of the proceedings of the Callaway Gardens Conference attended by selected science educators, scientists, and psychologists, invited papers by Robert Gagne ("The High School Science Program--A Psychologist's Assessment") and Clifford Swartz ("The High School Science Program--A Scientist's Assessment")…

  2. STEPS TOWARD SCIENTIFIC LITERACY, A REPORT OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CONFERENCES ON SCIENCE FOR NONSCIENCE MAJORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    DURING THE 1967-68 ACADEMIC YEAR, THE NATIONAL SCIENCE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION SPONSORED FOUR WORKING CONFERENCES WITH COLLEGE SCIENCE TEACHERS WHO WERE CONCERNED WITH TEACHING SCIENCE FOR THE NONSCIENCE MAJOR. THE TWO ASPECTS EMPHASIZED AT THE MEETINGS WERE (1) THE MEANING OF THE TERM "SCIENTIFIC LITERACY," AND THE IMPORTANCE OF PRODUCING COLLEGE…

  3. Proceedings of the Redesign in Science Education Conference (RISE) (Columbus, OH, October 20-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeth, Michael E., Ed.; Kwon, Hyeoksoon, Ed.; Lee, Gyoungho, Ed.

    This document contains the papers presented at the Redesign in Science Education (RISE) Conference. Papers include: (1) "A Model Development Concept (MDC) for Education: A Framework for Change" (C. K. Barsky, K. G. Wilson, and B. Daviss); (2) "Teaching Science Everyday" (K. L. Scott); (3) "Science Teacher Licensure…

  4. Integrated Science Education Worldwide. International Conference (Nijmegen, Netherlands, March 28-April 7, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council of Associations for Science Education.

    This document contains the full texts of plenary lectures presented at a conference which focused on developments in integrated science education (ISE), between 1968 and 1978, and on issues and new trends in science education in the 1980s and 1990s. These lectures include: (1) "Interaction of Science and Society" (J. C. Terlouw); (2) "A Review of…

  5. Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2014. Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (Lisbon, Portugal, July 15-19, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptista Nunes, Miguel, Ed.; McPherson, Maggie, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the International Conference e-Learning 2014, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society and is part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (Lisbon, Portugal July 15-19, 2014). The e-Learning 2014 conference aims to address the…

  6. The Southeastern Regional Conference on the Social Sciences and Environmental Education (Athens, Georgia, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saveland, Robert N.

    Remarks presented at the Southeastern Regional Conference on the Social Sciences and Environmental Education, held at Athens, Georgia, are compiled in this document. Two major conference addresses are reported in their entirety: "International Programs in Environmental Education" by Dr. Jan Cerovsky, Education Executive Officer,…

  7. A Toolkit for Democratizing Science and Technology Policy: The Practical Mechanics of Organizing a Consensus Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Daniel Lee; Powell, Maria; Grice, Joshua; Adrian, Judith; Lobes, Carol

    2007-01-01

    A widely touted approach to involving laypeople in science and technology policy-related decisions is the consensus conference. Virtually nothing written on the topic provides detailed discussion of the many steps from citizen recruitment to citizen report. Little attention is paid to how and why the mechanics of the consensus conference process…

  8. Proceedings of the New England Conference on Ocean Science Education, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, May 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangelsdorf, Frederick E.; And Others

    Reported are the papers presented at the New England Conference on Ocean Science Education. The purpose of the conference was to bring together prominent oceanographers and New England educators at the primary and secondary level to discuss current progress in oceanographic research and to relate this progress to the needs of schools for materials…

  9. Parkes radio science system design and testing for Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebold, T. A.; Weese, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Radio Science System installed at Parkes, Australia for the Voyager Neptune encounter was specified to meet the same stringent requirements that were imposed upon the Deep Space Network Radio Science System. The system design and test methodology employed to meet these requirements at Parkes are described, and data showing the measured performance of the system are presented. The results indicate that the system operates with a comfortable margin on the requirements. There was a minor problem with frequency-dependent spurious signals which could not be fixed before the encounter. Test results characterizing these spurious signals are included.

  10. TOMORROW: EPA Administrator to Keynote National Council for Science and the Environment Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy will give a keynote address tomorrow at the 15 th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment hosted by the National Counci

  11. TODAY: EPA Administrator to Keynote National Council for Science and the Environment Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy will give a keynote address today at the 15 th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment hosted by the National Council f

  12. Organization by Gordon Research Conferences of the 2012 Plasma Processing Science Conference 22-27 July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jane

    2012-07-27

    The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in plasma science and technology as well as explore the applications of this nonequilibrium medium in possible approaches relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics and chemistry, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy, the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks and carbon dioxide neutral solar fuels (from carbon dioxide and water), and plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization.

  13. Association for the Education of Teachers in Science; Southwest Regional Conference, Emporia, Kansas, February 14-15, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1969

    The focus of this conference was analyzing the impact of curricular innovations upon science teacher education. Included are a number of papers presented at the conference. The science and mathematics inservice programs in Kansas, particularly the Introductory Physical Science Program, are discussed. The Science In-Service Project at the…

  14. 28th Annual JPMorgan Healthcare Conference--Human Genome Sciences and Celgene.

    PubMed

    Gale, Sophie; Croasdell, Gary

    2010-03-01

    The JPMorgan Healthcare Conference, held in San Francisco, included presentations by various pharmaceutical companies summarizing their achievements in 2009 and expectations for 2010. This conference report highlights presentations from Human Genome Sciences Inc and Celgene Corp. Investigational drugs from Human Genome Sciences, including belimumab (in collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline plc), albinterferon alfa-2b (with Novartis AG), mapatumumab (with Takeda Pharmaceutical Co Ltd) and HGS-1029, and from Celgene, including romidepsin, pomalidomide, apremilast and PDA-001 (Celgene Cellular Therapeutics), are discussed.

  15. Proceedings: Fifteenth annual EPRI conference on fuel science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    Research is presented from a conference on fuel science. Topics presented included: Recent Progress in Coal Liquefaction at Wilsonville; HRI's Co-Processing Program; Distillate Product Quality from Liquefaction of Low Rank Coals; Modeling the Chem-Coal Process; Organic Sulfur Nitrogen Species in Illinois Basin Coals; Distribution of Organic Sulfur Containing Structures in High Organic Sulfur Coals; New Approaches to the Direct Measurement of Sulfur Forms in Coal; Process Engineering Studies of the Perchloroethylene Coal Cleaning Process; XAFS Investigation of the Molecular Forms of Organic Sulfur in Coal; LPMEOH: Beyond LaPorte -- Next Step to Commercialization; Development of Single-Stage, Liquid-Phase Dimethyl Ether Synthesis Process from CO-Rich Syngas; Biomimetic Catalyst: Mechanistic Aspects of the C-H Activation; Low Temperature Methanol Catalyst Some Aspects of Process Scale-up; Recovery of Methanol from a Catalyst Slurry by Membrane Pervaporation; Site-Specific IGCC Methanol Co-Production Study; Proof-of-Concept Results using the Arcanum/Bechtel Spherical Agglomeration Approach to Clean Ultra-Fine Coals; Pyrite Removal from Bituminous Coals by Aglofloat Process; Coal Desulfurization by Perchloroethylene Processing; Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration Technology; Development of Clean Soil Technology using Coal as Oily/Tarry Contaminant Removal; Evaluation of Hydrothermally Reformed Lignite for use at Minnesota Power's Clay Boswell Station; Development of an Ozonation Process for Degradation of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons; Fungal Composting for Accelerated Degradation of PAHs from Coal Tars; and Development of an Engineering Model of Mixing Process in Residual Fuel Oil Storage. Individual projects are processed separately on the data bases.

  16. A review of decametric radio astronomy - Instruments and science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Cane, H. V.

    1987-01-01

    The techniques and instruments used in Galactic and extragalactic radio astronomy at dkm wavelengths are surveyed, and typical results are summarized. Consideration is given to the large specialized phased arrays used for early surveys, the use of wideband elements to increase frequency agility, experimental VLBI observations, and limitations on ground-based observations below about 10 MHz (where the proposed LF Space Array, with resolution 0.5-5 arcmin, could make a major contribution). Observations discussed cover the Galactic center, the Galactic background radiation, SNRs, compact Galactic sources, the ISM, and large extragalactic sources.

  17. Economics and computer science of a radio spectrum reallocation.

    PubMed

    Leyton-Brown, Kevin; Milgrom, Paul; Segal, Ilya

    2017-07-11

    The recent "incentive auction" of the US Federal Communications Commission was the first auction to reallocate radio frequencies between two different kinds of uses: from broadcast television to wireless Internet access. The design challenge was not just to choose market rules to govern a fixed set of potential trades but also, to determine the broadcasters' property rights, the goods to be exchanged, the quantities to be traded, the computational procedures, and even some of the performance objectives. An essential and unusual challenge was to make the auction simple enough for human participants while still ensuring that the computations would be tractable and capable of delivering nearly efficient outcomes.

  18. Radio frequency science considerations. [technology utilization of telecommunications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    Use of the 400 MHz telecommunications system to obtain scientific information, to provide backup information for the experiments flown, and to obtain measurements which aid in designing future probes is considered. Recommended objectives of such a program are summarized and include: measure 400 MHz amplitude to determine adsorption and perhaps scintillation (if data rate permits); measure noise strength near 400 MHz to reexamine 400 MHz choice and to observe thermal, cosmic, and local synchrotron noise trends; probe VSWR sensing to monitor integrity of system, icing, and possible plasma effects; after the probe is finished, have the bus radio occultation in the same region where the probe fell to evaluate the occultation.

  19. Science Education in Rural and Small Schools. Proceedings from the Rural and Small Schools Conference, Science Education Section: 1988 (10th, Manhattan, Kansas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, J. Steve, Ed.

    The Rural and Small Schools Conference has made a special effort to address the needs that pertain to science educators in rural and small schools. This publication presents the proceedings from the 1988 science education section of the conference. The content of the conference deals with a diversity of topics. The proceedings include a preface…

  20. Essays on Creativity and Science. Proceedings of the Creativity and Science Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, March 23-24, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana Macintyre, Ed.

    Essays focusing on creativity in the humanities and sciences are contained in this proceedings of the Creativity and Science Conference. The presentors, who represented many academic disciplines, agreed that creativity is as essential to the scientist as to the humanist and that one can prepare for it but not instruct or be instructed in achieving…

  1. Essays on Creativity and Science. Proceedings of the Creativity and Science Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, March 23-24, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana Macintyre, Ed.

    Essays focusing on creativity in the humanities and sciences are contained in this proceedings of the Creativity and Science Conference. The presentors, who represented many academic disciplines, agreed that creativity is as essential to the scientist as to the humanist and that one can prepare for it but not instruct or be instructed in achieving…

  2. International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015) took place in the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece on June 18-20, 2015 and was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The scope of the conference was to provide a forum on the latest developments in Biomedical Instrumentation and related principles of Physical and Engineering sciences. Scientists and engineers from academic, industrial and health disciplines were invited to participate in the Conference and to contribute both in the promotion and dissemination of the scientific knowledge.

  3. From Nearby Low Luminosity AGN to High Redshift Radio Galaxies: Science Interests with Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharb, P.; Lal, D. V.; Singh, V.; Bagchi, J.; Ishwara Chandra, C. H.; Hota, A.; Konar, C.; Wadadekar, Y.; Shastri, P.; Das, M.; Baliyan, K.; Nath, B. B.; Pandey-Pommier, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present detailed science cases that a large fraction of the Indian AGN community is interested in pursuing with the upcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). These interests range from understanding low luminosity active galactic nuclei in the nearby Universe to powerful radio galaxies at high redshifts. Important unresolved science questions in AGN physics are discussed. Ongoing low-frequency surveys with the SKA pathfinder telescope GMRT, are highlighted.

  4. Learning Science from Children's Radio: Summative Evaluation of "Kinetic City Super Crew."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Barbara N.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study that assessed the impact of four half-hour science programs for fourth graders aired on commercial radio in a causal-comparative between-groups study with prebroadcast and postbroadcast questionnaires. Formative and summative evaluation of the programs is described, and results are reviewed. (21 references) (LRW)

  5. Reducing cost with autonomous operations of the Deep Space Network radio science receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S.; Anabtawi, A.; Connally, M.; Jongeling, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the Radio Science Receiver system and the savings it has brought to mission operations. The design and implementation of remote and autonomous operations will be discussed along with the process of including user feedback along the way and lessons learned and procedures avoided.

  6. Ultra-Stable Oscillators for Probe Radio Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami

    2012-01-01

    An Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) is: A frequency reference, and A clock It is stable, small, and sensitive. It is a science and an art form. It is flown on spacecraft/probes. It]is utilized at ground stations alone or as a cleanup loop. It eliminates lock-up time on uplink for occultation egress & effect of media on uplink signal. It has enabled significant planetary science investigations.

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on High Pressure Science and Technology, Joint AIRAPT-22 & HPCJ-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viña, Luis; Tejedor, Carlos; Calleja, José M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Joint AIRAPT-22 & HPCJ-50 Conference was held in Odaiba, Tokyo, on 26-31 July 2009. About 480 scientists from 24 countries attended the conference and 464 papers, including 3 plenary lectures, 39 invited talks, and 156 oral presentations, were presented. It is my great pleasure to present this proceedings volume, which is based on the high quality scientific works presented at the conference. The International AIRAPT conference has been held every two years in various countries around the world since 1965, while High Pressure Conference of Japan (HPCJ) has been held annually since 1959 in various Japanese cities. Pressure is a fundamental parameter to control the property of matter. As a result, both AIRAPT and HPCJ have become highly multidisciplinary, and cover Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Biosciences, Food Science, and Technology. Although each discipline has a unique target, they all have high-pressure research in common. This proceedings volume includes about 200 papers of state-of-the-art studies from numerous fields. I hope this proceedings volume provides excellent pieces of information in various fields to further advance high-pressure research. Conference logo Takehiko Yagi Conference Chairman Institute for Solid State Physics The University of Tokyo 7 December 2009 Conference photograph Participants at the conference venue, Tokyo International Exchange Center, Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan. Editor in Chief TAKEMURA Kenichi National Institute for Materials Science, Japan Editorial board Tadashi KONDO Osaka University, Japan Hitoshi MATSUKI The University of Tokushima, Japan Nobuyuki MATUBAYASI Kyoto University, Japan Yoshihisa MORI Okayama University of Science, Japan Osamu OHTAKA Osaka University, Japan Chihiro SEKINE Muroran Institute of Technology, Japan

  8. Proceedings of the 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference included sessions on: Phoenix: Exploration of the Martian Arctic; Origin and Early Evolution of the Moon; Comet Wild 2: Mineralogy and More; Astrobiology: Meteorites, Microbes, Hydrous Habitats, and Irradiated Ices; Phoenix: Soil, Chemistry, and Habitability; Planetary Differentiation; Presolar Grains: Structures and Origins; SPECIAL SESSION: Venus Atmosphere: Venus Express and Future Missions; Mars Polar Caps: Past and Present; SPECIAL SESSION: Lunar Missions: Results from Kaguya, Chang'e-1, and Chandrayaan-1, Part I; 5 Early Nebula Processes and Models; SPECIAL SESSION: Icy Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn: Cosmic Gymnasts; Mars: Ground Ice and Climate Change; SPECIAL SESSION: Lunar Missions: Results from Kaguya, Chang'e-1, and Chandrayaan-1, Part II; Chondrite Parent-Body Processes; SPECIAL SESSION: Icy Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn: Salubrious Surfaces; SNC Meteorites; Ancient Martian Crust: Primary Mineralogy and Aqueous Alteration; SPECIAL SESSION: Messenger at Mercury: A Global Perspective on the Innermost Planet; CAIs and Chondrules: Records of Early Solar System Processes; Small Bodies: Shapes of Things to Come; Sulfur on Mars: Rocks, Soils, and Cycling Processes; Mercury: Evolution and Tectonics; Venus Geology, Volcanism, Tectonics, and Resurfacing; Asteroid-Meteorite Connections; Impacts I: Models and Experiments; Solar Wind and Genesis: Measurements and Interpretation; Mars: Aqueous Processes; Magmatic Volatiles and Eruptive Conditions of Lunar Basalts; Comparative Planetology; Interstellar Matter: Origins and Relationships; Impacts II: Craters and Ejecta Mars: Tectonics and Dynamics; Mars Analogs I: Geological; Exploring the Diversity of Lunar Lithologies with Sample Analyses and Remote Sensing; Chondrite Accretion and Early History; Science Instruments for the Mars Science Lander; . Martian Gullies: Morphology and Origins; Mars: Dunes, Dust, and Wind; Mars: Volcanism; Early Solar System Chronology

  9. Proceedings of the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The sessions in the conference include: Titan, Mars Volcanism, Mars Polar Layered Deposits, Early Solar System Isotopes, SPECIAL SESSION: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: New Ways of Studying the Red Planet, Achondrites: Exploring Oxygen Isotopes and Parent-Body Processes, Solar System Formation and Evolution, SPECIAL SESSION: SMART-1, . Impact Cratering: Observations and Experiments, SPECIAL SESSION: Volcanism and Tectonism on Saturnian Satellites, Solar Nebula Composition, Mars Fluvial Geomorphology, Asteroid Observations: Spectra, Mostly, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: View from the Surface, Mars Tectonics and Crustal Dichotomy, Stardust: Wild-2 Revealed, Impact Cratering from Observations and Interpretations, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: The Map View, Chondrules and Their Formation, Enceladus, Asteroids and Deep Impact: Structure, Dynamics, and Experiments, Mars Surface Process and Evolution, Martian Meteorites: Nakhlites, Experiments, and the Great Shergottite Age Debate, Stardust: Mainly Mineralogy, Astrobiology, Wind-Surface Interactions on Mars and Earth, Icy Satellite Surfaces, Venus, Lunar Remote Sensing, Space Weathering, and Impact Effects, Interplanetary Dust/Genesis, Mars Cratering: Counts and Catastrophes?, Chondrites: Secondary Processes, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: Atmosphere, Soils, Brines, and Minerals, Lunar Interior and Differentiation, Mars Magnetics and Atmosphere: Core to Ionosphere, Metal-rich Chondrites, Organics in Chondrites, Lunar Impacts and Meteorites, Presolar/Solar Grains, Topics for Print Only papers are: Outer Planets/Satellites, Early Solar System, Interplanetary Dust, Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects, Asteroids and Meteoroids, Chondrites, Achondrites, Meteorite Related, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars, Astrobiology, Planetary Differentiation, Impacts, Mercury, Lunar Samples and Modeling, Venus, Missions and Instruments, Global Warming, Education and Public Outreach, Poster sessions are: Asteroids/Kuiper Belt Objects

  10. Proceedings of the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The sessions in the conference include: Titan, Mars Volcanism, Mars Polar Layered Deposits, Early Solar System Isotopes, SPECIAL SESSION: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: New Ways of Studying the Red Planet, Achondrites: Exploring Oxygen Isotopes and Parent-Body Processes, Solar System Formation and Evolution, SPECIAL SESSION: SMART-1, . Impact Cratering: Observations and Experiments, SPECIAL SESSION: Volcanism and Tectonism on Saturnian Satellites, Solar Nebula Composition, Mars Fluvial Geomorphology, Asteroid Observations: Spectra, Mostly, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: View from the Surface, Mars Tectonics and Crustal Dichotomy, Stardust: Wild-2 Revealed, Impact Cratering from Observations and Interpretations, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: The Map View, Chondrules and Their Formation, Enceladus, Asteroids and Deep Impact: Structure, Dynamics, and Experiments, Mars Surface Process and Evolution, Martian Meteorites: Nakhlites, Experiments, and the Great Shergottite Age Debate, Stardust: Mainly Mineralogy, Astrobiology, Wind-Surface Interactions on Mars and Earth, Icy Satellite Surfaces, Venus, Lunar Remote Sensing, Space Weathering, and Impact Effects, Interplanetary Dust/Genesis, Mars Cratering: Counts and Catastrophes?, Chondrites: Secondary Processes, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: Atmosphere, Soils, Brines, and Minerals, Lunar Interior and Differentiation, Mars Magnetics and Atmosphere: Core to Ionosphere, Metal-rich Chondrites, Organics in Chondrites, Lunar Impacts and Meteorites, Presolar/Solar Grains, Topics for Print Only papers are: Outer Planets/Satellites, Early Solar System, Interplanetary Dust, Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects, Asteroids and Meteoroids, Chondrites, Achondrites, Meteorite Related, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars, Astrobiology, Planetary Differentiation, Impacts, Mercury, Lunar Samples and Modeling, Venus, Missions and Instruments, Global Warming, Education and Public Outreach, Poster sessions are: Asteroids/Kuiper Belt Objects

  11. Conference on Geospatial Approaches to Cancer Control and Population Sciences

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of this conference is to bring together a community of researchers across the cancer control continuum using geospatial tools, models and approaches to address cancer prevention and control.

  12. Microwave absorptivity in the Saturn atmosphere from Cassini Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A. J.; Marouf, E. A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2005, the Cassini spacecraft has collected data from numerous radio occultations by the atmosphere of Saturn. These occultations probed a wide range of latitudes, ranging from equatorial to near-polar. The radio system of Cassini transmits three coherent downlinks to Earth at S-Band (13.04 cm), X-Band (3.56 cm), and Ka-Band (0.94 cm) wavelengths. With the Deep Space Net 70 m receiving stations, The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is approximately 48 dB at X-Band, and 38 dB at S-band. At Ka-band, 34 m DSN stations are used, resulting in an SNR of about 41 dB. These SNRs are quite adequate to follow the signals through the top of the microwave-absorbing regions before the noise-floor is reached. By subtracting the refractive defocusing attenuation in the atmosphere (derived from the phase data) from the total attenuation, one obtains the attenuation due to absorption (dB0, which can then be inverted to obtain vertical profiles of absorptivity (dB km-1 ) at each of the three wavelengths. Preliminary results show the expected large effect of wavelength on the absorptivity profiles, with the shorter wavelength signals being absorbed higher in the atmosphere. These profiles can be used to estimate the vertical density profiles of known microwave absorbers, such as NH3 and PH3, examples of which are presented .This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, San Jose State University, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with support from the Cassini program.

  13. The Challenges and Opportunities for International Cooperative Radio Science; Experience with Mars Express and Venus Express Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Dwight P.; Thompson, Tommy; Simpson, Richard; Tyler, G. Leonard; Dehant, Veronique; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Hausler, Bernd; Patzold, Martin; Goltz, Gene; Kahan, Daniel; hide

    2008-01-01

    Radio Science is an opportunistic discipline in the sense that the communication link between a spacecraft and its supporting ground station can be used to probe the intervening media remotely. Radio science has recently expanded to greater, cooperative use of international assets. Mars Express and Venus Express are two such cooperative missions managed by the European Space Agency with broad international science participation supported by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) and ESA's tracking network for deep space missions (ESTRAK). This paper provides an overview of the constraints, opportunities, and lessons learned from international cross support of radio science, and it explores techniques for potentially optimizing the resultant data sets.

  14. The Challenges and Opportunities for International Cooperative Radio Science; Experience with Mars Express and Venus Express Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Dwight P.; Thompson, Tommy; Simpson, Richard; Tyler, G. Leonard; Dehant, Veronique; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Hausler, Bernd; Patzold, Martin; Goltz, Gene; Kahan, Daniel; Valencia, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Radio Science is an opportunistic discipline in the sense that the communication link between a spacecraft and its supporting ground station can be used to probe the intervening media remotely. Radio science has recently expanded to greater, cooperative use of international assets. Mars Express and Venus Express are two such cooperative missions managed by the European Space Agency with broad international science participation supported by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) and ESA's tracking network for deep space missions (ESTRAK). This paper provides an overview of the constraints, opportunities, and lessons learned from international cross support of radio science, and it explores techniques for potentially optimizing the resultant data sets.

  15. Third International Conference on Inverse Design Concepts and Optimization in Engineering Sciences (ICIDES-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Papers from the Third International Conference on Inverse Design Concepts and Optimization in Engineering Sciences (ICIDES) are presented. The papers discuss current research in the general field of inverse, semi-inverse, and direct design and optimization in engineering sciences. The rapid growth of this relatively new field is due to the availability of faster and larger computing machines.

  16. PREFACE The International Conference on Science of Friction 2010 (ICSF2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    The second international conference on science of friction in Japan was held at Ise-Shima, Mie on 13-18 September 2010. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered at the conference were: Superlubricity and friction Electronic and phononic contributions to friction Friction on the atomic and molecular scales van der Waals friction and Casimir force Molecular motor and friction Friction and adhesion in soft matter system Wear and crack on the nanocsale Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipatin Friction and Chaos Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts Friction of powder The number of participants in the conference was approximately 85, registered from 8 countries. 40 oral and 16 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 19 papers devoted to the topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the organizing Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education, and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The surface Science Society of Japan and The Japanese Society of Tribologists. The details of the conference are available on http://www.science-of-friction.com/2010/. Finally we would like to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Ise-Shima, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  17. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  18. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  19. Mercury's gravity, tides, and spin from MESSENGER radio science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    We analyze radio tracking data obtained during 1311 orbits of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft in the period March 2011 to April 2014. A least squares minimization of the residuals between observed and computed values of two-way range and Doppler allows us to solve for a model describing Mercury's gravity, tidal response, and spin state. We use a spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field to degree and order 40 and report error bars corresponding to 10 times the formal uncertainties of the fit. Our estimate of the product of Mercury's mass and the gravitational constant, GM = (22031.87404 ± 9×10-4) km3 s-2, is in excellent agreement with published results. Our solution for the geophysically important second-degree coefficients (C¯2,0=-2.25100×10-5±1.3×10-9, C¯2,2=1.24973×10-5±1.2×10-9) confirms previous estimates to better than 0.4% and, therefore, inferences about Mercury's moment of inertia and interior structure. Our estimate of the tidal Love number k2 = 0.464 ± 0.023 indicates that Mercury's mantle may be hotter and weaker than previously thought. Our spin state solution suggests that gravity-based estimates of Mercury's spin axis orientation are marginally consistent with previous measurements of the orientation of the crust.

  20. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  1. FOREWORD: 9th Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering International Conference 2014 (CUTSE2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieng Chen, Vincent Lee

    2015-04-01

    A very warm welcome to all participants of the 9th Curtin University Technology, Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference 2014. This annual conference dates back to 2006 when the first Curtin University of Technology Science and Engineering (CUTSE) Conference was held in Curtin University, Miri Sarawak. CUTSE Conference was initially intended for Curtin's undergraduates such that they are able to experience the presentation of their work in a conference environment. As time passes and following the urge of knowledge dissemination, CUTSE Conference is hence open to public. This year the Department of Mechanical Engineering has been given the honour to organize the 9th CUTSE Conference. It has been a pleasure to watch CUTSE grow from strength to strength over the years. This year, our theme is "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". We hope that it is in this spirit that CUTSE participants may align their respective work, such that we all aim for a greater and better implementation of "Discovering, Innovating and Engineering". The 9th CUTSE Conference 2014 is an excellent avenue for researchers, engineers, scientists, academicians, professionals from industry and students to share their research findings and initiate further collaborations in their respective fields. Parallel sessions in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Civil and Chemical engineering as well as the sciences will be hosted over a period of two days. Each year, the conference attracts participation from a number of countries in addition to Malaysia and Australia. In addition, student participants will get the opportunity to present their research projects and gain valuable feedback from industry professionals. This year the Conference will be organised by the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Curtin Sarawak's School of Engineering and Science in collaboration with The Institute of Engineers Malaysia, Miri Branch. On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to thank this year

  2. PREFACE: 1st Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science 2013 (LPBMS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi

    2014-04-01

    From 29-31 August 2013, the 1st International Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science, LPBMS 2013, took place in the Tsukuba International Congress Center in the city of Tsukuba, Japan. The conference was a continuation of the international series Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS), which started in 1994. The last one, SRMS-7, was held in Oxford UK 11-14 July 2010, where the International Advisory Committee (IAC) recommended the conference be enlarged to incorporate Materials Research from Neutron, Muon, and Slow Positron Sources, as well as the science emerging from Synchrotron Light Sources. The conference brought together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experience from the physics, chemistry and engineering communities. The topics covered in the LPBMS2013 include strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism and magnetic materials, soft matter, interface and surface defects, catalysts, biomaterials, and ceramics. In the 3-day scientific program, the conference consisted of 9 plenary talks, 33 invited talks, 20 oral presentations, and 126 poster presentations. We are pleased to publish the proceedings of the LPBMS2013 in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. This volume contains 58 papers representing the work that was presented and discussed at the conference. We hope that this volume will promote further development of this interdisciplinary materials research emerging from synchrotron light, neutron, muon, and slow positron sciences. Finally, we would like to thank the International Advisory Committee (Chair: Professor G N Greaves), sponsors, all the participants and contributors for making possible this international meeting of researchers. Reiji Kumai & Youichi Murakami Conference photograph Details of the program and organizing committees are available in the pdf

  3. Proceedings of the 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference included sessions on: Phoenix: Exploration of the Martian Arctic; Origin and Early Evolution of the Moon; Comet Wild 2: Mineralogy and More; Astrobiology: Meteorites, Microbes, Hydrous Habitats, and Irradiated Ices; Phoenix: Soil, Chemistry, and Habitability; Planetary Differentiation; Presolar Grains: Structures and Origins; SPECIAL SESSION: Venus Atmosphere: Venus Express and Future Missions; Mars Polar Caps: Past and Present; SPECIAL SESSION: Lunar Missions: Results from Kaguya, Chang'e-1, and Chandrayaan-1, Part I; 5 Early Nebula Processes and Models; SPECIAL SESSION: Icy Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn: Cosmic Gymnasts; Mars: Ground Ice and Climate Change; SPECIAL SESSION: Lunar Missions: Results from Kaguya, Chang'e-1, and Chandrayaan-1, Part II; Chondrite Parent-Body Processes; SPECIAL SESSION: Icy Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn: Salubrious Surfaces; SNC Meteorites; Ancient Martian Crust: Primary Mineralogy and Aqueous Alteration; SPECIAL SESSION: Messenger at Mercury: A Global Perspective on the Innermost Planet; CAIs and Chondrules: Records of Early Solar System Processes; Small Bodies: Shapes of Things to Come; Sulfur on Mars: Rocks, Soils, and Cycling Processes; Mercury: Evolution and Tectonics; Venus Geology, Volcanism, Tectonics, and Resurfacing; Asteroid-Meteorite Connections; Impacts I: Models and Experiments; Solar Wind and Genesis: Measurements and Interpretation; Mars: Aqueous Processes; Magmatic Volatiles and Eruptive Conditions of Lunar Basalts; Comparative Planetology; Interstellar Matter: Origins and Relationships; Impacts II: Craters and Ejecta Mars: Tectonics and Dynamics; Mars Analogs I: Geological; Exploring the Diversity of Lunar Lithologies with Sample Analyses and Remote Sensing; Chondrite Accretion and Early History; Science Instruments for the Mars Science Lander; . Martian Gullies: Morphology and Origins; Mars: Dunes, Dust, and Wind; Mars: Volcanism; Early Solar System Chronology

  4. Marine Science and the 1974 Law of the Sea Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knauss, John A.

    1974-01-01

    More intensive and varied use of the oceans and their resources requires a more comprehensive legal regime than previously. Three years of preparatory work have been completed for the Law of the Sea Conference. It appears that the coastal nations will gain some form of jurisdiction over fisheries and mineral resources off their shores. (RH)

  5. Marine Science and the 1974 Law of the Sea Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knauss, John A.

    1974-01-01

    More intensive and varied use of the oceans and their resources requires a more comprehensive legal regime than previously. Three years of preparatory work have been completed for the Law of the Sea Conference. It appears that the coastal nations will gain some form of jurisdiction over fisheries and mineral resources off their shores. (RH)

  6. Teaching Social Sciences in the Clinical Years through Psychosocial Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priel, Beatrice; Rabinowitz, Betty

    1988-01-01

    A program during clerkships in internal medicine, pediatrics, and surgery at Ben-Gurion University emphasizes psychosocial conferences teaching to include tutorial guidance throughout the student's preparation of a case presentation in which psychological, sociological, and anthropological aspects of the patients' coping with illness and the…

  7. The Gravity Field of Mars From MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) missions have enabled NASA to conduct reconnaissance and exploration of Mars from orbit for sixteen consecutive years. These radio systems on these spacecraft enabled radio science in orbit around Mars to improve the knowledge of the static structure of the Martian gravitational field. The continuity of the radio tracking data, which cover more than a solar cycle, also provides useful information to characterize the temporal variability of the gravity field, relevant to the planet's internal dynamics and the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere [1]. MGS operated for more than 7 years, between 1999 and 2006, in a frozen sun-synchronous, near-circular, polar orbit with the periapsis at approximately 370 km altitude. ODY and MRO have been orbiting Mars in two separate sun-synchronous orbits at different local times and altitudes. ODY began its mapping phase in 2002 with the periapis at approximately 390 km altitude and 4-5pm Local Solar Time (LST), whereas the MRO science mission started in November 2006 with the periapis at approximately 255 km altitude and 3pm LST. The 16 years of radio tracking data provide useful information on the atmospheric density in the Martian upper atmosphere. We used ODY and MRO radio data to recover the long-term periodicity of the major atmospheric constituents -- CO2, O, and He -- at the orbit altitudes of these two spacecraft [2]. The improved atmospheric model provides a better prediction of the annual and semi-annual variability of the dominant species. Therefore, the inclusion of the recovered model leads to improved orbit determination and an improved gravity field model of Mars with MGS, ODY, and MRO radio tracking data.

