Science.gov

Sample records for radio source population

  1. Populations of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, J. V.

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, radio sky surveys were the center of an intense and public debate -- Big-Bang versus Steady-State cosmology -- the arguments revolving about source counts and statistical interpretations in the face of instrumental complications. The 1965 discovery of the microwave background took the fire from the debate, but left the momentum in place for large-area radio surveys at different frequencies, and for extensive identification/redshift-measurement programs. By the 1970s the data enabled us to start disentangling the different populations of extragalactic radio sources. We could refine our taxonomy, and we could view the possibility of delineating individual cosmic histories and evolutions. We could at least describe a goal to elucidate the birth-life-death cycles of the objects involved 1quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) and radio galaxies: together the 'active galactic nuclei' (AGNs)1 whose unaccountably prodigious energies somehow produce the beautifully aligned radio structures with which we are now familiar. One part of John Bolton's vision was to see how distorted a view of the AGN universe the original long-wavelength surveys provided. One legacy is thus the 'short-wavelength survey' for extragalactic radio sources, which has done so much to balance our picture of the radio sky. And indeed the legacy continues in the form of the immense sky surveys at present under way, complete with their sub-industries of radio-positioning and identification. From these, yet further results are emerging on spatial distribution and the skeleton structure of the universe. It is the purpose of this paper to outline something of this current view of the populations, their differences, similarities and unifying concepts.

  2. The cosmic population of extended radio sources: A Radio-Optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorat, K.

    2014-03-01

    This thesis presents studies of cosmic populations of extragalactic radio sources. The problems selected for this thesis are 1) the derivation of constraints on the emergence of new sub-mJy populations at flux density below about 1 mJy (at 1.4 GHz) paying careful attention to including sources with low surface brightness and counting sources rather than components 2) development of a new method to estimate the asymmetry in the large scale galaxy environment with respect to the axes of extended radio sources and use this to examine for evidence of impact of the environment on the morphology of radio sources. The studies presented herein have been carried out using the Australia Telescope Low Brightness Survey (ATLBS), which is a sensitive radio survey at 1.4 GHz, imaging 8.42 square degrees of the sky along with accompanying optical observations of the same region.

  3. HerMES: disentangling active galactic nuclei and star formation in the radio source population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, J. I.; Page, M. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Guo, K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Vaccari, M.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ˜50 μJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that radio sources which have likely been selected on their star formation have a high AGN fraction. Below a 1.4 GHz flux density of 1 mJy, along with finding a strong contribution to the source counts from pure star-forming sources, we find that hybrid sources constitute 20-65 per cent of the sources. This result suggests that hybrid sources have a significant contribution, along with sources that do not host a detectable AGN, to the observed flattening of the source counts at ˜1 mJy for the extragalactic radio source population.

  4. The Population of Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a deep centimeter-wavelength catalog of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), based on a 30 hr single-pointing observation with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in its high-resolution A-configuration using two 1 GHz bands centered at 4.7 and 7.3 GHz. A total of 556 compact sources were detected in a map with a nominal rms noise of 3 μJy bm-1, limited by complex source structure and the primary beam response. Compared to previous catalogs, our detections increase the sample of known compact radio sources in the ONC by more than a factor of seven. The new data show complex emission on a wide range of spatial scales. Following a preliminary correction for the wideband primary-beam response, we determine radio spectral indices for 170 sources whose index uncertainties are less than ±0.5. We compare the radio to the X-ray and near-infrared point-source populations, noting similarities and differences.

  5. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  6. The Population of KPC-Scale Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, Pedro; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Browne, Ian W. A.

    In this paper we present a subsample of 55 flat-spectrum radio sources dominated by (~ 100 mas) kpc-scale structure, selected from a parent sample of 1665 VLA sources. Most are core-jets and 23 are CSO/MSO candidates. Properties of the subsample are discussed.

  7. Multi-source self-calibration: Unveiling the microJy population of compact radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, J. F.; Garrett, M. A.; Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Barthel, P. D.; Deller, A. T.; Middelberg, E.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data are extremely sensitive to the phase stability of the VLBI array. This is especially important when we reach μJy rms sensitivities. Calibration using standard phase-referencing techniques is often used to improve the phase stability of VLBI data, but the results are often not optimal. This is evident in blank fields that do not have in-beam calibrators. Aims: We present a calibration algorithm termed multi-source self-calibration (MSSC) which can be used after standard phase referencing on wide-field VLBI observations. This is tested on a 1.6 GHz wide-field VLBI data set of the Hubble Deep Field North and the Hubble Flanking Fields. Methods: MSSC uses multiple target sources that are detected in the field via standard phase referencing techniques and modifies the visibilities so that each data set approximates to a point source. These are combined to increase the signal to noise and permit self-calibration. In principle, this should allow residual phase changes caused by the troposphere and ionosphere to be corrected. By means of faceting, the technique can also be used for direction-dependent calibration. Results: Phase corrections, derived using MSSC, were applied to a wide-field VLBI data set of the HDF-N, which comprises of 699 phase centres. MSSC was found to perform considerably better than standard phase referencing and single source self-calibration. All detected sources exhibited dramatic improvements in dynamic range. Using MSSC, one source reached the detection threshold, taking the total detected sources to twenty. This means 60% of these sources can now be imaged with uniform weighting, compared to just 45% with standard phase referencing. In principle, this technique can be applied to any future VLBI observations. The Parseltongue code, which implements MSSC, has been released and made publicly available to the astronomical community (http://https://github.com/jradcliffe5/multi_self_cal).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The population of compact radio sources in ONC (Forbrich+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-08-01

    The observations were carried out with the Karl G. Jansky VLA of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on 2012 September 30, October 2-5 under project code SD630. Data were taken using the VLA's C-band (4-8GHz) receivers in full polarization mode, with two 1GHz basebands centered at 4.736 and 7.336GHz to provide a good baseline for source spectral index determination. Apart from the first epoch, the field was simultaneously observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Mostly of interest for variability information, these data will be presented as part of a follow-up paper. (1 data file).

  9. GMRT 610-MHz observations of the faint radio source population - and what these tell us about the higher radio-frequency sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittam, I. H.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Riley, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of 0.84 deg2 of the AMI001 field (centred on 00h23m10s, +31°53') with an rms noise of 18 μJy beam-1 in the centre of the field. A total of 955 sources are detected, and 814 are included in the source count analysis. The source counts from these observations are consistent with previous work. We have used these data to study the spectral index distribution of a sample of sources selected at 15.7 GHz from the recent deep extension to the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey. The median spectral index, α, (where S ∝ ν-α) between 0.08 < S_{15.7 GHz} / mJy < 0.2 is 0.32 ± 0.14, showing that star-forming galaxies, which have much steeper spectra, are not contributing significantly to this population. This is in contrast to several models, but in agreement with the results from the 10C ultradeep source counts; the high-frequency sky therefore continues to be dominated by radio galaxies down to S15.7GHz = 0.1 mJy.

  10. Is there a Population of Weak Radio Sources that Contributes to the Excess Sky Temperature Observed by Arcade 2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Perley, R. A.; Miller, N. A.; Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J.

    2013-01-01

    The ARCADE 2 balloon experiment has reported a 3 GHz sky brightness that is 65 +/- 8 mK in excess of the CMB which is much greater than the ~13 mK that can be explained by the known population of radio sources. We have used the Karl Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam at 3 GHz with 8 arcsecond resolution and 1.0 μJy per beam rms noise near the pointing center. Our image is confusion limited with an rms confusion noise of ~1.2 μJy per beam. Modeling the distribution of confusion noise suggests that any excess background must be very smooth, so any hypothetical population of discrete sources that can account for the ARCADE result must be very numerous and weaker than ~ 30 nanoJy. If the ARCADE results are correct, the number of weak radio sources would be several orders of magnitude greater than the faintest galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field.

  11. Astrometry of southern radio sources.

    PubMed

    White, G L; Jauncey, D L; Harvey, B R; Savage, A; Gulkis, S; Preston, R A; Peterson, B A; Reynolds, J E; Nicolson, G D; Malin, D F

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogues. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarc-second radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  12. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  13. Radio properties of extragalactic IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, J. J.; Broderick, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study identifies extragalactic sources from the IRAS Faint Source Catalog by position coincidence with radio sources stronger than 25 mJy and lying north of +5 deg on the Green Bank 4.85 GHz sky maps. Published VLA maps, new 4.86 GHz VLA maps made with 15-arcsec resolution, and accurate optical positions are used to confirm 122 of these candidate identifications. Normal and starburst spiral galaxies were found to comprise about 97 percent of the FIR flux-limited sample. Radio-loud 'monsters' with q less than 2.25 dominate the radio emission from about 2 percent of the FIR source sample, and radio-quiet monsters are responsible for the FIR emission from less than about 1 percent of the FIR sample. All of the radio-identified sources are optically identified, mostly with relatively bright nearby galaxies. No evidence was found for any new populations of high-redshift FIR sources, nonthermal sources with steep FIR/optical spectra, or dust-shrouded sources visible only at FIR and radio wavelengths.

  14. Compact steep-spectrum sources as the parent population of flat-spectrum radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, M.; Caccianiga, A.; Foschini, L.; Peterson, B. M.; Mathur, S.; Terreran, G.; Ciroi, S.; Congiu, E.; Cracco, V.; Frezzato, M.; La Mura, G.; Rafanelli, P.

    2016-06-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are an interesting subclass of active galactic nuclei (AGN), which tipically does not exhibit any strong radio emission. Seven percent of them, though, are radio-loud and often show a flat radio-spectrum (F-NLS1s). This, along to the detection of γ-ray emission coming from them, is usually interpreted as a sign of a relativistic beamed jet oriented along the line of sight. An important aspect of these AGN that must be understood is the nature of their parent population, in other words how do they appear when observed under different angles. In the recent literature it has been proposed that a specific class of radio-galaxies, compact-steep sources (CSS) classified as high excitation radio galaxies (HERG), can represent the parent population of F-NLS1s. To test this hypothesis in a quantitative way,in this paper we analyzed the only two statistically complete samples of CSS/HERGs and F-NLS1s available in the literature. We derived the black hole mass and Eddington ratio distributions, and we built for the first time the radio luminosity function of F-NLS1s. Finally, we applied a relativistic beaming model to the luminosity function of CSS/HERGs, and compared the result with the observed function of F-NLS1s. We found that compact steep-spectrum sources are valid parent candidates and that F-NLS1s, when observed with a different inclination, might actually appear as CSS/HERGs.

  15. Radio outbursts in extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Wayne Morris

    Three aspects of the flux density variability of extragalactic radio sources were examined: millimeter wavelength short timescale variability, the spectral evolution of outbursts, and whether the outbursts are periodically spaced. Observations of extragalactic radio sources were conducted using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory between January and June 1985 at 88.2 GHz and during June and July 1985 at 40.0 GHz. Many of the sources exhibited significant flux density variations during the observing span. In addition, the most rapid variations observed were comparable with those reported in previous works. Two sources, 0355+50 and OJ287, both exhibited outbursts whose rise and fall timescales were less than a month. An anomalous flux density dropout was observed in 3C446 and was interpreted as an occultation event. Data at five frequencies between 2.7 and 89.6 GHz from the Dent-Balonek monitoring program were used to investigate the spectral evolution of eight outbursts. Outburst profile fitting was used to deconvolve the individual outbursts from one another at each frequency. The fit profiles were used to generate multiple epoch spectra to investigate the evolution of the outbursts. A phase residual minimization method was used to examine four sources for periodic behavior.

  16. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  17. The infrared properties of the GPS and CSS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-02-01

    I review the results of three Spitzer studies of GHz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies. The luminosity of the IR continuum and the high ionization lines confirm that some GPS/CSS can have central engines which are similar to those of the extended powerful radio sources. This is consistent with the hypothesis that some GPS/CSS can evolve to become the large-scale sources. Warm H_2 is common in the GPS/CSS sources consistent with feedback via jet-ISM interaction. The GPS/CSS seem to have higher star formation rates than typical (2JY + 3CRR) radio sources. This should be confirmed with a larger sample. If compact sources interact with dense, clumpy star forming clouds and if the interaction with the dense medium sufficiently enhances the radio power, these star forming galaxies with enhanced radio emission will be selected for the current bright samples of GPS and CSS sources. This will increase the number of GPS and CSS sources which are observed to be forming stars. If radio sources have longer lives and/or star formation is more common in large radio galaxies, the need for a new population of star forming compact sources with enhanced radio emission is reduced.

  18. The Host Galaxies of Micro-Jansky Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchsinger, K. M.; Lacy, M.; Jones, K. M.; Mauduit, J. C.; Pforr, J.; Surace, J. A.; Vaccari, M.; Farrah, D.; Gonzales-Solares, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Maraston, C.; Marchetti, L.; Oliver, S.; Afonso, J.; Cappozi, D.; Sajina, A.

    2015-09-01

    We combine a deep 0.5 deg2, 1.4 GHz deep radio survey in the Lockman Hole with infrared and optical data in the same field, including the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) and UKIDSS near-infrared surveys, to make the largest study to date of the host galaxies of radio sources with typical radio flux densities ˜ 50 μJy. 87% (1274/1467) of radio sources have identifications in SERVS to {AB}≈ 23.1 at 3.6 or 4.5μm, and 9% are blended with bright objects (mostly stars), leaving only 4% (59 objects), which are too faint to confidently identify in the near-infrared. We are able to estimate photometric redshifts for 68% of the radio sources. We use mid-infrared diagnostics to show that the source population consists of a mixture of star-forming galaxies, rapidly accreting (cold mode) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and low accretion rate (hot mode) AGNs, with neither AGNs nor star-forming galaxies clearly dominating. We see the breakdown in the K-z relation in faint radio source samples, and show that it is due to radio source populations becoming dominated by sources with radio luminosities ˜ {10}23 {{WHz}}-1. At these luminosities, both the star-forming galaxies and the cold mode AGNs have hosts with stellar luminosities of about a factor of two lower than those of hot mode AGNs, which continue to reside in only the most massive hosts. We show that out to at least z˜ 2, galaxies with stellar masses \\gt {10}11.5 {M}⊙ have radio-loud fractions up to ˜30%. This is consistent with there being a sufficient number of radio sources for radio-mode feedback to play a role in galaxy evolution.

  19. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  20. Optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe II emission is strong while [O III] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad Hβ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad Hβ component of 4C 12.50 is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  1. Population Studies of Radio and Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K; Gonthier, Peter; Coltisor, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are one of the most promising candidates for at least some of the 40-50 EGRET unidentified gamma-ray sources that lie near the Galactic plane. Since the end of the EGRO mission, the more sensitive Parkes Multibeam radio survey has detected mere than two dozen new radio pulsars in or near unidentified EGRET sources, many of which are young and energetic. These results raise an important question about the nature of radio quiescence in gamma-ray pulsars: is the non-detection of radio emission a matter of beaming or of sensitivity? The answer is very dependent on the geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We present results of a population synthesis of pulsars in the Galaxy, including for the first time the full geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We use a recent empirically derived model of the radio emission and luminosity, and a gamma-ray emission geometry and luminosity derived theoretically from pair cascades in the polar slot gap. The simulation includes characteristics of eight radio surveys of the Princeton catalog plus the Parkes MB survey. Our results indicate that EGRET was capable of detecting several dozen pulsars as point sources, with the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars increasing significantly to about ten to one when the Parkes Survey is included. Polar cap models thus predict that many of the unidentified EGRET sources could be radio-loud gamma- ray pulsars, previously undetected as radio pulsars due to distance, large dispersion and lack of sensitivity. If true, this would make gamma-ray telescopes a potentially more sensitive tool for detecting distant young neutron stars in the Galactic plane.

  2. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-12-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, ( u, v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and clean-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System ( aips) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications ( casa). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  3. Optically faint radio sources: reborn AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, M. E.; Brinchmann, J.; Lobo, C.; Antón, S.

    2011-12-01

    We present our discovery of several relatively strong radio sources in the field-of-view of SDSS galaxy clusters that have no optical counterparts down to the magnitude limits of the SDSS. The optically faint radio sources appear as double-lobed or core-jet objects in the FIRST radio images and have projected angular sizes ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 arcmin. We followed-up these sources with near-infrared imaging using the wide-field imager HAWK-I on the VLT. We detected Ks-band emitting regions, about 1.5 arcsec in size and coincident with the centers of the radio structures, in all sources, with magnitudes in the range 17-20 mag. We used spectral modelling to characterize the sample sources. In general, the radio properties are similar to those observed in 3CRR sources but the optical-radio slopes are consistent with those of moderate to high redshift (z < 4) gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources. Our results suggest that these unusual objects are galaxies whose black hole has been recently re-ignited but that retain large-scale radio structures, which are signatures of previous AGN activity.

  4. Faint radio sources and gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, G.I.; Conner, S.R.; Heflin, M.B.; Lehar, J.; Burke, B.F. MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-04-01

    Measurements of the surface density of radio sources resulting from a deep VLA integration at 5 GHz and the MIT-Green Bank (MG) II 5 GHz survey are summarized. The faint source counts are combined with previous observations and fitted to a power-law function of surface density vs. limiting flux density. The surface density of radio sources brighter than 1 mJy is k = 0.019 + or - 0.004/arcmin. The power-law exponent is best fit by -0.93 + or - 0.14. Between 15 and 100 mJy, the surface density of radio sources varies nearly as predicted by Euclidian models of the universe. Estimates are given for the number of chance alignments of radio sources in the VLA snapshot observations of the MIT-Princeton-Caltech gravitational lens search. The probability of lens candidate configurations occurring by chance alignment is calculated. 28 refs.

  5. Optical Characteristics of Astrometric Radio Sources OCARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Z.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the current status of the catalog of Optical Characteristics of Astrometric Radio Sources OCARS is presented. The catalog includes radio sources observed in various astrometric and geodetic VLBI programs in 1979-2012. For these sources the physical object type, redshift and visual or infrared magnitude is given when available. Detailed comments are provided when some problems with published data were encountered. Since the first version created in December 2007, the catalog is continuously developed and expanded in respect to inclusion of new radio sources and addition of new or correction of old astrophysical data. Several sources of information are used for OCARS. The main of them are the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) and SIMBAD astronomical databases. Besides several astronomical journals and arXiv depository are regularly monitored, so that new data is included in OCARS just after publication. The redshift for about 150 sources have been determined from dedicated optical spectroscopic observations. As of October 2012, OCARS catalog includes 7173 radio sources. 3898 sources have known redshift, and 4860 sources have known magnitude. In 2009, it was used as a supplement material to the ICRF2. The list of radio sources with a good observational history but lacking astrophysical information is provide for planning of optical observations of the most important astrometric sources. The OCARS catalog is updated, in average every several weeks and is available at http://www.gao.spb.ru/english/as/ac_vlbi/ocars.txt.

  6. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  7. Steep Spectrum Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Tracy E.

    2012-05-01

    Steep spectrum radio emission associated with galaxy clusters comes from compact central active galactic nuclei (AGN) driven radio sources in dense cool core clusters as well as from large regions of diffuse (halo and relic) emission associated with dynamically complex merging systems. These radio halos and relics are best traced at low radio frequencies where details of their morphology, location and spectral index distribution can be used to probe the underlying acceleration mechanism(s) as well as important details of large scale structure formation. Low frequency radio observations also play an important role in the study of AGN feedback into the intracluster medium and the regulation of cooling cores. While spectacular results are coming from the current generation of low frequency instruments, there will soon be a new revolution in studies of steep spectrum sources with the upcoming generation of low frequency interferometers on Earth and ultimately the moon.

  8. The faint radio AGN population in the spotlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Ruiz, Noelia; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-08-01

    To determine the AGN component in the faint radio population is fundamental in galaxy evolution studies. A relatively easy and direct way to determine which galaxies do have a radio-active AGN is a detection using the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. The goal of this project is to study with statistically relevant numbers the faint radio source population using VLBI observations. To achieve this goal, the project is divided into two parts. In the first part, we have observed ~3000 radio sources in the COSMOS extragalactic field with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4GHz. We have detected 468 sources. In the second part, we have observed ~200 radio sources in the COSMOS field with extremely high sensitivity using the VLBA together with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4GHz, to explore an even fainter population in the flux density regime of tens of uJy. We are currently calibrating this data. In this overview I will present the survey design, observations, and calibration, along with some first results.

  9. ATLBS EXTENDED SOURCE SAMPLE: THE EVOLUTION IN RADIO SOURCE MORPHOLOGY WITH FLUX DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Thorat, K.; Ekers, R. D.; Hunstead, R. W.; Johnston, H. M.; Sadler, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Based on the Australia Telescope Low Brightness Survey (ATLBS) we present a sample of extended radio sources and derive morphological properties of faint radio sources. One hundred nineteen radio galaxies form the ATLBS Extended Source Sample (ATLBS-ESS) consisting of all sources exceeding 30'' in extent and integrated flux densities exceeding 1 mJy. We give structural details along with information on galaxy identifications and source classifications. The ATLBS-ESS, unlike samples with higher flux-density limits, has almost equal fractions of FR-I and FR-II radio galaxies, with a large fraction of the FR-I population exhibiting 3C31-type structures. Significant asymmetry in lobe extents appears to be a common occurrence in the ATLBS-ESS FR-I sources compared with FR-II sources. We present a sample of 22 FR-Is at z > 0.5 with good structural information. The detection of several giant radio sources, with size exceeding 0.7 Mpc, at z > 1 suggests that giant radio sources are not less common at high redshifts. The ESS also includes a sample of 28 restarted radio galaxies. The relative abundance of dying and restarting sources is indicative of a model where radio sources undergo episodic activity in which an active phase is followed by a brief dying phase that terminates with restarting of the central activity; in any massive elliptical a few such activity cycles wherein adjacent events blend may constitute the lifetime of a radio source and such bursts of blended activity cycles may be repeated over the age of the host. The ATLBS-ESS includes a 2 Mpc giant radio galaxy with the lowest surface brightness lobes known to date.

  10. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of their optical and infrared faintness, it is very challenging to study IFRS at these wavelengths. However, IFRS are relatively bright in the radio regime with 1.4 GHz flux densities of a few to a few tens of mJy. Therefore, the radio regime is the most promising wavelength regime in which to constrain their nature. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Methods: We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. Results: We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep (α < -0.8; %), but we also find ultra-steep SEDs (α < -1.3; %). In particular, IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least % of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by

  11. Radio Source Morphology: 'nature or nuture'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Julie; Emonts, Bjorn; O'Sullivan, Shane

    2012-10-01

    Radio sources, emanating from supermassive black-holes in the centres of active galaxies, display a large variety of morphological properties. It is a long-standing debate to what extent the differences between various types of radio sources are due to intrinsic properties of the central engine (`nature') or due to the properties of the interstellar medium that surrounds the central engine and host galaxy (`nurture'). Settling this `nature vs. nurture' debate for nearby radio galaxies, which can be studied in great detail, is vital for understanding the properties and evolution of radio galaxies throughout the Universe. We propose to observe the radio galaxy NGC 612 where previous observations have detected the presence of a large-scale HI bridge between the host galaxy and a nearby galaxy NGC 619. We request a total of 13 hrs in the 750m array-configuration to determine whether or not the 100 kpc-scale radio source morphology is directly related to the intergalactic distribution of neutral hydrogen gas.

  12. 3C 236: Radio Source, Interrupted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Baum, Stefi A.; Sparks, William B.; Martel, André R.; Allen, Mark G.; Macchetto, Ferdinando D.; Miley, George K.

    2001-04-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph MAMA near-UV images and archival Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) V- and R-band images that reveal the presence of four star-forming regions in an arc along the edge of the dust lane in the giant (4 Mpc) radio galaxy 3C 236. Two of the star-forming regions are relatively young, with ages of order ~107 yr, while the other two are older, with ages of order ~108-109 yr, which is comparable to the estimated age of the giant radio source. Based on dynamical and spectral aging arguments, we suggest that the fuel supply to the active galactic nucleus (AGN) was interrupted for ~107 yr and has now been restored, resulting in the formation of the inner 2 kpc-scale radio source. This timescale is similar to that of the age of the youngest of the star-forming regions. We suggest that the transport of gas in the disk is nonsteady and that this produces the multiple episodes of star formation in the disk, as well as the multiple epochs of radio source activity. If the inner radio source and the youngest star-forming region are related by the same event of gas transport, the gas must be transported from the hundreds of parsec scale to the subparsec scale on a timescale of ~107 yr, which is similar to the dynamical timescale of the gas on the hundreds of parsec scale.

  13. 3C236: Radio Source, Interrupted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Baum, S. A.; Sparks, W. B.

    We present highlights of the results of new HST STIS/MAMA near-UV images and archival WFPC2 V- and R-band images which reveal the presence of four apparently star forming regions in an arc along the edge of the dust lane in the giant (4 Mpc) radio galaxy 3C236. Two of the star forming regions are relatively young with ages of order ~107 yr, while the other two are older with ages of order ~108 -- 109 yr, which is comparable to the estimated age of the giant radio source. Based on dynamical and spectral aging arguments, we suggest that the fuel supply to the AGN was interrupted for ~107 yr and has now been restored, resulting in the formation of the inner 2 kpc scale radio source. This time scale is similar to that of the age of the youngest of the star forming regions. We suggest that the transport of gas in the disk is non-steady and that this produces both the multiple episodes of star formation in the disk as well as the multiple epochs of radio source activity. If the inner radio source and the youngest star forming region are related by the same event of gas transport, the gas must be transported from the hundreds of pc scale to the sub-parsec scale on a time scale of ~107 yr, which is similar to the dynamical timescale of the gas on the hundreds of pc scales.

  14. Spectrophotometric observations of Molonglo radio source identifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. E.; Burbidge, E. M.; Baldwin, J. A.; Tohline, J. E.; Wampler, E. J.; Hazard, C.; Murdoch, H. S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents spectrophotometric observations of 76 optical objects identified with radio sources from the MC2 and MC3 catalogs. Line intensities, equivalent widths, line widths, and optical spectral indices are presented for 44 objects confirmed as quasi-stellar objects. The statistical and physical properties of the Molonglo sample are briefly discussed.

  15. Nature of X-shaped radio sources .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, D. V.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Cheung, C. C.; Lobanov, A. P.; Zensus, J. A.; Bhatnagar, S.; Rao, A. P.

    The nature of X-shaped sources is a matter of considerable debate: it has even been proposed that they provide evidence for black hole mergers/spin reorientation, and therefore constrain the rate of strong gravitational wave events (Merritt & Ekers 2002). Based on morphological and spectral characteristics of these sources, currently a strong contender to explain the nature of these sources is the `alternative' model of Lal & Rao (2007), in which these sources consist of two pairs of jets, which are associated with two unresolved AGNs. Detailed morphological and spectral results on milliarcsecond-scales (mas) provide a crucial test of this model, and hence these sources are excellent candidates to study on mas; i.e., to detect the presence/absence of double nuclei/AGNs, signs of helical/disrupted jets, thereby, to investigate spatially resolved/unresolved binary AGN systems and providing clues to understanding the physics of merging of AGNs on mas. We conducted a systematic study of a large sample of known X-shaped, comparison FR II radio galaxies, and newly discovered X-shaped candidate sources using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array at several radio frequencies. In our new observations of `comparison' FR II radio galaxies we find that almost all of our targets show standard spectral steepening as a function of distance from the hotspot. However, one source, 3C 321, has a low-surface-brightness extension that shows a flatter spectral index than the high-surface-brightness hotspots/lobes, as found in `known' X-shaped sources.

  16. Pulsating Radio Sources near the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Staelin, D H; Reifenstein, E C

    1968-12-27

    Two new pulsating radio sources, designated NP 0527 and NP 0532, were found near the Crab Nebula and could be coincident with it. Both sources are sporadic, and no periodicities are evident. The pulse dispersions indicate that 1.58 +/- 0.03 and 1.74 +/- 0.02 x 10(20) electrons per square centimeter lie in the direction of NP 0527 and NP 0532, respectively.

  17. Source characteristics of Jovian hectometric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Direct confirmation that low-frequency Jovian hectometric (HOM) radio emissions centered near 0 deg central meridian longitude consist of distinct, oppositely polarized northern and southern beams has been achieved using data from the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. Distinct northern and southern beams were observed in the frequency range from approximately 300 kHz to 1 MHz for at least eight Jovian rotations during the Ulysses inbound pass at distances from 100 to 40 R(sub j). The radiation from the two magnetic hemispheres was measured from different Jovigraphic longitudes and magnetic (or centrifugal) latitudes. Observed temporal variations in the radio intensities, with time scales on the order of 30 min, may result either from longitudinal variations of the HOM sources or from longitudinal density variations in the Io plasma torus. Using the URAP direction-finding capabilities and assuming a tilted dipole planetary magnetic field model, the three-dimensional HOM source locations, the L shell through these source locations, and the beam opening angles were independently deduced. The HOM sources were found to originate at approximately 3 R(sub j) and on low L shells (L approximately 4 to 6), with beam opening angles ranging from 10 to 50 deg.

  18. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H{sup {minus}} beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. BROADBAND RADIO POLARIMETRY AND FARADAY ROTATION OF 563 EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-10

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1′ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  20. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1‧ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  1. The FIRST radio survey: Panchromatic properties of FIRST radio sources identified in the Boötes and Cetus fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouchefry, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the availability of multi-wavelength optical/infrared information of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm) radio sources counterparts over ˜9.2 deg2 in the Boötes field and ˜2.4 deg2 in the Cetus field is exploited to infer the physical properties of the faint radio population. The radio sources optically identified have been divided into resolved galaxies and stellar-like objects finding that the faint radio population is mainly composed of early-type galaxies with very red colour (Bw-R˜ 4.6). A total number of 57 counterparts of FIRST radio sources have extremely red colour (R-K≥ 5). Photometric redshift from {Hyperz} implies that the Extremely Red Objects (EROs) counterparts to FIRST radio sources are mostly located in the range z=0.7-2 , with the bulk of the population at z˜ 1. Taking advantage of the near infrared imaging with FLAMEX (FLAMINGOS Extragalactic Infrared Survey), the EROs counterparts to FIRST radio sources are separated into passively-evolving and dusty star-forming galaxies using their {RJK} colours; the relatively blue J-K of these galaxies suggest that most are old elliptical galaxies (18/25) rather than dusty starburst galaxies (7/25). A total of 15 Distant Red Galaxy (DRGs) have been identified as counterparts to FIRST radio sources in the Cetus field and 3 DRGs in the Boötes field with J-K>2.3.

  2. Clustering of Radio Sources at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    1998-12-01

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources in the FIRST 1.4-GHz survey by analysing their distribution function. We estimate the angular two-point correlation function w(theta), the variance Psi_2, and skewness Psi_3 of the distribution; both w(theta) and Psi_2 show power-law behaviour with an amplitude corresponding a spatial correlation length of r_0 ~10 h^{-1}Mpc. We detect significant skewness in the distribution, the first such detection in radio surveys, consistent with the non-linear gravitational growth of perturbations from primordial Gaussian initial conditions. We also investigate how different theoretical predictions for the normalised variance sigma^2 can match our measurements.

  3. Pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR 0 radio-galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, that was unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys. The key questions are related to the origin of their radio-emission and to its connection with the properties of their hosts. We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources, a small but representative subsample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or only slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with the one exception of a hybrid FR I/FR II source extended over ~40 kpc. Thanks to either the new high-resolution maps or to the radio spectra, we isolated the radio core component in most of them. We split the sample into two groups. Four sources have low black hole (BH) masses (mostly ~107 M⊙) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission, and are associated with radio-quiet (RQ) AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud (RL) AGN, which are located in red massive (~1011 M⊙) early-type galaxies, have high BH masses (≳108 M⊙), and are spectroscopically classified as low excitation galaxies (LEG). These are all characteristics typical of FR I radio galaxies. They also lie on the correlation between radio core power and [O III] line luminosity defined by FR Is. However, they are more core-dominated (by a factor of ~30) than FR Is and show a deficit of extended radio emission. We dub these sources "FR 0" to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission, which is their single distinguishing feature with respect to FR Is. The differences in radio properties between FR 0s and FR Is might be ascribed to an evolutionary effect, with the FR 0 sources undergoing rapid intermittency that prevents the growth of large-scale structures. However, this contrasts with the scenario in which low-luminosity radio-galaxies are fed by continuous accretion of gas from

  4. Compact radio sources in luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Rodrigo

    2007-08-01

    Radio interferometry is an observational technique of high sensitivity and incomparably high spatial resolution. Moreover, because radio waves can freely propagate through interstellar dust and gas, it allows the study of regions of the universe completely obscured at other wavelengths. This thesis reports the observational and theoretical results of my research during the past four years which are mostly based on interferometric radio data. The COLA sample is an infrared selected sample of active star forming galaxies. We conducted 6 cm VLA and VLBI snapshot observations of the northern half of this sample. The radio emission seen at VLA scales is consistent with being powered by star formation activity because it follows the far infrared to radio correlation. We detect 22% of the sample sources in our VLBI snapshots. Based on luminosity arguments, we argue that these sub-parsec VLBI sources are powered by AGN activity. Furthermore, we find that VLBI detections are preferentially found in sources whose VLA scale structures have the highest peak brightnesses suggesting a strong correlation between compact starburst and AGN activity. This observational result is consistent with the theoretical picture of an Eddington-limited nuclear starburst acting as the last valve in the pipeline transporting the gas from kiloparsec scales onto the accretion disc of a buried AGN. Arp 220 is the archetypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy. For many years this source has been known to harbour a compact (~100 pc) cluster of unresolved 18 cm bright sources believed to be bright core collapse supernovae. Using multiwavelength VLBI observations, we obtained for the first time radio spectra for 18 of these sources. We find that over a half of them have spectra consistent with young supernovae. The rest can be better explained as older supernova remnants interacting with the high density starburst ISM. This finding allowed us to constrain the number of possible scenarios for the Arp 220

  5. Radio source stability and geodetic VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The observation of the Earth's rotation by VLBI is conditioned by the celestial reference frame that should be as stable as possible. The selection of the most stable sources therefore constitutes a major step in the construction of a celestial reference frame since their stability prevents time deformation of the axes with time. The assessment of astrometric stability, i.e., the time stability the radiocenter location as detected by the VLBI, is one of the methods that were used in previous ICRF realizations (works of M. Feissel-Vernier and ICRF2). We think the same method should be addressed for the construction of the ICRF3. We analyzed the radio source time series obtained from the analysis of the data from the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program of the IVS. We used several utils based on basic statistics and more advanced methods (Allan variance) in order to provide a preliminary classification of sources.

  6. Artificial calibration source for ALMA radio interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Hills, Richard; Whyborn, Nicholas D.; Asayama, Shinichiro; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Iguchi, Satoru; Corder, Stuartt A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) radio interferometer has some different types of antennas which have a variation of gain and leakages across the primary beam of an individual antenna. We have been developing an artificial calibration source which is used for compensation of individual difference of antennas. In a high-frequency antenna, using astronomical sources to do calibration measurement would be extremely time consuming, whereas with the artificial calibration source becomes a realistic possibility. Photonic techniques are considered to be superior to conventional techniques based on electronic devices in terms of wide bandwidth and high-frequency signals. Conversion from an optical signal to a millimeter/sub-millimeter wave signal is done by a photo-mixer.

  7. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  8. GPS/CSS radio sources and their relation to other AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    We are entering a new era of sensitive, large-area and multi-frequency radio surveys that will allow us to identify Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources over a wide range in radio luminosity and study them within the context of the overall radio-source populations to which they belong. ``Classical'' GPS/CSS objects are extremely luminous radio sources with a compact double morphology, commonly thought to represent the earliest stages in the life cycle of powerful radio galaxies (e.g. O'Dea 1998). It is now becoming easier to identify GPS/CSS candidates with much lower radio luminosity - particularly in the nearby Universe. These less powerful objects, with typical 1.4 GHz radio luminosities of 1023 to 1025 W Hz-1, include peaked-spectrum radio sources with a core-jet morphology on parsec scales as well as high-frequency GPS-like peaked components embedded within lower-frequency extended emission. In the latter case, the presence of a young GPS component may not be evident from low-frequency data alone. Many radio galaxies in the local Universe have a compact (FR-0) morphology, and appear to lack extended radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The relationship of these FR-0 objects to the classical GPS/CSS radio sources remains unclear - some of them may represent short-lived episodes of AGN activity that will not lead to an extended FR-1 or FR-2 radio galaxy. Future wide-band radio surveys will shed more light on this - such surveys should ideally be coordinated to cover the full frequency range from 100 MHz to 100 GHz in order to sample all stages of GPS/CSS evolution in an unbiased way.

  9. Radio morphology and parent population of X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.; Kollgaard, R. I.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Feigelson, E. D.

    1993-01-01

    High-dynamic range (typically 1700:1) radio maps of 15 X-ray BL Lac (XBL) objects from the HEAO-1 Large Area Sky Survey are presented. Morphological characteristics of these sources are compared with Fanaroff-Riley (FR) class I radio galaxies in the context of unified schemes, with reference to one-sided kiloparsec-scale emission. Evidence that cluster membership of XBLs is significantly higher than previously thought is also presented. It is shown that the extended radio powers, X-ray emission, core-to-lobe ratios, and linear sizes of the radio selected BL Lac (RBL) and XBL populations are consistent with an FR I radio galaxy parent population. A source list and VLA observing log and map parameters are provided.

  10. The Radio/Optical Morphology of Micro-Jansky Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I.; Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    We have observed the SSA13 field (RA=13 23, DEC=42 38) using the VLA. At 1.4 GHz the rms noise is 5.0 μ Jy with resolution 1.8'', at 8.4 GHz the rms noise is 1.5 μ Jy with a resolution of 3.0''. Optical images at R-band and Z-band with 1.1'' seeing were obtained from the Subaru telescope. Over 900 radio sources were detected (528 in the complete sample) and the optical/radio registration <0.2'' permitted identification of >95% of the radio sources. The radio/optical morphological properties of the sources are sorted into a small number of classifications and these properties are compared. Our main conclusions are: (1) About half of the radio sources are associated with a relatively isolated galaxy; most other identifications are with binary systems. (2) Only 7 extended AGN (>5'') are found. (3) At Z-band, 8% of the sources are fainter than 26 mag. (4) The slope of the differential radio count is -2.3 with a density of 2.0 sources (amin)-2 with a flux density >27.5 μ Jy. (5) The average radio angular size is 1.35'', but very few sources are larger than 5''. (6) The radio orientation is often correlated with the galaxy identification or binary system orientation. Two correlations in these data suggest that most sources are associated with distant galaxies dominated by starburst activity. (1) The radio sources with angular size >1'' show an Infrared/radio correlation, whereas smaller-diameter sources do not; and (2) The radio spectral index steepens for sources weak then 100 μ Jy, suggesting an even lower proportion of AGN at the fainter observed levels.

  11. TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T.

    2013-10-20

    The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ∼30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (∼95%) or optical (∼70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

  12. Survey of Potential Radio Frequency Interference Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-13

    Article 5 of the International Telecomunications Union (ITU) Radio Regulations, 1968 Edition, as revised by the World Administrative Radio Conferences (WARC...satellite systems under Radio Regulation 3618/308A, Canada agrees that such systens should be coordinated and notified according to Articles Nll, N13 and...to the Table of Frequency Allocations, subject only to coordination as prescribed in Article Nl3A. The additional provision of this footnote imposes

  13. A population of fast radio bursts at cosmological distances.

    PubMed

    Thornton, D; Stappers, B; Bailes, M; Barsdell, B; Bates, S; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Milia, S; Ng, C; Possenti, A; van Straten, W

    2013-07-05

    Searches for transient astrophysical sources often reveal unexpected classes of objects that are useful physical laboratories. In a recent survey for pulsars and fast transients, we have uncovered four millisecond-duration radio transients all more than 40° from the Galactic plane. The bursts' properties indicate that they are of celestial rather than terrestrial origin. Host galaxy and intergalactic medium models suggest that they have cosmological redshifts of 0.5 to 1 and distances of up to 3 gigaparsecs. No temporally coincident x- or gamma-ray signature was identified in association with the bursts. Characterization of the source population and identification of host galaxies offers an opportunity to determine the baryonic content of the universe.

  14. Flat spectrum multicomponent radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pacholczyk, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Compact radio sources which do not exhibit currently large flux density variations, are often characterized by spectra nearly flat over a wide range of wavelengths. Cotton et al. (1980) recently reported the results of the VLBI multifrequency interferometric and total flux density observations of a typical representative of the flat spectrum class of sources, a BL Lacertae object PKS 0735+178. If 0735+178 is indeed representative of flat spectrum sources, then some mechanism causing the component production and energy loss to be balanced must be operative among this type of radio source to maintain a flat spectrum over at least certain periods of time. This effect is referred to as 'cosmic conspiracy'. It is suggested that the flatness of spectra of this class of radio sources may be related to a specific symmetry in the radio structure, namely, to a predominantly linear, one-dimensional evolution of radio radiating material, rather than spherical, three-dimensional evolution.

  15. The radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247: The hot spots of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chernikov, P. A.

    2013-06-01

    The physical conditions in the radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247 are studied assuming that the low-frequency spectral turnovers are due to synchrotron self-absorption. The physical parameters of the radio sources are estimated using a technique based on a nonuniform synchrotron source model. It is shown that the magnetic-field distributions in the dominant compact components of these radio sources are strongly inhomogeneous. The magnetic fields at the center of the sources are B ˜ 10-1 G, and the fields are two to three orders of magnitude weaker at the periphery. The magnetic field averaged over the compact component is B ˜ 10-3 G, and the density of relativistic electrons is n e ˜ 10-3 cm-3. Assuming that there is equipartition of the energies of the magnetic field and relativistic particles, averaged over the source, < E H > = < E e > ˜ 10-7-10-6 erg cm-3. The energy density of the magnetic field exceeds that of the relativistic electrons at the centers of the radio sources. The derived parameters of CTA 21 and OF+247 are close to those of the hot spots in the radio galaxy Cygnus A. On this basis, it is suggested that CTA 21 and OF+247 are radio galaxies at an early stage of their evolution, when the hot spots (dominant compact radio components) have appeared, and the radio lobes (weak extended components) are still being formed.

  16. What are the gigahertz peaked-spectrum radio sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Stanghellini, C.

    1991-01-01

    The astrophysical implications of recent radio and optical observations of the powerful compact gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio sources are discussed. Some tentative conclusions are presented and a scenario based on the existing data is suggested. It is argued that the spectrum is due to synchrotron self-absorption, which is assumed as the basis for the present inferences from the radio spectral shape. The finding that some GPS sources have a very narrow spectral shape is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a narrow range of size scales which dominate the radio luminosity. The highly inverted LF radio spectrum is consistent with the hypothesis that the radio source is tightly confined. The conclusion that the radio polarization of these sources is systematically low is consistent either with a very tangled magnetic field or very large Faraday rotation measures. It is suggested that GPS radio sources are formed when the radio plasma is confined on the scale of the narrow-line region by an unusually dense and clumpy ISM. The existing optical spectroscopic results are also consistent with the existence of a dense and dusty nuclear ISM.

  17. Angular structure of extragalactic radio sources at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Koshovy, V. V.; Lozynsky, A. R.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovsky, S. L.; Shepelev, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    The low frequency VLBI of URAN network operated in the decameter range has been designed in Ukraine to study cosmic radio sources. The network consists of five radio telescopes making up of four interferometers with baselines range from 42 to 913 km with UTR-2 radio telescope operated as the main antenna of the interferometers. The angular resolution of the network amount to 1 arcsec at the highest frequency of the range, and its sensitivity is about 20 Jy. Regular observations of galactic and extragalactic radio sources are performed with the network. Some results of studies are presented here.

  18. How Fred Hoyle Reconciled Radio Source Counts and the Steady State Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron

    2012-09-01

    In 1969 Fred Hoyle invited me to his Institute of Theoretical Astronomy (IOTA) in Cambridge to work with him on the interpretation of the radio source counts. This was a period of extreme tension with Ryle just across the road using the steep slope of the radio source counts to argue that the radio source population was evolving and Hoyle maintaining that the counts were consistent with the steady state cosmology. Both of these great men had made some correct deductions but they had also both made mistakes. The universe was evolving, but the source counts alone could tell us very little about cosmology. I will try to give some indication of the atmosphere and the issues at the time and look at what we can learn from this saga. I will conclude by briefly summarising the exponential growth of the size of the radio source counts since the early days and ask whether our understanding has grown at the same rate.

  19. The sub-mJy radio population in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzini, M.

    2014-06-01

    Deep radio observations provide a dust unbiased view of both black hole (BH) and star formation (SF) activity and therefore represent a powerful tool to investigate their evolution and their possible mutual influence across cosmic time. Radio astronomy is therefore becoming increasingly important for galaxy evolution studies thanks also to the many new radio facilities under construction or being planned. To maximise the potentiality of these new instruments it is crucial to make predictions on what they will observe and to see how best to complement the radio data with multi-wavelength information. These are the motivations of my Thesis in which I studied a sample of 900 sources detected in one of the deepest radio surveys ever made. The observations have been performed at 1.4 GHz with the Very Large Array on the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. I developed a multi-wavelength method to identify the optical-infrared counterparts of the radio sources and to classify them as radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RL AGNs), radio-quiet (RQ) AGNs, and star forming galaxies (SFGs). I was able for the first time to quantify the relative contribution of these different classes of sources down to a radio flux density limit of ∼30 μJy. I characterized the host galaxy properties (stellar masses, optical colors, and morphology) of the radio sources; RQ AGN hosts and SFGs have similar properties with disk morphology and blue colors while radio-loud AGN hosts are more massive, redder and mostly ellipticals. This suggests that the RQ and RL activity occurs at two different evolutionary stages of the BH-host galaxy co-evolution. The RQ phase occurs at earlier times when the galaxy is still gas rich and actively forming stars while the radio activity of the BH appears when the galaxy has already formed the bulk of its stellar population, the gas supply is lower, and the SF is considerably reduced. I quantified the star formation rate (SFR) of the radio sources using two

  20. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  1. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Gawne, K R; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Roseberry, R T; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ∼38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ∼90%. H(-) beam pulses (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ∼60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ∼0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ∼99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ∼75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance∕installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ∼100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  2. Searching for Compact Radio Sources Associated with UCHII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masqué, Josep M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Trinidad, Miguel A.; Kurtz, Stan; Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodríguez-Rico, Carlos A.; Loinard, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Ultra-compact (UC)H ii regions represent a very early stage of massive star formation. The structure and evolution of these regions are not yet fully understood. Interferometric observations showed in recent years that compact sources of uncertain nature are associated with some UCH ii regions. To examine this, we carried out VLA 1.3 cm observations in the A configuration of selected UCH ii regions in order to report additional cases of compact sources embedded in UCH ii regions. With these observations, we find 13 compact sources that are associated with 9 UCH ii regions. Although we cannot establish an unambiguous nature for the newly detected sources, we assess some of their observational properties. According to the results, we can distinguish between two types of compact sources. One type corresponds to sources that are probably deeply embedded in the dense ionized gas of the UCH ii region. These sources are photoevaporated by the exciting star of the region and will last for 104–105 years. They may play a crucial role in the evolution of the UCH ii region as the photoevaporated material could replenish the expanding plasma and might provide a solution to the so-called lifetime problem of these regions. The second type of compact sources is not associated with the densest ionized gas of the region. A few of these sources appear resolved and may be photoevaporating objects such as those of the first type, but with significantly lower mass depletion rates. The remaining sources of this second type appear unresolved, and their properties are varied. We speculate on the similarity between the sources of the second type and those of the Orion population of radio sources.

