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Sample records for radio wave absorption

  1. Synopsis of Mid-latitude Radio Wave Absorption in Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Friedrich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Radio wave absorption data covering almost two years from Europe to Central Asia are presented. They are normalized by relating them to a reference absorption. Every day these normalized data are fitted to a mathematical function of geographical location in order to obtain a daily synopsis of radio wave absorption. A film of these absorption charts was made which is intended to reveal movements of absorption or absorption anomaly. In addition, radiance (temperature) data from the lower D-region are also plotted onto these charts.

  2. Relations among low ionosphere parameters and high frequency radio wave absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Charged particle conductivities measured in the very low ionosphere at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, and Wallops Island, Virginia, are compared with atmospheric parameters and high frequency radio wave absorption measurements. Charged particle densities are derived from the conductivity data. Between 33 and 58 km, positive conductivity correlated well with neutral atmospheric temperature, with temperature coefficients as large as 4.6%/deg K. Good correlations were also found between HF radio wave absorption and negative conductivity at altitudes as low as 53 km, indicating that the day-to-day absorption variations were principally due to variations in electron loss rate.

  3. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations.

  4. Results of measurement of radio wave absorption in the ionosphere by the AI method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korinevskaya, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Median noon absorption values for each month from 1964 through 1967, the diurnal variations of absorption on the regular world days, and the seasonal variations of absorption are given. The dependence of the absorption coefficient on sunspot number is analyzed.

  5. The role of natural E-region plasma turbulence in the enhanced absorption of HF radio waves in the auroral ionosphere:Implications for RF heating of the auroral electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. R.

    1994-04-01

    Physical processes which affect the absorption of radio waves passing through the auroral E-region when Farley-Buneman irregularities are present are examined. In particular, the question of whether or not it is legitimate to include the anomalous wave-enhanced collision frequency, which has been used successfully to account for the heating effects of Farley-Buneman waves in the auroral E-region, in the usual expression for the radio-wave absorption coefficient is addressed. Effects also considered are those due to wave coupling between electromagnetic waves and high-frequency electrostatic waves in the presence of Farley-Buneman irregularities. The implications for radio-wave heating of the auroral electrojet of these processes are also discussed. In particular, a new theoretical model for calculating the effects of high-power radio-wave heating on the electron temperature in an electrojet containing Farley-Buneman turbulence is presented.

  6. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  7. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  8. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  9. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  10. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive set of ground-based measurements of the diurnal variation of medium frequency radio wave adsorption and virtual height is analyzed in terms of current understanding of the D- and lower E-region ion production and loss process. When this is done a gross discrepancy arises, the source of which is not known.

  11. Whistlers, helicons, and lower hybrid waves: The physics of radio frequency wave propagation and absorption for current drive via Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.

    2015-09-15

    This introductory-level tutorial article describes the application of plasma waves in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) for current drive in tokamaks. Wave damping mechanisms in a nearly collisionless hot magnetized plasma are briefly described, and the connections between the properties of the damping mechanisms and the optimal choices of wave properties (mode, frequency, wavelength) are explored. The two wave modes available for current drive in the LHRF are described and compared. The terms applied to these waves in different applications of plasma physics are elucidated. The character of the ray paths of these waves in the LHRF is illustrated in slab and toroidal geometries. Applications of these ideas to experiments in the DIII-D tokamak are discussed.

  12. Crystalline surfactant dispersions by radio frequency absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tedder, S.H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently interest has increased in the use of liquid crystalline surfactant dispersions for enhanced oil recovery. The object of the work described in the report was to develop a method of measuring the electrical properties of colloidal surfactant particles, which control the structure and stability of the surfactant dispersion. A further object was to find how these electrical properties are affected by the method used to mix the components of the dispersion. The results may be useful in solving several practical problems, including the identification of optimally performing liquid crystalline surfactant formulations for oil recovery use. Another possible use is to identify and categorize effects of the method of mixing surfactants on the final product. This information would provide guidelines for field handling of chemical recovery agents. The absorption of radio frequency energy, a process which is mediated by the surface electrical properties of the surfactant particles, was used to measure several electrical parameters of the surfactant mixtures. Two commercial petroleum sulfonate surfactants were tested by the radio frequency absorption method, and a model of their electrical properties was developed and used to fit the data. The strength of the layer of electric charges surrounding the surfactant particles was found to be related to the stability of the solution. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. UHF Radio Wave Attenuation Factor Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, S. I.; Kostina, V. L.; Mytsenko, I. M.; Roenko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    As is known each sea-going vessel is equipped with navigation, communication and other radio engineering facilities that serve to secure the safety of navigation and are chiefly operated at UHF-wave band. In developing these systems and calculating the energy potential for a necessary coverage range one should be well aware of the radio signal attenuation processes on a propagation path. The key parameter of this path is the (radio) wave attenuation factor V and its distance dependence V(R). A diversity of factors influencing the radio signal attenuation over the oceanic expanses, especially well pronounced and quite stable tropospheric ducts, and the lack of experimental data were the compelling reasons why the researchers of the Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, NASU, had spent many years on comprehensive radiophysical investigations carried out in different regions of the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The experimental data obtained allow creating the database of radio wave attenuation factor V.

  14. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  15. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  16. Speckles in interstellar radio-wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Nicholson, G.; Flanagan, C.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of speckles in the scattering disk of the Vela pulsar are presented and speckle techniques for studying and circumventing scattering of radio waves by the turbulent interstellar plasma are discussed. The speckle pattern contains, in a hologrammatic fashion, complete information on the structure of the radio source as well as the distribution of the scattering material. Speckle observations of interstellar scattering of radio waves are difficult because of their characteristically short timescales and narrow bandwidths. Here, first observations are presented, taken at 13 cm wavelength with elements of the SHEVE VLBI network, of speckles in interstellar scattering.

  17. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  18. Embracing the Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach Students about Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, M. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Doherty, M.; Minnigh, S.; Arndt, M. B.; Pratap, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT) is a low-cost educational tool appropriate for laboratory demonstrations of the nature of radio waves and the principles of interferometry for use in both high school and undergraduate physics/astronomy classes. The system consists of small direct broadcast antenna dishes and other commercially available parts and can be assembled for under $500. Complete teaching units have been developed and tested by high school physics teachers to demonstrate radio wave transmission and exponential absorption though materials (Beer's law), the polarization of electromagnetic waves (Malus' law), the inverse square law, and interferometry. These units can be used to explore the properties of electromagnetic waves, including similarities and differences between radio and visible light, while challenging students' misconceptions about a wavelength regime that is important to both astronomy and everyday life. In addition, the VSRT can be used as a radio astronomical interferometer to measure the diameter of the Sun at 12 GHz. Full details, including a parts list, comprehensive assembly instructions, informational memos, teaching units, software, and conformance to national and Massachusetts educational standards, are available on the web at http://www.haystack.mit.edu/edu/undergrad/VSRT/index.html . Development of the VSRT at MIT Haystack Observatory is made possible through funding provided by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  20. The Unified Radio and Plasma wave investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J. L.; Caldwell, J.; Canu, P.; De Conchy, Y.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; Fainberg, J.; Goetz, K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) experiment are twofold: (1) the determination of the direction, angular size, and polarization of radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere and the Jovian magnetosphere and (2) the detailed study of local wave phenomena, which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. A brief discussion of the scientific goals of the experiment is followed by a comprehensive description of the instrument. The URAP sensors consist of a 72.5 m electric field antenna in the spin plane, a 7.5-m electric field monopole along the spin axis of a pair of orthogonal search coil magnetic antennas. The various receivers, designed to encompass specific needs of the investigation, cover the frequency range from dc to 1 MHz. A relaxation sounder provides very accurate electron density measurements. Radio and plasma wave observations are shown to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the URAP instruments: radio observations include solar bursts, auroral kilometric radiation, and Jovian bursts; plasma waves include Langmuir waves, ion acousticlike noise, and whistlers.

  1. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  2. The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kirchner, D. L.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Manning, R.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Meyer, A.; Boström, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Åhlen, L.; Rucker, H. O.; Ladreiter, H. P.; Macher, W.; Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Alleyne, H.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Louarn, P.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Pedersen, A.

    2004-09-01

    The Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation is designed to study radio emissions, plasma waves, thermal plasma, and dust in the vicinity of Saturn. Three nearly orthogonal electric field antennas are used to detect electric fields over a frequency range from 1 Hz to 16 MHz, and three orthogonal search coil magnetic antennas are used to detect magnetic fields over a frequency range from 1 Hz to 12 kHz. A Langmuir probe is used to measure the electron density and temperature. Signals from the electric and magnetic antennas are processed by five receiver systems: a high frequency receiver that covers the frequency range from 3.5 kHz to 16 MHz, a medium frequency receiver that covers the frequency range from 24 Hz to 12 kHz, a low frequency receiver that covers the frequency range from 1 Hz to 26 Hz, a five-channel waveform receiver that covers the frequency range from 1 Hz to 2.5 kHz in two bands, 1 Hz to 26 Hz and 3 Hz to 2.5 kHz, and a wideband receiver that has two frequency bands, 60 Hz to 10.5 kHz and 800 Hz to 75 kHz. In addition, a sounder transmitter can be used to stimulate plasma resonances over a frequency range from 3.6 kHz to 115.2 kHz. Fluxes of micron-sized dust particles can be counted and approximate masses of the dust particles can be determined using the same techniques as Voyager. Compared to Voyagers 1 and 2, which are the only spacecraft that have made radio and plasma wave measurements in the vicinity of Saturn, the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument has several new capabilities. These include (1) greatly improved sensitivity and dynamic range, (2) the ability to perform direction-finding measurements of remotely generated radio emissions and wave normal measurements of plasma waves, (3) both active and passive measurements of plasma resonances in order to give precise measurements of the local electron density, and (4) Langmuir probe measurements of the local electron density and temperature. With these new capabilities, it will be

  3. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF RADIO-SELECTED BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; Becker, R. H.; Gregg, M. D.; Tran, H. D.; White, R. L.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2010-07-15

    We report spectropolarimetry of 30 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with the Keck Observatory, 25 from the sample of Becker et al. Both high- and low-ionization BAL quasars are represented, with redshifts ranging from 0.5 to 2.5. The spectropolarimetric properties of radio-selected BAL quasars are very similar to those of radio-quiet BAL quasars: a sizeable fraction (20%) shows large continuum polarization (2%-10%) usually rising toward short wavelengths; emission lines are typically less polarized than the continuum; and absorption line troughs often show large polarization jumps. There are no significant correlations between polarization properties and radio properties, including those indicative of system orientation, suggesting that BAL quasars are not simply normal quasars seen from an edge-on perspective.