  8. 1st International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference 2014 (INST2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear technology has played an important role in many aspects of our lives, including agriculture, energy, materials, medicine, environment, forensics, healthcare, and frontier research. The International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference (INST) aims to bring together scientists, engineers, academics, and students to share knowledge and experiences about all aspects of nuclear sciences. INST has evolved from a series of national conferences in Thailand called Nuclear Science and Technology (NST) Conference, which has been held for 11 times, the first being in 1986. INST2014 was held in August 2014 and hosted by Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT). The theme was "Driving the future with nuclear technology". The conference working language was English. The proceedings were peer reviewed and considered for publication. The topics covered in the conference were: • Agricultural and food applications [AGR] • Environmental applications [ENV] • Radiation processing and industrial applications [IND] • Medical and nutritional applications [MED] • Nuclear physics and engineering [PHY] • Nuclear and radiation safety [SAF] • Other related topics [OTH] • Device and instrument presentation [DEV] Awards for outstanding oral and poster presentations will be given to qualified students who present their work during the conference.

  9. Literature and the Sea. Proceedings of a Conference Held at the Marine Science Center, Newport, Oregon, May 8, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astro, Richard, Ed.

    This document is a collection of eight papers presented at a conference held at the Marine Science Center, Newport, Oregon, May 8, 1976. The conference concluded a course offered jointly by the School of Oceanography and the Department of English at Oregon State University. The conference had two purposes: (1) focus on the relationship between…

  10. Headwaters to estuaries: advances in watershed science and management - Proceedings of the Fifth Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds

    Treesearch

    Christina E. Stringer; Ken W. Krauss; James S. Latimer

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings contain the abstracts, manuscripts, and posters of presentations given at the Fifth Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds—Headwaters to estuaries: advances in watershed science and management, held at the Trident Technical College Conference Center in North Charleston, South Carolina, March 3-5, 2015. The conference was hosted...

  11. 75th anniversary of the N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 February 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) celebrating the 75th anniversary of the N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation of the RAS (IZMIRAN) was held in the IZMIRAN conference hall on 25 February 2015. The agenda of the session announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division contained the following reports: (1) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Moscow) "N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, and tomorrow"; (2) Gvishiani A D (Geophysical Center, Moscow) "Studies of the terrestrial magnetic field and the network of Russian magnetic laboratories"; (3) Sokoloff D D (Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Magnetic dynamo questions"; (4) Petrukovich A A (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Some aspects of magnetosphere-ionosphere relations"; (5) Lukin D S (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region) "Current problems of ionospheric radio wave propagation"; (6) Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Scientific Center, RAS, Murmansk), Sergienko T I (Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Sweden), Kozlovskii A E (Sodankyl \\ddot a Geophysical Observatory, Finland), Safargaleev A V (St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg), Kotikov A L (St. Petersburg Branch of IZMIRAN, St. Petersburg) "Magnetic and optical measurements and signatures of reconnection in the cusp and vicinity"; (7) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Moscow) "Space solar research: achievements and prospects". Papers written on the basis of oral reports 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 are given below. • N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, tomorrow, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2015

  12. Synergy Conference: Industry's Role in the Reform of Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education. Report of the Synergy Conference (Leesburg, Virginia, June 23-25, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education, College Park, MD.

    The purpose of the Synergy Conference was to define and initiate new roles for industry in the systemic reform of K-12 science, mathematics, and technology education. The three specific goals of the conference were: (1) inform the corporate community about the status of education reform and its relationship to the larger economic context; (2)…

  13. Synergy Conference: Industry's Role in the Reform of Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education. Report of the Synergy Conference (Leesburg, Virginia, June 23-25, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education, College Park, MD.

    The purpose of the Synergy Conference was to define and initiate new roles for industry in the systemic reform of K-12 science, mathematics, and technology education. The three specific goals of the conference were: (1) inform the corporate community about the status of education reform and its relationship to the larger economic context; (2)…

  14. Precise Pointing for Radio Science Occultations and Radar Mapping During the Cassini Mission at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation challenges and lessons learned from radar and radio science pointing observations during the Cassini mission at Saturn. Implementation of the precise desired pointing reveals key issues in the ground system, the flight system, and the pointing paradigm itself. To achieve accurate pointing on some observations, specific workarounds had to be implemented and folded into the sequence development process. Underlying Cassini's pointing system is a remarkable construct known as Inertial Vector Propagation.

  15. Precise Pointing for Radio Science Occultations and Radar Mapping During the Cassini Mission at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation challenges and lessons learned from radar and radio science pointing observations during the Cassini mission at Saturn. Implementation of the precise desired pointing reveals key issues in the ground system, the flight system, and the pointing paradigm itself. To achieve accurate pointing on some observations, specific workarounds had to be implemented and folded into the sequence development process. Underlying Cassini's pointing system is a remarkable construct known as Inertial Vector Propagation.

  16. The Fifteenth International Conference on the Science and Application of Nanotubes (NT14)

    SciTech Connect

    cronin, stephen

    2015-01-06

    The Fifteenth International Conference on the Science and Application of Nanotubes (NT14) was held at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California on June 2-6, 2014. NT14 upheld the NT tradition of presenting the latest results in the science and applications of nanotubes and related materials in plenary sessions. Emphasis was given to convivial poster sessions and student participation. Over 225 participants attended the conference, including students, post-docs, faculty, and members from industry. A total of 45 talks were presented, as well as 157 posters.

  17. Perspectives of women of color in science-based education and careers. Summary of the conference on diversity in science

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Research on inequality or stratification in science and engineering tends to concentrate on black/white or male/female difference; very few studies have discussions of both race and gender. Consequently, very little is known about the exact course that women of color take in science-based education and employment or about the course that steers them out of science-based careers. Questions abound: What are the environmental factors that affect the choices in education and science-based careers of women of color? What has influenced women of color who currently are in science-based careers? Is critical mass important and, if so, what are the keys to increasing it? What recommendations can be made to colleges and universities, faculty members, employers, the federal government, women of color themselves, and to improve the conditions and numbers of women of color in science-based careers? These questions prompted the National Research Council`s Committee on Women in Science and Engineering (CWSE) to convene a conference on Diversity in Science: Perspectives on the Retention of Minority Women in Science, Engineering, and Health-Care Professions, held on October 21--23, 1995. Confronting the problem of the lack of knowledge about the journey of women of color in science-based education and career, the conference offered opportunities for these women to describe the paths that they have taken and to identify strategies for success. Their perspectives ground this report. For purposes of this document, women of color include women in the following racial or ethnic groups: Hispanics, African-Americans, Asian and Pacific Islanders, and American Indians and Alaskan Natives. Science-based careers include those in the physical sciences and mathematics, life sciences, social sciences, and engineering.

  18. Cassini Radio Science Experiments on Saturn and Titan Preserved Because of Lewis Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1999-01-01

    The Cassini mission to Saturn is an international venture with participation from NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency. The Cassini spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral in October 1997 and is scheduled to arrive at Saturn in July 2004. After arrival, the spacecraft will orbit Saturn about 60 times over a period of 4 years. During this time, the Cassini Radio Science Subsystem will be used to investigate the atmosphere and rings of Saturn and the atmosphere of its largest moon, Titan--which is larger than Mercury and is the only moon in our solar system with a dense atmosphere. A critical component in Cassini s Radio Science Subsystem is a traveling-wave tube (TWT) that was designed at the NASA Lewis Research Center and built by Hughes Electronic Dynamics Division (ref. 1). This TWT will amplify downlink microwave signals at a frequency of 32 GHz for the Deep Space Network and will be involved in a number of experiments. These include occultation experiments in which the microwave signal will be beamed through rings and atmospheres toward Earth. Researchers will analyze the received signals to determine the sizes and distributions of the particles in the rings and the structure and composition of the atmospheres. The Radio Science Subsystem also will also be used to more accurately determine the mass and size of Saturn and its moons, to investigate the solar corona, and to search for gravity waves from outside the solar system.

  19. Transient elevation of glycolysis confers radio-resistance by facilitating DNA repair in cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Rai, Yogesh; Singh, Saurabh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-05-01

    Cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis for ATP production (the Warburg effect) and macromolecular biosynthesis; it is also linked with therapeutic resistance that is generally associated with compromised respiratory metabolism. Molecular mechanisms underlying radio-resistance linked to elevated glycolysis remain incompletely understood. We stimulated glycolysis using mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs viz. di-nitro phenol, DNP; Photosan-3, PS3; Methylene blue, MB) in established human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1). Glucose utilization and lactate production, levels of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes were investigated as indices of glycolysis. Clonogenic survival, DNA repair and cytogenetic damage were studied as parameters of radiation response. MRMs induced the glycolysis by enhancing the levels of two important regulators of glucose metabolism GLUT-1 and HK-II and resulted in 2 fold increase in glucose consumption and lactate production. This increase in glycolysis resulted in resistance against radiation-induced cell death (clonogenic survival) in different cell lines at an absorbed dose of 5 Gy. Inhibition of glucose uptake and glycolysis (using fasentin, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate) in DNP treated cells failed to increase the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells, suggesting that radio-resistance linked to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is glycolysis dependent. Elevated glycolysis also facilitated rejoining of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to a reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. These findings suggest that enhanced glycolysis generally observed in cancer cells may be responsible for the radio-resistance, partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage.

  20. Determination of Enceladus' gravity field from Cassini radio science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Marzia; Iess, Luciano; Ducci, Marco

    2014-05-01

    ., Science 311, 1393 (2006).

  1. 75 FR 3243 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... causes and potential treatments for Alzheimer's and other dementias, researchers are focused on finding... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's... the ``NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline''...

  2. Adapting Science to Social Needs: Knowledge, Institutions, People Into Action. Proceedings of a Workshop Conference on Problem-Oriented Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scribner, Richard A., Ed.; Chalk, Rosemary A., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of a workshop conference sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) held at the Institute of Man and Science in Rensselaerville, New York, in May 1976. The proceedings include presented papers, discussions, and comments of the participants. The conference had two sets of…

  3. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on "How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: "How Can the History and Philosophy of…

  4. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on "How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: "How Can the History and Philosophy of…

  5. Sixteenth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Press abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A broad range of topics concerned with lunar and planetary science are discussed. Topics among those included are, the sun, the planets, comets, meteorities, asteroids, satellites, space exploration, and the significance of these to Earth.

  6. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  7. Impact of an In-Class Biochemistry Mini-Conference on Students' Perception of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerczei, Timea

    2016-01-01

    The work presented here is the summary of a 3 year study that aimed to uncover how students' perception of science changes with the chance to participate in a mini-conference that is incorporated into the biochemistry lecture course. Students were asked to work in groups of 2 or 3 and research a topic that is related to the material covered in…

  8. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Biological and Medical Science Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on biological and medical science libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The International Programs of the National Library of Medicine" (Lois Ann Colaianni, United States); (2) "Information Needs for International Health. A CDC (Centers for Disease…

  9. Proceedings: international conference on transfer of forest science knowledge and technology.

    Treesearch

    Cynthia Miner; Ruth Jacobs; Dennis Dykstra; Becky Bittner

    2007-01-01

    This proceedings compiles papers presented by extensionists, natural resource specialists, scientists, technology transfer specialists, and others at an international conference that examined knowledge and technology transfer theories, methods, and case studies. Theory topics included adult education, applied science, extension, diffusion of innovations, social...

  10. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Biological and Medical Science Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on biological and medical science libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The International Programs of the National Library of Medicine" (Lois Ann Colaianni, United States); (2) "Information Needs for International Health. A CDC (Centers for Disease…

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1984. Special Libraries Division. Section on Social Science Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The two papers in this document on social science libraries were presented at the 1984 IFLA general conference. In "Library and Continuing Education with Implications for Developing Countries: A Research Essay," David R. Bender (United States) examines factors impacting upon the skills necessary for effective librarianship in the social…

  12. Open Conference on Information Science in Canada, Proceedings (1st, Montebello, Quebec, May 14 & 15, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauerhoff, Georg R., Comp.

    The papers presented at the first Canadian conference on information science are presented in this volume. Six presentations were given under the general topic of research: Research into Privacy and Data Banks, Communications Knowledge Software Industry for Canada, Census Data Access and Statistical Information Management, Communication System…

  13. Open Conference on Information Science in Canada, Proceedings (1st, Montebello, Quebec, May 14 & 15, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauerhoff, Georg R., Comp.

    The papers presented at the first Canadian conference on information science are presented in this volume. Six presentations were given under the general topic of research: Research into Privacy and Data Banks, Communications Knowledge Software Industry for Canada, Census Data Access and Statistical Information Management, Communication System…

  14. Conference of the Society for Literature and Science. Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, October 10-13, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkowitz, Sidney, Ed.

    The papers contained in these proceedings from the 1996 Society for Literature and Science Conference are organized into sections based on theme. Some of these themes are: (1) Secularizing Enlightenment; (2) Eugenics and the Politics of Knowledge; (3) Reading the Discourses of Psychology; (4) Women and Medicine; (5) The Rhetoric of Public Health;…

  15. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Special Libraries Division. Section: Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Four papers on biological and medical sciences libraries were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. "Activities and Services of Medical Libraries in Japan--Past, Present, and Future" (Kazuo Urata and Toshinobu Suga, Japan) discusses the inauguration of the Japan Medical Library…

  16. Undergraduate Education in the Plant and Soil Sciences, Proceedings of a Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of the 1967 Conference on Undergraduate Teaching in the Plant and Soil Sciences are presented in this publication. Seven individual presentations and reports from ten working groups review the adequacy and effectiveness of courses and curricula for undergraduate students; discuss instructional materials, methods, and equipment that…

  17. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "UAP (Universal Availability of Publications) and User Training for Categories of Grey Literature" (Dieter Schmidmaier, Mining Academy Freiberg, East Germany); (2) "Resource…

  18. PHYTOREMEDIATION: STATE OF THE SCIENCE CONFERENCE AND OTHER DEVELOPMENTS. EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION AND SPECIAL COMMENTARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is a pleasure to present six papers in this issue, selected from presentations at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conference, Phytoremediation: State of the Science held May 1-2, 2000 in Boston, MA, USA. These papers highlight some of the many advances reported...

  19. The radio science experiment with BepiColombo mission to Mercury .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, G.; Di Ruzza, S.; De Marchi, F.; Cicalò, S.; Tommei, G.; Milani, A.

    BepiColombo is a joint ESA/JAXA mission to Mercury with challenging objectives regarding geophysics, geodesy and fundamental physics. The Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) is one of the on-board experiments, including three different but linked experiments: gravimetry, rotation and relativity. Using radio observables (range and range-rate) performed with very accurate tracking from ground stations, together with optical observations from the on-board high resolution camera (SIMBIO-SYS) and accelerometer readings from the on-board accelerometer (ISA), MORE will be able to measure with unprecedented accuracy the global gravity field of Mercury and the rotation state of the planet. In this work we present the results of a numerical full-cycle simulation of the gravimetry and rotation experiments of MORE: we discuss the accuracies which can be achieved, focussing in particular on the possible benefits from the use of optical observations in support to the tracking measurements.

  20. Lunar Science. 3: Revised abstracts of papers presented at the Third Lunar Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, C. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Prior to the meeting some 375 preliminary abstracts were printed for distribution to conference participants, with the provision that revised abstracts of up to three typed pages each could be submitted before the end of the conference. These updated expanded abstracts are collected here.

  1. PREFACE: 2013 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford

    2013-03-01

    The 2013 International Conference on Science and Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2013), was held at the Aston Rasuna Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 24-25 January 2013. The ScieTech 2013 conference aims to bring together scholars, leading researchers and experts from diverse backgrounds and applications areas. Special emphasis is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics, all areas of sciences and applied mathematics. We would like to thank the invited and plenary speakers as well as all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program. This year, we received 197 papers and, after rigorous review, 67 papers were accepted. The participants come from 21 countries. There are 6 (six) Plenary and Invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and we thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed ScieTech 2013 be be sucyh a success. The Editors of the ScieTech 2013 Proceedings Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Dr Hoga Saragih Tumpal Pandiangan Dr Mohamed Bououdina The PDF also contains the abstracts of the Invited and Plenary talks, and some photographs taken during the conference.

  2. 2014 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    2014 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2014), was held at the Media Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 13-14 January 2014. The ScieTech 2014 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. ScieTech 2014 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 187 papers and after rigorous review, 50 papers were accepted. The participants come from 16 countries. There are 5 (Five) Paralell Sessions and Four Keynote Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of ScieTech 2014. The Editors of the Scietech 2014 Proceedings: Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Dr. Benfano Soewito Dr. P.N. Gajjar

  3. Press abstracts of the 21st Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Program Committee for the Twenty-fisrt Lunar and Planetary Science Conference has chosen these contributions as having the greatest potential interest for the general public. The papers in this collection were written for general presentation, avoiding jargon and unnecessarily complex terms. More technical abstracts will be found in Lunar and Planetary Science XXI. Representative titles are: Ancient Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions on Mars: Global Model and Geological Evidence; Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Ordinary Chondrites and Their Chondrules; Exposure Ages and Collisional History of L-Chondrite Parent Bodies; Models of Solar-Powered Geysers on Triton; and Search for Life: A Science Rationale for a Permanent Base on Mars.

  4. Proceedings of the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Sessions with oral presentations include: A SPECIAL SESSION: MESSENGER at Mercury, Mars: Pingos, Polygons, and Other Puzzles, Solar Wind and Genesis: Measurements and Interpretation, Asteroids, Comets, and Small Bodies, Mars: Ice On the Ground and In the Ground, SPECIAL SESSION: Results from Kaguya (SELENE) Mission to the Moon, Outer Planet Satellites: Not Titan, Not Enceladus, SPECIAL SESSION: Lunar Science: Past, Present, and Future, Mars: North Pole, South Pole - Structure and Evolution, Refractory Inclusions, Impact Events: Modeling, Experiments, and Observations, Mars Sedimentary Processes from Victoria Crater to the Columbia Hills, Formation and Alteration of Carbonaceous Chondrites, New Achondrite GRA 06128/GRA 06129 - Origins Unknown, The Science Behind Lunar Missions, Mars Volcanics and Tectonics, From Dust to Planets (Planetary Formation and Planetesimals):When, Where, and Kaboom! Astrobiology: Biosignatures, Impacts, Habitability, Excavating a Comet, Mars Interior Dynamics to Exterior Impacts, Achondrites, Lunar Remote Sensing, Mars Aeolian Processes and Gully Formation Mechanisms, Solar Nebula Shake and Bake: Mixing and Isotopes, Lunar Geophysics, Meteorites from Mars: Shergottite and Nakhlite Invasion, Mars Fluvial Geomorphology, Chondrules and Chondrule Formation, Lunar Samples: Chronology, Geochemistry, and Petrology, Enceladus, Venus: Resurfacing and Topography (with Pancakes!), Overview of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission, Mars Sulfates, Phyllosilicates, and Their Aqueous Sources, Ordinary and Enstatite Chondrites, Impact Calibration and Effects, Comparative Planetology, Analogs: Environments and Materials, Mars: The Orbital View of Sediments and Aqueous Mineralogy, Planetary Differentiation, Titan, Presolar Grains: Still More Isotopes Out of This World, Poster sessions include: Education and Public Outreach Programs, Early Solar System and Planet Formation, Solar Wind and Genesis, Asteroids, Comets, and Small Bodies, Carbonaceous

  5. Taking the initiative. A leadership conference for women in science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    The conference sprang from discussions on the current climate that women face in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. The conference (and this document) is a beginning, not a culmination, of women`s learning leadership skills. Conferees were active, articulate, energetic, and ready to learn leadership qualities, some of which seem universal, others that appear to require skills in specific fields. After the introduction, the workshops and presentations are arranged under vision and direction, barriers, alignment and communication, and motivation and inspiration. Some statistics are presented on women degrees and employment in various fields.

  6. PREFACE: 4th Global Conference on Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruda, H. E.; Khotsianovsky, A.

    2015-12-01

    IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering is publishing a volume of conference proceedings that contains a selection of papers presented at the 4th Global Conference on Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE 2015), which is an annual event that started in 2012. CMSE 2015, technically supported by the Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering of University of Macau, organized by Wuhan Advance Materials Society, was successfully held at the University of Macau-new campus located on Hengqin Island from August 3rd-6th, 2015. It aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and scholars to exchange and share their experience and research results on all aspects of Materials Science and Engineering, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted. Macau, one of the two special administrative regions of the People's Republic of China, where East meets West, turned out to be an ideal meeting place for domestic and overseas participants of this annual international conference. The conference program included keynote presentations, special sessions, oral and poster contributions. From several hundred submissions, 52 of the most promising and mainstream, IOP-relevant, contributions were included in this volume. The submissions present original ideas or results of general significance, supported by clear reasoning, compelling evidence and methods, theories and practices relevant to the research. The authors state clearly the problems and the significance of their research to theory and practice. Being a successful conference, this event gathered more than 200 qualified and high-level researchers and experts from over 40 countries, including 10 keynote speakers from 6 countries, which created a good platform for worldwide researchers and engineers to enjoy the academic communication. Taking advantage of this opportunity, we would like to thank all participants of this conference, and particularly the

  7. Taking the initiative: A leadership conference for women in science and engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference sprang from discussions on the current climate that women face in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. The conference (and this document) is a beginning, not a culmination, of women's learning leadership skills. Conferees were active, articulate, energetic, and ready to learn leadership qualities, some of which seem universal, others that appear to require skills in specific fields. After the introduction, the workshops and presentations are arranged under vision and direction, barriers, alignment and communication, and motivation and inspiration. Some statistics are presented on women degrees and employment in various fields.

  8. Improved Spacecraft Tracking and Navigation Using a Portable Radio Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, Melissa; Jacobs, Christopher; Navarro, Robert; Naudet, Charles; Rogstad, Stephen; White, Leslie; Finley, Susan; Goodhart, Charles; Sigman, Elliott; Trinh, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The Portable Radio Science Receiver (PRSR) is a suitcase-sized open-loop digital receiver designed to be small and easy to transport so that it can be deployed quickly and easily anywhere in the world. The PRSR digitizes, downconverts, and filters using custom hardware, firmware, and software. Up to 16 channels can be independently configured and recorded with a total data rate of up to 256 Mbps. The design and implementation of the system's hardware, firmware, and software is described. To minimize costs and time to deployment, our design leveraged elements of the hardware, firmware, and software designs from the existing full-sized operational (non-portable) Radio Science Receivers (RSR) and Wideband VLBI Science Receivers (WVSR), which have successfully supported flagship NASA deep space missions at all Deep Space Network (DSN) sites. We discuss a demonstration of the PRSR using VLBI, with one part per billion angular resolution: 1 nano-radian / 200 ?as synthesized beam. This is the highest resolution astronomical instrument ever operated solely from the Southern Hemisphere. Preliminary results from two sites are presented, including the European Space Agency (ESA) sites at Cebreros, Spain and Malargue, Argentina. Malargue's South American location is of special interest because it greatly improves the geometric coverage for spacecraft navigation in the Southern Hemisphere and will for the first time provide coverage to the 1/4 of the range of declination that has been excluded from reference frame work at Ka-band.

  9. Improved Spacecraft Tracking and Navigation Using a Portable Radio Science Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, M.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Navarro, Robert; Naudet, C.; Rogstad, S.; White, L.; Finley, S.; Goodhart, C.; Sigman, E.; Trinh, J.; Lobo-Garcia, J.; García-Miró, C.; Mercolino, M.; Maddè, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Portable Radio Science Receiver (PRSR) is a suitcase-sized open-loop digital receiver designed to be small and easy to transport so that it can be deployed quickly and easily anywhere in the world. The PRSR digitizes, downconverts, and filters using custom hardware, firmware, and software. Up to 16 channels can be independently configured and recorded with a total data rate of up to 256 Mbps. The design and implementation of the system's hardware, firmware, and software is described. To minimize costs and time to deployment, our design leveraged elements of the hardware, firmware, and software designs from the existing full-sized operational (non-portable) Radio Science Receivers (RSR) and Wideband VLBI Science Receivers (WVSR), which have successfully supported flagship NASA deep space missions at all Deep Space Network (DSN) sites. We discuss a demonstration of the PRSR using VLBI, with one part per billion angular resolution: 1 nano-radian / 200 μas. This is the highest resolution astronomical instrument ever operated solely from the Southern Hemisphere. Preliminary results from two sites are presented, including the European Space Agency (ESA) sites at Cebreros, Spain and Malargüe, Argentina. Malargüe's South American location is of special interest because it greatly improves the geometric coverage for spacecraft navigation in the Southern Hemisphere and will for the first time provide coverage to the 1/4 of the range of declination that has been excluded from reference frame work at Ka-band.

  10. Improved spacecraft tracking and navigation using a Portable Radio Science Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, M.; Jacobs, C.; Navarro, R.; Naudet, C.; Rogstad, S.; White, L.; Finley, S.; Goodhart, C.; Sigman, E.; Trinh, J.; Garcia, J. L.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Mercolino, M.; Madde, R.

    The Portable Radio Science Receiver (PRSR) is a suitcase-sized open-loop digital receiver designed to be small and easy to transport so that it can be deployed quickly and easily anywhere in the world. The PRSR digitizes, down-converts, and filters using custom hardware, firmware, and software. Up to 16 channels can be independently configured and recorded with a total data rate of up to 256 Mbps. The design and implementation of the system's hardware, firmware, and software is described. To minimize costs and time to deployment, our design leveraged elements of the hardware, firmware, and software designs from the existing full-sized operational (non-portable) Radio Science Receivers (RSR) and Wideband VLBI Science Receivers (WVSR), which have successfully supported flagship NASA deep space missions at all Deep Space Network (DSN) sites. We discuss a demonstration of the PRSR using VLBI, with one part per billion angular resolution: 1 nano-radian / 200 μ as. This is the highest resolution astronomical instrument ever operated solely from the Southern Hemisphere. Preliminary results from two sites are presented, including the European Space Agency (ESA) sites at Cebreros, Spain and Malargü e, Argentina. Malargü e's South American location is of special interest because it greatly improves the geometric coverage for spacecraft navigation in the Southern Hemisphere and will for the first time provide coverage to the 1/4 of the range of declination that has been excluded from reference frame work at Ka-band.