  3. Radio observations in the fields of COS-B gamma ray sources. IV - First quadrant sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, M. E.; Schlickeiser, R.; Sieber, W.; Younis, S.

    1988-01-01

    The field of five COS-B gamma-ray sources in the first galactic quadrant have been mapped using the Effelsberg radio telescope at several frequencies. Candidate objects as potential radio counterparts of gamma-ray sources are discussed in the light of current observations; however, mostly being due to the crowded nature of the radio fields, no clear identification has been possible.

  4. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechamisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as it flew by Neptune. The study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, and ray tracing to determine the possible source mechanisms and locations of the radiation, including the narrowband bursty and smooth components of the Neptune radio emission.

  5. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Scott D; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kassim, Namir E; Ray, Paul S; Markwardt, Craig B; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2005-03-03

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. Although high-time-resolution observations are often possible in radio astronomy, they are usually limited to quite narrow fields of view. The dynamic radio sky is therefore poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a transient radio source, GCRT J1745-3009, which was detected during a moderately wide-field monitoring programme of the Galactic Centre region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the Galactic Centre, its brightness temperature (approximately 10(16) K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceed those observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and are consistent with coherent emission processes that are rarely observed. We conclude that it represents a hitherto unknown class of transient radio sources, the first of possibly many new classes that may be discovered by emerging wide-field radio telescopes.

  6. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  7. Sco X-1 - A galactic radio source with an extragalactic radio morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geldzahler, B. J.; Corey, B. E.; Fomalont, E. B.; Hilldrup, K.

    1981-01-01

    VLA observations of radio emissions at 1465 and 4885 MHz, of Sco X-1 confirm the existence of a colinear triple structure. Evidence that the three components of Sco X-1 are physically associated is presented, including the morphology, spectrum, variability, volume emissivity and magnetic field strength. The possibility of a physical phenomenon occurring in Sco X-1 similar to that occurring in extragalactic radio sources is discussed, and two galactic sources are found having extended emission similar to that in extragalactic objects. The extended structure of Sco X-1 is also observed to be similar to that of the hot spots in luminous extragalactic sources, and a radio source 20 arcmin from Sco X-1 is found to lie nearly along the radio axis formed by the components of Sco X-1.

  8. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  9. Forthcoming Occultations of Astrometric Radio Sources by Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    L'vov, Victor; Malkin, Zinovy; Tsekmeister, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Astrometric observations of radio source occultations by solar system bodies may be of large interest for testing gravity theories, dynamical astronomy, and planetary physics. In this paper, we present an updated list of the occultations of astrometric radio sources by planets expected in the coming years. Such events, like solar eclipses, generally speaking can only be observed in a limited region. A map of the shadow path is provided for the events that will occurr in regions with several VLBI stations and hence will be the most interesting for radio astronomy experiments.

  10. High-energy sources at low radio frequency: the Murchison Widefield Array view of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, M.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Lico, R.; Burlon, D.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Morgan, J.; Pavlidou, V.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ewall-Rice, A.; Emrich, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kratzenberg, E.; Feng, L.; Jacobs, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-frequency radio arrays are opening a new window for the study of the sky, both to study new phenomena and to better characterize known source classes. Being flat-spectrum sources, blazars are so far poorly studied at low radio frequencies. Aims: We characterize the spectral properties of the blazar population at low radio frequency, compare the radio and high-energy properties of the gamma-ray blazar population, and search for radio counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources. Methods: We cross-correlated the 6100 deg2 Murchison Widefield Array Commissioning Survey catalogue with the Roma blazar catalogue, the third catalogue of active galactic nuclei detected by Fermi-LAT, and the unidentified members of the entire third catalogue of gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi-LAT. When available, we also added high-frequency radio data from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz catalogue. Results: We find low-frequency counterparts for 186 out of 517 (36%) blazars, 79 out of 174 (45%) gamma-ray blazars, and 8 out of 73 (11%) gamma-ray blazar candidates. The mean low-frequency (120-180 MHz) blazar spectral index is ⟨αlow⟩ = 0.57 ± 0.02: blazar spectra are flatter than the rest of the population of low-frequency sources, but are steeper than at ~GHz frequencies. Low-frequency radio flux density and gamma-ray energy flux display a mildly significant and broadly scattered correlation. Ten unidentified gamma-ray sources have a (probably fortuitous) positional match with low radio frequency sources. Conclusions: Low-frequency radio astronomy provides important information about sources with a flat radio spectrum and high energy. However, the relatively low sensitivity of the present surveys still misses a significant fraction of these objects. Upcoming deeper surveys, such as the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-Sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, will provide further insight into this population. Tables 5-7 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  11. The Physics of Cooling Flow Clusters with Central Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    2005-01-01

    Central galaxies in rich clusters are the sites of cluster cooling flows, with large masses of gas cooling through part of the X-ray band. Many of these galaxies host powerful radio sources. These sources can displace and compress the X-ray gas leading to enhanced cooling and star formation. We observed the bright cooling flow Abell 2626 with a strangely distorted central radio source. We wished to understand the interaction of radio and X-ray thermal plasma, and to determine the dynamical nature of this cluster. One aim was to constrain the source of additional pressure in radio "holes" in the X-ray emission needed to support overlying shells of X-ray gas. We also aimed to study the problem of the lack of kT < 1-2 keV gas in cooling flows by searching for abundance inhomogeneities, heating from the radio source, and excess absorption. We also have a Chandra observation of this cluster. There were problems with the pipeline processing of this data due to a telemetry dropout. We are publishing the Chandra and XMM data together. Delays with the Chandra data have slowed up the publication. At the center of the cluster, there is a complex interaction of the odd, Z-shaped radio source, and the X-ray plasma. However, there are no clear radio bubbles. Also, the cluster SO galaxy IC 5337, which is projected 1.5 arcmin west of the cluster center, has unusual tail-like structures in both the radio and X-ray. It appears to be falling into the cluster center. There is a hot, probably shocked region of gas to the southwest, which is apparently due to the merger of a subcluster in this part of the system. There is also a merging subcluster to the northeast. The axes of these two mergers agrees with a supercluster filament structure.

  12. Giant Radio Sources in View of the Dynamical Evolution of FRII-Type Population. II. The Evolutionary Tracks on the P-D and u_c-E_tot Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machalski, J.; Chyzy, K. T.; Jamrozy, M.

    2004-12-01

    The time evolution of "fiducial" radio sources derived from fitting the dynamical model of Kaiser et al (1997) is compared with the observational data for the "clan" sources found in the sample of giant and normal-size FRII-type sources published in Paper I (Machalski et al 2004). Each "clan" comprises 3, 4 or 5 sample sources having similar values of the two basic physical parameters: the jet power Q_0 and central density of the galaxy nucleus rho_0 (determined in Paper I) but different ages, radio luminosities and axial ratios. These sources are considered as the "same" source observed at different epochs of its lifetime and used to fit the evolutionary luminosity--size (P-D) and energy density-total energy (u_c-E_tot) tracks derived from the model for a "fiducial" source with Q_0 and rho_0 equal to the averages of relevant values obtained for the "clan" members, as well as to constrain the evolutionary model of the source dynamics used. In the result we find that (i) the best fit is achieved when the Kaiser et al's model is modified by allowing an evolution of the sources' cocoon axial ratio with time as suggested by Blundell et al (1999), (ii) a slow acceleration of the average expansion speed of the cocoon along the jet axis is suggested by the "clan" sources. We argue that this acceleration, although minor, may be real and some supporting arguments come from the well known hydrodynamical considerations.

  13. Angular Structure of the Radio Sources at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Inyutin, G. A.; Koshovyy, V. V.; Lozins'kyy, A. B.; Lytvinenko, O. A.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Shepelyev, V. A.; Vaschishin, R. V.

    2006-08-01

    The world biggest decameter radio telescope UTR-2 and four smaller arrays forms the Ukrainian VLBI network URAN with an angular resolution up to 1" operated at decameter wavelengths. A number of galactic and extragalactic radio sources were studed with the URAN interferometers. At decimeter and centimeter wavelengths the studied extragalactic radio sources usually possess compact components and a total size of the sources is of about or less than a resolving power of the shortest baseline of the network. The obtained results allow us to affirm that the structure of the studied extragalactic radio sources changes at the decameter wavelengths. The reason of the changes usually is a combination of various phenomena of radio wave generation and propagation. The peculiarities of the brightness distribution in the range are: - The compact details (hot spots and sources associated with AGN) in the radio galaxies and quasars are usually less prominent at the decameter wavelengths because of synchrotron self-absorption. Their angular diameters are equal to those at higher frequencies or enlarged by the interstellar scattering. - Dimensions of lobes are enlarged as a rule. - A characteristic feature of the quasars structure at lower frequencies is extended components with steep spectra producing the main part of a flux of the sources at the decameter wavelengths. Their angular diameters exceed the total size of the source measured at higher frequencies. Such halos have been revealed in some radio galaxies too. The galactic supernova remnants studied with the URAN mainly possess the same features of their structure as at higher frequencies. Some modificatios of their structure at lower frequencies are caused by interstellar scattering, which increases a size of their compact details and difference of spectral indexes that changes relative fluxes of source parts at the decameters.

  14. Multifrequency study of a new Hybrid Morphology Radio Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperin, F.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid Morphology Radio Sources (HyMoRS) are a class of radio galaxies having the lobe morphology of a Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I on one side of the active nucleus and of a FR type II on the other. The origin of the different morphologies between FR I and FR II sources has been widely discussed in the past 40 years, and HyMoRS may be the best way to understand whether this dichotomy is related to the intrinsic nature of the source and/or to its environment. However, these sources are extremely rare (≲ 1% of radio galaxies) and only for a few of them a detailed radio study, that goes beyond the morphological classification, has been conducted. In this paper we report the discovery of one new HyMoRS; we present X-ray and multi-frequency radio observations. We discuss the source morphological, spectral and polarisation properties and confirm that HyMoRS are intrinsically bimodal with respect to these observational characteristics. We notice that HyMoRS classification based just on morphological properties of the source is hazardous.

  15. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup observations are necessary to confirm these identifications, this

  16. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.

  17. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes ofmore » neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.« less

  18. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-09-01

    We present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.

  19. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

  20. Radio Implementation of a Testbed For Cognitive Radio Source Localization Using USRPS and GNU Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    pp. 116–130, 2009. [4] R.A. Rashid , M.A. Sarijari, N. Fisal, S.K.S. Yusof and N.H. Mahalin, “Spectrum sensing measurement using GNU Radio and...USRP software radio platform,” in Proc. 7th Int. Conf. Wireless and Mobile Commun., Luxembourg, 2011. [5] R.A. Rashid , M.A. Sarijari, N. Fisal...Sarijari, A. Marwanto, N. Fisal, S.K.S. Yusof and R.A Rashid , “Energy detection sensing based on GNU Radio and USRP: An analysis study,” in Proc

  1. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  2. Radio-Quiet Pulsars and Point Sources in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David

    2002-04-01

    Since Baade and Zwicky made their prescient remark identifying the central blue star in the Crab Nebula as a neutron star, this pulsar's period has increased by 0.9 msec, turning 10^48 ergs of rotational kinetic energy into a relativistic wind that has been deposited in its surroundings. This makes the compact remnant of the supernova of 1054 AD highly conspicuous. It also makes this remnant highly anomalous. Nowhere else in the Galaxy does such a luminous young pulsar exists, despite the fact that at least half a dozen core-collapse supernovae have occurred since the Crab's birth. Indeed, the newly discovered central object in Cas A is four orders of magnitude less luminous in the X-ray band. While the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories are discovering an increasing number of Crab-like synchrotron nebulae (albeit, far less luminous than the prototype), they are also revealing X-ray point sources inside supernova remnants that lack detectable radio pulses and show no evidence of a relativistic outflow to power a surrounding nebula. I will provide an inventory of these objects, discuss whether or not truly radio-silent young neutron stars exist, and speculate on the emission mechanisms and power sources which make such objects shine. I will conclude with a commentary on the implications of this population for the distributions of pulsar birth parameters such as spin period, magnetic field strength, and space velocity, as well as offer a glimpse of what future observations might reveal about the demographics of core-collapse remnants.

  3. Field-independent source localization of Neptune's radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune, a narrowbanded bursty radio component was observed between 500 and 1326 kHz by the Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument. Based on the emission occurrence pattern, the radio source has been localized without the explicit use of the Neptunian offset-tilted dipole magnetic field model, which is accurate only at distances greater than 4 R(N) (Neptune radii) from the planet. Only assumptions based upon the general nature of radio wave propagation in planetary magnetospheres were used. A number of different candidate radial positions were sampled. For example, at 1.5 R(N), the derived source location was positioned only about 10 deg from the south magnetic pole. The radiation from this source was beamed into a cone of 77.5 + or - 6.3 deg half-angle that was tilted about 10 deg from the radial direction to the north-northeast. At other sampled radial positions, similar source locations were obtained. Due to its proximity to the south magnetic pole, the kilometric emission radio source is believed to be associated with an active auroral region, similar in nature to those found at earth and Saturn.

  4. HOST GALAXIES OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, A.; Cheung, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, active galaxies that emit much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies has an “X”-or winged-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being a realignment of the black hole within the AGN and the second positing that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium, causing backflow and producing secondary wings. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, the distribution of the stellar mass is compared to the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN. Results show elliptical host galaxies with an orthogonal offset between the semi-major axis of the host galaxy and the secondary radio wings, which lends support to the hydrodynamical model. However, results also show circular host galaxies with radio wings, making the realignment scenario a more likely model to describe the formation of these X-shaped radio sources.

  5. Optical identifications of flat-spectrum radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, J.J.; Condon, M.A.; Broderick, J.J.; Davis, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of radio sources with S> or =0.3 Jy at 1400 MHz, +24/sup 0/sources were made from the PSS prints on the basis of accurate position coincidence alone. Nearly all sources with ''flat'' high-frequency spectra ..cap alpha..(2695, 8085)<+0.5 are identified, and most of the identifications are QSO candidates. Those sources with flat low-frequency spectra but ..cap alpha..(2695, 8085)> or =+0.5 are usually in empty fields. The lower limits that can be assigned to the radio-optical spectral indices ..cap alpha../sub RO/ of these sources are significantly higher than the median ..cap alpha../sub RO/ of the sources with flat high-frequency spectra, so the optical characteristics of the two classes of radio source are intrinsically different. The radio and optical fluxes of flat-spectrum QSO's appear to be correlated, at least when averaged over 10/sup 2/--10/sup 3/ yr.

  6. Spectral structure of X-shaped radio sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Dharam Vir; Rao, A. Pramesh

    2004-09-01

    Analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope low frequency data for an X-shaped source, 3C 223.1 has revealed an unusual result as discussed earlier by Lal & Rao (2004). The radio morphologies of it at 240 and 610 MHz show a well-denfied X-shaped structure with a pair of active jets along the north-south axis and a pair of wings along the east-west axis, that pass symmetrically through the undetected radio core. The wings (or low surface brightness jet) seem to have flatter spectral index with respect to the high surface brightness jet. This clearly shows the value of mapping the sample of X-shaped sources at low frequencies. Here we present our preliminary results for two more such sources.

  7. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, V.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Kale, R.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to z > 0.3. Here, we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235, and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036, and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic, or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters, we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper limits on their radio powers. We also use archival Chandra X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio powers of the first four MACS clusters are consistent with their expected values in the LX-P1.4 GHz plot. However, we found ultrasteep spectrum radio halo in the MACSJ0417.5-1154 cluster whose rest-frame cut-off frequency is at ˜900 MHz. The remaining two clusters whose radio powers are ˜11 times below the expected values are most likely to be in the `off-state' as has been postulated in some of the models of radio halo formation.

  8. ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MERCURY ( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), PERIODIC VARIATIONS, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES...EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SOURCES), GALAXIES, BLACKBODY RADIATION, BRIGHTNESS, TEMPERATURE, MARS( PLANET ), JUPITER( PLANET ), SATURN( PLANET

  9. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  10. Radio-Optical Analysis of Extended Radio Sources in the First Look Survey Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, C. M.; Prandoni, I.; Morganti, R.; Cress, C. M.

    2010-05-01

    We combine 610 MHz GMRT data, 1.4 GHz VLA data, and 1.4 GHz WSRT observations, encompassing a ~ 4 square degree field centered on the verification strip of the Spitzer First Look Survey field, to study radio sources down to fluxes of about 0.1 mJy. The spectral index (Figure 1) analysis shows that the majority of multi-component sources are steep-spectrum sources. Nevertheless the spread in the spectral distribution is wide, with a significant number of ultra-steep, flat or inverted sources, possibly indicating a wider range of accretion modes in fainter samples. By cross-correlating 107 multi-component radio sources with the optical catalogues of Marleau et al. (2007) and Papovich et al. (2006), 23 objects were identified.

  11. On the origin of two unidentified radio/X-ray sources discovered with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Federico; Combi, Jorge A.; Medina, María C.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We aim at clarifying the nature of the emission of two spatially related unidentified X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton telescope at intermediate-low Galactic latitude Methods: We use the imaging and spectral capabilities of XMM-Newton to study the X-ray properties of these two sources. In addition, we complement our study with radio data obtained at different frequencies to analyze a possible physical association between the sources. Results: Observations reveal a point-like source aligned with elongated diffuse emission. The X-ray spectra of these sources is best-fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index Γ ~ 1.7 for the point-like source and ~2.0 for the extended source. Both sources show nonthermal radio-continuum counterparts that might indicate a physical association. In addition, from the available data, we did not detect variability on the point-like source in several timescales. Two possible scenarios are analyzed: one Galactic and one extra-Galactic. First, based on HI line absorption, assuming a Galactic origin, we infer a distance upper bound of ≲2 kpc, which poses a constraint on the height over the Galactic plane of ≲200 pc and on the linear size of the system of ≲2.3 pc. In this case, the X-ray luminosities are ≳1032 erg s-1 and ≳7.5 × 1032 erg s-1, for the point-like and extended sources, respectively. Second, an extra-Galactic nature is discussed, where the point-like source might be the core of a radio galaxy and the extended source its lobe. In this case, we compare derived fluxes, spectral indices, and spatial correlation with those typical from the radio galaxy population, showing the feasibility of this alternative astrophysical scenario. Conclusions: From the available observational evidence, we suggest that the most promising scenario to explain the nature of these sources is a system consisting of a one-sided radio galaxy, where the point-like source is an active galactic nucleus and the extended source

  12. Two Variable Radio Sources Near the Position of GRB 940301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; DeBruyn, A. G.; vanParadijs, J.; Hanlon, L.; Groot, P. J.; VanDerKlis, M.; Strom, R.; Spoelstra, T.; Bennett, K.; Fishman, G. J.; Hurley, K.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the results of a search for a radio counterpart to the strong gamma-ray burst GRB 940301. Observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the Compton Telescope error box region of GRB 940301 began on March 4, 1994, at 21 cm and April 2, 1994, at 92 cm. No flux density variations were detected at 92 cm above S= 10 mJy (5 (sigma)) within a period of 1 to 4 months after the burst. However, when we compared the field with Westerbork Northern Sky Survey data, taken two years prior to GRB 940301, we found two radio sources with significantly increased flux densities. These sources, only 17 min. apart, are located at the 2.3 and 2.6(sigma) Compton Telescope confidence contours. Their separation from the Inter Planetary Network annulus virtually excludes association with GRB 940301. Further observations in January 1996 reveal that the sources continued to change in flux density. The relatively large flux density variations at 92 cm, compared to those at higher frequencies, and the inverted spectra in the frequency range from 325-38O MHz make the sources somewhat unusual. Because the sources were already detected at 5 GHz in 1986 most, if not all, of the radio emission is probably associated with activity in Active Galactic Nuclei in distant galaxies.

  13. Source characteristics of Jovian narrow-band kilometric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Manning, R.; Zarka, P.; Pedersen, B.-M.

    1993-07-01

    New observations of Jovian narrow-band kilometric (nKOM) radio emissions were made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. These observations have demonstrated the unique capability of the URAP instrument for determining both the direction and polarization of nKOM radio sources. An important result is the discovery that nKOM radio emission originates from a number of distinct sources located at different Jovian longitudes and at the inner and outermost regions of the Io plasma torus. These sources have been tracked for several Jovian rotations, yielding their corotational lags, their spatial and temporal evolution, and their radiation characteristics at both low latitudes far from Jupiter and at high latitudes near the planet. Both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized nKOM sources were observed. The polarizations observed for sources in the outermost regions of the torus seem to favor extraordinary mode emission.

  14. The radio structure source of X-ray-selected BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Arcsecond-size radio structure for a complete sample of 14 X-ray-selected BL Lac objects (XBLs) from the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey is presented. Most objects possess radio morphologies which are similar to those of nearby Fanaroff-Riley type 1 (FR 1) radio galaxies once the effects of surface brightness dimming and beam dilution as a function of redshift are taken into account. In order to test the beamed FR 1 hypothesis for BL Lac objects, the core and extended power levels are determined for these sources and compared with samples of radio-selected BL Lac objects (RBLs) and FR 1 from galaxies from the literature. RBLs and XBLs are found to possess extended (and thus unbeamed) power levels and the largest angular sizes similar to those of the FR 1 galaxies both supporting the beaming hypothesis and a common parent population for XBLs and RBLs.

  15. Autonomous robotic platforms for locating radio sources buried under rubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasu, A. S.; Anchidin, L.; Tamas, R.; Paun, M.; Danisor, A.; Petrescu, T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the use of autonomous robotic platforms able to locate radio signal sources such as mobile phones, buried under collapsed buildings as a result of earthquakes, natural disasters, terrorism, war, etc. This technique relies on averaging position data resulting from a propagation model implemented on the platform and the data acquired by robotic platforms at the disaster site. That allows us to calculate the approximate position of radio sources buried under the rubble. Based on measurements, a radio map of the disaster site is made, very useful for locating victims and for guiding specific rubble lifting machinery, by assuming that there is a victim next to a mobile device detected by the robotic platform; by knowing the approximate position, the lifting machinery does not risk to further hurt the victims. Moreover, by knowing the positions of the victims, the reaction time is decreased, and the chances of survival for the victims buried under the rubble, are obviously increased.

  16. The spectral evolution of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Broderick, J. J.; Odell, S. L.; Mitchell, K. J.; Altschuler, D. R.; Payne, H. E.; Condon, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic spectra of several low frequency extragalactic radio sources are presented. The observations were made at 318, 430, 606, 880, and 1400 MHz at several different radio observatories around the U.S. Two outbursts were observed in AO 0235 + 16 at 1.4 GHz, followed by a diminished variation at the lower frequencies. The dynamic frequencies of NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3 do not fit the same pattern. These radio sources displayed the following characteristics: (1) departure from straight or curved spectra at the frequencies of variation; (2) no obvious frequency drifting; and (3) negligible variation at 1.4 GHz. Possible explanations for this behavior are briefly discussed.

  17. Deep 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field - III. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garn, Timothy; Alexander, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRSs) are a class of source which are bright at radio frequencies, but do not appear in deep infrared images. We report the detection of 14 IFRSs within the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field, eight of which are detected near to the limiting magnitude of a deep R-band image of the region, at R ~ 24.5. Sensitive Spitzer Space Telescope images are stacked in order to place upper limits on their mid-infrared flux densities, and using recent 610-MHz and 1.4-GHz observations we find that they have spectral indices which vary between α = 0.05 and 1.38, where we define α such that Sν = S0ν-α, and should not be thought of as a single source population. We place constraints on the luminosity and linear size of these sources, and through comparison with well-studied local objects in the Revised Revised Third Cambridge catalogue demonstrate that they can be modelled as being compact (<20 kpc) Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxies located at high redshift (z ~ 4).

  18. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  19. Chandra observations of dying radio sources in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims: We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods: We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results: The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions: We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  20. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, Alessondra; /Wellesley Coll. /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies have an ''X''-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being through the merger of a binary supermassive black hole system and the second being that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, we probe the distribution of the stellar mass to compare the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN.

  1. Double Lobed Radio Sources in Cl1604 at z .9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirisky, Stephen; Gal, R.

    2010-05-01

    We present findings from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) super cluster survey. The super cluster Cl1604 residing at z 9 is one of only a few such large scale structures discovered at high redshift. The structure has been imaged in a variety of wavelengths, including radio, optical, infrared, and x-ray, and spectroscopic measurements have been taken using DEIMOS and LRIS on Keck. Using the 1.4 GHz VLA maps and HST optical imaging of Cl 1604 to visually inspect for double radio sources with associated optical host galaxies, we have confirmed three double lobed radio sources within the large scale structure. From the observations of these sources, we calculate radio luminosities and lobe separations using data from previously discovered double lobes at similar redshifts in the VVDS and FIRST surveys. Furthermore, we examine the host galaxy properties, including optical colors, morphologies, spectra, and each of their specific locations within the constituent cluster and the broader super cluster. Although the low number of sources limits statistical analysis, we find that the double lobes only appear in the large scale structure, and within the large scale structure only in areas of high galactic density.

  2. Saddle antenna radio frequency ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V. Johnson, R.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Santana, M.; Piller, C.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2016-02-15

    Existing RF ion sources for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H{sup +} and H{sup −} ion generation ∼3–5 mA/cm{sup 2} kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) surface plasma source (SPS) described here was developed to improve H{sup −} ion production efficiency, reliability, and availability. In SA RF ion source, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm{sup 2} kW. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to ∼1.2 kW in the plasma with production up to Ic = 7 mA. A stable long time generation of H{sup −} beam without degradation was demonstrated in RF discharge with AlN discharge chamber.

  3. Saddle antenna radio frequency ion sources.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Santana, M; Piller, C; Stockli, M; Welton, R; Breitschopf, J; Dudnikova, G

    2016-02-01

    Existing RF ion sources for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H(+) and H(-) ion generation ∼3-5 mA/cm(2) kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) surface plasma source (SPS) described here was developed to improve H(-) ion production efficiency, reliability, and availability. In SA RF ion source, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm(2) kW. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to ∼1.2 kW in the plasma with production up to Ic = 7 mA. A stable long time generation of H(-) beam without degradation was demonstrated in RF discharge with AlN discharge chamber.

  4. Plasma phenomenology in astrophysical systems: Radio-sources and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Montani, Giovanni; Petitta, Jacopo

    2014-06-15

    We review the plasma phenomenology in the astrophysical sources which show appreciable radio emissions, namely Radio-Jets from Pulsars, Microquasars, Quasars, and Radio-Active Galaxies. A description of their basic features is presented, then we discuss in some details the links between their morphology and the mechanisms that lead to the different radio-emissions, investigating especially the role played by the plasma configurations surrounding compact objects (Neutron Stars, Black Holes). For the sake of completeness, we briefly mention observational techniques and detectors, whose structure set them apart from other astrophysical instruments. The fundamental ideas concerning angular momentum transport across plasma accretion disks—together with the disk-source-jet coupling problem—are discussed, by stressing their successes and their shortcomings. An alternative scenario is then inferred, based on a parallelism between astrophysical and laboratory plasma configurations, where small-scale structures can be found. We will focus our attention on the morphology of the radio-jets, on their coupling with the accretion disks and on the possible triggering phenomena, viewed as profiles of plasma instabilities.

  5. Dense plasma focus (DPF) accelerated non radio isotopic radiological source

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Tang, Vincent

    2017-01-31

    A non-radio-isotopic radiological source using a dense plasma focus (DPF) to produce an intense z-pinch plasma from a gas, such as helium, and which accelerates charged particles, such as generated from the gas or injected from an external source, into a target positioned along an acceleration axis and of a type known to emit ionizing radiation when impinged by the type of accelerated charged particles. In a preferred embodiment, helium gas is used to produce a DPF-accelerated He2+ ion beam to a beryllium target, to produce neutron emission having a similar energy spectrum as a radio-isotopic AmBe neutron source. Furthermore, multiple DPFs may be stacked to provide staged acceleration of charged particles for enhancing energy, tunability, and control of the source.

  6. Observation on the Radio Telescope Uran-4 Of Radio Sources, Connected with the Coronal Mass Ejection on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanin, V. V.; Derevjagin, V. G.; Kravetz, R. O.

    In 2012 and 2013 the observations of radio sources covering by the solar corona was conducted on the radio telescope URAN-4. In obtained data there was fixed the records of the strong radio sources, which had flow level comparable with the 3c461 source. As a result of information analysis from miscellaneous observatories about the solar activity conditions there is done the conclusion that they are connected with the coronal mass ejections which was took place that time.

  7. Flat-spectrum radio source C1 in M33 is a background radio galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.P.; Fix, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    A candidate Crab-like supernova remnant in M33 discovered in a high-resolution survey of compact radio sources (Reynolds and Fix, 1987) has been observed. VLA observations at 1465 and 4885 MHz show that it is simply the flat-spectrum core of a completely normal double-lobed radio galaxy. This eliminates the last candidate Crab-like object in M33 whose size and brightness do not at all resemble those of the Crab Nebula, and confirms the dearth of Crab-like supernova remnants reported earlier. 7 references.

  8. Planck intermediate results. XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovatta, T.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Järvelä, E.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mingaliev, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nieppola, E.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rastorgueva-Foi, E. A.; S Readhead, A. C.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Richards, J. L.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Sotnikova, Y.; Stolyarov, V.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tammi, J.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Valtaoja, E.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wehrle, A. E.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at high frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations, while sources with clear signatures of evolving shocks appear to be limited to the strongest outbursts.

  9. Low Frequency Spectral Structure of X-shaped Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, D. V.; Rao, A. P.

    2005-12-01

    X-shaped radio galaxies are attributed to be formed by galactic mergers as the black holes of two galaxies fall into the merged system and form a bound system. Recent analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope low frequency data for an X-shaped source, 3C 223.1 has revealed an unusual result (Lal & Rao 2004). The radio morphologies of it at 240 and 610 MHz show well defined X-shape with a pair of active jets along the north-south axis and a pair of wings along the east-west axis, that pass symmetrically through the undetected radio core. The wings (or low surface brightness jets) have flatter spectral indices with respect to the high surface brightness jets, which confirms the earlier marginal result obtained at high frequency by Dennett-Thorpe et al. (2002). Although unusual, it is a valuable result which puts stringent constraints on the formation models and nature of these sources. We present preliminary results for two such sources.

  10. EVIDENCE FOR INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES AS z > 1 RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-10

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 {mu}m) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z {approx}> 1) active galactic nuclei.

  11. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M.; Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Pursimo, T.; Jauncey, David L.; Maslennikov, K.

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  12. Properties of Radio Sources in the FRB 121102 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chatterjee, Shami; Wharton, Robert; Law, Casey J.; Hessels, Jason; Spolaor, Sarah; Abruzzo, Matthew W.; Bassa, Cees; Butler, Bryan J.; Cordes, James M.; Demorest, Paul; Kaspi, Victoria M.; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott M.; Scholz, Paul; Seymour, Andrew; Spitler, Laura; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; PALFA Survey; VLA+AO FRB121102 Simultaneous Campaign Team; EVN FRB121102 Campaign Team; Realfast Team

    2017-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond duration radio pulses of unknown origin. With dispersion measures substantially in excess of expected Galactic contributions, FRBs are inferred to originate extragalactically, implying very high luminosities. Models include a wide range of high energy systems such as magnetars, merging neutron star binaries, black holes, and strong stellar magnetic fields driving coherent radio emission. Central to the mystery of FRB origins are the absence of confirmed host objects at any wavelength. This is primarily the result of the poor localization from single dish detection of FRBs. Of the approximately 20 known examples, only one, FRB 121102, has been observed to repeat. This repetition presents an opportunity for detailed follow-up if interferometric localization to arcsecond accuracy can be obtained. The Very Large Array has previously been used to localize individual pulses from pulsars and rotating radio transients to arcsecond localizaiton. We present here the results of radio observations of the field of FRB 121102 that permit us to constrain models of possible progenitors of this bursting source. These observations can characterize active galactic nuclei, stars, and other progenitor objects.

  13. Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources as Likely Counterparts of Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources (Research Note)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    Many sources in the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue are still unidentified since they lack an optical counterpart. An important tool that can help in identifying and classifying these sources is the cross-correlation with radio catalogues, which are very sensitive and positionally accurate. Moreover, the radio properties of a source, such as the spectrum or morphology, could provide further insight into its nature. In particular, flat-spectrum radio sources at high Galactic latitudes are likely to be AGN, possibly associated to a blazar or to the compact core of a radio galaxy. Here we present a small sample of 6 sources extracted from the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue that are still unidentified or unclassified, but which are very likely associated with a bright, flat-spectrum radio object. To confirm the association and to study the source X-ray spectral parameters, we performed X-ray follow-up observations with Swift/XRT of all objects. We report in this note the overall results obtained from this search and discuss the nature of each individual INTEGRAL source. We find that 5 of the 6 radio associations are also detected in X-rays; furthermore, in 3 cases they are the only counterpart found. More specifically, IGR J06073-0024 is a flat-spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.08, IGR J14488-4008 is a newly discovered radio galaxy, while IGR J18129-0649 is an AGN of a still unknown type. The nature of two sources (IGR J07225-3810 and IGR J19386-4653) is less well defined, since in both cases we find another X-ray source in the INTEGRAL error circle; nevertheless, the flat-spectrum radio source, likely to be a radio loud AGN, remains a viable and, in fact, a more convincing association in both cases. Only for the last object (IGR J11544-7618) could we not find any convincing counterpart since the radio association is not an X-ray emitter, while the only X-ray source seen in the field is a G star and therefore unlikely to produce the persistent emission seen by INTEGRAL.

  14. A radio telescope for the calibration of radio sources at 32 gigahertz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, M. S.; Stewart, S. R.; Bowen, J. G.; Paulsen, E. B.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.5-m-diameter radio telescope has been designed, developed, and assembled to directly measure the flux density of radio sources in the 32-GHz (Ka-band) frequency band. The main goal of the design and development was to provide a system that could yield the greatest absolute accuracy yet possible with such a system. The accuracy of the measurements have a heritage that is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. At the present time, the absolute accuracy of flux density measurements provided by this telescope system, during Venus observations at nearly closest approach to Earth, is plus or minus 5 percent, with an associated precision of plus or minus 2 percent. Combining a cooled high-electron mobility transistor low-noise amplifier, twin-beam Dicke switching antenna, and accurate positioning system resulted in a state-of-the-art system at 32 GHz. This article describes the design and performance of the system as it was delivered to the Owens Valley Radio Observatory to support direct calibrations of the strongest radio sources at Ka-band.

  15. IGR J06074+2205 - possible association with radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, Guy

    2004-01-01

    The radio source NVSS J060718+220452 (34.9 mJy at 1.4 GHz, resolution 45 arcsec: Condon et al AJ 115 1693 (1998)) lies some 80 arcsec from the reported position of the transient X-ray source IGR J06074+2205 (ATEL #223). While this is within the current uncertainty in the X-ray position, it may be a chance coincidence. An observation with the Ryle Telescope, Cambridge, at 15 GHz on 2004 Jan 29 shows an unresolved source (resolution 25 x 65 arcsec2) of 4.0 +/- 0.2 mJy.

  16. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  17. SDSS J143244.91+301435.3: a link between radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies and compact steep-spectrum radio sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccianiga, A.; Antón, S.; Ballo, L.; Dallacasa, D.; Della Ceca, R.; Fanali, R.; Foschini, L.; Hamilton, T.; Kraus, A.; Maccacaro, T.; Mack, K.-H.; Marchã, M. J.; Paulino-Afonso, A.; Sani, E.; Severgnini, P.

    2014-06-01

    We present SDSS J143244.91+301435.3, a new case of a radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) with a relatively high radio power (P1.4 GHz = 2.1 × 1025 W Hz-1) and large radio-loudness parameter (R1.4 = 600 ± 100). The radio source is compact with a linear size below ˜1.4 kpc but, in contrast to most of the RL NLS1 discovered so far with such a high R1.4, its radio spectrum is very steep (α = 0.93, Sν ∝ ν-α) and does not support a `blazar-like' nature. Both the small mass of the central supermassive black hole and the high accretion rate relative to the Eddington limit estimated for this object (3.2 × 107 M⊙ and 0.27, respectively, with a formal error of ˜0.4 dex for both quantities) are typical of the NLS1 class. Through modelling the spectral energy distribution of the source, we have found that the galaxy hosting SDSS J143244.91+301435.3 is undergoing quite intense star formation (SFR = 50 M⊙ yr-1), which, however, is expected to contribute only marginally (˜1 per cent) to the observed radio emission. The radio properties of SDSS J143244.91+301435.3 are remarkably similar to those of compact steep-spectrum (CSS) radio sources, a class of active galactic nuclei (AGN) mostly composed of young radio galaxies. This may suggest a direct link between these two classes of AGN, with CSS sources possibly representing the misaligned version (the so-called `parent population') of RL NLS1 showing blazar characteristics.

  18. Degree of polarization and source counts of faint radio sources from Stacking Polarized intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Stil, J. M.; George, S. J.; Keller, B. W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We present stacking polarized intensity as a means to study the polarization of sources that are too faint to be detected individually in surveys of polarized radio sources. Stacking offers not only high sensitivity to the median signal of a class of radio sources, but also avoids a detection threshold in polarized intensity, and therefore an arbitrary exclusion of sources with a low percentage of polarization. Correction for polarization bias is done through a Monte Carlo analysis and tested on a simulated survey. We show that the nonlinear relation between the real polarized signal and the detected signal requires knowledge of the shape of the distribution of fractional polarization, which we constrain using the ratio of the upper quartile to the lower quartile of the distribution of stacked polarized intensities. Stacking polarized intensity for NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources down to the detection limit in Stokes I, we find a gradual increase in median fractional polarization that is consistent with a trend that was noticed before for bright NVSS sources, but is much more gradual than found by previous deep surveys of radio polarization. Consequently, the polarized radio source counts derived from our stacking experiment predict fewer polarized radio sources for future surveys with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

  19. Observations of the power cosmic radio sources on the radio telescope URAN-4 during 1998 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevyagin, V. G.; Isaeva, E. A.; Kravetz, R. O.; Litvinenko, O. A.; Panishko, S. K.

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the variability of the flux density, observations of four power radio sources (3C144, 3C274, 3C405 and 3C461) were carried out on the radio telescope URAN-4 at two frequencies, 20 and 25MHz, during 1998 2005. The automatic procedure for obtaining the observations is considered briefly in this paper. The results of previous procedures are presented in the tables. They contained information that allows the vast amount of material that has been gathered to be analysed in more detail as follows: estimation of the source flux densities, study of ionospheric scintillations, investigation of the dependence of the direction pattern on the hour angle and the solving of other tasks. The dependence of the URAN-4 direction pattern on the hour angle is cited as an example of the mean procedure using many observation data. Long-time observation series allowed the cycle year dependence of the ionospheric scintillation index to be obtained.

  20. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  1. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  2. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  3. The Role of Beam Geometry in Population Statistics and Pulse Profiles of Radio and Gamma-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; VanGuilder, Robert; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a pulsar population synthesis study that incorporates a number of recent developments and some significant improvements over our previous study. We have included the results of the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey in our select group of nine radio surveys, doubling our sample of radio pulsars. More realistic geometries for the radio and gamma-ray beams are included in our Monte Carlo computer code that simulates the characteristics of the Galactic population of radio and gamma-ray pulsars. We adopted with some modifications the radio beam geometry of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002). For the gamma-ray beam, we have assumed the slot gap geometry described in the work of Muslimov & Harding (2003). To account for the shape of the distribution of radio pulsars in the P(dot) - P diagram, we continue to find that decay of the magnetic field on a timescale of 2.8 Myr is needed. With all nine surveys, our model predicts that EGRET should have seen 7 radio-quiet (below the sensitivity of these radio surveys) and 19 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. AGILE (nominal sensitivity map) is expected to detect 13 radio-quiet and 37 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars, while GLAST, with greater sensitivity is expected to detect 276 radio-quiet and 344 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. When the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey is excluded, the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars decreases, especially for GLAST. The decrease for EGRET is 45%, implying that some fraction of EGRET unidentified sources are radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. In the radio geometry adopted, short period pulsars are core dominated. Unlike the EGRET gamma-ray pulsars, our model predicts that when two gamma-ray peaks appear in the pulse profile, a dominant radio core peak appears in between the gamma-ray peaks. Our findings suggest that further improvements are required in describing both the radio and gamma-ray geometries.

  4. Modulated spectral activity (MSA) - Implications for planetary radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Staelin, David H.

    The properties of the Jovian and Saturnian MSA, modulation patterns within the normally diffuse nonthermal radio emission that are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity fluctuations in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes, are discussed. Although Jovian and Saturnian MSA are both normally observed in the 0.2-1.3-MHz frequency range, similar pattern have been noted in Jovian decametric emission above 30 MHz. The MSA properties are used to constrain the possible source mechanism.

  5. Looking for prematurely `dying', young, compact radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Marecki, A.; Spencer, R. E.

    We present VLBA 1.6, 5, 8.4 and 15 GHz observations of a new sample of weak, young, compact candidates for radio faders selected from the VLA FIRST survey. We claim that some, or even the majority of young sources, may be short-lived phenomena due to a lack of stable fuelling from the black hole and fade before evolving to large extended objects. (astro-ph/0411719 )

  6. Modulated spectral activity (MSA) - Implications for planetary radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Staelin, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of the Jovian and Saturnian MSA, modulation patterns within the normally diffuse nonthermal radio emission that are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity fluctuations in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes, are discussed. Although Jovian and Saturnian MSA are both normally observed in the 0.2-1.3-MHz frequency range, similar pattern have been noted in Jovian decametric emission above 30 MHz. The MSA properties are used to constrain the possible source mechanism.

  7. Extragalactic Peaked-spectrum Radio Sources at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callingham, J. R.; Ekers, R. D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Line, J. L. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Sadler, E. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Hancock, P. J.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-02-01

    We present a sample of 1483 sources that display spectral peaks between 72 MHz and 1.4 GHz, selected from the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey. The GLEAM survey is the widest fractional bandwidth all-sky survey to date, ideal for identifying peaked-spectrum sources at low radio frequencies. Our peaked-spectrum sources are the low-frequency analogs of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) and compact-steep spectrum (CSS) sources, which have been hypothesized to be the precursors to massive radio galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of known peaked-spectrum candidates, and 95% of our sample have a newly characterized spectral peak. We highlight that some GPS sources peaking above 5 GHz have had multiple epochs of nuclear activity, and we demonstrate the possibility of identifying high-redshift (z > 2) galaxies via steep optically thin spectral indices and low observed peak frequencies. The distribution of the optically thick spectral indices of our sample is consistent with past GPS/CSS samples but with a large dispersion, suggesting that the spectral peak is a product of an inhomogeneous environment that is individualistic. We find no dependence of observed peak frequency with redshift, consistent with the peaked-spectrum sample comprising both local CSS sources and high-redshift GPS sources. The 5 GHz luminosity distribution lacks the brightest GPS and CSS sources of previous samples, implying that a convolution of source evolution and redshift influences the type of peaked-spectrum sources identified below 1 GHz. Finally, we discuss sources with optically thick spectral indices that exceed the synchrotron self-absorption limit.

  8. 318-MHz variability of complete samples of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Broderick, J. J.; Ledden, J. E.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is found by a low-frequency variability survey, involving two- and three-epoch, 318-MHz observations of extragalactic sources in samples complete to 3 Jy at 1400 MHz and 1 Jy at 5000 MHz, that steep-spectrum sources do not seem to vary while all flat-spectrum sources exhibit low-frequency variability greater than 8% over about 5 yr. It is also found that the flat-spectrum sources with inverted spectra show the largest fractional variations, and that there is a correlation between the incidence of low-frequency variability and the determination that a source is an optically violent variable. These statistical properties are consistent with models which invoke radio and optical emission relativistic beaming.

  9. Spectral observations of active region sources with RATAN-600 and WSRT. [Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Gel'frejkh, G. B.; Borovik, V. N.; Korzhavin, A. N.; Bogod, V. M.; Nindos, A.; Kundu, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    We present spectral observations of neutral line and sunspot associated sources obtained with the RATAN-600 radio telescope and the WSRT in the wavelength range of 2 to 6 cm. Sources associated with large sunspots have flat spectra, while neutral line sources have very steep spectra. In the case of a large spot we estimated the magnetic field to be at least 2700 G at the base of the transition region and 1800 G in the low corona. We consider possible interpretations of the radio emission above the neutral lines. Gyroresonance emission at the fourth harmonic is inadequate, whereas emission from a small population of nonthermal electrons (total number 10 exp 30 to 10 exp 31) with a delta = 3 power law distribution seems to be sufficient.

  10. The Cosmological Evolution of Radio Sources with CENSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookes, Mairi; Best, Philip; Peacock, John; Dunlop, James; Rottgering, Huub

    2006-01-01

    The CENSORS survey, selected from the NVSS, has been followed up using EIS, K-band imaging and spectroscopic observations to produce a radio sample capable of probing the source density in the regime: z greater than 2.5. With a current spectroscopic completeness of 62%, CENSORS has been used in direct modeling of RLF evolution and in V/V(sub max) tests. There is evidence for a shallow decline in number density of source in the luminosity range 10(sup 26) - 10(sup 27)WHz(sup -1) at 1.4GHz.

  11. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (<~10e4 K) and star formation in cooling cores will be described. The implications for the energetics of radio jets and the cooling of the X-ray gas are discussed. The minimum-energy or equipartition pressures of the radio plasma in the radio lobes are generally much lower than is required to inflate the bubbles. The nature of the primary form of energy and pressure in the bubbles will be discussed, and arguments will be given suggesting that the lobes are dominated by thermal pressure from very hot gas (>10 keV).