  4. Magnetotellurics and radio-wave interference sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelevskoy, V. K.; Petrukhin, B. P.; Pushkarev, P. Yu.

    2010-09-01

    The plane harmonic electromagnetic fields are considered in the theory of magnetotelluric methods in the range of frequencies from 0.0001 Hz to 20 kHz. These fields are natural by their origin and contain information on the depths from tens of meters up to 100 km and more. The magnetotelluric soundings, which use the fields of radio stations, expand the frequency band almost up to 1 MHz and make it possible to study the depths from the first few meters. The method of radio-wave interference sounding supplements geoelectric prospecting on plane waves into the range of even higher frequencies (up to 100 MHz). In this case, the conduction and displacement currents become comparable, which makes it possible to distinguish objects both by their electrical conductivity and by their dielectric permittivity. For the two-layered model of a medium, there exist simple kinematic methods of data interpretation of a radio-interferometry sounding. Within multilayer, and especially horizontally heterogeneous, media, methods for solving equations of electrodynamics and inverse problems of geophysics are required. In the present paper, the foundations of the theory of radio-interferometry sounding, the methodology, its role in geoelectric prospecting, and the opportunities for the solution of geological problems are discussed.

  5. Wave optics-based LEO-LEO radio occultation retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the theory for performing retrieval of radio occultations that use probing frequencies in the XK and KM band. Normally, radio occultations use frequencies in the L band, and GPS satellites are used as the transmitting source, and the occultation signals are received by a GPS receiver on board a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite. The technique is based on the Doppler shift imposed, by the atmosphere, on the signal emitted from the GPS satellite. Two LEO satellites are assumed in the occultations discussed in this paper, and the retrieval is also dependent on the decrease in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites, while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS-based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high-frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing the retrieval of the water vapor content. Selecting the correct probing frequencies would make it possible to retrieve other information such as the content of ozone. The retrieval is performed through a number of processing steps which are based on the Full Spectrum Inversion (FSI) technique. The retrieval chain is therefore a wave optics-based retrieval chain, and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on five different frequencies are used. The five frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave optics-based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples, and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global European Centre for Medium

  6. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  7. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  8. WIND/WAVES observations of man-made radio transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Manning, R.; Meetre, C. A.

    The WAVES radio and plasma wave instrument on the Wind spacecraft, launched on November 1, 1994, has detected copious shortwave radio transmissions from broadcast stations on Earth. WAVES can easily detect signals consisting of only a few kW of transmitted power, suggesting that useful ionospheric propagation research can be accomplished with very modest equipment. We also conclude that the terrestrial radio spectrum is quite “non natural” so that any extraterrestrial radio astronomer should easily deduce that Earth is populated with a civilization with technical capabilities.

  9. Magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research - 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This review covers research performed in the area of magnetospheric plasma waves and wave-particle interactions as well as magnetospheric radio emissions. The report focuses on the near-completion of the discovery phase of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres with the successful completion of the Voyager 2 encounters of Neptune and Uranus. Consideration is given to the advances made in detailed studies and theoretical investigations of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere or in magnetospheric plasmas in general.

  10. Clumpy Langmuir waves in type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Cairns, I. H.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed for type III radio emission in the interplanetary medium based on recent data on Langmuir waves, associated with ion sound waves, density fluctuations in the interplanetary plasma, streaming electrons and radio emission. In this model, Langmuir wave growth is suppressed by refraction in field-aligned density irregularities except near density minima where clumps of Langmuir waves form. Quasi-linear relaxation limits the growth of the Langmuir waves in the clumps. The radio emission, which is attributed to coalescence of the Langmuir waves with associated ion sound waves, saturates at a brightness temperature equal to the effective temperature of the Langmuir waves, estimated to be between 10 to the 15th and 10 to the 16th K from obserrvational data. The model is consistent with all the relevant data on type III events. In particular, it accounts naturally for observed brightness temperatures of type III bursts.

  11. Making Waves: Pirate Radio and Popular Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    The history of pirate radio--radio broadcasts offered by unlicensed broadcasters as alternatives to licensed, commercial radio programming--is difficult to trace, both in America and the United Kingdom (UK) since mention of pirate broadcasts of a less-then-thrilling nature are rarely found. Also, until 1927, the U.S. government did not formally…

  12. Radio wave scattering in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    Current models for the 2-3 kHz emissions observed by the Voyager spacecraft in the outer heliosphere involve 2f(p) radiation generated near the termination shock or the heliopause. Radio wave scattering by solar wind density irregularities strongly affects observed sources of f(p) and 2f(p) emission in the inner heliosphere and the characteristics of astrophysical sources. In particular, the angular size, brightness temperature, and time variability of the source are strongly affected by scattering, thereby having major implications for the inferred size, energy budget, time variability, location, and nature of the source if scattering is ignored. This paper addresses whether scattering is important for interpreting the Voyager 2-3 kHz emissions. Quantitative calculations (with and without diffraction) are performed for the angular broadening of an outer heliospheric source as a function of path length, radiation frequency relative to f(p) and the spectrum of density irregularities. The effects of scattering in both the solar wind and the heliosheath are considered. Predictions for radial gradients in the source's apparent angular size and in the source's modulation index are presented. The calculations are compared with observations and the results discussed. First estimates suggest that scattering plausibly dominates the observed source size. The observed trend in modulation index with heliocentric distance is consistent with scattering being important and the source being in the outer heliosphere. Additional arguments for scattering being important are summarized.

  13. Gravity wave detection by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Arras, Christina; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role for the general atmospheric circulation due to the related transport of energy and momentum between different regions of the atmosphere. The momentum mostly generated in the troposphere is transported to upper atmospheric levels where GWs break or dissipate and transfer their momentum to the background wind (GW drag). The deposit of GW momentum can occur in the complete altitude range from the upper troposphere-stratosphere, the mesosphere, and even in the thermosphere. A global observation of GW parameters (e.g. potential energy and vertical flux of absolute horizontal momentum) is only possible with satellite data. The radio occultation (RO) technique uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Atmospheric temperature profiles in the troposphere/stratosphere and ionospheric electron densities are derived with high vertical resolution. The GPS RO technique is sensitive to GWs with small ratios of vertical to horizontal wavelengths. In this presentation we give an overview about the derivation of GW parameters from RO temperature profiles, review some results of GW detection with RO data, and discuss the limitations of the RO technique. The focus of the presented results is (1) global GW activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for different seasons, (2) influence of the topography on GW activity from the troposphere to the ionosphere in the Andean region of South America, and (3) the variation of ionospheric sporadic E layers.

  14. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechamisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as it flew by Neptune. The study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, and ray tracing to determine the possible source mechanisms and locations of the radiation, including the narrowband bursty and smooth components of the Neptune radio emission.

  15. Nonextensivity effect on radio-wave transmission in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new theoretical findings on the application of magnetic field in effective transmission of electromagnetic (EM) waves through a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle are reported. The results are obtained by assuming the plasma sheath to consist of nonextensive electrons and thermal ions. The expressions for the electric field and effective collision frequency are derived analytically in the framework of nonextensive statistics. Examination of the reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients regarding the strength of the ambient magnetic field shows the significance of q-nonextensive parameter effect on these entities. For small values of the magnetic field, the transmission coefficient increases to unity only in the range of - 1 < q < 1 . It is also found that the EM wave transmission through the nonextensive plasma sheath can take place using lower magnetic field strengths in the presence of superthermal electrons compared with that of Maxwellian ones. It is observed that superthermal electrons, with nonextensive parameter, q < 1, play a dominant role in overcoming the radio blackout for hypersonic flights.

  16. The ISPM unified radio and plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Caldwell, J.; Deconchy, Y.; Deschanciaux, C.; Ebbett, R.; Epstein, G.; Groetz, K.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoang, S.; Howard, R.

    1983-01-01

    Hardware for the International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) wave experiment is presented. The URAP determines direction and polarization of distant radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere, and studies local wave phenomena which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. Electric and magnetic field antennas and preamplifiers; the electromagnetic compatibility plan and grounding; radio astronomy and plasma frequency receivers; a fast Fourier transformation data processing unit waveform analyzer; dc voltage measurements; a fast envelope sampler for the solar wind, and plasmas near Jupiter; a sounder; and a power converter are described.

  17. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

  18. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.; Schumacher, Richard V.; Pendleton, Rand P.

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  19. The mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to lower hybrid wave propagation and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.; Zonca, F.; Cardinali, A.