  11. Improved Spacecraft Tracking and Navigation Using a Portable Radio Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, Melissa; Jacobs, Christopher; Navarro, Robert; Naudet, Charles; Rogstad, Stephen; White, Leslie; Finley, Susan; Goodhart, Charles; Sigman, Elliott; Trinh, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The Portable Radio Science Receiver (PRSR) is a suitcase-sized open-loop digital receiver designed to be small and easy to transport so that it can be deployed quickly and easily anywhere in the world. The PRSR digitizes, downconverts, and filters using custom hardware, firmware, and software. Up to 16 channels can be independently configured and recorded with a total data rate of up to 256 Mbps. The design and implementation of the system's hardware, firmware, and software is described. To minimize costs and time to deployment, our design leveraged elements of the hardware, firmware, and software designs from the existing full-sized operational (non-portable) Radio Science Receivers (RSR) and Wideband VLBI Science Receivers (WVSR), which have successfully supported flagship NASA deep space missions at all Deep Space Network (DSN) sites. We discuss a demonstration of the PRSR using VLBI, with one part per billion angular resolution: 1 nano-radian / 200 ?as synthesized beam. This is the highest resolution astronomical instrument ever operated solely from the Southern Hemisphere. Preliminary results from two sites are presented, including the European Space Agency (ESA) sites at Cebreros, Spain and Malargue, Argentina. Malargue's South American location is of special interest because it greatly improves the geometric coverage for spacecraft navigation in the Southern Hemisphere and will for the first time provide coverage to the 1/4 of the range of declination that has been excluded from reference frame work at Ka-band.

  12. U.S.-Canadian Partnership in Radio Astronomy Valuable for Science, NRAO Director Says

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    The United States and Canada intend to collaborate on two of the most important radio astronomy projects of the new century - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), astronomers from both countries announced today. "This cooperative program - the North American Partnership in Radio Astronomy - involves the key projects that will dominate radio astronomy world-wide," said Paul Vanden Bout, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This partnership will multiply the efforts of both nations' astronomers for the benefit of science. It builds on a long tradition of cooperative efforts in radio astronomy, and will ensure that we continue that tradition into the new millennium," Vanden Bout said. The U.S.-Canada radio astronomy partnership is outlined in two letters of intent signed recently. The first, between the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and Canada's National Research Council (NRC), states that both agencies will use their best efforts to obtain the necessary funding for construction and operation of ALMA. The second, between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, funded by the NSF, and the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, funded by the NRC, forms a partnership in the EVLA. The VLA Expansion Project is a two-phase program designed to improve the scientific capabilities of the VLA tenfold by replacing 1970s-vintage equipment with modern technologies and adding new radio-telescope antennas to the existing 27-antenna array. Dedicated in 1980, the VLA has been used for more than 10,000 observing projects covering nearly every area of astrophysics. It is the most powerful, flexible and widely-used radio telescope in the world. The Expanded VLA will provide the improved observational capabilities needed to meet the research challenges of the coming years. In addition to the participation by Canada, funds have been pledged by Mexico. Both Mexico and Germany have funded VLA improvements in the

  13. Overview of Cassini radio science at Saturn, Titan, and the icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A. J.; Ambrosini, R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Flasar, F. M.; French, R. G.; Iess, L.; Marouf, E. A..; Nagy, A. F.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.; Jpl/Dsn Radio Science Support Team

    The Cassini spacecraft which has been in orbit about Saturn for over two years is the first Radio Science platform to provide three downlink frequencies In addition to the X-band telemetry link 3 56 cm w l two other frequencies S-band 13 04 cm and Ka-band 0 94 cm are available This plus the high SNR 50 dBHz at X-band afforded by the 4 m diameter s c high gain antenna in combination with the excellent low noise receivers of the DSN as well as overall system stabilities of 1 part in 10 13 when referenced to the on-board ultra-stable oscillator USO in one-way operation and 1 part inx 10 15 for a two-way link make Cassini an unprecedented instrument of radio science The orbital tour phase of the mission has the following main radio science objectives a determination of the masses and gravity fields of Saturn s icy satellites Titan and Saturn through two-way tracking during fly-bys To date the masses of Phoebe Iapetus Dione Enceladus Rhea and Titan have been measured and will be reported here b Measurement of the structure and other properties of Saturn s rings through three-band occultation Seven near-diametric occultations at a high ring opening angle have been completed and the results will be presented here c Measurement of the vertical structure of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Saturn The same series of occultations have provided nearly equatorial observations of the atmosphere structure and the ionosphere and the results will be described here d Measurement of the vertical structure of

  14. The Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI) and the Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Burns, J.; Jones, D.; Kasper, J.; Neff, S.; MacDowall, R.; Weiler, K.; DALI/ROLSS Team

    2009-01-01

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe, the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Achieving the required performance demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet” locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. The Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI) is a Moon-based telescope concept, funded under the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study program, intended to observe the highly-redshifted hyperfine (21-cm) transition from neutral hydrogen (H I) in the intergalactic medium at z 30. This H I signal is potentially rich for both cosmology and astrophysics_for a portion of the Dark Ages, the physics is sufficiently simple that the H I signal can be used to constrain fundamental cosmological parameters in a manner similar to that of CMB observations, but the spectral nature of the signal allows the evolution of the Universe as a function of z to be followed. Observing at wavelengths around 5 m ( 60 MHz), DALI would be located on the Moon's far side, where it would be shielded from terrestrial emissions. We illustrate the notional DALI concept and identify required areas of technology development. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS), funded under the Lunar Sortie Science Opportunity program, is intended to probe particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and the lunar ionosphere. ROLSS is designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers), and would also serve as a pathfinder for a future larger telescope, such as DALI. We describe the science antenna design work, antenna materials testing, and a system-level analysis.

  15. Radio frequency diodes and circuits fabricated via adhesion lithography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadou, Dimitra G.; Semple, James; Wyatt-Moon, Gwenhivir; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2016-09-01

    The commercial interest in Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags keeps growing, as new application sectors, spanning from healthcare to electronic article surveillance (EAS) and personal identification, are constantly emerging for these types of electronic devices. The increasing demand for the so-called "smart labels" necessitates their high throughput manufacturing, and indeed on thin flexible substrates, that will reduce the cost and render them competitive to the currently widely employed barcodes. Adhesion Lithography (a-Lith) is a novel patterning technique that allows the facile high yield fabrication of co-planar large aspect ratio (<100,000) metal electrodes separated by a sub-20 nm gap on large area substrates of any type. Deposition of high mobility semiconductors from their solution at low, compatible with plastic substrates, temperatures and application of specific processing protocols can dramatically improve the performance of the fabricated Schottky diodes. It will be shown that in this manner both organic and inorganic high speed diodes and rectifiers can be obtained, operating at frequencies much higher than the 13.56 MHz benchmark, currently employed in passive RFID tags and near filed communications (NFC). This showcases the universality of this method towards fabricating high speed p- and n-type diodes, irrespective of the substrate, simply based on the extreme downscaling of key device dimensions obtained in these nanoscale structures. The potential for scaling up this technique at low cost, combined with the significant performance optimisation and improved functionality that can be attained through intelligent material selection, render a-Lith unique within the field of plastic electronics.

  16. The Radio & Plasmas Waves instrument on the Solar Orbiter mission : science objectives and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Milan; Bale, Stuart; Chust, Thomas; Krasnosselskikh, Vladimir; Soucek, Jan; Steller, Manfred; Stverak, Stepan; Vaivads, Andris

    2017-08-01

    We will review the science objectives of the Radio & Plasmas Waves (RPW) instrument on the Solar Orbiter mission. Among those the study of the connectivity between the solar corona and the inner Heliosphere as close as from 0.3 AU and the kinetic behavior of the Solar Wind are of prime importance. We present then the RPW technical capabilities which will allow in-situ and remote sensing measurements of both electrostatic and electromagnetic fields and waves in a broad frequency range, typically from a fraction of Hertz to a few tens of MHz.

  17. The Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, S.; Haeusler, B.; Paetzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Tyler, G. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa is sounding the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using the spacecraft radio subsystem in the oneway radio link mode at X-band (8.4 GHz) and S- band (2.3 GHz). An Ultrastable Oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard frequency reference source for the derivation of electron density profiles in the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere. Radial profiles of neutral number density derived from the occultations cover the altitude range 40 to 90 km, which are converted to vertical profiles of temperature and pressure. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Five occultation seasons could be covered so far during the Venus Express mission resulting in a data set of more than 150 profiles of the neutral atmosphere. The thermal structure is investigated with regard to the latitudinal and temporal variability. A distinct cold collar region could be observed on both hemispheres. The tropopause altitude increases in this latitude region while the tropopause temperature shows a strong decrease. Profiles of static stability are found to be latitude-dependent and nearly adiabatic in the middle cloud region.

  18. The New Horizons Bistatic Radio Science Experiment to Measure Pluto's Surface Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.; Vincent, M.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for principally occultation and radiometric measurement of Pluto and Charon during the flyby in July 2015. The REX subsystem is contained, together with the NH X-Band radio, in the Integrated Electronics Module (IEM) in the New Horizons spacecraft. REX samples and records in two polarizations both total RF power in a 4.5 MHz bandwidth, and radio signal waveforms in a narrow, 1.25 kHz band. During the encounter, and at closest approach to Pluto, the spacecraft's high gain antenna (HGA) will scan Pluto's equatorial latitudes, intercepting the specular zone, a region near Pluto's limb that geometrically favors reflection from the earth's direction. At the same time, a powerful 80 kW uplink beacon will have been transmitted from earth by the DSN to arrive at Pluto during spacecraft closest approach. Reflection from the specular zone is expected to be sufficiently strong to observe the bistatic uplink in the REX narrowband record. Measurements in both polarizations will then be combined to yield surface reflectivity, roughness and limits on the dielectric constant in the specular zone.

  19. First results of HF radio science with e-POP RRI and SuperDARN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. W.; James, H. G.; Gillies, R. G.; Howarth, A.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.; White, A.; Yau, A. W.

    2017-01-01

    The first results from coordinated experiments between the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) Saskatoon high frequency (HF) radar are examined for a conjunction on 8 July 2014. e-POP, a payload on the CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer spacecraft, was located at 380 km altitude, approximately 10° north (geographic) and 2° west of Saskatoon, Canada, moving in a southeast direction. We use a matched filter technique to extract individual received SuperDARN pulses from the RRI data stream. The pulses show characteristics of propagation through the F region ionosphere: they are heavily dispersed, they show significant pulse-to-pulse variability in magnitude, and there is clear evidence that they experienced multipath propagation. We calculate the polarization parameters of the pulses and use them to identify magnetoionic phenomena such as mode-splitting and single-mode fading. These first RRI results provide compelling insight into HF radio wave propagation and show RRI's potential to significantly advance radio science.

  20. 13th ERS Lung Science Conference. The most important take home messages: News from the Underground.

    PubMed

    Bikov, Andras; Boots, Agnes; Bjerg, Anders; Jacinto, Tiago; Olland, Anne; Skoczyński, Szymon

    2015-06-01

    The 13th ERS Lung Science Conference (LSC) was organised to bring academics together from all over the world to present and discuss the latest developments regarding lung infection and immunity. The conference took place in breathtaking Estoril, Portugal; however, it wasn't the beautiful surroundings that were our main motivation to attend, but instead the scientific merit of the conference and the chance to create new scientific collaborations. The scientific programme [1] was packed with the most up-to-date content in the field of lung infection and immunity and included some of the top researchers within this exciting area. Moreover, the convenient size of the LSC offered the opportunity to renew and intensify friendships and collaborations. In particular, for researchers at the start of their career, this is a great feature and we therefore warmly recommend the LSC to ERS Juniors Members!

  1. Longitudinal effects of college type and selectivity on degrees conferred upon undergraduate females in physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Stacy Mckimm

    There has been much research to suggest that a single-sex college experience for female undergraduate students can increase self-confidence and leadership ability during the college years and beyond. The results of previous studies also suggest that these students achieve in the workforce and enter graduate school at higher rates than their female peers graduating from coeducational institutions. However, some researchers have questioned these findings, suggesting that it is the selectivity level of the colleges rather than the comprised gender of the students that causes these differences. The purpose of this study was to justify the continuation of single-sex educational opportunities for females at the post-secondary level by examining the effects that college selectivity, college type, and time have on the rate of undergraduate females pursuing majors in non-traditional fields. The study examined the percentage of physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science degrees conferred upon females graduating from women's colleges from 1985-2001, as compared to those at comparable coeducational colleges. Sampling for this study consisted of 42 liberal arts women's (n = 21) and coeducational (n = 21) colleges. Variables included the type of college, the selectivity level of the college, and the effect of time on the percentage of female graduates. Doubly multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance testing revealed significant main effects for college selectivity on social science graduates, and time on both life science and math and computer science graduates. Significant interaction was also found between the college type and time on social science graduates, as well as the college type, selectivity level, and time on math and computer science graduates. Implications of the results and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  2. A Network for Integrated Science and Mathematics Teaching and Learning Conference Plenary Papers. NSF/SSMA Wingspread Conference (Racine, Wisconsin, April 1991). School Science and Mathematics Association Topics for Teachers Series Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Donna F., Ed.

    The integration of mathematics and science is not a new concept. However, during recent years it has been a major focus in education reform. A Wingspread conference promoted discussion regarding the integration of mathematics and science and explored ways to improve science and mathematics education in grades K-12. Papers from the conference…

  3. PREFACE: 1st International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    We are delighted to come up with thirty two (32) contributed research papers in these proceedings, focusing on Materials Science and Applied Physics as an output of the 2013 International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science (ICAMS2013) held on October 22-24, 2013 at the Ateneo de Davao University, Davao City, Philippines. The conference was set to provide a high level of international forum and had brought together leading academic scientists, industry professionals, researchers and scholars from universities, industries and government agencies who have shared their experiences, research results and discussed the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted as well as the advances in the fields of Applied Physics and Materials Science. This conference has provided a wide opportunity to establish multidisciplinary collaborations with local and foreign experts. ICAMS2013, held concurrently with 15th Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (SPVM) National Physics Conference and 2013 International Meeting for Complex Systems, was organized by the Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (Physics Society of Visayas and Mindanao) based in MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, Iligan City, Philippines. The international flavor of converging budding researchers and experts on Materials Science and Applied Physics was the first to be organized in the 19 years of SPVM operation in the Philippines. We highlighted ICAMS2013 gathering by the motivating presence of Dr. Stuart Parkin, a British Physicist, as one of our conference's plenary speakers. Equal measures of gratitude were also due to all other plenary speakers, Dr. Elizabeth Taylor of Institute of Physics (IOP) in London, Dr. Surya Raghu of Advanced Fluidics in Maryland, USA and Prof. Hitoshi Miyata of Niigata University, Japan, Prof. Djulia Onggo of Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, and Dr. Hironori Katagiri of Nagaoka National College of Technology, Japan. The warm hospitality of the host

  4. Environmental Science: Teaching and Practice. Conference Proceedings of the International Conference on the Nature and Teaching of Environmental Studies and Sciences in Higher Education (3rd, Sunderland, Durham, England, September 9-12, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrass, R., Ed.; And Others

    The Sunderland Conference on the Nature and Teaching of Environmental Science/Studies in Higher Education provided an opportunity to review progress in the field and assess its state in the mid 1980s. This volume contains an edited selection of the 49 papers presented at the conference. Section A, "Nature and Philosophy," contains discussions of…

  5. The Progress of Science Preparation for the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    By early 2015, the FAST project has reached a major landmark-finishing laying its cable-mesh system.The primary panels, actuators, and the first receiver platform will be in place by early 2016. We expect an intense period of system testing followed by the first light toward the end of 2016. The early science focus will be to explore opportunities provided by two main receivers, the L-band system and the ultra-wide band receiver covering 280 MHz to 1.6 GHz.I will report here the progress being made in early science project definition, including a pathfinding pulsar search, quasar absorption studies, radio-band line surveys, and megamaser surveys.

  6. The Deep Space Atomic Clock: Ushering in a New Paradigm for Radio Navigation and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd; Seubert, Jill; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the on-orbit performance of a high-accuracy, high-stability miniaturized mercury ion atomic clock during a year-long experiment in Low Earth Orbit. DSAC's timing error requirement provides the frequency stability necessary to perform deep space navigation based solely on one-way radiometric tracking data. Compared to a two-way tracking paradigm, DSAC-enabled one-way tracking will benefit navigation and radio science by increasing the quantity and quality of tracking data. Additionally, DSAC also enables fully-autonomous onboard navigation useful for time-sensitive situations. The technology behind the mercury ion atomic clock and a DSAC mission overview are presented. Example deep space applications of DSAC, including navigation of a Mars orbiter and Europa flyby gravity science, highlight the benefits of DSAC-enabled one-way Doppler tracking.

  7. The Deep Space Atomic Clock: Ushering in a New Paradigm for Radio Navigation and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd; Seubert, Jill; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the on-orbit performance of a high-accuracy, high-stability miniaturized mercury ion atomic clock during a year-long experiment in Low Earth Orbit. DSAC's timing error requirement provides the frequency stability necessary to perform deep space navigation based solely on one-way radiometric tracking data. Compared to a two-way tracking paradigm, DSAC-enabled one-way tracking will benefit navigation and radio science by increasing the quantity and quality of tracking data. Additionally, DSAC also enables fully-autonomous onboard navigation useful for time-sensitive situations. The technology behind the mercury ion atomic clock and a DSAC mission overview are presented. Example deep space applications of DSAC, including navigation of a Mars orbiter and Europa flyby gravity science, highlight the benefits of DSAC-enabled one-way Doppler tracking.

  8. The AGU Chapman Conference on Communicating Climate Science: A Historic Look to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; Rasch, P. J.; Andronova, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union hosted a Chapman Conference on Communicating Climate Science at Snow Mountain Ranch, Granby, Colorado, June 8-13, 2013. The goal of the Chapman Conference was to bring together scholars, social scientists and journalists to discuss the history, and more importantly, the present and future of climate change communication. We met to evaluate our current and needed communication capacity, and to develop ways and means to convey advances in the understanding of climate science. Delegates discussed and presented methods and capacity to communicate to policymakers, the media, and society. Our focus was on the efficacy of scientific communication, on improving communication practices, and on building collaborations spawned at the conference, and beyond. The Chapman was a success. Close to 150 of us gathered high in the Colorado Rockies to share almost 100 presentations and nearly 10 hours of group discussions focused on ways and means to better bring the climate change message to society, to educators and policymakers in North America and around the world. This presentation will focus on the outcomes of the Chapman Climate Change Communication Conference; the conclusions of the delegate community; and directions forward.

  9. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-09-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 education from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science. Key ones were that: students need to understand that central to science is argumentation, criticism, and analysis; students should be educated to appreciate science as part of our culture; students should be educated to be science literate; what is meant by the nature of science as discussed in much of the science education literature must be broadened to accommodate a science literacy that includes preparation for socioscientific issues; teaching for science literacy requires the development of new assessment tools; and, it is difficult to change what science teachers do in their classrooms. The principal conclusions drawn by the editors are that: to prepare students to be citizens in a participatory democracy, science education must be embedded in a liberal arts education; science teachers alone cannot be expected to prepare students to be scientifically literate; and, to educate students for scientific literacy will require a new curriculum that is coordinated across the humanities, history/social studies, and science classrooms.

  10. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: Application to gravitational wave searches

    SciTech Connect

    Tinto, Massimo; Dick, George J.; Prestage, John D.; Armstrong, J. W.

    2009-05-15

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multilink CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would give GW strain sensitivity of 3.7x10{sup -14} Hz{sup -1/2} for randomly polarized, monochromatic GW signals isotropically distributed over the celestial sphere, over a two-decade ({approx}0.0001-0.01 Hz) region of the low-frequency band. This is about an order of magnitude better than currently achieved with traditional two-way coherent Doppler experiments. The utility of optimally combining simultaneous up- and down-link observations is not limited to GW searches. The Doppler tracking technique discussed here could be performed at minimal incremental cost to improve also other radio science experiments (i.e., tests of relativistic gravity, planetary and satellite gravity field measurements, atmospheric and ring occultations) on future interplanetary missions.

  11. Material science and Condensed matter Physics. 8th International Conference. Abstracts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyuk, L. L.; Paladi, Florentin; Canter, Valeriu; Nikorich, Valentina; Filippova, Irina

    2016-08-01

    The book includes the abstracts of the communications presented at the 8th International Conference on Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics (MSCMP 2016), a traditional biennial meeting organized by the Institute of Applied Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova (IAP).A total of 346 abstracts has been included in the book. The Conference programm included plenary lectures, topical keynote lectures, contributed oral and poster presentations distributed into 7 sections: * Condensed Matter Theory; * Advanced Bulk Materials; * Design and Structural Characterization of Materials; * Solid State Nanophysics and Nanotechnology; * Energy Conversion and Storage. Solid State Devices; * Surface Engineering and Applied Electrochemistry; * Digital and Optical holography: Materials and Methods. The abstracts are arranged according to the sections mentioned above. The Abstracts book includes a table of matters at the beginning of the book and an index of authors at the finish of the book.

  12. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include magnetic disk and tape technologies, optical disk and tape, software storage and file management systems, and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990s.

  13. Report from the NSF/SSMA Wingspread Conference: A Network for Integrated Science and Mathematics Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Donna F.; White, Arthur L.

    1992-01-01

    Reports the proceedings of the Wingspread conference on integrating science and mathematics teaching and learning. Discusses (1) a literature review on integration of science and mathematics education; (2) development of definitions of integration; (3) specification of guidelines for infusing integrated teaching and learning into science and…

  14. Conference of the Society for Literature and Science. Proceedings (Los Angeles, California, November 2-5, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labinger, Jay, Ed.

    The papers contained in this proceedings from the 1995 Society for Literature and Science Conference are organized into sections with the following themes: (1) Metaphor and Science; (2) The Technological Invasion of the Living Space; (3) Autobiographies and Biographies of Scientists; (4) Science and 19th Century Literature; (5) Visions of the…

  15. Proceedings of the Klamath Basin Science Conference, Medford, Oregon, February 1-5, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman; VanderKooi, Scott; Duffy, Walter

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Klamath Basin Science Conference (February 2010). A primary purpose of the meeting was to inform and update Klamath Basin stakeholders about areas of scientific progress and accomplishment during the last 5 years. Secondary conference objectives focused on the identification of outstanding information needs and science priorities as they relate to whole watershed management, restoration ecology, and possible reintroduction of Pacific salmon associated with the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (KBRA). Information presented in plenary, technical, breakout, and poster sessions has been assembled into chapters that reflect the organization, major themes, and content of the conference. Chapter 1 reviews the major environmental issues and resource management and other stakeholder needs of the basin. Importantly, this assessment of information needs included the possibility of large-scale restoration projects in the future and lessons learned from a case study in South Florida. Other chapters (2-6) summarize information about key components of the Klamath Basin, support conceptual modeling of the aquatic ecosystem (Chapter 7), and synthesize our impressions of the most pressing science priorities for management and restoration. A wealth of information was presented at the conference and this has been captured in chapters addressing environmental setting and human development of the basin, hydrology, watershed processes, fishery resources, and potential effects from climate change. The final chapter (8) culminates in a discussion of many specific research priorities that relate to and bookend the broader management needs and restoration goals identified in Chapter 1. In many instances, the conferees emphasized long-term and process-oriented approaches to watershed science in the basin as planning moves forward.

  16. Science Policy Conference Speakers Examine Megadisasters and Call for Risk Reduction Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-07-01

    How well is the United States prepared for a megadisaster, such as a solar storm that knocks out the power grid for months, a large asteroid impact, a giant tsunami, or a rainstorm that lasts for weeks and leads to widespread flooding? Moreover, how can risk reduction efforts be made more effective? These were two topics addressed during two of the hazards sessions at the 2013 AGU Science Policy Conference on 25 and 26 June.

  17. Research in Science Education, Volume 1990. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (21st, Perth, Western Australia, July 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains selected refereed papers from the 21st Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association. The papers are as follows: "A Learning Model for Science Education: Developing Teaching Strategies" (Appleton); "Researching Balance between Cognition and Affect in Science Teaching" (Baird et…

  18. Advancing the fundamental sciences: proceedings of the Forest Service National Earth Sciences Conference, San Diego, CA, 18-22 October 2004.

    Treesearch

    Michael J. Furniss; Catherine F. Clifton; Kathryn L. Ronnenberg

    2007-01-01

    This conference was attended by nearly 450 Forest Service earth scientists representing hydrology, soil science, geology, and air. In addition to active members of the earth science professions, many retired scientists also attended and participated. These 60 peer-reviewed papers represent a wide spectrum of earth science investigation, experience, research, and...

  19. Earth Science Education for the 21st Century Conference (Alexandria, Virginia, April 19-23, 1988). Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Geological Inst., Alexandria, VA.

    This meeting initiates the planning of new guidelines and a framework for teaching the earth sciences from kindergarten through grade 12. The conference report serves as a discussion paper for a series of American Geological Institute (AGI) regional conferences scheduled for fall and winter, 1988-89. It also provides background for an advisory…

  20. Undergraduate Education in the Sciences for Students in Agriculture and Natural Resources. Summary of Proceedings of Regional Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington, DC.

    Following a national conference entitled, "Undergraduate Education in the Biological Sciences for Students in Agriculture and Natural Resources," four regional conferences ensued, bringing together teaching faculty members from agriculture, forestry, other natural resource areas, and biology. The papers presented at these regional meetings are…

  1. UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES FOR STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES, PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    REPORTED ARE THE PROCEEDINGS OF A 1966 CONFERENCE WHICH DEALT WITH UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS FOR STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES. THE 167 EDUCATORS (MOSTLY DEANS AND DIRECTORS OF RESIDENT INSTRUCTION) WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE CONFERENCE REPRESENTED AGRICULTURE, RENEWABLE NATURAL RESOURCES, THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, AND…

  2. Strontium iodide gamma ray spectrometers for planetary science (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Rowe, Emmanuel; Butler, Jarrhett; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Lambert, James L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Beck, Patrick R.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Feldman, Sabrina M.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-09-01

    Gamma rays produced passively by cosmic ray interactions and by the decay of radioelements convey information about the elemental makeup of planetary surfaces and atmospheres. Orbital missions mapped the composition of the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Vesta, and now Ceres. Active neutron interrogation will enable and/or enhance in situ measurements (rovers, landers, and sondes). Elemental measurements support planetary science objectives as well as resource utilization and planetary defense initiatives. Strontium iodide, an ultra-bright scintillator with low nonproportionality, offers significantly better energy resolution than most previously flown scintillators, enabling improved accuracy for identification and quantification of key elements. Lanthanum bromide achieves similar resolution; however, radiolanthanum emissions obscure planetary gamma rays from radioelements K, Th, and U. The response of silicon-based optical sensors optimally overlaps the emission spectrum of strontium iodide, enabling the development of compact, low-power sensors required for space applications, including burgeoning microsatellite programs. While crystals of the size needed for planetary measurements (>100 cm3) are on the way, pulse-shape corrections to account for variations in absorption/re-emission of light are needed to achieve maximum resolution. Additional challenges for implementation of large-volume detectors include optimization of light collection using silicon-based sensors and assessment of radiation damage effects and energetic-particle induced backgrounds. Using laboratory experiments, archived planetary data, and modeling, we evaluate the performance of strontium iodide for future missions to small bodies (asteroids and comets) and surfaces of the Moon and Venus. We report progress on instrument design and preliminary assessment of radiation damage effects in comparison to technology with flight heritage.

  3. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Sessions in this conference include: Mars polar geology and glaciology; Mars and terrestrial radar investigations; Observations, nature, and evolution of the Martian seasonal polar caps; Mars' residual south polar cap; Climate change, ice core analysis, and the redistribution of volatiles on Mars; errestrial Mars analog environments; The Phoenix Scout mission and the nature of the near-polar environment; Moderated Discussion: Key Issues Regarding Phoenix Scout Mission and the nature of the near-polar environment; Panel Discussion: Key Issues in Mars Polar Science and Exploration; Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter investigations of the Martian polar regions and climate; Mars Polar Scout Mission concepts; and Panel Discussion: New perspectives on Mars polar science and exploration

  4. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Sessions in this conference include: Mars polar geology and glaciology; Mars and terrestrial radar investigations; Observations, nature, and evolution of the Martian seasonal polar caps; Mars' residual south polar cap; Climate change, ice core analysis, and the redistribution of volatiles on Mars; errestrial Mars analog environments; The Phoenix Scout mission and the nature of the near-polar environment; Moderated Discussion: Key Issues Regarding Phoenix Scout Mission and the nature of the near-polar environment; Panel Discussion: Key Issues in Mars Polar Science and Exploration; Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter investigations of the Martian polar regions and climate; Mars Polar Scout Mission concepts; and Panel Discussion: New perspectives on Mars polar science and exploration

  5. Science Education in Rural and Small Schools. Proceedings from the Rural and Small Schools Conferences, Science Education Sections: 1985-1987 (Manhattan, Kansas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pembleton, Sil, Ed.; And Others

    For several years at the Rural and Small Schools Conference, a special effort has been made to address the needs that are unique to rural science educators. This publication is a compilation of materials presented at those conferences reflecting the following themes: "In Search of Excellence" (1985); "Rural Education: A Proud…

  6. Science Education in Rural and Small Schools. Proceedings from the Rural and Small Schools Conferences, Science Education Sections: 1985-1987 (Manhattan, Kansas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pembleton, Sil, Ed.; And Others

    For several years at the Rural and Small Schools Conference, a special effort has been made to address the needs that are unique to rural science educators. This publication is a compilation of materials presented at those conferences reflecting the following themes: "In Search of Excellence" (1985); "Rural Education: A Proud…

  7. The Religion/Science Controversy: The Use and Abuse of Science in the Defense of Religion. Proceedings of a Conference (Westville, Indiana, October 5, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanagy, Sherman P., II, Ed.

    Science and religion have been referred to as the two strongest general forces which influence humankind. This document contains the proceedings of a conference which was held to address some of the relationships and controversies surrounding these topics. Included are the texts of the major papers presented at the conference. These are: (1)…

  8. The Religion/Science Controversy: The Use and Abuse of Science in the Defense of Religion. Proceedings of a Conference (Westville, Indiana, October 5, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanagy, Sherman P., II, Ed.