  12. Quartz antenna for radio frequency ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Vujic, J.; Wu, L.K.; Olivo, M.; Einenkel, H.

    1998-02-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp ion sources developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory use an internal induction coil (antenna) for plasma generation. The copper rf-antenna with a thin layer of porcelain coating, which is presently used, cannot fully satisfy the increasing demands on source cleanliness and antenna lifetime under high power cw or pulsed operation in applications where water cooling is not possible. A quartz antenna has been designed and operated in the multicusp ion source. It has been demonstrated that the overall performance of the new antenna exceeds that of the regular porcelain-coated antenna. It can be operated with a long lifetime in different discharge plasmas. The quartz antenna has also been tested at the Paul Scherrer Institute for cw source operation at rf power higher than 5 kW. Results demonstrated that the antenna can survive under dense plasma discharge operations. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. FIRST Winged And X-Shaped Radio Source Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.; Springmann, A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Wellesley Coll.

    2007-05-30

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies are found with an additional pair of extended low surface brightness 'wings' of emission giving them a distinctive 'X'-shaped appearance. One popular explanation for the unusual morphologies posits that the central supermassive black hole (SMBH)/accretion disk system underwent a recent realignment; in a merger scenario, the active lobes mark the post-merger axis of the resultant system (e.g., Merritt & Ekers 2002). However, this and other interpretations are not well tested on the few (about one dozen) known examples. In part to remedy this deficiency, a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources is being compiled for a systematic study. An initial sample of 100 new candidates is described as well as some of the follow-up work being pursued to test the different scenarios.

  14. FRB121102: statistics of burst properties compared to the fast radio burst population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Andrew; Michilli, Daniele; McLaughlin, Maura; Chatterjee, Shami; Hessel, Jason; Spolaor, Sarah; Paul, Demorest; Scholz, Paul; Spitler, Laura; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; PALFA Survey Team; VLA+AO FRB121102 Simultaneous Campaign Team; EVN FRB121102 Campaign Team

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-long radio events with dispersion measures that exceed that expected from our Galaxy. Therefore the FRB source is anticipated to be extragalactic and highly energetic. Until recently, these were only observed as one-off events. This was until multiple bursts were observed at the Arecibo Observatory from FRB 121102. I will present the most recent burst statistics from FRB 121102's follow-up observations. Understanding the distribution of all burst characteristics can eliminate some of the proposed mechanisms to FRB 121102’s burst events. Not only that, comparing these values to the rest of the FRB population can give insight as to whether FRB 121102 is distinct from the rest of the FRB population.

  15. Correlation of Fermi Large Area Telescope sources with the 20-GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array radio survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.

    2010-09-01

    We cross-correlate the Fermi 11-month survey (1FGL) catalogue with the 20-GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array (AT20G) radio survey catalogue composed of 5890 sources at declination < 0°. Among the 738 Fermi sources distributed in the southern sky, we find 230 highly probable candidate counterparts in the AT20G survey. Of these, 222 are already classified in the Fermi one-year Large Area Telescope (LAT) active galactic nucleus (AGN) catalogue (1LAC) as blazars [either flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) or BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs)], AGNs or sources of unknown class but with an associated counterpart, while eight are new associations. By studying the γ-ray and radio properties of these associations, we find a correlation between the γ-ray flux (above 100 MeV) and the 20-GHz flux density. This correlation is more than 3σ statistically significant, both for the population of BL Lacs and for FSRQs considered separately. We also find that the radio counterparts associated with the Fermi sources have, on average, flat radio spectra between 5 and 20 GHz and that Fermi γ-ray sources are not preferentially associated with `ultra-inverted spectrum' radio sources. For two of the eight new associations, we build the broad-band spectral energy distribution combining Fermi, Swift and radio observations. One of these two sources is identified with the high-redshift FSRQ Swift J1656.3-3302 (z = 2.4) and we classify the other source as a candidate new FSRQ. We also study the brightest radio source of the 46 associations without an optical classification and classify it as a new BL Lac candidate `twin' of the prototypical BL Lac OJ 287 if its redshift is larger, z ~ 0.4.

  16. Variability studies of 3C 371. [extragalactic radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The compact extragalactic radio source, 3C 371, was observed with the X-ray detectors of the EXOSAT satellite for 19.5 hours in 2 observing periods separated by 18 days. This resulted in the discovery of X-ray variability of the source on time scales between 8 hours and about 25 minutes and the confirmation of earlier reports of variability on longer time scales. The short time scale variability agrees remarkably well with earlier predictions based on fitting multifrequency data from the source to a relativistically beamed inhomogeneous synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) jet model. This SSC model is frequently applied to BL Lac objects and related sources, such as 3C 371. However, the number of free parameters in model fits tends to be large, and so independent support such as from this work is important. The X-ray spectral results for 3C 371 also may provide qualitative support for the SSC model in that the spectrum probably consists of two components, with the steeper one at low photon energies. In terms of the model, the low-energy spectrum would be dominated by synchrotron emission extending down to radio energies, whereas the higher energy X-rays would be dominated by Compton radiation.

  17. The Mysterious Galactic Center Radio Source N3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovici, Dominic; Lang, Cornelia C.; Morris, Mark; Mutel, Robert Lucien; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Toomey, James E.; Ott, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Here we report on multi-wavelength radio observations of the mysterious point source "N3" that appears to be located in the vicinity of the Galactic Center. VLA observations between 2 and 50 GHz reveal that N3 is a compact and bright non-thermal source (56 mJy at 10 GHz) which is superimposed upon the non-thermal radio filaments (NTFs) of the Radio Arc. Our highest frequency observations place a strict upper limit of 65x28 milli-arcseconds on the size of this source. We compare our observations to those of Yusef-Zadeh (1987) and Lang (1997) and conclude that N3 is variable over long time scales. Additionally, we present the detection of a compact molecular cloud located adjacent to N3 in projection. CH3CN, CH3OH, CS, HC3N, HNCO, SiO, SO, and NH3 are detected in the cloud and most transitions have FWHM line widths of ~20 km s-1. The rotational temperature determined from the metastable NH3 transitions ranges from 79 K to 183 K depending on the transitions used and the location in the cloud. We present evidence that this molecular cloud is interacting with N3. After exploring the relationship between the NTFs, molecular cloud, and N3, we conclude that N3 likely lies within the Galactic Center. We are able to rule out many possible physical counterparts, including an active star, HII region, young supernova, AGN, and micro-quasar. To further constrain the nature of N3, we also discuss new extremely high resolution observations of N3 taken with the VLBA, and what these observations reveal about the true nature of this mysterious source.

  18. Nonthermal processes around collapsed objects: High energy gamma ray sources in the radio sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Ruderman, Malvin; Applegate, James H.; Becker, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In our proposal responding to the initial Guest Observer NRA for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, 'Nonthermal Processes Around Collapsed Objects: High Energy Gamma Ray Sources in the Radio Sky', we stated that 'At high energies - the identity of the principal Galactic source population remains unknown' although the 'one certain source of high energy emission is young radio pulsars'. These two statements remain true, although at this writing, eighteen months after the beginning of the Compton allsky survey, much of the gamma-ray data required to greatly extend our knowledge of the Galaxy's high energy emission has been collected. The thrust of the program supported by our grant was to collect and analyze a complementary set of data on the Milky Way at radio wavelengths in order to help identify the dominant Pop 1 component of the Galaxy's gamma ray sources, and to pursue theoretical investigations on the origins and emission mechanisms of young pulsars, the one component of this population identified to date. We summarize here our accomplishments under the grant. In Section 2, we describe our VLA surveys of the Galactic Plane along with the current status of the radio source catalogs derived therefrom; unfortunately, owing to the TDRSS antenna problem and subsequent extension of the Sky Survey, we were not able to carry out a comparison with the EGRET data directly, although everything is now in place to do so as soon as it becomes available. In Section 2, we summarize our progress on the theoretical side, including the substantial completion of a dissertation on pulsar origins and work on the high energy emission mechanisms of isolated pulsars. We list the personnel supported by the grant in section 4 and provide a complete bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part by the grant in the final section.

  19. The Galaxy Cluster Environments of Wide Angle Tail Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Wing, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Generally found in the centers of galaxy clusters, Wide Angle Tail radio sources (WATs) are defined by their characteristic jet-hotspot-lobe transition and intermediate radio power. They are typically associated with the luminous central galaxy within the cluster and often appear bent due to interaction with the hot, X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Their linear extent (r > 100 kpc) and radio luminosity make them good tracers of high redshift systems where X-ray and optical observations are more difficult. In an effort to characterize the global X-ray properties of WAT clusters, we have assembled a sample of WAT systems from the Chandra archive. We have examined the distribution of substructure, temperature, abundance, density and pressure within the ICM. We find the majority of WAT clusters display some merger signatures and many show evidence of cool/high metallicity gas within 100 kpc of the WAT host galaxy. Most notably, we observe that clusters with the highest central densities and pressures host WATs with the shortest flare radii.

  20. On the Nature of Neutral-Line-Associated Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasnov, Leonid V.

    2014-04-01

    A number of authors claimed that radio sources above the neutral line of the magnetic field in solar active regions are due to non-thermal emission. This study shows that the thermal mechanism explains the radio emission from such sources. Models similar to those used for interpreting cyclotron lines were used in this study. Such models account for a steep decline in the spectrum at high frequencies and a low degree of polarization. The magnetic field between the two sunspots with an anti-parallel magnetic field has a lower gradient than the field above the sunspots. This, combined with the possibly high temperature in coronal loops connecting the sunspots, leads to the following conclusions. The optical thickness of the gyroresonance layers is increased and leads to more effective radiation at a harmonic number of 4 or 5. The lower gradient of the field between the sunspots also results in more rapid growth of emission intensity with increasing wavelength in this region than in the regions immediately above the sunspots. Additionally, the spatial averaging of the source structure due to the antenna beam pattern leads to a decrease in the degree of polarization in the region between the sunspots.

  1. John Bolton and the discovery of discrete radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    John Bolton was born in Sheffield in 1922 and educated at Cambridge University. After wartime service in the Royal Navy, in 1946 he joined the CSIRO's Radiophysics Laboratory in Sydney and began work in the fledgling field of radio astronomy. Radio emission from our Galaxy had been discovered and studied during the 1930s by the Americans Karl Jansky and Grote Reber. It was thought that the emission emanated from interstellar space, but the mechanism was unknown. In June 1947, observing from Dover Heights near the entrance to Sydney Harbour, Bolton discovered that strong emission from the constellation of Cygnus came from a discrete point-like source. By the end of the year, with colleagues Gordon Stanley and Bruce Slee ( a co-author of this paper) , Bolton had discovered a further five of these discrete sources. However, the positions measured for them were not accurate enough to allow them to be identified optically with any known celestial objects. In 1948 Bolton organised a three-month expedition to New Zealand where there were observing sites superior to the one at Dover Heights. The new observations gave more accurate positions and allowed Bolton to identify three of the sources: one was a supernova remnant in our Galaxy and two were unusual extragalactic objects. This paper will document this remarkable chapter in the development of twentieth century astronomy.

  2. Radio Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extra-galactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5 arcmin of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (+4.2 to -3.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5 arcmin). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are in turn a factor of 3.3 (+4.1 -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of al[ja = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S varies as upsilon(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  3. Radio Sources toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extragalactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of millijansky source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 noncluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5' of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (sup +4.3)(sub -2.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5'). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are, in turn, a factor of 3.3 (sup +4.1) (sub -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the noncluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute the spectral indices of millijansky sources in the cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of alpha = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S proportional to nu(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  4. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  5. Development and preliminary results of radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yahong Hu, Chundong; Jiang, Caichao; Chen, Yuqian; Gu, Yumin; Su, Renxue; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Zhimin

    2016-02-15

    A radio frequency (RF) ion source was designed and developed for neutral beam injector. A RF driver test bed was used with a RF generator with maximum power of 25 kW with 1 MHz frequency and a matching box. In order to study the characteristic of RF plasma generation, the capacitance in the matching box was adjusted with different cases. The results show that lower capacitance will better the stability of the plasma with higher RF power. In the future, new RF coils and matching box will be developed for plasma generators with higher RF power of 50 kW.

  6. Flat-spectrum radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or relativistic neutrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanoni, Peter M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The intensity spectrum of the core of radio-loud AGN varies smoothly from 10 exp 8.5 to 10 to the 16th Hz, and is flat between 10 to the 9th and 10 to the 10th Hz, implying that a single emission mechanism is responsible. It is proposed here that energy is transported from the central source by relativistic neutrons which travel freely over a large volume and decay into relativistic protons. The protons produce secondary electrons which generate the observed radiation. The photon spectra thus produced are largely model-independent and flat.

  7. A Submillimeter Perspective on the Goods Fields. II. The High Radio Power Population in the Goods-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Owen, F. N.; Hsu, L.-Y.; Wang, W.-H.

    2017-01-01

    We use ultradeep 20 cm data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and 850 μm data from SCUBA-2 and the Submillimeter Array of an 124 arcmin2 region of the Chandra Deep Field-north to analyze the high radio power ({P}20{cm}> {10}31 erg s‑1 Hz‑1) population. We find that 20 (42 ± 9%) of the spectroscopically identified z> 0.8 sources have consistent star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from both submillimeter and radio observations, while the remaining sources have lower (mostly undetected) submillimeter fluxes, suggesting that active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity dominates the radio power in these sources. We develop a classification scheme based on the ratio of submillimeter flux to radio power versus radio power and find that it agrees with AGN and star-forming galaxy classifications from Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Our results provide support for an extremely rapid drop in the number of high SFR galaxies above about a thousand solar masses per year (Kroupa initial mass function) and for the locally determined relation between X-ray luminosity and radio power for star-forming galaxies applying at high redshifts and high radio powers. We measure far-infrared (FIR) luminosities and find that some AGNs lie on the FIR-radio correlation, while others scatter below. The AGNs that lie on the correlation appear to do so based on their emission from the AGN torus. We measure a median radio size of 1.″0 ± 0.3 for the star-forming galaxies. The radio sizes of the star-forming galaxies are generally larger than those of the AGNs. The W. M. Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Deep multi-frequency radio imaging in the Lockman Hole using the GMRT and VLA - I. The nature of the sub-mJy radio population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibar, Edo; Ivison, R. J.; Biggs, A. D.; Lal, D. V.; Best, P. N.; Green, D. A.

    2009-07-01

    In the run up to routine observations with the upcoming generation of radio facilities, the nature of sub-mJy radio population has been hotly debated. Here, we describe multi-frequency data designed to probe the emission mechanism that dominates in these faint radio sources. Our analysis is based on observations of the Lockman Hole using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) - the deepest 610-MHz imaging yet reported - together with 1.4-GHz imaging from the Very Large Array (VLA), well matched in resolution and sensitivity to the GMRT data: σ610MHz ~ 15μJybeam-1, σ1.4GHz ~ 6μJybeam-1, full width at half-maximum (FWHM) ~ 5arcsec. The GMRT and VLA data are cross-matched to obtain the radio spectral indices for the faint radio emitters. Statistical analyses show no clear evolution for the median spectral index, α610MHz1.4GHz (where Sν ~ να), as a function of flux density. α610MHz1.4GHz is found to be approximately -0.6 to -0.7, based on an almost unbiased 10σ criterion, down to a flux level of S1.4GHz >~100μJy. The fraction of inverted spectrum sources (α610MHz1.4GHz > 0) is less than 10 per cent. The results suggest that the most prevalent emission mechanism in the sub-mJy regime is optically thin synchrotron, ruling out a dominant flat spectrum or ultra-steep spectrum radio population. The spectral index distribution has a significant scatter, Δα ~ 0.4-0.5, which suggests a mixture of different populations at all flux levels. Spectroscopic classification of radio sources with X-ray emission has allowed us to estimate that the fraction of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 30μJy <~ S1.4GHz <300μJy is roughly 25 +/- 10 per cent, suggesting that star-forming galaxies dominate the sub-mJy regime.

  9. A selection of giant radio sources from NVSS

    DOE PAGES

    Proctor, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    Results of the application of pattern-recognition techniques to the problem of identifying giant radio sources (GRSs) from the data in the NVSS catalog are presented, and issues affecting the process are explored. Decision-tree pattern-recognition software was applied to training-set source pairs developed from known NVSS large-angular-size radio galaxies. The full training set consisted of 51,195 source pairs, 48 of which were known GRSs for which each lobe was primarily represented by a single catalog component. The source pairs had a maximum separation ofmore » $$20^{\\prime} $$ and a minimum component area of 1.87 square arcmin at the 1.4 mJy level. The importance of comparing the resulting probability distributions of the training and application sets for cases of unknown class ratio is demonstrated. The probability of correctly ranking a randomly selected (GRS, non-GRS) pair from the best of the tested classifiers was determined to be 97.8 ± 1.5%. The best classifiers were applied to the over 870,000 candidate pairs from the entire catalog. Images of higher-ranked sources were visually screened, and a table of over 1600 candidates, including morphological annotation, is presented. These systems include doubles and triples, wide-angle tail and narrow-angle tail, S- or Z-shaped systems, and core-jets and resolved cores. In conclusion, while some resolved-lobe systems are recovered with this technique, generally it is expected that such systems would require a different approach.« less

  10. A selection of giant radio sources from NVSS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    Results of the application of pattern-recognition techniques to the problem of identifying giant radio sources (GRSs) from the data in the NVSS catalog are presented, and issues affecting the process are explored. Decision-tree pattern-recognition software was applied to training-set source pairs developed from known NVSS large-angular-size radio galaxies. The full training set consisted of 51,195 source pairs, 48 of which were known GRSs for which each lobe was primarily represented by a single catalog component. The source pairs had a maximum separation of $20^{\\prime} $ and a minimum component area of 1.87 square arcmin at the 1.4 mJy level. The importance of comparing the resulting probability distributions of the training and application sets for cases of unknown class ratio is demonstrated. The probability of correctly ranking a randomly selected (GRS, non-GRS) pair from the best of the tested classifiers was determined to be 97.8 ± 1.5%. The best classifiers were applied to the over 870,000 candidate pairs from the entire catalog. Images of higher-ranked sources were visually screened, and a table of over 1600 candidates, including morphological annotation, is presented. These systems include doubles and triples, wide-angle tail and narrow-angle tail, S- or Z-shaped systems, and core-jets and resolved cores. In conclusion, while some resolved-lobe systems are recovered with this technique, generally it is expected that such systems would require a different approach.

  11. A Selection of Giant Radio Sources from NVSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    Results of the application of pattern-recognition techniques to the problem of identifying giant radio sources (GRSs) from the data in the NVSS catalog are presented, and issues affecting the process are explored. Decision-tree pattern-recognition software was applied to training-set source pairs developed from known NVSS large-angular-size radio galaxies. The full training set consisted of 51,195 source pairs, 48 of which were known GRSs for which each lobe was primarily represented by a single catalog component. The source pairs had a maximum separation of 20\\prime and a minimum component area of 1.87 square arcmin at the 1.4 mJy level. The importance of comparing the resulting probability distributions of the training and application sets for cases of unknown class ratio is demonstrated. The probability of correctly ranking a randomly selected (GRS, non-GRS) pair from the best of the tested classifiers was determined to be 97.8 ± 1.5%. The best classifiers were applied to the over 870,000 candidate pairs from the entire catalog. Images of higher-ranked sources were visually screened, and a table of over 1600 candidates, including morphological annotation, is presented. These systems include doubles and triples, wide-angle tail and narrow-angle tail, S- or Z-shaped systems, and core-jets and resolved cores. While some resolved-lobe systems are recovered with this technique, generally it is expected that such systems would require a different approach.

  12. Clustering Properties of Radio Sources in the FIRST Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources in the FIRST 1.4 GHz survey by analysing the distribution function (Counts in Cells) of this sample. We select a reliable galaxy sample from the the FIRST catalogue, paying particular attention to the problem of how to define single radio sources from the multiple components listed in the FIRST catalogue. We also consider the incompleteness of the catalogue. We estimate angular two-point correlation function w(theta), the variance, Psi_2, and skewness, Psi_3, of the distribution for the galaxy subsample. Both w(theta) and Psi_2 show power-law behaviour with an amplitude corresponding a spatial correlation length of r_0 ~10 h^{-1} Mpc. We detect significant skewness in the distribution, and find that it is related to the variance through the relation Psi_3 = S_3(Psi_2)alpha with alpha = 1.9 +- 0.1 consistent with the non-linear growth of perturbations from primordial Gaussian initial conditions. We show that the amplitude of clustering (corresponding to a spatial correlation length of r_0 ~10 h^{-1} Mpc) and skewness are consistent with realistic models of galaxy clustering.

  13. Possible Source Location of the Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Shao, X.; Frey, H. U.; Garcia, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Fung et al. [2013] reported recently the identification of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) that was possibly a result from a dayside high latitude reconnection process. The TMRB was observed simultaneously by the IMAGE and Geotail satellites when the satellites were located at widely different latitudes on opposite sides of the Earth in nearly the same meridional plane. The TMRB was observed when the interplanetary field was northward. Its intensity seemed to be modulated by the IMF Bz component while the source directions (relative to the Geotail positions over the TMRB interval) also seemed to respond to the changes in the IMF By component. In this paper, we will present further observations from the IMAGE FUV data during the TMRB interval, revealing the presence of a bright proton aurora spot at the cusp foot print and thus confirming the presence of high-latitude dayside reconnection at the time. We have also performed a CCMC run-on-request of a global magnetospheric simulation for a time period over the TMRB interval. We will present the CCMC results and discuss the possible identification of the location of the TMRB source. Fung, S. F., K. Hashimoto, H. Kojima, S. A. Boardsen, L. N. Garcia, H. Matsumoto, J. L. Green, and B. W. Reinisch (2013), Terrestrial myriametric radio burst observed by IMAGE and Geotail satellites, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 1101-1111, doi:10.1002/jgra.50149.

  14. The Lockman Hole project: LOFAR observations and spectral index properties of low-frequency radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Brienza, M.; Best, P. N.; Brüggen, M.; Calistro Rivera, G.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Harwood, J. J.; Heald, G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mandal, S.; Miley, G. K.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Sabater, J.; Tasse, C.; van Velzen, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; White, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Lockman Hole is a well-studied extragalactic field with extensive multi-band ancillary data covering a wide range in frequency, essential for characterizing the physical and evolutionary properties of the various source populations detected in deep radio fields (mainly star-forming galaxies and AGNs). In this paper, we present new 150-MHz observations carried out with the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), allowing us to explore a new spectral window for the faint radio source population. This 150-MHz image covers an area of 34.7 square degrees with a resolution of 18.6 × 14.7 arcsec and reaches an rms of 160 μJy beam-1 at the centre of the field. As expected for a low-frequency selected sample, the vast majority of sources exhibit steep spectra, with a median spectral index of α _{150}^{1400}=-0.78± 0.015. The median spectral index becomes slightly flatter (increasing from α _{150}^{1400}=-0.84 to α _{150}^{1400}=-0.75) with decreasing flux density down to S150 ˜10 mJy before flattening out and remaining constant below this flux level. For a bright subset of the 150-MHz selected sample, we can trace the spectral properties down to lower frequencies using 60-MHz LOFAR observations, finding tentative evidence for sources to become flatter in spectrum between 60 and 150 MHz. Using the deep, multi-frequency data available in the Lockman Hole, we identify a sample of 100 ultra-steep-spectrum sources and 13 peaked-spectrum sources. We estimate that up to 21 per cent of these could have z > 4 and are candidate high-z radio galaxies, but further follow-up observations are required to confirm the physical nature of these objects.

  15. New redshift determinations for three 3C radio sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaldi, V.

    2017-01-01

    I report the new redshift determinations of three radio sources 3C 196.1, 3C 268.2 and 3C 303.1 by using GMOS/Gemini North long-slit optical spectroscopy. The details of the observations are summarized in the following table (the B600 grating was used for the three observations): Object | RA(J2000) | DEC(J2000) | Date of obs. | width-slit(arcsec) | PA(deg) | Exp.Time(sec) 3C 196.1 | 8:15:27.8 | -03:08:27 | Mar 2012 | 0.5 | 50 | 2560 3C 268.2| |12:00:59.1 | 31:33:28 | Feb 2011 | 0.5 | 165 | 2576 3C 303.1 | 14:43:14.5 | 77:07:28 | Feb 2012 | 1 | 145 | 2560 The three of the sources have extended regions of ionized gas that do not obey a spherical distribution.

  16. The radio-emission spectra of some extragalactic radio sources in the 11.6-36.8 GHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, E.; Valtonen, M.; Lekhto, Kh.; Efanov, V. A.; Moiseev, I. G.

    Results are presented of coordinated observations of 20 extragalactic radio sources in the 11.6-3.8 GHz range. The measurements were carried out in 1980-1982 using the RT-22 and RT-14 radio telescopes at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and the Radio Laboratory of the Helsinki University of Technology, respectively. Quasi-simultaneous radiation spectra are presented for 12 sources and the magnetic field strength (MFS) is estimated for 0235+16, OH 471, OJ 287, and BL Lac. The MFS turns out to be in the 0.001-0.002 G range.

  17. Multifrequency polarimetry of a complete sample of PACO radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galluzzi, V.; Massardi, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Casasola, V.; Gregorini, L.; Trombetti, T.; Burigana, C.; De Zotti, G.; Ricci, R.; Stevens, J.; Ekers, R. D.; Bonavera, L.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Liuzzo, E.; López-Caniego, M.; Mignano, A.; Paladino, R.; Toffolatti, L.; Tucci, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present high-sensitivity polarimetric observations (σP ≃0.6 mJy) in six bands covering the 5.5-38 GHz range of a complete sample of 53 compact extragalactic radio sources brighter than 200 mJy at 20 GHz. The observations, carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, achieved a 91 per cent detection rate (at 5σ). Within this frequency range, the spectra of about 95 per cent of sources are well fitted by double power laws, both in total intensity and in polarization, but the spectral shapes are generally different in the two cases. Most sources were classified as either steep- or peaked-spectrum but less than 50 per cent have the same classification in total and in polarized intensity. No significant trends of the polarization degree with flux density or with frequency were found. The mean variability index in total intensity of steep-spectrum sources increases with frequency for a 4-5 yr lag, while no significant trend shows up for the other sources and for the 8 yr lag. In polarization, the variability index, which could be computed only for the 8 yr lag, is substantially higher than in total intensity and has no significant frequency dependence.

  18. Radio Point Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Bonamente, M.; Dawson, K.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.

    2006-01-01

    Extra-galactic point sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio point sources toward galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy point source fluxes from 90 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We also compute counts towards clusters as a function of luminosity in three redshift bins out to z = 1.0 and see no clear evidence for evolution with redshift. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz. The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.76 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.55 and 0.95, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of brighter field point sources measured by other surveys.

  19. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production.

  20. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Pursimo, T.; Johnston, Helen M.; Stanford, Laura M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Jauncey, David L.; Zenere, Katrina A.

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ∼160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  1. THE LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO CATALOG OF FLAT-SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Giroletti, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2014-07-01

    A well known property of the γ-ray sources detected by Cos-B in the 1970s, by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 1990s, and recently by the Fermi observations is the presence of radio counterparts, particularly for those associated with extragalactic objects. This observational evidence is the basis of the radio-γ-ray connection established for the class of active galactic nuclei known as blazars. In particular, the main spectral property of the radio counterparts associated with γ-ray blazars is that they show a flat spectrum in the GHz frequency range. Our recent analysis dedicated to search blazar-like candidates as potential counterparts for the unidentified γ-ray sources allowed us to extend the radio-γ-ray connection in the MHz regime. We also showed that blazars below 1 GHz maintain flat radio spectra. Thus, on the basis of these new results, we assembled a low-frequency radio catalog of flat-spectrum sources built by combining the radio observations of the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey and of the Westerbork in the southern hemisphere catalog with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky survey (NVSS). This could be used in the future to search for new, unknown blazar-like counterparts of γ-ray sources. First, we found NVSS counterparts of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio sources, and then we selected flat-spectrum radio sources according to a new spectral criterion, specifically defined for radio observations performed below 1 GHz. We also described the main properties of the catalog listing 28,358 radio sources and their logN-logS distributions. Finally, a comparison with the Green Bank 6 cm radio source catalog was performed to investigate the spectral shape of the low-frequency flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies.

  2. Survival of mountain quail translocated from two distinct source populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troy, Ronald J.; Coates, Peter S.; Connelly, John W.; Gillette, Gifford; Delehanty, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Translocation of mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus) to restore viable populations to their former range has become a common practice. Because differences in post-release vital rates between animals from multiple source populations has not been well studied, wildlife and land managers may arbitrarily choose the source population or base the source population on immediate availability when planning translocation projects. Similarly, an understanding of the optimal proportion of individuals from different age and sex classes for translocation would benefit translocation planning. During 2006 and 2007, we captured and translocated 125 mountain quail from 2 ecologically distinct areas: 38 from southern California and 87 from southwestern Oregon. We released mountain quail in the Bennett Hills of south-central Idaho. We radio-marked and monitored a subsample of 58 quail and used them for a 2-part survival analysis. Cumulative survival probability was 0.23 ± 0.05 (SE) at 150 days post-release. We first examined an a priori hypothesis (model) that survival varied between the 2 distinct source populations. We found that source population did not explain variation in survival. This result suggests that wildlife managers have flexibility in selecting source populations for mountain quail translocation efforts. In a post hoc examination, we pooled the quail across source populations and evaluated differences in survival probabilities between sex and age classes. The most parsimonious model indicated that adult male survival was substantially less than survival rates of other mountain quail age and sex classes (i.e., interaction between sex and age). This result suggests that translocation success could benefit by translocating yearling males rather than adult males, perhaps because adult male breeding behavior results in vulnerability to predators

  3. Multiple-Beam Detection of Fast Transient Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been designed for using multiple independent stations to discriminate fast transient radio sources from local anomalies, such as antenna noise or radio frequency interference (RFI). This can improve the sensitivity of incoherent detection for geographically separated stations such as the very long baseline array (VLBA), the future square kilometer array (SKA), or any other coincident observations by multiple separated receivers. The transients are short, broadband pulses of radio energy, often just a few milliseconds long, emitted by a variety of exotic astronomical phenomena. They generally represent rare, high-energy events making them of great scientific value. For RFI-robust adaptive detection of transients, using multiple stations, a family of algorithms has been developed. The technique exploits the fact that the separated stations constitute statistically independent samples of the target. This can be used to adaptively ignore RFI events for superior sensitivity. If the antenna signals are independent and identically distributed (IID), then RFI events are simply outlier data points that can be removed through robust estimation such as a trimmed or Winsorized estimator. The alternative "trimmed" estimator is considered, which excises the strongest n signals from the list of short-beamed intensities. Because local RFI is independent at each antenna, this interference is unlikely to occur at many antennas on the same step. Trimming the strongest signals provides robustness to RFI that can theoretically outperform even the detection performance of the same number of antennas at a single site. This algorithm requires sorting the signals at each time step and dispersion measure, an operation that is computationally tractable for existing array sizes. An alternative uses the various stations to form an ensemble estimate of the conditional density function (CDF) evaluated at each time step. Both methods outperform standard detection strategies on a test

  4. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio PWN G141.2+5.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula (PWN) (Kothes et al. 2014). We find a faint unresolved X-ray source coincident with the central peak of radio emission. Spectral fits to the 241 counts show that an absorbed power-law describes the data well, with absorbing column NH = 4.8 (2.6, 7.3) x 1021 cm-2 and photon index Γ = 1.6 (1.2, 2.1). (A black-body fit is slightly less favored statistically, and has an implausibly high temperature, kT = 0.9 keV.) For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is 1.8 (1.1, 3.0) x 1032 erg s-1. No extended emission is seen; a very conservative upper limit to Lx (nebula) is about the same luminosity as that observed from the point source. The radio luminosity is about 3 x 1030 erg s-1 the X-ray upper limit then gives Lx/Lr < 700, satisfied by almost all pulsar-wind nebulae. Both Lx and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. The steep radio spectrum (α ~ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts Lx (nebula) ~ 1 x 1033 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  5. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  6. Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; Keane, E. F.; Barr, E. D.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Stevens, J.; Brem, C.; Jameson, A.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Johnston, S.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Kudale, P. Chandra S.; Bhandari, S.

    2015-08-01

    `Perytons' are millisecond-duration transients of terrestrial origin, whose frequency-swept emission mimics the dispersion of an astrophysical pulse that has propagated through tenuous cold plasma. In fact, their similarity to FRB 010724 had previously cast a shadow over the interpretation of `fast radio bursts' (FRBs), which otherwise appear to be of extragalactic origin. Until now, the physical origin of the dispersion-mimicking perytons had remained a mystery. We have identified strong out-of-band emission at 2.3-2.5 GHz associated with several peryton events. Subsequent tests revealed that a peryton can be generated at 1.4 GHz when a microwave oven door is opened prematurely and the telescope is at an appropriate relative angle. Radio emission escaping from microwave ovens during the magnetron shut-down phase neatly explains all of the observed properties of the peryton signals. Now that the peryton source has been identified, we furthermore demonstrate that the microwave ovens on site could not have caused FRB 010724. This and other distinct observational differences show that FRBs are excellent candidates for genuine extragalactic transients.

  7. Compact radio sources in the starburst galaxy M82 and the Sigma-D relation for supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Z. P.; Thuan, T. X.; Chevalier, R. A.; Condon, J. J.; Yin, Q. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained an 8.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) A-array map of the starburst galaxy M82 with a resolution Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) approximately 0.182 sec. About 50 compact radio sources in the central region of M82 were detected with a peak surface brightness approximately greater than 10(exp -17) W/Hz/sq m/sr. Comparison with previous observations shows that most sources are declining in flux. Three previously visible sources have faded into the background of our map (approximately less than 0.2 mJy/beam), while a few sources, including the second and third brightest radio sources in M82, may have increased slightly in flux over the last decade. No new radio supernova was found. The birth rate of the compact radio sources is estimated to be 0.11 + or - 0.05/yr. We attribute the population of such bright, small supernova remnants (SNRs) in M82 to the high pressure in the central region that can truncate the mass loss during a red supergiant phase or allow dense ionized clouds to be present. The compact radio sources obey a Sigma(radio surface brightness) - D(diameter) relation which is remarkably similar to that followed by supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds and by two of the strongest known extragalactic radio supernovae: SN 1986J and SN 1979C. A least-squares fit to the SNR data gives: Sigma(sub 8.4 GHz) (W/Hz/sq m/sr) = 4.4 x 10(exp -16) D(sub pc)(exp -3.5 +/- 0.1) covering seven orders of magnitude in Sigma. Possible selection effects are discussed and a theoretical discussion of the correlation is presented.

  8. The compact radio structure of radio-loud NLS1 galaxies and the relationship to CSS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, M.; Chen, Y.; Komossa, S.; Yuan, W.; Shen, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are thought to be young AGNs with relatively small black hole masses and high accretion rates. Radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s) are very special, because some of them show blazar-like characteristics, while others resemble compact steep-spectrum sources. Relativistic jets were shown to exist in a few RLNLS1s based on VLBI observations and confirmed by the gamma-ray flaring of some of them. These properties may possibly be contrary to typical radio-loud AGNs, in light of the low black-hole masses, and high accretion rates. We present the compact radio structure of fourteen RLNLS1 galaxies from Very Long Baseline Array observations at 5 GHz in 2013. Although all these sources are very radio-loud with {R > 100}, their jet properties are diverse, in terms of their milli-arcsecond (mas) scale (pc scale) morphology and their overall radio spectral shape. The core brightness temperatures of our sources are significantly lower than those of blazars, therefore, the beaming effect is generally not significant in our sources, compared to blazars. This implies that the bulk jet speed may likely be low in our sources. The relationship between RLNLS1s and compact steep-spectrum sources, and the implications on jet formation are discussed based on the pc-scale jet properties.

  9. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  10. The Interaction of Radio Sources and X-ray-Emitting Gas in Cluster Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2001-10-01

    Recent Chandra observations of cooling flow clusters containing central radio sources reveal an anti-correlation between radio and X-ray emission. Abell 2052 is one such cluster that exhibits this morphology. The cD galaxy at the center of Abell 2052 is host to the powerful radio source 3C 317. "Holes" in the X-ray emission are coincident with the radio lobes which are surrounded by bright "shells" of X-ray emission. Heating by central radio sources has been proposed as one solution to the "missing gas" in cooling flows -- there is a lack of gas detected in the X-ray at temperatures at or below approximately 1 keV. However, the gas surrounding the radio source in Abell 2052 is cool. The data are consistent with the radio source displacing and compressing, and at the same time being confined by, the X-ray gas. The compression of the X-ray shells appears to have been relatively gentle and, at most, slightly transonic. The pressure in the X-ray gas (the shells and surrounding cooler gas) is approximately an order of magnitude higher than the minimum pressure derived for the radio source, suggesting that an additional source of pressure is needed to support the radio plasma. The compression of the X-ray shells has speeded up the cooling of the shells, and optical emission line filaments are found coincident with the brightest regions of the shells.

  11. The Interaction of Radio Sources and X-Ray-Emitting Gas in Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, E. L.

    Recent observations of the interactions between radio sources and the X-ray-emitting gas in cooling flows in the cores of clusters of galaxies are reviewed. The radio sources inflate bubbles in the X-ray gas, which then rise buoyantly outward in the clusters transporting energy to the intracluster medium (ICM). The bright rims of gas around the radio bubbles are cool, rather than hot, and do not show signs of being strongly shocked. Energy deposited into the ICM over the lifetime of a cluster through several outbursts of a radio source helps to account for at least some of the gas that is missing in cooling flows at low temperatures.

  12. Binary black holes in nuclei of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, J.; Britzen, S.

    If we assume that nuclei of extragalactic radio sources contain a Binary Black Hole system, the 2 black holes can eject VLBI components and in that case 2 families of different VLBI trajectories will be observed. An important consequence of the presence of a Binary Black Hole system is the following: the VLBI core is associated with one black hole and if a VLBI component is ejected by the second black hole, one expects to be able to detect the offset of the origin of the VLBI component ejected by the black hole not associated with the VLBI core. The ejection of VLBI components is perturbed by the precession of the accretion disk and the motion of the black holes around the gravity center of the BBH system. We modeled the ejection of the component taking into account the 2 perturbations and we obtained a method to fit the coordinates of a VLBI component and to deduce the characteristics of the BBH system, i.e. the ratio Tp/Tb where Tp is the precession period of the accretion disk and Tb the orbital period of the BBH system, the mass ratio M1/M2, the radius of the BBH system Rbin. We applied the method to component S1 of 1823+568 and to component C5 of 3C 279 which presents a large offset of the space origin from the VLBI core. We found that 1823+568 contains a BBH system which size is Rbin ≈ 60 mu as and 3C 279 contains a BBH system which size is Rbin ≈ 378 mu as. We were able to deduce the separation of the 2 black holes and the coordinates of the second black hole from the VLBI core, this information will be important to make the link between the radio reference frame system deduced from VLBI observations and the optical reference frame system deduced from GAIA.

  13. THE ABUNDANCE OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES. I. VLA SURVEY OF 52 SOURCES WITH OFF-AXIS DISTORTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David H.; Cohen, Jake P.; Lu, Jing; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-09-15

    Cheung identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here, we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1″. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, 7 were observed at 1.4 and 5 GHz, and 1 was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey red images for 48 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% of sources might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that could have formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following an interruption and axis flip. The remaining 20% are in neither of these categories. The implications of this result for the gravitational wave background are discussed in Roberts et al.

  14. Radio jet propagation and wide-angle tailed radio sources in merging galaxy cluster environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loken, Chris; Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) within merging clusters of galaxies is likely to be in a violent or turbulent dynamical state which may have a significant effect on the evolution of cluster radio sources. We present results from a recent gas + N-body simulation of a cluster merger, suggesting that mergers can result in long-lived, supersonic bulk flows, as well as shocks, within a few hundred kiloparsecs of the core of the dominant cluster. These results have motivated our new two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of jet propagation in such environments. The first set of simulations models the ISM/ICM transition as a contact discontinuity with a strong velocity shear. A supersonic (M(sub j) = 6) jet crossing this discontinuity into an ICM with a transverse, supersonic wind bends continuously, becomes 'naked' on the upwind side, and forms a distended cocoon on the downwind side. In the case of a mildly supersonic jet (M(sub j) = 3), however, a shock is driven into the ISM and ISM material is pulled along with the jet into the ICM. Instabilities excited at the ISM/ICM interface result in the jet repeatedly pinching off and reestablishing itself in a series of 'disconnection events.' The second set of simulations deals with a jet encountering a shock in the merging cluster environment. A series of relatively high-resolution two-dimensional calculations is used to confirm earlier analysis predicting that the jet will not disrupt when the jet Mach number is greater than the shock Mach number. A jet which survives the encounter with the shock will decrease in radius and disrupt shortly thereafter as a result of the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We also find, in disagreement with predictions, that the jet flaring angle decreases with increasing jet density. Finally, a three-dimensional simulation of a jet crossing an oblique shock gives rise to a morphology which resembles a wide-angle tailed radio source with the jet flaring at the shock and

  15. Infrared point sources aligned with the SgrA(asterisk) non-thermal radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, W. A.; Forrest, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Assembled 0.7-5.0 micron observational data for two point sources approximately aligned with the compact nonthermal radio source SgrA(asterisk) in the Galactic center, thus far interpreted as being from the same object on the basis of their position and spectral continuity, are presently given alternative interpretations. While the object must be a hot star surrounded by a circumstellar dust cloud if it is a foreground star, a Galactic center position calls for an unorthodox extinction curve which suggests that the IR emission may be the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot star or star cluster, or perhaps a thermal accretion disk.

  16. Determination of radio spectra from catalogues and identification of gigahertz peaked sources using the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Bernd; Derriere, Sebastian; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Boch, Thomas; Gassmann, Brice; Davoust, Emmanuel; Dubois, Pascal; Genova, Françoise; Ochsenbein, François; van Driel, Wim

    2007-08-01

    We have used the 20 largest radio continuum catalogues contained in VizieR (CDS) to determine radio continuum spectra between wavelengths of 2cm and 1m. For 67,000 out of the 3.5 million catalogued sources we could extract radio spectra with measurements at at least three independent frequencies (Vollmer et al. 2005, A&A, 431, 1177). These have been validated by comparison with existing spectral indices from the literature. This work allowed us to investigated the compatibility between the 20 radio continuum catalogues (Vollmer et al. 2005, A&A, 436, 757). Our radio spectra data base was searched for Gigahertz peaked source candidates, which we then observed quasi-simultaneously with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope at 6cm (4.85GHz), 2.8cm (10.45GHz), and 9mm (32GHz). This represents an efficient procedure to discover new Gigahertz peaked sources, which are believed to be AGNs at the beginning of their radio evolution. In our sample of more than 200 sources we find more than 50% bona fide GPS sources. In addition, we can estimate the percentage of variable sources in our multi-epoch sample of radio sources which show an inverted spectrum. We are generalizing the method by using VO capabilities to: (i) identify pertinent radio catalogues in the VO registry using Uniform Content Descriptions (UCDs); all catalogues containing a user defined set of UCDs (e.g., PHOT_FLUX_RADIO* for a radio flux, POS_EQ_RA and POS_EQ_DEC for the position) are located in the VO registry and listed for further queries; (ii) extract relevant data, the user can easily assign a row of a given catalogue to a row of a previously defined output catalogue; and (iii) normalize these for the determination of radio spectra; units can be converted, aconymes can be created, flags can be created, etc. This procedure allows to homogenize the information retrieved from a heterogenuous set of catalogues. For this purpose software allowing semi-automated information retrieval is being developed at the

  17. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-frequency Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias A.; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek Renee A.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Ivison, R. J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Edward J.; Zemcov, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect associated with the halos that host them. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) has conducted a survey at 148 GHz, 218 GHz and 277 GHz along the celestial equator. Using samples of radio sources selected at 1.4 GHz from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) Survey and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS), we measure the stacked 148, 218 and 277 GHz flux densities for sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities ranging from 5 to 200 mJy. At these flux densities, the radio source population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), with both steep and at spectrum populations, which have combined radio-to-millimeter spectral indices ranging from 0.5 to 0.95, reecting the prevalence of steep spectrum sources at high flux densities and the presence of at spectrum sources at lower flux densities. The thermal Sunyaev-Zelapos;dovich (SZ) eect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 level through its spectral signature. When we compare the SZ eect with weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies, we find that the relation between the two is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. We present a detection of the SZ eect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approx. equals 10(exp 13) solar M h(sup-1) (sub 70) ) studied to date. This detection is particularly important in the context of galaxy evolution models, as it confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. With Herschel* observations, we show that the SZ detection is not significantly contaminated by dusty galaxies or by dust associated with the AGN or galaxies hosting the AGN. We show that 5 mJy < S(sub 1:4) < 200 mJy radio sources contribute l(l +1)C(sub l)/(2 pi ) = 0:37+/- 0:03 micro K(exp 2) to the angular

  18. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus: Evidence of a cusp source

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (< 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz by both the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) and Plasma Wave (PWS) experiments. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration (about 250 msec), tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. In this report, the authors present an explicit determination of the burst source location based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole an the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp. Based upon the emission power, it is suspected that at certain times large amounts of auroral input power may originate in this cusp.

  19. Method of making radio frequency ion source antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1988-01-01

    In the method, the radio frequency (RF) antenna is made by providing a clean coil made of copper tubing or other metal conductor, which is coated with a tacky organic binder, and then with a powdered glass frit, as by sprinkling the frit uniformly over the binder. The coil is then heated internally in an inert gas atmosphere, preferably by passing an electrical heating current along the coil. Initially, the coil is internally heated to about 200.degree. C. to boil off the water from the binder, and then to about 750.degree. C.-850.degree. C. to melt the glass frit, while also burning off the organic binder. The melted frit forms a molten glass coating on the metal coil, which is then cooled to solidify the glass, so that the metal coil is covered with a thin continuous homogeneous impervious glass coating of substantially uniform thickness. The glass coating affords complete electrical insulation and complete dielectric protection for the metal coil of the RF antenna, to withstand voltage breakdown and to prevent sputtering, while also doubling the plasma generating efficiency of the RF antenna, when energized with RF power in the vacuum chamber of an ion source for a particle accelerator or the like. The glass frit preferably contains apprxoimately 45% lead oxide.