    2013-03-01

    The mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach for the calculation of the 2D mode structure in tokamak plasmas is further developed based on our previous work [A. Cardinali and F. Zonca, Phys. Plasmas 10, 4199 (2003) and Z. X. Lu et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 042104 (2012)]. A new scheme for theoretical analysis and numerical implementation of the mixed WKB-full-wave approach is formulated, based on scale separation and asymptotic analysis. Besides its capability to efficiently investigate the initial value problem for 2D mode structures and linear stability, in this work, the mixed WKB-full-wave approach is extended to the investigation of radio frequency wave propagation and absorption, e.g., lower hybrid waves. As a novel method, its comparison with other approaches, e.g., WKB and beam tracing methods, is discussed. Its application to lower hybrid wave propagation in concentric circular tokamak plasmas using typical FTU discharge parameters is also demonstrated.

  20. Roles Played by Electrostatic Waves in Producing Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    Processes in which electromagnetic radiation is produced directly or indirectly via intermediate waves are reviewed. It is shown that strict theoretical constraints exist for electrons to produce nonthermal levels of radiation directly by the Cerenkov or cyclotron resonances. In contrast, indirect emission processes in which intermediary plasma waves are converted into radiation are often favored on general and specific grounds. Four classes of mechanisms involving the conversion of electrostatic waves into radiation are linear mode conversion, hybrid linear/nonlinear mechanisms, nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle processes, and radiation from localized wave packets. These processes are reviewed theoretically and observational evidence summarized for their occurrence. Strong evidence exists that specific nonlinear wave processes and mode conversion can explain quantitatively phenomena involving type III solar radio bursts and ionospheric emissions. On the other hand, no convincing evidence exists that magnetospheric continuum radiation is produced by mode conversion instead of nonlinear wave processes. Further research on these processes is needed.

  1. Evidence for nonlinear wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Levedahl, W. K.; Lotko, W.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that nonlinear wave-wave interactions occur in type III solar radio bursts. Intense, spiky Langmuir waves are observed to be driven by electron beams associated with type III solar radio bursts in the interplanetary medium. Bursts of 30-300 Hz (in the spacecraft frame) waves are often observed coincident in time with the most intense spikes of the Langmuir waves. These low-frequency waves appear to be long-wavelength ion acoustic waves, with wavenumber approximately equal to the beam resonant Langmuir wavenumber. Three possible interpretations of these observations are considered: modulational instability, parametric decay of the parent Langmuir waves to daughter ion acoustic and Langmuir waves, and decay to daughter electromagnetic waves and ion acoustic waves.

  2. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  3. Coincidently Searching for Gravitational Waves and Low Frequency Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Yancey, C.; Shawhan, P. S.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.

    2014-01-01

    The transient sky has become an important area of astrophysical study, especially with the appearance of recent fast transients, but little is known about the sources of these transients. One possible approach which can shed light on this area is multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves and prompt emission meter-wavelength radio to observe fast transients. This is made possible with gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO (IndIGO and KAGRA proposed or under construction) and phased-array radio-telescopes such LWA, LOFAR, LoFASM, and MWA. This talk presents a method for coincidence of gravitational wave and meter-wavelength radio observations to enable multi-messenger astronomy and discusses the optimization of gravitational-wave and radio sensitivities to attain effective combined observational sensitivities. It is shown that coincidence provides a 52.9% increase to the sensitivity distance for LIGO and a 200% increase to the SNR of radio arrays for particular cases.

  4. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  5. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luis C. B.

    2010-06-15

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  6. Excitation of parametric instabilities by radio waves in the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.; Leer, E.

    1972-01-01

    The excitation of parametric instabilities by radio waves in a magnetoplasma is discussed. A uniform medium is assumed and linear approximations are used. Excitation by a pump wave of ordinary polarization is hardly affected by the magnetic field. Low or zero frequency ion waves and high frequency Langmuir waves are excited simultaneously. For an extraordinary pump wave, the excited high frequency electrostatic waves are in the Bernstein mode. The threshold is slightly higher and excitation can occur only within certain 'allowed' frequency bands. A new type of parametric instability in which the excited waves are electromagnetic in nature and which is more strongly affected by the inhomogeneous nature of the medium is discussed qualitatively.

  7. Fermi energy-dependence of electromagnetic wave absorption in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoufie Ukhtary, M.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Saito, Riichiro

    2015-05-01

    Undoped graphene is known to absorb 2.3% of visible light at a normal angle of incidence. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate that the absorption of 10-100 GHz of an electromagnetic wave can be tuned from nearly 0 to 100% by varying the Fermi energy of graphene when the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic wave is kept within total internal reflection geometry. We calculate the absorption probability of the electromagnetic wave as a function of the Fermi energy of graphene and the angle of incidence of the wave. These results open up possibilities for the development of simple electromagnetic wave-switching devices operated by gate voltage.

  8. Attosecond Electron Wave-Packet Interference Observed by Transient Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Holler, M.; Schapper, F.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.

    2011-03-25

    We perform attosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy around the first ionization threshold of helium and observe rapid oscillations of the absorption of the individual harmonics as a function of time delay with respect to a superimposed, moderately strong infrared laser field. The phase relation between the absorption modulation of individual harmonics gives direct evidence for the interference of transiently bound electronic wave packets as the mechanism behind the absorption modulation.

  9. Attosecond electron wave-packet interference observed by transient absorption.

    PubMed

    Holler, M; Schapper, F; Gallmann, L; Keller, U

    2011-03-25

    We perform attosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy around the first ionization threshold of helium and observe rapid oscillations of the absorption of the individual harmonics as a function of time delay with respect to a superimposed, moderately strong infrared laser field. The phase relation between the absorption modulation of individual harmonics gives direct evidence for the interference of transiently bound electronic wave packets as the mechanism behind the absorption modulation.

  10. Short-Wave Radio: An Aid to Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutcavage, Charles P.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses use of short-wave radio broadcasts as method for expanding students' appreciation of practical advantages of language learning. Suggests use of news broadcasts and gives guidelines for using broadcasts such as level of aural comprehension in class. (Author/BK)

  11. Radio wave propagation at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 in the short wave band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkaliyev, Y. F.; Bocharov, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The results of measurements of field strength and signal/noise ratio on experimental ionospheric-scattering short wave radio links are presented. It is shown that the seasonal and diurnal variations of field strength are determined by features of solar and meteoric activity. The role of the sporadic E-layer in propagation of short radio waves at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 is noted.

  12. HI absorption towards low luminosity radio-loud AGNs of different accretion modes and WISE colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, Yogesh; Saikia, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    HI absorption studies of active galaxies enable us to probe their circumnuclear regions and the general interstellar medium, and study the supply of gas which may trigger the nuclear activity. We investigated the detection rate of HI absorption on the nature of radio galaxies based on their emission-line spectra, nature of the host galaxies based on the WISE colours and their radio structure, which may help understand the different accretion modes. The highest detection rate of HI absorption is found in the `late-type' galaxies with WISE infrared colours W2-W3 > 2, which is typical of gas-rich systems, along with a compact radio structure. Almost all the high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) in our sample have W2-W3 > 2. The HI detection rate for low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) with W2-W3 > 2 and compact radio structure is high (~ 71 %). This is similar to compact HERGs with W2-W3 > 2 where, although the numbers are small, all three sources are detected with HI absorption. In HERGs, compact radio structure in the nuclear or circumnuclear region could give rise to absorption by gas in the dusty torus in addition to gas in the interstellar medium. However, higher specific star formation rate (sSFR) for the LERGs with W2-W3 > 2 suggests that HI absorption may be largely due to star-forming gas in their hosts.

  13. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  14. Millimeter-wave Absorption Studies of Molecules in Diffuse Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Robert; Liszt, Harvey S.

    1999-10-01

    With IRAM instruments in the last few years, we have been using compact extragalactic millimeter wave radio sources as background objects to study the absorption spectrum of diffuse interstellar gas at millimeter wavelengths. The molecular content of interstellar gas has turned out to be unexpectedly rich. Simple polyatomic molecules such as HCO+, C2H are quite ubiquitous near the Galactic plane (beta < 15o), and many species are detected in some directions (CO, HCO+, H2CO, HCN, HNC, CN, C2H, C3H2, H2S, CS, HCS+, SO, SiO). Remarkable proportionality relations are found between related species such as HCO+ and OH, or CN, HCN and HNC. The high abundance of some species is still a challenge for current models of diffuse cloud chemistry. A factor of 10 increase in the sensitivity will make such studies achievable in denser clouds, where the chemistry is still more active and where abundances are nowadays only available by emission measurements, and thus subject to uncertainties due to sometimes poorly understood line formation and excitation conditions.

  15. Nonlinear absorption of Alfven wave in dissipative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Taiurskii, A. A. Gavrikov, M. B.

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method for studying absorption of Alfven wave propagation in a homogeneous non-isothermal plasma along a constant magnetic field, and relaxation of electron and ion temperatures in the A-wave. The absorption of a A-wave by the plasma arises due to dissipative effects - magnetic and hydrodynamic viscosities of electrons and ions and their elastic interaction. The method is based on the exact solution of two-fluid electromagnetic hydrodynamics of the plasma, which for A-wave, as shown in the work, are reduced to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations.

  16. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the Jupiter environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; De Villedary, C.; Fainberg, J.; Farrell, W. M.; Goetz, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of auroral-like hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the Io plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the Io torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  17. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the jupiter environment.