    Science and religion have been referred to as the two strongest general forces which influence humankind. This document contains the proceedings of a conference which was held to address some of the relationships and controversies surrounding these topics. Included are the texts of the major papers presented at the conference. These are: (1)…

  9. PREFACE: 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan Bhatti, Javaid; Hussain, Talib; Khan, Wakil

    2013-06-01

    The Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA) conference series has been organized to create a new forum in Asia and Australia to discuss vacuum, surface and related sciences, techniques and applications. The conference series is officially endorsed by the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Application (IUVSTA). The International Steering Committee of VASSCAA is comprised of Vacuum Societies in seven countries: Australia, China, India, Iran, Japan, South Korea and Pakistan. VASSCAA-1 was organized by the Vacuum Society of Japan in 1999 in Tokyo, Japan. VASSCAA-2 was held in 2002 in Hong Kong, VASSCAA-3 in Singapore in 2005. VASSCAA-4 was held in Matsue, Japan in 2008 and VASSCAA-5 in 2010 in Beijing, China. The 6th Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia (VASSCAA-6) was held from 9-13 October 2012 in the beautiful city of Islamabad, Pakistan. The venue of the conference was the Pak-China Friendship Centre, Islamabad. More than six hundred local delgates and around seventy delegates from different countries participated in this mega event. These delegates included scientists, researchers, engineers, professors, plant operators, designers, vendors, industrialists, businessmen and students from various research organizations, technical institutions, universities, industries and companies from Pakistan and abroad. The focal point of the event was to enhance cooperation between Pakistan and the international community in the fields of vacuum, surface science and other applied technologies. At VASSCAA-6 85 oral presentations were delivered by local and foreign speakers. These were divided into different sessions according to their fields. A poster session was organized at which over 70 researchers and students displayed their posters. The best three posters won prizes. In parallel to the main conference sessions four technical short courses were held. The participants showed keen interest in all these

  10. The Alvey Conference in Edinburgh: A Review of the United Kingdom’s Research Program in Computer Science.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    A conference to review the UK’s Alvey Program of research in computer science was held in Edinburgh from 24 through 27 June 1985. This report summarizes the speakers’ comments about the progress of the Alvey Program.

  11. Radio Science Concepts for Exploring the Interior Structures of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Anderson, J. D.; Castillo, J. C.; Folkner, W. M.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schubert, G.; Spilker, T. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Watkins, M. M.; Yoder, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    A set of concepts are proposed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) to apply Radio Science tools to investigate the interior structures of the Galilean Satellites and address key questions on their thermal and dynamical evolution. Multi-frequency Doppler tracking and ranging of the orbiter can be used to measure the gravity harmonic coefficients of the satellites as well as their secular and dynamic potential Love numbers. These measurements will confirm the presence of a subsurface ocean and constrain the oceanic density. Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, the core's size and density will be determined. The potential tidal phase lag, a function of the viscosity profile, will be determined or limited for each body. Altimetry data produce local topography and topographic harmonic coefficients as well as the topographic Love number. Combining the gravity and topography data will determine the mean as well as the spatial variations of the crustal thickness and produce a model of the cryospheric structure. This knowledge leads to understanding the mechanisms of topographic support or compensation and any large-scale geomorphological features related to the interior. Accelerometers measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, a typical systematic noise type in the gravity data and, thus, improve the accuracy of the measurement. Gradiometers improve the resolution of the data by providing higher spatial resolution in the gravity field and its correlation with the topography. The resulting information will be crucial to establishing the link between surface and internal dynamics leading to identifying the terrain with easiest ocean access and to understanding the origin of the chaotic terrains and ridges. Time observations of surface features enable an examination of the difference between the obliquity and inclination which, when combined with the gravity data, provide a measurement of the moments of inertia. High stability coherent

  12. First Rosetta Radio Science Bistatic Radar Observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, Thomas P.; Remus, Stefan; Simpson, Richard A.; Pätzold, Martin; Asmar, Sami W.; Kahan, Daniel S.; Bird, Mike K.; Häusler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft was successfully inserted on 6th August 2014 into orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In September Rosetta was placed into bound orbits with an initial distance of 30 km and a decreasing distance until the end October. After lander delivery, bound orbits were maintained again at 20 km and 30 km. One of the objectives of the Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) is to address the dielectric properties, small-scale roughness, and rotational state of the nucleus of the comet, which can be determined by means of a surface scattering experiment, also known as Bistatic Radar. The radio subsystem transmitter located on board the Rosetta spacecraft beams right circularly polarized radio signals at two wavelengths -3.6 cm (X-Band) and 13 cm (S-Band) - toward the nucleus surface. Part of the impinging radiation is then scattered toward a receiver at a ground station on Earth and recorded. On September 29th, 2014 the first Bistatic Radar experiment ever at a comet was successfully conducted. The distance between 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and Rosetta was 20 km and both right circularly polarized (RCP) and left circularly polarized (LCP) reflected signals from the comet's surface in X-Band were detected during the experiment at the Goldstone complex of the NASA Deep Space Network. The ultra-stable oscillator (USO) on board Rosetta served during the experiment as a very stable reference frequency source. The direct and reflected signal were separated during the experiment by only a fraction of 1 Hz. The extreme stability of the USO allowed a detection and separation of the weak signals even on the required long integration times. Five additional Bistatic Radar experiments were conducted successfully between mid-October and mid-December 2014 with the 70-m DSN ground stations in Goldstone and Canberra at different distances to the comet (10 km, 20 km and 30 km) and reflected signals were observed in each case.

  13. Instrumentation for Spacecraft-to-Spacecraft Radio Science Observations of Jupiter and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Sami; Folkner, W.; Hinson, D.; Iess, L.; Linscott, I.; Marouf, E.; Tortora, P.

    2010-10-01

    Investigations of planetary atmospheres and surfaces via radio occultation and scattering techniques have been successfully conducted on many planets and several large satellites in the solar system using one-way downlink from a spacecraft to a ground station. Limitations on the received SNR or geometrical coverage can be overcome with alternate observation configurations. Uplink observations where a signal is transmitted from a ground station and received by the spacecraft can have an SNR advantage of almost three orders of magnitude. Spacecraft-to-spacecraft observations can also have significant SNR advantage over the traditional one-way downlink technique and can yield improved geometrical coverage. These have never been carried out before because a special radio science receiver is required onboard the spacecraft. One type of this receiver is onboard the New Horizons mission for an uplink occultation of Pluto. Another prototype receiver on MRO has been used to demonstrate a spacecraft-to-spacecraft occultation with the Odyssey spacecraft. A new digital open-loop receiver specifically designed to meet the requirements of an occultation experiment has been prototyped for flight on the EJSM missions to the Jovian system. This instrument is based on heritage of the MRO receiver with significant improvements and can be used to achieve multiple objectives, all of scientific interest to the community and all using the crosslink or uplink configurations. They include: (1) occultations of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Jupiter, (2) occultations of the tenuous atmospheres and ionospheres of the Jovian satellites, (3) occultations of the tenuous Jovian rings, and (4) bistatic scattering from surfaces of the satellites. Studies are underway to determine the appropriate wavelengths of the radio links and the design of the onboard receiver, including the front-end down-converters, the required antennas, and the baseband digital signal processor configuration. This paper

  14. Mass Estimate Of The Moon Phobos From The Radio Science Experiment Mars On Mars-express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, Thomas; Paetzold, M.; Rosenblatt, P.; Lainey, V.; Dehant, V.; Marty, J. C.; Le Maistre, S.; Haeusler, B.

    2006-09-01

    The mass of the Mars moon Phobos has been estimated several times based on radio tracking data during close flybys by Viking, Phobos-2 and MGS spacecraft. The derived GM values (gravity constant times mass) of the moon Phobos vary considerably between 0.66x10-3 km3/s2 and 0.85x10-3 km3/s2 with a weighted mean value of 0.74±0.06x10-3 km3/s2. Two approaches have been used for a new estimate of the Phobos mass based on tracking data from the flyby of the Mars Express spacecraft at a distance of 460 km on 23rd March 2006. This closest approach distance to Phobos was not optimal but it was so far the only allowed and successful occasion for a mass determination by the radio science experiment MaRS within the prime and extended mission of Mars Express. The first approach uses a precise reconstruction of the flown orbit of MEX during the flyby and a prediction of the orbit without Phobos using the GINS (Géodésie par Integrations Numériques Simultanées) software, developed at CNES and adapted for planetary missions at ROB. The GM value was fit to the frequency residuals. The resulting value of GM is within the 1σ range of the mean value above at an error of 5%. The error combines the measurement noise from the radio propagation and the thermal noise and constitutes an acceptable SNR in view of the large flyby distance. A much better SNR could have been achieved at smaller flyby distances which are required for verification. The second approach is the adjustement of the GM value along with other parameters during the precise MEX orbit reconstruction performed with the GINS software. The results of both methods are compared and discussed.

  15. Mars Express 10 years at Mars: Observations by the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment (MaRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, M.; Häusler, B.; Tyler, G. L.; Andert, T.; Asmar, S. W.; Bird, M. K.; Dehant, V.; Hinson, D. P.; Rosenblatt, P.; Simpson, R. A.; Tellmann, S.; Withers, P.; Beuthe, M.; Efimov, A. I.; Hahn, M.; Kahan, D.; Le Maistre, S.; Oschlisniok, J.; Peter, K.; Remus, S.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express spacecraft is operating in Mars orbit since early 2004. The Mars Express Radio Science Experiment (MaRS) employs the spacecraft and ground station radio systems (i) to conduct radio occultations of the atmosphere and ionosphere to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, neutral number densities and electron density, (ii) to conduct bistatic radar experiments to obtain information on the dielectric and scattering properties of the surface, (iii) to investigate the structure and variation of the crust and lithosphere in selected target areas, (iv) to determine the mass, bulk and internal structure of the moon Phobos, and (v) to track the MEX radio signals during superior solar conjunction to study the morphology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we report observations, results and discoveries made in the Mars environment between 2004 and 2014 over almost an entire solar cycle.

  16. Testing General Relativity with the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Giulia; Tommei, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The relativity experiment is part of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Thanks to very precise radio tracking from the Earth and accelerometer, it will be possible to perform an accurate test of General Relativity, by constraining a number of post-Newtonian and related parameters with an unprecedented level of accuracy. The Celestial Mechanics Group of the University of Pisa developed a new dedicated software, ORBIT14, to perform the simulations and to determine simultaneously all the parameters of interest within a global least squares fit. After highlighting some critical issues, we report on the results of a full set of simulations, carried out in the most up-to-date mission scenario. For each parameter we discuss the achievable accuracy, in terms of a formal analysis through the covariance matrix and, furthermore, by the introduction of an alternative, more representative, estimation of the errors. We show that, for example, an accuracy of some parts in 10^-6 for the Eddington parameter β and of 10^-5 for the Nordtvedt parameter η can be attained, while accuracies at the level of 5×10^-7 and 1×10^-7 can be achieved for the preferred frames parameters α1 and α2, respectively.

  17. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Paladino, R.; Hull, C. L. H.; Cortes, P.; Moellenbrock, G.; Fomalont, E.; Asada, K.; Hada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C 286 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south-west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17%; this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or electric vector position angle (EVPA)) in the core is ˜39◦, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report a serendipitous detection of a sub-mJy source in the field of view, which is likely to be a submillimeter galaxy.

  18. Radio science ground data system for the Voyager-Neptune encounter, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Asmar, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager radio science experiments at Neptune required the creation of a ground data system array that includes a Deep Space Network complex, the Parkes Radio Observatory, and the Usuda deep space tracking station. The performance requirements were based on experience with the previous Voyager encounters, as well as the scientific goals at Neptune. The requirements were stricter than those of the Uranus encounter because of the need to avoid the phase-stability problems experienced during that encounter and because the spacecraft flyby was faster and closer to the planet than previous encounters. The primary requirement on the instrument was to recover the phase and amplitude of the S- and X-band (2.3 and 8.4 GHz) signals under the dynamic conditions encountered during the occultations. The primary receiver type for the measurements was open loop with high phase-noise and frequency stability performance. The receiver filter bandwidth was predetermined based on the spacecraft's trajectory and frequency uncertainties.

  19. Global Navigation Satellite System Radio Occultation: Processing Algorithms, Science Applications, and COSMIC-2 Mission Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, W. S.; Sokolovskiy, S. V.; Kuo, Y. H.; Weiss, J.; Braun, J.; Hunt, D.; Pedatella, N. M.; Yue, X.; Ho, S. P.; Zeng, Z.; Wee, T. K.; Vanhove, T.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Radio Occultation (RO) data are becoming a benchmark dataset of the international global observing system. The high vertical resolution, precision, and accuracy of retrieved atmospheric profiles makes GNSS RO ideal for weather and space weather specification and forecasting, climate change research and detection, and ground-based and satellite instrument validation. With a GNSS receiver on board a low-Earth orbiting (LEO) satellite, the amplitude and phase of the radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted from GNSS satellites can be measured very precisely as the ray tangent point descends from ~100 km altitude to the surface. With proper algorithms and observational modeling, vertical profiles of bending angle are derived. Profiles of refractivity, and subsequently pressure, temperature and humidity can be derived with additional a priori information. This presentation will first provide an overview of GNSS RO data processing algorithms and then present recent research results from challenging regions such as the upper stratosphere and the lower troposphere. Additional research results from science application studies using RO data will also be discussed. Finally, a status update of the COSMIC-2 mission due to launch in Sept 2016 will be presented.

  20. PREFACE: Third Conference of the Asian Consortium for Computational Materials Science (ACCMS-3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding-sheng; Chen, Gang

    2006-01-01

    Following the tradition of the ACCMS-1 held in Bangalore, India, in November 2001, and the ACCMS-2 in Novosibirsk, Russia, during July 14-16, 2004, this conference, held at the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, 8-11 September 2005, has been set up to promote research and development activities in computational materials science in Asian countries. Computational materials science has emerged as a distinct multidisciplinary branch of science whose relevance and importance has come from (a) the desire to have a microscopic understanding of complex materials and phenomena, (b) the need to design novel materials with a desired combination of physical, chemical and metallurgical properties, and (c) the possibility to describe the basic interatomic interactions in materials via appropriate quantum mechanical and statistical mechanical tools. With the unprecedented growth of computer power and the developments of efficient and smart algorithms and codes, it is now possible to do large scale simulations of real materials with increasing complexity. A synergy amongst a wide variety of disciplines such as physics, chemistry, metallurgy, geology, biology, computer science and information technology is gradually coming to a reality due to advances in computer simulations. What follows here are the written ACCMS-3 proceedings based on the presentations, oral and poster, of the research pursued by the various participating groups, which cover topics, such as density functional theory-based methods, Monte Carlo, molecular and lattice dynamics simulations, tight-binding and effective medium approaches, coarse graining and mesoscopic modeling, continuum and quasi-continuum approaches, etc and their applications to different materials. ACCMS-3 was chaired by Professor Enge Wang, and co-chaired by professors B.L. Gu, Y. Kawazoe and G.P. Das, and organized and supported by the Institute of Physics (Beijing), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the

  1. Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA): A fundamental support to BepiColombo Radio Science Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Morbidini, A.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Persichini, M.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio Science Experiments of the BepiColombo mission will enable substantial improvement of the knowledge of Mercury's orbit and rotation, and the relativistic dynamics in the solar system. A fundamental support to the spacecraft tracking data will be given by the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA). This is a three-axis accelerometer devoted to the measurement of the non-gravitational perturbations acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), whose knowledge is important in order to fully exploit the quality of the tracking data. The intrinsic noise level of the instrument that will be onboard MPO, 10-9m/s2/√{Hz} in the 3×10-5 to 10-1Hz frequency range, guarantees the fulfilment of the RSE requirements. The main scientific and technological features of the instrument are discussed, together with its current error budget, experimental activities and foreseen calibration strategies.

  2. Precise radio Doppler and interferometric tracking of spacecraft in service of planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duev, Dmitry; PRIDE Team

    2016-10-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments (PRIDE) project is designed as a multi-purpose, multidisciplinary enhancement of the space missions science return by means of Doppler and phase-referenced Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) tracking of spacecraft. These measurements can be used in a multitude of scientific applications, both fundamental and applied, where an accurate estimate of the spacecraft state vector is essential. In particular, the gravitational field of planetary moons can be sampled with close spacecraft flybys, allowing to probe the moons' interior.In this presentation, we will describe the principles of PRIDE data collection, processing, and analysis. We will present the results of demonstrational observations of a Phobos flyby conducted by ESA's Mars Express spacecraft.

  3. Surface Science Laboratory for Studying the Surfaces of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Wu

    2003-09-01

    A Surface Science Laboratory (SSL) has been established at JLab to study surfaces relevant to superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Current operational facilities include a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive x-ray analysis, a secondary ion mass spectrometry, a metallographic optical microscope, a transmission electron microscope, a high precision and large scan area 3-D profilometer, a scanning field emission microscope, and a fully equipped sample preparation room. A scanning Auger microscope is being commissioned, and will be available for routine usage soon. Results from typical examples of the R&D projects on SRF cavities that were supported in the past through the use of the facilities in the SSL will be briefly reported.

  4. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  5. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  6. News CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

  7. The Weather Guys - Discussing Science via regular Radio and Newspaper Appearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Martin, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has described the value of outreach through its Wisconsin Idea. Simply put it states that the boundaries of the university are the boundaries of the state. In addition to their research, teaching, and administration duties, they have routinely reached out to share their science with various public groups. Since 1998, Profs Jon Martin and Steve Ackerman, have be regular quests on the Larry Meiller show on Wisconsin Public Radio IDEAS Network. The format of the show is a live call-in show. They air as guests the last Monday of every month. The show is also web-cast live (http://www.wpr.org/), enabling questions to be called in on phone or sent via email. Archives can be found at http://www.wpr.org/webcasting/audioarchives_display.cfm?Code=mlr In 2008 they were asked to do a Q&A column for the regional Madison paper: The Wisconsin State Journal (WSJ). This is a weekly column that addresses readers questions in about 250 words. Example columns can be found in the WSJ e-book: http://www.amazon.com/Ask-Weather-Guys-2010-ebook/dp/B00AY4VMZE These two activities have earned them the nickname The Weather Guys, resulting in various speaking invitations including master gardener clubs and a Science Pub sponsored by Nova. Overall, these activities have been beneficial to our careers, earning name recognition across the University and throughout the state. They also provide learning opportunities for us through experiences described by the public. We will discuss our motivation and experiences in doing this live show and the weekly column, presenting personal stories of successful and less-successful communication attempts. A nearly complete archive exists or the live radio show and we will present an analysis of the type of questions asked and the more common, and less common, topics. The Weather Guys, an image developed by and for the Why?Files (http://whyfiles.org

  8. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Application. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include the following: magnetic disk and tape technologies; optical disk and tape; software storage and file management systems; and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990's.

  9. Helping science and drug development to succeed through pharma-academia partnerships: Yale Healthcare Conference 2013.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daniel X; Kim, Yunsoo A

    2013-09-01

    The theme of the 2013 Yale Healthcare Conference was "Partnerships in Healthcare: Cultivating Collaborative Solutions." The April conference brought together leaders across several sectors of health care, including academic research, pharmaceuticals, information technology, policy, and life sciences investing. In particular, the breakout session titled "Taking R&D Back to School: The Rise of Pharma-Academia Alliances" centered on the partnerships between academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies. Attendees of the session included members of the pharmaceutical industry, academic researchers, and physicians, as well as graduate and professional students. The discussion was led by Dr. Thomas Lynch of Yale University. Several topics emerged from the discussion, including resources for scientific discovery and the management of competing interests in collaborations between academia and the pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Mars' gravity field and upper atmosphere with MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO radio science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    The Mars exploration program conducted by NASA during the last decade has enabled continuous observations of the planet from orbit with three different missions: the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). These spacecraft were equipped with on board instrumentation dedicated to collect radio tracking data in the X-band. The analysis of these data has provided a high-resolution gravity field model of Mars. MGS and ODY were inserted into two separate frozen sun-synchronous, near-circular, polar orbits with different local times, with their periapsis altitude at ~370 km and ~390 km, respectively. MGS was in orbit around Mars between 1999 and 2006, whereas ODY has been orbiting the planet since January 2002. Using the radio science data of these two spacecraft, gravity models with a maximum resolution of degree and order 95 in spherical harmonics (spatial resolution of 112 km) have been determined. MRO has been orbiting Mars since August 2006 in a frozen sun-synchronous orbit with a periapsis at 255 km altitude. Therefore, its radio data helped significantly improve Mars' gravity field model, up to degree and order 110 (spatial resolution of 96 km). However, mismodeling of the atmospheric drag, which is the strongest non-conservative force acting on the spacecraft at MRO's low altitude, compromises the estimation of the temporal variations of the gravity field zonal harmonics that provide crucial information on the seasonal mass of carbon dioxide in the polar caps. For this reason, we implemented the Drag Temperature Model (DTM)-Mars model (Bruinsma and Lemoine 2002) into our Precise Orbit Determination (POD) program GEODYN-II. We estimated key model parameters to adequately reproduce variations in temperatures and (partial) density along the spacecraft trajectories. Our new model allows us to directly estimate the long-term periodicity of the major constituents at MGS, ODY, and MRO altitudes (~255-450 km). In this

  11. PREFACE: IC-MSQUARE 2012: International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, Theocharis; Vagenas, Elias; Vlachos, Dimitrios

    2013-02-01

    The first International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Budapest, Hungary, from Monday 3 to Friday 7 September 2012. The conference was attended by more than 130 participants, and hosted about 290 oral, poster and virtual papers by more than 460 pre-registered authors. The first IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields in which mathematical modelling is used, such as theoretical/mathematical physics, neutrino physics, non-integrable systems, dynamical systems, computational nanoscience, biological physics, computational biomechanics, complex networks, stochastic modelling, fractional statistics, DNA dynamics, and macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, two parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The mounting question is whether this occurred accidentally, or whether IC-MSQUARE is a necessity in the field of physical and mathematical modelling. For all of us working in the field, the existing and established conferences in this particular field suffer from two distinguished and recognized drawbacks: the first is the increasing orientation, while the second refers to the extreme specialization of the meetings. Therefore, a conference which aims to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with applications of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology, environmental sciences etc., appears to be a necessity. This is the key role that IC-MSQUARE will play. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to IC-MSQUARE. We would also

  12. Developing Talent in Mathematics, Science and Technology: A Conference on Academic Talent (Durham, North Carolina, March 28-30, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyden, Julia I., Ed.; And Others

    An introductory chapter, "Contemporary Issues in Gifted Education" by Julia Dreyden and Shelagh Gallagher, summarizes National Science Foundation policy concerning development of new science and mathematics curricula and the work of the Talent Identification Program. Major conference papers and responses are then presented: "Developing Academic…

  13. Information in the Language Sciences: Proceedings of the Conference Held at Warrenton, Virginia, March 4-6, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Robert R., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 22 papers from the Conference on Information in the Language Sciences held in Warrenton, Va., in 1966, sponsored by the Center for Applied Linguistics, stresses three themes: general trends, information needs of the languages sciences, and system design. Discussions attempt to formulate modern rational approaches to the complex…

  14. Information in the Language Sciences: Proceedings of the Conference Held at Warrenton, Virginia, March 4-6, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Robert R., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 22 papers from the Conference on Information in the Language Sciences held in Warrenton, Va., in 1966, sponsored by the Center for Applied Linguistics, stresses three themes: general trends, information needs of the languages sciences, and system design. Discussions attempt to formulate modern rational approaches to the complex…

  15. Improving the Math and Science Curriculum: Choices for State Policymasters. Report on the Secretary's Conference on Improving Mathematics and Science Education, December 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    In December 1991, the first of a series of Secretary's Conferences on Improving Mathematics and Science Education was held in Washington, D.C., to discuss methods of attaining the fourth National Education Goal of being the world leader in mathematics and science education by the year 2000 as set by President Bush and the nation's governors. More…

  16. 4th Annual Conference for African-American Researchers in the Mathematical Sciences (CAARMS4). Preliminary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tapia, Richard

    1998-06-01

    In June, The Center for Research on Parallel Computation (CRPC), an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center, hosted the 4th Annual Conference for African-American Reserachers in the Mathematical Sciences (CAARMS4) at Rice University. The main goal of this conference was to highlight current work by African-American researchers and graduate students in mathematics. This conference strengthened the mathematical sciences by encouraging the increased participation of African-American and underrepresented groups into the field, facilitating working relationships between them and helping to cultivate their careers. In addition to the talks there was a graduate student poster session and tutorials on topics in mathematics and computer science. These talks, presentations, and discussions brought a broader perspective to the critical issues involving minority participation in mathematics.

  17. M/SET 2000: International Conference on Mathematics/Science Education & Technology Proceedings (San Diego, California, February 5-8, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Robby, Ed.

    The International Conference on Mathematics/Science Education and Technology (M/SET) is an annual conference focusing on current research, theory, issues, classroom applications, developments, and trends related to the use of information technologies in mathematics, science, and computer science education. This proceedings contains a corporate…

  18. National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference Statement: Family History and Improving Health.

    PubMed

    Berg, Alfred O; Baird, Macaran A; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Driscoll, Deborah A; Fishman, Paul A; Guarino, Peter D; Hiatt, Robert A; Jarvik, Gail P; Millon-Underwood, Sandra; Morgan, Thomas M; Mulvihill, John J; Pollin, Toni I; Schimmel, Selma R; Stefanek, Michael Edward; Vollmer, William M; Williams, Janet K

    2009-12-15

    National Institutes of Health consensus and state-of-the science statements are prepared by independent panels of health professionals and public representatives on the basis of 1) the results of a systematic literature review prepared under contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ); 2) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the conference questions during a 2-day public session; 3) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that are part of the public session; and 4) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the National Institutes of Health or the U.S. government. The statement reflects the panel's assessment of medical knowledge available at the time the statement was written. Thus, it provides a "snapshot in time" of the state of knowledge on the conference topic. When reading the statement, keep in mind that new knowledge is inevitably accumulating through medical research.

  19. The Red Radio Ring: a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z = 2.553 discovered through the citizen science project SPACE WARPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, J. E.; More, A.; Verma, A.; Marshall, P. J.; Jackson, N.; Belles, P.-E.; Beswick, R.; Baeten, E.; Chavez, M.; Cornen, C.; Cox, B. E.; Erben, T.; Erickson, N. J.; Garrington, S.; Harrison, P. A.; Harrington, K.; Hughes, D. H.; Ivison, R. J.; Jordan, C.; Lin, Y.-T.; Leauthaud, A.; Lintott, C.; Lynn, S.; Kapadia, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Macmillan, C.; Makler, M.; Miller, G.; Montaña, A.; Mujica, R.; Muxlow, T.; Narayanan, G.; O'Briain, D.; O'Brien, T.; Oguri, M.; Paget, E.; Parrish, M.; Ross, N. P.; Rozo, E.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez-Argüelles, D.; Simpson, R.; Snyder, C.; Schloerb, F. P.; Tecza, M.; Wang, W.-H.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Wilcox, J.; Viero, M.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.; Zeballos, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (intrinsic LIR ≈ 1013 L⊙) with strong radio emission (intrinsic L1.4 GHz ≈ 1025 W Hz-1) at z = 2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SPACE WARPS through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (re ≈ 3 arcsec) around an LRG at z = 0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3→2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [O III] and Hα line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph. We have resolved the radio emission with high-resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and Very Large Array C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-infrared imaging to construct a lens model, which indicates a lensing magnification of μ ≈ 10. The source reconstruction appears to support a radio morphology comprised of a compact (<250 pc) core and more extended component, perhaps indicative of an active nucleus and jet or lobe.

  20. PREFACE: The fifth International Conference on Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications (IFSA2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azechi, Hiroshi; Hammel, Bruce; Gauthier, Jean-Claude

    2008-06-01

    The Fifth International Conference on Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications (IFSA 2007) was held on 9-14 September 2007 at Kobe International Conference Center in Kobe, Japan. The host organizations for this conference were Osaka University and the Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE) at Osaka University; and co-organized by the Institute Lasers and Plasmas (ILP) in France, the Commissariatá l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, and Kansai Photon Science Institute (KPSI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The conference objective was to review the state of the art of research in inertial fusion sciences and applications since the last conference held in Biarritz, France, in 2005. 470 abstracts were accepted, and 448 persons from 18 countries attended the conference. These Proceedings contain 287 of the papers presented at IFSA 2007. This collection of papers represents the manuscripts submitted to and passing the peer review process. The program was organized with some specific features: The reviews of influential programs appeared both at the very beginning and at the very end of the Conference to attract attendance throughout the Conference. Each poster session had the same time period as a single oral session, thereby avoiding overlap with oral talks. The everyday program was structured to be as similar as possible so the attendees could easily recognize the program. With a goal of achieving inertial fusion ignition and burn propagation in the laboratory, researchers presented the exciting advances in both traditional hot spot ignition and fast ignition approach, including status report of USA's National Ignition Facility (NIF), French Laser Magajoule (LMJ), Japanese Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX), and European High Power laser Energy Research (HiPER). A particular emphasis of the meeting was that the `physics of inertial fusion' category was dominated

  1. Phenylketonuria Scientific Review Conference: state of the science and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Camp, Kathryn M; Parisi, Melissa A; Acosta, Phyllis B; Berry, Gerard T; Bilder, Deborah A; Blau, Nenad; Bodamer, Olaf A; Brosco, Jeffrey P; Brown, Christine S; Burlina, Alberto B; Burton, Barbara K; Chang, Christine S; Coates, Paul M; Cunningham, Amy C; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Ferguson, John H; Franklin, Thomas D; Frazier, Dianne M; Grange, Dorothy K; Greene, Carol L; Groft, Stephen C; Harding, Cary O; Howell, R Rodney; Huntington, Kathleen L; Hyatt-Knorr, Henrietta D; Jevaji, Indira P; Levy, Harvey L; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A; Matalon, Kimberlee; MacDonald, Anita; McPheeters, Melissa L; Mitchell, John J; Mofidi, Shideh; Moseley, Kathryn D; Mueller, Christine M; Mulberg, Andrew E; Nerurkar, Lata S; Ogata, Beth N; Pariser, Anne R; Prasad, Suyash; Pridjian, Gabriella; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Reddy, Uma M; Rohr, Frances J; Singh, Rani H; Sirrs, Sandra M; Stremer, Stephanie E; Tagle, Danilo A; Thompson, Susan M; Urv, Tiina K; Utz, Jeanine R; van Spronsen, Francjan; Vockley, Jerry; Waisbren, Susan E; Weglicki, Linda S; White, Desirée A; Whitley, Chester B; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Yannicelli, Steven; Young, Justin M

    2014-06-01

    New developments in the treatment and management of phenylketonuria (PKU) as well as advances in molecular testing have emerged since the National Institutes of Health 2000 PKU Consensus Statement was released. An NIH State-of-the-Science Conference was convened in 2012 to address new findings, particularly the use of the medication sapropterin to treat some individuals with PKU, and to develop a research agenda. Prior to the 2012 conference, five working groups of experts and public members met over a 1-year period. The working groups addressed the following: long-term outcomes and management across the lifespan; PKU and pregnancy; diet control and management; pharmacologic interventions; and molecular testing, new technologies, and epidemiologic considerations. In a parallel and independent activity, an Evidence-based Practice Center supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality conducted a systematic review of adjuvant treatments for PKU; its conclusions were presented at the conference. The conference included the findings of the working groups, panel discussions from industry and international perspectives, and presentations on topics such as emerging treatments for PKU, transitioning to adult care, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory perspective. Over 85 experts participated in the conference through information gathering and/or as presenters during the conference, and they reached several important conclusions. The most serious neurological impairments in PKU are preventable with current dietary treatment approaches. However, a variety of more subtle physical, cognitive, and behavioral consequences of even well-controlled PKU are now recognized. The best outcomes in maternal PKU occur when blood phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations are maintained between 120 and 360 μmol/L before and during pregnancy. The dietary management treatment goal for individuals with PKU is a blood Phe concentration between 120 and 360 μmol/L. The use

  2. PARTICIPANT SUPPORT FOR THE 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE ON PLASMA PROCESSING SCIENCE (JULY 11-16,2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe Kortshagen

    2011-06-14

    The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in low temperature plasma science and will explore the applications of low temperature plasma technology relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy and the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks, plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization, and environmental remediation and waste treatment. The conference will bring together in an informal atmosphere leaders in the field with junior investigators and graduate students. The special format of the Gordon Conferences, with programmed discussion sessions and ample time for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide for a fertile atmosphere of brainstorming and creative thinking among the attendees.