  20. Sunspot magnetic structure and interspot radio source formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic structure of a typical sunspot is represented as a set of three interacting magnetic fluxes. The first one, F1, escapes upward from the sunspot umbra and closes through the corona on the sunspot of opposite polarity. The second, F2, forms the sunspot penumbra. It includes Evershed flows emerging from the sunspot, the heavy photospheric plasma of which cannot be pulled up to the corona. For this reason, the F2 flux at the outer edge of the penumbra should close on the photosphere adjacent to the sunspot, i.e., here the F2 field changes sign. The third flux, F3, is the external magnetic field flux and has the same polarity as F1. Thus, magnetic fields of different signs occur near the outer boundary of the sunspot penumbra. Magnetic reconnections will inevitably take place there. Smalland multiscale current sheets in which particles are accelerated are formed. The latter fill short and low magnetic loops that connect sunspots of different polarity in the bipolar group and form interspot radio sources at the tops of these loops.

  1. Program Source Directory. A Resource for Canadian Community Radio Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Broadcasting Corp., Toronto (Ontario).

    In Canada, Community Radio is beginning to reassert itself as local groups demand access to the airwaves to share information about their own cultures and communities, to devise their own entertainment, and to participate in dialogues with others. Since funds for Community Radio are scarce and programing expensive, and effort is underway to…

  2. JVLA observations of IC 348 SW: Compact radio sources and their nature

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Palau, Aina E-mail: l.zapata@crya.unam.mx

    2014-07-20

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, 7 of which are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797, we detect a double radio source at its center, separated by ∼3''. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  3. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  4. Binary black holes in nuclei of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, J.; Britzen, S.; Caproni, A.; Fromm, C.; Glück, C.; Zensus, A.

    2013-09-01

    If we assume that nuclei of extragalactic radio sources contain binary black hole systems, the two black holes can eject VLBI components, in which case two families of different VLBI trajectories will be observed. Another important consequence of a binary black hole system is that the VLBI core is associated with one black hole, and if a VLBI component is ejected by the second black hole, one expects to be able to detect the offset of the origin of the VLBI component ejected by the black hole that is not associated with the VLBI core. The ejection of VLBI components is perturbed by the precession of the accretion disk and the motion of the black holes around the center of gravity of the binary black hole system. We modeled the ejection of the component taking into account the two pertubations and present a method to fit the coordinates of a VLBI component and to deduce the characteristics of the binary black hole system. Specifically, this is the ratio Tp/Tb where Tp is the precession period of the accretion disk and Tb is the orbital period of the binary black hole system, the mass ratio M1/M2, and the radius of the binary black hole system Rbin. From the variations of the coordinates as a function of time of the ejected VLBI component, we estimated the inclination angle io and the bulk Lorentz factor γ of the modeled component. We applied the method to component S1 of 1823+568 and to component C5 of 3C 279, which presents a large offset of the space origin from the VLBI core. We found that 1823+568 contains a binary black hole system whose size is Rbin ≈ 60 μas (μas is a microarcsecond) and 3C 279 contains a binary black hole system whose size is Rbin ≈ 420 μas. We calculated the separation of the two black holes and the coordinates of the second black hole from the VLBI core. This information will be important to link the radio reference-frame system obtained from VLBI observations and the optical reference-frame system obtained from Gaia.

  5. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA (I): observations and background sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Massardi, Marcella; de Blok, W. J. G.; Profumo, Stefano; Orford, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are key objects in near-field cosmology, especially in connection to the study of galaxy formation and evolution at small scales. In addition, dSphs are optimal targets to investigate the nature of dark matter. However, while we begin to have deep optical photometric observations of the stellar population in these objects, little is known so far about their diffuse emission at any observing frequency, and hence on thermal and non-thermal plasma possibly residing within dSphs. In this paper, we present deep radio observations of six local dSphs performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 16 cm wavelength. We mosaicked a region of radius of about 1 deg around three `classical' dSphs, Carina, Fornax, and Sculptor, and of about half of degree around three `ultrafaint' dSphs, BootesII, Segue2, and Hercules. The rms noise level is below 0.05 mJy for all the maps. The restoring beams full width at half-maximum ranged from 4.2 arcsec × 2.5 arcsec to 30.0 arcsec × 2.1 arcsec in the most elongated case. A catalogue including the 1392 sources detected in the six dSph fields is reported. The main properties of the background sources are discussed, with positions and fluxes of brightest objects compared with the FIRST, NVSS, and SUMSS observations of the same fields. The observed population of radio emitters in these fields is dominated by synchrotron sources. We compute the associated source number counts at 2 GHz down to fluxes of 0.25 mJy, which prove to be in agreement with AGN count models.

  6. Population density effect on radio frequencies interference (RFI) in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Hassan, Mohd Saiful Rizal; Rosli, Zulfazli; Hamidi, Zety Shahrizat

    2012-06-01

    Radio astronomical observation is infected by wide range of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). We will also use information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'good' areas generated by this study. After investigating a few suitable sites we will commence to the site and construct the RFI observation. Eventually, the best area we will be deciding from the observations soon. The result of this experiment will support our planning to build the first radio telescope in Malaysia. Radio observatories normally are located in remote area, in order to combat RFI from active spectrum users and radio noise produced in industrial or residential areas. The other solution for this problem is regulating the use of radio frequencies in the country (spectrum management). Measurement of RFI level on potential radio astronomical site can be done to measure the RFI levels at sites. Seven sites are chosen divide by three group, which is A, B and C. In this paper, we report the initial testing RFI survey for overall spectrum (0-2GHz) for those sites. The averaged RFI level above noise level at the three group sites are 19.0 (+/-1.79) dBm, 19.5 (+/-3.71) dBm and 17.0 (+/-3.71) dBm and the averaged RFI level above noise level for without main peaks are 20.1 (+/-1.77) dBm, 19.6 (+/-3.65) dBm and 17.2 (+/-1.43) dBm respectively.

  7. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus - Evidence of a cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kurth, W. S.

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (less than 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration, tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. An explicit determination of the burst source location is presented, based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole and the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp.

  8. Source of O mode radio emissions from the dayside of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Menietti, J.D.; Curran, D.B. )

    1990-09-01

    During the inbound trajectory toward Uranus the Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument on board the Voyager 2 spacecraft observed narrowband smooth (n-smooth) emission at frequencies centered near 60 kHz and O mode emission (the dayside source) in a frequency range narrowly confined around 160 kHz. By assuming empirical models of the plasma density for the dayside magnetosphere of Uranus, and by using cold plasma theory together with observational constraints, the authors have performed ray-tracing calculations to determine the source lcoation of the O mode emission. The dayside source appears to originate along magnetic field lines with a footprint near the north magnetic pole. Sources of nightside, high-frequency, broadband smooth (b-smooth) emission observed by Voyager after encounter are believed to exist near the conjugate footprint of these same field lines. This would indicate that the particle population supplying the free energy source has energies at least as high as a few keV and the density in the source region satisfies the condition 0.3 < f{sub p}/f{sub ce} < 1.0 where f{sub p} and f{sub ce} are the electron plasma frequency and gyrofrequency, respectively.

  9. Some Results of Coordinate Measurements of Local Radio Sources on the Sun.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-03

    7 AD-A VS@ 186 SOME RESULTS OF COORDINATE MEASUREMENTS OF LOCAL RADIO iSOURCES ON THE SUN (U) NAVRL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SRN1) DIEGO CR Y N BOROYIK ET...MEASUREMENTS OF LOCAL RADIO !C~i SOURCES ON THE SUN ell Translated by CM Bigger from an article by VN Borovik and AV Temirova Edited by MP Bleiweiss C...COORDINATE MEASUREMENTS OF LOCAL RADIO SOURCES ON THE SUN 12 PERSOML AJT"ORS V.N. Borovik, A.V. Temirova 1l W 0 REPORT l3b VM COVIRED 4 SAlE 09 9504 f . 4 j

  10. On the nature of bright compact radio sources at z > 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Rocco; Frey, Sándor; Cseh, Dávid; Müller, Cornelia; Paragi, Zsolt; Falcke, Heino; Gabányi, Krisztina É.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; An, Tao; Titov, Oleg

    2016-12-01

    High-redshift radio-loud quasars are used to, among other things, test the predictions of cosmological models, set constraints on black hole growth in the early Universe and understand galaxy evolution. Prior to this paper, 20 extragalactic radio sources at redshifts above 4.5 have been imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Here, we report on observations of an additional ten z > 4.5 sources at 1.7 and 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network, thereby increasing the number of imaged sources by 50 per cent. Combining our newly observed sources with those from the literature, we create a substantial sample of 30 z > 4.5 VLBI sources, allowing us to study the nature of these objects. Using spectral indices, variability and brightness temperatures, we conclude that of the 27 sources with sufficient information to classify, the radio emission from one source is from star formation, 13 are flat-spectrum radio quasars and 13 are steep-spectrum sources. We also argue that the steep-spectrum sources are off-axis (unbeamed) radio sources with rest-frame self-absorption peaks at or below GHz frequencies and that these sources can be classified as gigahertz peaked-spectrum and megahertz peaked-spectrum sources.

  11. RADIO MONITORING OF THE PERIODICALLY VARIABLE IR SOURCE LRLL 54361: NO DIRECT CORRELATION BETWEEN THE RADIO AND IR EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Forbrich, Jan; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A.; Muzerolle, James; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2015-11-20

    LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star-forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 over roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of ∼100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of the order of a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27 ± 5 μJy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, 53 ± 11 μJy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.

  12. Difficulties in Estimating the Physical Parameters of Compact Radio Sources in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The various factors influencing estimates of the physical parameters of compact radio sources in active galactic nuclei (AGN) using a methods based on uniform models of synchrotron radiation sources are analyzed. It is found that the form of the relativistic electron energy density distribution as a function of magnetic energy density (Ee-EH) in the radio sources is determined by the shape of the electron energy spectrum. It is shown that the very large observed deviations of the estimated energies of the field and relativistic particles from equipartition are mainly caused by nonuniformity of the radio sources. In order to obtain correct estimates of the physical parameters of nonuniform radio sources, it is necessary to know their angular sizes at low frequencies (in the opaque region) and their Doppler factors.

  13. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an active galactic nuclei (AGN). Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≲ 1 mJy). Aims: The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties by making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). Methods: We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 μm IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. Results: We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that IR-detected IFRSs are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z ≳ 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S1.4 GHz 100 μJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios >500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios ( 100-200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.

  14. The under-explored radio-loudness of quasars and the possibility of radio-source-environment interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Katherine M.

    2003-10-01

    I demonstrate that radio observations in the literature to date of optically-selected quasars are largely inadequate to reveal the full extent of their jet-activity. I discuss a recent example of an optically-powerful quasar, which is radio-quiet according to all the standard classifications, which Blundell and Rawlings discovered to have a >100 kpc jet, and show that other than being the first FR I quasar to be identified, there is no reason to presume it is exceptional. I also discuss a possible new probe of accounting for the interactions of radio sources with their environments. This tool could help to avoid over-estimating magnetic fields strengths within cluster gas. I briefly describe recent analyses by Rudnick and Blundell which confront claims in the literature of cluster gas B-fields >10 μG.

  15. Effect of asymmetry of the radio source distribution on the apparent proper motion kinematic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Malkin, Z.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Information on physical characteristics of astrometric radio sources, such as magnitude and redshift, is of great importance for many astronomical studies. However, data usually used in radio astrometry is often incomplete and outdated. Aims: Our purpose is to study the optical characteristics of more than 4000 radio sources observed by the astrometric VLBI technique since 1979. We also studied the effect of the asymmetry in the distribution of the reference radio sources on the correlation matrices between vector spherical harmonics of the first and second degrees. Methods: The radio source characteristics were mainly taken from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). Characteristics of the gravitational lenses were checked with the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey. SIMBAD and HyperLeda databases were also used to clarify the characteristics of some objects. Also we simulated and investigated a list of 4000 radio sources evenly distributed around the celestial sphere. We estimated the correlation matrices between the vector spherical harmonics using the real as well as modelled distribution of the radio sources. Results: A new list OCARS (optical characteristics of astrometric radio sources) of 4261 sources has been compiled. Comparison of our data of optical characteristics with the official International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) list showed significant discrepancies for about half of the 667 common sources. Finally, we found that asymmetry in the radio source distribution between hemispheres could cause significant correlation between the vector spherical harmonics, especially in the case of sparse distribution of the sources with high redshift. We also identified radio sources having a many-year observation history and lack of redshift. These sources should be urgently observed with large optical telescopes. Conclusions: The list of optical characteristics created in this paper is recommended for use as a

  16. The Trivariate / Radio Optical X-Ray / Luminosity Function CD Galaxies - Part Two - the Fuelling of Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Bijleveld, W.

    1983-09-01

    In order to the test the hypothesis that radio sources in elliptical galaxies are fuelled by a fraction of accreted X-ray gas, a sample of 81 cD galaxies in clusters and 23 cD galaxies in poor groups is studied. Various subsamples have been defined (reviewed in Table t) according to the origin of the cD galaxy classification (optically, radio or X-ray selected). A catalogue is presented, listing the measured optical, radio and X-ray luminosities from various origins, but all transformed to a uniform and homogeneous system: optical Mv (38 kpc metric diameter), radio P1.4 (1.4 GHz monochromatic total radio power) and Lx (1 Mpc metric diameter 0.5-3.0 keV X-ray band). The three luminosity parameters are investigated for cross- correlations by studying power-power plots and by analysing how the integral radio luminosity function, expressed in fractions of radio detections (F(> P1.4)), depend on Mv and Lx. All three parameters are found to correlate with each other. F(> P1.4) increases with both increasing Lx and brighter Mv and Lx also increases with brighter Mv. The determinations of the different regression relations are internally consistent. The empirical conclusions from the analysis are: (i) The mean Mv of poor group cDs is 0.m4 fainter than the mean Mv of cluster cDs. (ii) The bivariate radio luminosity functions of both samples confirm, both in shape and in their dependence on Mv, those of normal and giant ellipticals. (iii) cD galaxies have an increasing probability to contain a central (≲ 28 kpc) radio source when the X-ray luminosity of their halo (˜1 Mpc diameter) increases. 50 ± 9% of Lx ≧ 1044 erg s-1 cDs have a central radio source with P1.4 ≧ 1024WHz-1, while 12+l2-5% of Lx < 1043 ergs-1 cDs have a radio source of that power. This important conclusion is summarised in Fig. 5. (iv) Comparing rich cluster cDs and poor group cDs a relation between Mv and Lx is found. This relation holds among the rich cluster cDs as well. The physical origins of

  17. New method for determining the distances to certain extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.

    1980-06-01

    The structural evolution of variable radio sources is examined in the Hedgehog model. It is shown that the time evolution of the angular separation of two components is described by the ellipse equation.

  18. A statistical VLBI study of milli-arcsecond cores in extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Morabito, D. D.; Jauncey, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    VLBI observations at 2.3 GHz with a baseline of approximately 8 x 10 to the 7th wavelengths were performed on a complete sample of 103 sources from the Parkes + or - 4 deg catalog. Compact milli-arcsec cores were found in 35 percent of all sources: in 80 percent of quasars, in 10 percent of galaxies, and in 20 percent of empty field sources. It is shown that for quasars the percentage of the source flux density coming from milli-arcsec cores increased with increasing radio spectral index, radio variability, and optical redness. It is noted that quasars with extended radio structure (not less than approximately 10 arcsec) seem more likely to have a detectable milli-arcsec core than do extended radio galaxies. The absence of a strong correlation between quasar milli-arcsec structure and redshift is found to be evidence for a lack of strong physical evolution in quasars.

  19. New method for determining the distances to certain extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.

    1980-01-01

    The structural evolution of variable radio sources is examined in the Hedgehog model. It is shown that the time evolution of the angular separation of two components is described by the ellipse equation.

  20. Source counts at 5 gigahertz from the MG survey. [radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Lawrence, C. R.; Burke, B. F.

    1985-01-01

    The MIT-Green Bank (MG) radio survey (reported by Bennett and colleagues in 1984 and 1985) is the largest 5 GHz survey to date. In this paper the source counts from the MG survey are examined. They are consistent with past measurements, but due to the large size of the MG survey the Poisson errors have been reduced. Radio source evolution models (such as that reported by Condon in 1984) are consistent with these new measurements.

  1. A LOFAR view on the duty cycle of young radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienza, M.; Morganti, R.; Shulevski, A.; Godfrey, L.; Vilchez, N.

    2016-02-01

    Compact Steep Spectrum, Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum, and High Frequency Peak (CSS, GPS, HFP) sources are considered to be young radio sources, but the details of their duty cycle are not well understood. In some cases they are thought to develop in FRI/FRII radio galaxies while in other cases their jets may remain confined within the host galaxy, and some may experience intermittent activity or die prematurely, never reaching the size of large classical double radio galaxies. Studying in a systematic way the presence and the properties of any extended emission surrounding these compact sources can provide firmer constraints on their evolutionary history and on the timescales of activity of the radio source. Remnant emission from previous outbursts is supposed to have very low surface brightness and to be brighter at low frequency. Taking advantage of the unprecedented sensitivity and resolution provided by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) we have started a systematic search of new CSS, GPS, and HFP sources with extended emission, as well as a more detailed study of some well-known of these sources. Here we present the key points of our search in the LOFAR fields and a more in-depth analysis on the source B2 0258+35, a CSS source surrounded by a pair of large, diffuse radio lobes. In this way, we aim to provide a better census of restarted sources and a better knowledge of the variety of their duty cycle.

  2. Synoptic Solar Radio Burst Source Directions Derived by the Ulysses URAP Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Hess, R. A.; Reiner, M. J.; Hoang, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) investigation is one of 10 instruments on the Ulysses spacecraft. Ulysses, with its highly inclined orbit around the sun, provides URAP with a unique perspective on solar radio bursts, which are usually emitted at low heliolatitudes as the electron sources move outward from the sun. These radio bursts provide positional information relating to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (type II radio bursts), the initiation of CMEs (type III-L bursts), and solar flares (type III bursts). In this presentation, we use the routine radio direction-finding data from URAP to track radio bursts and locate their sources when Ulysses is near perihelion. Plots of these data are available on the URAP Goddard Space Flight Center web site (for example, http://urap.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi/giffer?date=20070726&PLOT_TYPE= DIRFIND), as are ASCII data files. The results shown are derived from fitting the spin-plane antenna data only; we compare the source directions so derived to the more accurate determinations made by fitting to both URAP antennas. The accuracy of the radio source directions to identify flare locations, determine solar wind densities remotely, etc., will be compared to previously published determinations. Applications to Wind Waves and STEREO Waves data, for which the spacecraft are in-ecliptic, will be addressed briefly.

  3. Technique to determine location of radio sources from measurements taken on spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    The procedure developed to extract average source direction and average source size from spin-modulated radio astronomy data measured on the IMP-6 spacecraft is described. Because all measurements are used, rather than just finding maxima or minima in the data, the method is very sensitive, even in the presence of large amounts of noise. The technique is applicable to all experiments with directivity characteristics. It is suitable for onboard processing on satellites to reduce the data flow to Earth. The application to spin-modulated nonpolarized radio astronomy data is made and includes the effects of noise, background, and second source interference. The analysis was tested with computer simulated data and the results agree with analytic predictions. Applications of this method with IMP-6 radio data have led to: (1) determination of source positions of traveling solar radio bursts at large distances from the Sun; (2) mapping of magnetospheric radio emissions by radio triangulation; and (3) detection of low frequency radio emissions from Jupiter and Saturn.

  4. Multifrequency VLA observations of PKS 0745 - 191 - The archetypal 'cooling flow' radio source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-, 20-, 6- and 2-cm VLA observations of the high-radio-luminosity cooling-flow radio source PKS 0745 - 191 are presented. The radio source was found to have a core with a very steep spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5) and diffuse emission with an even steeper spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5 to -2.3) without clear indications of the jets, hotspots, or double lobes found in the other radio sources of comparable luminosity. It is inferred that the energy to power the radio source comes from the central engine, but the source's structure may be heavily influenced by the past history of the galaxy and the inflowing intracluster medium. It is shown that, while the radio source is energetically unimportant for the cluster as a whole, it is important on the scale of the cooling flow. The mere existence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields within a substantial fraction of the volume inside the cooling radius has important consequences for cooling-flow models.

  5. Multifrequency VLA observations of PKS 0745 - 191 - The archetypal 'cooling flow' radio source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1991-06-01

    Ninety-, 20-, 6- and 2-cm VLA observations of the high-radio-luminosity cooling-flow radio source PKS 0745 - 191 are presented. The radio source was found to have a core with a very steep spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5) and diffuse emission with an even steeper spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5 to -2.3) without clear indications of the jets, hotspots, or double lobes found in the other radio sources of comparable luminosity. It is inferred that the energy to power the radio source comes from the central engine, but the source's structure may be heavily influenced by the past history of the galaxy and the inflowing intracluster medium. It is shown that, while the radio source is energetically unimportant for the cluster as a whole, it is important on the scale of the cooling flow. The mere existence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields within a substantial fraction of the volume inside the cooling radius has important consequences for cooling-flow models.

  6. Diffuse radio emission around FR II sources as exemplified by 3C452

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna, ..

    2014-01-01

    We have discovered a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. For the past several decades 3C452 has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) but we show it to be a bonafide "double-double" radio galaxy (DDRG). The inner double fed by the jets has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. We also present additional examples of the occurrence of faded outer lobes around well defined FRII sources, using our deep GMRT images at meter wavelengths processed with AIPS++ software. We also examine the statistics of the occurrence of such sources using a flux density limited sample. A key ramification of our findings are that they caution against the use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  7. All-News Radio Journalism: Source, Message and Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael B.

    All-news radio is an important journalistic voice for large audiences. To maximize the size of audiences, all-news programing avoids specific partisan appeals. Three aspects of the objective journalistic style are important in forming the discourse of "newsradio": legitimatization, the creation of hierarchies of values; dramatic…

  8. The second version of the OCARS catalog of optical characteristics of astrometric radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Z. M.

    2016-11-01

    A new version of the Optical Characteristics of Astrometric Radio Sources (OCARS) catalog is presented. The catalog includes a list of radio sources observed in astrometric and geodetic VLBI programs since 1979, their redshifts, photometric data in 13 bands in the visible and near infrared, and a table indicating identifications btween the OCARS objects and objects in other catalogs. The main sources of information for the OCARS catalog are the NED and SIMBAD databases, as well as a variety of publications. Targeted observing programs designed to supplement the optical data for the astrometric radio sources have also been organized. The catalog currently contains 9956 sources, of which 5449 have redshifts and 7473 have photometric data. The catalog is updated, on average, once every several weeks, and is continuously augmented with new sources and new optical data.

  9. H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  10. Infrared Properties of Weak Radio Sources in the ρ Ophiuchi Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilking, Bruce A.; Bontemps, Sylvain; Schuler, Richard E.; Greene, Thomas P.; André, Philippe

    2001-04-01

    We report mid-infrared ISOCAM observations for a sample of radio continuum sources in the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud core with unknown or poorly studied infrared counterparts. These data are combined with existing infrared photometry, including recently published ISOCAM data, for previously studied radio sources to investigate the evolutionary states of 35 radio-emitting young stars in the ρ Oph cloud core. About 50% of the radio stars are found to have class I, flat, or class II spectral energy distributions with near-infrared excesses arising from circumstellar disks. Their radio emission is most likely thermal emission from gas ionized by stellar winds. The remaining radio emitters are young stars with class III spectral energy distributions that lack infrared excesses and circumstellar disks. Their radio emission likely is nonthermal emission from magnetic surface activity. The lack of young stars with weak infrared excesses supports earlier suggestions that disk dissipation is rapid. Class III sources are twice as common as class II sources in this radio-selected sample in comparison with extinction-limited samples, which underscores the importance of radio surveys in obtaining a complete census of young stellar objects. The concentration of diskless class III objects in the high column-density molecular core, and their median age of 0.3 Myr derived from their positions in a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, indicate they are contemporaries of class II objects which include the classical T Tauri stars. It appears that these class III objects have shorter disk survival times than class II objects in the cloud. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  11. Radio Astronomical Polarimetry and Point-Source Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straten, W.

    2004-05-01

    A mathematical framework is presented for use in the experimental determination of the polarimetric response of observatory instrumentation. Elementary principles of linear algebra are applied to model the full matrix description of the polarization measurement equation by least-squares estimation of nonlinear, scalar parameters. The formalism is applied to calibrate the center element of the Parkes Multibeam receiver using observations of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and the radio galaxy 3C 218 (Hydra A).

  12. Radio emission evolution of nonstationary sources in the Hedgehog model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.; Mikhaylutsa, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Correlations are obtained for numerical calculation of flux F sub v and polarized radiation intensity of a cloud of arbitrary geometry, consisting of ultrarelativistic electrons that dissipate in a radial magnetic field of the nucleus at a random angle to the observer. It is possible that some of the variable extragalactic objects that were previously described by the Shklovskiy model are young formations in the examined model. Radio astronomical observations would permit a determination of their distance, age, and lifetime.

  13. Optical properties of high-frequency radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Bannister, Keith W.; Chhetri, Rajan; Hancock, Paul J.; Johnston, Helen M.; Massardi, Marcella; Murphy, Tara

    2011-11-01

    Our current understanding of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) comes predominantly from studies at frequencies of 5 GHz and below. With the recent completion of the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey, we can now gain insight into the high-frequency radio properties of AGN. This paper presents supplementary information on the AT20G sources in the form of optical counterparts and redshifts. Optical counterparts were identified using the SuperCOSMOS data base and redshifts were found from either the 6dF Galaxy Survey or the literature. We also report 144 new redshifts. For AT20G sources outside the Galactic plane, 78.5 per cent have optical identifications and 30.9 per cent have redshift information. The optical identification rate also increases with increasing flux density. Targets which had optical spectra available were examined to obtain a spectral classification. There appear to be two distinct AT20G populations; the high luminosity quasars that are generally associated with point-source optical counterparts and exhibit strong emission lines in the optical spectrum, and the lower luminosity radio galaxies that are generally associated with passive galaxies in both the optical images and spectroscopic properties. It is suggested that these different populations can be associated with different accretion modes (cold-mode or hot-mode). We find that the cold-mode sources have a steeper spectral index and produce more luminous radio lobes, but generally reside in smaller host galaxies than their hot-mode counterparts. This can be attributed to the fact that they are accreting material more efficiently. Lastly, we compare the AT20G survey with the S-cubed semi-empirical (S3-SEX) models and conclude that the S3-SEX models need refining to correctly model the compact cores of AGN. The AT20G survey provides the ideal sample to do this.

  14. Source and event selection for radio-planetary frame-tie measurements using the Phobos Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R.; Ulvestad, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Soviet Phobos Lander mission will place two spacecraft on the Martian moon Phobos in 1989. Measurements of the range from Earth-based stations to the landers will allow an accurate determination of the ephemerides of Phobos and Mars. Delta Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) between the landers and compact radio sources nearby on the sky will be used to obtain precise estimates of the angular offset between the radio and planetary reference frames. The accuracy of this frame-tie estimate is expected to be in the vicinity of 10 mrad, depending on how well several error sources can be controlled (calibrated or reduced). Many candidate radio sources for VLBI measurements were identified, but additional work is necessary to select those sources which have characteristics appropriate to the present application. Strategies for performing the source selection are described.

  15. A Quantitative Evaluation of Potential Radio Identifications for 3EG EGRET Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Hartman, R. C.; Reimer, O.

    2001-08-01

    The method of Mattox et al. for identifying EGRET sources with 5 GHz radio sources has been applied to the 3EG EGRET catalog of Hartman et al. Complete results are tabulated. We tabulate separately 46 EGRET sources with radio identifications which we expect to have a high probability of being correct. We suggest that these sources are appropriate for most studies of the properties of γ-ray blazars as a class. All but one of these 46 sources were classified by Hartman et al. as high-confidence identifications; and the additional source was classified by Hartman et al. as a plausible identification. We also tabulate separately 37 additional ``plausible identifications of EGRET sources with radio sources.'' These less secure possibilities include the remaining 21 ``high-confidence identifications'' of Hartman et al., three of the 27 ``lower confidence potential blazar identifications'' of Hartman et al., and an additional 15 plausible identifications which have not been suggested previously. Many of these sources require new radio and optical observations to establish them as blazars. We suggest that the 23 ``lower-confidence potential blazar identifications'' of Hartman et al. which we do not find plausible should not be used in studies of the properties of the EGRET blazars. For this analysis, we have made elliptical fits to the 95% confidence contours of the position uncertainty regions of the 3EG sources which are tabulated in an Appendix.

  16. Radio spectra of bright compact sources at z>4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Rocco; van Velzen, Sjoert; Intema, Huib T.; Müller, Cornelia; Frey, Sándor; Coppejans, Deanne L.; Cseh, Dávid; Williams, Wendy L.; Falcke, Heino; Körding, Elmar G.; Orrú, Emanuela; Paragi, Zsolt; Gabányi, Krisztina É.

    2017-01-01

    High-redshift quasars are important to study galaxy and active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution, test cosmological models, and study supermassive black hole growth. Optical searches for high-redshift sources have been very successful, but radio searches are not hampered by dust obscuration and should be more effective at finding sources at even higher redshifts. Identifying high-redshift sources based on radio data is, however, not trivial. Here we report on new multi-frequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations of eight z > 4.5 sources previously studied at high angular resolution with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Combining these observations with those from the literature, we construct broad-band radio spectra of all 30 z > 4.5 sources that have been observed with VLBI. In the sample we found flat, steep and peaked spectra in approximately equal proportions. Despite several selection effects, we conclude that the z > 4.5 VLBI (and likely also non-VLBI) sources have diverse spectra and that only about a quarter of the sources in the sample have flat spectra. Previously, the majority of high-redshift radio sources were identified based on their ultra-steep spectra (USS). Recently a new method has been proposed to identify these objects based on their megahertz-peaked spectra (MPS). Neither method would have identified more than 18 per cent of the high-redshift sources in this sample. More effective methods are necessary to reliably identify complete samples of high-redshift sources based on radio data.

  17. Chandra Observation of the WAT Radio Source/ICM Interaction in Abell 623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Gagandeep; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Douglass, Edmund

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are important objects for studying the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM), galaxy formation and evolution, and cosmological parameters. Clusters containing wide-angle tail (WAT) radio sources are particularly valuable for studies of the interaction between these sources and the surrounding ICM. These sources are thought to form when the ram pressure from the ICM caused by the relative motion between the host radio galaxy and the cluster bends the radio lobes into a distinct wide-angle morphology. We present our results from the analysis of a Chandra observation of the nearby WAT hosting galaxy cluster Abell 623. A clear decrement in X-ray emission is coincident with the southern radio lobe, consistent with being a cavity carved out by the radio source. We present profiles of surface brightness, temperature, density, and pressure and find evidence for a possible shock. Based on the X-ray pressure in the vicinity of the radio lobes and assumptions about the content of the lobes, we estimate the relative ICM velocity required to bend the lobes into the observed angle. We also present spectral model fits to the overall diffuse cluster emission and see no strong signature for a cool core. The sum of the evidence indicates that Abell 623 may be undergoing a large scale cluster-cluster merger.

  18. Sources of population and family planning assistance.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    This document assesses the current status of population and family planning assistance throughout the world and provides brief sketches of the available sources including national governments, intergovernmental agencies such as the UNFPA and other UN entities, and nongovernmental funding, technical assistance, or funding and technical assistance organizations. The descriptions of aid-granting organizations describe their purposes, sources of funding, and activities, and give addresses where further information may be sought. At present about $100 million of the US $1 billion spent for family planning in developing countries each year comes from individuals paying for their own supplies and services, over $400 million is spent by national governments on their own programs, and about $450 million comes from developed country governments and private agencies. Over half of external assistance appears to be channeled through international agencies, and only a few countries provide a substantial proportion of aid bilaterally. In the past decade several governments, particularly in Asia, significantly increased the share of program costs they assumed themselves, and the most populous developing countries, China, India, and Indonesia, now contribute most of the funding for their own programs. Although at least 130 countries have provided population aid at some time, most is given by 12 industrialized countries. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) is the largest single donor, but the US share of population assistance has declined to 50% of all assistance in 1981 from 60% in the early 1970s. Governments of Communist bloc countries have made only small contributions to international population assistance. Most governmental asistance is in cash grant form, but loans, grants in kind, and technical assistance are also provided. Private organizations give assistance primarily to other private organizations in developing countries, and have been major innovators in

  19. Radio Follow-up on All Unassociated Gamma-Ray Sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinzel, Frank K.; Petrov, Leonid; Taylor, Gregory B.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2017-04-01

    The third Fermi Large Area Telescope γ-ray source catalog (3FGL) contains over 1000 objects for which there is no known counterpart at other wavelengths. The physical origin of the γ-ray emission from those objects is unknown. Such objects are commonly referred to as unassociated and mostly do not exhibit significant γ-ray flux variability. We performed a survey of all unassociated γ-ray sources found in 3FGL using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Array in the range 4.0–10.0 GHz. We found 2097 radio candidates for association with γ-ray sources. The follow-up with very long baseline interferometry for a subset of those candidates yielded 142 new associations with active galactic nuclei that are γ-ray sources, provided alternative associations for seven objects, and improved positions for another 144 known associations to the milliarcsecond level of accuracy. In addition, for 245 unassociated γ-ray sources we did not find a single compact radio source above 2 mJy within 3σ of their γ-ray localization. A significant fraction of these empty fields, 39%, are located away from the Galactic plane. We also found 36 extended radio sources that are candidates for association with a corresponding γ-ray object, 19 of which are most likely supernova remnants or H ii regions, whereas 17 could be radio galaxies.

  20. Tracking Type III Radio Burst Sources in the Solar Corona by Heliographic Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.

    We present the preliminary results of heliographic measurements of solar type III radio bursts in the low-frequency range (16.5-33 MHz) using the UTR-2 radio heliograph. The radio astronomy tools permit us to obtain two-dimensional spatial structures of burst sources in dependence of frequency and time. Each heliogram consists of 40 pixels (beams) as a result of the serial sweep in UV-plane wherein signals of each beam are recorded in a dynamic spectrum with both high temporal (˜ 2.482 ms) and top spectral (˜ 4 kHz) resolutions. The rate of output heliograph is one image per 3 seconds. Over a session in April, 2013 many type III radio and IIIb-III bursts were observed. On the heliograms the source motion direction in the upper corona is clearly detectable. The heliogram features are discussed.

  1. The Role of the Jet Emission in Young Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Giulia

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the contribution of the jet to the observed high energy emission in a sample of young and compact radio quasars. For the first time, we compared the Fermi-LAT and Chandra observations of the sample to γ-ray and X-ray luminosities predicted assuming a jet synchrotron and inverse Compton radiative model. The simulations performed for a reasonable set of model parameters and assumptions provide constraints on the minimum jet power (Ljet,kin/Ldisk >0.01), on the contribution of the jet to the X-ray emission, and on the particles to magnetic field energy density ratios.

  2. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  3. VLA observations of radio sources in interacting galaxy pairs in poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batuski, David J.; Hanisch, Robert J.; Burns, Jack O.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of 16 radio sources in interacting galaxies in 14 poor clusters were made using the Very Large Array in the B configuration at lambda of 6 and 2 cm. These sources had been unresolved in earlier observations at lambda of 21 cm, and were chosen as a sample to determine which of three models for radio source formation actually pertains in interacting galaxies. From the analysis of this sample, the starburst model appears most successful, but the 'central monster' model could pertain in some cases.

  4. Characterizing radio continuum sources in a sample of Hi-GAL massive cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jason

    In 2012 and 2013, Olmi and collaborators conducted a survey for 6.7GHz methanol masers with the Arecibo Telescope toward far infrared sources selected from the Hi-GAL catalog of massive cores. They reported a number of sources with weak 6.7GHz methanol masers, possibly indicating regions in early stages of star formation. Follow-up observations were conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico to characterize the sources. This thesis presents the results of radio continuum observations of nine of the Arecibo regions. A total of 33 radio continuum sources were detected. The nature of the radio continuum sources was analyzed based on their spectral indices. Most of the sources have negative spectral indices, which is indicative of synchrotron radiation. Many of the synchrotron sources are associated with a supernova remnant in our Galaxy, while the rest are likely background radio galaxies and quasars. Evidence for thermal bremsstrahlung radiation was found toward six sources associated with the Arecibo regions, which is consistent with the interpretation of gas ionized by young high-mass stellar objects.

  5. Analysis of the Low-Frequency Radio Noise Environment at Satellite Heights from Terrestrial Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Basart, J. P.; McCoy, M.; Rios, E.

    1996-05-01

    We have investigated the propagation of terrestrial radio sources from 1 to 30 MHz (HF spectral region) through the ionosphere for the purpose of characterizing the interference spectrum on potential space-based, low-frequency-radio telescopes. A recent survey of the HF noise environment at satellite heights from 1 to 14 MHz has been conducted using the WIND spacecraft. Radio frequencies for which the interference appears to be sufficiently low for radio telescopes are 1.3, 2.9, 3.1, 8.2, and 11.4 MHz. A model was developed to predict the HF noise environment. Our current model includes a source model, an ionospheric model, and a ray tracing model. The source model was developed using known commercial broadcast stations found in the World Radio TV Handbook. The ICED ionospheric model was used to generate a model ionosphere. By ray tracing a terrestrially based broadcast source through the model ionosphere, an ionospheric transfer function (ITF) was developed. By modifying the source model using the ITF, we were able to simulate the expected noise environment at satellite heights. Comparison of modeled and measured spectra show the majority of the noise environment is due to known commercial broadcasters. Improved modeling is necessary because the slopes of the simulated spectra above the plasma frequency are too shallow, and the plasma cutoff frequencies are too high compared to the measured data.

  6. The Catalog of Positions of Optically Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources OBRS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrov, L.

    2011-01-01

    It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make it possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500,000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal of making comparisons between coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments and the coordinate system constructed from analysis of global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of the rotation, zonal errors, and non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures is needed to validate both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with decl. > -10deg was observed with the Very Long Baseline Array and European VLBI Network (EVN) with the primary goal of producing images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 mag in the V band, and they were previously detected by the EVN. In this paper, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations using an absolute astrometry method. The catalog of positions for 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in the range of 0.3.7 mas, with a median of 1.1 mas.

  7. The impact of compact radio sources on their host galaxies: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C.

    2016-02-01

    I review the observational evidence that CSS/GPS radio sources have a significant impact on the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly on the kpc-scales of the galaxy bulges. Starting with an overview of the observational evidence for jet-cloud interactions and warm ionised outflows in CSS/GPS sources, I then consider the challenges involved in quantifying the feedback effect of the warm outflows in terms of their mass outflow rates and kinetic powers. For the best-observed cases it is shown that the warm outflows may have a major negative feedback effect in the very central regions, but probably lack the power to heat and eject the full cool ISM contents of the host galaxies. In contrast, the recently-discovered neutral and molecular outflows are more massive and powerful and therefore carry more destructive potential. However, the feedback effect of such outflows is not necessarily negative: there is now clear observational evidence that the molecular outflows are formed as the hot, compressed gas cools behind fast shocks driven into the ISM by the relativistic jets. The natural endpoint of this process is the formation of stars. Therefore, jet-induced star formation may be a significant process in CSS/GPS radio galaxies. Finally, I discuss whether CSS/GPS sources are ``imposters'' in flux-limited radio samples, due the flux boosting of the radio sources by strong jet-cloud interactions in the early stages of radio source evolution.

  8. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Giroletti, M.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Nori, M.

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  9. Radio structure at 8.4 GHz in Sagittarius A, the compact radio source at the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauncey, David L.; Batchelor, Robert A.; Gates, John; Preston, Robert A.; Meier, David L.; Morabito, David D.; Skjerve, Lyle; Slade, Martin A.; Niell, Arthur E.; Wehrle, Ann E.

    1989-01-01

    VLBI observations of the compact, nonthermal radio source at the Galactic center show it to be elongated at 8.4 GHz along a position angle of 82 + or - 6 deg. The source has an axial ratio of 0.53 + or - 0.10 with a major axis of 17.4 + or - 0.5 mas. Examination of VLA maps of the Galactic center region indicate no obvious alignment with this smaller-scale elongation of the nuclear region, nor is the nuclear position angle aligned with the axis of Galactic rotation. Comparison with the size measured at frequencies from 1 to 22 GHz shows that the size follows very closely the lambda-squared dependence expected from interstellar scattering. The alongated nature of the source implies either that the scattering medium is anisotropic or that some remnant of the intrinsic structure remains visible through the scattering medium.

  10. A Compact X-Ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source that we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column {N}H=6.7(4.0,9.7)× {10}21 cm-2 and photon index {{Γ }}=1.8(1.4,2.2). For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is {1.7}-0.3+0.4× {10}32 erg s-1 (90% confidence intervals). Both LX and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative 3σ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be 3× {10}-17 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter 13\\prime\\prime , the flux limit is 6% of the flux of the point source. The steep radio spectrum of the PWN (α ˜ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts {L}{{X}} {{(nebula)}}˜ 1× {10}33 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  11. THE VLA SURVEY OF CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH. V. EVOLUTION AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SUB-MILLIJANSKY RADIO SOURCES AND THE ISSUE OF RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Padovani, P.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-10

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 {mu}Jy at the field center and redshift {approx}5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P {approx}> 3 x 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1}) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for {approx}30% of the sample and {approx}60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at {approx}< 0.1 mJy. This implies that future, large area sub-millijansky surveys, given the appropriate ancillary multiwavelength data, have the potential of being able to assemble vast samples of radio-quiet AGNs, bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  12. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, O.; Jauncey, D. L.; Johnston, H. M.; Hunstead, R. W.; Christensen, L.

    2011-11-15

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations of the optical counterparts of 47 southern radio sources from the candidate International Celestial Reference Catalogue as part of a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame, especially in the south. We made the observations with the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope. We obtained redshifts for 30 quasars and one radio galaxy, with a further seven objects being probable BL Lac objects with featureless spectra. Of the remainder, four were clear misidentifications with Galactic stars and five had low signal-to-noise spectra and could not be classified. These results, in combination with new VLBI data of the radio sources with redshifts more than 2, add significantly to the existing data needed to refine the distribution of source proper motions over the celestial sphere.

  13. An X-ray and radio study of steep-spectrum radio sources. II - Four fields from a 22 MHz polar cap survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewdney, P. E.; Mchardy, I.; Willis, A. G.; Harris, D. E.; Costain, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    Four fields containing radio sources with spectral indices greater than unity at low frequencies have been observed over a wide range of radio wavelengths and at X-ray wavelengths. For most of the steep-spectrum sources no optical identifications have been found to the detection limit of the Palomar Schmidt prints, even with the positional precision of about 1 arcsec from VLA maps. This implies that the associated galaxies or clusters lie at a great distance. X-ray emission was not detected from any of the steep-spectrum radio sources. In one case, an extended source appears to be a radio halo in an uncataloged cluster of galaxies at a redshift of 0.125, and it is suggested that this object is a promising candidate for the detection of inverse Compton X-rays, since it is not a high-luminosity source of thermal X-rays.

  14. A statistical study of radio-source structure effects on astrometric very long baseline interferometry observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Errors from a number of sources in astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) have been reduced in recent years through a variety of methods of calibration and modeling. Such reductions have led to a situation in which the extended structure of the natural radio sources used in VLBI is a significant error source in the effort to improve the accuracy of the radio reference frame. In the past, work has been done on individual radio sources to establish the magnitude of the errors caused by their particular structures. The results of calculations on 26 radio sources are reported in which an effort is made to determine the typical delay and delay-rate errors for a number of sources having different types of structure. It is found that for single observations of the types of radio sources present in astrometric catalogs, group-delay and phase-delay scatter in the 50 to 100 psec range due to source structure can be expected at 8.4 GHz on the intercontinental baselines available in the Deep Space Network (DSN). Delay-rate scatter of approx. 5 x 10(exp -15) sec sec(exp -1) (or approx. 0.002 mm sec (exp -1) is also expected. If such errors mapped directly into source position errors, they would correspond to position uncertainties of approx. 2 to 5 nrad, similar to the best position determinations in the current JPL VLBI catalog. With the advent of wider bandwidth VLBI systems on the large DSN antennas, the system noise will be low enough so that the structure-induced errors will be a significant part of the error budget. Several possibilities for reducing the structure errors are discussed briefly, although it is likely that considerable effort will have to be devoted to the structure problem in order to reduce the typical error by a factor of two or more.

  15. HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO PROPERTIES OF SOURCES IN THE FERMI-LAT 1 YEAR POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Murphy, Tara; Ekers, Ronald D.; Edwards, Philip G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2010-08-01

    The high-frequency radio sky, like the gamma-ray sky surveyed by the Fermi satellite, is dominated by flat spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects at bright flux levels. To investigate the relationship between radio and gamma-ray emission in extragalactic sources, we have cross-matched the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey catalog (AT20G) with the Fermi-LAT 1 year Point Source Catalog (1FGL). The 6.0 sr of sky covered by both catalogs ({delta} < 0{sup 0}, |b|>1.{sup 0}5) contains 5890 AT20G radio sources and 604 1FGL gamma-ray sources. The AT20G source positions are accurate to within {approx}1 arcsec and, after excluding known Galactic sources, 43% of Fermi 1FGL sources have an AT20G source within the 95% Fermi confidence ellipse. Monte Carlo tests imply that at least 95% of these matches are genuine associations. Only five gamma-ray sources (1% of the Fermi catalog) have more than one AT20G counterpart in the Fermi error box. The AT20G matches also generally support the active galactic nucleus (AGN) associations in the First LAT AGN Catalog. We find a trend of increasing gamma-ray flux density with 20 GHz radio flux density. The Fermi detection rate of AT20G sources is close to 100% for the brightest 20 GHz sources, decreasing to 20% at 1 Jy, and to roughly 1% at 100 mJy. Eight of the matched AT20G sources have no association listed in 1FGL and are presented here as potential gamma-ray AGNs for the first time. We also identify an alternative AGN counterpart to one 1FGL source. The percentage of Fermi sources with AT20G detections decreases toward the Galactic plane, suggesting that the 1FGL catalog contains at least 50 Galactic gamma-ray sources in the southern hemisphere that are yet to be identified.

  16. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  17. Position and morphology of the compact non-thermal radio source at the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcaide, J. M.; Alberdi, A.; Bartel, N.; Clark, T. A.; Corey, B. E.; Elosegui, P.; Gorenstein, M. V.; Guirado, J. C.; Kardashev, N.; Popov, M.

    1992-01-01

    We have determined with VLBI the position of the compact nonthermal radio source at the Galactic Center, commonly referred to as SgrA*, in the J2000.0 reference frame of extragalactic radio sources. We have also determined the size of SgrA* at 1.3, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelengths and found that the apparent size of the source increases proportionally to the observing wavelength squared, as expected from source size broadening by interstellar scattering and as reported previously by other authors. We have also established an upper limit of about 8 mJy at 3.6 cm wavelength for any ultracompact component. The actual size of the source is less than 15 AU. Fourier analysis of our very sensitive 3.6 cm observations of this source shows no significant variations of correlated flux density on time scales from 12 to 700 s.