    PubMed

    Stone, R G; Pedersen, B M; Harvey, C C; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Desch, M D; de Villedary, C; Fainberg, J; Farrell, W M; Goetz, K; Hess, R A; Hoang, S; Kaiser, M L; Kellogg, P J; Lecacheux, A; Lin, N; Macdowall, R J; Manning, R; Meetre, C A; Meyer-Vernet, N; Moncuquet, M; Osherovich, V; Reiner, M J; Tekle, A; Thiessen, J; Zarka, P

    1992-09-11

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of aurorallike hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the lo plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the lo torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  18. Data compression for the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Woolliscroft, L. J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment will employ data compression to make effective use of the available data telemetry bandwidth. Some compression will be achieved by use of a lossless data compression chip and some by software in a dedicated 80C85 processor. A description of the instrument and data compression system are included in this report. Also, the selection of data compression systems and acceptability of data degradation is addressed.

  19. Theories of radio emissions and plasma waves. [in Jupiter magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The complex region of Jupiter's radio emissions at decameter wavelengths, the so-called DAM, is considered, taking into account the basic theoretical ideas which underly both the older and newer theories and models. Linear theories are examined, giving attention to direct emission mechanisms, parallel propagation, perpendicular propagation, and indirect emission mechanisms. An investigation of nonlinear theories is also conducted. Three-wave interactions are discussed along with decay instabilities, and three-wave up-conversio. Aspects of the Io and plasma torus interaction are studied, and a mechanism by which Io can accelerate electrons is reviewed.

  20. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Schmid, S.; Villanueva, L. G.; Zeuthen, E.; Appel, J.; Taylor, J. M.; Sørensen, A.; Usami, K.; Schliesser, A.; Polzik, E. S.

    2014-03-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of , this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of . Our approach to all-optical, ultralow-noise detection of classical

  1. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis

    2013-05-15

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  2. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis

    2013-05-01

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  3. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2015-12-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  4. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2015-12-10

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  5. Absorption and Direct Processes in Chaotic Wave Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.; Baez, G.; Martinez-Mares, M.

    2010-12-21

    Recent results on the scattering of waves by chaotic systems with losses and direct processes are discussed. We start by showing the results without direct processes nor absorption. We then discuss systems with direct processes and lossy systems separately. Finally the discussion of systems with both direct processes and loses is given. We will see how the regimes of strong and weak absorption are modified by the presence of the direct processes.

  6. Energy absorption from ocean waves: a free ride for cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Bose, N; Lien, J

    1990-06-22

    Flukes of cetaceans are capable of absorbing energy from ocean waves for propulsion. The extent of this energy absorption is demonstrated by considering the flukes of an immature fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus. In a fully developed seaway corresponding to a wind speed of 20 knots (around Beaufort force 5) and at a low swimming speed, of 2.5 m s-1, this whale was able to absorb up to 25% of its required propulsive power in head seas and 33% of propulsive power in following seas. Consequences of wave-energy absorption for energetics of cetacean migrations are discussed.

  7. The Radio & Plasma Wave Investigation (RPWI) for JUICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlund, J.-E.

    2013-09-01

    We present the Radio & Plasma Waves Investigation (RPWI) selected for implementation on the JUICE mission. RPWI consists of a highly integrated instrument package that provides a whole set of plasma and fields measurements. The RPWI instrument has outstanding new capabilities not previously available to outer planet missions, and that would address many fundamental planetary science objectives. Specifically, RPWI would be able to study the electro-dynamic influence of the Jovian magnetosphere on the exospheres, surfaces and conducting oceans of Ganymede, Europa and Callisto. RPWI would also be able to monitor the sources of radio emissions from auroral regions of Ganymede and Jupiter, and possibly also from lightning activity in Jupiter's clouds. Moreover, RPWI will search for exhaust plumes from cracks on the icy moons, as well as μm-sized dust and related dust-plasmasurface interaction processes occurring near the icy moons of Jupiter.

  8. Discovery of millimetre-wave excess emission in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud; Baldi, Ranieri D.; Laor, Ari; Horesh, Assaf; Stevens, Jamie; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2015-07-01

    The physical origin of radio emission in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (RQ AGN) remains unclear, whether it is a downscaled version of the relativistic jets typical of radio-loud (RL) AGN, or whether it originates from the accretion disc. The correlation between 5 GHz and X-ray luminosities of RQ AGN, which follows LR = 10-5LX observed also in stellar coronae, suggests an association of both X-ray and radio sources with the accretion disc corona. Observing RQ AGN at higher (mm-wave) frequencies, where synchrotron self-absorption is diminished, and smaller regions can be probed, is key to exploring this association. Eight RQ AGN, selected based on their high X-ray brightness and variability, were observed at 95 GHz with the CARMA (Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy) and ATCA (the Australia Telescope Compact Array) telescopes. All targets were detected at the 1-10 mJy level. Emission excess at 95 GHz of up to ×7 is found with respect to archival low-frequency steep spectra, suggesting a compact, optically thick core superimposed on the more extended structures that dominate at low frequencies. Though unresolved, the 95 GHz fluxes imply optically thick source sizes of 10-4-10-3 pc, or ˜10-1000 gravitational radii. The present sources lie tightly along an LR (95 GHz) = 10-4LX (2-10 keV) correlation, analogous to that of stellar coronae and RQ AGN at 5 GHz, while RL AGN are shown to have higher LR/LX ratios. The present observations argue that simultaneous mm-wave and X-ray monitoring of RQ AGN features a promising method for understanding accretion disc coronal emission.

  9. The VLBI structure of radio-loud Broad Absorption Line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The nature and origin of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars and their relationship to non-BAL quasars are an open question. The BAL quasars are probably normal quasars seen along a particular line of sight. Alternatively, they are young or recently refueled. The high resolution radio morphology of BAL quasars is very important to understand the radio properties of BAL quasars. We present VLBA observations at L and C bands for a sample of BAL quasars. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties, and distinguish the present models of explaining BAL phenomena.

  10. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  11. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  12. Dependence of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar Fraction on Radio Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Dai, Xinyu; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2008-11-01

    We find that the fraction of classical broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) among the FIRST radio sources in the Sloan Data Release 3, is 20.5+ 7.3-5.9% at the faintest radio powers detected (L1.4 GHz ~ 1032 erg s-1), and rapidly drops to lesssim8% at L1.4 GHz ~ 3 × 1033 erg s-1. Similarly, adopting the broader absorption index (AI) definition of Trump et al., we find the fraction of radio BALQSOs to be 44+ 8.1-7.8%, reducing to 23.1+ 7.3-6.1% at high luminosities. While the high fraction at low radio power is consistent with the recent near-IR estimates by Dai et al., the lower fraction at high radio powers is intriguing and confirms previous claims based on smaller samples. The trend is independent of the redshift range, the optical and radio flux selection limits, or the exact definition of a radio match. We also find that at fixed optical magnitude, the highest bins of radio luminosity are preferentially populated by non-BALQSOs, consistent with the overall trend. We do find, however, that those quasars identified as AI-BALQSOs but not under the classical definition do not show a significant drop in their fraction as a function of radio power, further supporting independent claims that these sources, characterized by lower equivalent width, may represent an independent class from the classical BALQSOs. We find the balnicity index, a measure of the absorption trough in BALQSOs, and the mean maximum wind velocity to be roughly constant at all radio powers. We discuss several plausible physical models which may explain the observed fast drop in the fraction of the classical BALQSOs with increasing radio power, although none is entirely satisfactory. A strictly evolutionary model for the BALQSO and radio emission phases requires a strong fine-tuning to work, while a simple geometric model, although still not capable of explaining polar BALQSOs and the paucity of FRII BALQSOs, is statistically successful in matching the data if part of the apparent radio

  13. Gyrokinetic simulation on the effect of radio frequency waves on ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Sen, S.; Vahala, G.

    2016-02-01

    The ion-temperature-driven modes are studied in the presence of radio frequency waves by the use of the Gyro-Kinetic simulation Code. It is shown that the radio frequency waves through the ponderomotive force can stabilise the ion-temperature-gradient instabilities and contrary to the usual belief no radio frequency wave-induced flow generation hypothesis is required. This might be a major way to create a transport barrier in the fusion energy generation.

  14. Hertz and the Discovery of Radio Waves and the Photoelectric Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the discoveries by Hertz historically, such as photoelectric effect, radio waves, their impact on modern physics and some applications. Presents several diagrams and two chronological tables. (YP)

  15. Searching for Correlated Radio Transients & Gravitational Wave Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Shawhan, P. S.; Yancey, C.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.

    2013-01-01

    We will discuss an ongoing multi-messenger search for transient radio pulses and gravitational wave bursts. This work is being conducted jointly by the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). A variety of astrophysical sources can produce simultaneous emission of gravitational waves and coherent low-frequency electromagnetic radiation. The primary common source motivating this work is the merger of neutron star binaries for which the LWA and LSC instruments have comparable sensitivity. Additional common sources include supernovae, long timescale GRBs and cosmic string cusp events. Data taken by both instruments can be compared to search for correlated signals. Identification of correlated signals can be used to increase the sensitivity of both instruments. We will summarize the coincident observations which have already been conducted and outline plans for future work. We will describe the process being used for synthesizing these data set and present preliminary results.

  16. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  17. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer.

    PubMed

    Bagci, T; Simonsen, A; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2014-03-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be 60 pV Hz-1/2 when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of ~150 with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to

  18. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer.

    PubMed

    Bagci, T; Simonsen, A; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2014-03-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be 60 pV Hz-1/2 when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of ~150 with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to

  19. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore » vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  20. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    SciTech Connect

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing the vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.