  3. Ike 101: The Dwight D. Eisenhower Program for Mathematics and Science Education National Conference (Arlington, Virginia, November 17-22, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education, College Park, MD.

    A conference was held to discuss educational issues related to mathematics and science education. This document reports the proceedings of the conference by summarizing the comments of several of the conference speakers. The speakers and topics discussed included: (1) Senator Mark Hatfield and Congressman Thomas Sawyer on the perspective of…

  4. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Cincinnati, OH, January 9-12, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A., Ed.; And Others

    This proceedings of the 1997 Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (AETS) includes a copy of the conference program and 43 papers and presentation summaries from the meeting, placed in order by conference session. Among the topics of the papers include are: reading-to-learn and writing-to-learn…

  5. Spectral Calibration Requirements of Radio Interferometers for Epoch of Reionisation Science with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral features introduced by instrumental chromaticity of radio interferometers have the potential to negatively impact the ability to perform Epoch of Reionisation and Cosmic Dawn (EoR/CD) science. We describe instrument calibration choices that influence the spectral characteristics of the science data, and assess their impact on EoR/CD statistical and tomographic experiments. Principally, we consider the intrinsic spectral response of the antennas, embedded within a complete frequency-dependent primary beam response, and instrument sampling. The analysis is applied to the proposed SKA1-Low EoR/CD experiments. We provide tolerances on the smoothness of the SKA station primary beam bandpass, to meet the scientific goals of statistical and tomographic (imaging) of EoR/CD programs. Two calibration strategies are tested: (1) fitting of each fine channel independently, and (2) fitting of an nth-order polynomial for each ~ 1 MHz coarse channel with (n+1)th-order residuals (n = 2, 3, 4). Strategy (1) leads to uncorrelated power in the 2D power spectrum proportional to the thermal noise power, thereby reducing the overall sensitivity. Strategy (2) leads to correlated residuals from the fitting, and residual signal power with (n+1)th-order curvature. For the residual power to be less than the thermal noise, the fractional amplitude of a fourth-order term in the bandpass across a single coarse channel must be < 2.5% (50 MHz), < 0.5% (150 MHz), < 0.8% (200 MHz). The tomographic experiment places constraints on phase residuals in the bandpass. We find that the root-mean-square variability over all stations of the change in phase across any fine channel (4.578 kHz) should not exceed 0.2 degrees.

  6. Gravimetry, rotation and angular momentum of Jupiter from the Juno Radio Science experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, D.; Dimare, L.; Tommei, G.; Milani, A.

    2016-12-01

    Juno is a NASA space mission to Jupiter, arriving at the planet in July 2016. Through accurate Doppler tracking in X and Ka-band, the Radio Science experiment will allow to map Jupiter's gravity field, crucial for the study of the interior structure of the planet. In this paper we describe the results of numerical simulations of this experiment, performed with the ORBIT14 orbit determination software, developed by the Department of Mathematics of the University of Pisa and by the spin-off Space Dynamics Services srl. Our analysis included the determination of Jupiter's gravity field, the Love numbers, the direction of the rotation axis and the angular momentum magnitude, the latter by measuring the Lense-Thirring effect on the spacecraft. As far as the gravity field is concerned, the spherical harmonics coefficients of Jupiter's gravitational potential are highly correlated and the accuracy in the determination of the zonal coefficients of degree ℓ is degraded for ℓ > 15 . We explore the possibility of using a local model, introducing ring-shaped mascons, so as to determine the gravity field of the portion of the spherical surface bounded by latitudes 6°N and 35°N, the latitude belt observed during Juno's pericenter passes. Finally, the determination of Jupiter's angular momentum magnitude turned out to be compromised by the impossibility of separating the effects of the Lense-Thirring acceleration and of a change in Jupiter's rotation axis direction.

  7. Determining the amplitude of Mercury's long period librations with the BepiColombo radio science experiment⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Giulia; Cicalò, Stefano; Tommei, Giacomo; Milani, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    The Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) is one of the experiments on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. A crucial goal of MORE is to determine the gravity field and rotational state of Mercury in order to enable a better understanding of the planet's geophysics. The authors have recently reported on the results of a set of simulations of the MORE gravimetry and rotation experiments, carried out with the dedicated ORBIT14 software. Since that time, the launch date has been postponed twice, leading to a shift of more than one year in the orbital phase of the mission. Actually, the updated schedule results in a more suitable planetary configuration to determine the amplitude of the forced librations in longitude induced by Jupiter. In fact, the amplitude can be considerably enhanced due to a near-resonance with the free librations period, a key parameter to constrain the interior structure of Mercury. We show that the newest launch date allows the measurement of the long period librations amplitude forced by Jupiter with an accuracy of some tenth of arcseconds, a significant improvement with respect to the results with the previous mission schedule.

  8. The Cassini Radio & Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) view of the Enceladus Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Gurnett, Donald; Kurth, William; Andrews, David; Engelhardt, Ilka; Eriksson, Anders; Farrell, William; Holmberg, Mika; Hospodarsky, George; Morooka, Michiko; Sheng-Yi, Ye; Vigren, Erik

    2014-05-01

    A physical picture of the interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere and the moon Enceladus space environment is presented based on Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) observations. The space environment around Enceladus consists of several different regions with a diversity of active physical processes. Foremost, the southward exhaust plume reveals a cold, dense, conductive and dusty plasma environment where the magnetic field is piled-up. Plasma acceleration processes are active at the plume edges, and constitute an important part of the electrodynamic MHD dynamo, giving rise to Auroral hiss emissions as well as a magnetic footprint pattern in the high-latitude atmosphere of Saturn. The Enceladus wake is filled with negatively charged dust that depletes the region from electrons by water grain attachment. The grains around Enceladus can be picked-up by the magnetospheric co-rotation electric field. The charged water grains then populate the region in Enceladus orbit around Saturn and create the E-ring. Depending on the size of the grains, different grain evolutions occur and different dynamics of the grains are expected. The Enceladus plume as well as the plasma disc surrounding the E-ring constitutes complex natural laboratories for dust-plasma interaction, which has important implications also for the newly discovered Europa plume and associated plasma disk material around Jupiter to be investigated by the ESA JUICE and the NASA Europa Clipper missions. We present a detailed account of the Cassini RPWS observations around Enceladus with associated physical interpretations.

  9. Stability measurements of the radio science system at the 34-m high-efficiency antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Breidenthal, J. C.; Peng, T. K.; Abbate, S. F.; Rockwell, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    From 1991 to 1993 the fractional frequency stability of the operational Radio Science System was measured at DSS's 15, 45, and 65. These stations are designed to have the most stable uplink and downlink equipment in the Deep Space Network (DSN). Some measurements were performed when the antenna was moving and the frequency was ramped. The stability, including contributions of all elements in the station except for the antenna and the hydrogen maser, was measured to be 0.3 to 1.3 x 10(exp -15) when the frequency was fixed, and 0.6 to 6.0 x 10(exp -15) when the frequency was ramped (sample interval, 1000 sec). Only one measurement out of fifteen exceeded specification. In all other cases, when previous measurements on the antenna and the hydrogen maser were added, a total system stability requirement of 5.0 x 10(exp -15) as met. In addition, ambient temperature was found to cause phase variation in the measurements at a rate of 5.5 deg of phase per deg C.

  10. An International Workshop on Primary Science. Report on the Primary Science Workshop Held after the Conference in Science and Technology Education and Future Human Needs (Bangalore, India, August 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlen, Wynne, Comp.

    A conference on science and technology and future human needs was attended by over 300 science educators from 64 countries. Educators with particular interest in primary science and technology education extended their stay for an additional seminar. This report highlights the events of that seminar. Contents include: (1) recent and on-going work…

  11. An International Workshop on Primary Science. Report on the Primary Science Workshop Held after the Conference in Science and Technology Education and Future Human Needs (Bangalore, India, August 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlen, Wynne, Comp.

    A conference on science and technology and future human needs was attended by over 300 science educators from 64 countries. Educators with particular interest in primary science and technology education extended their stay for an additional seminar. This report highlights the events of that seminar. Contents include: (1) recent and on-going work…

  12. News Competition: School team launches a rocket Conference: Norway focuses on physics teaching Science on Stage: Canadian science acts take to the stage Particle Physics: Teachers get a surprise at CERN Teaching: Exploring how students learn physics University: Oxford opens doors to science teachers Lasers: Lasers shine light on meeting Science Fair: Malawi promotes science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    Competition: School team launches a rocket Conference: Norway focuses on physics teaching Science on Stage: Canadian science acts take to the stage Particle Physics: Teachers get a surprise at CERN Teaching: Exploring how students learn physics University: Oxford opens doors to science teachers Lasers: Lasers shine light on meeting Science Fair: Malawi promotes science education

  13. Seventy Years of Radio Science, Technology, Standards, and Measurement at the National Bureau of Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmor, C. Stewart

    This large volume describes all the forms of radio research done at the National Bureau of Standards (now, National Institute of Standards and Technology) from its founding in 1901 until about 1980. The volume truly reflects its subtitle; it describes in great detail research in radio propagation and all its connections with geophysics and geospace, but also radio as instrument for discovery and application in meteorology, navigation, and in standards of measurement and testing in electronics.The book is a bit unwieldy and some of its chapters will be of most interest to former NBS employees. For example, there is a lengthy chapter on the transfer of radio research work from Washington, D.C, to Boulder, Colo., in the early 1950s, complete with photostat of the quit claim deed to NBS from the Boulder Chamber of Commerce. On the other hand, radio research developed and flourished in this country in the early days at industrial (Bell Telephone, General Electric, Westinghouse) and government (NBS, Naval Research Laboratory) labs more than in academia, and it is very interesting to learn how the labs interacted and to read details of the organizational structure. I can attest personally to the great difficulties in locating materials concerning radio history. While we have numerous volumes devoted to certain popular radio heroes, little is available concerning government radio pioneers such as L. W. Austin, who directed the U.S. Navy's radio research for many years while situated physically at the Bureau of Standards, or J. H. Dellinger, long-time chief of the Radio Section and head spokesman on radio for the U.S. government until the 1930s.

  14. 2010 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference, and Room Temperature Semiconductor Detectors Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Nuclear Science Symposium (NSS) offers an outstanding opportunity for scientists and engineers interested or actively working in the fields of nuclear science, radiation instrumentation, software and their applications, to meet and discuss with colleagues from around the world. The program emphasizes the latest developments in technology and instrumentation and their implementation in experiments for space sciences, accelerators, other radiation environments, and homeland security. The Medical Imaging Conference (MIC) is the foremost international scientific meeting on the physics, engineering and mathematical aspects of nuclear medicine based imaging. As the field develops, multi-modality approaches are becoming more and more important. The content of the MIC reflects this, with a growing emphasis on the methodologies of X-ray, optical and MR imaging as they relate to nuclear imaging techniques. In addition, specialized topics will be addressed in the Short Courses and Workshops programs. The Workshop on Room-Temperature Semiconductor Detectors (RTSD) represents the largest forum of scientists and engineers developing new semiconductor radiation detectors and imaging arrays. Room-temperature solid-state radiation detectors for X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron radiation are finding increasing applications in such diverse fields as medicine, homeland security, astrophysics and environmental remediation. The objective of this workshop is to provide a forum for discussion of the state of the art of material development for semiconductor, scintillator, and organic materials for detection, materials characterization, device fabrication and technology, electronics and applications.

  15. NCSE's 13th National Conference on Disasters and Environment: Science, Preparedness and Resilience, Post Conference Follow-up Activities and Dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Saundry, Peter; Kossak, Shelley

    2014-04-29

    The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) received $15,000 from the US Department of Energy to support post-conference activities of the 13th National Conference on the theme of Disasters and the Environment: Science, Preparedness and Resilience, held on January 15-17, 2013 at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC. Over 1,000 participants from the scientific, emergency response, policy, conservation, and business communities, as well as federal and local government officials, and international entities attended the event. The conference developed actionable outcomes that constructively advance the science behind decision-making on environmental disasters, with an intended result of more prepared and resilient communities in light of a changing climate. Disasters and Environment topic was addressed through six organizing themes: Cascading Disasters; Intersection of the Built and Natural Environments; Disasters as Mechanisms of Ecosystem Change; Rethinking Recovery and Expanding the Vision of Mitigation; Human Behavior and its Consequences; and "No Regrets" Resilience. The program featured eight plenary sessions, 24 symposia and 23 breakout workshops and addressed pivotal issues surrounding disasters and environment including lifeline services, the energy, climate, hazard nexus, grid collapse, community vulnerability, and natural resource management. Sessions, symposia and workshops were conducted by over 200 distinguished thought leaders, scientists, government officials, policy experts and international speakers throughout the three day event. Following the conference, NCSE prepared a set of recommendations and results from the workshops and disseminated the results to universities, organizations and agencies, the business community. NCSE’s national dissemination involved organized several targeted trips and meetings to disseminate significant findings to key stakeholder groups.

  16. Science preparedness and science response: perspectives on the dynamics of preparedness conference.

    PubMed

    Lant, Timothy; Lurie, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the scientific modeling community to meaningfully contribute to postevent response activities during public health emergencies was the direct result of a discrete set of preparedness activities as well as advances in theory and technology. Scientists and decision-makers have recognized the value of developing scientific tools (e.g. models, data sets, communities of practice) to prepare them to be able to respond quickly--in a manner similar to preparedness activities by first-responders and emergency managers. Computational models have matured in their ability to better inform response plans by modeling human behaviors and complex systems. We advocate for further development of science preparedness activities as deliberate actions taken in advance of an unpredicted event (or an event with unknown consequences) to increase the scientific tools and evidence-base available to decision makers and the whole-of-community to limit adverse outcomes.

  17. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSquare2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Dimitrios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    The 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Mykonos, Greece, from Friday 5th June to Monday 8th June 2015. The Conference was attended by more than 150 participants and hosted about 200 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. There were more than 600 pre-registered authors. The 4th IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather intense as after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high quality of talks creating an innovative and productive scientific environment for all attendees. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  18. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The third International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Madrid, Spain, from Thursday 28 to Sunday 31 August 2014. The Conference was attended by more than 200 participants and hosted about 350 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. More than 600 pre-registered authors were also counted. The third IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral sessions and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  19. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences 2013 (IC-MSQUARE 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The second International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Prague, Czech Republic, from Sunday 1 September to Thursday 5 September 2013. The Conference was attended by more than 280 participants and hosted about 400 oral, poster, and virtual presentations while counted more than 600 pre-registered authors. The second IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel sessions were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee. Further information on the editors, speakers and committees is available in the attached pdf.

  20. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Seattle, Washington, January 11-14, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A. Ed.; And Others

    These conference proceedings include papers presented and summaries of presentations made at the 1996 Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (AETS). Topics include: English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) Strategies in science methods courses; writing strategies; action research and equity issues;…

  1. Proceedings of the lunar and planetary science conference, 13th, part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, W.V.; Ahrens, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The second part of the proceedings of the Thirteenth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference considers sedimentary processes and crustal cycling on Venus, a model for the formation of the earth's core, evidence of resurfacing in the lunar nearside highlands, the geology of Tethys, thermal stresses in planetary elastic lithospheres, the petrology and comparative thermal and mechanical histories of clasts in breccia 62236, lunar paleointensity data and its implications for the origin of lunar magnetism, and a model for the accumulation of solar wind radiation damage effects in lunar dust grains. Also discussed are fluid inclusions in stony meteorites, nuclear track and compositional studies of olivines in CI and CM chondrites, the impact of an asteroid or comet in the ocean and the extinction of terrestrial life, cooling rates for glass-containing lunar compositions, and the homogeneity of lava flows.

  2. Amateur Radio in Space: A Teacher's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Sandy; White, Rosalie

    This educator's guide contains background information on the Space Amateur Radio EXperiment (SAREX) designed to facilitate communication between astronauts in orbit and students on the ground. Through SAREX, astronauts make scheduled and unscheduled amateur radio contacts from the Shuttle orbiter with schools selected through a proposal process…

  3. Definition phase of Grand Tour missions/radio science investigations study for outer planets missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Scientific instrumentation for satellite communication and radio tracking systems in the outer planet exploration mission is discussed. Mission planning considers observations of planetary and satellite-masses, -atmospheres, -magnetic fields, -surfaces, -gravitational fields, solar wind composition, planetary radio emissions, and tests of general relativity in time delay and ray bending experiments.

  4. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Expected Performance in Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Woods, W. W.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for investigating key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the upcoming flyby in July 2015. REX flight equipment augments the NH radio transceiver used for spacecraft communications and tracking. The REX hardware implementation requires 1.6 W and 160 g. This presentation will focus on the final design and the predicted performance of two high-priority observations. First, REX will receive signals from a pair of 70-m antennas on Earth - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. The data recorded by REX will reveal the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius. Second, REX will measure the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2-cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the nightside are visible, allowing the surface temperature and its spatial variations to be determined. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of about 10 pixels; one bisects Pluto whereas the second crosses the winter pole. We will illustrate the capabilities of REX by reviewing the method of analysis and the precision achieved in a lunar occultation observed by New Horizons in May 2011. Re-analysis of radio occultation measurements by Voyager 2 at Triton is also under way. More generally, REX objectives include a radio occultation search for Pluto's ionosphere; examination of Charon through both radio occultation and radiometry; a search for a radar echo from Pluto's surface; and improved knowledge of the Pluto system mass and the Pluto-Charon mass ratio from a combination of two-way and one-way Doppler frequency measurements.

  5. The pharmaceutical sciences in 2020--report of a conference organized by the Board of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

    PubMed

    Shah, Vinod P; Besançon, Luc J R; Stolk, Pieter; Tucker, Geoffrey; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2009-12-08

    In accordance with its missions, the Board of Pharmaceutical Sciences (BPS) of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) has developed a view on the future of pharmaceutical sciences in 2020. This followed an international conference with invited participants from various fields (scientists, academicians, regulators, industrialists, venture capitalists...) who shared their views on the forces that might determine how the pharmaceutical sciences will look in 2020. The participants of the conference identified major research activities which will drive drug discovery and development, the enabling technologies, as well as likely paradigm shifts in drug discovery, development, regulation and usage. In addition, they discussed the translation of these changes into the education of pharmaceutical scientists and the potential role of FIP. The outcome of this exercise could serve as a starting point for a scenario analysis of the future of pharmaceutical sciences and the challenges that await the pharmaceutical scientist.

  6. Learning radio astronomy by doing radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo Gallego, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is an educational program that allows high school and undergraduate students to control a 34 meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the internet. High-school teachers who join the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna as an educational resource. Also, teachers are provided with learning activities they can do with their students and focused on the classroom implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. PARTNeR provides students with firsthand experience in radio astronomy science. Thus, remote radio astronomical observations allow students to learn with a first rate scientific equipment the basics of radio astronomy research, aiming to arouse scientific careers and positive attitudes toward science. In this contribution we show the current observational programs and some recent results.

  7. NCSE's 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Ellen

    2016-07-08

    The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) held its 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change, on January 27-29, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Crystal City, VA. The National Conference: Energy and Climate Change developed and advanced partnerships that focused on transitioning the world to a new “low carbon” and “climate resilient” energy system. It emphasized advancing research and technology, putting ideas into action, and moving forward on policy and practice. More than 900 participants from the scientific research, policy and governance, business and civil society, and education communities attended. The Conference was organized around four themes: (1) a new energy system (including energy infrastructure, technologies and efficiencies, changes in distribution of energy sources, and low carbon transportation); (2) energy, climate and sustainable development; (3) financing and markets; and (4) achieving progress (including ideas for the 21st Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). The program featured six keynote presentations, six plenary sessions, 41 symposia and 20 workshops. Conference participants were involved in the 20 workshops, each on a specific energy and climate-related issue. The workshops were designed as interactive sessions, with each workshop generating 10-12 recommendations on the topic. The recommendations were prepared in the final conference report, were disseminated nationally, and continue to be available for public use. The conference also featured an exhibition and poster sessions. The National Conference on Energy and Climate Change addressed a wide range of issues specific to the U.S. Department of Energy’s programs; involved DOE’s scientists and program managers in sessions and workshops; and reached out to a broad array of DOE stakeholders.

  8. Methods and successes of New York University workshops for science graduate students and post-docs in science writing for general audiences (readers and radio listeners)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and science administrators often stress the importance of communication to the general public, but rarely develop educational infrastructures to achieve this goal. Since 2009, the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University has offered a series of basic and advanced writing workshops for graduate students and post-docs in NYU's eight scientific divisions (neuroscience, psychology, physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, anthropology, and computer science). The basic methodology of the NYU approach will be described, along with successful examples of both written and radio work by students that have been either published or broadcast by general interest journalism outlets.

  9. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Commemoration of the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 May 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), was held on 26 May 2010 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The session was devoted to the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii. The program announced on the web page of the RAS Physical Sciences Division (www.gpad.ac.ru) contained the following reports: (1) Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Current sheets and reconnection in the geomagnetic tail"; (2) Frank A G (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Dynamics of current sheets as the cause of flare events in magnetized plasmas"; (3) Kuznetsov V D (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space research on the Sun"; (4) Somov B V (Shternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Strong shock waves and extreme plasma states"; (5) Zybin K P (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Structure functions for developed turbulence"; (6) Ptuskin V S (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The origin of cosmic rays." Papers based on reports 1-4 and 6 are published in what follows. • Metastability of current sheets, L M Zelenyi, A V Artemyev, Kh V Malova, A A Petrukovich, R Nakamura Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 933-941 • Dynamics of current sheets underlying flare-type events in magnetized plasmas, A G Frank Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 941-947 • Space research of the Sun, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 947-954 • Magnetic reconnection in solar flares, B V Somov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 954-958 • The origin of cosmic rays, V S Ptuskin Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 958-961

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON THE CHANGING IDENTITY OF GRADUATE EARTH SCIENCE EDUCATION (ATLANTA, JANUARY 25-26, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEAVER, CHARLES E.

    DISCUSSED ARE THE CHANGING IDENTITY OF GRADUATE EARTH SCIENCE EDUCATION, THE FACTORS WHICH PRECIPITATED THESE CHANGES, AND THE RESULTING PROBLEMS. THE CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS INCLUDED EARTH SCIENTISTS WITH DIVERSE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUNDS FROM A BROAD GEOGRAPHICAL AREA. SPECIFIC TOPICS COVERED INCLUDED--(1) PRESENT DEVELOPMENTS AND FUTURE OF EARTH…

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Social Science Libraries and Geography and Map Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers presented on social science and map and geography libraries at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Information for the Developing World: NTIS's (National Technical Information Service) Role in Information Transfer to Developing Countries" (Joseph F. Caponio, United States); (2)…

  12. Resolution Adopted by the Ad Hoc Conference on Society and the Study of Science, Mathematics and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Journal of Science Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Presents resolution adopted by the Conference on Society and the Study of Science, Mathematics and Technology (SMT) which was held in Strasburg in November 1978. A list of measures recommended to the European Ministers of Education and some explanatory notes are also presented. (HM)

  13. Classroom Assessment in Mathematics: Views from a National Science Foundation Working Conference (Greensboro, North Carolina, May 16-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, George W., Ed.; Joyner, Jeane M., Ed.

    This document presents papers from a National Science Foundation (NSF) working conference to identify research issues and implementation strategies that support quality classroom assessment. Papers include: (1) "Understanding and Improving Classroom Assessment: Summary of Issues Raised" (George W. Bright and Jeane M. Joyner); (2) "Recommendations…

  14. Classroom Assessment in Mathematics: Views from a National Science Foundation Working Conference (Greensboro, North Carolina, May 16-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, George W., Ed.; Joyner, Jeane M., Ed.

    This document presents papers from a National Science Foundation (NSF) working conference to identify research issues and implementation strategies that support quality classroom assessment. Papers include: (1) "Understanding and Improving Classroom Assessment: Summary of Issues Raised" (George W. Bright and Jeane M. Joyner); (2) "Recommendations…

  15. The Science of Enhanced Student Engagement and Employability: Introducing the Psychology Stream of the Inaugural HEA STEM Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, Julie; Taylor, Jacqui; Davies, Mark N. O.; Banister, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Higher Education Academy (HEA) is committed to enhancing the quality of learning and teaching for all university students in the UK, and the inaugural conference for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, held in April 2012 at Imperial College, London, aimed to showcase research and evidence-based educational…

  16. Education in Library and Information Science. Proceedings of the International Conference (Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, May 21-26, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihel, Ivan, Ed.; Tudor-Silovic, Neva, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    An international conference attended by 59 participants from 12 countries was organized to present Yugoslavia as a case study to the international audience, to bring to the Yugoslav audience a variety of international experiences in library and information science education and training, and to acquaint participants with some of the new…

  17. Understanding Achievement in Science and Mathematics in Rural Schools. Conference Proceedings (Lexington, Kentucky, May 21-23, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Stephen A., Ed.

    The research base for science and mathematics education in rural school contexts is extremely limited. Education reform movements have generally been unresponsive to the unique qualities of rural schools, and many national and state reform leaders continue to ignore the importance of local contexts. A conference was held in May 2001 to identify a…

  18. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Social Science Libraries and Geography and Map Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers presented on social science and map and geography libraries at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Information for the Developing World: NTIS's (National Technical Information Service) Role in Information Transfer to Developing Countries" (Joseph F. Caponio, United States); (2)…

  19. Goals and Methods in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education in the Netherlands. Report of a Conference in the Framework of the OECD Project, 'Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krabbendam, Hans, Ed.; de Vries, Marc, Ed.

    The aim of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) project "Science, Mathematics, and Technology" is to formulate recommendations for educational policy. Preparations for the project were made in each of the various member countries. Reported here are the results of the Netherlands meeting. The conference and…

  20. Improving Science Instruction for Students with Disabilities: Proceedings. Working Conference on Science for Persons with Disabilities (Anaheim, California, March 28-29, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanich, Greg P.; Egelston-Dodd, Judy, Ed.

    This proceedings report includes papers presented at a conference on teaching science to students with disabilities. In the first paper, "Family Pedigrees: A Model Lesson Illustrating Strategies for Teaching Students with Disabilities in a Mainstreamed High School Biology Class" (Kathleen Ball and Edward C. Keller, Jr.), strategies are described…

  1. MGS Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Martian Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, Stephen W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Martian electron density profiles provided by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment over the 95-200 km altitude range indicate that the height of the electron peak and the longitudinal structure of the peak height are sensitive indicators of the physical state of the Mars lower atmosphere. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation profiles, all at high solar zenith angles (SZA). Variations spanning 2-Martian years are investigated near aphelion conditions at high Northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N). A mean ionospheric peak height of 133.5-135 km was obtained for all aphelion profiles near SZA = 78-82; a corresponding mean peak density of 7.3-8.5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm was also measured, reflecting solar moderate conditions. Strong wave 2-3 oscillations in peak heights were observed as a function of longitude over both Martian seasons. The Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) is exercised for Mars aphelion conditions. The measured interannual variations in the mean and longitude structure of the peak heights are small (consistent with MTGCM simulations), signifying the repeatability of the Mars atmosphere during aphelion conditions. A non-migrating (semi-diurnal period, wave#l eastward propagating) tidal mode is likely responsible for the wave#3 longitude features identified. The height of this photochemically driven peak can be observed to provide an ongoing monitor of the changing state of the Mars lower atmosphere. The magnitudes of these same peaks may reflect more than changing solar EUV fluxes when they are located in the vicinity of Mars crustal magnetic field centers.