  18. Radio-source structure in astrometric and geodetic very long baseline interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Charlot, P. Institut Geographique National, Saint Mande )

    1990-04-01

    An algorithm to calculate source structure corrections for bandwidth synthesis delays and delay rates is used to refer the position of extragalacitc radio sources to a specific feature of each source's morphology. The delay and delay rate are obtained from VBLI observations. The algorithm and its theoretical basis are described, and simulations for a simple two-component source are discussed. VLBI data for the complex radio source NRAO 140 are analyzed. For this source, structure corrections are calculated with maps from three different VLBI imaging techniques: the hybrid-CLEAN algorithm, the maximum entropy method, and model fitting. The calculated structure corrections are compared with brightness distributions to the actual data. The results are used to map NRAO 140. It is found that the CLEAN map produces the most accurate structure corrections. 27 refs.

  19. A VLA Survey for Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.; Mann, Rita K.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2016-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC). We mosaicked 34 arcmin2 at 1.3 cm, 70 arcmin2 at 3.6 cm and 109 arcmin2 at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected young stellar objects and 190 Hubble Space Telescope-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source, we fitted a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from submillimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm data, to search for and quantify the variability of our sources.

  20. The radio and optical counterpart of the new Fermi LAT flaring source J0109+6134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.; Peracaula, M.

    2010-02-01

    Following the recent ATELs #2414, #2416 and #2420 concerning the Fermi-LAT, AGILE and Swift/XRT consistent detections of the new gamma-ray flaring source J0109+6134, we wish to remind that the proposed radio counterpart (VCS2 J0109+6133/GT 0106+613) was extensively observed nearly two decades ago by different authors in the context of the GT catalogue of Galactic Plane radio sources (Taylor and Gregory 1983, AJ, 88, 1784; Gregory and Taylor 1986, AJ 92, 371).

  1. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  2. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA∕kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  3. Toward Understanding the Fanaroff-Riley Dichotomy in Radio Source Morphology and Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Stefi A.; Zirbel, Esther L.; O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1995-09-01

    In Paper I we presented the results of a study of the interrelationships between host galaxy magnitude, optical line luminosity, and radio luminosity in a large sample of Fanaroff-Riley classes 1 and 2 (FR 1 and FR 2) radio galaxies. We report several important differences between the FR 1 and FR 2 radio galaxies. At the same host galaxy magnitude or radio luminosity, the FR 2's produce substantially more optical line emission (by roughly an order of magnitude or more) than do FR 1's. Similarly, FR 2 sources produce orders of magnitude more line luminosity than do radio-quiet galaxies of the same optical magnitude, while FR 1 sources and radio-quiet galaxies of the same optical magnitude produce similar line luminosities. Combining these results with previous results from the literature, we conclude that while the emission-line gas in the FR 2's is indeed photoionized by a nuclear UV continuum source from the AGN, the emission-line gas in the FR 1's may be energized predominantly by processes associated with the host galaxy itself. The apparent lack of a strong UV continuum source from the central engine in FR 1 sources can be understood in two different ways. In the first scenario, FR l's are much more efficient at covering jet bulk kinetic energy into radio luminosity than FR 2's, such that an FR 1 has a much lower bolometric AGN luminosity (hence nuclear UV continuum source) than does an FR 2 of the same radio luminosity. We discuss the pros and cons of this model and conclude that the efficiency differences needed between FR 2 and FR 1 radio galaxies are quite large and may lead to difficulties with the interpretation since it would suggest that FR 2 radio source deposit very large amounts of kinetic energy into the ISM Intracluster Medium. However, this interpretation remains viable. Alternatively, it may be that the AGNs in FR 1 sources simply produce far less radiant UV energy than do those in FR 2 sources. That is, FR 1 sources may funnel a higher fraction

  4. EVLA Observations of FR II Radio Sources with Candidate Relativistic Hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Alexander M.; Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Gawronski, M. P.; Cederbloom, S. E.

    2012-05-01

    We have identified six FR II radio sources that are candidates to possess hotspots with modestly relativistic (0.2 < v/c < 0.7) bulk velocities, in contrast to the vast majority of FR II radio sources that possess non-relativistic hotspot bulk velocities (e.g., v/c = 0.03 +/- 0.02 from Scheuer 1995). These candidates were selected based on their arm-length and flux-ratio asymmetries from a parent sample of 900 SDSS/FIRST double-lobed radio-loud quasars. For the four candidates lacking higher-resolution radio mapping, we obtained EVLA observations at 5 GHz to confirm the hotspot parameters, to measure their radio spectral indices, and to check for the presence of any jets. The observations were carried out on 12 June 2011 using 27 antennas in the A configuration. For one candidate, the morphology is found to be likely contaminated by an unrelated intruding source. For two candidates, the fainter lobes are not detected at 5 GHz. Simulations suggest that 4-6/900 objects may randomly display asymmetries (e.g., due to environmental interactions) as found for the candidates. It is ruled out that the candidates are young sources observed prior to deceleration of their hotspots because their intrinsic lobe distances are not abnormal for FR II sources. While it remains possible that a few of the candidates possess long-lived relativistic hotspots (e.g., one object shows additional supportive evidence in the form of a one-sided jet aligned with the brighter hotspot), we conclude that relativistic hotspots are extremely rare (<0.5%) or absent within double-lobed radio-loud quasars.

  5. THE ABUNDANCE OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David H.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    Coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galaxy mergers is potentially the dominant contributor to the low frequency gravitational wave background (GWB). It was proposed by Merritt and Ekers that X-shaped radio galaxies are signposts of such coalescences and that their abundance might be used to predict the magnitude of the GWB. In Roberts et al. we presented radio images of all 52 X-shaped radio source candidates out of the sample of 100 selected by Cheung for which archival VLA data were available. These images indicate that at most 21% of the candidates might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that were formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following a major merger. This suggests that fewer than 1.3% of extended radio sources appear to be candidates for genuine axis reorientations (“spin flips”), much smaller than the 7% suggested by Leahy and Parma. Thus, the associated GWB may be substantially smaller than previous estimates. These results can be used to normalize detailed calculations of the SMBH coalescence rate and the GWB.

  6. The algorithm of construction of a multiring model for the radio image of non-coherent radio sources based on the measured visibility function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshovij, V. V.; Lozins'kij, A. B.; Romanishin, I. M.; Romanchev, Yu. V.

    1998-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of constructing a centrosymmetrical model of the radio image of a noncoherent radio source based on the van Cittert-Zernike theorem. They show that it is enough to know the visibility function modulus determined on the (u,v) plane. A new multiring model for the radio image restoration of radio sources based on visibility function measured by radiointerferometric method is proposed. The authors give the algorithm for determination of the number of rings, their angular radii, and flux densities based on Fourier-Bessel series. The radio image of Cas A was restored from measurements performed with the short-base (up to 2000 D/λ) interferometer URAN-3. The model of the large-scale structure deduced from measurements in the metre range, is consistent with results obtained in decametre wavelengths.

  7. An unusually strong Einstein ring in the radio source PKS1830 - 211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Murphy, D. W.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.; Meier, D. L.; Hoard, D. W.; Lobdell, E. T.; Skjerve, L.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution radio images of PKS1830 - 211 are obtained to study the possibility that the double structure is a gravitationally lensed object. The VLBI observations, taken from interferometric radiotelescope networks, reveal an elliptical ring that connects two bright spots of similar composition. Because the lens and the lensed object are closely aligned, and because of the structure of the two spots, the source is concluded to be a radio Einstein ring. The source is found to be close to the galactic plane, and the lens and the lensed object are extragalactic. The source is also found to be unusually bright, suggesting that it is aligned with a bright background source or amplified by some mechanism related to a source that is not so bright.

  8. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Bootes Field. VLBA Imaging And Optical Identifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J.M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Rector, T.A.; Myers, S.T.; Fassnacht, C.D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-06-13

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Booetes field. These 76 sources were selected from the FIRST catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5'' resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3'' at 1.4 GHz. Fifty-five of these faint radio sources were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On VLA scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NVSS catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Thirty of the faint radio sources, or 39{sub -7}{sup +9}%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 {sigma} {approx} 2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Eight VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically-obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  9. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  10. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-12-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  11. Astronomers Detect Powerful Bursting Radio Source Discovery Points to New Class of Astronomical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers at Sweet Briar College and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have detected a powerful new bursting radio source whose unique properties suggest the discovery of a new class of astronomical objects. The researchers have monitored the center of the Milky Way Galaxy for several years and reveal their findings in the March 3, 2005 edition of the journal, “Nature”. This radio image of the central region of the Milky Way Galaxy holds a new radio source, GCRT J1745-3009. The arrow points to an expanding ring of debris expelled by a supernova. CREDIT: N.E. Kassim et al., Naval Research Laboratory, NRAO/AUI/NSF Principal investigator, Dr. Scott Hyman, professor of physics at Sweet Briar College, said the discovery came after analyzing some additional observations from 2002 provided by researchers at Northwestern University. “"We hit the jackpot!” Hyman said referring to the observations. “An image of the Galactic center, made by collecting radio waves of about 1-meter in wavelength, revealed multiple bursts from the source during a seven-hour period from Sept. 30 to Oct. 1, 2002 — five bursts in fact, and repeating at remarkably constant intervals.” Hyman, four Sweet Briar students, and his NRL collaborators, Drs. Namir Kassim and Joseph Lazio, happened upon transient emission from two radio sources while studying the Galactic center in 1998. This prompted the team to propose an ongoing monitoring program using the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which operates the VLA, approved the program. The data collected, laid the groundwork for the detection of the new radio source. “Amazingly, even though the sky is known to be full of transient objects emitting at X- and gamma-ray wavelengths,” NRL astronomer Dr. Joseph Lazio pointed out, “very little has been done to look for radio bursts, which are often easier for astronomical objects to produce

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio identification of 3EG EGRET sources (Mattox+, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Hartman, R. C.; Reimer, O.

    2001-09-01

    The method of Mattox et al. (1996ApJ...461..396M) for identifying EGRET sources with 5GHz radio sources has been applied to the 3EG EGRET catalog of Hartman et al. (1999, Cat. ). Complete results are tabulated. We tabulate separately 46 EGRET sources with radio identifications which we expect to have a high probability of being correct. We suggest that these sources are appropriate for most studies of the properties of γ-ray blazars as a class. All but one of these 46 sources were classified by Hartman et al. (1999, Cat. ) as high-confidence identifications; and the additional source was classified by Hartman et al. (1999, Cat. ) as a plausible identification. We also tabulate separately 37 additional "plausible identifications of EGRET sources with radio sources." These less secure possibilities include the remaining 21 "high-confidence identifications" of Hartman et al. (1999, Cat. ), three of the 27 "lower confidence potential blazar identifications" of Hartman et al. (1999, Cat. ), and an additional 15 plausible identifications which have not been suggested previously. Many of these sources require new radio and optical observations to establish them as blazars. We suggest that the 23 "lower-confidence potential blazar identifications" of Hartman et al. (1999, Cat. ) which we do not find plausible should not be used in studies of the properties of the EGRET blazars. For this analysis, we have made elliptical fits to the 95% confidence contours of the position uncertainty regions of the 3EG sources. (4 data files).

  13. Investigations in Time and of Space Using the FIRST Survey: Radio Source Variability and the Evolution of FR II Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan

    The FIRST survey covered ∼10,000 deg2 of the sky over a decade, providing unprecedented levels of flux density sensitivity (∼ 1 mJy) at 1.4 GHz, uniformity to within 15% (at ∼0.15 mJy rms), 5.4" angular resolution, astrometric accuracy to better than 1" and has cataloged ≳ 800,000 sources. It has made enormous contributions to diverse scientific ends including such subjects as radio source populations, quasars, large-scale structure and clustering of radio sources, gravitational lensing, cosmology, etc. I present the motivation, analysis and results of two projects also intended to demonstrate the power and expand the scope of the FIRST survey's scientific reach. A comprehensive search for variable and transient radio sources has been conducted using the ∼55,000 snapshot images of the FIRST survey. An analysis leading to the discovery of 1,651 variable and transient objects down to mJy levels over a wide range of timescales (few minutes to years) is presented. The multi-wavelength matching for counterparts reveals the diverse classes of objects exhibiting variability. Interestingly, ∼ 60% of the objects in the sample have either no classified counterparts or no corresponding sources at any other wavelength and require multi-wavelength follow-up observations. I discuss these classes of variables and speculate on the identity of objects that lack multi-wavelength counterparts. Thus, the FIRST survey has yielded the largest sample by far of radio variables and transients to date to unprecedented levels of sensitivity and sky coverage and demonstrates the promise of future radio instruments which have transient-detection as one of their key science projects. For decades, radio astronomers have attempted to use double-lobed radio sources to constrain the angular size-redshift (θ - z ) relation and to derive cosmological parameters therefrom. Most of the early attempts have, embarrassingly, shown general consistency with a static Euclidean universe rather

  14. DISCOVERY OF TWO MILLISECOND PULSARS IN FERMI SOURCES WITH THE NANCAY RADIO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Ferrara, E. C.; Smith, D. A.; Dumora, D.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Donato, D.; Ballet, J.; Desvignes, G.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M. E-mail: guillemo@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2011-05-01

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of Fermi-Large Area Telescope sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nancay Radio Telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days, respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated Fermi sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR J2302+4442, consistent with thermal emission from a neutron star. These discoveries along with the numerous detections of radio-loud millisecond pulsars in gamma rays suggest that many Fermi sources with no known counterpart could be unknown millisecond pulsars.

  15. RadioSource.NET: Case-Study of a Collaborative Land-Grant Internet Audio Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohar, Kathleen; Wood, Ashley M.; Ramirez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Provides a case study of RadioSource.NET, an Internet broadcasting venture developed collaboratively by land-grant university communication departments to share resources, increase online distribution, and promote access to agricultural and natural and life science research. Describes planning, marketing, and implementation processes. (Contains 18…

  16. Analysis of GALFACTS Data for the Study of Variable Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenfeld, Scott; Ghosh, T.; Salter, C.

    2011-01-01

    The G-ALFA Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS) is a spectro-polarimetric survey of Arecibo Observatory's visible sky from 1225-1525 MHz, using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA). Among the survey's many scientific goals is a large-scale statistical study on the short-term variability of the flux density and polarization of radio sources. Every point in the sky is observed twice, with less than a month between observations, making this the largest systematic search for variability ever conducted. In this poster, we present the development of computer code to aid in this search, and some preliminary results from this code. The code takes GALFACTS data in the form of time series for 2048 individual spectral channels, containing positions and full-stokes antenna temperatures, and turns these into a list of individual radio sources with their positions and Stokes-I temperatures. We first ran the code for the field surrounding the radio source S0206+330, of known flux density, as a test. Once a working code was completed, it was run on the field of another radio source, S0311+307.

  17. High-energy gamma radiation from extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Schlickeiser, R.; Mastichiadis, A.

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the important relationship between 3C 273 and 3C 279, the first two extragalactic sources detected at over 100 MeV energies, is their superluminal nature. In support of this conjecture, we propose a kinematic focusing mechanism, based on Compton scattering of accretion-disk photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons in the jet, that preferentially emits gamma rays in the superluminal direction.

  18. A multifrequency radio continuum and IRAS faint source survey of markarian galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicay, M. D.; Kojoian, G.; Seal, J.; Dickinson, D. F.; Malkan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from a multifrequency radio continumm survey of Markarian galaxies (MRKs) and are supplemented by IRAS infrared data from the Faint Source Survey. Radio data are presented for 899 MRKs observed at nu = 4.755 GHz with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)-Green Bank 300 foot (91 m) telescope, including nearly 88% of those objects in Markarian lists VI-XIV. In addition, 1.415 GHz measurements of 258 MRKs, over 30% of the MRKs accessible from the National Aeronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC)-Arecibo, are reported. Radio continuum observations of smaller numbers of MRKs were made at 10.63 GHz and at 23.1 GHz and are also presented. Infrared data from the IRAS Faint Source Survey (Ver. 2) are presented for 944 MRKs, with reasonably secure identifications extracted from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. MRKs exhibit the same canonical infrared characteristics as those reported for various other galaxy samples, that is well-known enhancement of the 25 micrometer/60 micrometer color ratio among Seyfert MRKs, and a clear tendency for MRKs with warmer 60 micrometer/100 micrometer colors to also possess cooler 12 micrometer/25 micrometer colors. In addition, non-Seyfert are found to obey the well-documented infrared/radio luminosity correlation, with the tightest correlation seen for starburst MRKs.

  19. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and synchrotron self-absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency-linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sub-mJy radio sources SF properties (Bonzini+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzini, M.; Mainieri, V.; Padovani, P.; Andreani, P.; Berta, S.; Bethermin, M.; Lutz, D.; Rodighiero, G.; Rosario, D.; Tozzi, P.; Vattakunnel, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated the SF properties of the faint radio population as detected by one of the deepest 1.4 GHz survey up-to-date conducted with the VLA in the E-CDFS. This study builds upon the results presented in Bonzini et al. (2012, Cat. J/ApJS/203/15 and 2013, Cat. J/MNRAS/436/3759) where we have exploited the wealth of multiwavelength data available in this field to identify the AGNs, further divide them into RL and RQ, and characterize the properties of the radio selected galaxies (e.g. redshift, stellar mass). (1 data file).

  1. VLBI measurements of radio source positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Fanselow, J. L.; Thomas, J. B.; Cohen, E. J.; Rogstad, D. H.; Sovers, O. J.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of approximately 1300 observations of 67 radio sources are presented. Most of the measurements were made at the stations of the Deep Space Network in California, Spain, and Australia at wavelengths of 13.1 and 3.6 cm, between 1971 and 1978. The formal errors in the derived source positions are generally in the neighborhood of 0.01 seconds of arc and the positions agree fairly well with those previously published.

  2. Radio Sources in the NCP Region Observed with the 21 Centimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qian; Wu, Xiang-Ping; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Gu, Jun-hua; Xu, Haiguang

    2016-12-01

    We present a catalog of 624 radio sources detected around the North Celestial Pole (NCP) with the 21 Centimeter Array (21CMA), a radio interferometer dedicated to the statistical measurement of the epoch of reionization (EoR). The data are taken from a 12 hr observation made on 2013 April 13, with a frequency coverage from 75 to 175 MHz and an angular resolution of ˜4‧. The catalog includes flux densities at eight sub-bands across the 21CMA bandwidth and provides the in-band spectral indices for the detected sources. To reduce the complexity of interferometric imaging from the so-called “w” term and ionospheric effects, the present analysis is restricted to the east-west baselines within 1500 m only. The 624 radio sources are found within 5° around the NCP down to ˜0.1 Jy. Our source counts are compared, and also exhibit a good agreement, with deep low-frequency observations made recently with the GMRT and MWA. In particular, for fainter radio sources below ˜1 Jy, we find a flattening trend of source counts toward lower frequencies. While the thermal noise (˜0.4 mJy) is well controlled to below the confusion limit, the dynamical range (˜104) and sensitivity of current 21CMA imaging are largely limited by calibration and deconvolution errors, especially the grating lobes of very bright sources, such as 3C061.1, in the NCP field, which result from the regular spacings of the 21CMA. We note that particular attention should be paid to the extended sources, and their modeling and removal may constitute a large technical challenge for current EoR experiments. Our analysis may serve as a useful guide to the design of next generation low-frequency interferometers like the Square Kilometre Array.

  3. An analysis of source structure effects in radio interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    To begin a study of structure effects, this report presents a theoretical framework, proposes an effective position approach to structure corrections based on brightness distribution measurements, and analyzes examples of analytical and measured brightness distributions. Other topics include the effect of the frequency dependence of a brightness distribution on bandwidth synthesis (BWS) delay, the determination of the absolute location of a measured brightness distribution, and structure effects in dual frequency calibration of charged particle delays. For the 10 measured distributions analyzed, it was found that the structure effect in BWS delay at X-band (3.6 cm) can reach 30 cm, but typically falls in the range of 0 to 5 cm. A trial limit equation that is dependent on visibility was successfully tested against the 10 measured brightness distributions (seven sources). If the validity of this particular equation for an upper limit can be established for nearly all sources, the structure effect in BWS delay could be greatly reduced without supplementary measurements of brightness distributions.

  4. X-ray spectra of a complete sample of extragalactic core-dominated radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, H.; Lamer, G.; Worrall, D. M.; Staubert, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT soft X-ray spectra for the members of a complete sample of 13 core-dominated, flat radio spectrum sources. The sample comprises all radio sources from a flux-limited radio catalog (S(sub 5GHz) greater than 1 Jy; Kuehr et al. 1981) which are north of delta = 70 deg, at galactic latitudes b greater than 10 deg, and have a flat radio spectrum between 1.4 and 5 GHz (alpha(sub r) less than 0.5; f approximately nu(sup -alpha)). The sources have already undergone much study at radio and optical wavelengths and are classified in broad terms as quasars (8 sources) and BL Lac objects (5 sources). We find mean X-ray power-law energy indices of alpha(sub x) = 0.59 +/- 0.19 for the quasars and 1.36 +/- 0.27 for the BL Lac objects (68% confidence range for two parameters of interest as determined by a maximum likelihood method), supporting earlier Einstein Observatory results for heterogeneous samples of sources (Worrall & Wilkes 1990). A non-zero dispersion on alpha(sub x) is found for both the quasars and the BL Lac objects. When we incorporate published radio, mm, and optical measurements and compare the X-ray and broad-band spectral indices alpha(sub x), alpha(sub rx), alpha(sub mm,x), and alpha(sub ox), the most obvious difference between the quasar and BL Lac subsamples lies within the X-ray band. We have fitted the multi-wavelength data to inhomogeneous synchotron-self-Compton models and find that, for the BL Lac objects with steep X-ray spectra, synchotron emission can account for the radio to soft X-ray measurements, whereas the BL Lac objects with hard X-ray spectra and the quasars require significant Compton emission to model the spectral flattening indicated by alpha(sub x) less than alpha(sub ox).

  5. Reseau astrometry with Palomar Schmidt plates - Position-coincidence optical identification of radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, K.J.; Condon, J.J.; Warnock, A., III

    1981-10-01

    The simple, inexpensive method for determining celestial coordinates on original Palomar Schmidt plates developed previously is here inverted and shown to be a useful way of finding and identifying objects with known celestial coordinates. The method is especially suited for rapidly identifying large numbers of radio sources having accurate radio positions which are found in surveys made with large aperture-synthesis instruments. The average position error (approximately 0.9 arc sec) for stellar objects, galaxies, and faint objects near the plate limit is sufficient for making reliable optical identifications of objects as faint as J magnitude +24 on the basis of position coincidence alone, without regard to color or morphology.

  6. A radio/optical reference frame. 5: Additional source positions in the mid-latitude southern hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; De Vegt, C.; Zacharias, N.; Ma, C.; Fey, A. L.; Johnston, K. J.; Hindsley, R.; Hughes, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We report new accurate radio position measurements for 30 sources, preliminary positions for two sources, improved radio postions for nine additional sources which had limited previous observations, and optical positions and optical-radio differences for six of the radio sources. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are part of the continuing effort to establish a global radio reference frame of about 400 compact, flat spectrum sources, which are evenly distributed across the sky. The observations were made using Mark III data format in four separate sessions in 1988-89 with radio telescopes at Tidbinbilla, Australia, Kauai, USA, and Kashima, Japan. We observed a total of 54 sources, including ten calibrators and three which were undetected. The 32 new source positions bring the total number in the radio reference frame catalog to 319 (172 northern and 147 southern) and fill in the zone -25 deg greater than delta greater than -45 deg which, prior to this list, had the lowest source density. The VLBI positions have an average formal precision of less than 1 mas, although unknown radio structure effects of about 1-2 mas may be present. The six new optical postion measurements are part of the program to obtain positions of the optical counterparts of the radio reference frame source and to map accurately the optical on to the radio reference frames. The optical measurements were obtained from United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Black Birch astrograph plates and source plates from the AAT, and Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4 m, and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt. The optical positions have an average precision of 0.07 sec, mostly due to the zero point error when adjusted to the FK5 optical frame using the IRS catalog. To date we have measured optical positions for 46 sources.

  7. A radio optical reference frame. I - Precise radio source positions determined by Mark III VLBI - Observations from 1979 to 1988 and a tie to the FK5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D. B.; De Vegt, C.; Johnston, K. J.; Russell, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Observations from 600 Mark III VLBI experiments from 1979 to 1988, resulting in 237,681 acceptable pairs of group delay and phase delay rate observations, have been used to derive positions of 182 extragalactic radio sources with typical formal standard errors less than 1 mas. The sources are distributed fairly evenly above delta = -30 deg, and 70 sources have delta greater than 0 deg. Analysis with different troposphere models, as well as internal and external comparisons, indicates that a coordinate frame defined by this set of radio sources should be reliable at the 1 mas level. The right ascension zero point of this reference frame has been aligned with the FK5 by using the optical positions of 28 extragalactic radio sources whose positions are on the FK5 system. Because of known defects in the knowledge of astronomical constants, daily nutation offsets in longitude and obliquity were determined relative to an arbitrary reference day in the set of experiments.

  8. Magnetic Field Disorder and Faraday Effects on the Polarization of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamee, Mehdi; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnes, Jamie S.; Carretti, Ettore; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Poppi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We present a polarization catalog of 533 extragalactic radio sources that have a 2.3 GHz total intensity above 420 mJy from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey, S-PASS, with corresponding 1.4 GHz polarization information from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, NVSS. We studied the selection effects and found that fractional polarization, π, of radio objects at both wavelengths depends on the spectral index, the source magnetic field disorder, the source size, and depolarization. The relationship between depolarization, spectrum, and size shows that depolarization occurs primarily in the source vicinity. The median {π }2.3 of resolved objects in NVSS is approximately two times larger than that of unresolved sources. Sources with little depolarization are ∼2 times more polarized than both highly depolarized and re-polarized sources. This indicates that intrinsic magnetic field disorder is the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed low fractional polarization of radio sources at high frequencies. We predict that number counts from polarization surveys will be similar at 1.4 GHz and at 2.3 GHz, for fixed sensitivity, although ∼10% of all sources may currently be missing because of strong depolarization. Objects with {π }1.4≈ {π }2.3≥slant 4 % typically have simple Faraday structures, so they are most useful for background samples. Almost half of flat-spectrum (α ≥slant -0.5) and ∼25% of steep-spectrum objects are re-polarized. Steep-spectrum, depolarized sources show a weak negative correlation of depolarization with redshift in the range 0 < z < 2.3. Previous non-detections of redshift evolution are likely due the inclusion of re-polarized sources as well.

  9. A binary population synthesis study on gravitational wave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinzhong, Liu; Yu, Zhang

    Gravitational waves (GW) are a natural consequence of Einstein's theory of gravity (general relativity), and minute distortions of space-time. Gravitational Wave Astronomy is an emerging branch of observational astronomy which aims to use GWs to collect observational data about objects such as neutron stars and black holes, about events such as supernovae and about the early universe shortly after the big bang.This field will evolve to become an established component of 21st century multi-messenger astronomy, and will stand shoulder-to-shoulder with gamma-ray, x-ray, optical, infrared and radio astronomers in exploring the cosmos. In this paper, we state a recent theoretical study on GW sources, and present the results of our studies on the field using a binary population synthesis (BPS) approach, which was designed to investigate the formation of many interesting binary-related objects, including close double white dwarfs, AM CVn stars, ultra-compact X-ray binaries(UCXBs), double neutron stars, double stellar black holes. Here we report how BPS can be used to determine the GW radiation from double compact objects.

  10. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  11. Constraints on the clustering, biasing and redshift distribution of radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    1999-07-01

    We discuss how different theoretical predictions for the variance sigma^2 of the counts-in-cells distribution of radio sources can be matched to measurements from the FIRST survey at different flux limits. The predictions are given by the integration of models for the angular correlation function w(theta) for three different functional forms of the redshift distribution N(z), different spatial correlation functions that match the observed present-day shape and by different evolutions of the bias b(z) with redshift. We also consider the two cases of open and flat universes. Although the predicted w(theta) show substantial differences because of differences in the values of N(z), these differences are not significant compared to the uncertainties in the current observations. It turns out that, independent of the geometry of the universe and the flux limit, the best fit is provided by models with constant biasing at all times, although the difference between models with epoch-independent bias and models with bias that evolves linearly with redshift is not very large. All models with strong evolution of bias with epoch are ruled out, as they grossly overestimate the amplitude of the variance over the whole range of angular scales sampled by the counts-in-cells analysis. As a further step we directly calculated w_obs(theta) at 3mJy from the catalogue and matched it with our models for the angular correlation function, in the hypothesis that the clustering signal comes from two different populations, namely AGN-powered sources and starbursting galaxies. The results are consistent with a scenario for hierarchical clustering where the fainter starbursting galaxies trace the mass at all epochs, while the brighter AGNs are strongly biased, with b(z) evolving linearly with redshift, as suggested by some theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  12. Development of a novel radio-frequency negative hydrogen ion source in conically converging configuration.

    PubMed

    Jung, B K; Dang, J J; An, Y H; Chung, K J; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Volume-produced negative ion source still requires enhancement of current density with lower input RF (radio-frequency) power in lower operating pressure for various applications. To confirm recent observation of efficient negative ion production with a short cylindrical chamber with smaller effective plasma size, the RF-driven transformer-coupled plasma H(-) ion source at Seoul National University is modified by adopting a newly designed quartz RF window to reduce the chamber length. Experiments with the reduced chamber length show a few times enhancement of H(-) ion beam current compared to that extracted from the previous chamber design, which is consistent with the measured H(-) ion population. Nevertheless, decrease in H(-) ion beam current observed in low pressure regime below ∼5 mTorr owing to insufficient filtering of high energy electrons in the extraction region needs to be resolved to address the usefulness of electron temperature control by the change of geometrical configuration of the discharge chamber. A new discharge chamber with conically converging configuration has been developed, in which the chamber diameter decreases as approaching to the extraction region away from the planar RF antenna such that stronger filter magnetic field can be utilized to prohibit high energy electrons from transporting to the extraction region. First experimental results for the H(-) ion beam extraction with this configuration show that higher magnetic filter field makes peak negative beam currents happen in lower operating pressure. However, overall decrease in H(-) ion beam current due to the change of chamber geometry still requires further study of geometrical effect on particle transport and optimization of magnetic field in this novel configuration.

  13. X-Ray Properties of the Youngest Radio Sources and Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sobolewska, Małgosia; Migliori, Giulia; Guainazzi, Matteo; Hardcastle, Martin; Ostorero, Luisa; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-05-01

    We present the first results from our X-ray study of young radio sources classified as compact symmetric objects (CSOs). Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we observed six CSOs for the first time in X-rays, and re-observed four CSOs already observed with XMM-Newton or BeppoSAX. We also included six other CSOs with archival data to built a pilot study of a sample of the 16 CSO sources observed in X-rays to date. All the sources are nearby, z\\lt 1, and the age of their radio structures (\\lt 3000 yr) has been derived from the expansion velocity of their hot spots. Our results show the heterogeneous nature of the CSOs’ X-ray emission, indicating a complex environment associated with young radio sources. The sample covers a range in X-ray luminosity, {L}2{--10{keV}}˜ {10}41-1045 erg s-1, and intrinsic absorbing column density of {N}{{H}}≃ {10}21-1022 cm-2. In particular, we detected extended X-ray emission in 1718-649 a hard photon index of {{Γ }}≃ 1 in 2021+614 and 1511+0518 consistent with either a Compton-thick absorber or non-thermal emission from compact radio lobes, and in 0710+439 an ionized iron emission line at {E}{rest}=(6.62+/- 0.04) keV and EW ˜ 0.15-1.4 keV, and a decrease by an order of magnitude in the 2-10 keV flux since the 2008 XMM-Newton observation in 1607+26. We conclude that our pilot study of CSOs provides a variety of exceptional diagnostics and highlights the importance of deep X-ray observations of large samples of young sources. This is necessary in order to constrain theoretical models for the earliest stage of radio source evolution and to study the interactions of young radio sources with the interstellar environment of their host galaxies.

  14. The near-infrared counterpart of a variable galactic plane radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Phillips, Andrew C.; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A near-infrared counterpart to the highly variable, unresolved galactic plane radio source GT 0116 + 622 is identified. This source is of particular interest, as it has been previously suggested to be the counterpart of the gamma-ray source Cas gamma-l. The present NIR and red images detect a faint, spatially extended (3 arcsec FWHM), very red object coincident with the radio position. There is complex spatial structure which may be due in part to an unrelated superposed foreground object. Observations on multiple nights show no evidence for flux variability, despite the high amplitude variability on a time-scale of days reported for the radio source. The data are consistent with an interpretation of GT 0116 + 622 as an unusually variable, obscured active galaxy at a distance of several hundred megaparsecs, although more exotic, and in particular galactic, interpretations cannot yet be ruled out. If the object is extragalactic, the previously suggested identification with the gamma-ray source would seem unlikely.

  15. CRATES: An All-Sky Survey of Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, Stephen E.; Romani, Roger W.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Ricci, Roberto; Murphy, Tara; Ulvestad, James S.; Winn, Joshua N.; /MIT

    2007-02-20

    We have assembled an 8.4 GHz survey of bright, flat-spectrum ({alpha} > -0.5) radio sources with nearly uniform extragalactic (|b| > 10{sup o}) coverage for sources brighter than S{sub 4.8 GHz} = 65 mJy. The catalog is assembled from existing observations (especially CLASS and the Wright et al. PMN-CA survey), augmented by reprocessing of archival VLA and ATCA data and by new observations to fill in coverage gaps. We refer to this program as CRATES, the Combined Radio All-sky Targeted Eight GHz Survey. The resulting catalog provides precise positions, sub-arcsecond structures, and spectral indices for some 11,000 sources. We describe the morphology and spectral index distribution of the sample and comment on the survey's power to select several classes of interesting sources, especially high energy blazars. Comparison of CRATES with other high-frequency surveys also provides unique opportunities for identification of high-power radio sources.

  16. INVESTIGATING PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PROTOSTELLAR JETS: THE TRIPLE RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCE IN SERPENS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Valotto, Carlos; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Araudo, Anabella; Torrelles, José M.; Anglada, Guillem; Martí, Josep

    2016-02-10

    While most protostellar jets present free–free emission at radio wavelengths, synchrotron emission has also been proposed to be present in a handful of these objects. The presence of nonthermal emission has been inferred by negative spectral indices at centimeter wavelengths. In one case (the HH 80-81 jet arising from a massive protostar), its synchrotron nature was confirmed by the detection of linearly polarized radio emission. One of the main consequences of these results is that synchrotron emission implies the presence of relativistic particles among the nonrelativistic material of these jets. Therefore, an acceleration mechanism should be taking place. The most probable scenario is that particles are accelerated when the jets strongly impact against the dense envelope surrounding the protostar. Here we present an analysis of radio observations obtained with the Very Large Array of the triple radio source in the Serpens star-forming region. This object is known to be a radio jet arising from an intermediate-mass protostar. It is also one of the first protostellar jets where the presence of nonthermal emission was proposed. We analyze the dynamics of the jet and the nature of the emission and discuss these issues in the context of the physical parameters of the jet and the particle acceleration phenomenon.

  17. Plasma ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H- source

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Staples, J.W.; Thomae, W.; Reijonen, J.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Keller, R.

    2001-09-06

    The H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a cesiated, radio-frequency driven (2 MHz) multicusp volume source which operates at a duty cycle of 6% (1 ms pulses and 60 Hz). In pulsed RF driven plasma sources, ignition of the plasma affects the stability of source operation and the antenna lifetime. We are reporting on investigations of different ignition schemes, based on secondary electron generation in the plasma chamber by UV light, a hot filament, a low power RF plasma (cw, 13.56 MHz), as well as source operation solely with the high power (40 kW) 2 MHz RF. We find that the dual frequency, single antenna scheme is most attractive for the operating conditions of the SNS H{sup -} source.

  18. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* MERCURY ( PLANET ), (*RADIO ASTRONOMY, EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, SKY BRIGHTNESS, ANTENNAS...EPHEMERIDES, ASTROPHYSICS, JUPITER( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), BRIGHTNESS, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, INTENSITY, MEASUREMENT.

  19. Source Regions of the Type II Radio Burst Observed During a CME-CME Interaction on 2013 May 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, P.; Gopalswamy, N.; Reiner, M. J.; Akiyama, S.; Krupar, V.

    2016-08-01

    We report on our study of radio source regions during the type II radio burst on 2013 May 22 based on direction-finding analysis of the Wind/WAVES and STEREO/WAVES (SWAVES) radio observations at decameter-hectometric wavelengths. The type II emission showed an enhancement that coincided with the interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in sequence along closely spaced trajectories. The triangulation of the SWAVES source directions posited the ecliptic projections of the radio sources near the line connecting the Sun and the STEREO-A spacecraft. The WAVES and SWAVES source directions revealed shifts in the latitude of the radio source, indicating that the spatial location of the dominant source of the type II emission varies during the CME-CME interaction. The WAVES source directions close to 1 MHz frequencies matched the location of the leading edge of the primary CME seen in the images of the LASCO/C3 coronagraph. This correspondence of spatial locations at both wavelengths confirms that the CME-CME interaction region is the source of the type II enhancement. Comparison of radio and white-light observations also showed that at lower frequencies scattering significantly affects radio wave propagation.

  20. AGN Feedback And Evolution of Radio Sources: Discovery of An X-Ray Cluster Associated With Z=1 Quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Cheung, C.C.; LaMassa, S.; Burke, D.; Aldcroft, T.L.; Bechtold, J.; Elvis, M.; Worrall, D.M.; /Bristol U.

    2006-01-11

    We report the first significant detection of an X-ray cluster associated with a powerful (L{sub bol} {approx} 10{sup 47} erg sec{sup -1}) radio-loud quasar at high redshift (z=1.06). Diffuse X-ray emission is detected out to {approx} 120 kpc from the CSS quasar 3C 186. A strong Fe-line emission at the z{sub rest} = 1.06 confirms its thermal nature. We find that the CSS radio source is highly overpressured with respect to the thermal cluster medium by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This provides direct observational evidence that the radio source is not thermally confined as posited in the ''frustrated'' scenario for CSS sources. Instead, the radio source may be young and at an early stage of its evolution. This source provides the first detection of the AGN in outburst in the center of a cooling flow cluster. Powerful radio sources are thought to be triggered by the cooling flows. The evidence for the AGN activity and intermittent outbursts comes from the X-ray morphology of low redshift clusters, which usually do not harbour quasars. 3C186 is a young active radio source which can supply the energy into the cluster and potentially prevent its cooling. We discuss energetics related to the quasar activity and the cluster cooling flow, and possible feedback between the evolving radio source and the cluster.

  1. DIAGNOSTICS ON THE SOURCE PROPERTIES OF A TYPE II RADIO BURST WITH SPECTRAL BUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Song, H. Q.; Feng, X. S.; Guo, Fan

    2013-04-10

    In recent studies, we proposed that source properties of type II radio bursts can be inferred through a causal relationship between the special shape of the type II dynamic spectrum (e.g., bump or break) and simultaneous extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white light imaging observations (e.g., CME-shock crossing streamer structures). As a further extension of these studies, in this paper we examine the coronal mass ejection (CME) event on 2007 December 31 associated with a multiple type II radio burst. We identify the presence of two spectral bump features on the observed dynamic spectrum. By combining observational analyses of the radio spectral observations and the EUV-white light imaging data, we conclude that the two spectral bumps result from a CME-shock propagating across dense streamers on the southern and northern sides of the CME. It is inferred that the corresponding two type II emissions originate separately from the two CME-shock flanks where the shock geometries are likely quasi-perpendicular or oblique. Since the emission lanes are bumped as a whole within a relatively short time, it suggests that the type II radio bursts with bumps of this study are emitted from spatially confined sources (with a projected lateral dimension smaller than 0.05-0.1 R{sub Sun} at a fundamental frequency level of 20-30 MHz).

  2. Source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Calvert, W. )

    1989-05-01

    The source location of the smooth high-frequency (SHF) radio emissions from Uranus has been determined using a technique differing from those applied previously. Specifically, by fitting the signal dropouts which occurred as Voyager traversed the hollow center for the emission pattern to a symmetrical cone centered on the source magnetic field direction at the cyclotron frequency, a southern-hemisphere (nightside) source was found at approximately 56{degree} S, 219{degree} W. The half-angle for the hollow portion of the emission pattern was found to be 13{degree}.

  3. Population statistics of radio and γ-ray pulsars from the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Story, Sarah A.; Clow, Brian D.; Harding, Alice K.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of our population synthesis of normal and millisecond pulsars from the Galactic disk. Over the past several years, a program has been developed to simulate pulsar birth, evolution, and emission using Monte Carlo techniques. We have added to the program the capability to simulate millisecond pulsars, which are old, recycled pulsars with extremely short periods. We model the spatial distribution of millisecond pulsars by assuming they start with a random kick velocity and then evolve through the Galactic potential. We use a polar cap/slot gap model for gamma-ray emission from both millisecond and normal pulsars. We also include gamma-ray emission from an outer-gap model to compare the statistics of radio-loud and radio-faint gamma-ray pulsars on the same footing as pulsars from our polar cap/slot gap model. From our studies of radio pulsars that have clearly identifiable core and cone components, in which we fit the polarization sweep as well as the pulse profiles to constrain the viewing geometry, we develop a model describing the ratio of radio core-to-cone peak fluxes. In this model, short period pulsars are more cone-dominated than in our previous studies. We present the preliminary results of our recent study including comparisons between these two groups of pulsars and the implications for observing these pulsars with GLAST and AGILE. GLAST should detect significant numbers of millisecond pulsars.

  4. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  5. Movements of radio-marked California Ridgway's rails during monitoring surveys: implications for population monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bui, Thuy-Vy D.; Takekawa, John Y.; Overton, Cory T.; Schultz, Emily R.; Hull, Joshua M.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The California Ridgway's rail Rallus obsoletus obsoletus (hereafter California rail) is a secretive marsh bird endemic to tidal marshes in the San Francisco Bay (hereafter bay) of California. The California rail has undergone significant range contraction and population declines due to a variety of factors, including predation and the degradation and loss of habitat. Call-count surveys, which include call playbacks, based on the standardized North American marsh bird monitoring protocol have been conducted throughout the bay since 2005 to monitor population size and distribution of the California rail. However, call-count surveys are difficult to evaluate for efficacy or accuracy. To measure the accuracy of call-count surveys and investigate whether radio-marked California rails moved in response to call-count surveys, we compared locations of radio-marked California rails collected at frequent intervals (15 min) to California rail detections recorded during call-count surveys conducted over the same time periods. Overall, 60% of radio-marked California rails within 200 m of observers were not detected during call-count surveys. Movements of radio-marked California rails showed no directional bias (P = 0.92) irrespective of whether or not playbacks of five marsh bird species (including the California rail) were broadcast from listening stations. Our findings suggest that playbacks of rail vocalizations do not consistently influence California rail movements during surveys. However, call-count surveys may underestimate California rail presence; therefore, caution should be used when relating raw numbers of call-count detections to population abundance.

  6. A new population of very high energy gamma-ray sources in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Aye, K-M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Gordo, J Bussons; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L-M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; de Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khélifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemière, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; de Naurois, M; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Théoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; van der Walt, D J; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-03-25

    Very high energy gamma-rays probe the long-standing mystery of the origin of cosmic rays. Produced in the interactions of accelerated particles in astrophysical objects, they can be used to image cosmic particle accelerators. A first sensitive survey of the inner part of the Milky Way with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) reveals a population of eight previously unknown firmly detected sources of very high energy gamma-rays. At least two have no known radio or x-ray counterpart and may be representative of a new class of "dark" nucleonic cosmic ray sources.

  7. Observations of the radio emission field around the gamma -ray source 2EG J1834-2138

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, J. A.; Romero, G. E.

    1998-03-01

    We present results of a study of the radio emission field around the best estimate position of the low-latitude EGRET source 2EG J1834-2138. The identification of this gamma -ray source with the gravitational lensed AGN PKS 1830-211 has been recently proposed by \\cite[Mattox et al. (1997)]{ma97}. Additional support for this identification is provided here. Contamination produced by the diffuse disk emission has been removed from new radio images of the surrounding region of 2EG J1834-2138 allowing a determination of the fine radio structure. Several previously unnoticed supernova remnants have been found within a few degrees from the gamma -ray source. However, the only strong radio source within the 95% source location confidence contour of 2EG J1834-2138 is PKS 1830-211. In addition, both spectrum and variability analysis of the EGRET data support the identification of both sources.

  8. Discovery of millisecond pulsars in radio searches of southern Fermi Large Area Telescope sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Ray, P. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Çelik, Ö.; Belfiore, A.; Donato, D.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Kramer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Ransom, S. M.; Romani, R. W.; Smith, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-06-01

    Using the Parkes Radio Telescope, we have carried out deep observations of 11 unassociated gamma-ray sources. Periodicity searches of these data have discovered two millisecond pulsars, PSR J1103-5403 (1FGL J1103.9-5355) and PSR J2241-5236 (1FGL J2241.9-5236), and a long-period pulsar, PSR J1604-44 (1FGL J1604.7-4443). In addition, we searched for but did not detect any radio pulsations from six gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi satellite to a level of ˜0.04 mJy (for pulsars with a 10 per cent duty cycle). The timing of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1103-5403 has shown that its position is 9 arcmin from the centroid of the gamma-ray source. Since these observations were carried out, independent evidence has shown that 1FGL J1103.9-5355 is associated with the flat spectrum radio source PKS 1101-536. It appears certain that the pulsar is not associated with the gamma-ray source, despite the seemingly low probability of a chance detection of a radio millisecond pulsar. We consider that PSR J1604-44 is a chance discovery of a weak, long-period pulsar and is unlikely to be associated with 1FGL J1604.7-4443. PSR J2241-5236 has a spin period of 2.2 ms and orbits a very low mass companion with a 3.5-h orbital period. The relatively high flux density and low dispersion measure of PSR J2241-5236 make it an excellent candidate for high precision timing experiments. The gamma rays of 1FGL J2241.9-5236 have a spectrum that is well modelled by a power law with an exponential cut-off, and phase binning with the radio ephemeris results in a multipeaked gamma-ray pulse profile. Observations with Chandra have identified a coincident X-ray source within 0.1 arcsec of the position of the pulsar obtained by radio timing.