  1. Characteristics of layers, waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and ionosphere as estimated by GPS space radio-holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, Alexander; Gubenko, Vladimir; Matyugov, Stanislav; Pavelyev, Alexey

    The spatial, seasonal and geographical distrubutions of the intensity of layers, turbulence and internal waves at different altitudes in the atmosphere and ionosphere of the Earth are presented. The results have been obtained on the base of locality principle using a new phase acceleration-intensity method for analysis of the GPS radio occultation signals. This methodology has been applied to mesearements of the inclination and altitude of ionospheric layers. Obtained information has been used for estimation of the front orientation, internal frequency and phase speed of the internal waves in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A new index of the ionospheric activity as measured from the phase of radio waves passed through the ionosphere is introduced and its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the significant influence of ionospheric layers on variations of characteristics of radio waves in transionospheric communication links. Specially for the troposphere the geographical distribution of the weak total absorption (about of 1-2 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies in the Earth atmosphere corresponding to influence of the oxygen and water vapor in the troposphere is measured with accuracy better than 0.1 db. Obtained results expanded the applicable domain of the GPS space radio-holography for global investigation of the natural processes in the atmosphere and ionosphere as function of solar activity and space weather effects. The new phase acceleration-intensity method is also a basic tool which can be applied for data analysis of future planetary radio occultation missions

  2. Picosecond Surface Acoustic Waves Using A Suboptical Wavelength Absorption Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2002-10-01

    We have demonstrated laser generation and detection of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAW’s) with acoustic wavelengths that are smaller than the optical wavelength of both the excitation and the detection beams. SAW generation was achieved using electron beam lithography to modulate the surface reflectivity and hence the lateral thermal gradients on a suboptical wavelength scale. The generation and detection characteristics of two material systems were investigated (aluminum absorption gratings on Si and GaAs substrates). The polarization sensitive absorption characteristics of the suboptical wavelength lithographic grating were exploited in order to explore various acoustic generation and detection schemes.

  3. Solar Corona and plasma effects on Radio Frequency waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkono, C.; Rosenblatt, P.; Dehant, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    Solar corona (plasma) effects on radio signal waves for three different frequency bands S (2.3 GHz), X (8.4 GHz), and Ka (32 GHz), currently used to track probes in the solar system, have been computed using different models of the total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path between the Earth and Mars. The Earth-Mars-Sun configuration has been obtained from the planetary ephemerides DE421 (using SPICE kernels) for the period from September 2004 to September 2006. This configuration is expressed as a function of the Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles (the probe being in close orbit to Mars). We used the TEC values provided by the different models proposed in the literature in order to estimate the TEC along the propagation path (STEC, for Slant TEC). From these model-dependent STEC estimates, the time delay on the wave propagation as well as the associated frequency shift with a 10 seconds sampling time have been obtained for each of the three frequency bands. For the X-band mostly used in radio science, we have obtained estimates differing by up to several orders of magnitude due to the different STEC values derived from different models of TEC. For example, if the propagation path passes near the Sun such that SEP angle is 1.55° the STEC is ranging from 4.6x1020 electron/m2 to 6.07x1016 electron/m2, which corresponds to a time delay range between 0.87 μs and 1.15x10-4 μs, respectively. For SEP angles between 2° and 8°, the range of the different time delay values reduces to 2.8x10-1 μs and becomes as small as 1.6x10-2 μs for SEP angles larger than 8° (1x10-2 μs is about the order of magnitude of the radioscience instrument precision). These results show that the correction of the solar corona effect on radio frequency waves can be reliably done on usual X-band tracking data of spacecraft for SEP angles >12°, but should be use with caution for lower SEP angles, especially lower than 2°.

  4. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  5. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  6. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  7. Grating formation by a high power radio wave in near-equator ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-11-15

    The formation of a volume grating in the near-equator regions of ionosphere due to a high power radio wave is investigated. The radio wave, launched from a ground based transmitter, forms a standing wave pattern below the critical layer, heating the electrons in a space periodic manner. The thermal conduction along the magnetic lines of force inhibits the rise in electron temperature, limiting the efficacy of heating to within a latitude of few degrees around the equator. The space periodic electron partial pressure leads to ambipolar diffusion creating a space periodic density ripple with wave vector along the vertical. Such a volume grating is effective to cause strong reflection of radio waves at a frequency one order of magnitude higher than the maximum plasma frequency in the ionosphere. Linearly mode converted plasma wave could scatter even higher frequency radio waves.

  8. Resonance absorption of propagating fast waves in a cold plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of propagating waves impinging on a surface in which the plasma and magnetic field may change is investigated by examining in depth the problem of a combination of cold plasma, uniform magnetic field and a surface density which varies linearly from zero at the left end to some finite value at the right end, beyond which the density is constant. Two cases are considered: one in which the plasma is a vacuum everywhere to the left of the surface (which may correspond to coronal conditions) and one in which the plasma density jumps to a very large value to the left of the surface (which may mimic the magnetosphere with the dense region at the left corresponding to the plasmasphere). A complete discussion of the resonance absorption of propagating fast waves for the case considered by Kiveloson and Southwood (1986) is presented, emphasizing approximate analytical results whenever possible; these results are then compared with exact numerical solutions.

  9. Annual report 1992/93, FOA 38. Radio systems and wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildh, I. M.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation is to carry out research and development in the field of secure and robust radio communications for Sweden's national defense. This is the Annual Report for fiscal year 1992/93 of the Division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation. The division is responsible for research and development of secure radio communication for information transmission. We are also responsible for wave propagation research within a frequency range from LF to SHF. We carry out applied research in fields like antijamming systems, modulation, error correcting codes, wave propagation and digital signal processing. The wave propagation research is carried out by basic research so the demands from new techniques and new radio systems for accurate propagation models can be achieved.

  10. Radio Wave Scattering in the Outer Heliosphere: Preliminary Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed first estimates are presented of angular broadening in the outer heliosphere due to scattering of radio waves by density irregularities. The application is to the 2-3 kHz radiation observed by Voyager. Two plausible turbulence models, which account very well for scattering within 1 AU, are extrapolated beyond 10 AU. Both models predict significant angular broadening in the outer heliosphere, accounting semi- quantitatively alone for the source sizes inferred from roll modulation data. Predictions are presented for radial variations in the apparent source size if scattering is important. Comparisons with available data argue that scattering is important (and indeed is the dominant contributor to the apparent source size) and that the radiation source is located in the outer heliosphere. Other evidence that scattering is important, such as the fluctuations in apparent source direction and intensity, are also identified. The effects of scattering should be included in future analyses of the 2-3 kHz emissions.

  11. The Birth and Development of Radio Astronomy Studies of the Sun at the Siberian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere and Radio-Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smol'kov, G. Y.

    The history of the organisation of the Department of Radio Astronomy at the Siberian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere and Radio-Wave Propagation (SibIZMIRAN) is described, together with the principles behind the construction of the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope and the results of observations of the solar radio emission at decimetre wavelengths using this telescope.

  12. Rest-frame optical properties of luminous, radio-selected broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Ganguly, R.; Brotherton, M. S.; DiPompeo, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    We have obtained Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX spectra of eight moderate-redshift (z = 0.7-2.4), radio-selected (log R* ≈ 0.4-1.9) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. The spectra cover the rest-frame optical band. We compare the optical properties of these quasars to those of canonically radio-quiet (log R* ≲ 1) BAL quasars at similar redshifts and to low-redshift quasars from the Palomar-Green catalogue. As with previous studies of BAL quasars, we find that [O III] λ5007 is weak, and optical Fe II emission is strong, a rare combination in canonically radio-loud (log R* ≳ 1) quasars. With our measurements of the optical properties, particularly the Balmer emission-line widths and the continuum luminosity, we have used empirical scaling relations to estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios. These lie in the range (0.4-2.6) × 109 M⊙ and 0.1-0.9, respectively. Despite their comparatively extreme radio properties relative to most BAL quasars, their optical properties are quite consistent with those of radio-quiet BAL quasars and dissimilar to those of radio-loud non-BAL quasars. While BAL quasars generally appear to have low values of [O III] λ5007/Fe II an extreme of `Eigenvector 1', the Balmer line widths and Eddington ratios do not appear to significantly differ from those of unabsorbed quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities.

  13. Microwave absorption in s- and d-wave disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan

    2001-10-01

    We model s- and d-wave ceramic superconductors with a three-dimensional lattice of randomly distributed 0 and π Josephson junctions with finite self-inductance. The field and temperature dependences of the microwave absoption are obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin dynamical equations. We find that at magnetic field H=0 the microwave absoption of the s-wave samples, when plotted against the field, has a minimum at any temperature. In the case of d-wave superconductors one has a peak at H=0 in the temperature region where the paramagnetic Meissner effect is observable. These results agree with experiments. The dependence of the microwave absorption on the screening strength was found to be nontrivial due to the crossover from the weak to the strong screening regime.

  14. A blind green bank telescope millimeter-wave survey for redshifted molecular absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-10

    We present the methodology for 'blind' millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO{sup +} rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z ≳ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is 'blind', i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H{sub 2} column densities ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H{sub 2}) ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}.

  15. An Overview of Recent Results from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D.; Kurth, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Persoon, A.; Averkamp, T.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Desch, M.; Farrell, W.; Kaiser, M.; Kellogg, P.; Goetz, K.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Pedersen, A.

    2005-08-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) investigation on the Cassini spacecraft provides measurements of radio emissions, plasma waves, and thermal plasma parameters in the vicinity of Saturn. This paper gives an overview of recent results from the RPWS. These include the most recent measurements of the rotational modulation period of radio emissions from Saturn (Saturn Kilometric Radiation), of impulsive radio bursts from atmospheric lightning (Saturn Electrostatic Discharges), of the distribution of small dust particles near the ring plane, and of the distribution and origin of plasma in the inner regions of the Saturnian system and near Titan.