  2. MGS Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Martian Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Martian electron density profiles provided by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment over the 95-200 km altitude range indicate what the height of the electron peak and the longitudinal structure of the peak height are sensitive indicators of the physical state of the Mars lower and upper atmospheres. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation profiles, all at high solar zenith angles (SZA). Variations spanning 2 Martian years are investigated near aphelion conditions at high northern latitudes (64.7 - 77.6 N) making use of four of these data sets. A mean ionospheric peak height of 133.5 - 135 km is obtained near SZA = 78 - 82 deg.; a corresponding mean peak density of 7.3 - 8.5 x l0(exp 4)/ qu cm is also measured during solar moderate conditions at Mars. Strong wave number 2 - 3 oscillations in peak heights are consistently observed as a function of longitude over the 2 Martian years. These observed ionospheric features are remarkably similar during aphelion conditions 1 Martian year apart. This year-to-year repeatability in the thermosphere-ionosphere structure is consistent with that observed in multiyear aphelion temperature data of the Mars lower atmosphere. Coupled Mars general circulation model (MGCM) and Mars thermospheric general circulation model (MTGCM) codes are run for Mars aphelion conditions, yielding mean and longitude variable ionospheric peak heights that reasonably match RS observations. A tidal decomposition of MTGCM thermospheric densities shows that observed ionospheric wave number 3 features are linked to a non-migrating tidal mode with semidiurnal period (sigma = 2) and zonal wave number 1 (s = -1) characteristics. The height of this photochemically determined ionospheric peak should be monitored regularly.

  3. MGS Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Martian Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, Stephen W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Martian electron density profiles provided by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment over the 95-200 km altitude range indicate that the height of the electron peak and the longitudinal structure of the peak height are sensitive indicators of the physical state of the Mars lower atmosphere. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation profiles, all at high solar zenith angles (SZA). Variations spanning 2-Martian years are investigated near aphelion conditions at high Northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N). A mean ionospheric peak height of 133.5-135 km was obtained for all aphelion profiles near SZA = 78-82; a corresponding mean peak density of 7.3-8.5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm was also measured, reflecting solar moderate conditions. Strong wave 2-3 oscillations in peak heights were observed as a function of longitude over both Martian seasons. The Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) is exercised for Mars aphelion conditions. The measured interannual variations in the mean and longitude structure of the peak heights are small (consistent with MTGCM simulations), signifying the repeatability of the Mars atmosphere during aphelion conditions. A non-migrating (semi-diurnal period, wave#l eastward propagating) tidal mode is likely responsible for the wave#3 longitude features identified. The height of this photochemically driven peak can be observed to provide an ongoing monitor of the changing state of the Mars lower atmosphere. The magnitudes of these same peaks may reflect more than changing solar EUV fluxes when they are located in the vicinity of Mars crustal magnetic field centers.

  4. MGS Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Martian Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Martian electron density profiles provided by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment over the 95-200 km altitude range indicate what the height of the electron peak and the longitudinal structure of the peak height are sensitive indicators of the physical state of the Mars lower and upper atmospheres. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation profiles, all at high solar zenith angles (SZA). Variations spanning 2 Martian years are investigated near aphelion conditions at high northern latitudes (64.7 - 77.6 N) making use of four of these data sets. A mean ionospheric peak height of 133.5 - 135 km is obtained near SZA = 78 - 82 deg.; a corresponding mean peak density of 7.3 - 8.5 x l0(exp 4)/ qu cm is also measured during solar moderate conditions at Mars. Strong wave number 2 - 3 oscillations in peak heights are consistently observed as a function of longitude over the 2 Martian years. These observed ionospheric features are remarkably similar during aphelion conditions 1 Martian year apart. This year-to-year repeatability in the thermosphere-ionosphere structure is consistent with that observed in multiyear aphelion temperature data of the Mars lower atmosphere. Coupled Mars general circulation model (MGCM) and Mars thermospheric general circulation model (MTGCM) codes are run for Mars aphelion conditions, yielding mean and longitude variable ionospheric peak heights that reasonably match RS observations. A tidal decomposition of MTGCM thermospheric densities shows that observed ionospheric wave number 3 features are linked to a non-migrating tidal mode with semidiurnal period (sigma = 2) and zonal wave number 1 (s = -1) characteristics. The height of this photochemically determined ionospheric peak should be monitored regularly.

  5. From Research to Radio: How to Talk to a Science Reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. C.

    2006-12-01

    While there can be misunderstanding between scientists and journalists in communicating scientific research and, in particular, the realities of climate change, the communication gulf is wider between scientists/journalists and the public. Scientists may not be aware just how a journalist decides when and how to report on scientific research so that it might have an impact on the audience since these considerations are not those made when writing a paper for scientists' peers - or, in turn, how scientists can work with reporters to communicate more effectively the significance of their work. For example, polls have shown that while the majority of the American public is aware of climate change, they feel no urgency about it, or feel helpless as to how to respond. A newspaper article that includes new research into increased melt of Artic glaciers, that also includes the relevance the changes have to the individual living outside the Arctic, and how the public might take action, may help scientists break through the psychological barrier that prevents the public from absorbing the consequences of a changing climate. It is also important that scientists describe their research in language that a lay public can understand, without the jargon familiar only to scientists within a particular circle of research. In this talk I will describe my experience reporting on science and climate change for the BBC as to what frustrations reporters have in interviewing scientists, what misconceptions scientists may have about how journalism work, and what scientists should keep in mind when talking to reporters so that both groups can work together to communicate more effectively to the public. I will include audio examples from my radio work, whose concepts are relevant also to other media.

  6. Disciplinarity and sport science in Europe: A statistical and sociological study of ECSS conference abstracts.

    PubMed

    Champely, Stéphane; Fargier, Patrick; Camy, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Abstracts of European College of Sports Science conferences (1995-2014) are studied. The number of abstracts has been increasing regularly (+90 per year). This rise is in recent years largely due to extra-European countries. The magnitude and accumulation of the different topics of discussion are examined. An operational criterion determines four stages of evolution of a topic: social network, cluster, specialty, and discipline. The scientific production can, therefore, be classified as disciplinary or non-disciplinary. The disciplinary part is more important but has been less dynamic recently. The cognitive content of sport science is then explored through a multidimensional scaling of the topics based on the keywords used in the abstracts. Three areas are visible: social sciences and humanities, sports medicine and physiology, and biomechanics and neurophysiology. According to the field theory of Bourdieu ( 1975 ), three scientific habitus are distinguished. The logic of academic disciplinary excellence is the consequence of the autonomy of this scientific field, its closure, peer-review process, and barriers to entry. The distribution of scientific capital and professional capital is unequal across the three areas. Basically, conservation strategies of academic disciplinary excellence are predicted in biomechanics and neurophysiology, subversion strategies of interdisciplinarity based on professional concerns can appear in the sports medicine and physiology area, and critical strategies of interdisciplinarity based on social utility in social sciences and humanities. Moreover, additional tensions within these areas are depicted. Lastly methods based on co-citations of disciplines and boundary objects are proposed to find tangible patterns of multidisciplinarity confirming these strategies.

  7. STEM on the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  8. Abstracts: Papers to be Presented at the Joint Conference for Social Studies of Science (4S) and the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) Amsterdam, 16-19 November 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents about 200 abstracts of papers presented at the joint conference of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) Amsterdam, 16-19 November 1988. (YP)

  9. 2011 X-Ray Science Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Colby, College. Waterville, ME)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Stephenson

    2011-08-12

    The 2011 Gordon Research Conference on X-ray Science will feature forefront x-ray-based science enabled by the rapid improvements in synchrotron and x-ray laser sources. Across the world, x-ray sources are playing an increasingly important role in physics, materials, chemistry, and biology, expanding into ever broadening areas of science and engineering. With the first hard x-ray free electron laser source beginning operation and with other advanced x-ray sources operational and planned, it is a very exciting and pivotal time for exchange ideas about the future of x-ray science and applications. The Conference will provide the forum for this interaction. An international cast of speakers will illuminate sessions on ultrafast science, coherence, imaging, in situ studies, extreme conditions, new developments in optics, sources, and detectors, inelastic scattering, nanoscience, life science, and energy sciences. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of these areas, and will provide a venue for young scientists entering a career in x-ray research to present their research in poster format, hold discussions in a friendly setting, and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with ample time for discussion as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to exchange ideas about forefront x-ray techniques and will promote cross-fertilization between the various research areas represented.

  10. Art, Science & Visual Literacy: Selected Readings from the Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (24th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, September 30-October 4, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Roberts A., Ed.; And Others

    Following an introductory paper on Pittsburgh and the arts, 57 conference papers are presented under the following four major categories: (1) "Imagery, Science and the Arts," including discovery in art and science, technology and art, visual design of newspapers, multimedia science education, science learning and interactive videodisc technology,…

  11. Art, Science & Visual Literacy: Selected Readings from the Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association (24th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, September 30-October 4, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Roberts A., Ed.; And Others

    Following an introductory paper on Pittsburgh and the arts, 57 conference papers are presented under the following four major categories: (1) "Imagery, Science and the Arts," including discovery in art and science, technology and art, visual design of newspapers, multimedia science education, science learning and interactive videodisc technology,…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Minneapolis, MN, January 8-11, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A., Ed.; Rye, James A., Ed.

    The 40 papers from this international conference addressed the major theme of facilitating science literacy for all teachers and students. Papers include the following: (1) "Confronting the Gender Gap in Science and Mathematics: The Sisters in Science Program" (P. Hammrich); (2) Teaching Instructional Materials for Science Educators with…

  13. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  14. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  15. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  16. Cutting-edge science and coffee: Auditory System Gordon Research Conference and Seminar 2012 report.

    PubMed

    Slee, Sean J; Coffin, Allison B

    2013-02-01

    At the third Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar on the Auditory System (2012), investigators from all career stages reported on emerging research in a broad range of sub-fields. A distinguishing feature of these conferences is their attention to junior investigators, and their experience is the focus of this conference report.

  17. The Calm Methane Northern Seas of Titan from Cassini Radio Science Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; French, Richard G.; Wong, Kwok; Anabtawi, Aseel; Schinder, Paul J.; Cassini Radio Science Team

    2016-10-01

    We report on results from 3 bistatic scattering observations of Titan northern seas conducted by the Cassini spacecraft in 2014 ( flybys T101, T102, and T106). The onboard Radio Science instrument transmits 3 sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelengths. The spacecraft is continuously maneuvered to point in incidence direction so that mirror-like reflections from Titan's surface are observed at the ground stations of the NASA Deep Space Network. The corresponding ground-track in all 3 cases crossed different regions of Kraken Mare, and in the case of T101 also crossed Ligeia Mare. A nearly pure sinusoidal reflected signal was clearly detectable in the observed echoes spectra over surface regions identified in the Cassini RADAR images as potential liquid regions. Weaker quasi-specular echoes were also evident over some intermediate dry land and near sea shores. Cassini transmits right-circularly-polarized (RCP) signals and both the RCP and LCP echo components are observed. Their spectral shape, bandwidth, and total power are the observables used to infer/constrain physical surface properties. Presented results are limited to the 3.6 cm wavelength signal which has the largest SNR. The remarkably preserved sinusoidal echo spectral shape and the little detectable Doppler broadening strongly suggest surface that is smooth on scales large compared to 3.6 cm. If long wavelength gravity waves are present, they must be very subtle. The measured RCP/LCP echo power ratio provides direct measurement of the surface dielectric constant and is diagnostic of the liquid composition. The power ratio measurements eliminate possible significant ethane contribution and strongly imply predominantly liquid methane and nitrogen composition. Carefully calibrated measurements of the absolute echo power and the inferred dielectric constant constrain the presence of any capillary waves of wavelength << 3.6 cm. The latter affect wave coherence across the Fresnel region, reducing the

  18. Testing general relativity with the BepiColombo radio science experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Vokrouhlický, David; Villani, Daniela; Bonanno, Claudio; Rossi, Alessandro

    2002-10-01

    The ESA mission BepiColombo will explore the planet Mercury with equipment allowing an extremely accurate tracking. While determining its orbit around Mercury, it will be possible to indirectly observe the motion of its center of mass, with an accuracy several orders of magnitude better than what is possible by radar ranging to the planet's surface. This is an opportunity to conduct a relativity experiment which will be a modern version of the traditional tests of general relativity, based upon Mercury's perihelion advance and the relativistic light propagation near the Sun. We define the mathematical methods to be used to extract from the data of the BepiColombo mission, as presently designed, the best constraints on the main post-Newtonian parameters, especially β,γ and the Nordtvedt parameter η, but also the dynamic oblateness of the Sun J2solar and the preferred frame parameters α1,α2. We have performed a full cycle simulation of the BepiColombo radio science experiments, including this relativity experiment, with the purpose of assessing in a realistic (as opposed to formal) way the accuracy achievable on each parameter of interest. For γ the best constraint can be obtained by means of a dedicated superior conjunction experiment, with a realistic accuracy ~=2×10-6. For β the main problem is the very strong correlation with J2solar if the Nordtvedt relationship η=4β-γ-3 is used, as it is legitimate in the metric theories of gravitation, a realistic accuracy of ~=2×10-6 for β and ~=2×10-9 for J2solar can be achieved, while η itself is constrained within ~=10-5. If the preferred frame parameters α1,α2 are included in the analysis, they can be constrained within ~=8×10-6 and ~=10-6, respectively, at the price of some degradation in β, J2solar and η. It is also possible to test the change with time of the gravitational constant G, but the results are severely limited because of the problems of absolute calibration of the ranging transponder, to

  19. Conference on the Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, 3rd, University of Sydney, Australia, February 11-15, 1985, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, D. G.; McNamara, L. F.

    1985-12-01

    Various papers on the ionosphere and radio wave propagation are presented. The subjects discussed include: day-to-day variability in foF2 at low latitudes over a solar cycle; semiempirical, low-latitude ionospheric model; remote sensing with the Jindalee skywave radar; photographic approach to irregularities in the 80-100 km region; interference of radio waves in a CW system; study of the F-region characteristics at Waltair; recent developments in the international reference ionosphere; research-oriented ionosonde with directional capabilities; and ionospheric forecasting for specific applications. Also addressed are: experimental and theoretical techniques for the equatorial F region; empirical models of ionospheric electron concentration; the Jindalee ionospheric sounding system; a semiempirical midlatitude ionospheric model; Es structure using an HF radar; short-term variations in f0F2 and IEC; nonreciprocity in Omega propagation observed at middle latitudes; propagation management for no acknowledge HF links; new techniques in ionospheric sounding and studies; and lunar effects in the ionospheric F region.

  20. A solar wind turbulence event during the Voyager 1978 solar conjunction profiled via new DSN radio science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.; Conteas, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    A radio science data capability within the DSN Tracking System is described. This capability consists of routine provision of phase fluctuation data concurrently computed over several different time scales. This capability was used to observe phase fluctuation spectral characteristics during a rapid increase in solar wind turbulence that occurred during a July 23, 1978 track of the Voyager 1 spacecraft by Deep Space Station 11. It is suggested that the capability will prove useful in studies of variations of solar wind phase fluctuation spectral characteristics with, for instance, parameters such as the solar cycle and radial distance.

  1. News Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

  2. The Structure of the Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, S. A.; Häusler, B.; Pätzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Tyler, G. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa is sounding the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using the spacecraft radio subsystem in the oneway radio link mode. An Ultrastable Oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard frequency reference source for the derivation of electron density profiles in the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere. The measurement configuration allows an altitude resolution of only a few hundred metres from the cloud deck at about 40 km to approximately 100 km. Three occultation seasons could be covered in the first two years of the Venus Express mission resulting in a data set of about 140 profiles of the neutral atmosphere. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Special attention will be given to day-night variations of the thermal structure and the temperature distribution at high polar latitudes on both hemispheres ("cold collar region") and signal absorption effects caused by the H2SO4 vapour.

  3. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Performance and Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Bird, M. K.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft payload contained the Radio Science Experiment (REX) for determining key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the July 14, 2015, flyby of the Pluto/Charon system. The REX flight equipment augments the NH X-band radio transceiver by providing a high precision, narrow band recording of high power uplink transmissions from Earth stations, as well as a record of broadband radiometric power. This presentation will review the performance and initial results of two high- priority observations. First, REX received two pair of 20-kW signals, one pair per polarization, transmitted from the DSN at 4.2-cm wavelength during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. REX recorded these uplink signals and determined precise measurement of the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius of Pluto. The ingress portion of one polarization was played back from the spacecraft in July and processed to obtain the pressure and temperature structure of Pluto's atmosphere. Second, REX measured the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2- cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the night side are visible. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of one-tenth Pluto's disk and temperature resolution of 0.1 K. Occultation and radiometric temperature results presented here will encompass additional data scheduled for playback in September.

  4. Structure of the Venus neutral atmosphere as observed by the Radio Science experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Bird, Michael K.; Tyler, G. Leonard

    2009-04-01

    The European Space Agency Venus Express Radio Science experiment (VeRa) obtained 118 radio occultation measurements of the Venusian atmosphere between July 2006 and June 2007. Southern latitudes are uniformly sampled; measurements in the northern hemisphere are concentrated near the pole. Radial profiles of neutral number density derived from the occultations cover the altitude range 40-90 km, which are converted to profiles of temperature (T) and pressure (p) versus height (h). Profiles of static stability are found to be latitude-dependent and nearly adiabatic in the middle cloud region. Below the clouds the stability decreases at high latitudes. At an altitude of 65 km, the VeRa T[p(h)] profiles generally lie between the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) and VIRA-2 models; the retrieved temperatures at any given pressure level typically are within 5 K of those derived from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Radio Occultation experiments. A large equator-to-pole temperature contrast of ˜30 K is found at the 1-bar (1000 hPa) level. The VeRa observations reveal a distinct cold collar region in the southern hemisphere, complementing that in the north. At the latitudes of the cold collars, the tropopause altitude increases relative to higher and lower latitudes by ≈7 km while the temperature drops roughly 60 K. The observations indicate the existence of a wave number 2 structure poleward of ±75° latitude at altitudes of 62 km.

  5. [Intervention of psychological and ethical professionals of human science in obstetrical morbidity and mortality conferences].

    PubMed

    Clavel, B; Dupont, C; Perrotin, C; Barbier, A; Blaise Kopp, F; Gaucher, J; Branger, B; Winer, N; Lansac, J; Morin, X; Dubois, C; Deiber, M; Saliba, E; Rudigoz, R-C; Colin, C

    2013-06-01

    To identify the defence mechanisms manifested by medical staff which could disturb the decision making, revealed by professionals of human science (PHS) in morbidity and mortality conferences (MMC). Application of two methods of psychological intervention in MMC, conducted between March 1st, 2009 and November 30, 2010, in 20 randomized maternity among five perinatal networks: the method of inter-active problem solving targeted at the functioning of the teams and the method for developing professional practice centred on individual. The data collection was realized during analyse of case in MMC, with note-taking by two pair PHS. The oral expressions of RMM' participant were secondarily re-written, analyzed and classed by theme. Fifty-four MMC were performed. The mechanisms of defence have been identified by PHS intervention in MMC: denial of situation, pact of denegation, rift and overprotection. They were be identified by two PHS intervention methods, this consolidates these results. This intervention began staff medical to transformation at different level, in particular to improve the capacity of cooperation. The identification of the mechanisms of defence in MMC enables staff medical to improve communication and quality relationship between healthcare professionals. This could constitute an actual factor of practices improvement. However, complementary studies must be performed to confirm this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 21st, Houston, TX, Mar. 12-16, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham (Editor); Sharpton, Virgil L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on lunar and planetary science discusses the geology and geophysics of Venus; the lunar highlands and regolith; magmatic processes of the moon and meteorites; remote sensing of the moon and Mars; chondrites, cosmic dust, and comets; ammonia-water mixtures; and the evolution of volcanism, tectonics, and volatiles on Mars. Attention is given to volcanism on Venus, pristine moon rocks, the search for Crisium Basin ejecta, Apollo 14 glasses, lunar anorthosites, the sources of mineral fragments in impact melts 15445 and 15455, and argon adsorption in the lunar atmosphere. Also discussed are high-pressure experiments on magnesian eucrite compositions, the early results of thermal diffusion in metal-sulfide liquids, preliminary results of imaging spectroscopy of the Humorum Basin region of the moon, high-resolution UV-visible spectroscopy of lunar red spots, and a radar-echo model for Mars. Other topics addressed include nitrogen isotopic signatures in the Acapulco Meteorite, tridymite and maghemite formation in an Fe-SiO smoke, and the enigma of mottled terrain on Mars.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 21st, Houston, TX, Mar. 12-16, 1990, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, G.; Sharpton, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on lunar and planetary science discusses the geology and geophysics of Venus; the lunar highlands and regolith; magmatic processes of the moon and meteorites; remote sensing of the moon and Mars; chondrites, cosmic dust, and comets; ammonia-water mixtures; and the evolution of volcanism, tectonics, and volatiles on Mars. Attention is given to volcanism on Venus, pristine moon rocks, the search for Crisium Basin ejecta, Apollo 14 glasses, lunar anorthosites, the sources of mineral fragments in impact melts 15445 and 15455, and argon adsorption in the lunar atmosphere. Also discussed are high-pressure experiments on magnesian eucrite compositions, the early results of thermal diffusion in metal-sulfide liquids, preliminary results of imaging spectroscopy of the Humorum Basin region of the moon, high-resolution UV-visible spectroscopy of lunar red spots, and a radar-echo model for Mars. Other topics addressed include nitrogen isotopic signatures in the Acapulco Meteorite, tridymite and maghemite formation in an Fe-SiO smoke, and the enigma of mottled terrain on Mars.

  8. Girls And Science And Technology (GASAT). Contributions to the Conference (1st, Eindhaven, The Netherlands, November 9-13, 1981). Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raat, Jan H.; And Others

    This document contains the full text of 21 papers presented at an international conference on Girls And Science And Technology (GASAT). They include: "Women in Science and Engineering: A Case of Awareness and Encouragement" (Mary Anderson); "A Multi-phased Program for Recruiting Southern Women into Science Based on Extensive Media Use and…

  9. The 6th International Conference on Computer Science and Computational Mathematics (ICCSCM 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-09-01

    The ICCSCM 2017 (The 6th International Conference on Computer Science and Computational Mathematics) has aimed to provide a platform to discuss computer science and mathematics related issues including Algebraic Geometry, Algebraic Topology, Approximation Theory, Calculus of Variations, Category Theory; Homological Algebra, Coding Theory, Combinatorics, Control Theory, Cryptology, Geometry, Difference and Functional Equations, Discrete Mathematics, Dynamical Systems and Ergodic Theory, Field Theory and Polynomials, Fluid Mechanics and Solid Mechanics, Fourier Analysis, Functional Analysis, Functions of a Complex Variable, Fuzzy Mathematics, Game Theory, General Algebraic Systems, Graph Theory, Group Theory and Generalizations, Image Processing, Signal Processing and Tomography, Information Fusion, Integral Equations, Lattices, Algebraic Structures, Linear and Multilinear Algebra; Matrix Theory, Mathematical Biology and Other Natural Sciences, Mathematical Economics and Financial Mathematics, Mathematical Physics, Measure Theory and Integration, Neutrosophic Mathematics, Number Theory, Numerical Analysis, Operations Research, Optimization, Operator Theory, Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Potential Theory, Real Functions, Rings and Algebras, Statistical Mechanics, Structure Of Matter, Topological Groups, Wavelets and Wavelet Transforms, 3G/4G Network Evolutions, Ad-Hoc, Mobile, Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing, Agent Computing & Multi-Agents Systems, All topics related Image/Signal Processing, Any topics related Computer Networks, Any topics related ISO SC-27 and SC- 17 standards, Any topics related PKI(Public Key Intrastructures), Artifial Intelligences(A.I.) & Pattern/Image Recognitions, Authentication/Authorization Issues, Biometric authentication and algorithms, CDMA/GSM Communication Protocols, Combinatorics, Graph Theory, and Analysis of Algorithms, Cryptography and Foundation of Computer Security, Data Base(D.B.) Management & Information

  10. News Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western Australian Science Education Association (19th, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, November 18, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Leonie J., Ed.

    The Western Australian Science Education Association is an informal group which meets annually for a conference. This document contains the proceedings of the 1994 conference. Papers included were: (1) "Relationship Between Cognitive Style and Students' Proportional Reasoning Ability" (Ayo Akatugba); (2) "Alternative Modes of…

  12. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2015-06-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015), was held at The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali on 31 January - 1 February 2015. The ScieTech 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. ScieTech 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics. As we already know that science and technology have brought tremendous benefits for human civilization. People are becoming healthier, wealthier, better educated, more peaceful, increasingly connected, and living longer. Of course, science and technology provide many answers to global challenges, but we will face more complex problems in the next decade due to increasing world population, limitation of energy, and climate change. Therefore, researchers should be more active in conducting research that enables collaboration between one and the others. Interdisciplinary cooperation is absolutely necessary in order to create a smart system for solving the global problems. We need a global and general long-term view of the future with long-range goals for solving complex problems in next decade. Therefore the conference was held to be a forum for researchers from different disciplines to start collaborating and conducting research that provides a solution to the global issues. The theme of ScieTech 2015 was ''The interdisciplinary Application between Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics to enhance the Quality of Life''. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting conference program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 197 papers and after rigorous review, 59 papers were accepted. The participants came from 19

  13. NIH State-of-the-Science Conference Statement on cesarean delivery on maternal request.

    PubMed

    To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of currently available data on cesarean delivery on maternal request. A non-DHHS, nonadvocate 18-member panel representing the fields of obstetrics and gynecology, preventive medicine, biometrics, family planning and reproductive physiology, nurse midwifery, anesthesiology, patient safety, epidemiology, pediatrics, perinatal medicine, urology, urogynecology, general nursing, inner city public health sciences, law, psychiatry, and health services research. In addition, 18 experts from pertinent fields presented data to the panel and conference audience. Presentations by experts and a systematic review of the literature prepared by the RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center, through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Scientific evidence was given precedence over anecdotal experience. The panel drafted its statement based on scientific evidence presented in open forum and on published scientific literature. The draft statement was presented on the final day of the conference and circulated to the audience for comment. The panel released a revised statement later that day at http://consensus.nih.gov. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal Government. The incidence of cesarean delivery without medical or obstetric indications is increasing in the United States, and a component of this increase is cesarean delivery on maternal request. Given the tools available, the magnitude of this component is difficult to quantify. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate fully the benefits and risks of cesarean delivery on maternal request as compared to planned vaginal delivery, and more research is needed. Until quality evidence becomes available, any decision to perform a cesarean delivery on maternal request should be carefully individualized and consistent with

  14. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Science 2015 (AeroEarth 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2016-02-01

    The 3rd International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospaces and Earth Sciences 2015 (AeroEarth 2015), was held at The DoubleTree Hilton, Jakarta, Indonesia during 26 - 27 September 2015. The 1st AeoroEarth was held succefully in Jakarta in 2013. The success continued to The 2nd AeroEarth 2014 that was held in Kuta Bali, Indonesia. The publications were published by EES IOP in http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/19/1 and http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/23/1 respectively. The AeroEarth 2015 conference aims to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. Through research and development, Earth's scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. The theme of AeroEarth 2015 is ''Earth and Aerospace Sciences : Challenges and Opportunities'' Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 78 papers and after rigorous review, 18 papers were accepted. The participants

  15. The Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences, 1955-1981: a retrospective look at a program providing interactive continuing medical education at a distance.

    PubMed

    Tulgan, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite early widespread recognition of the necessity of continuing medical education (CME) for practicing physicians and surgeons, medical schools and national medical organizations were slow to mobilize to address the need. One pioneering program, developed by the Albany Medical College in New York, not only provided CME, but did so in a live distance education format that allowed for interaction between the participants and the faculty presenters. The Albany Program commenced in 1955 using what was then state-of-the-art technology; it exemplified principles and practices that can be seen as the precursors for the distance education approaches used to reach physicians today. This short article describes the contributions of the Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences and places them in the context of developments in national organizations and policies in the 20th century. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  16. Exploring the Proposition of a Joint Conference between State Science, and Technology and Engineering Education Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Loveland, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this article the authors collected numerous forms of data to better understand the perceptions of a joint conference from the various stakeholders. From the detailed survey and interview responses, the researchers found that administrators/supervisors had fewer reservations in regards to holding a joint conference. One reason for this may due…

  17. Continued development of the radio science technique as a tool for planetary and solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A possible alternative to a spacecraft monostatic radar system for surface studies of Titan is introduced. The results of a short study of the characteristics of a bistatic radar investigation of Titan's surface, presented in terms of the Voyager 1 flyby and a proposed Galileo orbiter of Saturn are outlined. The critical factors which need to be addressed in order to optimize the radio occultation technique for the study of clouds and cloud regions in planetary atmospheres are outlined. Potential improvements in the techniques for measuring small-scale structures in planetary atmospheres and ionospheres are addressed. The development of a technique for vastly improving the radial resolution from the radio occultation measurements of the rings of Saturn is discussed.

  18. Lightning detection from Space Science and Applications Team review. [optical and radio frequency sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Few, A. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The various needs for lightning data that exist among potential users of satellite lightning data were identified and systems were defined which utilize the optical and radio frequency radiations from lightning to serve as the satellite based lightning mapper. Three teams worked interactively with NASA to develop a system concept. An assessment of the results may be summarized as follows: (1) a small sensor system can be easily designed to operate on a geostationary satellite that can provide the bulk of the real time user requirements; (2) radio frequency systems in space may be feasible but would be much larger and more costly; RF technology for this problem lags the optical technology by years; and (3) a hybrid approach (optical in space and RF on the ground) would provide the most complete information but is probably unreasonably complex and costly at this time.

  19. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (14th, Portland, Oregon, May 31-June 2, 2007) and State of the Science Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swart, Sandra, Ed.; Friesen, Barbara, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The State of the Science conference was held in May, 2007 as part of the ongoing series of national conferences, "Building on Family Strengths," conducted by the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health at Portland State University. The theme of this State-of-the Science conference was "Effective…

  20. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (14th, Portland, Oregon, May 31-June 2, 2007) and State of the Science Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swart, Sandra, Ed.; Friesen, Barbara, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The State of the Science conference was held in May, 2007 as part of the ongoing series of national conferences, "Building on Family Strengths," conducted by the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health at Portland State University. The theme of this State-of-the Science conference was "Effective…

  1. PREFACE: The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Soewito, Benfano

    2015-01-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014), was held at Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel, Kuta, Bali, Indonesia during 11 - 12 October 2014. The AeroEarth 2014 conference aims to bring together researchers and engineers from around the world. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 98 papers and after rigorous review, 17 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There are four Parallel Sessions and two invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee

  2. The Conference on Corporate Interference with Science and Health: fracking, food and wireless: genesis, rationale, and results.