  9. Large scale X-ray and radio structures associated with compact extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, P.; Pauliny-Toth, I. I. K.; Witzel, A.; Fricke, K.; Johnston, K. J.; Kuehr, H.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Urbanik, M.

    1982-01-01

    Knots of X-ray emission have been detected within 20 arcmin of five compact sources initially selected from the MPIfR north polar 5 GHz survey. Two of the knots have also been detected at centimeter wavelengths and probably have nonthermal spectra. They appear to be associated with the compact sources since the probability of serendipitous discovery at the observed flux levels is low. While the apparent association may be due to colocation of the sources in a distant supercluster, it is suggested on the basis of overall alignment, and possible correlations with structures in the respective central sources, that the association may be similar to that found in extended radio sources. The observed emission may thus be due to synchrotron or inverse Compton radiation, the energy being supplied by jets from the central source.

  10. Population Education in Asia: A Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Designed as a resource guide for educators and curriculum developers, this book formulates the knowledge base for school curriculum in population education; presents a body of concepts and data pertaining to the Asian region which is useful as a basis for selected aspects of a curriculum in population education; and provides stimulus, and possibly…

  11. Compact Steep Spectrum 3CR radio sources - VLBI observations at 18 CM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, C.; Fanti, R.; Parma, P.; Schilizzi, R. T.; van Breugel, W. J. M.

    1985-02-01

    Results of a program to investigate the kiloparsec-sized radio structure of a representative sample of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources from the 3CR catalog (Jenkins et al., 1977) are presented. Ten objects (3C49,67, 119, 237, 241, 268.3, 287, 303.1, 343, 343.1) have been mapped at 18 cm with a resolution of about 30 marcsec using the European VLBI Network. In some cases the VLBI data have been supplemented by MERLIN observations at the same wavelength to enhance sensitivity to large-scale structure. The overall sizes of the CSS sources range from about 0.1 to 1 or 2 arcsec, corresponding to linear sizes of the order of 1 to 10 kpc. The morphological classification ranges from double to core-jet to complex; CSS quasars are generally core-jets or complex, while CSS radio galaxies are doubles, although not necessarily simple doubles.

  12. Ka-Band Monopulse Antenna Pointing Calibration Using Wideband Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buu, C.; Calvo, J.; Cheng, T.-H.; Vazquez, M.

    2010-08-01

    A new method of performing a system end-to-end monopulse antenna calibration using widely available wideband astronomical radio sources is presented as an alternative to the current method of using a spacecraft signal. Current monopulse calibration requires a spacecraft carrier signal to measure amplitude and phase differences in the monopulse feed and low-noise amplifiers (LNAs). The alternative method presented here will allow the ground station to perform monopulse calibrations during maintenance periods instead of spacecraft track time, and provide an end-to-end system check-out capability without requiring a spacecraft signal. In this article, we give an overview of the current calibration approach, describe a new method for calibrating with radio sources, and present results from field testing of this new method.

  13. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Chandler, C.; Churchwell, E. B.; Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fender, R. P.; Gledhill, T. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Hindson, L.; Jackson, J. M.; Kurtz, S. E.; Marti, J. [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  14. HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF RADIO GALAXY MORPHOLOGY: WINGED AND X-SHAPED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2011-05-20

    We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of radio galaxies interacting with initially relaxed hot atmospheres and explore the significant off-axis radio lobe structures that result under certain conditions. With a focus on the 'winged' and 'X-shaped' radio galaxy population, we confirm the importance of observed trends such as the connection of wing formation with jets co-aligned with the major axis of the surrounding atmosphere. These wings are formed substantially by the deflection of lobe plasma flowing back from the hot spots (backflow) and develop in two stages: supersonic expansion of an overpressured cocoon at early times followed by buoyant expansion at later times. We explore a limited parameter space of jet and atmosphere properties and find that the most prominent wings are produced when a decaying jet is injected into a small, dense, highly elliptical atmosphere. On the basis of this search, we argue that the deflection of backflow by gradients in the hot atmosphere is a strong candidate for forming observed wings but must work in tandem with some other mechanism for forming the initial wing channels. Our models indicate that lobe interaction with the hot atmosphere may play a dominant role in shaping the morphology of radio galaxies.

  15. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Hessels, J.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Sarkissian, J. E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  16. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  17. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Cleary, K.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T.; Dickinson, C.; Gundersen, J. O.; Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  18. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Miller, A. D.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; QUIET Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ˜480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30-40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%-20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  19. The LBA Calibrator Survey of Southern Compact Extragalactic Radio Sources - LCS1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrov, Leonid; Phillips, Chris; Bertarini, Alessandra; Murphy, Tara; Sadler, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a catalogue of accurate positions and correlated flux densities for 410 flat-spectrum, compact extragalactic radio sources previously detected in the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey. The catalogue spans the declination range [-90deg, -40deg] and was constructed from four 24-h very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observing sessions with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 8.3 GHz. The VLBI detection rate in these experiments is 97 per cent, the median uncertainty of the source positions is 2.6 mas and the median correlated flux density on projected baselines longer than 1000 km is 0.14 Jy. The goals of this work are (1) to provide a pool of southern sources with positions accurate to a few milliarcsec, which can be used for phase-referencing observations, geodetic VLBI and space navigation; (2) to extend the complete flux-limited sample of compact extragalactic sources to the Southern hemisphere; and (3) to investigate the parsec-scale properties of high-frequency selected sources from the AT20G survey. As a result of this VLBI campaign, the number of compact radio sources south of declination -40deg which have measured VLBI correlated flux densities and positions known to milliarcsec accuracy has increased by a factor of 3.5.

  20. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  1. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  2. Algorithm for constructing a multiring model of radio images of noncoherent radio sources on the basis of the visibility function modulus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshovij, V. V.; Lozins'kij, A. B.; Romanishin, I. M.; Romanchev, Yu. V.

    The authors consider the problem of constructing a centrosymmetrical model of radio images of noncoherent radio sources based on the van Cittert-Zernike theorem. They show that one needs only the visibility function modulus determined on the (u,v) plane to construct such a model. They propose to restore radio images as sets of concentric rings using the visibility function measured by the radiointerferometric method with different baselines. An algorithm is given for the determination of the number of rings, their angular radii, and flux densities through the use of the Fourier-Bessel series. The radio image of Cas A was restored from the measurements made with the short-base (up to 2000 D/λ) interferometer URAN-3 at decameter wavelengths (25 MHz), it is in agreement with the results obtained earlier.

  3. Another Shock for the Bullet Cluster, and the Source of Seed Electrons for Radio Relics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimwell, Timothy W,; Markevitch, Maxim; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E 0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2:30:11025 WHz(exp -1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster - a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re- )acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma - as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM - is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.

  4. High Resolution Rapid Response Observations of Compact Radio Sources with the Ceduna Hobart Interferometer (CHI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Jay M.; Lovell, James E. J.; Ojha, Roopesh; Kadler, Matthias; Dickey, John M.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Frequent, simultaneous observations across the electromagnetic spectrum are essential to the study of a range of astrophysical phenomena including Active Galactic Nuclei. A key tool of such studies is the ability to observe an object when it flares i.e. exhibits a rapid and significant increase in its flux density. Aims. We describe the specific observational procedures and the calibration techniques that have been developed and tested to create a single baseline radio interferometer. that can rapidly observe a flaring object. This is the only facility that is dedicated to rapid high resolution radio observations of an object south of -30 degrees declination. An immediate application is to provide rapid contemporaneous radio coverage of AGN flaring at y-ray frequencies detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods. A single baseline interferometer was formed with radio telescopes in Hobart, Tasmania and Ceduna, South Australia. A software correlator was set up at the University of Tasmania to correlate these data. Results. Measurements of the flux densities of flaring objects can be made using our observing strategy within half an hour of a triggering event. These observations can be calibrated with amplitude errors better than 20%. Lower limits to the brightness temperatures of the sources can also be calculated using CHI. Key words. instrumentation:interferometers - galaxies:active - galaxies:jets - galaxies:nuclei quasars:general gamma rays:galaxies- 1.

  5. Coronal Sources of the Solar F10.7 Radio Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, S. J.; White, S. M.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present results from the first solar full-disk {{{F}}}10.7 (the radio flux at 10.7 cm, 2.8 GHz) image taken with the S-band receivers on the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in order to assess the relationship between the {{{F}}}10.7 index and solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission. To identify the sources of the observed 2.8 GHz emission, we calculate differential emission measures from EUV images collected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and use them to predict the bremsstrahlung component of the radio emission. By comparing the bremsstrahlung prediction and radio observation we find that 8.1% ± 0.5% of the variable component of the {{{F}}}10.7 flux is associated with the gyroresonance emission mechanism. Additionally, we identify optical depth effects on the radio limb which may complicate the use of {{{F}}}10.7 time series as an EUV proxy. Our analysis is consistent with a coronal iron abundance that is four times the photospheric level.

  6. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  7. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  8. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  9. Broadband Spectral Modeling of the Extreme Gigahertz-peaked Spectrum Radio Source PKS B0008-421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ekers, R. D.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Morgan, J.; Bernardi, G.; Bell, M. E.; Bhat, R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D. C.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kudrayvtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    We present broadband observations and spectral modeling of PKS B0008-421 and identify it as an extreme gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) source. PKS B0008-421 is characterized by the steepest known spectral slope below the turnover, close to the theoretical limit of synchrotron self-absorption, and the smallest known spectral width of any GPS source. Spectral coverage of the source spans from 0.118 to 22 GHz, which includes data from the Murchison Widefield Array and the wide bandpass receivers on the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have implemented a Bayesian inference model fitting routine to fit the data with internal free-free absorption (FFA), single- and double-component FFA in an external homogeneous medium, FFA in an external inhomogeneous medium, or single- and double-component synchrotron self-absorption models, all with and without a high-frequency exponential break. We find that without the inclusion of a high-frequency break these models cannot accurately fit the data, with significant deviations above and below the peak in the radio spectrum. The addition of a high-frequency break provides acceptable spectral fits for the inhomogeneous FFA and double-component synchrotron self-absorption models, with the inhomogeneous FFA model statistically favored. The requirement of a high-frequency spectral break implies that the source has ceased injecting fresh particles. Additional support for the inhomogeneous FFA model as being responsible for the turnover in the spectrum is given by the consistency between the physical parameters derived from the model fit and the implications of the exponential spectral break, such as the necessity of the source being surrounded by a dense ambient medium to maintain the peak frequency near the gigahertz region. This implies that PKS B0008-421 should display an internal H i column density greater than 1020 cm-2. The discovery of PKS B0008-421 suggests that the next generation of low radio frequency surveys could reveal a

  10. Compact Radio Sources and Jet-driven AGN Feedback in the Early Universe: Constraints from Integral-Field Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvadba, N H; Lehnert, M D; De Breuck, C; Gilbert, A; van Breugel, W

    2007-07-05

    To investigate the impact of radio jets during the formation epoch of their massive host galaxies, we present an analysis of two massive, log M{sub stellar}/M{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} 10.6 and 11.3, compact radio galaxies at z = 3.5, TNJ0205+2242 and TNJ0121+1320. Their small radio sizes (R {le} 10 kpc) are most likely a sign of youth. In particular, we compare their radio properties and gas dynamics with those in well extended radio galaxies at high redshift, which show strong evidence for powerful, jet-driven outflows of significant gas masses (M {approx} 10{sup 9-10} M{sub {circle_dot}}). Our analysis combines rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy obtained with SINFONI on the VLT with existing radio imaging, CO(4-3) emission line spectra, and rest-frame UV longslit spectroscopy. [OIII]{lambda}5007 line emission is compact in both galaxies and lies within the region defined by the radio lobes. For TNJ0205+2242, the Ly{alpha} profile narrows significantly outside the jet radius, indicating the presence of a quiescent halo. TNJ0121+1320 has two components at a projected relative distance of {approx}10 kpc and a velocity offset of {approx}300 km s{sup -1}, measured from the [OIII]{lambda}5007 velocity map. This suggests that the fainter component is orbiting around the more massive, radio-loud galaxy. If motions are gravitational, this implies a dynamical mass of 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the radio-loud component. The dynamical mass, molecular gas mass measured from the CO line emission, and radio luminosity of these two compact radio galaxies imply that compact radio sources may well develop large-scale, energetic outflows as observed in extended radio galaxies, with the potential of removing significant fractions of the ISM from the host galaxy. The absence of luminous emission line gas extending beyond the radio emission in these sources agrees with the observed timescales and outflow rates in extended radio galaxies, and adds further

  11. Mathematical properties of Fst between admixed populations and their parental source populations.

    PubMed

    Boca, Simina M; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2011-11-01

    We consider the properties of the F(st) measure of genetic divergence between an admixed population and its parental source populations. Among all possible populations admixed among an arbitrary set of parental populations, we show that the value of F(st) between an admixed population and a specific source population is maximized when the admixed population is simply the most distant of the other source populations. For the case with only two parental populations, as a function of the admixture fraction, we further demonstrate that this F(st) value is monotonic and convex, so that F(st) is informative about the admixture fraction. We illustrate our results using example human population-genetic data, showing how they provide a framework in which to interpret the features of F(st) in admixed populations.

  12. On the Populations of Radio Galaxies with Extended Morphology at z < 0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Lunnan, Ragnhild

    2010-11-01

    Extended extragalactic radio sources have traditionally been classified into Fanaroff & Riley (FR) I and II types, based on the ratio rs of the separation S between the brightest regions on either sides of the host galaxy and the total size T of the radio source (rs ≡ S/T). In this paper, we examine the distribution of various physical properties as a function of rs of 1040 luminous (L >~ L *) extended radio galaxies (RGs) at z < 0.3 selected with well-defined criteria from the SDSS, NVSS, and FIRST surveys. About 2/3 of the RGs are lobe dominated (LD) and 1/3 have prominent jets. If we follow the original definition of the FR types, i.e., a division based solely on rs , FR I and FR II RGs overlap in their host galaxy properties. However, the rare LD sources with rs >~ 0.8 and [O III] λ5007 line luminosity >106 L sun are markedly different on average from the rest of the RGs, in the sense that they are hosted in lower mass galaxies, live in relatively sparse environments, and likely have higher accretion rates onto the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Thus, these high emission line luminosity, high-rs LD RGs, and the rest of RGs form a well-defined dichotomy. Motivated by the stark differences in the nuclear emission line properties of the RG subsamples, we suggest that the accretion rate onto the SMBH may play the primary role in creating the different morphologies. At relatively high accretion rates, the accretion system may produce powerful jets that create the "classical double" morphology (roughly corresponding to the LD sources with rs >~ 0.8 and emission lines); at lower accretion rates, the jets from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow generate radio lobes without apparent "hot spots" at the edge (corresponding to the majority of LD sources). At slightly lower accretion rates and in galaxies with dense galactic structure, sources with prominent jets result. It is possible that while the high accretion rate systems could affect sub-Mpc scale

  13. Genetic sources of population epigenomic variation.

    PubMed

    Taudt, Aaron; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Johannes, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The field of epigenomics has rapidly progressed from the study of individual reference epigenomes to surveying epigenomic variation in populations. Recent studies in a number of species, from yeast to humans, have begun to dissect the cis- and trans-regulatory genetic mechanisms that shape patterns of population epigenomic variation at the level of single epigenetic marks, as well as at the level of integrated chromatin state maps. We show that this information is paving the way towards a more complete understanding of the heritable basis underlying population epigenomic variation. We also highlight important conceptual challenges when interpreting results from these genetic studies, particularly in plants, in which epigenomic variation can be determined both by genetic and epigenetic inheritance.

  14. Gamma-ray bursts from massive Population-III stars: clues from the radio band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, D.; Murphy, T.; Ghirlanda, G.; Hancock, P. J.; Parry, R.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-07-01

    Current models suggest gamma-ray bursts could be used as a way of probing Population-III stars - the first stars in the early Universe. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that late-time radio observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows could provide a means of identifying bursts that originate from Population-III stars, if these were highly massive, independently from their redshift. We then present the results from a pilot study using the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 17 GHz, designed to test the hypothesis that there may be Population-III gamma-ray bursts amongst the current sample of known events. We observed three candidates plus a control gamma-ray burst, and make no detections with upper limits of 20-40 μJy at 500-1300 d post-explosion.

  15. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2010-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  16. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2009-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  17. A dynamical model for FR II type radio sources with terminated jet activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuligowska, Elżbieta

    2017-02-01

    Context. The extension of the KDA analytical model of FR II-type source evolution originally assuming a continuum injection process in the jet-IGM interaction towards a case of the jet's termination is presented and briefly discussed. Aims: The dynamical evolution of FR II-type sources predicted with this extended model, hereafter referred to as KDA EXT, and its application to the chosen radio sources. Methods: Following the classical approach based on the source's continuous injection and self-similarity, I propose the effective formulae describing the length and luminosity evolution of the lobes during an absence of the jet flow, and present the resulting diagrams for the characteristics mentioned. Results: Using an algorithm based on the numerical integration of a modified formula for jet power, the KDA EXT model is fitted to three radio galaxies. Their predicted spectra are then compared to the observed spectra, proving that these fits are better than the best spectral fit provided by the original KDA model of the FR II-type sources dynamical evolution.

  18. Cosmic star formation probed via parametric stack-fitting of known sources to radio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Best, P. N.

    2014-04-01

    The promise of multiwavelength astronomy has been tempered by the large disparity in sensitivity and resolution between different wavelength regimes. Here, we present a statistical approach which attempts to overcome this by fitting parametric models directly to image data. Specifically, we fit a model for the radio luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies to pixel intensity distributions at 1.4 GHz coincident with near-IR selected sources in COSMOS. Taking a mass-limited sample in redshift bins across the range 0 < z < 4, we are able to fit the radio LF with ˜0.2 dex precision in the key parameters (e.g. Φ*,L*). Good agreement is seen between our results and those using standard methods at radio and other wavelengths. Integrating our LFs to get the star formation rate density, we find that galaxies with M* > 109.5 M⊙ contribute ≳50 per cent of cosmic star formation at 0 < z < 4. The scalability of our approach is empirically estimated, with the precision in LF parameter estimates found to scale with the number of sources in the stack, Ns, as ∝ √{N_s}. This type of approach will be invaluable in the multiwavelength analysis of upcoming surveys with the Square Kilometre Array pathfinder facilities: LOFAR, ASKAP and MeerKAT.

  19. Space reconstruction of the morphology and kinematics of axisymmetric radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Nhung, P. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-10-01

    The unprecedented quality of the observations available from the Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array (ALMA) calls for analysis methods making the best of them. Reconstructing in space the morphology and kinematics of radio sources is an underdetermined problem that requires imposing additional constraints for its solution. The hypothesis of rotational invariance, which is a good approximation to, or at least a good reference for the description of the gas envelopes of many evolved stars and protostars, is particularly efficient in this role. In the first part of the article, a systematic use of simulated observations allows us for identifying the main problems and for constructing quantities aimed at solving them. In particular the evaluation of the orientation of the star axis in space and the differentiation between expansion along the star axis and rotation about it are given special attention. The use of polar rather than Cartesian sky coordinates to display the results of the analysis is shown to often better match the morphology and kinematics of actual stars. The radial dependence of the gas density and temperature and the possible presence of velocity gradients are briefly considered. In the second part, these results are applied to a few stars taken as examples with the aim of evaluating their usefulness when applied to concrete cases. A third part takes stock of what precedes and formulates some guidelines for modelling the radio emission of axisymmetric radio sources, limited however to the mathematics and geometry of the problem, physics considerations being generally ignored.

  20. THE WISE BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO-LOUD SOURCES: AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF CANDIDATE γ-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate γ-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed γ-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE γ-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST, and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q {sub 22} parameter, which is analogous to the q {sub 24} parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 μm. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs, or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated as confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate γ-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low-energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources.

  1. Occultations of Astrophysical Radio Sources as Probes of Planetary Environments: A Case Study of Jupiter and Possible Applications to Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2017-02-01

    Properties of planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres are difficult to measure from Earth. Radio occultations are a common method for measuring these properties, but they traditionally rely on radio transmissions from a spacecraft near the planet. Here, we explore whether occultations of radio emissions from a distant astrophysical radio source can be used to measure magnetic field strength, plasma density, and neutral density around planets. In a theoretical case study of Jupiter, we find that significant changes in polarization angle due to Faraday rotation occur for radio signals that pass within 10 Jupiter radii of the planet and that significant changes in frequency and power occur from radio signals that pass through the neutral atmosphere. There are sufficient candidate radio sources, such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, and masers, that occultations are likely to occur at least once per year. For pulsars, time delays in the arrival of their emitted pulses can be used to measure plasma density. Exoplanets, whose physical properties are very challenging to observe, may also occult distant astrophysical radio sources, such as their parent stars.

  2. Swift observations of unidentified radio sources in the revised Third Cambridge Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Liuzzo, E.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the Third Cambridge Catalogue (3CR) to increase the multifrequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) the field of view of 21 bright NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT filters at the position of the NVSS objects, confirming the scenario that all of them are heavily obscured. With this in mind, a spectroscopic campaign, preferably in the infrared band, will be necessary to establish the nature of the sources that we have finally identified.

  3. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  4. Characterization of the near-source population around five ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many ports are currently preparing for increased freight traffic, which may result in elevated local air pollution in areas near the port and freight transportation corridors. In this study, a geographical information system (GIS) analysis of areas surrounding five ports – Port of New York and New Jersey, Port of Virginia, Port of Savannah, Port of Miami, and Port of Houston – was conducted to characterize the population that might be affected by air emissions from the freight transportation network and to determine which sources had the potential to affect the most people. Defining “near-source” populations as living within 300 m of the freight transportation network, namely the port and associated truck routes, railroads, and intermodal facilities (e. g. rail yards and warehouses); near-source populations ranged from 37,000 to over a million within 10 km of a port. At the ports considered, the population living within 300 m of the port boundary constituted <10 % of the total near-source population. Sensitive population exposure was also indicated, such as the 81 day care centers and K-12 schools in near-source environments within 2 km of the Port of New York and New Jersey. Minority groups constituted 55 % to 85 % of the near-source populations in the five port areas. For four of the five ports, the mean and median income of the near-source population was lower and the minority percentage was higher than the population living adjacent to the near-sou

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: S-PASS & NVSS bright extragalactic radio sources (Lamee+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamee, M.; Rudnick, L.; Farnes, J. S.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Poppi, S.

    2016-11-01

    The S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS) is a project to map the southern sky at decl. <-1.0° in total intensity and linear polarization. The observations were conducted with the 64m Parkes Radio Telescope, NSW Australia at 2.3GHz. A description of S-PASS is given in Carretti+ (2013Natur.493...66C) and Carretti (2010ASPC..438..276C). We cross-match the S-PASS data with the 1.4GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog (Condon+, 1998, VIII/65) and generate a new independent depolarization catalog of bright extragalactic radio sources. We matched our catalog to the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, WISE, catalog, Wright+ (2010AJ....140.1868W), with a search radius of five arcseconds. See section 4.7. (1 data file).

  6. Source characteristics and locations of hectometric radio emissions from the northern Jovian hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Northern Jovian hectometric (HOM) radio emissions, detected from high Jovian latitudes by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, were observed at all Jovian longitudes. This emission was observed to be predominantly right-hand circularly polarized, but some left-hand circular polarization was observed implying the presence of O mode emissions from the northern Jovian hemisphere. Intense HOM emissions, with well-defined directions and polarizations, were often confined to similar longitudinal regions where intense HOM emissions were previously observed at low latitudes. The present analysis confirms that these northern HOM sources lie in the Jovian polar regions on magnetic field lines that pass through the Io plasma torus. The observations may be consistent with emission from either a filled cone beam or a longitudinal distribution of thin hollow cones.

  7. 6 centimeter radio source counts and spectral index studies down to 0. 1 millijansky

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, R.H.; Partridge, R.B.; Windhorst, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    Results are reported from radio observations of three fields in the Lynx.2 area of the Leiden Berkeley Deep Survey (Windhorst et al., 1984), obtained at 6 cm with sensitivity about 15 microJy using the D configuration of the VLA on January 22, 23, and 26, 1986. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail, and optical identifications and photometry based on the observations of Kron et al. (1985) are included. Consideration is given to the spectral index distribution, possible biases in this distribution, the relationship between the spectral index distribution and the 6-cm and 21-cm flux densities, and the possible nature of the sub-mJy radio sources. 28 references.

  8. RADIO SIGNATURES OF CORONAL-MASS-EJECTION-STREAMER INTERACTION AND SOURCE DIAGNOSTICS OF TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Song, H. Q.; Feng, X. S.; Liu Ying

    2012-07-01

    It has been suggested that type II radio bursts are due to energetic electrons accelerated at coronal shocks. Radio observations, however, have poor or no spatial resolutions to pinpoint the exact acceleration locations of these electrons. In this paper, we discuss a promising approach to infer the electron acceleration location by combining radio and white light observations. The key assumption is to relate specific morphological features (e.g., spectral bumps) of the dynamic spectra of type II radio bursts to imaging features (e.g., coronal mass ejection (CME) going into a streamer) along the CME (and its driven shock) propagation. In this study, we examine the CME-streamer interaction for the solar eruption dated on 2003 November 1. The presence of spectral bump in the relevant type II radio burst is identified, which is interpreted as a natural result of the shock-radio-emitting region entering the dense streamer structure. The study is useful for further determinations of the location of type II radio burst and the associated electron acceleration by CME-driven shock.

  9. Global VLBI Observations of Weak Extragalactic Radio Sources: Imaging Candidates to Align the VLBI and Gaia Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Charlot, Patrick; Porcas, Richard; Garrington, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames (International Celestial Reference Frame) with the highest accuracy. In this respect, it is found that only 10% of the ICRF sources are suitable to establish this link (70 sources), either because most of the ICRF sources are not bright enough at optical wavelengths or because they show extended radio emission which precludes reaching the highest astrometric accuracy. In order to improve the situation, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of about 450 optically-bright radio sources, typically 20 times weaker than the ICRF sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent 90% detection rate. This paper reports on global VLBI observations carried out in March 2008 to image 105 from the 398 previously detected sources. All sources were successfully imaged, revealing compact VLBI structure for about half of them, which is very promising for the future.

  10. Milli-Arcsecond Morphology and Structural Changes in a Complete Sample of Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Barthel, P. D.; Conway, J. E.; Myers, S. T.

    1993-05-01

    We have conducted a VLBI survey of a complete, flux-density--limited sample of 65 extragalactic radio sources, selected at 5 GHz, in order to study their morphology and to look for superluminal motion and other structural changes. First-epoch images of 37 sources were published by Pearson & Readhead (1988, ApJ, 328, 114). Here we present 5-GHz images, with a resolution ~ 1 milliarcsec, taken at three epochs spread over 9 years for each of 25 sources. The majority of the sources have an asymmetric, core-jet morphology. Several of these are superluminal sources in which an emission feature moves outward along the jet at v_app > c (e.g., 0850+581, 1642+690, 1928+738, BL Lac, 3C 216, 3C 345). Several other sources with similar morphology, however, show no changes in relative positions of subcomponents, although subcomponent flux densities do change (e.g., 0711+356, 1652+398, 1823+568). We draw attention to a new class of ``compact symmetric'' objects with double or triple morphology (e.g., 0108+388, 0710+439, 2352+495). We have placed limits < c on relative motion of components in these sources, and they show little if any evidence for relativistic beaming. The central engine appears to lie midway between two lobes ~ 100 pc apart. The sample also includes some compact steep-spectrum sources and other sources that are difficult to classify.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources II (Petrov, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, L.

    2014-06-01

    The first VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) observing campaign in 2007 resulted in the detection of 398 targets with the European VLBI Network (EVN; Bourda et al., 2010, cat. J/A+A/520/A113). During the second observing campaign, a subset of 105 sources detected in the previous campaign was observed (Bourda et al., 2011, cat. J/A+A/526/A102). Their positions were derived by Petrov (2011, cat. J/AJ/142/105) and formed the OBRS-1 (Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources) catalog. The remaining sources were observed in the third campaign, called OBRS-2. During the OBRS-2 campaign, there were three observing sessions with 10 VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) stations and 5-6 EVN stations from this list: EFLSBERG, MEDICINA, ONSALA60, YEBES40M, DSS63, HARTRAO, and NOTO. Observations were made on 2010 Mar 23 (session ID gc034a), on 2011 Nov 8 (gc034bcd), and on 2011 Mar 15 (gc034ef). The OBRS-2 catalog presents precise positions of the 295 extragalactic radio sources as well as median correlated flux densities at 8.4 and 2.2GHz at baseline lengths shorter than 900km and at baseline lengths longer than 5000km. (1 data file).

  12. Planck intermediate results. VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurinsky, N.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschènes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sajina, A.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2013-02-01

    We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources - infrared and radio sources - from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately homogeneous coverage are used to permit a clean and controlled correction for incompleteness, which was explicitly not done for the ERCSC, as it was aimed at providing lists of sources to be followed up. Our sample, prior to the 80% completeness cut, contains between 217 sources at 100 GHz and 1058 sources at 857 GHz over about 12 800 to 16 550 deg2 (31 to 40% of the sky). After the 80% completeness cut, between 122 and 452 and sources remain, with flux densities above 0.3 and 1.9 Jy at 100 and 857 GHz. The sample so defined can be used for statistical analysis. Using the multi-frequency coverage of the Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between the two populations. We find an approximately equal number of synchrotron and dusty sources between 217 and 353 GHz; at 353 GHz or higher (or 217 GHz and lower) frequencies, the number is dominated by dusty (synchrotron) sources, as expected. For most of the sources, the spectral indices are also derived. We provide for the first time counts of bright sources from 353 to 857 GHz and the contributions from dusty and synchrotron sources at all HFI frequencies in the key spectral range where these spectra are crossing. The observed counts are in the Euclidean regime. The number counts are compared to previously published data (from earlier Planck results, Herschel, BLAST, SCUBA, LABOCA, SPT, and ACT) and models taking into account both radio or infrared galaxies, and covering a

  13. The distribution of polarized radio sources >15 μJy IN GOODS-N

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnick, L.; Owen, F. N.

    2014-04-10

    We present deep Very Large Array observations of the polarization of radio sources in the GOODS-N field at 1.4 GHz at resolutions of 1.''6 and 10''. At 1.''6, we find that the peak flux cumulative number count distribution is N(> p) ∼ 45*(p/30 μJy){sup –0.6} per square degree above a detection threshold of 14.5 μJy. This represents a break from the steeper slopes at higher flux densities, resulting in fewer sources predicted for future surveys with the Square Kilometer Array and its precursors. It provides a significant challenge for using background rotation measures (RMs) to study clusters of galaxies or individual galaxies. Most of the polarized sources are well above our detection limit, and they are also radio galaxies that are well-resolved even at 10'', with redshifts from ∼0.2-1.9. We determined a total polarized flux for each source by integrating the 10'' polarized intensity maps, as will be done by upcoming surveys such as POSSUM. These total polarized fluxes are a factor of two higher, on average, than the peak polarized flux at 1.''6; this would increase the number counts by ∼50% at a fixed flux level. The detected sources have RMs with a characteristic rms scatter of ∼11 rad m{sup –2} around the local Galactic value, after eliminating likely outliers. The median fractional polarization from all total intensity sources does not continue the trend of increasing at lower flux densities, as seen for stronger sources. The changes in the polarization characteristics seen at these low fluxes likely represent the increasing dominance of star-forming galaxies.

  14. Constraining the population of radio-loud active galactic nuclei at high redshift with the power spectrum of the 21 cm Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Dillon, Joshua S.; Mesinger, Andrei; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.

    2014-06-01

    The 21 cm forest, the absorption by the intergalactic medium (IGM) towards a high redshift radio-loud source, is a probe of the thermal state of the IGM. To date, the literature has focused on line-of-sight spectral studies of a single quasar known to have a large redshift. We instead examine many sources in a wide field of view, and show that the imprint from the 21 cm forest absorption of these sources is detectible in the power spectrum. The properties of the power spectrum can reveal information on the population of the earliest radio loud sources that may have existed during the pre-reionization epoch at z>10.Using semi-numerical simulations of the IGM and a semi-empirical source population, we show that the 21 cm forest dominates, in a distinctive region of Fourier space, the brightness temperature power spectrum that many contemporary experiments aim to measure. In particular, the forest dominates the diffuse emission on smaller spatial scales along the line of sight. Exploiting this separation, one may constrain the IGM thermal history, such as heating by the first X-ray sources, on large spatial scales and the absorption of radio loud active galactic nuclei on small ones.Using realistic simulations of noise and foregrounds, we show that planned instruments on the scale of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) with a collecting area of one tenth of a square kilometer can detect the 21cm forest in this small spatial scale region with high signal to noise. We develop an analytic toy model for the signal and explore its detectability over a large range of thermal histories and potential high redshift source scenarios.

  15. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2012-02-15

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1/5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A/cm{sup 2} level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  16. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source.

    PubMed

    Oka, Y; Shoji, T

    2012-02-01

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1∕5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A∕cm(2) level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  17. A study of the properties of twin radio arms of FR-II extragalactic radio sources within z≤1-II (dynamical properties)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Ubachukwu, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    We carried out a comparative study on the dynamical properties of the Longer Arm (LA) and the Shorter Arm (SA) of different classes of FR-II radio sources (Broad Line Radio Galaxies (BLRG), Quasars (Q), Narrow Line Radio Galaxies (NLRG) and Low Excitation Radio Galaxies (LERG)) based on self-similar model of time evolution of the radio lobes and hotspot properties of radio sources, using the power-law expression for the dependence of hotspot size (D_{hs}), the advance velocity of the hotspot (v_{hs}) and hotspot luminosity (PL) on the core-lobe length (DL). Using observational values of D_{hs}, PL and DL we constrained the exponents of these power-law relations for the LA and SA. We also estimated the hotspot pressure, (p_{hs}), cocoon pressure within the lobe (p_{cc}), the ratio of the hotspot pressure to the cocoon pressure (p_{hc}), the cocoon volume (Vcc), the energy density within the cocoon (u_{cc}), the equipartition magnetic field (B_{em}) in the lobe, the particle number density at the hotspot (n_{hs}), the external density profile (ρ _{ext}) and the kinetic jet power (Q_{jet}) for the LA and the SA. Linear regression analyses indicate a tight correlation between the D_{hs} and the DL of LA for all classes of radio sources with r˜0.5-0.8. Similar result was obtained for SA except for that of Q with r˜ 0.2. For P_{hs} and DL correlation, the result indicates a mild negative correlation that seems stronger for the SA (r˜-0.3 to -0.6) than LA (r˜-0.2 to -0.4) for all the different classes of radio sources. Comparing the values of ρ_{ext}, B_{em}, uB, p_{hs}, p_{cc}, Vcc, and u_{cc} between SA side and LA side, indicate that the SA values of the parameters are higher than those of LA; while (p_{hs}) showed higher values in LA than SA for all the different classes of radio sources. Generally, the hotspot has a larger volume on the LA side than on the SA side except for NLRG, while the hotspot of the SA side contains more particle per unit volume than the

  18. Luminous radio-quiet sources in the W3(MAIN) cloud core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynnwilliams, C. Gareth; Ladd, E. F.; Deane, James R.; Sanders, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    We have resolved 450 micrometer and 800 micrometer emission from the W3(Main) star forming region into three major peaks, using 8 inch - 14 inch beams with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea. One of the submillimeter sources is identified with W3 - IRS5, a well-known candidate protostar. However, to our surprise, we find that none of the submillimeter peaks coincides with any of the prominent compact HII regions in the area. We estimate that the three submillimeter sources together contribute 30-50 percent of the total bolometric luminosity of the region, and speculate that the contribution of luminous radio-quiet sources to the total luminosity of HII region/molecular cloud complexes may be larger than is often assumed.

  19. Evidence for halo-like radio sources from kilometric type III burst observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The radio azimuths for many kilometric type III bursts that originate near or behind the limb of the sun are observed to drift far to the east or far to the west of the spacecraft-sun line. It is shown that the behavior of the observed burst parameters for these events corresponds to the response of a spinning dipole antenna to halolike sources of radiation around the sun. These results provide evidence for a previous suggestion that behind-the-limb type III events should appear as halolike sources of radiation to an observer on the opposite side of the sun, due to scattering of the radiation from the primary source back around the sun.

  20. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  1. JPL 1990-3: A 5-nrad extragalactic source catalog based on combined radio interferometric observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.

    1991-01-01

    A combined analysis merges 17,000 Deep Space Network (DSN) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) observations with 303,000 observations from the Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP) and the International Radio Interferometric Surveying (IRIS) project. Observations from the Radio Reference Frame Development (RRFD) and Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations (TEMPO) programs through late 1990 form the DSN VLBI data set. The combined analysis yields angular coordinates of extragalactic radio sources with a precision of a few nanoradians, as compared with 5 to 10 nrad precision for coordinates derived in the past solely from DSN data. The improvement in the combined analysis is due to the new Mark III DSN data, as well as to increased statistical strength from the large volume of observations from non-DSN experiments. Such a unified analysis is made possible by recent improvements in parameter estimation software efficiency. The terrestrial reference frame is based on joint VLBI experiments using both DSN and CDP antennas, and on specifying the coordinates of VLBI antennas in a proper geocentric coordinate system by means of Global Positioning System (GPS) collocation of VLBI, LLR, and SLR (Laser Ranging) sites.

  2. The impacts of source structure on geodetic parameters demonstrated by the radio source 3C371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming H.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Anderson, James M.; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Karbon, Maria; Schuh, Harald; Wang, Guang L.

    2017-01-01

    Closure quantities measured by very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations are independent of instrumental and propagation instabilities and antenna gain factors, but are sensitive to source structure. A new method is proposed to calculate a structure index based on the median values of closure quantities rather than the brightness distribution of a source. The results are comparable to structure indices based on imaging observations at other epochs and demonstrate the flexibility of deriving structure indices from exactly the same observations as used for geodetic analysis and without imaging analysis. A three-component model for the structure of source 3C371 is developed by model-fitting closure phases. It provides a real case of tracing how the structure effect identified by closure phases in the same observations as the delay observables affects the geodetic analysis, and investigating which geodetic parameters are corrupted to what extent by the structure effect. Using the resulting structure correction based on the three-component model of source 3C371, two solutions, with and without correcting the structure effect, are made. With corrections, the overall rms of this source is reduced by 1 ps, and the impacts of the structure effect introduced by this single source are up to 1.4 mm on station positions and up to 4.4 microarcseconds on Earth orientation parameters. This study is considered as a starting point for handling the source structure effect on geodetic VLBI from geodetic sessions themselves.

  3. Probing Statistical Isotropy of Cosmological Radio Sources using Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shamik; Jain, Pankaj; Kashyap, Gopal; Kothari, Rahul; Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari; Tiwari, Prabhakar

    2016-12-01

    There currently exist many observations which are not consistent with the cosmological principle. We review these observations with a particular emphasis on those relevant for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). In particular, several different data sets indicate a preferred direction pointing approximately towards the Virgo cluster. We also observe a hemispherical anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) temperature fluctuations. Although these inconsistencies may be attributed to systematic effects, there remains the possibility that they indicate new physics and various theories have been proposed to explain them. One possibility, which we discuss in this review, is the generation of perturbation modes during the early pre-inflationary epoch, when the Universe may not obey the cosmological principle. Better measurements will provide better constraints on these theories. In particular, we propose measurement of the dipole in number counts, sky brightness, polarized flux and polarization orientations of radio sources. We also suggest test of alignment of linear polarizations of sources as a function of their relative separation. Finally we propose measurement of hemispherical anisotropy or equivalently dipole modulation in radio sources.

  4. A Central X-ray Source in the Non-thermal Radio Nebula DA 495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T. L.; Kothes, R.

    2003-01-01

    We report the detection, in archival ROSAT and ASCA observations, of X-ray emission from the direction of DA 495 (G65.7+1.2), a likely supernova remnant of uncertain classification but with similarities to the Crab Nebula. An unusual feature of the radio nebula is its annular morphology, with a flux minimum at the geometrical center. In the soft X-ray band, the ROSAT data resolve a compact source near the edge of the central radio hole ; the hard X-ray morphology, at the limit of ASCA's spatial resolution, is suggestive of extended plerionic emission dropping off from a central flux maximum coincident with the ROSAT source. The spectrum is well-described by a power-law with photon index approximately 1.7, and the X-ray flux is roughly constant with time. Taken together, this evidence suggests identification of the X-ray source with a magnetospherically active neutron star and its associated wind nebula. Timing analysis of the ASCA data yields only a weak upper bound on pulsations with periods longer than approximately 30 ms. These results reveal for the first time the high-energy engine that powers the synchrotron nebula, and strengthen the classification of DA 495 as a plerionic supernova remnant, one that may represent a late evolutionary stage of Crab-like nebulae.

  5. Electric Field Distribution Excited by Indoor Radio Source for Exposure Compliance Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Junji; Tarusawa, Yoshiaki

    Correction factors are presented for estimating the RF electromagnetic field strength in the compliance assessment of human exposure from an indoor RF radio source in the frequency range from 800MHz to 3.5GHz. The correction factors are derived from the increase in the spatial average electric field strength distribution, which is dependent on the building materials. The spatial average electric field strength is calculated using relative complex dielectric constants of building materials. The relative complex dielectric constant is obtained through measurement of the transmission and reflection losses for eleven kinds of building materials used in business office buildings and single family dwellings.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ultra steep spectrum radio sources (Singh+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Beelen, A.; Wadadekar, Y.; Sirothia, S.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Basu, A.; Omont, A.; McAlpine, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Oliver, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacy, M.

    2014-11-01

    We obtained 325 MHz GMRT observations of the XMM-LSS field over sky area of ~12deg2 with synthesized beamsize ~10.2"x7.9". In the mosaiced 325MHz GMRT image the average noise rms is ~160uJy, while in the central region the average noise-rms reaches to ~120uJy. Our 325MHz observations are one of the deepest low-frequency surveys over such a wide sky area and detect ~2553/3304 radio sources at >=5.0σ with noise rms cut-off <=200/300uJy. (1 data file).

  7. A Decade of Developing Radio-Astronomy Instrumentation using CASPER Open-Source Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickish, Jack; Abdurashidova, Zuhra; Ali, Zaki; Buch, Kaushal D.; Chaudhari, Sandeep C.; Chen, Hong; Dexter, Matthew; Domagalski, Rachel Simone; Ford, John; Foster, Griffin; George, David; Greenberg, Joe; Greenhill, Lincoln; Isaacson, Adam; Jiang, Homin; Jones, Glenn; Kapp, Francois; Kriel, Henno; Lacasse, Rich; Lutomirski, Andrew; MacMahon, David; Manley, Jason; Martens, Andrew; McCullough, Randy; Muley, Mekhala V.; New, Wesley; Parsons, Aaron; Price, Daniel C.; Primiani, Rurik A.; Ray, Jason; Siemion, Andrew; van Tonder, Vereesé; Vertatschitsch, Laura; Wagner, Mark; Weintroub, Jonathan; Werthimer, Dan

    The Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) has been working for a decade to reduce the time and cost of designing, building and deploying new digital radio-astronomy instruments. Today, CASPER open-source technology powers over 45 scientific instruments worldwide, and is used by scientists and engineers at dozens of academic institutions. In this paper, we catalog the current offerings of the CASPER collaboration, and instruments past and present built by CASPER users and developers. We describe the ongoing state of software development, as CASPER looks to support a broader range of programming environments and hardware and ensure compatibility with the latest vendor tools.

  8. The main source of radio emission from the magnetosphere of Uranus.

    PubMed

    Gulkis, S; Carr, T D

    1987-12-30

    Observations of kilometric radiation from Uranus made with the planetary radio astronomy experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft are presented and discussed. Similarities between the auroral kilometric radiation from Earth and the observed Uranus emission are pointed out. A geometrical beaming model is developed in which a single distributed source is located above the darkside auroral region and emits in the extraordinary mode by the cyclotron maser process. The model can account for nearly all the Uranian kilometric radiation from the high-frequency limit near 850 kHz down to about 150 kHz and for much of it down to the lower limit of 20 kHz.

  9. A design study of a signal detection system. [for search of extraterrestrial radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described which can aid in the search for radio signals from extraterrestrial sources, or in other applications characterized by low signal-to-noise ratios and very high data rates. The system follows a multichannel (16 million bin) spectrum analyzer, and has critical processing, system control, and memory fuctions. The design includes a moderately rich set of algorithms to be used in parallel to detect signals of unknown form. A multi-threshold approach is used to obtain high and low signal sensitivities. Relatively compact and transportable memory systems are specified.

  10. Inconsistency of Ulysses Millisecond Langmuir Spikes with Wave Collapse in Type 3 Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent Ulysses observations of millisecond spikes superposed on broader Langmuir wave packets in type 3 radio sources are compared quantitatively with constraints from the theory of wave collapse. It is found that both the millisecond spikes and the wave packets have fields at least 10 times too small to be consistent with collapse, contrary to previous interpretations in terms of this process. Several alternative explanations are considered and it is argued that the spikes should be interpreted as either non-collapse phenomena or observational artifacts. To the extent the observations are representative, this rules out theories for type 3 bursts at approx. 1 - 4 AU that rely on collapse.

  11. Compton Observatory observations of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This task involved the investigation of the emission of clusters of galaxies, particularly those which contain extended radio emission, in the gamma-ray region of the spectrum. Observations were made of several clusters using the Compton Observatory EGRET instrument. For each cluster a measured flux or upper limit on the gamma-ray flux was obtained. In only one case, Abell 2199, was there a significant measured flux. This source is spatially confused with a know blazar in the field of view. The observation is consistent with all emissions being from the blazar.

  12. OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* PLANETS , STARS, VENUS( PLANET ), MARS( PLANET ), MERCURY ( PLANET ), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, GALAXIES, ASTROPHYSICS, TEMPERATURE, MEASUREMENT, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, ASTRONOMY, RADIO ASTRONOMY.

  13. Another shock for the Bullet cluster, and the source of seed electrons for radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, Timothy W.; Markevitch, Maxim; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-05-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E 0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2.3 ± 0.1 × 1025 W Hz-1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94 per cent of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail, we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster - a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re-)acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma - as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM - is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.

  14. Towards large and powerful radio frequency driven negative ion sources for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, B.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.; Bonomo, F.; Fröschle, M.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.