  16. Combined X-Ray and mm-Wave Observations of Radio Quiet Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, E.

    2016-06-01

    A connection between the X-ray and radio sources in radio quiet active galaxies (AGNs) will be demonstrated. High radio frequency, i.e., mm-wave observations are promising probes of the X-ray emitting inner regions of the accretion disks in radio quiet AGNs. An argument for simultaneous observations in X-rays and in mm waves will be made, in order to promote these as one of the future science goals of X-ray and AGN astronomy in the next decade. Preliminary results from an exploratory campaign with several space and ground based telescopes will be presented.

  17. Discovery of carbon radio recombination lines in absorption towards Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Asgekar, A.; White, G. J.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Brentjens, M.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Conway, J. E.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; van Enst, J.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Jackson, N. J.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Klijn, W.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J. P.; Mevius, M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mol, J. D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schwarz, D.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2014-02-01

    We present the first detection of carbon radio recombination line absorption along the line of sight to Cygnus A. The observations were carried out with the Low Frequency Array in the 33-57 MHz range. These low-frequency radio observations provide us with a new line of sight to study the diffuse, neutral gas in our Galaxy. To our knowledge this is the first time that foreground Milky Way recombination line absorption has been observed against a bright extragalactic background source. By stacking 48 carbon α lines in the observed frequency range we detect carbon absorption with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 5. The average carbon absorption has a peak optical depth of 2 × 10-4, a line width of 10 km s-1 and a velocity of +4 km s-1 with respect to the local standard of rest. The associated gas is found to have an electron temperature Te ˜ 110 K and density ne ˜ 0.06 cm-3. These properties imply that the observed carbon α absorption likely arises in the cold neutral medium of the Orion arm of the Milky Way. Hydrogen and helium lines were not detected to a 3σ peak optical depth limit of 1.5 × 10-4 for a 4 km s-1 channel width. Radio recombination lines associated with Cygnus A itself were also searched for, but are not detected. We set a 3σ upper limit of 1.5 × 10-4 for the peak optical depth of these lines for a 4 km s-1 channel width.

  18. A VERY LARGE ARRAY SURVEY OF RADIO-SELECTED SDSS BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally

    2011-12-10

    We have built a sample of 74 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters, along with a well-matched sample of 74 unabsorbed 'normal' quasars. The sources have been observed with the NRAO Very Large Array/Expanded Very Large Array at 8.4 GHz (3.5 cm) and 4.9 GHz (6 cm). All sources have additional archival 1.4 GHz (21 cm) data. Here we present the measured radio fluxes, spectral indices, and our initial findings. The percentage of BAL quasars with extended structure (on the order of 10%) in our sample is similar to previous studies at similar resolutions, suggesting that BAL quasars are indeed generally compact, at least at arsecond resolutions. The majority of sources do not appear to be significantly variable at 1.4 GHz, but we find two previously unidentified BAL quasars that may fit into the 'polar' BAL category. We also identify a significant favoring of steeper radio spectral index for BAL compared to non-BAL quasars. This difference is apparent for several different measures of the spectral index and persists even when restricting the samples to only include compact objects. Because radio spectral index is a statistical indicator of viewing angle for large samples, these results suggest that BAL quasars do have a range of orientations but are more often observed farther from the jet axis compared to normal quasars.

  19. Multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves inferred from high-resolution array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency radio sky shows the locations of electromagnetic radio sources with a characteristic dilution of precision. Here we report a thorough high-resolution analysis of radio waves from low-frequency (˜20-150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day. It is found that the observed dilution of precision results from the array geometry of the radio receivers, a birefringent wave propagation, and the correlated multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves. The influence of the array geometry on the dilution of precision is reduced by taking into account the impulse response of the array. This procedure reveals for the very first time the splitting of one single radio source into two distinct source locations separated by ˜0.2°-1.9° which result from a birefringent wave propagation. The two locations are yet more clearly identified by using the polarity of the modulated wave number vectors of the radio waves. This polarity is also used to quantify the dilution of precision arising from correlated multipath propagation which is discriminated against wave number fluctuations arising from the timing accuracy of the radio receivers. It is found that ˜69% of the wave number variability is of natural origin and ˜31% originates from the timing accuracy of the receivers. The wave number variability from correlated multipath propagation results in a standard deviation ˜2-8% relative to the source location. This compact measurement of correlated multipath propagation is used to characterize the uncertainty of source locations in the radio sky. The identification of correlated multipath propagation strongly suggests the existence of very fast processes acting on time scales <1 ms in the D region ionosphere with physically meaningful effects on low-frequency radio wave propagation. This important result has implications for practical applications in that the observed multipath

  20. Low Frequency Radio-wave System for subsurface investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Kudelya, Anatoliy; Denisov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Low frequency radio-wave methods (RWM) allow subsurface investigations in terms of lithological structure characterization, detection of filtration flows of ground water, anthropogenic and natural cavities. In this contribution, we present a RWM that exploits two coils working at frequencies of few MHz as transmitting and receiving antennas. The basic principle of this inductive method is as follows. The primary alternating electromagnetic field radiated by the transmitting coil induces eddy currents in the subsurface mainly due to the conductivity anomalies. These eddy currents generate a secondary (scattered) magnetic field which overlaps to the incident magnetic field and is detected by the receiving coil. Despite the simple operation of the system, the complexity of the electromagnetic scattering phenomenon at hand must be properly modeled to achieve adequate performance. Therefore, an advanced data processing technique, belonging to the class of the inverse scattering approaches, has been developed by the authors in a full 3D geometry. The proposed method allows to deal with data collected on a scanning surface under a dipole inductive profiling (DIP) modality, where the transmitting/receiving coils are moved simultaneously with fixed offset (multi-bistatic configuration). The hardware, called Dipole Inductive Radio-wave System (DIRS), is composed by an electronic unit and transmitting and receiving loop antennas radiating at frequencies of few MHz (2-4 MHz), which are installed on theodolite supports. The compactness of DIRS and its robustness to external electromagnetic interference offers the possibility to perform geophysical research up to the depth of some tens of meters and under several types of ground and water surfaces, vegetation, and weather conditions. The light weight and small size of system (the single antenna with support weights about 5 kg and has a diameter of 0.5m) allows two operators to perform geophysical research without disturbing the

  1. Characteristics of coronal shock waves and solar type 2 radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections can be observed by radio astronomical methods in terms of solar type 2 radio bursts. In dynamic radio spectra they appear as emission stripes slowly drifting from high to low frequencies. A sample of 25 solar type 2 radio bursts observed in the range of 40 - 170 MHz with a time resolution of 0.1 s by the new radiospectrograph of the Astrophvsikalisches Institut Potsdam in Tremsdorf is statistically investigated concerning their spectral features, i.e, drift rate, instantaneous bandwidth, and fundamental harmonic ratio. In-situ plasma wave measurements at interplanetary shocks provide the assumption that type 2 radio radiation is emitted in the vicinity of the transition region of shock waves. Thus, the instantaneous bandwidth of a solar type 2 radio burst would reflect the density jump across the associated shock wave. Comparing the inspection of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations of shock waves under coronal circumstances with those obtained from the observational study, solar type 2 radio bursts should be regarded to be generated by weak supercritical, quasi-parallel, fast magnetosonic shock waves in the corona.

  2. Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a 2-D Fokker-Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

  3. Quasilinear analysis of absorption of ion Bernstein waves by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Paoletti, F.; Bernabei, S.; Ono, M.

    1995-05-01

    The effects induced on plasma electrons by an externally launched ion Bernstein wave (IBW), in the presence of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) in the current drive regime, are studied by analytical integration of the IBW ray-tracing equations, along with the amplitude transport equation (Poynting theorem). The electric field amplitude parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the quasilinear diffusion coefficient, and the modified electron distribution function are analytically calculated in the case of IBW. The analytical calculation is compared to the numerical solution obtained by using a two-dimensional (2-D) Fokker--Planck code for the distribution function, without any approximation for the collision operator. The synergy between the IBW and LHW can be accounted for, and the absorption of the IBW power when the electron distribution function presents a tail generated by the LHW in the current drive regime can be calculated.

  4. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum fluxes from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo; Ramezani Ziarani, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd<250 km) and the time interval (Δt<15 minutes) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MF) derived in this study are considerable larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method is investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in the presentation is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e. the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches including a new attempt by detrending RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  5. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Alexander, P.; Torre, A.

    2016-05-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data, better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd≤250 km) and the time interval (Δt≤15 min) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MFs) derived in this study are considerably larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method are investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in this paper is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e., the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches and for the first time an attempt is made to detrend RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  6. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-02-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  7. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  8. Put a Short-Wave Radio in Your Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oksenholt, Svein

    1977-01-01

    Advantages of the short-wave radio as a supplement to foreign language instruction as well as practical hints on wavelength, antenna, and techniques for use are provided. Selective annotated bibliography. (STS)

  9. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  10. Jupiter: As a planet. [its physical characteristics and radio waves emitted from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The planet Jupiter, its planetary mass and atmosphere, radio waves emitted from Jupiter, thermal radiation, internal structure of Jupiter, and the possibility of life on Jupiter are discussed. Educational study projects are included.