    PubMed

    Kopald, Deborah E

    2013-01-01

    A number of serious environmental health hazards created by under-regulated/unregulated industries have morphed into public health crises around the world. The Conference on Corporate Interference with Science and Health (the Conference) was held to examine this trend in three economically significant industries: fracking, food, and wireless. The Conference provided an overview of the structures of these three industries and the history of standard-setting therein, identified the sources of environmental exposures created by these industries, and surveyed the health consequences of these exposures and the policies that have resulted in them. It then examined corporate influence on the setting of these policies and the production of scientific studies and interpretation of their results. The Conference also analyzed the general influence of corporations on the political system and the relationship of this conflict of interest to the aforementioned topics. The concluding discussion focused on what solutions could be implemented to improve public health, including what institutional changes are necessary to promote public awareness and change policy.

  3. Translating Science into Survival: Report on the Inaugural International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference.

    PubMed

    Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    The inaugural International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference, cohosted by the Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT), and the European Academy of Tumor Immunology (EATI), was held in New York City on September 16–19, 2015. The conference brought together nearly 1,400 scientists, clinicians, regulators, patient advocates, and other stakeholders to discuss the latest scientific developments in cancer immunology and immunotherapy, as well as the regulatory hurdles facing new drug development. This conference report summarizes the main themes that emerged during the 4-day meeting.

  4. Ionopause features of Mars as observed by the radio science experiment MaRS on Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, K.; Pätzold, M.; Häusler, B.; Tellmann, S.; Tyler, G. L.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The ionopause of a planet is defined as the boundary between the ionosphere and the solar wind regime. It was first described for Venus when a sharp decrease in electron density towards very small values was found at certain altitudes. So far, the ionopause at Mars has not been well observed. One reason is that the noise of the Viking profiles was relatively high and did not drop below 500 el/cc. The MGS data base is inconclusive concerning the ionopause. The highly elliptical orbit of Mars Express allows us to investigate the electron density of Mars up to an altitude of about 1500 km. The Radio Science Experiment MaRS sounded the Martian atmosphere and ionosphere during four occultation seasons starting from April 2004. During a measurement the spacecraft disappears behind the planetary disk of Mars as seen from the Earth. The uplink (X-band, 7100 MHz) and downlink (X-band 8400 MHz, S-band 2300 MHz) radio signals travel through the ionosphere and atmosphere of Mars from the top at about 1500 km altitude down to the surface. The bending of the radio carrier ray paths in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere of Mars prior to the occultation offers the possibility to receive altitude profiles of the electron density in the ionosphere. So far, more than 400 vertical profiles of the ionospheric electron density could be derived covering all planetary latitudes and almost all local times of the northern hemisphere. On the basis of these data we want to define the ionopause feature at Mars as an electron density gradient starting well above the topside ionospheric main peak, tending to decrease the electron density towards noisy values around zero. This presentation will show the high variability of the ionopause structures of Mars.

  5. 2nd Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean (RADIO 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    It was an honor and a great pleasure for all those involved in its organization to welcome the participants to the ''Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean'' (RADIO 2014) international conference that was held from 7th to 10th April 2014 at the Sugar Beach Resort, Wolmar, Flic-en-Flac, Mauritius. RADIO 2014 is the second of a series of conferences organized in the Indian Ocean region. The aim of the conference is to discuss recent developments, theories and practical applications covering the whole scope of radio-frequency engineering, including radio waves, antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility. The RADIO international conference emerged following discussions with engineers and scientists from the countries of the Indian Ocean as well as from other parts of the world and a need was felt for the organization of such an event in this region. Following numerous requests, the Island of Mauritius, worldwide known for its white sandy beaches and pleasant tropical atmosphere, was again chosen for the organization of the 2nd RADIO international conference. The conference was organized by the Radio Society, Mauritius and the Local Organizing Committee consisted of scientists from SUPELEC, France, the University of Mauritius, and the University of Technology, Mauritius. We would like to take the opportunity to thank all people, institutions and companies that made the event such a success. We are grateful to our gold sponsors CST and FEKO as well as URSI for their generous support which enabled us to partially support one PhD student and two scientists to attend the conference. We would also like to thank IEEE-APS and URSI for providing technical co-sponsorship. More than hundred and thirty abstracts were submitted to the conference. They were peer-reviewed by an international scientific committee and, based on the reviews, either accepted, eventually after revision, or rejected. RADIO 2014 brought together participants from twenty countries spanning

  6. The Structure of the Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, S.; Häusler, B.; Pätzold, M.; Bird, M.; Tyler, G. L.

    2008-09-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa uses one-way radio signals at X-band (8.4 GHz) and S-band (2.3 GHz) for the sounding of the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere. Three occultation seasons could be covered during the nominal mission of Venus Express resulting in a data set of about 118 profiles of the neutral atmosphere. Another three occultation seasons are planned during the extended mission. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at a large range of planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Radial profiles of neutral number density derived from the occultations cover the altitude range 40-90 km, which are converted to vertical profiles of temperature and pressure. Profiles of static stability are found to be latitude-dependent and nearly adiabatic in the middle cloud region. Below the clouds the stability decreases at high latitudes. A large equator-to-pole temperature contrast of approximately 30 K is found at the 1-bar level. A distinct cold collar region could be observed on both hemispheres. At the latitudes of the cold collars, the tropopause altitude increases relative to higher and lower latitudes, while the temperature drops roughly 60 K. The observations indicate the existence of a wave number 2 structure polewards of ±75° latitude at altitudes of about 60 km.

  7. Voyager 2 radio science observations of the uranian system: atmosphere, rings, and satellites.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Hinson, D P; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Marouf, E A; Simpson, R A

    1986-07-04

    Voyager 2 radio occultation measurements of the Uranian atmosphere were obtained between 2 and 7 degrees south latitude. Initial atmospheric temperature profiles extend from pressures of 10 to 900 millibars over a height range of about 100 kilometers. Comparison of radio and infrared results yields mole fractions near the tropopause of 0.85 and 0.15 +/- 0.05 for molecular hydrogen and helium, respectively, if no other components are present; for this composition the tropopause is at about 52 kelvins and 110 millibars. Distinctive features in the signal intensity measurements for pressures above 900 millibars strongly favor model atmospheres that include a cloud deck of methane ice. Modeling of the intensity measurements for the cloud region and below indicates that the cloud base is near 1,300 millibars and 81 kelvins and yields an initial methane mole fraction of about 0.02 for the deep atmosphere. Scintillations in signal intensity indicate small-scale stucture throughout the stratosphere and upper troposphere. As judged from data obtained during occultation ingress, the ionosphere consists of a multilayer structure that includes two distinct layers at 2,000 and 3,500 kilometers above the 100-millibar level and an extended topside that may reach altitudes of 10,000 kilometers or more. Occultation measurements of the nine previously known rings at wavelengths of 3.6 and 13 centimeters show characteristic values of optical depth between about 0.8 and 8; the maxim value occurs in the outer region of the in ring, near its periapsis. Forward-scattered signals from this ring have properties that differ from those of any of Saturn's rings, and they are inconsistent with a discrete scattering object or local (three-dimensional) assemblies of orbiting objects. These signals suggest a new kdnd of planetary ring feature characterized by highly ordered cylindrical substructures of radial scale on the order of meters and azimuthal scale of kilometers or more. From radio data

  8. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Ka Band Radio Science Experiments and the Effect of the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Morabito, David

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the possibilities of utilizing the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and polarization of radio signals to investigate, specifically for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)mission utilizes X-band coherent (uplink and downlink) carrier Doppler and range for its gravity investigation Gravity team will also take advantage of Ka-band downlink signal Tropospheric calibration data from Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) will be used. The calibration of the received Ka band signal for the effect of the troposphere is discussed.

  9. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Ka Band Radio Science Experiments and the Effect of the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami W.; Morabito, David

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the possibilities of utilizing the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and polarization of radio signals to investigate, specifically for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)mission utilizes X-band coherent (uplink and downlink) carrier Doppler and range for its gravity investigation Gravity team will also take advantage of Ka-band downlink signal Tropospheric calibration data from Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer (AWVR) will be used. The calibration of the received Ka band signal for the effect of the troposphere is discussed.

  10. Recovery of Europa's geophysical attributes with the radio science component of a Europa Multiple-Flyby Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-01

    NASA has approved the development of a multiple-flyby mission to Jupiter's satellite Europa. Important science questions about Europa's interior structure and sub-surface ocean can be addressed by measuring Europa's gravity field, tidal Love number, and spin state. The mission's radio science investigation will rely on tracking the Doppler shift between the spacecraft and Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas. Here, we simulate the X-band two-way coherent Doppler link between the spacecraft and DSN antennas to evaluate the precision with which geophysical parameters can be recovered. We use the project's 15F10 reference trajectory and simulate Doppler measurements within ±2 h of the spacecraft's closest approach to Europa for each one of 42 flybys. After adding noise to the simulated observables, we solve for Europa's GM, degree and order 2 gravity coefficients (J2 and C22), tidal love number k2, pole position (right ascension and declination), and spin rate. The results of our simulations show that the precision in the recovery of geophysical parameters is sufficient to answer questions related to the presence of a global ocean in some tracking scenarios but not in others. We compare our results to an independent analysis by the Europa Mission Gravity Science Working Group (GSWG, 2016).

  11. Proceedings of the 25th annual offshore technology conference. Volume 1: Geology, earth sciences and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This conference proceedings represents volume 1 of a 4 volume conference relating to offshore operations in both energy and non-energy fields of resource development. This volume discusses the use of geophysical surveying techniques and equipment for mapping the seafloor; the design and use of offshore platforms; safety engineering systems; interpretation techniques for offshore survey data; environmental impacts from offshore operations; geology of offshore areas; and regulations pertaining to the development of offshore resources.

  12. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  13. DSS 43 antenna gain analysis for Voyager Uranus encounter: 8.45-GHz radio science data correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, S. D.; Imbriale, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    A malfunction of the Deep Space Network (DSN) 64-meter antenna in Australia forced the antenna to operate with a mispositioned subreflector during the Voyager Uranus encounter period (January 24, 1986). Because of changing main reflector shape and quadripod position as a function of elevation angle, the antenna gain and pointing were not as expected, and the 8.45 GHz received signal level changed during the pass. The study described here used the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) analysis to determine actual antenna gain and pointing during that period in an attempt to reconstruct the radio science data. It is found that the 1.4 dB of signal variation can be accounted for by antenna geometry changes and pointing error. Suggested modifications to the values measured during the pass are presented. Additionally, an extremely useful tool for the analysis of gravity deformed reflectors was developed for use in future antenna design and analysis projects.

  14. The BepiColombo mission to Mercury and the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) role in the Radio Science Experiments measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D. M.; Lucente, M.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Santoli, F.; Argada, A.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Magnafico, C.

    2011-10-01

    The BepiColombo mission to Mercury [1, 10] of the European Space Agency (ESA) aims to perform a set of experiments, the so called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), that will be devoted to the study of the gravity field and rotational state of Mercury [8] as well as to verify the theory of general relativity to an unprecedented level of accuracy [9]. One of the key ingredients in order to reach the very ambitious objectives of this mission, in the context of the RSE, is represented by the measurements of the onboard accelerometer [5, 2]. The Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) has been selected by ESA to measure and then allow to remove, a posteriori, the disturbing nongravitational accelerations acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) surface. This paper is devoted to describe the accelerometer characteristics and performance and to introduce some of the experimental procedures in order to calibrate its measurements on ground and during the nominal phase of the mission.

  15. Inverse theory resolution analysis in planning radio science gravity investigations of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, A.; Vance, S.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of an icy satellite's interior relates fundamentally to its composition, thermal structure, formation and evolution history, and prospects for supporting life. Gravity measurements via radio Doppler information during spacecraft flybys constitute an important tool to infer gross interior structure. Liquid water and ice layers have previously been inferred for the interiors of Jupiter's icy satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto on the basis of magnetic field measurements by the Galileo probe. On Europa and Callisto induced magnetic field signatures measured by the Galileo probe provided strong evidence for an ionic aqueous ocean. Among the chief goals of the proposed Europa Clipper mission in returning to Europa is characterizing the structure of the moon's icy shell. A geophysical inverse theory resolution analysis can be calculated at the pre-measurement mission planning stage, contributing planning considerations from the point of view of the search for mass anomalies in the ice shell (meteorites or diapiric upwellings) or near the H2O/rock interface (seamounts). The analysis allows us to assess the location-varying resolution of an icy moon's interior density anomaly distribution that can be estimated from radio Doppler measurements. It considers the tradeoff between the resolution of the estimated density anomaly distribution and its estimation uncertainty, and investigates issues in distinguishing between ocean anomalies (e.g., seamounts) and mass anomalies within or near the surface of the ice layer. We apply the resolution analysis to proposed Europa Clipper trajectories and past Galileo spacecraft trajectories about Europa and Ganymede.

  16. Science Literacy Project for Mid-Career Public Radio Producers, Reporters, Editors and News Directors

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bari

    2012-12-01

    SoundVision held a post-workshop teleconference for our 2011 graduates (as we have done for all participants) to consolidate what they'd learned during the workshop. To maximize the Science Literacy Project's impact after it ends, we strengthened and reinforced our alumni's vibrant networking infrastructure so they can continue to connect and support each other, and updated our archive system to ensure all of our science and science journalism resources and presentations will be easy to access and use over time.

  17. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Special Libraries. Biological and Medical Science Libraries Section. Social Science Libraries Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the nine papers in this collection focus on biological and medical science libraries; the remaining three are concerned with social science libraries. The papers on biological and medical science libraries appear first in this list: (1) "Standards for Medical and Health Care Libraries: Canada" (Jan Greenwood, Canada); (2) "Standards for…

  18. XVII International AIDS Conference: From Evidence to Action - Social, behavioural and economic science and policy and political science

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    AIDS 2008 firmly established stigma and discrimination as fundamental priorities in the push for universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. Conference sessions and discussions reinforced the tangible negative effects of stigma on national legislation and policies. A strong theme throughout the conference was the need to replace prevention interventions that focus exclusively on individual behaviour change or biomedical prevention interventions with "combination prevention" approaches that address both individual and structural factors that increase vulnerability to HIV infection. Several high-level sessions addressed various aspects of the debate over "vertical" (disease-specific) versus "horizontal" (health systems) funding. The majority of evidence presented at the conference suggests that HIV investments strengthen health systems through the establishment of clinical and laboratory infrastructure, strengthened supply and procurement systems, improvements in health care worker training, and increased community engagement. Human rights were a focal point at the conference; several presentations emphasized the importance of securing human rights to achieve universal access goals, including workplace discrimination, travel restrictions, gender inequality, and the criminalization of homosexuality, drug use, sex work, and HIV transmission and/or exposure. PMID:19811671

  19. Environmental Science Conference for State Supervisors of Science (Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, May 1-5, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland State Univ., OR.

    The Conference report reviewed the status of man's environment and drafted guidelines for state education agencies to use for developing state programs related to environmental education. The six featured speakers and topics were: Kessler Cannon--"Report of the Governor's Committee on Natural Resources;" Dr. Harry…

  20. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Charlotte, North Carolina, January 10-13, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A., Ed.; Rye, James A., Ed.; DiBiase, Warren J., Ed.; Crawford, Barbara A., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 2002 Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science which was held in Charlotte, North Carolina, January 10-13, 2002. Papers include: (1) "Teaching Science Methods Courses with Web-Enhanced Activities" (Alec M. Bodzin); (2) "How Is Your Lawnmower Working?…

  1. Science, Technology and the Liberal Arts: Report on a National Conference Held at Lehigh University (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, April 1-3, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcliffe, Stephen H.; Goldman, Steven L.

    This conference was designed to provide information on the development and implementation of seven undergraduate science courses primarily for non-science majors at Lehigh University, to examine what ought to be the objectives of courses such as these in the liberal arts curriculum, and to describe parallel efforts with similar educational…

  2. MSaTERs: Mathematics, Science, and Technology Educators & Researchers of The Ohio State University. Proceedings of the Annual Spring Conference (3rd, Columbus, OH, May 15, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costner, Kelly M., Ed.; Reed, Michelle K., Ed.

    The Mathematics, Science, and Technology Educators and Researchers of The Ohio State University (MSaTERs-OSU) is a student organization that grew out of the former OSU Council of Teachers of Mathematics (OSU-CTM). Papers from the third annual conference include: (1) "Gender, Ethnicity, and Science" (Terry Arambula-Greenfield); (2)…

  3. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 1: Changing perspectives and future directions; 1999 May 23-27; Missoula, MT

    Treesearch

    David N. Cole; Stephen F. McCool; Wayne A. Freimund; Jennifer O' Loughlin

    2000-01-01

    Ten papers presented as plenary talks at the conference, "Wilderness Science in a Time of Change," are included. Topics include: the influence of global change on wilderness and its management; contemporary criticisms and celebrations of the wilderness idea; the capacity of science to meet the challenges and opportunities wilderness presents; wilderness in...

  4. Broadening Participation in Science, Technology and Medicine: Proceedings of the Annual Technological Literacy Conference (6th, Washington, D.C., February 1-3, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Dennis W., Ed.

    This document contains the text of 50 papers presented at a national conference that focused on the relationships among science, technology, and society (STS). Most of the papers presented featured one of five major thematic areas around which the National Association for Science, Technology and Society is organized: education and information;…

  5. Proceedings of the Nordic Conference on Science and Technology Education: The Challenge of the Future (Karlslunde Strand, Denmark, May 8-12, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thulstrup, Erik W., Ed.

    The Nordic Conference of 1985 was convened for the purpose of fostering cooperation between science and technology educators within different fields and at different levels, with approximately 40 science and technology educators from Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, India, the United States, and Yugoslavia participating. This report contains 27…

  6. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  7. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  8. Radio science investigations of the saturn system with voyager 1: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Eshleman, V R; Anderson, J D; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Wood, G E; Croft, T A

    1981-04-10

    Voyager 1 radio occultation measurements of Titan's equatorial atmosphere successfully probed to the surface, which is provisionally placed at a radius of 2570 kilometers. Derived scale heights plus other experimental and theoretical results indicate that molecular nitrogen is the predominant atmospheric constituent. The surface pressure and temperature appear to be about 1.6 bars and 93 K, respectively. The main clouds are probably methane ice, although some condensation of nitrogen cannot be ruled out. Solar abundance arguments suggest and the measurements allow large quantities of surface methane near its triple-point temperature, so that the three phases of methane could play roles in the atmosphere and on the surface of Titan similar to those of water on Earth. Radio occultation measurements of Saturn's atmosphere near 75 degrees south latitude reached a maximum pressure of 1.4 bars, where the temperature is about 156 K. The minimum temperature is about 91 K near the 60-millibar pressure level. The measured part of the polar ionosphere of Saturn has a peak electron concentration of 2.3 x 10(4) per cubic centimeter at an altitude of 2500 kilometers above the 1-bar level in the atmosphere, and a plasma scale height at the top of the ionosphere of 560 kilometers. Attenuation of monochromatic radiation at a wavelength of 3.6 centimeters propagating obliquely through Saturn's rings is consistent with traditional values for the normal optical depth of the rings, but the near-forward scattering of this radiation by the rings indicates effective scattering particles with larger than expected diameters of 10, 8, and 2 meters in the A ring, the outer Cassini division, and the C ring, respectively. Preliminary analysis of the radio tracking data yields new values for the masses of Rhea and Titan of 4.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(-6) and 236.64 +/- 0.08 x 10(-6) times the mass of Saturn. Corresponding values for the mean densities of these objects are 1.33 +/- 0.10 and about 1.89 grams

  9. Minitrack on data and knowledge base issues in genomics at the 27th Hawaii International Conference on system sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of the proceedings from the Minitrack on Data and Knowledge Base Issues in Genomics at the 27th Hawaii International Conference on System Science, January 4 - 7, 1994. The minitrack was organized by Dong-Guk Shin (University of Connecticut) and Francois Rechenmann (INRIA, France). Support was jointly provided by the NSF, NIH and DOE. The minitrack included, after rigorous review, ten full papers and four extended abstracts in the following five different research subareas of genome informatics: data modeling and management, sequence analysis, graphical user interface, interoperation in a heterogenous computing environment, and system integration in a knowledge-based approach.

  10. From the History of Conferences on the Machine and Mechanism Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowski, J.

    2016-08-01

    In the course of the past sixty years of the Polish Committee for the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms (PC TMM) 24 scientific and didactic conferences have been held. The subject matter of these conferences, generally organized every other year, comprised problems of the classification, analysis and synthesis of mechanisms, the dynamics of machine systems, investigations concerning self-excited vibrations, the stability of the systems, the control of machines and biomechanics. The numbers of submitted papers as well as the number of participants substantiate the need of organizing such conferences, their importance and the activity of the Polish Committee of TMM for the purpose of creating a platform for the presentation and discussion of new research methods in the domain of mechanisms, machines, biomechanics and mechatronics.

  11. Multiple signal propagation at the tropopause of the Venusian atmosphere: new insights from the Radio Science Experiment (VeRa) onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Maren; Oschlisniok, Janusz; Remus, Stefan; Tellmann, Silvia; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The rapid change of the refractive index over a short altitude range in a planetary atmosphere can lead to multi-path effects when sounding the atmosphere with radio waves. The Radio Science Experiment (VeRa) [1,2] onboard Venus Express sounded the Venusian atmosphere from 90 km downward to 40 km altitude[3,4]. More than 800 profiles of temperature, pressure and neutral number density could be retrieved which cover almost all local times and latitudes. A specially developed analysis method based on the VeRa open loop receiving technique deciphers the multi-path effect and identifies an inversion layer near the tropopause at an altitude of about 60km. This layer is of particular interest - it separates the stratified troposphere from the highly variable mesosphere and can be a likely location for the formation of gravity waves [5]. The new retrieval method shows an inversion layer up to 15 K colder than commonly thought. Local time and latitude dependence including the influence of the spacecraft trajectory on this effect will be discussed. These results will contribute to a consistent picture of the Venus' thermal atmosphere structure and therefore help to improve atmospheric models.[1] Häusler, B. et al: 'Radio science investigations by VeRa onboard the Venus Express spacecraft' Planetary and Space Science 54, 2006[2] Häusler, B. et al, 'Venus Atmospheric, Ionospheric, Surface and Interplanetery Radio-Wave Propagation Studies with the VeRa Radio Science experiment' Eur. Space Agencys, Spec. Publ., ESA SP 1295, 2007[3] Pätzold, M. et al: 'The structure of Venus' middle atmosphere and ionosphere', Nature 450, 2007[4] Tellmann, S. et al : 'Structure of the Venus neutral atmosphere as observed by the Radio Science experiment VeRa on Venus Express', Journal of Geophysical Research 114, 2009[5] Tellmann, S. et al: 'Small-scale temperature fluctuations seen by the VeRa Radio Science Experiment on Venus Express' Icarus 221, 2012.

  12. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers and viewgraphs from the conference are presented. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include magnetic disk and tape technologies, optical disks and tape, software storage and file management systems, and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990's.

  13. FOREWORD: Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean (RADIO 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monebhurrun, Vikass; Lesselier, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    It was an honor and a great pleasure for all those involved in its organization to welcome the participants to the 'Radio and Antenna Days of the Indian Ocean' (RADIO 2012) international conference that was held from 24th to 27th September 2012 at the Sugar Beach Resort, Wolmar, Flic-en-Flac, Mauritius. RADIO 2012 is the first of a series of conferences that is to be regularly organized in the Indian Ocean region. The aim is to discuss recent developments, theories and practical applications covering the whole scope of radio-frequency engineering, including radio waves, antennas, propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility. Following discussions with engineers and scientists from the countries of the Indian Ocean as well as from other parts of the world, a need was felt for the organization of such an international event in this region. The Island of Mauritius, worldwide known for its white sandy beaches and pleasant tropical atmosphere, provided an excellent environment for the organization of the 1st RADIO international conference. The Local Organizing Committee consisted of scientists from SUPELEC, the University of Mauritius, and the University of Technology, Mauritius. Various members of staff of the University of Mauritius provided help for the organization of the conference. The International Union of Radio Science (URSI) made available technical and financial sponsorship for partial support of young scientists. A number of companies also supported RADIO 2012 ('Platinum': GSMA, ICTA & MMF, 'Gold': CST & FEKO). The event itself was organized in a premier hotel on Mauritius. In this foreword, we would like to take the opportunity again to thank all the people, institutions and companies that made the event such a success. More than 120 abstracts were submitted to the conference and were peer-reviewed by an international scientific committee. RADIO 2012 overall featured six oral sessions, one poster session and two workshops. Three internationally recognized

  14. Proceedings of the NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Kim; Blasso, Len (Editor); Lipscomb, Ann (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the National Space Science Data Center Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications held July 23 through 25, 1991 at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center are presented. The program includes a keynote address, invited technical papers, and selected technical presentations to provide a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include magnetic disk and tape technologies, optical disk and tape, software storage and file management systems, and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990's.

  15. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  16. Radio-induced alteration in cordierite - Implications for petrology, gemmology and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krickl, R.; Nasdala, L.; Grambole, D.; Kaindl, R.

    2009-04-01

    Cordierite is a common metamorphic and magmatic mineral, which is used as petrologic tool for reconstructing the history of its host rock. Further applications include cordierite gemstones and the use of synthetic analogs in ceramics. Cordierite is stable over a wide temperature and pressure range and relatively resistant to chemical alteration; however, its properties can be significantly changed upon the impact of external irradiation. In the course of a comprehensive study, natural radiohaloes in cordierite (a widespread feature caused by the impact of alpha-particles originating from radioactive inclusions) as well as artificial analogs produced by implantation of 8.8 MeV He2+ ions were investigated using modern micro-techniques. Additional irradiation experiments were performed using O6+ ions, electrons and gamma-rays. Ion irradiation causes yellow colouration that is strongly pleochroic, and fades at higher doses. The possibility of radiation-treatment for enhancing the quality of gem-cordierite is discussed. While samples remain crystalline up to doses of 1016 He2+/cm2, the same material is fully amorphised when irradiated with the same dose of 30 MeV O6+ ions. These different observations may help to estimate the performance assessment of cordierite-ceramics in radiated environments. A very important result concerning the petrological use of cordierite is the radio-induced transformation of channel constituents: Inside the irradiated areas the vibrational bands of CO2 decrease in intensity, whereas two new bands appear at 2135 cm-1 (both IR- and Raman-active; cf. Nasdala et al., 2006) and 1550 cm-1 (only Raman-activ). They are assigned to stretching vibrations of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen, respectively, thus indicating a radio-chemical transformation 2CO2 → 2CO + O2 in alpha-irradiated cordierite. This study yields the first spectroscopic evidence for the irradiation-induced formation of molecular oxygen in cordierite. Polarised vibrational

  17. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  18. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction The 3rd International Conference on Alternatives for Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT3), organized by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, was held from May 10 -13, 20...

  19. The Twenty-Fifth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Part 1: A-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: planetary geology, meteorites, planetary composition, meteoritic composition, planetary craters, lunar craters, meteorite craters, petrology, petrography, volcanology, planetary crusts, geochronology, geomorphism, mineralogy, lithology, planetary atmospheres, impact melts, volcanoes, planetary evolution, tectonics, planetary mapping, asteroids, comets, lunar soil, lunar rocks, lunar geology, metamorphism, chemical composition, meteorite craters, and planetary mantles.

  20. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction The 3rd International Conference on Alternatives for Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT3), organized by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, was held from May 10 -13, 20...

  1. PREFACE: International Conference on Advancement in Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST): Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Hee, Pah Chin

    2013-04-01

    The 4th International Conference on the Advancement of Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST 2012), with theme 'Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications', took place in Kuantan, Malaysia, from Wednesday 7 to Friday 9 November 2012. The conference was attended by more than 100 participants, and hosted about 160 oral and poster papers by more than 140 pre-registered authors. The key topics of the 4th iCAST 2012 include Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Dynamical Systems, Statistics and Financial Mathematics. The scientific program was rather full since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, four parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The conference aimed to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with the application of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology and environmental sciences. We would like to thank the Keynote and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to 4th iCAST 2012. We would also like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. We cannot end without expressing our many thanks to International Islamic University Malaysia and our sponsors for their financial support . This volume presents selected papers which have been peer-reviewed. The editors hope that it may be useful and fruitful for scholars, researchers, and advanced technical members of the industrial laboratory facilities for developing new tools and products. Guest Editors Nasir Ganikhodjaev, Farrukh Mukhamedov and Pah Chin Hee The PDF contains the committee lists, board list and biographies of the plenary speakers.

  2. Contribution of BepiColombo's MORE radio science experiment to the determination of Mercury's interior structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior Mariani, Mirco; Imperi, Luigi; Iess, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Orbiter Radioscience Experiment (MORE) is one of the instruments on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), designed to estimate the Mercury's gravity field and rotational state and to perform a wide set of tests of relativistic gravity. The experiments exploits a highly stable, multi-frequency radio links in X and Ka band. The state-of-the-art microwave equipment enables simultaneous two-way links in X/X (7.2 GHz uplink/8.4 GHz downlink), X/Ka (7.2/32.5 GHz) and Ka/Ka band (34/32.5 GHz), providing range rate accuracies of 3 micron/s (at 1000 s integration time) at nearly all elongation angles. Range observables accurate to 20 cm (two-way) will be attained using a novel, wideband (24 Mcps) ranging system, based upon a pseudo-noise modulation scheme. Non-gravitational acceleration will be provided by a dedicated accelerometer (the Italian Spring Accelerometer, ISA). We present the results of numerical simulations carried out using the latest mission scenario, entailing a launch date in October 2018 with arrival in Mercury in December 2025. We illustrate as the combination of the gravity and rotation measurements expected from BepiColombo can bring a substantial improvement in understanding the interior of the planet. Particularly, we show that MORE can detect planetary-induced librations, allowing to constrain the size of a possible solid inner core inside the outer liquid core.