    2017-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam system will be equipped with radio-frequency (RF) negative ion sources, based on the IPP Garching prototype source design. Up to 100 kW at 1 MHz is coupled to the RF driver, out of which the plasma expands into the main source chamber. Compared to arc driven sources, RF sources are maintenance free and without evaporation of tungsten. The modularity of the driver concept permits to supply large source volumes. The prototype source (one driver) demonstrated operation in hydrogen and deuterium up to one hour with ITER relevant parameters. The ELISE test facility is operating with a source of half the ITER size (four drivers) in order to validate the modular source concept and to gain early operational experience at ITER relevant dimensions. A large variety of diagnostics allows improving the understanding of the relevant physics and its link to the source performance. Most of the negative ions are produced on a caesiated surface by conversion of hydrogen atoms. Cs conditioning and distribution have been optimized in order to achieve high ion currents which are stable in time. A magnetic filter field is needed to reduce the electron temperature and co-extracted electron current. The influence of different field topologies and strengths on the source performance, plasma and beam properties is being investigated. The results achieved in short pulse operation are close to or even exceed the ITER requirements with respect to the extracted ion currents. However, the extracted negative ion current for long pulse operation (up to 1 h) is limited by the increase of the co-extracted electron current, especially in deuterium operation.

  15. Jet Emission in Young Radio Sources: A Fermi Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (lsim10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ~1046-1048 erg s-1 depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ~4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L jet, kin/L disk > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (lsim 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  16. Limits on Fast Radio Bursts and other transient sources at 182 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlinson, A.; Bell, M. E.; Murphy, T.; Trott, C. M.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston, S.; Tingay, S. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Carbone, D.; Hancock, P. J.; Feng, L.; Offringa, A. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a survey for transient and variable sources, on time-scales from 28 s to ˜1 yr, using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) at 182 MHz. Down to a detection threshold of 0.285 Jy, no transient candidates were identified, making this the most constraining low-frequency survey to date and placing a limit on the surface density of transients of <4.1 × 10-7 deg-2 for the shortest time-scale considered. At these frequencies, emission from Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) is expected to be detectable in the shortest time-scale images without any corrections for interstellar or intergalactic dispersion. At an FRB limiting flux density of 7980 Jy, we find a rate of <82 FRBs per sky per day for dispersion measures <700 pc cm-3. Assuming a cosmological population of standard candles, our rate limits are consistent with the FRB rates obtained by Thornton et al. if they have a flat spectral slope. Finally, we conduct an initial variability survey of sources in the field with flux densities ≳0.5 Jy and identify no sources with significant variability in their light curves. However, we note that substantial further work is required to fully characterize both the short-term and low-level variability within this field.

  17. RADIO AND MID-INFRARED IDENTIFICATION OF BLAST SOURCE COUNTERPARTS IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, Simon; Ade, Peter A. R.; Eales, Stephen A.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Dunlop, James S.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Olmi, Luca

    2009-09-20

    We have identified radio and/or mid-infrared counterparts to 198 out of 350 sources detected at >=5{sigma} over {approx}9 deg{sup 2} centered on the Chandra Deep Field South by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m. We have matched 114 of these counterparts to optical sources with previously derived photometric redshifts and fitted spectral energy distributions to the BLAST fluxes and fluxes at 70 and 160 {mu}m acquired with the Spitzer Space Telescope. In this way, we have constrained dust temperatures, total far-infrared/submillimeter luminosities, and star formation rates for each source. Our findings show that, on average, the BLAST sources lie at significantly lower redshifts and have significantly lower rest-frame dust temperatures compared to submillimeter sources detected in surveys conducted at 850 {mu}m. We demonstrate that an apparent increase in dust temperature with redshift in our sample arises as a result of selection effects. Finally, we provide the full multiwavelength catalog of >=5{sigma} BLAST sources contained within the complete {approx}9 deg{sup 2} survey area.

  18. Radio Frequency Plasma Discharge Lamps for Use as Stable Calibration Light Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAndrew, Brendan; Cooper, John; Arecchi, Angelo; McKee, Greg; Durell, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Stable high radiance in visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths is desirable for radiometric calibration sources. In this work, newly available electrodeless radio-frequency (RF) driven plasma light sources were combined with research grade, low-noise power supplies and coupled to an integrating sphere to produce a uniform radiance source. The stock light sources consist of a 28 VDC power supply, RF driver, and a resonant RF cavity. The RF cavity includes a small bulb with a fill gas that is ionized by the electric field and emits light. This assembly is known as the emitter. The RF driver supplies a source of RF energy to the emitter. In commercial form, embedded electronics within the RF driver perform a continual optimization routine to maximize energy transfer to the emitter. This optimization routine continually varies the light output sinusoidally by approximately 2% over a several-second period. Modifying to eliminate this optimization eliminates the sinusoidal variation but allows the output to slowly drift over time. This drift can be minimized by allowing sufficient warm-up time to achieve thermal equilibrium. It was also found that supplying the RF driver with a low-noise source of DC electrical power improves the stability of the lamp output. Finally, coupling the light into an integrating sphere reduces the effect of spatial fluctuations, and decreases noise at the output port of the sphere.

  19. Obscured flat spectrum radio active galactic nuclei as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, G.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; de Vries, K. D.; Gentile, G.; Tavares, J. León; Scholten, O.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vereecken, M.; Winchen, T.

    2016-11-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no significance. Therefore, in this article we consider a specific subclass of AGN for which an increased neutrino production is expected. This subclass contains AGN for which their high-energy jet is pointing toward Earth. Furthermore, we impose the condition that the jet is obscured by gas or dust surrounding the AGN. A method is presented to determine the total column density of the obscuring medium, which is probed by determining the relative x-ray attenuation with respect to the radio flux as obtained from the AGN spectrum. The total column density allows us to probe the interaction of the jet with the surrounding matter, which leads to additional neutrino production. Finally, starting from two different source catalogs, this method is applied to specify a sample of low redshift radio galaxies for which an increased neutrino production is expected.

  20. Separation of Radio-Frequency Sources and Localization of Partial Discharges in Noisy Environments

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function. PMID:25923935

  1. Radio interferometric determination of source positions utilizing deep space network antennas - 1971 to 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanselow, J. L.; Sovers, O. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Cohen, E. J.; Rogstad, D. H.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Approximately 2400 observations of extragalactic radio sources were made between August 1971 and February 1980 during 48 separate sessions. These consisted of 259 delay rate observations at 2.3 GHz (S-band), 796 delay and delay rate observations at either S-band of 8.3 GHz (X-band) and 1325 delay and delay rate observations recorded simultaneously at both S- and X-band. A single multiparameter fit has been applied to the observed values of delay and delay rate to extract astrometric and geophysical parameters from this decade-long sequence. The fit produced estimates of 784 parameters, including station locations, radio source positions, polar motion, Universal Time, the precession constant, and solid earth tides. The a priori model included gravitational bending, the 1980 IAU nutation series, the 1976 IAU expressions for Greenwich mean sidereal time and precession, BIH estimates of Universal Time and polar motion, and monthly mean values for zenith troposphere delay. The rms residuals were 0.52 nsec for delay and 0.30 psec/sec for delay rate. Intercontinental baseline lengths were determined with formal uncertainties of 5 to 10 cm. Universal Time and polar motion were measured at 49 epochs, with formal uncertainties (for the more recent data) of 0.5 msec for UT1 and 6 and 2 mas, respectively, for the X and Y components of polar motion. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28038

  2. Apparent 'superrelativistic' expansion of the extragalactic radio source 3C 345

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittels, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.; Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    The compact extragalactic radio source 3C 345 was observed by very-long-baseline interferometry (wavelength about 3.8 cm) at 12 epochs distributed over the nearly four-year period from February 1971 to October 1974. For one of these epochs, the multibaseline data were sufficient to allow the brightness distribution to be estimated in a model-independent manner; the resultant distribution was clearly dominated by two components. The remaining sets of data were also represented adequately by two-component models. The angular separation of the two components increased during this period from about 1.00 to 1.30 milliarcsec, corresponding to an apparent average speed of expansion of approximately 2.5 c at a fixed position angle of 105 (plus or minus 5) deg. These results, coupled with the fact that contraction has never been observed, seem difficult to reconcile with the so-called Christmas-tree model of the 'superrelativistic' expansion of extragalactic radio sources.

  3. Separation of radio-frequency sources and localization of partial discharges in noisy environments.

    PubMed

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-04-27

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function.

  4. Statistical Effects of Doppler Beaming and Malmquist Bias on Flux-limited Samples of Compact Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Matthew L.; Marscher, Alan P.

    1997-02-01

    We examine the effects of Doppler beaming on flux-limited samples of compact radio sources representative of relativistic jets found in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We expand upon past studies by incorporating a luminosity function and redshift distribution for the parent population and by allowing the unbeamed synchrotron luminosity L of a relativistic jet to be related to its bulk Lorentz factor (Γ). These enhancements allow us to compare observable parameters other than simply apparent velocity with the data. The predictions of L-Γ-independent (LGI) models are compared to those of a L-Γ-dependent (LGD) scenario in which the Lorentz factor and luminosity are related by the form L ~ Γξ. This is accomplished using Monte Carlo simulations, where we compare the predicted flux density, redshift, monochromatic emitted luminosity, and apparent velocity distributions of flux-limited samples to the Caltech-Jodrell Bank sample of bright, flat-spectrum, radio core-dominated AGNs (CJ-F). The LGI model predictions are consistent with the CJ-F data if we adopt parent Lorentz factor distributions of the form N(Γ) ~ Γa, where -1.5 <~ a <~ -1.75, or, alternatively N(Γ) ~ (Γ - 1)a, where -0.5 <~ a <~ -1. These models reproduce, via selection effects, a deficit of sources having both low apparent velocity (βapp) and high monochromatic emitted luminosity (P) seen in the CJ-F sample, as reported by Vermeulen in 1995. We examine two possible cases for the LGD scenario, the first of which employs a positive correlation between unbeamed synchrotron luminosity and Lorentz factor (the LGC model), and the second of which employs an anticorrelation (the LGA model). The LGA models do not predict enough low-P sources to be consistent with the CJ-F data and do not reproduce the P versus βapp envelope. The predictions of the best-fit LGC model, on the other hand, are very similar to our best-fit LGI models and provide as good fits to the CJ-F data, with the important exception that

  5. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  6. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  7. Structure of the radio sources 3C 196 and 3C 280

    SciTech Connect

    Bovkun, V.; Zhuk, I.; Men', A.

    1981-05-01

    The structure of the quasar 3C 196 and the radio galaxy 3C 280 at 20- and 25-MHz frequency has been surveyed by the scintillation technique with the URAN-1 interferometer. Angular sizes are estimated for the scintillating components and the extended portions of each source. In 3C 196 these components have effective angular sizes of 2'' +- 1''.5 and 18'' x 25'', with the compact feature contributing 0.46 +- 0.20 of the total flux. Spectra of the various structural components of the source are compiled for the range 20--5000 MHz. In 3C 280 the effective angular size of the scintillating component is 1''.5 +- 1''.2; the extended region measures >10'' across. The compact feature contributes 0.35 +- 0.20 of the total flux.

  8. Development of a portable system for checking radioactive sources using long wave radio frequency identification.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Deji, S; Ito, S; Saze, T; Nishizawa, K

    2007-03-01

    A portable system for automatically checking radioactive sources stored in lead containers at low temperatures was developed in order to prevent the discharging of orphan sources and contaminated materials from a controlled area to the general public. A radio frequency identification (RFID) system using a long wave in a frequency range of 125 kHz was composed of identification tags, a reader, a notebook computer, and software. ID tags without batteries were devised by using integrated circuits with an electrically erasable programmable read-only memory of 250 bytes and antennas. This software consisted of operating and maintenance functions. The read range of the ID tags was adjusted to around 5 cm in order to avoid accidental contamination and for discriminating the multiple sources. A water layer of 6.9 cm had no influence on communication between the ID tags and the reader. The data of the ID tags stored at +4, -20, and -80 degrees C were precisely read 4 mo later. The influence of lead was completely removed by separating the ID tags more than 1.6 cm from the lead. A reader can exactly identify the data of the ID tags within 6.0 cm at a velocity less than 9.0 cm s(-1). Performance of the software was verified using mock data. Nine lists concerning registered, disposed, and missing sources, etc., were displayed on the computer monitor and printed out. An RFID system using long waves proved to be applicable for routinely checking radioactive sources.

  9. Helical jets and the misalignment distribution for core-dominated radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. E.; Murphy, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    The type of a model which would explain the large population of orthogonally misaligned sources is considered. Two of the best examples of misaligned sources are investigated, namely, the quasar 3C 309.1 (Wilkinson et al., 1986; Kus et al., 1990, 1991) and the BL Lac object 1823 + 568 (Foley, 1982; O'Dea et al., 1988). It is shown that simple bend geometries cannot explain the misaligned sources, and the geometries required to give orthogonal misalignments are explained. A generally applicable model which might explain misaligned sources is proposed.

  10. Search for High Rotation Measures in Extragalactic Radio Sources I. Multi-Channel Observations at 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Tabara, H.; Kato, T.; Aizu, K.

    1995-12-01

    Multi-channel polarimetry has been performed to detect high rotation measure (RM) at 3 cm using the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. The high RM candidates of 96 radio sources were selected to be observed, and RMs of 35 sources were derived from the observations. Since the four channels are set contiguously from 2.84 cm to 3.31 cm, |RM| can be derived uniquely up to 15000 rad m(-2) by this polarimeter. We found that there exist sources with RM of several thousands rad m(-2) . In fact, 5 sources have |RM| > 1000 rad m(-2) . On the other hand, all sources observed are well within this system limits, and therefore we suggest the observed upper limit of |RM| is around 5000 rad m(-2) for extragalactic radio sources, even taken into account the redshift of sources.

  11. Multiwavelength Study of the Bright X-ray Source Population in the Interacting Galaxies NGC 5774/NGC 5775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray source population in the field of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5774/5775 is reported. A total of 49 discrete sources are detected, including 12 ultraluminous X-ray source candidates with lum inosities above 10(exp 39)erg/s in the 0.5 - 8.0 keV X-ray band. Several of these latter are transient X-ray sources that fall below detect ion levels in one of two X-ray observations spaced 15 months apart. X-ray source positions are mapped onto optical and radio images to sear ch for potential counterparts. Eleven sources have optically-bright c ounterparts. Optical colors are used to differentiate these sources, which are mostly located outside the optical extent of the interacting galaxies, as potential globular clusters (3 sources) and quasars (5) . Follow-up optical spectroscopy confirms two of the latter are background quasars.

  12. Population exposure to electromagnetic fields generated by radio base stations: evaluation of the urban background by using provisional model and instrumental measurements.

    PubMed

    Anglesio, L; Benedetto, A; Bonino, A; Colla, D; Martire, F; Saudino Fusette, S; d'Amore, G

    2001-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation, which is used by broadcasting and mobile telephone systems to transmit information, permeates the city environment. In order to properly evaluate population exposure to electromagnetic fields, knowledge of their intensity and spectral components is necessary. In this study the results of radiofrequency field monitoring carried out in Torino, a large town located in the north-west of Italy are shown: the variation of the electromagnetic field strength is evaluated as a function of the height from the ground, the location in the urban area and the frequency. separating the contributions of the different sources (broadcasting antennas and radio base stations for mobile phones). Furthermore, the contribution of the radio base stations is theoretically evaluated, adding the emissions off all installations situated in Torino and examining the field strength maps calculated, considering the orography, for different heights. The theoretical values are also compared with those measured in the frequency range of mobile telephony emissions.

  13. The parametrization of radio source coordinates in VLBI and its impact on the CRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbon, Maria; Heinkelmann, Robert; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Xu, Minghui; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Usually celestial radio sources in the celestial reference frame (CRF) catalog are divided in three categories: defining, special handling, and others. The defining sources are those used for the datum realization of the celestial reference frame, i.e. they are included in the No-Net-Rotation (NNR) constraints to maintain the axis orientation of the CRF, and are modeled with one set of totally constant coordinates. At the current level of precision, the choice of the defining sources has a significant effect on the coordinates. For the ICRF2 295 sources were chosen as defining sources, based on their geometrical distribution, statistical properties, and stability. The number of defining sources is a compromise between the reliability of the datum, which increases with the number of sources, and the noise which is introduced by each source. Thus, the optimal number of defining sources is a trade-off between reliability, geometry, and precision. In the ICRF2 only 39 of sources were sorted into the special handling group as they show large fluctuations in their position, therefore they are excluded from the NNR conditions and their positions are normally estimated for each VLBI session instead of as global parameters. All the remaining sources are classified as others. However, a large fraction of these unstable sources show other favorable characteristics, e.g. large flux density (brightness) and a long history of observations. Thus, it would prove advantageous including these sources into the NNR condition. However, the instability of these objects inhibit this. If the coordinate model of these sources would be extended, it would be possible to use these sources for the NNR condition as well. All other sources are placed in the "others" group. This is the largest group of sources, containing those which have not shown any very problematic behavior, but still do not fulfill the requirements for defining sources. Studies show that the behavior of each source can vary

  14. The derived population of luminous supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Stefano, R.STEFANO; Rappaport, S.

    1994-01-01

    The existence of a new class of astrophysical object, luminous supersoft X-ray sources, has been established through ROSAT satellite observations and analysis during the past approximately 3 yr. Because most of the radiation emitted by supersoft sources spans a range of wavelengths readily absorbed by interstellar gas, a substantial fraction of these sources may not be detectable with present satellite instrumentation. It is therefore important to derive a reliable estimate of the underlying population, based on the approximately 30 sources that have been observed to date. The work reported here combines the observational results with a theoretical analysis, to obtain an estimate of the total number of sources likely to be present in M31, the Magellanic Clouds, and in our own Galaxy. We find that in M31, where approximately 15 supersoft sources have been identified and roughly an equal number of sources are being investigated as supersoft candidates, there are likely to be approximately 2500 active supersoft sources at the present time. In our own Galaxy, where about four supersoft sources have been detected in the Galactic plane, there are likely to be approximately 1000 active sources. Similarly, with about six and about four (nonforeground) sources observed in the Large (LMC) and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC), respectively, there should be approximately 30 supersoft sources in the LMC, and approximately 20 in the SMC. The likely uncertainties in the numbers quoted above, and the properties of observable sources relative to those of the total underlying population, are also derived in detail. These results can be scaled to estimate the numbers of supersoft sources likely to be present in other galaxies. The results reported here on the underlying population of supersoft X-ray sources are in good agreement with the results of a prior population synthesis study of the white dwarf accretor model for luminous supersoft X-ray sources. It should be emphasized, however

  15. Detection of sources of periodic radio emission with the Large Phased Array of the Lebedev Physical Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. E.; Oreshko, V. V.; Samodurov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    A method for searching for new periodic radio sources is described. The method is based on the spectral analysis of data from daily monitoring of the sky on the Large Phased Antenna (LPA) of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory at 111 MHz in a 2.5-MHz band. The 96-beam directivity pattern of the LPA is used. The signal is received in six 0.42-MHz frequency channels with a sampling rate of 0.1 s. The duration of the processed survey is four months. The particulars of detecting periodic sources with the LPA are considered. In total, 16 such radio sources have been detected, for which equatorial and Galactic coordinates, periods, and dispersion measures are given.

  16. Long-term variability of the radio source J0010+1058 in 2000-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, A. G.; Konnikova, V. K.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Kratov, D. V.

    2015-04-01

    During thirteen-year monitoring of the source J0010+1058, four bursts have been observed with an amplitude greater than 1 Jy on a frequency of 21.7 GHz. Using autocorrelation functions, we determined the average characteristic burst time τ acf ≈ 1.55 ± 0.1 yr (max-min), identical at five frequencies: 2.3, 4.8, 7.7, 11.2, and 21.7 GHz, which provides the linear sizes of the emission region R ≈ cτ acf ≈ 0.48 pc, and the angular ones—0.28 mas; the brightness temperature is 0.6-6.5 × 1011 K at the frequencies 21.7-2.3 GHz. Moreover, at frequencies higher than 2.3 GHz, there is one more characteristic time τ ≈ 0.6 yr. We estimated the average lag time of the bursts in relation to a frequency of 21.7 GHz as 150, 210, 270, and 390 days at 11.2, 7.7, 4.8, and 2.3 GHz respectively, and some other source characteristics. Spectra obtained in different periods of source activity confirm the model of the burst development as a result of the evolution of a shock wave propagating along the radio source jet.

  17. Power efficiency improvements with the radio frequency H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T. Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M.

    2016-02-15

    CW 13.56 MHz radio frequency-driven H{sup −} ion source is under development at the University of Jyväskylä for replacing an existing filament-driven ion source at the MCC30/15 cyclotron. Previously, production of 1 mA H{sup −} beam, which is the target intensity of the ion source, has been reported at 3 kW of RF power. The original ion source front plate with an adjustable electromagnet based filter field has been replaced with a new front plate with permanent magnet filter field. The new structure is more open and enables a higher flux of ro-vibrationally excited molecules towards the plasma electrode and provides a better control of the potential near the extraction due to a stronger separation of the main plasma from the plasma electrode. While the original system provided better control over the e{sup −}/H{sup −} ratio, the new configuration has led to a higher production efficiency of 1 mA H{sup −} at 1.75 kW RF power. The latest results and upgrade plans are presented.

  18. The compact radio sources in 4C 39.25 and 3C 345. [quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; Kellermann, K. I.; Purcell, G. H.; Pauliny-Toth, I. I. K.; Preuss, E.; Witzel, A.; Graham, D.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Cohen, M. H.; Niell, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Long-baseline interferometry of the quasars 4C 39.25 and 3C 345 at 10.65 and 14.77 GHz shows that the centimeter radio source in each object is double, with component separations of 0.0020 arcsec (4C 39.25) and 0.0013 arcsec (3C 345 at 1974.5). For each source, the separation is the same at both frequencies, as well as similar to the structure observed at 7.85 GHz (and 5.0 GHz for 4C 39.25). The spectra of the individual components are derived and shown to vary with time approximately as expected for expanding self-absorbed synchrotron sources. The magnetic fields in the components are estimated to be as high as 0.1 gauss, but the structure of the sources appears to be unrelated to the magnetic-field orientation derived from low-resolution polarization measurements. The component separation in 4C 39.25 has not changed for several years, whereas 3C 345 shows rapid expansion.

  19. Flat-spectrum radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz survey - A study of a complete sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Ann; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Peterson, Bruce A.; Peters, W. L.; Gulkis, Samuel

    1990-01-01

    A complete sample, taken from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalog, of flat-spectrum radio sources with flux densities greater than 0.5 Jy is described. The sample covers all right ascensions and declinations for +10 deg to -45 deg, excluding the Galactic plane, and contains 403 sources. Attention is drawn to the advantages of radio surveys over optical surveys. The survey is used to highlight some selection effects found in optical surveys. How this sample can be used to give information on the early universe is discussed.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray+Radio sources in XBootes (El Bouchefry, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouchefry, K.

    2010-08-01

    The radio data are from the 2002 version of the FIRST VLA catalogue (Becker et al., 1995, See Cat. VIII/71), and it is derived from 1993 through 2002 observations. The X-ray data (Kenter et al. 2005, Cat. J/ApJS/161/9; Murray et al. 2005ApJS..161....1M) used in this paper are from the Chandra XBootes surveys. The XBootes catalogue contains ~3213 X-ray point sources and is publicly available through the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) homepage (http://www.noao.edu/noao/noaodeep/XBootesPublic/index.html) The NDWFS is a deep multiband imaging (Bw, R, I, J, H, K) designed to study the formation and evolution of large-scale structures (Jannuzi et al., 1999, BAAS, 31, 1392; Brown et al., 2003ApJ...597..225B). (1 data file).

  1. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.; Schumacher, Richard V.; Pendleton, Rand P.

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  2. The fields of reference stars for optical positional observations of astrometric extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement'eva, A. A.; Ryl'Kov, V. P.

    The Pulkovo programme (Pul ERS) and the techniques used to create a catalogue of coordinates and magnitudes for more than 7000 faint stars in 73 small fields around extragalactic radiosources (ERS) are described. Accurate positions of stars in the fields around ERS 2200+420 and ERS 2021+614 are given. The catalogue containing 223 stars is presented. The errors of coordinate reductions in the system of reference stars from the CMC catalogue are found to be 1.5-2.0 times smaller than for those in the system of the PPM catalogue. This programme (Pul ERS) is required for quick identification of the extragalactic radio sources and for obtaining their characteristics from observations with large telescopes and CCD detectors.

  3. 0.6 GHz mapping of extended radio galaxies. I - Edge-brightened double sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaegers, W. J.

    1987-02-01

    Radio observations made with the Westerbork telescope at 0.6 GHz are presented for 9 edge-brightened double sources: 3C 33.1, 3C 35, 3C 111, B 0844+316, 3C 223, 4C 26.35A, 4C 74.17.1, 3C 390.3 and 3C 452. Previously observed Westerbork data at 1.4 GHz are convolved for comparison with the 0.6 GHz observational data. Beside maps of the total intensity and linear polarization structure, the distributions of the spectral index, the depolarization and the rotation of the polarization position angle between 0.6 GHz and 1.4 GHz have been derived. Integrated values for the total intensity and the polarization are also given.

  4. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  5. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and the distribution of galaxy orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Owen, Frazer N.

    1987-01-01

    The present data on the orientations of the tails with respect to the cluster centers of a sample of 70 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters show the distribution of tail angles to be inconsistent with purely radial or circular orbits in all the samples, while being consistent with isotropic orbits in (1) the whole sample, (2) the sample of NATs far from the cluster center, and (3) the samples of morphologically regular Abell clusters. Evidence for very radial orbits is found, however, in the sample of NATs near the cluster center. If these results can be generalized to all cluster galaxies, then the presence of radial orbits near the center of Abell clusters suggests that violent relaxation may not have been fully effective even within the cores of the regular clusters.

  6. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  7. Optical flaring of a radio source seen in the Catalina Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A. A.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M.; Williams, R.; Herczeg, G.; Beshore, E.; Larson, S. M.; Boattini, A.; Christiansen, E.

    2008-12-01

    We have detected the optical brightening by ~3 mags (V ~ 16.8) of a previously known radio source (~ flat-spectrum, unknown redshift) in the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) on 29 Dec 2008 UT.

    CSS081229:104032+061721 2008-12-29 UT 10:22:05 10:40:31.61 06:17:21.8 812291070574110368
    The discovery data and finding chart are posted at the CRTS VOEventNet webpage: http://voeventnet.caltech.edu/feeds/ATEL/CRTS/812291070574110368.atel.html (SDSS object ID 587732701792108700).

  8. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Haselton, Halsey H.

    1994-01-01

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  9. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  10. DOES SIZE MATTER? THE UNDERLYING INTRINSIC SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF RADIO SOURCES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR UNIFICATION BY ORIENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Myers, A. D.; Boroson, T. A.

    2013-09-01

    Unification by orientation is a ubiquitous concept in the study of active galactic nuclei. A gold standard of the orientation paradigm is the hypothesis that radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars are intrinsically the same, but are observed over different ranges of viewing angles. Historically, strong support for this model was provided by the projected sizes of radio structure in luminous radio galaxies, which were found to be significantly larger than those of quasars, as predicted due to simple geometric projection. Recently, this test of the simplest prediction of orientation-based models has been revisited with larger samples that cover wider ranges of fundamental properties-and no clear difference in projected sizes of radio structure is found. Cast solely in terms of viewing angle effects, these results provide convincing evidence that unification of these objects solely through orientation fails. However, it is possible that conflicting results regarding the role orientation plays in our view of radio sources simply result from insufficient sampling of their intrinsic size distribution. We test this possibility using Monte Carlo simulations constrained by real sample sizes and properties. We develop models for the real intrinsic size distribution of radio sources, simulate observations by randomly sampling intrinsic sizes and viewing angles, and analyze how likely each sample is to support or dispute unification by orientation. We find that, while it is possible to reconcile conflicting results purely within a simple, orientation-based framework, it is very unlikely. We analyze the effects that sample size, relative numbers of radio galaxies and quasars, the critical angle that separates the two subclasses, and the shape of the intrinsic size distribution have on this type of test.

  11. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter; Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei; Chen, Kevin; Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B.; Gough, Jonathan D.; Kanner, Jonah; Kavic, Michael

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  12. Source population characteristics affect heterosis following genetic rescue of fragmented plant populations

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, M.; Field, D. L.; Rowell, D. M.; Young, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of heterosis and outbreeding depression over multiple generations is a key question in evolutionary biology and is essential for identifying appropriate genetic sources for population and ecosystem restoration. Here we use 2455 experimental crosses between 12 population pairs of the rare perennial plant Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides (Asteraceae) to investigate the multi-generational (F1, F2, F3) fitness outcomes of inter-population hybridization. We detected no evidence of outbreeding depression, with inter-population hybrids and backcrosses showing either similar fitness or significant heterosis for fitness components across the three generations. Variation in heterosis among population pairs was best explained by characteristics of the foreign source or home population, and was greatest when the source population was large, with high genetic diversity and low inbreeding, and the home population was small and inbred. Our results indicate that the primary consideration for maximizing progeny fitness following population augmentation or restoration is the use of seed from large, genetically diverse populations. PMID:23173202

  13. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire; Langston, Glen

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  14. A Search for Rapidly Spinning Pulsars and Fast Transients in Unidentified Radio Sources with the NRAO 43 Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Langston, Glen; Gilpin, Claire

    2013-04-01

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  15. Faraday rotation from magnesium II absorbers toward polarized background radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Farnes, J. S.; O'Sullivan, S. P.; Corrigan, M. E.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2014-11-01

    Strong singly ionized magnesium (Mg II) absorption lines in quasar spectra typically serve as a proxy for intervening galaxies along the line of sight. Previous studies have found a correlation between the number of these Mg II absorbers and the Faraday rotation measure (RM) at ≈5 GHz. We cross-match a sample of 35,752 optically identified non-intrinsic Mg II absorption systems with 25,649 polarized background radio sources for which we have measurements of both the spectral index and RM at 1.4 GHz. We use the spectral index to split the resulting sample of 599 sources into flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum subsamples. We find that our flat-spectrum sample shows significant (∼3.5σ) evidence for a correlation between Mg II absorption and RM at 1.4 GHz, while our steep-spectrum sample shows no such correlation. We argue that such an effect cannot be explained by either luminosity or other observational effects, by evolution in another confounding variable, by wavelength-dependent polarization structure in an active galactic nucleus, by the Galactic foreground, by cosmological expansion, or by partial coverage models. We conclude that our data are most consistent with intervenors directly contributing to the Faraday rotation along the line of sight, and that the intervening systems must therefore have coherent magnetic fields of substantial strength ( B-bar =1.8±0.4 μG). Nevertheless, the weak nature of the correlation will require future high-resolution and broadband radio observations in order to place it on a much firmer statistical footing.

  16. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  17. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  18. Detection of hypervelocity impact radio frequency pulses through prior constrained source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, Andrew; Kochenderfer, Mykel; Close, Sigrid

    2016-10-01

    Hypervelocity dust impacts produce electromagnetic pulses in the radio frequency (RF) spectrum that scales with impactor mass and velocity. Due to the mass acceleration limitations of ground-based facilities, detecting emissions from impacts in a laboratory setup is difficult due to their low output power. This paper presents a general probabilistic technique to perform signal excision, which was applied to synthetic and hypervelocity impact data sets. The task of excising multiple signals from a single observation of their mixtures is referred to as underdetermined blind source separation (BSS). This paper introduces a framework for solving underdetermined BSS problems when there is only one observation signal by leveraging often overlooked prior information. The most probable solutions for the source signals are computed by solving an iterative constrained optimization problem that seeks to maximize the posterior probability of the system model. In the hypervelocity impact data set, the goal was to reduce the noise floor on an RF antenna by modeling and extracting exterior sources of noise. It was found that the algorithm described in this paper was able to model signals in the observation and subtract them while still maintaining the spectral and temporal content of the remaining signals. Through the use of this methodology, previously hidden impact emissions were able to be isolated and identified for further characterization.

  19. CHANDRA VIEW OF THE ULTRA-STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCE IN A2443: MERGER SHOCK-INDUCED COMPRESSION OF FOSSIL RADIO PLASMA?

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, T. E.; Randall, S. W.; Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Giacintucci, S.

    2013-08-01

    We present a new Chandra X-ray observation of the intracluster medium in the galaxy cluster A2443, hosting an ultra-steep spectrum radio source. The data reveal that the intracluster medium is highly disturbed. The thermal gas in the core is elongated along a northwest to southeast axis and there is a cool tail to the north. We also detect two X-ray surface brightness edges near the cluster core. The edges appear to be consistent with an inner cold front to the northeast of the core and an outer shock front to the southeast of the core. The southeastern edge is coincident with the location of the radio relic as expected for shock (re)acceleration or adiabatic compression of fossil relativistic electrons.

  20. Nuisance Source Population Modeling for Radiation Detection System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sokkappa, P; Lange, D; Nelson, K; Wheeler, R

    2009-10-05

    A major challenge facing the prospective deployment of radiation detection systems for homeland security applications is the discrimination of radiological or nuclear 'threat sources' from radioactive, but benign, 'nuisance sources'. Common examples of such nuisance sources include naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), medical patients who have received radioactive drugs for either diagnostics or treatment, and industrial sources. A sensitive detector that cannot distinguish between 'threat' and 'benign' classes will generate false positives which, if sufficiently frequent, will preclude it from being operationally deployed. In this report, we describe a first-principles physics-based modeling approach that is used to approximate the physical properties and corresponding gamma ray spectral signatures of real nuisance sources. Specific models are proposed for the three nuisance source classes - NORM, medical and industrial. The models can be validated against measured data - that is, energy spectra generated with the model can be compared to actual nuisance source data. We show by example how this is done for NORM and medical sources, using data sets obtained from spectroscopic detector deployments for cargo container screening and urban area traffic screening, respectively. In addition to capturing the range of radioactive signatures of individual nuisance sources, a nuisance source population model must generate sources with a frequency of occurrence consistent with that found in actual movement of goods and people. Measured radiation detection data can indicate these frequencies, but, at present, such data are available only for a very limited set of locations and time periods. In this report, we make more general estimates of frequencies for NORM and medical sources using a range of data sources such as shipping manifests and medical treatment statistics. We also identify potential data sources for industrial source frequencies, but leave the task of

  1. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Haynes, R. F.; Simons, L. W.; Murdin, P.; Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Wheaton, W. A.; Doty, J.

    1979-01-01

    On June 17, 1977, the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53 was simultaneously monitored for about 4 hr with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope at a frequency of 14.7 GHz and the SAS 3 X-ray satellite (1.3-12 keV). One X-ray burst was observed; an upper limit (2 sigmas) of 200 mJy is reported for any radio burst coincident with the X-ray event. During the X-ray burst the radio/X-ray time-integrated flux ratio was no more than 375 with a 90 percent confidence. An upper limit (2 sigmas) of 22 mJy was determined for any steady 14.7-GHz source coincident with the X-ray position.

  2. A Robust Derivation of the Tight Relationship of Radio Core Dominance to Inclination Angle in High Redshift 3CRR Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Frédéric; Antonucci, Robert

    2016-10-01

    It is believed that, in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the core radio flux density can be normalized to the flux density of the extended lobe emission to infer the orientation of a radio source. However, very little is known about the reliability and precision of this method, and we are unaware of any robust conversion recipe to infer the inclination from the core dominance. Investigating whether or not the radio core dominance parameter R separates the quasars from the radio galaxies in the z ≥slant 1 3CRR catalog, we found excellent agreement of R with optical type, infrared flux ratios, and optical polarization. This indicates that probably both R and optical classification are very good orientation indicators, and the unified model is strongly predictive for these objects. The relative number densities indicate half-opening angles close to 60°, as expected from large surveys. The separations of optical types according to radio core dominance as well as near-infrared/MIR ratios, which are essentially perfect, mean that there can be only a small dispersion of torus half-opening angles. Also, even though torus dust is thought to be clumpy, there is an almost zero probability to see a type-1 source at high inclination. Finally, using only the Copernican Principle, i.e., the assumption that solid angle is filled uniformly with source axis orientations, we estimated a semi-empirical relation between core dominance and AGN inclination. This makes it possible to use R to infer the inclination of a source to an accuracy of ∼10° or less, at least for this type of object.

  3. The nuclear region of low luminosity flat radio spectrum sources. II. Emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Serote Roos, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marchã's et al. (\\cite{March96}) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. The fact that we observe a LINER-type spectrum in LL FRS sources supports the idea that some of these objects could be undergoing an ADAF phase; in addition, such a low ionization emission-line spectrum is in agreement with the black hole mass values and sub-Eddington accretion rates published for some FRS sources. Based on observations collected at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mt. Hopkins. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  4. THE FAINTEST RADIO SOURCE YET: EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL LENS SDSS J1004+4112

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, N.

    2011-09-20

    We present new radio observations of the large-separation gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112, taken in a total of 6 hr of observations with the Expanded Very Large Array. The maps reach a thermal noise level of approximately 4 {mu}Jy. We detect four of the five lensed images at the 15-35 {mu}Jy level, representing a source of intrinsic flux density, after allowing for lensing magnification, of about 1 {mu}Jy, intrinsically probably the faintest radio source yet detected. This reinforces the utility of gravitational lensing in potentially allowing us to study nJy-level sources before the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. In an optical observation taken three months after the radio observation, image C is the brightest image, whereas the radio map shows flux density ratios consistent with previous optical observations. Future observations separated by a time delay will give the intrinsic flux ratios of the images in this source.

  5. J1649+2635: A Grand-Design Spiral with a Large Double-Lobed Radio Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Minnie Y.; Owen, Frazer; Duffin, Ryan; Keel, Bill; Lacy, Mark; Momjian, Emmanuel; Morrison, Glenn; Mroczkowski, Tony; Neff, Susan; Norris, Ray P.; Schmitt, Henrique; Toy, Vicki; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a grand-design spiral galaxy associated with a double-lobed radio source. J1649+2635 (z = 0.0545) is a red spiral galaxy with a prominent bulge that it is associated with a L(1.4GHz) is approximately 10(exp24) W Hz(exp-1) double-lobed radio source that spans almost 100 kpc. J1649+2635 has a black hole mass of M(BH) is approximately 3-7 × 10(exp8) Solar mass and SFR is approximately 0.26 - 2.6 solar mass year(exp-1). The galaxy hosts a approximately 96 kpc diffuse optical halo, which is unprecedented for spiral galaxies. We find that J1649+2635 resides in an overdense environment with a mass of M(dyn) = 7.7(+7.9/-4.3) × 10(exp13) Solar mass, likely a galaxy group below the detection threshold of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We suggest one possible scenario for the association of double-lobed radio emission from J1649+2635 is that the source may be similar to a Seyfert galaxy, located in a denser-than-normal environment. The study of spiral galaxies that host large-scale radio emission is important because although rare in the local Universe, these sources may be more common at high-redshifts.

  6. Interstellar scattering, the North Polar Spur, and a possible new class of compact galactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickard, J. J.; Cronyn, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Claims for a galactic-latitude dependence of interstellar angular broadening based on interplanetary-scintillation (IPS) observations are investigated. Analysis of the statistics of the angular sizes in an IPS survey shows that there is no evidence for increased angular broadening in the galactic plane. A region of sky about 500 sq deg of arc in area is considered in which significant angular broadening is thought to exist. An association between this region and the nearby North Polar Spur is proposed on the basis of the former's extension off the galactic plane to high latitudes. An evaluation of two-frequency angular-broadening measurements suggests that the data used to support the conclusion about a galactic-latitude dependence are not statistically significant. A study of pulsar data and implications for the angular broadening expected in the interstellar medium for sources at galactic latitudes below + or - 10 deg indicates the possible existence of a previously unsuspected class of compact galactic nonthermal radio sources, designated 'scintars'.

  7. Design of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for negative ions radio frequency source SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Barbisan, M.

    2012-04-15

    A facility will be built in Padova (Italy) to develop, commission, and optimize the neutral beam injection system for ITER. The full scale prototype negative ion radio frequency source SPIDER, featuring up to 100 kV acceleration voltage, includes a full set of diagnostics, required for safe operation and to measure and optimize the beam performance. Among them, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) will be used to measure the line integrated beam uniformity, divergence, and neutralization losses inside the accelerator (stripping losses). In the absence of the neutralization stage, SPIDER beam is mainly composed by H{sup -} or D{sup -} particles, according to the source filling gas. The capability of a spectroscopic diagnostic of an H{sup -} (D{sup -}) beam relies on the interaction of the beam particles with the background gas particles. The BES diagnostic will be able to acquire the H{sub {alpha}} (D{sub {alpha}}) spectrum from up to 40 lines of sight. The system is capable to resolve stripping losses down to 2 keV and to measure beam divergence with an accuracy of about 10%. The design of this diagnostic is reported, with discussion of the layout and its components, together with simulations of the expected performance.

  8. Absolute flux density calibrations of radio sources: 2.3 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Batelaan, P. D.; Bathker, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed description of a NASA/JPL Deep Space Network program to improve S-band gain calibrations of large aperture antennas is reported. The program is considered unique in at least three ways; first, absolute gain calibrations of high quality suppressed-sidelobe dual mode horns first provide a high accuracy foundation to the foundation to the program. Second, a very careful transfer calibration technique using an artificial far-field coherent-wave source was used to accurately obtain the gain of one large (26 m) aperture. Third, using the calibrated large aperture directly, the absolute flux density of five selected galactic and extragalactic natural radio sources was determined with an absolute accuracy better than 2 percent, now quoted at the familiar 1 sigma confidence level. The follow-on considerations to apply these results to an operational network of ground antennas are discussed. It is concluded that absolute gain accuracies within + or - 0.30 to 0.40 db are possible, depending primarily on the repeatability (scatter) in the field data from Deep Space Network user stations.

  9. On the Retrieval of Lightning Radio Sources from Time-of-Arrival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the problem of retrieving three-dimensional lightning locations from radio frequency Time-Of-Arrival (TOA) measurements. Arbitrary antenna locations are considered. By judiciously differencing measurements that are related to the location of the antennas and their excitation times, the problem is converted from the initial spherical nonlinear form to a system of linear equations. In the linear formalism, the source location and time-of-occurrence is viewed geometrically as an intersection of hyperplanes in the four-dimensional Minkowski space (x,y,z,t). The linear equations are solved to obtain explicit analytic expressions for the location and time variables. Retrieval errors are not interpreted with conventional Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) arguments as discussed by Holmes and Reedy (1951), but with more recent inversion analyses considered by Twomey (1977). Measurement errors are propagated analytically so that the specific effect of these errors on the solution is clarified. The sensitivity of the solution on the number of antennas used, antenna network geometry, source position, and measurement differencing schemes are discussed in terms of the eigenvalues of the linear system.

  10. On the retrieval of lightning radio sources from time-of-arrival data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.

    1996-11-01

    We examine the problem of retrieving three-dimensional lightning locations from radio frequency time-of-arrival (TOA) measurements. Arbitrary antenna locations are considered. By judiciously differencing measurements that are related to the location of the antennas and their excitation times, the problem is converted from the initial spherical nonlinear form to a system of linear equations. In the linear formalism, the source location and time-of-occurrence is viewed geometrically as an intersection of hyperplanes in the four-dimensional Minkowski space (x, y, z, t). The linear equations are solved to obtain explicit analytic expressions for the location and time variables. Retrieval errors are not interpreted with conventional Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) arguments as discussed by Holmes and Reedy [1951], but with more recent inversion analyses considered by Twomey [1977]. Measurement errors are propagated analytically so that the specific effect of these errors on the solution is clarified. The sensitivity of the solution on the number of antennas used, antenna network geometry, source position, and measurement differencing schemes are discussed in terms of the eigenvalues of the linear system.

  11. Scale covariance and G-varying cosmology. IV - The log N-log S relation. [radio source models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Owen, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The traditional radio counts N(S) and radio source models are studied within the framework of the scale-covariant cosmology developed to investigate whether the relative strength of the gravitational and electromagnetic constants is a function of cosmological epoch. It is found that a gravitational constant G varying as the inverse of t, where t is the epoch in atomic units, is consistent with all the data analyzed. For a wide class of models the present cosmology allows a finer discrimination of the deceleration parameter than does standard theory. The results, when combined with those of previous papers, namely, those from radio and optical flux and angular-diameter data analysis, favor an open universe.

  12. Remote sensing of a NTC radio source from a Cluster tilted spacecraft pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décréau, P. M. E.; Kougblénou, S.; Lointier, G.; Rauch, J.-L.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Vallières, X.; Canu, P.; Rochel Grimald, S.; El-Lemdani Mazouz, F.; Darrouzet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The Cluster mission operated a "tilt campaign" during the month of May 2008. Two of the four identical Cluster spacecraft were placed at a close distance (~50 km) from each other and the spin axis of one of the spacecraft pair was tilted by an angle of ~46°. This gave the opportunity, for the first time in space, to measure global characteristics of AC electric field, at the sensitivity available with long boom (88 m) antennas, simultaneously from the specific configuration of the tilted pair of satellites and from the available base of three satellites placed at a large characteristic separation (~1 RE). This paper describes how global characteristics of radio waves, in this case the configuration of the electric field polarization ellipse in 3-D-space, are identified from in situ measurements of spin modulation features by the tilted pair, validating a novel experimental concept. In the event selected for analysis, non-thermal continuum (NTC) waves in the 15-25 kHz frequency range are observed from the Cluster constellation placed above the polar cap. The observed intensity variations with spin angle are those of plane waves, with an electric field polarization close to circular, at an ellipticity ratio e = 0.87. We derive the source position in 3-D by two different methods. The first one uses ray path orientation (measured by the tilted pair) combined with spectral signature of magnetic field magnitude at source. The second one is obtained via triangulation from the three spacecraft baseline, using estimation of directivity angles under assumption of circular polarization. The two results are not compatible, placing sources widely apart. We present a general study of the level of systematic errors due to the assumption of circular polarization, linked to the second approach, and show how this approach can lead to poor triangulation and wrong source positioning. The estimation derived from the first method places the NTC source region in the dawn sector, at a

  13. Detection of a Compact Radio Source near the Center of a Gravitational Lens: Quasar Image or Galactic Core?

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, M V; Shapiro, I I; Cohen, N L; Corey, B E; Falco, E E; Marcaide, J M; Rogers, A E; Whitney, A R; Porcas, R W; Preston, R A; Rius, A

    1983-01-07

    By use of a new, very sensitive interferometric system, a faint, compact radio source has been detected near the center of the galaxy that acts as the main part of a gravitational lens. This lens forms two previously discovered images of the quasar Q09S7+561, which lies in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. The newly detected source has a core smaller than 0.002 arc second in diameter with a flux density of 0.6 +/- 0.1 millijansky at the 13-centimeter wavelength of the radio observations. This source could be the predicted third image of the transparent gravitational lens, the central core of the galaxy, or some combination of the two. It is not yet possible to choose reliably between these alternatives.