  11. New theoretical aspects of potential radio wave emission from Jupiter like exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christof; Rucker, Helmut; Vocks, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The UTR-2 (Ukrainian T-shaped Radio Telescope 2nd generation), LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) or the upgrade of LOFAR in Nancay (the NENUFAR project) are promising facilities with sensitivities sufficiently low to be able to detect radio emission from exoplanets, especially from so-called Hot Jupiters. These are Jovian like planets very close to their host star (about 0.045 AU) and their radio emission is expected to be up to 10E5 times higher than the emission from Jupiter in our solar system. Also recent investigations of the possibility of moons around a Jovian exoplanet (an analog of the Io-Jupiter system) are promising candidates amongst the exoplanets for a future detection of exoplanetary radio emission. As is well known Io triggers radio emission up to 40 MHz in the Jovian case, a frequency which lies well above the ionospheric cutoff of 10 MHz and thus can be measured with ground-based facilities on Earth. We present simulation results for wave growth rates at Jupiter-like exoplanets orbiting at distances smaller than 0.1 AU from their parent star. Under sophisticated assumptions for the plasma environment at these exoplanets we find that the cyclotron maser instability (CMI), the process which is very likely responsible for the generation of radio waves in our solar system, produces radio waves which can propagate away from the planet. Furthermore we check the influence of a magnetodisc at Hot Jupiters on the possible power of the emitted radio waves.

  12. Unusual high-redshift radio broad absorption-line quasar 1624+3758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, C. R.; Carballo, R.; Holt, J.; Vigotti, M.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Mack, K.-H.; Perley, R. A.

    2005-07-01

    We present observations of the most radio-luminous broad absorption-line (BAL) quasar known, 1624+3758, at redshift z= 3.377. The quasar has several unusual properties. (1) The FeII UV191 1787-Åemission line is very prominent. (2) The BAL trough (BALnicity index 2990 km s-1) is detached by 21000 km s-1 and extends to velocity v=-29000 km s-1. There are additional intrinsic absorbers at -1900 and -2800 km s-1. (3) The radio rotation measure of the quasar, 18350 rad m-2, is the second highest known. The radio luminosity is P1.4GHz= 4.3 × 1027 W Hz-1 (H0= 50 km s-1 Mpc-1, q0= 0.5) and the radio loudness is R*= 260. The radio source is compact and the radio spectrum is GHz-peaked, consistent with it being relatively young. The width of the CIV emission line, in conjunction with the total optical luminosity, implies a black hole mass MBH~ 109Msolar, L/LEddington~ 2. The high Eddington ratio and the radio-loudness place this quasar in one corner of Boroson's two-component scheme for the classification of active galactic nuclei, implying a very high accretion rate, and this may account for some of the unusual observed properties. The v=-1900km s-1 absorber is a possible Lyman-limit system, with N(HI) = 4 × 1018 cm-2, and a covering factor of 0.7. A complex mini-BAL absorber at v=-2200 to -3400 km s-1 is detected in each of CIV, NV and OVI. The blue and red components of the CIV doublet happen to be unblended, allowing both the covering factor and optical depth to be determined as a function of velocity. Variation of the covering factor with velocity dominates the form of the mini-BAL, with the absorption being saturated (e-τ~ 0) over most of the velocity range. The velocity dependence of the covering factor and the large velocity width imply that the mini-BAL is intrinsic to the quasar. There is some evidence of line-locking between velocity components in the CIV mini-BAL, suggesting that radiation pressure plays a role in accelerating the outflow.

  13. Reflection and transmission coefficients for radio waves incident obliquely on N identical plane plasma layers and zebra patterns in the spectrum of solar radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptukhov, A. I.; Chernov, G. P.

    2012-07-01

    The reflection and transmission coefficients for quasi-monochromatic radio waves incident at an arbitrary angle on an arbitrary number of identical piecewise-homogeneous plane plasma layers are calculated analytically and numerically. It is shown that alternating transparency and opacity stripes in the spectrum of radio waves passing through such a plasma structure (the zebra pattern effect) can be observed at any angle of incidence. The opacity stripes for ordinary waves are wider than those for extraordinary waves. For the zebra pattern to be well pronounced, the radio wave flux in the Sun's atmosphere should be narrowly directed, which is possible during bursts.

  14. Observation of radio-wave-induced red hydroxyl emission at low altitude in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Kagan, L M; Nicolls, M J; Kelley, M C; Carlson, H C; Belikovich, V V; Bakhmet'eva, N V; Komrakov, G P; Trondsen, T S; Donovan, E

    2005-03-11

    We report the discovery of radio-wave-induced red emission of OH Meinel rotation-vibrational bands at 629.79 nm. These are the first measurements of artificial aurora below 100 km. We believe that the 629.79-nm OH emission was due to radio-wave focusing by sporadic ionization clouds near 80-85 km altitude, thus giving a technique to visualize the low-altitude sporadic ionization and providing insight into ionospheric interactions at these low altitudes.

  15. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and synchrotron self-absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency-linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  16. Absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary radio pulsar.

    PubMed

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G

    2012-08-24

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far.

  17. Probing the gas content of radio galaxies through H I absorption stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2014-09-01

    Using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we carried out shallow H i absorption observations of a flux-selected (S1.4 GHz > 50 mJy) sample of 93 radio active galactic nuclei (AGN), which have available SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) redshifts between 0.02 < z < 0.23. Our main goal is to study the gas properties of radio sources down to S1.4 GHz flux densities not systematically explored before using, for the first time, stacking of absorption spectra of extragalactic H i. Despite the shallow observations, we obtained a direct detection rate of ~29%, comparable with deeper studies of radio galaxies. Furthermore, detections are found at every S1.4 GHz flux level, showing that H i absorption detections are not biased toward brighter sources. The stacked profiles of detections and non-detections reveal a clear dichotomy in the presence of H i, with the 27 detections showing an average peak τ = 0.02 corresponding to N(H i) ~(7.4 ± 0.2) × 1018 (Tspin/cf) cm-2, while the 66 non-detections remain undetected upon stacking with a peak optical depth upper limit τ < 0.002 corresponding to N(H i) < (2.26 ± 0.06) × 1017 (Tspin/cf) cm-2 (using a FWHM of 62 kms-1, derived from the mean width of the detections). Separating the sample into compact and extended radio sources increases the detection rate, optical depth, and FWHM for the compact sample. The dichotomy for the stacked profiles of detections and non-detections still holds between these two groups of objects. We argue that orientation effects connected to a disk-like distribution of the H i can be partly responsible for the dichotomy that we see in our sample. However, orientation effects alone cannot explain all the observational results, and some of our galaxies must be genuinely depleted of cold gas. A fraction of the compact sources in the sample are confirmed by previous studies as likely young radio sources (compact steep spectrum and gigahertz peaked spectrum sources). These show an even higher

  18. THE INTRINSIC FRACTIONS AND RADIO PROPERTIES OF LOW-IONIZATION BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xinyu; Shankar, Francesco; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-10-01

    Low-ionization (Mg II, Fe II, and Fe III) broad absorption line quasars (LoBALs) probe a relatively obscured quasar population and could be at an early evolutionary stage for quasars. We study the intrinsic fractions of LoBALs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm survey. We find that the LoBAL fractions of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio samples are approximately 5-7 times higher than those measured in the optical sample. This suggests that the fractions measured in the NIR and radio bands are closer to the intrinsic fractions of the populations, and that the optical fractions are significantly biased due to obscuration effects, similar to high-ionization broad absorption line quasars (HiBALs). Considering a population of obscured quasars that do not enter the SDSS, which could have a much higher LoBAL fraction, we expect that the intrinsic fraction of LoBALs could be even higher. We also find that the LoBAL fractions decrease with increasing radio luminosities, again, similarly to HiBALs. In addition, we find evidence for increasing fractions of LoBALs toward higher NIR luminosities, especially for FeLoBALs with a fraction of {approx}18% at M{sub K{sub s}}< -31 mag. This population of NIR-luminous LoBALs may be at an early evolutionary stage of quasar evolution. To interpret the data, we use a luminosity-dependent model for LoBALs that yields significantly better fits than those from a pure geometric model.

  19. Radio Wave Scintillations and Models of Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1998-05-01

    There are a number of well-established observational results from radio scintillations which have implications for the nature of interstellar turbulence. Among such results are evidence for anisotropy and a Kolmogorov spectrum for the density irregularities. It is probable the galactic magnetic field organizes these irregularities so that spatial gradients along the field are much less than those perpendicular to the field. Such a behavior for turbulence is predicted by theories of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in which the amplitude is small. The turbulence is then described by a theory termed reduced magnetohydrodynamics. A limiting case of reduced magnetohydrodynamics is two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics, in which the direction of the large scale magnetic field z defines the ignorable coordinate. Two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics consists of a pair of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations for the velocity stream function psi and the z component of the magnetic vector potential A_z. A number of observed features of interstellar turbulence can be identified with solutions to the equations of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. Examples are the development of Kolmogorov-like spectra for the velocity and magnetic field from a wide class (although not totally general) initial conditions, a natural explanation for the formation of intermittancy in turbulence, and the rapid development of small scale, large spatial wavenumber fluctuations, in contrast to the eddy cascade of hydrodynamic turbulence. The equations of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics may serve as a simple but tractable model of interstellar plasma turbulence that may complement and be superior to the traditional model of an ensemble of magnetohydrodynamic waves.

  20. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Pedersen, A.