  3. Cassini Radio Science observations of the Saturn ionosphere during the Cassini Equinox and Solstice missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, Arvydas; Nagy, Andrew; Marouf, Essam; Anabtawi, Aseel

    2013-04-01

    The results of the Cassini radio occultation measurements of the electron density profiles in the Saturn ionosphere during the Cassini Prime mission (2005-2008) have been presented previously( Nagy, A.F., et al., JGR, 2006; Kliore, A.J., et al., JGR, 2009). These measurements covered mostly low- and mid-latitudes, with some high-latitude measurements in the Southern hemisphere. Between July of 2009 and March of 2010, the first Cassini extended mission, called the Equinox mission was conducted, during which some equatorial and mid-Northern latitude ionosphere profiles were obtained. Beginning in August of 2011, and extending to 2016, the Solstice mission phase will provide some mid-latitude profiles, but most importantly some high Northern latitude observations from January to March of 2013, and some high Southern latitude profiles from April to May of 2013, Beyond this time the, the rings obscure all but the equatorial latitudes, and no further occultation measurements will be made. In this paper we will report on the comparison of these new observations to those from the original Prime mission, and draw conclusions on temporal changes at different latitudes. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology; The University of Michigan; and San Jose State University, with support from the Cassini Project.

  4. Earth Science and Public Health: Proceedings of the Second National Conference on USGS Health-Related Research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Pierce, Brenda S.

    2007-01-01

    health scientists and earth scientists can lead to improved solutions for existing and emerging environmental health problems. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions held at the Second National Conference on USGS Health-Related Research, held at the USGS national headquarters in Reston, Virginia. The report presents 68 abstracts of technical presentations made at the conference and summaries of six topical breakout sessions. The abstracts cover a broad range of issues and demonstrate connections between human health and the quality and condition of our environment and wildlife. The summaries of the topical breakout sessions present ideas for advancing interdisciplinary science in areas of earth science and human health.

  5. Science Education on the Internet: Conference for Developers of OnLine Curricula ''Learning Strategies for Science Education Websites''

    SciTech Connect

    Gesteland,Raymond F.; Dart, Dorothy S.; Logan,Jennifer; Stark, Louisa

    2000-09-01

    Internet-based science education programs are coming of age. Educators now look seriously to the Internet as a source of accessible classroom materials, and they are finding many high-quality online science programs. Beyond providing solid curriculum, these programs have many advantages. They provide materials that are far more current than what textbooks offer and are more accessible to disadvantaged and rural population. Students can engage in inquiry-based learning online through interactive and virtual activities, accessing databases, tracking nature occurrences in real time, joining online science communities and conversing with scientists.

  6. Research in Science Education, Volume 5. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (6th, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, May 19-21, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, A. M., Ed.; Power, Colin, N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the sixth Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (ASERA) held at Flinders University in May, 1975. Paper topics include: pupil learning and classroom climate, teacher structuring behavior, the Australian Science Education Project (ASEP), cognitive preference and…

  7. Research in Science Education, Volume 6. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (7th, The University of Newcastle, New South Wales, May 17-19, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddock, M. N., Ed.; Power, Colin N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the seventh Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association held at the University of Newcastle in May, 1976. Paper topics include: undergraduate research experience for future teachers, programmable calculator effects on attitude towards physics, development of science concepts…

  8. Research in Science Education, Volume 8. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (9th, Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education, Brisbane, Queensland, May, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRobbie, Campbell J., Ed.; Power, Colin N., Ed.

    Presented are the 21 papers which constitute the proceedings of the ninth annual conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association at a meeting in May, 1978. Papers range from philosophical analysis of the language of science teaching to experimental research into the effects of different laboratory skill development strategies,…

  9. Research in Science Education, Volume 8. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (9th, Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education, Brisbane, Queensland, May, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRobbie, Campbell J., Ed.; Power, Colin N., Ed.

    Presented are the 21 papers which constitute the proceedings of the ninth annual conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association at a meeting in May, 1978. Papers range from philosophical analysis of the language of science teaching to experimental research into the effects of different laboratory skill development strategies,…

  10. Research in Science Education, Volume 5. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (6th, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, May 19-21, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, A. M., Ed.; Power, Colin, N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the sixth Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (ASERA) held at Flinders University in May, 1975. Paper topics include: pupil learning and classroom climate, teacher structuring behavior, the Australian Science Education Project (ASEP), cognitive preference and…

  11. Research in Science Education, Volume 6. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (7th, The University of Newcastle, New South Wales, May 17-19, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddock, M. N., Ed.; Power, Colin N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the seventh Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association held at the University of Newcastle in May, 1976. Paper topics include: undergraduate research experience for future teachers, programmable calculator effects on attitude towards physics, development of science concepts…

  12. Lander radio science experiment with a direct link between Mars and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maistre, Sébastien; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Rivoldini, Attilio; Dehant, Véronique; Marty, Jean-Charles; Karatekin, Ozgür

    2012-08-01

    Mars' Orientation and rotation Parameters (called here MOP): precession, nutation, polar motion and length of day (LOD) variations, are related to the interior of the planet as well as to the dynamics of its atmosphere. The MOP can be determined using the Doppler shift on radio signal data due to the motion of a probe landed on Mars relative to tracking stations on Earth. In this paper we perform numerical simulations for assessing the precision on the determination of the MOP using Direct-To-Earth (DTE) X-band Doppler measurements for a nearly equatorial lander. We then discuss how a better knowledge of the MOP could improve our understanding on the interior structure. The sensitivity of such a DTE radio link to these rotation parameters is first investigated. This shows that the latitude of the landing site must be higher than 20° to detect the Chandler Wobble component of the polar motion in DTE Doppler data and must be at least 40° to get tight constraints on it. It is found that the precision in the determination of the seasonal LOD variations will be significantly improved after about 350 days of operation, reaching the 5% level after 550 days, thereby better constraining the CO2 mass budget in the Martian atmosphere and ice caps. The current precision in the precession rate (25 milliarcsecond (mas) per year) will be matched after 150 days of mission. An uncertainty of less than 5 mas/year will be reached after 700 days, improving the precision on the polar moment of inertia by a factor of five. The precision on the determination of the amplitudes of nutation is estimated at a few mas after one Martian year of mission (about 12 mas on the prograde/retrograde semi and terannual amplitudes) allowing for the detection of the contribution expected from the liquid core. Considering Mars with a liquid core in accordance with recent geodesic measurements, the Free-Core-Nutation (FCN) period is estimated with a precision of less than 10 days after 550 days of

  13. Gravity Investigations with the MarcoPolo-R Radio Science Experiment RSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, T. P.; Pätzold, M.; Bellerose, J.; Barriot, J. P.; Oberst, J.; Hahn, M.; Tellmann, S.; Remus, S.; Förstner, R.; Häusler, B.

    2013-09-01

    The ESA sample return mission MarcoPolo-R is one of the current candidate M3 missions. It will rendezvous with a primitive Near Earth Asteroid (NEA), scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and return a unique sample to Earth [3] The determination of the global physical properties of the mission target, the Near Earth Asteroid 2008 EV5, is among others one science objective of the MarcoPolo-R mission. In this context one key parameter is the gravity field, especially GM (gravitational constant times the mass) and the low order gravity coefficients C20 and C22 of the asteroid.

  14. Symptom management in cancer: pain, depression and fatigue: State-of-the-Science Conference Statement.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    NIH Consensus Statements are prepared by a nonadvocate, non-Federal panel of experts, based on (1) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the consensus questions during a 2 day public session; (2) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that are part of the public session; and (3) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal Government. The statement reflects the panel's assessment of medical knowledge available at the time the statement was written. Thus, it provides a "snapshot in time" of the state of knowledge on the conference topic. When reading the statement, keep in mind that new knowledge is inevitably accumulating through medical research.

  15. Twenty-Fourth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Part 3: N-Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: planetary geology, meteorites, planetary composition, meteoritic composition, planetary craters, lunar craters, meteorite craters, petrology, petrography, volcanology, planetary crusts, geochronology, geomorphism, mineralogy, lithology, planetary atmospheres, impact melts, K-T Boundary Layer, volcanoes, planetary evolution, tectonics, planetary mapping, asteroids, comets, lunar soil, lunar rocks, lunar geology, metamorphism, chemical composition, meteorite craters, planetary mantles, and space exploration.

  16. Twenty-Fourth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Part 3: N-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: planetary geology, meteorites, planetary composition, meteoritic composition, planetary craters, lunar craters, meteorite craters, petrology, petrography, volcanology, planetary crusts, geochronology, geomorphism, mineralogy, lithology, planetary atmospheres, impact melts, K-T Boundary Layer, volcanoes, planetary evolution, tectonics, planetary mapping, asteroids, comets, lunar soil, lunar rocks, lunar geology, metamorphism, chemical composition, meteorite craters, planetary mantles, and space exploration. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  17. Proceedings of the precollege-university partnerships for science and mathematics education conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    In April of 1992 in Atlanta, Georgia, nearly 50 elementary and secondary educators and about 100 postsecondary educators convened to explore their common interests in the conference on precollege-university partnerships. This report summarizes the remarks and conclusions of speakers, panelists, and of attendees gathered in regional work groups. During the course of the conference, attendees heard from federal agencies and foundations which fund education-related projects and learned of their enthusiastic support of partnerships. In our national need to manage education and training resources wisely, these funding agents see partnership benefits such as renewed excitement for teaching at all levels, effective and technologically up-to-date in-service training, more and better-prepared high school graduates entering colleges, and a general enhancement of understanding among educators at all levels of teaching. As an added benefit, the partnership concept promotes discussion and understanding in an atmosphere of respect, appreciation, and self-esteem. Several hours of the conference were devoted to panels addressing five questions important to education coalitions. The panelists represented a wide variety of teaching levels, geographic locations, educational experiences, and ethnic groups.

  18. First Cassini Radio Science Bistatic Scattering Observation of Titan's Northern Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E. A.; Kliore, A. J.; Rappaport, N. J.; French, R. G.; Schinder, P. J.; Anabtawi, A.; Wong, K. K.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Flasar, F. M.; Iess, L.; McGhee-French, C.; Nagy, A. F.; Tortora, P.; Barbinis, E.; Buccino, D.; Kahan, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    On May 17, 2014, the Cassini spacecraft completed its 101 flyby of Saturn's satellite Titan. Mirror-like (quasi-specular) reflections of radio signals transmitted by Cassini were observed on the Earth (bistatic scattering geometry). Three right circularly polarized (RCP) sinusoidal signals were transmitted (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm). Both the RCP and LCP surface reflections were observed at the Canberra, Australia, complex of the NASA Deep Space Network. The signals probed the region extending from about (lat, long) = (79°N, 315°W) to about (74°N, 232°W). For the first time, two major Titan northern seas, the Ligeia Mare and the Kraken Mare, were probed. Clearly detectable RCP and LCP echo components were observed over both seas at all 3 wavelengths. The echoes were intermittent over the region in between the two seas. The echoes from the seas have narrowband spectra well modeled as pure sinusoids, suggesting very smooth surfaces over > ~1 cm scales. Over shorelines and river like channels the measured spectra reveal a second distinct broadband component, likely reflection from a rough bottom solid interface. Modeling the narrowband echo components as sinusoids, we estimate the RCP and LCP echo power profiles over the observation period. High resolution power profiles (several seconds time average; 0.2 to 2 km along the ground track) reveal remarkable structural detail. The statistical measurement uncertainty improves significantly when the resolution is degraded to about 1 m time average (3 to 30 km). Comparison of the 1 m power profiles with theoretical predictions computed assuming absent surface waves (negligible roughness) reveals excellent agreement with reflections from liquid hydrocarbons. The small statistical uncertainty promises to strongly constrain the liquid composition (ethane vs methane dominance). In principle, the measured RCP/LCP power ratio removes dependence on roughness and enables determination of the dielectric constant

  19. The 4th International Symposium for Arctic Science and the 3rd International Conference for Arctic Research Planning, the science symposium of Arctic Science Summit Week 2015 (ISAR-4/ICARPIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, Peter; Kodama, Yuji; Yamanouchi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The 4th International Symposium for Arctic Research (ISAR-4) with the theme of "Rapid change of the Arctic climate system and its global influence" was held as the science symposium of the Arctic Science Summit Week 2015, together with the 3rd International Conference for Arctic Research Planning (ICARPIII) with the theme of "Integrating Arctic Research: a Roadmap for the Future," in Toyama, Japan, from April 27 to April 30, 2015. There were 340 oral and 177 poster presentations, totalling 511 presentations. Among them, 38 papers were submitted to this special issue and 30 were accepted. 16 sessions in which those accepted papers were presented are described.

  20. Annual Science and Engineering Technology Conference/DOD Technology Exposition (7th). Volume 2. Wednesday - Thursday

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-20

    Optical Components & Integrated Photonics Vaccaro/Buchwald/Lorenzo (AFRL/SNHC HAFB) Nelson (AFRL/SNDD WPAFB) Nanophotonics & Nano- Probes ( Silicon ...S/W Radios FY06-09 • Silicon Carbide Switches FY06-09 • Phase Shifter FY06-08 • Power Storage Systems FY06-09 Munitions • MEMS-IMU/GPS FY06-07 • MEMS...mobile palm-sized platform – Small size limits means for generating mobility • Bio- inspired and bio-mimetic sensing for navigation & control – Small

  1. Tracking Galaxy Evolution Through Low-Frequency Radio Continuum Observations using SKA and Citizen-Science Research using Multi-Wavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hota, Ananda; Konar, C.; Stalin, C. S.; Vaddi, Sravani; Mohanty, Pradeepta K.; Dabhade, Pratik; Dharmik Bhoga, Sai Arun; Rajoria, Megha; Sethi, Sagar

    2016-12-01

    We present a brief review of progress in the understanding of general spiral and elliptical galaxies, through merger, star formation and AGN activities. With reference to case studies performed with the GMRT, we highlight the unique aspects of studying galaxies in the radio wavelengths where powerful quasars and bright radio galaxies are traditionally the dominating subjects. Though AGN or quasar activity is extremely energetic, it is extremely short-lived. This justify focussing on transitional galaxies to find relic-evidences of the immediate past AGN-feedback which decide the future course of evolution of a galaxy. Relic radio lobes can be best detected in low frequency observations with the GMRT, LOFAR and in future SKA. The age of these relic radio plasma can be as old as a few hundred Myr. There is a huge gap between this and what is found in optical bands. The very first relic-evidences of a past quasar activity (Hanny's Voorwerp) was discovered in 2007 by a Galaxy Zoo citizen-scientist, a school teacher, in the optical bands. This relic is around a few tens of thousand years old. More discoveries needed to match these time-scales with star formation time-scales in AGN host galaxies to better understand black hole galaxy co-evolution process via feedback-driven quenching of star formation. It is now well-accepted that discovery and characterization of such faint fuzzy relic features can be more efficiently done by human eye than a machine. Radio interferometry images are more complicated than optical and need the citizen-scientists to be trained. RAD@home, the only Indian citizen-science research project in astronomy, analysing TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) 150 MHz data and observing from the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT), was launched in April 2013. Unique, zero-infrastructure zero-funded design of RAD@home as a collaboratory of 69 trained e-astronomers is briefly described. Some of the new-found objects like episodic radio galaxies, radio-jet and

  2. The ionospheres of Saturn and Titan from Cassini Radio Science observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, Arvydas; Nagy, Andrew

    Since @005, the NASA Cassini orbiter has produced 13 profiles of the electron density in the ionosphere of Titan at latitudes from near-equatorial to near polar (Kliore, A.J., et al, J. Geophys. Res.-space Phys.s, ( 2008), 113, A09317, DOI: 10.1029/2007JA012965; Kliore, A. J., et et al., J. Geophys. Res.-space Phys.(2011), 116. A11318, DOI: 10.1029/2011JA016694 ). Most of these profiles had a “normal” and fairly uniform appearance, with a main peak near 1,200 km. altitude and a peak density of about 1-2 x103 cm-3 with no peaks above the main peak. The other three observations have a “disturbed” appearance, with the main peak density of about 3 x 103 cm-3 , with several minor peaks above and below the main peak. It is probable, that these effects are due to the enhanced precipitation of energetic particles from Saturn’s magnetosphere. The planned acquisition of several more ionosphere profiles in 2014 and 2015 may cast more light on the nature of this phenomenon. In that same period, 62 profiles of the electron density in the Saturn ionosphere. In 2005, when the ring opening angle was near maximum, they obscured most of the limb of Saturn, and the near equatorial regions were available for radio occultations, and 12 near-equatorial profiles were obtained (Nagy, A.F., et al, J. Geophys. Res.-Space Phys., ( 2006), 111 ,Issue A6). During the rest of the Cassini Prime mission, 20 additional profiles were obtained at mid- and high latitudes (Kliore, A. J., et al., J. Geophys. Res.-space Phys., (20090, 114,A04215, DOI:10.1029/2008JA013900 ). In the Cassini Extended mission, 24 more profiles were obtained, mostly at low and near-equatorial latitudes during the Equinox mission in 2009-2011, and a final set of 15 observations were obtained in 2012 and 2013 during the Solstice mission, including several at high Northern and Southern latitudes. These are the last possible observations, because the increasing ring opening angle will again obscure the limb of Saturn

  3. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael S.; Lee, Gil U.

    2005-07-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology contains research papers contributed by the participants of the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), which was held in Austin, Texas, USA, 7-12 November, 2004. This conference saw 284 oral presentations from institutions around the world, which is the highest number for this topical conference series to date. These presentations were organized into 64 sessions, covering the range of nanotechnology subject areas in which chemical engineers are currently engaged. These sessions included the following areas. • Fundamentals: thermodynamics at the nanoscale; applications of nanostructured fluids; transport properties in nanophase and nanoscale systems; molecular modelling methods; self and directed assembly at the nanoscale; nanofabrication and nanoscale processing; manipulation of nanophases by external fields; nanoscale systems; adsorption and transport in carbon nanotubes; nanotribology; making the transition from materials and phenomena to new technologies; operation of micro-and nano-systems. • Materials: nanoparticle synthesis and stabilization; nanoscale structure in polymers; nanotemplating of polymers; synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube-based materials; nanowires; nanoparticle assemblies and superlattices; nanoelectronic materials; self-assembly of templated inorganic materials; nanostructured hybrid organic/inorganic materials; gas phase synthesis of nanoparticles; multicomponent structured particles; nano energetic materials; liquid-phase synthesis of nanoparticles. • Energy: synthesis and characterization of nanostructured catalytic materials; nanomaterials and devices for energy applications. • Biotechnology: nanobiotechnology; nanotechnology for the biotechnology and pharmaceuticals industries; nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology for sensors; advances in biomaterials, bionanotechnology, biomimetic

  4. XVII International AIDS Conference: From Evidence to Action - Clinical and biomedical prevention science

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether to initiate ART at higher CD4+ cell counts than currently recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines received much attention at the XVII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2008). If studies presented at the conference ultimately lead to a revision of WHO treatment guidance, the estimated number of people who will need ART globally will increase substantially. Task-shifting is emerging as an important strategy for dealing with the acute shortage of health care workers in many high-burden countries, and several studies presented at AIDS 2008 demonstrated the impressive health system efficiencies garnered by using nurses or other health care providers to deliver HIV care and treatment. Other key presentations and discussion at the conference focused on the optimal time to start TB treatment in HIV-infected patients, the growing risk of resistance in high-burden countries, including its impact on future treatment options, and several large cohort trials testing optimal drug regimens in resource-limited settings. Biomedical prevention research continues to confirm the long-term, protective benefits of circumcision. Several studies involving HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples have produced data suggesting a strong protective effect of ART for HIV-negative partners. Disappointing results from recent vaccine and non-ARV based microbicides trials are nevertheless providing important data to this field, and the expanding number of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials and ARV-based microbicides appear to provide the best hope for a new, efficacious biomedical prevention intervention. PMID:19811670

  5. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 13th, Houston, TX, March 15-19, 1982, Proceedings. Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Ahrens, T. J.

    The present conference on planetary and lunar science considers theoretical models for the composition of the Venus crust, the lunar crust, the prediction of phase relationships in planetary mantles, the volumetric analysis of complex lunar craters, grazing impacts on Mars, the determination of lunar structure by means of electrical conductivity and seismic experiments, results of studies on the Apollo 16 site rocks, as well as Apollo 14, 15 and 17 lunar glasses and regoliths, and carbon components and isotopic compositions of chondritic meteorites. Also discussed are iron meteorites, interplanetary dust and tektites, and such theoretical and experimental issues as refractory condensates and chondrules from solar furnace experiments, molecular synthesis through the irradiation of silicates, and the adsorption of excess fission Xe.

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 13th, Houston, TX, March 15-19, 1982, Proceedings. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V. (Editor); Ahrens, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on planetary and lunar science considers theoretical models for the composition of the Venus crust, the lunar crust, the prediction of phase relationships in planetary mantles, the volumetric analysis of complex lunar craters, grazing impacts on Mars, the determination of lunar structure by means of electrical conductivity and seismic experiments, results of studies on the Apollo 16 site rocks, as well as Apollo 14, 15 and 17 lunar glasses and regoliths, and carbon components and isotopic compositions of chondritic meteorites. Also discussed are iron meteorites, interplanetary dust and tektites, and such theoretical and experimental issues as refractory condensates and chondrules from solar furnace experiments, molecular synthesis through the irradiation of silicates, and the adsorption of excess fission Xe.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 13th, Houston, TX, March 15-19, 1982, Proceedings. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V. (Editor); Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The second part of the proceedings of the Thirteenth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference considers sedimentary processes and crustal cycling on Venus, a model for the formation of the earth's core, evidence of resurfacing in the lunar nearside highlands, the geology of Tethys, thermal stresses in planetary elastic lithospheres, the petrology and comparative thermal and mechanical histories of clasts in breccia 62236, lunar paleointensity data and its implications for the origin of lunar magnetism, and a model for the accumulation of solar wind radiation damage effects in lunar dust grains. Also discussed are fluid inclusions in stony meteorites, nuclear track and compositional studies of olivines in CI and CM chondrites, the impact of an asteroid or comet in the ocean and the extinction of terrestrial life, cooling rates for glass-containing lunar compositions, and the homogeneity of lava flows.

  8. In Search of Gender Free Paradigms for Computer Science Education. [Proceedings of a Preconference Research Workshop at the National Educational Computing Conference (Nashville, Tennessee, June 24, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, C. Dianne, Ed.; Murchie-Beyma, Eric, Ed.

    This monograph includes nine papers delivered at a National Educational Computing Conference (NECC) preconference workshop, and a previously unpublished paper on gender and attitudes. The papers, which are presented in four categories, are: (1) "Report on the Workshop: In Search of Gender Free Paradigms for Computer Science Education"…

  9. MSaTERs: Mathematics, Science, and Technology Educators & Researchers of The Ohio State University. Proceedings of the Annual Spring Conference (5th, Columbus, Ohio, May 5, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Marlena F., Ed.

    The Mathematics, Science, and Technology Educators and Researchers of The Ohio State University (MSaTERs-OSU) is a student organization that grew out of the former Ohio State University Council of Teachers of Mathematics (OSU-CTM). Papers from the fifth annual conference include: (1) "Models of the Structure of Matter: Why Should We Care…

  10. In Search of Gender Free Paradigms for Computer Science Education. [Proceedings of a Preconference Research Workshop at the National Educational Computing Conference (Nashville, Tennessee, June 24, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, C. Dianne, Ed.; Murchie-Beyma, Eric, Ed.

    This monograph includes nine papers delivered at a National Educational Computing Conference (NECC) preconference workshop, and a previously unpublished paper on gender and attitudes. The papers, which are presented in four categories, are: (1) "Report on the Workshop: In Search of Gender Free Paradigms for Computer Science Education"…

  11. MSaTERs: Mathematics, Science, and Technology Educators & Researchers of The Ohio State University. Proceedings of the Annual Spring Conference (4th, Columbus, Ohio, May 6, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costner, Kelly M., Ed.; Herman, Marlena F., Ed.

    The Mathematics, Science, and Technology Educators and Researchers of The Ohio State University (MSaTERs-OSU) is a student organization that grew out of the former Ohio State University Council of Teachers of Mathematics (OSU-CTM). Papers from the fourth annual conference include: (1) "Technology Education Curriculum Models in Michigan…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Costa Mesa, California, January 18-21, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A., Ed.; Rye, James A., Ed.; DiBiase, Warren J., Ed.; Crawford, Barbara A., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 2001 Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science which was held in Costa Mesa, California, January 18-21, 2001. Papers include: (1) "An Elementary Preservice Teacher's Search for Solutions about the Evolution-Divine Creation Question: The Story of Tracy"…

  13. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although youth in the United States remain substantially more violent than adolescents and young adults in most industrial countries, the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents identified many reasons for optimism about our capacity to…

  14. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although youth in the United States remain substantially more violent than adolescents and young adults in most industrial countries, the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) State-of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in Adolescents identified many reasons for optimism about our capacity to…

  15. Delivering Academic Excellence to Culturally Diverse Populations (Language Development through Math/Science Activities). Conference Proceedings (Saddle Brook, New Jersey, December 7-8, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilotta, Cynthia, Ed.

    This document includes the proceedings of a conference that made the following points about American society now and in the future: (1) racial changes in demographics require preparing urban minority students for entrance into scientific and technological fields; (2) the science/mathematics education movement of the late 1950s into the 1970s has…

  16. The Freshman Year in Science and Engineering: Old Problems, New Perspectives for Research Universities. Report of a Conference (Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 6-7, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wineke, William R.; Certain, Phillip

    The goal of the conference reported in this document was to initiate major revitalization of freshman science by bringing together individuals who have been working to improve introductory courses with research faculty who may or may not have been actively involved in the teaching of these courses. This report tries to capture the spirit and the…

  17. Bridging basic science and clinical research: the EASL Monothematic Conference on Translational Research in Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Boettler, Tobias; Moradpour, Darius; Thimme, Robert; Zoulim, Fabien

    2014-09-01

    The EASL Monothematic Conference on Translational Research in Viral Hepatitis brought together a group of leading scientists and clinicians working on both, basic and clinical aspects of viral hepatitis, thereby building bridges from bench to bedside. This report recapitulates the presentations and discussions at the conference held in Lyon, France on November 29-30, 2013. In recent years, great advances have been made in the field of viral hepatitis, particularly in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The identification of IL28B genetic polymorphisms as a major determinant for spontaneous and treatment-induced HCV clearance was a seminal discovery. Currently, hepatologists are at the doorstep of even greater advances, with the advent of a wealth of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV. Indeed, promising results have accumulated over the last months and few years, showing sustained virological response (SVR) rates of up to 100% with interferon-free DAA combination therapies. Thus, less than 25 years after its identification, HCV infection may soon be curable in the vast majority of patients, highlighting the great success of HCV research over the last decades. However, viral hepatitis and its clinical complications such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain major global challenges. New therapeutic strategies to tackle hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection are needed, as current therapies have undeniable limitations. Nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NUC) can efficiently control HBV replication and reduce or even reverse liver damage. However, these drugs have to be given for indefinite periods in most patients to maintain virological and biochemical responses. Although sustained responses off treatment can be achieved by treatment with (pegylated) interferon-α, only about 10-30% of patients effectively resolve chronic hepatitis B. It was the goal of this conference to review the progress made over the last

  18. Conference Report: The 2016 Olten Meeting at the Basel Life Science Week.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2016-12-21

    "This 'telephone' has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us." This was an internal memo written by Western Union in 1876. That's right. Without efficient knowledge sharing and technology transfer, even the best scientific development may prove to be a damp squib for a long time. The Basel Life Science Week was created in order to promote scientific and economic exchange and pave the way for innovative ideas. That's why NTN Swiss Biotech has moved its traditional 'Olten Meeting' to the Basel Life Science Week. It is the ideal setting for NTN Swiss Biotech and the School of Life Sciences FHNW to present innovative developments within its network of academic and industrial partners in the future-oriented disciplines of Molecular Diagnostics and Medicinal Chemistry. Short summaries of the key lectures are reported below.

  19. Conference report: reviving pharmaceutical R&D with translational science, regulatory efficiency and innovative models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi Tee; Weng, Naidong; Lee, Mike

    2013-10-01

    The 4th Annual Shanghai Symposium on Clinical & Pharmaceutical Solutions through Analysis (CPSA Shanghai 2013) was held on 24-27 April 2013 in Shanghai, China. The meeting provided an educational forum for scientists from pharmaceutical industry, academia, CROs and instrument vendors to share experience and ideas, and discuss current challenges, issues and innovative solutions associated with pharmaceutical R&D. The meeting featured highly interactive events, including diversified symposia, roundtable discussions, workshops, poster sessions and conference awards. Education and specialized training are the foundation of CPSA events. The CPSA Shanghai 2013 meeting also featured an inaugural satellite workshop event in Beijing, as well as joint sessions traditionally held with local bioanalytical and drug metabolism discussion groups.

  20. USL NASA/RECON project presentations at the 1985 ACM Computer Science Conference: Abstracts and visuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Chum, Frank Y.; Gallagher, Suzy; Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Moreau, Dennis R.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1985-01-01

    This Working Paper Series entry represents the abstracts and visuals associated with presentations delivered by six USL NASA/RECON research team members at the above named conference. The presentations highlight various aspects of NASA contract activities pursued by the participants as they relate to individual research projects. The titles of the six presentations are as follows: (1) The Specification and Design of a Distributed Workstation; (2) An Innovative, Multidisciplinary Educational Program in Interactive Information Storage and Retrieval; (3) Critical Comparative Analysis of the Major Commercial IS and R Systems; (4) Design Criteria for a PC-Based Common User Interface to Remote Information Systems; (5) The Design of an Object-Oriented Graphics Interface; and (6) Knowledge-Based Information Retrieval: Techniques and Applications.