  14. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety professionals and the public are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in central New Jersey and Jersey shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47% vs. 13%), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs. 6 d), and longer periods without Internet (29 vs. 6 d). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends, and Web/e-mail. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the Web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the Web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered Web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas.

  15. Detection of radio continuum emission from Herbig-Haro objects 1 and 2 and from their central exciting source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Curiel, S.; Canto, J.; Torrelles, J. M.; Becker, R. H.; Sellgren, K.

    1985-01-01

    The region in Orion containing HH 1 and HH 2 was observed with the VLA at 20, 6, and 2 cm on several occasions from 1981 to 1984. At lower resolution, four continuum sources were detected. Two of these sources coincide positionally with HH 1 and HH 2. At 6 cm and higher resolution, HH 1 is resolved into at least two components. The emission is probably bremsstrahlung originating in the same region where the visible line emission is produced. This is the first detection of radio continuum from classic Herbig-Haro objects. At a position closely centered between HH 1 and HH 2, an object that can be interpreted as the energy source of the system was detected. The central source spectrum is S(nu) of about nu to the alpha power, where alpha = 0.4 + or - 0.2, suggesting a stellar wind. Finally, the fourth radio continuum source coincides positionally with an H2O maser and is probably excited by an independent star. There is evidence of time variability in its radio flux. No emission was detected from the Cohen-Schwartz (1979) star at the 0.1 mJy level.

  16. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Health and safety professionals, and the public, are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in Central New Jersey and Jersey Shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47 % vs 13 %), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs 6 days), and longer periods without internet (29 vs 6 days). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends and web/email. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio, and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas. PMID:24279815

  17. Angular Structure of FrII Radio Sources 3C169.1 and 3C263 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchishin, R. V.; Shepelev, V. A.; Lozinskyy, A. B.; Lytvynenko, O. A.

    The radio galaxy 3C169.1 and the quasar 3C263, located at nearly the same distance with red shift z>0.6, have similar morphological and spectral characteristics. The maps of the sources obtained at decimeter and centimeter wavelengths have shown they are FRII radio sources with steep spectra and approximately equal angular sizes. The very first investigation of the sources structure at decameter wavelengths is presented in the report. Observations were made using a network of the URAN decameter interferometers with baselines 42 to 950 km and with maximum angular resolution of arcsec order of magnitude. The models of the image of these sources based on visibility functions measured have been obtained at frequencies of 20 and 25 MHz. They were composed of elliptical components with Gaussian brightness distribution. To facilitate the comparison of these lowfrequency models with high-frequency radio images, the latter were converted to the similar models by fitting the Gaussian components to lobes and hot spots selected at the maps. Comparison of the models revealed changes in a structure of the sources caused by the frequency decrease.

  18. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  19. Method of making radio frequency ion source antenna and such antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, K.W.; Leung, K.N.

    1985-05-22

    In the method, the radio frequency (rf) antenna is made by providing a clean coil made of copper tubing or other metal conductor, which is coated with a tacky organic binder, and then with a powdered glass frit, as by sprinkling the frit uniformly over the binder. The coil is then heated internally in an inert gas atmosphere, preferably by passing an electrical heating current along the coil. Initially, the coil is internally heated to about 200/sup 0/C to boil off the water from the binder, and then to about 750 to 850/sup 0/C to melt the glass frit, while also burning off the organic binder. The melted frit forms a molten glass coating on the metal coil, which is then cooled to solidify the glass, so that the metal coil is covered with a thin continuous homogeneous impervious glass coating of substantially uniform thickness. The glass coating affords complete electrical insulation and complete dielectric protection for the metal coil of the rf antenna, to withstand voltage breakdown and to prevent sputtering, while also doubling the plasma generating efficiency of the rf antenna, when energized with RF power in the vacuum chamber of an ion source for a particle accelerator or the like. The glass frit preferably contains approximately 45% lead oxide.

  20. Detectability of electrostatic decay products in Ulysses and Galileo observations of type 3 solar radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    Recent in situ Ulysses and Galileo observations of the source regions of type 3 solar radio bursts appear to show an absence of ion acoustic waves S produced by nonlinear Langmuir wave processes such as the electrostatic (ES) decay, in contradiction with earlier ISEE 3 observations and analytic theory. This letter resolves these apparent contradictions. Refined analyses of the maximum S-wave electric fields produced by ES decay and of the characteristics of the Ulysses Wave Form Analyzer (WFA) instrument show that the bursty S waves observed by the ISEE 3 should be essentially undetectable by the Ulysses WFA. It is also shown that the maximum S-wave levels predicted for the Galileo event are approximately less than the instrumental noise level, thereby confirming an earlier suggestion. Thus, no contradictions exist between the ISEE 3 and Ulysses/Galileo observation, and no evidence exists against ES decay in the published Ulysses and Galileo data. All available data are consistent with, or at worst not inconsistent with, the ES decay proceeding and being the dominant nonlinear process in type 3 bursts.

  1. On the systematics in apparent proper motions of radio sources observed by VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo-Pulido, V.; Lambert, S.; Capitaine, N.; Nilsson, T.; Heinkelmann, R.; Schuh, H.

    2015-08-01

    For about twenty years, several authors have been investigating the systematics in the apparent proper motions of radio source positions. In some cases, the theoretical work developed (Pyne et al., 1996) could not be assessed due to the few number of VLBI observations. In other cases, the effects attributed to apparent proper motion could not be related successfully because there were no significant evidences from a statistical point of view (MacMillan, 2005). In this work we provide considerations about the estimation of the coefficients of spherical harmonics, based on a three-step procedure used by Titov et al. (2011) and Titov and Lambert (2013). The early stage of this work has been to compare step by step the computations and estimation processes between the Calc/Solve (http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/solve/) and VieVS software (Böhm et al., 2012). To achieve this, the results were analyzed and compared with the previous study done by Titov and Lambert (2013).

  2. The Berkeley piggyback SETI program - SERENDIP II. [Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emission from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Lindsay, V.

    1988-01-01

    The SERENDIP (Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emission from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations) II system is currently operating at NRAO's 300-ft telescope in Greenbank, WV. The paper reports on the characteristics of this system in combination with this telescope, as well as elements of an off-line analysis program which are intended to identify signals of special interest. The sensitivity and relative probability of acquisition are evaluated.

  3. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  4. X-ray, optical, and radio properties of the extensive SNR population in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, W.; Long, S. K.; Winkler, F.; Soria, R.; Kuntz, D. K.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Dopita, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The nearly face-on spiral galaxy M83 (d=4.6 Mpc) provides a significant opportunity for finding and studying a large and diverse sample of SNRs all at the same distance, given its active star formation, a starburst nuclear region, and at least six SNe since 1923. As the result of a concerted effort involving ground and spaced-based studies at radio (ATCA), optical and NIR (Magellan 6.5m and HST), and X-ray (Chandra) wavelengths, we have identified almost 300 SNRs in M83. Of these, at least 87 and 47 were detected in the X-ray and radio bands. Some 227 of the SNR candidates are within the regions observed in [Fe II] 1.64 microns with HST WFC3/IR, and we detect ∼100 of them, including ~8 in dusty regions where the [Fe II] emission was the primary means of identification. Follow-up ground-based spectroscopy of 99 of the 300 SNRs with Gemini-S and the GMOS instrument shows that essentially all of the SNRs identified in ground-based imaging have the [S II]/Halpha ratios expected of bona fide SNRs, and that most of the SNRs in the sample are “normal ISM-dominated” SNRs, in the sense that the line widths are narrow and the spectra look like radiative shocks. We have studied a number of interesting individual SNRs and historical SNe counterparts, as well as investigating the ensemble population of nearly 300 SNRs to better understand their properties as a group, their evolution, and their impact on their host galaxy. Of particular interest is a set of the smallest diameter (and hence presumably youngest) objects measured with HST, where the 0.04arcsec WFC3-UVIS pixels correspond to ~1 pc. One SNR has very broad emission lines and given its small size, was most likely a SN that occurred during the last century but was missed. A number of the other objects are comparable to the Crab Nebula or Cas A in size, but very few show the high velocities and spectral signatures of ejecta. Rather, their spectra show low velocities and “normal” ISM-dominated emissions, albeit

  5. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  6. Bent-tailed radio sources in the australia telescope large area survey of the Chandra deep field south

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, supplemented by the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South. Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 BT sources, 4 diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (1 relic, 2 halos, and 1 unclassified object), and a further 7 complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range 10{sup 22} ≤ P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≤ 10{sup 26} W Hz{sup –1}, with redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kiloparsecs up to about 1 Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here, one is the most distant BT source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be associated with known clusters: a wide-angle tail source in A3141 and a putative radio relic which appears at the infall region between the galaxy group MZ 00108 and the galaxy cluster AMPCC 40. Further observations are required to confirm the relic detection, which, if successful, would demonstrate this to be the least powerful relic yet seen with P {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} = 9 × 10{sup 22} W Hz{sup –1}. Using these data, we predict future 1.4 GHz all-sky surveys with a resolution of ∼10 arcsec and a sensitivity of 10 μJy will detect of the order of 560,000 extended low-surface-brightness radio sources of which 440,000 will have a BT morphology.

  7. Genetic mixture of multiple source populations accelerates invasive range expansion.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Natalie K; Ochocki, Brad M; Crawford, Kerri M; Compagnoni, Aldo; Miller, Tom E X

    2017-01-01

    A wealth of population genetic studies have documented that many successful biological invasions stem from multiple introductions from genetically distinct source populations. Yet, mechanistic understanding of whether and how genetic mixture promotes invasiveness has lagged behind documentation that such mixture commonly occurs. We conducted a laboratory experiment to test the influence of genetic mixture on the velocity of invasive range expansion. The mechanistic basis for effects of genetic mixture could include evolutionary responses (mixed invasions may harbour greater genetic diversity and thus elevated evolutionary potential) and/or fitness advantages of between-population mating (heterosis). If driven by evolution, positive effects of source population mixture should increase through time, as selection sculpts genetic variation. If driven by heterosis, effects of mixture should peak following first reproductive contact and then dissipate. Using a laboratory model system (beetles spreading through artificial landscapes), we quantified the velocity of range expansion for invasions initiated with one, two, four or six genetic sources over six generations. Our experiment was designed to test predictions corresponding to the evolutionary and heterosis mechanisms, asking whether any effects of genetic mixture occurred in early or later generations of range expansion. We also quantified demography and dispersal for each experimental treatment, since any effects of mixture should be manifest in one or both of these traits. Over six generations, invasions with any amount of genetic mixture (two, four and six sources) spread farther than single-source invasions. Our data suggest that heterosis provided a 'catapult effect', leaving a lasting signature on range expansion even though the benefits of outcrossing were transient. Individual-level trait data indicated that genetic mixture had positive effects on local demography (reduced extinction risk and enhanced

  8. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-Frequency Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee A.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Ivison, R.J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect associated with the halos that host them. We stack data at 148, 218 and 277 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at the positions of a large sample of radio AGN selected at 1.4 GHz. The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 sigma level through its spectral signature, representing a statistical detection of the SZ effect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approximately equals 10(sup 13) solar mass h(sub 70)(exp -1) ) studied to date. The relation between the SZ effect and mass (based on weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies) is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. In the context of galaxy evolution models, this study confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. Adding Herschel observations allows us to show that the SZ signal is not significantly contaminated by dust emission. Finally, we analyze the contribution of radio sources to the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  9. THE COMPACT, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO SOURCE PROJECTED INSIDE W3(OH): EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOEVAPORATED DISK?

    SciTech Connect

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodriguez-Garza, Carolina B.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A.; Lizano, Susana

    2013-08-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the compact ({approx}0.''05), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact H II region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 (S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). This spectral index and the brightness temperature of the source ({approx}6500 K) suggest that we are most likely detecting partially optically thick free-free radiation. The radio source is probably associated with the ionizing star of W3(OH), but an interpretation in terms of an ionized stellar wind fails because the detected flux densities are orders of magnitude larger than expected. We discuss several scenarios and tentatively propose that the radio emission could arise in a static ionized atmosphere around a fossil photoevaporated disk.

  10. Is lightning a possible source of the radio emission on HAT-P-11b?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, G.; Rimmer, P. B.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-09-01

    Lightning induced radio emission has been observed on Solar system planets. There have been many attempts to observe exoplanets in the radio wavelength, however, no unequivocal detection has been reported. Lecavelier des Etangs et al. carried out radio transit observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b, and suggested that a small part of the radio flux can be attributed to the planet. Here, we assume that this signal is real, and study if this radio emission could be caused by lightning with similar energetic properties like in the Solar system. We find that a lightning storm with 3.8 × 106 times larger flash densities than the Earth-storms with the largest lightning activity is needed to produce the observed signal from HAT-P-11b. The optical emission of such thunderstorm would be comparable to that of the host star. We show that HCN produced by lightning chemistry is observable 2-3 yr after the storm, which produces signatures in the L (3.0-4.0 μm) and N (7.5-14.5 μm) infrared bands. We conclude that it is unlikely that the observed radio signal was produced by lightning, however, future, combined radio and infrared observations may lead to lightning detection on planets outside the Solar system.

  11. Measurements of distributed polarized radio sources from spinning spacecraft - Effect of a tilted axial antenna ISEE-3 application and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Hoang, S.; Manning, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the system response of a satellite receiver-antenna system to locate a radio source when the satellite is tilted on its axis. The satellite is spin stabilized but experiences a tilt due to either a mechanical misalignment or a shift in the electrical axis caused by parasitic currents in other spacecraft structures. The shorter the antenna, the more significant the effects. Numerical techniques are developed for obtaining the Stokes parameters and the angular parameters of a uniform conical source sensed by a linear antenna in order to derive the average power response of a synthesized dipole to a point on a distributed polarized source. Relative gains are calculated along the antenna at different angles to the source. The techniques are applied to sample ISEE-3 satellite data for Type III solar radio bursts which were sensed by an axial and an equatorial antenna. The two antennas permit localization of the source and quantification of the polarization and angular extent of the source. The resulting high precision in calculations of all three source parameters commends use of the model in analyses of data from the planned ULYSSES mission.

  12. Radio Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Radio science experiments use electromagnetic waves to probe or study the solar system. Three major research areas were identified within this discipline: radio astronomy, radar astronomy, and celestial mechanics. Radio astronomy (or radiometry) is the detection and measurement of naturally produced radio frequency emissions. Sources include surfaces, atmospheres, rings, and plasmas. Radar astronomy is the observation of man-made signals after their interaction with a target. Both imaging and non-imaging results. Celestial mechanics includes all studies related to the motions of (and gravity fields of) bodies within the solar system. These should not be considered rigid separations, but aid in the discussion of the data sets.

  13. Motion of the sources for type 2 and type 4 radio bursts and flare-associated interplanetary disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.; Chao, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Shock waves are indirectly observed as the source of type 2 radio brusts, whereas magnetic bottles are identified as the source of moving metric type 4 radio bursts. The difference between the expansion speeds of these waves bottles is examined during their generation and propagation near the flare regions. It is shown that, although generated in the explosive phase of flares, the behavior of the bottles is quite different from that of the waves and that the speed of the former is generally much lower. It is shown that the transit times of disturbances between the sun and the earth give information about the deceleration of shock waves to their local speeds observed near the earth's orbit. A brief discussion is given on the relationship among magnetic bottles, shock waves near the sun, and flare-associated disturbances in interplanetary space.

  14. The radio source and bipolar nebulosity in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Wilson, Andrew S.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael

    1992-01-01

    Results of radio continuum and optical emission-line observations of the type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 are presented. The radio maps reveal an elongated one-sided curved structure, which comprises a series of small-scale 'blobs' and extends up to 4 kpc from the nucleus. This radio structure is aligned and cospatial with one side of the double-sided and highly symmetric Z-shaped emission-line structure. It is argued that these morphological features are associated with a bipolar gaseous outflow from the nucleus of NGC 3516. The radio 'blobs' are elongated roughly perpendicular to the apparent local direction of the outflow, a result which is interpreted in terms of synchrotron emission from outflow-driven shock waves.

  15. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of ten years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of μas per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time). For one of our sources, 0615+820, the morphological and spectral properties in year 2010, as well as the relative astrometry between years 2000 and 2010, suggest the possibility of either a strong parsec-scale interaction of the AGN jet with the ISM, a gravitational lens with 1 mas diameter, or a resolved massive binary black hole. Reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A27

  16. Searches for correlated X-ray and radio emission from X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.; Catura, R. C.; Lamb, P. A.; White, N. E.; Sanford, P. W.; Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Jernigan, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank interferometer has been used to monitor MXB 1730-335 and MXB 1837+05 during periods when 68 X-ray bursts were detected by X-ray observations. No significant radio emission was detected from these objects, or from MXB 1820-30 and MXB 1906+00, which emitted no bursts throughout the simultaneous observations. The data place upper limits on radio emission from these objects in the 2695 and 8085 MHz bands.

  17. Special population planner 4 : an open source release.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J.; Metz, W.; Tanzman, E.

    2008-01-01

    Emergencies like Hurricane Katrina and the recent California wildfires underscore the critical need to meet the complex challenge of planning for individuals with special needs and for institutionalized special populations. People with special needs and special populations often have difficulty responding to emergencies or taking protective actions, and emergency responders may be unaware of their existence and situations during a crisis. Special Population Planner (SPP) is an ArcGIS-based emergency planning system released as an open source product. SPP provides for easy production of maps, reports, and analyses to develop and revise emergency response plans. It includes tools to manage a voluntary registry of data for people with special needs, integrated links to plans and documents, tools for response planning and analysis, preformatted reports and maps, and data on locations of special populations, facility and resource characteristics, and contacts. The system can be readily adapted for new settings without programming and is broadly applicable. Full documentation and a demonstration database are included in the release.

  18. Dynamic Characteristics of the Main Indexes of Space Weather and Their Application to the Analysis Monitoring Observations Flux Densities of Power Radio Sources on RT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglya, L.; Ryabov, M.; Panishko, S.; Suharev, A.

    On radio telescope "URAN-4" of the Odessa observatory of Radio-astronomical Institute during twenty five years (since 1987 till present) monitoring of power galactic and extragalactic radio sources on frequencies 25 and 20MHz has been carried out. Data of the observation was spent in a current of the 22-23th cycles of solar activity and in the beginning of the 24th cycle. Long-term variations density fluxes of radio sources connection with change of a condition of ionosphere in a cycle of solar activity are considered. Means Fourier and Wavelet analysis determine dynamics of changes of the main indexes of space weather and the basic periods of activity are revealed. The obtained data will be used for interpretation of the observation changes flux of radio sources for during all investigated cycle of activity and periods of extreme developments of space weather.

  19. Deep Wideband Single Pointings and Mosaics in Radio Interferometry: How Accurately Do We Reconstruct Intensities and Spectral Indices of Faint Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Owen, F. N.

    2016-11-01

    Many deep wideband wide-field radio interferometric surveys are being designed to accurately measure intensities, spectral indices, and polarization properties of faint source populations. In this paper, we compare various wideband imaging methods to evaluate the accuracy to which intensities and spectral indices of sources close to the confusion limit can be reconstructed. We simulated a wideband single-pointing (C-array, L-Band (1-2 GHz)) and 46-pointing mosaic (D-array, C-Band (4-8 GHz)) JVLA observation using a realistic brightness distribution ranging from 1 μJy to 100 mJy and time-, frequency-, polarization-, and direction-dependent instrumental effects. The main results from these comparisons are (a) errors in the reconstructed intensities and spectral indices are larger for weaker sources even in the absence of simulated noise, (b) errors are systematically lower for joint reconstruction methods (such as Multi-Term Multi-Frequency-Synthesis (MT-MFS)) along with A-Projection for accurate primary beam correction, and (c) use of MT-MFS for image reconstruction eliminates Clean-bias (which is present otherwise). Auxiliary tests include solutions for deficiencies of data partitioning methods (e.g., the use of masks to remove clean bias and hybrid methods to remove sidelobes from sources left un-deconvolved), the effect of sources not at pixel centers, and the consequences of various other numerical approximations within software implementations. This paper also demonstrates the level of detail at which such simulations must be done in order to reflect reality, enable one to systematically identify specific reasons for every trend that is observed, and to estimate scientifically defensible imaging performance metrics and the associated computational complexity of the algorithms/analysis procedures. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. Protoclusters with evolved populations around radio galaxies at z ~ 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, Masaru; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Ichi; Yamada, Toru; Bower, Richard

    2006-09-01

    We report the discovery of protocluster candidates around high-redshift radio galaxies at z ~ 2.5 on the basis of clear statistical excess of colour-selected galaxies around them seen in the deep near-infrared imaging data obtained with CISCO on the Subaru Telescope. We have observed six targets, all at similar redshifts at z ~ 2.5, and our data reach J = 23.5, H = 22.6 and K = 21.8 (5σ) and cover a 1.6 × 1.6 arcmin2 field centred on each radio galaxy. We apply colour cuts in JHK bands in order to exclusively search for galaxies located at high redshifts, z > 2. Over the magnitude range of 19.5 < K < 21.5, we see a significant excess of red galaxies with J - K > 2.3 by a factor of 2 around the combined radio galaxies fields compared to those found in the general field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S). The excess of galaxies around the radio galaxies fields becomes more than a factor of 3 around 19.5 < K < 20.5 when the two-colour cuts are applied with JHK bands. Such overdensity of the colour-selected galaxies suggests that those fields tend to host high-density regions at high redshifts, although there seems to be the variety of the density of the colour-selected galaxies in each field. In particular, two radio galaxies fields out of the six observed fields show very strong density excess and these are likely to be protoclusters associated with the radio galaxies which would evolve into rich clusters of galaxies dominated by old passively evolving galaxies.

  1. The X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation in radiatively efficient black-hole sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ai-Jun; Wu, Qingwen; Cao, Xiao-Feng

    2016-02-01

    We explore X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation simultaneously for four X-ray binaries (XRBs). We find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are anti- and positively correlated to X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F 3-9keV, is below and above a critical flux, F X,crit, which may be regulated by ADAF and disk-corona respectively. We find that the data points with anti-correlation of Γ-F 3-9keV follow the universal radio-X-ray correlation of F R ~ F X b (b ~ 0.5-0.7), while the data points with positive X-ray spectral evolution follow a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (b ~ 1.4, the so-called `outliers track'). The bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) share similar X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation as XRBs in `outliers' track, and we present a new fundamental plane of log L R=1.59+0.28 -0.22 log L X-0.22+0.19 -0.20 log M BH-28.97+0.45 -0.45 for these radiatively efficient BH sources.

  2. Laser measurement of H{sup -} ions in a field-effect-transistor based radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Ando, A.; Tauchi, Y.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Hydrogen negative ion density measurements are required to clarify the characteristics of negative ion production and ion source performance. Both of laser photodetachment and cavity ring down (CRD) measurements have been implemented to a field-effect-transistor based radio-frequency ion source. The density ratio of negative hydrogen ions to electrons was successfully measured by laser photodetachment and effect of magnetic filter field on negative ion density was confirmed. The calculated CRD signal showed that CRD mirrors with >99.990% reflectivity are required and loss of reflectivity due to cesium contamination should be minimized.

  3. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  4. NICMOS Imaging of the Dusty Microjansky Radio Source VLA J123642+621331 at z = 4.424.

    PubMed

    Waddington; Windhorst; Cohen; Partridge; Spinrad; Stern

    1999-12-01

    We present the discovery of a radio galaxy at a likely redshift of z=4.424 in one of the flanking fields of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). Radio observations with the Very Large Array and MERLIN centered on the HDF yielded a complete sample of microjansky radio sources, of which about 20% have no optical counterpart to Isources through deep Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared camera and multiobject spectrometer (NICMOS) images in the F110W (J110) and F160W (H160) filters. VLA J123642+621331 has a single emission line at 6595 Å, which we identify with Lyalpha at z=4.424. We argue that this faint (H160=23.9 mag), compact (re approximately 0&farcs;2), red (I814-K=2.0) object is most likely a dusty, star-forming galaxy with an embedded active nucleus.

  5. Jets, hotspots and lobes: what X-ray observations tell us about extra-galactic radio sources.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Martin J

    2005-12-15

    The brightest and most numerous discrete radio sources in the sky, radio galaxies and quasars, are powered by twin jets of plasma which emerge at relativistic speeds from very small regions at the centre of large elliptical galaxies, powered by mass infall on to supermassive black holes. The jets can carry material out to very large distances (millions of light years) where it forms balloon-like lobes. Until recently it has been impossible to make definite statements about the energy or the nature of the matter supplied by the jets, or the dynamics of the lobes as they expand into the external medium. This has meant that crucial questions about the generation of radio sources and their effect on their environment have gone unanswered. The situation has been revolutionized by the launch at the start of this decade of a new generation of X-ray observatories, Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this article, I explain why observations with these instruments have made such a difference, what we have learned as a result and why the community remains divided on some important features of the interpretation of the data.

  6. Variability of the Extragalactic Radio Sources 3C 446 and BL Lac in the Centimeter Wavelength Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the results of the analysis of long-term monitoring (over 40 years) changes in radio fluxes of the two extragalactic sources - 3C 446, and BL Lac. Observations at frequencies of 14.5, 8, 4.8 GHz were obtained in the Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO). With using Fourier filtering were selected O - C (short-periodic), and the trend components of flux variations that were analyzed separately with using the wavelet-analysis method. Each of these components is associated with certain physical processes in the "core-accretion disk-jet" system. Were constructed time-frequency waveletspectra showing the changes of the frequency composition of the investigated data over time. For the trend component values of the main periods of ~ 4-9 years (3C 446) and ~ 8 years (BL Lac), for O - C component - ~ 0.8-3 years (3C 446) and ~ 0.6-4 years (BL Lac) and they appear in the time and structural changes of the jet. On the basis of calculating the global wavelet-spectra in the frequency range identified main phases activity of radio sources. Obtained comparison between the dynamics of jets (Mojave VLBI images), and change the frequency spectral structure of the studied data. With bandpass wavelet filtering, flux components corresponding to the main periods in the spectra, were identified and also found the delay between the observation frequencies in spectral bands of these periods.

  7. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  8. Hydrogen production in a radio-frequency plasma source operating on water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Son-Ca Viet Thi

    The global energy and climate challenges have motivated development of innovative techniques to satisfy energy demand while minimizing emissions. To this end, hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier in the transportation sector is an attractive option. In addition, there is already a great need for hydrogen gas in several industrial processes such as hydro-cracking of crude oil to produce gasoline and production of ammonia and methanol. The current dominant methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels are well-developed and have reached relatively high energy efficiencies (up to 85%), but these methods rely on non-renewable natural resources and produce carbon dioxide emissions. This work investigates the feasibility of hydrogen production by dissociating water molecules in a radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge. In addition to the widespread usage of hydrogen gas, applications of water plasma have permeated in many areas of research, and information on basic behaviors of a water plasma discharge will provide fruitful insights for other researchers. An RF plasma source equipped with a double-helix antenna (m = 1 mode) and an applied axial magnetic field is designed to operate on water vapor. It is shown that water molecules are being dissociated in the discharge. Experimental results show that the rate of hydrogen production increases linearly with RF power in the absence of the applied axial magnetic field. With the magnetic field, the rate of hydrogen production increases from 250 to 500 W, and begins to saturate with RF power. Despite this saturation, it is shown that hydrogen increases with magnetic field strength at a fixed RF power. Further, the rate of hydrogen production increases with water input flow rate up to 100 sccm for a fixed RF power level, and begins to decrease at 125 sccm. This dissertation characterizes the rate of hydrogen production and plasma properties as a function of RF power, applied B-field strength, and water input flow rate. A

  9. Characterising Radio Emissions in Cosmic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. O.

    2014-02-01

    A growing number of radio studies probe galaxy clusters into the low-power regime in which star formation is the dominant source of radio emission. However, at the time of writing no comparably deep observations have focused exclusively on the radio populations of cosmic filaments. This thesis describes the ATCA 2.1 GHz observations and subsequent analysis of two such regions - labelled Zone 1 (between clusters A3158 and A3125/A3128) and Zone 2 (between A3135 and A3145) - in the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Source count profiles of both populations are discussed and a radio luminosity function for Zone 1 is generated. While the source counts of Zone 2 appear to be consistent with expected values, Zone 1 exhibits an excess of counts across a wide flux range (1 mJy< S_1.4 < 200 mJy). An excess in radio activity at the lower extent of this range (log P_1.4 < 22.5; within the SF-dominated regime) is also suggested by the radio luminosity function for that region, and brief colour analysis suggests that such an excess is indeed predominantly associated with a starforming population. The differences between the two filamentary zones is attributed to cosmic variation. The regions are both small (~ 1 degree square), and are significantly separated in the HRS. Further radio observations of filaments are required and the results combined into a larger sample size in order to arrive at a generalised model filamentary population.

  10. A catalog of selected compact radio sources for the construction of an extragalactic radio/optical reference frame (Argue et al. 1984): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the machine readable version of the Selected Compact Radio Source Catalog as it is currently being distributed from the international network of astronomical data centers. It is intended to enable users to read and process the computerized catalog. The catalog contains 233 strong, compact extragalactic radio sources having identified optical counterparts. The machine version contains the same data as the published catalog and includes source identifications, equatorial positions at J2000.0 and their mean errors, object classifications, visual magnitudes, redshift, 5-GHz flux densities, and comments.

  11. A radio-frequency source using direct digital synthesis and field programmable gate array for nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Weimin, Wang

    2009-12-01

    A radio-frequency (rf) source for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described. With the application of direct digital synthesis (DDS), the rf source has the ability to yield rf pulses with short switching time and high resolution in frequency and phase. To facilitate the generation of a soft pulse, a field programmable gate array (FPGA) cooperating with a pulse programmer is used as the auxiliary controller of the DDS chip. Triggered by the pulse programmer, the FPGA automatically controls the DDS to generate soft pulse according to predefined parameters, and the operation mode of the pulse programmer is optimized. The rf source is suitable for being used as transmitter in low-field (<1 T) NMR applications, for example, magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation measurement. As a compact and low-cost module, the rf source is of general use for constructing low-field NMR spectrometer.

  12. A radio-frequency source using direct digital synthesis and field programmable gate array for nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Weimin, Wang

    2009-12-01

    A radio-frequency (rf) source for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described. With the application of direct digital synthesis (DDS), the rf source has the ability to yield rf pulses with short switching time and high resolution in frequency and phase. To facilitate the generation of a soft pulse, a field programmable gate array (FPGA) cooperating with a pulse programmer is used as the auxiliary controller of the DDS chip. Triggered by the pulse programmer, the FPGA automatically controls the DDS to generate soft pulse according to predefined parameters, and the operation mode of the pulse programmer is optimized. The rf source is suitable for being used as transmitter in low-field (<1 T) NMR applications, for example, magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation measurement. As a compact and low-cost module, the rf source is of general use for constructing low-field NMR spectrometer.

  13. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y. E-mail: oka@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Shoji, T.

    2014-02-15

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm{sup 2}. The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  14. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS.

    PubMed

    Oka, Y; Shoji, T

    2014-02-01

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm(2). The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm(2)/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  15. Cosmic reionization by stellar sources: Population II stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokasian, Aaron; Abel, Tom; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker

    2003-09-01

    comparisons with observational constraints on the neutral fraction of hydrogen at z~ 6 derived from the z= 6.28 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar of Becker and coworkers. We find that, given the amplitude and form of the underlying star formation predictions, an escape fraction near fesc= 0.10-0.20 is most consistent with the observational results. In these models, reionization is expected to have occurred between z~ 7-8, although the IGM remains fairly opaque until z~= 6. Our method is also capable of handling the simultaneous reionization of the helium component in the IGM, allowing us to explore the plausibility of the scenario where sources with harder spectra are primarily responsible for reionization. In this case, we find that if the sources responsible for reionizing hydrogen by z~ 8 had spectra similar to active galactic nuclei, then the helium component of the IGM should have been reionized by z~ 6. We find that such an early reionization epoch for helium does not necessarily conflict with observational constraints obtained at z~= 3, but may be challenged by future observations at higher redshifts. The recent WMAP measurements of the electron scattering optical depth (τe= 0.17 +/- 0.04 according to the `model independent' analysis of Kogut et al.) appear to be inconsistent with the relatively late onset of reionization by the normal Population II type stars that we consider. In order to simultaneously match the observations from the z= 6.28 SDSS quasar and the optical depth measurement from WMAP with the sources modelled here, we require a boosting factor for the number of ionizing photons released in the fesc= 0.20 model which evolves from unity at z= 6 to >~50 by z~ 18. Such a steep enhancement in the stellar production rate of ionizing photons would be consistent with an IMF that becomes more and more top heavy with increasing redshift.

  16. Seasonal Variations of the Ionosphere Scintillations Parameters Obtained from the Long Observations of the Power Cosmic Radio Sources at the Decameter Wave Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytvynenko, O. A.; Panishko, S. K.

    Observations of the four power cosmic radio sources were carried out on the radio telescope (RT) URAN-4 during 1987-1990 and 1998-2007 at the frequencies 20 and 25 MHz. Effects of ionosphere and in particular existence of intensity fluctuations on the cosmic radio sources records, or scintillations, are essential at the decameter wave range. Long series of the ionosphere scintillations parameters such as indices, periods and spectrum slopes were obtained after observation data proceeding. Behavior of the seasonal variations was investigated on this data. Obtained dependencies were compared with the indices of the solar and geomagnetic activity.

  17. KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROTOSTELLAR DISK AROUND RADIO SOURCE I IN THE ORION KLEINMANN-LOW NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sitarski, Breann N.; Morris, Mark R.; Becklin, E. E.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Lu, Jessica R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Stolte, Andrea; Zinnecker, Hans

    2013-06-20

    We have made the first detection of a near-infrared counterpart associated with the disk around Radio Source ''I'', a massive protostar in the Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion, using imaging with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. The infrared emission is evident in images acquired using L' (3.8 {mu}m) and Ms (4.7 {mu}m) filters and is not detectable at K' (2.1 {mu}m). The observed morphology strongly suggests that we are seeing some combination of scattered and thermal light emanating from the disk. The disk is also manifest in the L'/Ms flux ratio image. We interpret the near-infrared emission as the illuminated surface of a nearly edge-on disk, oriented so that only the northern face is visible; the opposite surface remains hidden by the disk. We do not see infrared radiation associated directly with the star proposed to be associated with Source ''I''. The data also suggest that there is a cavity above and below the disk that is oriented perpendicular to the disk and is sculpted by the known, strong outflow from the inner disk of Source I. We compare our data to models of a protostar with a surrounding disk, envelope, and wind-blown cavity in order to elucidate the nature of the disk around Radio Source I.

  18. The highest redshift quasar at z = 7.085: A radio-quiet source

    SciTech Connect

    Momjian, E.; Carilli, C. L.; Walter, F.; Venemans, B. E-mail: ccarilli@nrao.edu E-mail: venemans@mpia.de

    2014-01-01

    We present 1-2 GHz Very Large Array A-configuration continuum observations on the highest redshift quasar known to date, the z = 7.085 quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3. The results show no radio continuum emission at the optical position of the quasar or its vicinity at a level of ≥3σ or 23.1 μJy beam{sup –1}. This 3σ limit corresponds to a rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity density limit of L {sub ν,} {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} < 1.76 × 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup –1} for a spectral index of α = 0, and L {sub ν,} {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} < 1.42 × 10{sup 25} W Hz{sup –1} for a spectral index of α = –1. The rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity limits are L {sub rad} < 6.43 × 10{sup 6} L {sub ☉} and L {sub rad} < 5.20 × 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉} for α = 0 and α = –1, respectively. The derived limits for the ratio of the rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity density to the B-band optical luminosity density are R{sub 1.4}{sup ∗}<0.53 and <4.30 for the above noted spectral indices, respectively. Given our upper limits on the radio continuum emission and the radio-to-optical luminosity ratio, we conclude that this quasar is radio-quiet and located at the low end of the radio-quiet distribution of high-redshift (z ≳ 6) quasars.

  19. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  20. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  1. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  2. Minifilament Eruption as the Source of a Blowout Jet, C-class Flare, and Type-III Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Li, Haidong; Xu, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    We report a strong minifilament eruption associated with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite C1.6 flare and WIND type-III radio burst. The minifilament, which lies at the periphery of active region 12259, is detected by Hα images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope. The minifilament undergoes a partial and then a full eruption. Simultaneously, two co-spatial jets are successively observed in extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The first jet exhibits a typical fan-spine geometry, suggesting that the co-spatial minifilament is possibly embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine structure. However, the second jet displays blowout morphology when the entire minifilament erupts upward, leaving behind a hard X-ray emission source in the base. Differential emission measure analyses show that the eruptive region is heated up to about 4 MK during the fan-spine jet, while up to about 7 MK during the blowout jet. In particular, the blowout jet is accompanied by an interplanetary type-III radio burst observed by WIND/WAVES in the frequency range from above 10 to 0.1 MHz. Hence, the minifilament eruption is correlated with the interplanetary type-III radio burst for the first time. These results not only suggest that coronal jets can result from magnetic reconnection initiated by erupting minifilaments with open fields, but also shed light on the potential influence of minifilament eruption on interplanetary space.

  3. A size of approximately 1 au for the radio source Sgr A* at the centre of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Lo, K Y; Liang, M-C; Ho, Paul T P; Zhao, J-H

    2005-11-03

    Although it is widely accepted that most galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres, concrete proof has proved elusive. Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), an extremely compact radio source at the centre of our Galaxy, is the best candidate for proof, because it is the closest. Previous very-long-baseline interferometry observations (at 7 mm wavelength) reported that Sgr A* is approximately 2 astronomical units (au) in size, but this is still larger than the 'shadow' (a remarkably dim inner region encircled by a bright ring) that should arise from general relativistic effects near the event horizon of the black hole. Moreover, the measured size is wavelength dependent. Here we report a radio image of Sgr A* at a wavelength of 3.5 mm, demonstrating that its size is approximately 1 au. When combined with the lower limit on its mass, the lower limit on the mass density is 6.5 x 10(21)M(o) pc(-3) (where M(o) is the solar mass), which provides strong evidence that Sgr A* is a supermassive black hole. The power-law relationship between wavelength and intrinsic size (size proportional, variantwavelength(1.09)) explicitly rules out explanations other than those emission models with stratified structure, which predict a smaller emitting region observed at a shorter radio wavelength.

  4. Medicina array demonstrator: calibration and radiation pattern characterization using a UAV-mounted radio-frequency source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupillo, G.; Naldi, G.; Bianchi, G.; Mattana, A.; Monari, J.; Perini, F.; Poloni, M.; Schiaffino, M.; Bolli, P.; Lingua, A.; Aicardi, I.; Bendea, H.; Maschio, P.; Piras, M.; Virone, G.; Paonessa, F.; Farooqui, Z.; Tibaldi, A.; Addamo, G.; Peverini, O. A.; Tascone, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of the new-generation Low-Frequency Aperture Array (LFAA) radio telescopes is instrument calibration. The operational LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) instrument and the future LFAA element of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) require advanced calibration techniques to reach the expected outstanding performance. In this framework, a small array, called Medicina Array Demonstrator (MAD), has been designed and installed in Italy to provide a test bench for antenna characterization and calibration techniques based on a flying artificial test source. A radio-frequency tone is transmitted through a dipole antenna mounted on a micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) (hexacopter) and received by each element of the array. A modern digital FPGA-based back-end is responsible for both data-acquisition and data-reduction. A simple amplitude and phase equalization algorithm is exploited for array calibration owing to the high stability and accuracy of the developed artificial test source. Both the measured embedded element patterns and calibrated array patterns are found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. The successful measurement campaign has demonstrated that a UAV-mounted test source provides a means to accurately validate and calibrate the full-polarized response of an antenna/array in operating conditions, including consequently effects like mutual coupling between the array elements and contribution of the environment to the antenna patterns. A similar system can therefore find a future application in the SKA-LFAA context.

  5. The Mitigation of Radio Noise from External Sources at Receiving Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    receiving site. Step 2—Understand sources and source mechanisms . Step 3—Locate sources. Step 4—Identify the hardware which is generating noise...Typical noise problems at a receiving site are described in Section 1. Typical sources, source mechanisms and the temporal and spectral properties...Two common types of noise will be encountered along with several less common types. These types are closely related to the source mechanisms

  6. The Discovery of Lensed Radio and X-Ray Sources behind the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 with the JVLA and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Ogrean, G. A.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Bulbul, E.; Clarke, T. E.; Churazov, E.; David, L.; Dawson, W. A.; Donahue, M.; Goulding, A.; Kraft, R. P.; Mason, B.; Merten, J.; Mroczkowski, T.; Murray, S. S.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Rosati, P.; Roediger, E.; Randall, S. W.; Sayers, J.; Umetsu, K.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zitrin, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on high-resolution JVLA and Chandra observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. MACS J0717.5+3745 offers the largest contiguous magnified area of any known cluster, making it a promising target to search for lensed radio and X-ray sources. With the high-resolution 1.0-6.5 GHz JVLA imaging in A and B configuration, we detect a total of 51 compact radio sources within the area covered by the HST imaging. Within this sample, we find seven lensed sources with amplification factors larger than two. None of these sources are identified as multiply lensed. Based on the radio luminosities, the majority of these sources are likely star-forming galaxies with star-formation rates (SFRs) of 10-50 {M}⊙ yr-1 located at 1≲ z≲ 2. Two of the lensed radio sources are also detected in the Chandra image of the cluster. These two sources are likely active galactic nuclei, given their 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities of ˜1043-44 erg s-1. From the derived radio luminosity function, we find evidence for an increase in the number density of radio sources at 0.6\\lt z\\lt 2.0, compared to a z\\lt 0.3 sample. Our observations indicate that deep radio imaging of lensing clusters can be used to study star-forming galaxies, with SFRs as low as ˜10 M⊙ yr-1, at the peak of cosmic star formation history.

  7. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  8. X-ray Source Population Study of the Local Group Galaxy M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, Holger

    2010-11-01

    This dissertation presents the analysis of a large and deep XMM-Newton survey of the second large Local Group spiral galaxy M31. The survey observations, taken between June 2006 and February 2008, together with re-analysed archival observations from June 2000 to July 2004 cover, for the first time, the whole D25 ellipse of M 31 with XMM-Newton down to a limiting luminosity of ˜10^35 erg s-1 in the 0.2-4.5 keV band. The main goal of the thesis was a study of the different source populations of M 31 that can be observed in X-rays. Therefore a catalogue was created, which contains all 1 948 sources detected in the 0.2 - 12.0 keV range. 961 of these sources were detected in X-rays for the first time. Source classification and identification was based on X-ray hardness ratios, spatial extent of the sources, and by cross correlating with catalogues in the X-ray, optical, infrared and radio wavelengths. An additional classification criterion was the long-term temporal variability of the sources in X-rays. This variability allows us to distinguish between X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. Furthermore, supernova remnant classifications of previous studies that did not use long-term variability as a classification criterion, could be validated. Including previous Chandra and ROSAT observations in the long-term variability study allowed me to detect additional transient or at least highly variable sources, which are good candidates for being X-ray binaries. Fourteen of the 40 supersoft source (SSS) candidates correlated with optical novae and therefore can be considered the supersoft emission of the optical novae. Among them is the first nova/SSS detected in a globular cluster of M 31. Correlations with previous ROSAT and Chandra studies revealed that only three SSSs are visible for at least one decade. This result underlines the strong long-term variability found for the class of SSSs. In addition the correlations demonstrated that strict selection criteria have to

  9. A Possible X-Ray and Radio Counterpart of the High-Energy Gamma-Ray Source 3EG J2227+6122

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Helfand, D. J.; Leighly, K. M.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The identity of the persistent EGRET sources in the Galactic plane is largely a mystery. For one of these, 3EG J2227+6122, our complete census of X-ray and radio sources in its error circle reveals a remarkable superposition of an incomplete radio shell with a flat radio spectrum, and a compact, power-law X-ray source with photon index Gamma = 1.5 and with no obvious optical counterpart. The radio shell is polarized at a level of approx. = 25%. The anomalous properties of the radio source prevent us from deriving a completely satisfactory theory as to its nature. Nevertheless, using data from ROSAT, ASCA, the VLA, and optical imaging and spectroscopy, we argue that the X-ray source may be a young pulsar with an associated wind-blown bubble or bow shock nebula, and an example of the class of radio-quiet pulsars which are hypothesized to comprise the majority of EGRET sources in the Galaxy. The distance to this source can be estimated from its X-ray absorption as 3 kpc. At this distance, the X-ray and gamma-ray luminosities would be approx. = 1.7 x 10(exp 33) and approx. = 3.7 x 10(exp 35) erg/s, respectively, which would require an energetic pulsar to power them. If, on the contrary, this X-ray source is not the counterpart of 3EG J2227+6122, then by process of elimination the X-ray luminosity of the latter must be less than 10(exp -4) of its gamma-ray luminosity, a condition not satisfied by any established class of gamma-ray source counterpart. This would require the existence of at least a quantitatively new type of EGRET source, as has been suggested in studies of other EGRET fields.

  10. Making Faranoff-Riley I radio sources. I. Numerical hydrodynamic 3D simulations of low-power jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaglia, S.; Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Capetti, S.; Mignone, A.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Extragalactic radio sources have been classified into two classes, Fanaroff-Riley I and II, which differ in morphology and radio power. Strongly emitting sources belong to the edge-brightened FR II class, and weakly emitting sources to the edge-darkened FR I class. The origin of this dichotomy is not yet fully understood. Numerical simulations are successful in generating FR II morphologies, but they fail to reproduce the diffuse structure of FR Is. Aims: By means of hydro-dynamical 3D simulations of supersonic jets, we investigate how the displayed morphologies depend on the jet parameters. Bow shocks and Mach disks at the jet head, which are probably responsible for the hot spots in the FR II sources, disappear for a jet kinetic power ℒkin ≲ 1043 erg s-1. This threshold compares favorably with the luminosity at which the FR I/FR II transition is observed. Methods: The problem is addressed by numerical means carrying out 3D HD simulations of supersonic jets that propagate in a non-homogeneous medium with the ambient temperature that increases with distance from the jet origin, which maintains constant pressure. Results: The jet energy in the lower power sources, instead of being deposited at the terminal shock, is gradually dissipated by the turbulence. The jets spread out while propagating, and they smoothly decelerate while mixing with the ambient medium and produce the plumes characteristic of FR I objects. Conclusions: Three-dimensionality is an essential ingredient to explore the FR I evolution becausethe properties of turbulence in two and three dimensions are very different, since there is no energy cascade to small scales in two dimensions, and two-dimensional simulations with the same parameters lead to FRII-like behavior.

  11. The BL LAC phenomenon: X-ray observations of transition objects and determination of the x-ray spectrum of a complete sample o