    2005-02-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 +/- 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  1. Radio and plasma wave observations at Saturn from Cassini's approach and first orbit.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Hospodarsky, G B; Persoon, A M; Averkamp, T F; Cecconi, B; Lecacheux, A; Zarka, P; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Galopeau, P; Roux, A; Harvey, C; Louarn, P; Bostrom, R; Gustafsson, G; Wahlund, J-E; Desch, M D; Farrell, W M; Kaiser, M L; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Fischer, G; Ladreiter, H-P; Rucker, H; Alleyne, H; Pedersen, A

    2005-02-25

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 +/- 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  2. X-RAYS FROM A RADIO-LOUD COMPACT BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASAR 1045+352 AND THE NATURE OF OUTFLOWS IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Katarzynski, Krzysztof; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2009-11-10

    We present new results on X-ray properties of radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and focus on broadband spectral properties of a high-ionization BAL (HiBAL) compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio-loud quasar 1045+352. This HiBAL quasar has a very complex radio morphology indicating either strong interactions between a radio jet and the surrounding interstellar medium or a possible re-start of the jet activity. We detected 1045+352 quasar in a short 5 ksec Chandra ACIS-S observation. We applied theoretical models to explain spectral energy distribution of 1045+352 and argue that non-thermal, inverse-Compton (IC) emission from the innermost parts of the radio jet can account for a large fraction of the observed X-ray emission. In our analysis, we also consider a scenario in which the observed X-ray emission from radio-loud BAL quasars can be a sum of IC jet X-ray emission and optically thin corona X-ray emission. We compiled a sample of radio-loud BAL quasars that were observed in X-rays to date and report no correlation between their X-ray and radio luminosity. However, the radio-loud BAL quasars show a large range of X-ray luminosities and absorption columns. This is consistent with the results obtained earlier for radio-quiet BAL quasars and may indicate an orientation effect in BAL quasars or more complex dependence between X-ray emission, radio emission, and an orientation based on the radio morphology.

  3. Energetic electrons and plasma waves associated with a solar type III radio burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Potter, D. W.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed in situ observations from the ISEE 3 spacecraft of energetic electrons, plasma waves, and radio emission for the type II solar radio burst of February 17, 1979, are presented. The reduced, one-dimensional electron distribution function is constructed as a function of time. Since the faster electrons arrive before the slower ones, a bump on tail distribution forms which is unstable to the growth of Langmuir waves. The plasma wave growth computed from the distribution function agrees well with the observed onset of the Langmuir waves, and there is qualitative agreement between variations in the plasma wave levels and in the development of regions of positive slope in the function. The evolution of the function, however, predicts far higher plasma wave levels than those observed. The maximum levels observed are approximately equal to the threshold for nonlinear wave processes, such as oscillation two-stream instability and soliton collapse.

  4. Radio Follow-up of Gravitational-wave Triggers during Advanced LIGO O1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, N. T.; Corsi, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Frail, D. A.; Perley, D. A.; Mishra, N.; Singer, L. P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Surace, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present radio follow-up observations carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array during the first observing run (O1) of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). A total of three gravitational-wave triggers were followed-up during the ≈ 4 months of O1, from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these triggers, GW150914 and GW151226, are binary black hole (BH) merger events of high significance. A third trigger, G194575, was subsequently declared as an event of no interest (i.e., a false alarm). Our observations targeted selected optical transients identified by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in the Advanced LIGO error regions of the three triggers, and a limited region of the gravitational-wave localization area of G194575 not accessible to optical telescopes due to Sun constraints, where a possible high-energy transient was identified. No plausible radio counterparts to GW150914 and GW151226 were found, in agreement with expectations for binary BH mergers. We show that combining optical and radio observations is key to identifying contaminating radio sources that may be found in the follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers, such as emission associated with star formation and active galactic nuclei. We discuss our results in the context of the theoretical predictions for radio counterparts to gravitational-wave transients, and describe our future plans for the radio follow-up of Advanced LIGO (and Virgo) triggers.

  5. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Wave Normal and Poynting Vector Calculations using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Dougherty, M.; Inan, Umran; Wood, Troy

    2001-01-01

    Wave normal and Poynting vector measurements from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument (RPWS) are used to examine the propagation characteristics of various plasma waves during the Earth flyby on August 18, 1999. Using the five-channel waveform receiver (WFR), the wave normal vector is determined using the Means method for a lightning-induced whistler, equatorial chorus, and a series of low-frequency emissions observed while Cassini was in the magnetosheath. The Poynting vector for these emissions is also calculated from the five components measured by the WFR. The propagation characteristics of the lightning-induced whistler were found to be consistent with the whistler wave mode of propagation, with propagation antiparallel to the magnetic field (southward) at Cassini. The sferic associated with this whistler was observed by both Cassini and the Stanford VLF group at the Palmer Station in Antarctica. Analysis of the arrival direction of the sferic at the Palmer Station suggests that the lightning stroke is in the same sector as Cassini. Chorus was observed very close (within a few degrees) to the magnetic equator during the flyby. The chorus was found to propagate primarily away from the magnetic equator and was observed to change direction as Cassini crossed the magnetic equator. This suggests that the source region of the chorus is very near the magnetic equator. The low-frequency emission in the magnetosheath has many of the characteristics of lion roars. The average value of the angle between the wave normal vector and the local magnetic field was found to be 16 degrees, and the emissions ranged in frequency from 0. 19 to 0.75 f(sub ce), where f(sub ce) is the electron cyclotron frequency. The wave normal vectors of these waves were primarily in one direction for each individual burst (either parallel or antiparallel to the local field) but varied in direction throughout the magnetosheath. This suggests that the sources of the emissions are far from

  7. Asymmetric perfectly matched layer for the absorption of waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-02-10

    The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) has become a standard for comparison in the techniques that have been developed to close the system of Maxwell equations (more generally wave equations) when simulating an open system. The original Berenger PML formulation relies on a split version of Maxwell equations with numerical electric and magnetic conductivities. They present here an extension of this formulation which introduces counterparts of the electric and magnetic conductivities affecting the term which is spatially differentiated in the equations. they phase velocity along each direction is also multiplied by an additional coefficient. They show that, under certain constraints on the additional numerical coefficients, this ''medium'' does not generate any reflection at any angle and any frequency and is then a Perfectly Matched Layer. Technically it is a super-set of Berenger's PML to which it reduces for a specific set of parameters and like it, it is anisotropic. However, unlike the PML, it introduces some asymmetry in the absorption rate and is therefore labeled an APML for Asymmetric Perfectly Matched Layer. They present here the numerical considerations that have led them to introduce such a medium as well as its theory. Several finite-different numerical implementations are derived (in one, two and three dimensions) and the performance of the APML is contrasted with that of the PML in one and two dimensions. Using plane wave analysis, they show that the APML implementations lead to higher absorption rates than the considered PML implementations. Although they have considered in this paper the finite-different discretization of Maxwell-like equations only, the APML system of equations may be used with other discretization schemes, such as finite-elements, and may be applied to other equations, for applications beyond electromagnetics.

  8. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  10. Commensal searches for microhertz gravitational waves and fast radio bursts: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Hobbs, George; Ravi, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    In this pilot observing programme, we propose to observe at high cadence the transient gravitational-wave and radio-wave Universe. The goals of these observations are threefold: 1) To improve the timing precision of secondary pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) to accelerate the detection of gravitational waves; 2) To characterise the gravitational wave universe in the hitherto unexplored microhertz frequency band; and 3) To develop methods and search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) while conducting precision time experiments. To achieve these goals, we request 120 hours of observations with the Parkes multibeam system, divided into 10 epochs comprising 12-hour LST days. This pilot project acts as a feasibility study for modifications to both the PPTA project and the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA), the consortium coordinating timing array observations in Australia, Europe, and North America, and assess the feasibility of searching for fast radio bursts while conduction precision timing observations.

  11. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets - Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    Current driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur in extragalactic jets for estimated values of the carried currents. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities. The relativistic double-layer-emitted electron and ion beams drive plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  12. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets: Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    For estimated values of the currents carried by extragalactic jets, current-driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities, the relativistic double-layer-emitted electron, and ion beams driving plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  13. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect

    Spinneken, Johannes Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  14. An assessment of full-wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John

    2008-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off--axis (r/a˜0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established modeling techniques use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wavenumber evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [1]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full-wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [2] and applied to scenarios at the density and magnetic field characteristic of devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER [B0 5 T, ne 1x10^20 m-3]. We find that retaining full wave effects due to diffraction and focusing has a strong effect on the location of wave absorption. Diffraction occurs at caustic surfaces and in resonance cones resulting in a large upshift of the parallel wavenumber and localized power deposition. For some values of density and magnetic field when the waves are fully accessible to the center of the plasma, the full wave description predicts all power being damped at larger radii (r/a ˜ 0.7) in contrast to ray tracing which shows more central power absorption. By incorporating a Fokker-Planck code for self-consistent treatment of the electron distribution and using an synthetic hard X-ray diagnostic we compare the code predictions by both full wave and ray tracing methods with recent Alcator C-Mod experiments. We will compare full-wave and ray tracing for low and high single pass damping regimes. [0pt] [1] G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32 1091 (1991). [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright, E. J. Valeo, C. K. Phillips and P. T. Bonoli, Comm. in Comput. Physics 4 545 (2008).

  15. Verification of nonlinear particle simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, W.; Sun, G. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear simulation model for radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas has been developed and verified using fully kinetic ion and drift kinetic electron. Ion cyclotron motion in the toroidal geometry is implemented using Boris push in the Boozer coordinates. Linear dispersion relation and nonlinear particle trapping are verified for the lower hybrid wave and ion Bernstein wave (IBW). Parametric decay instability is observed where a large amplitude pump wave decays into an IBW sideband and an ion cyclotron quasimode (ICQM). The ICQM induces an ion perpendicular heating, with a heating rate proportional to the pump wave intensity.

  16. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

  17. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

  18. A new mode of radio wave diffraction via the terrestrial surface plasmon on mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masafumi

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that a new mode of radio wave diffraction occurs at the peak of mountains mediated via the terrestrial surface plasmon. If mobile electrical charges exist on the Earth's surface, the electromagnetic theory predicts strong coupling between the radio wave and the surface plasmon on the ground. If sufficient amount of electrical charges of the same sign appear on the ground as a consequence of some underground preseismic activity, they will be subject to the electrical repulsive forces. The surface electrical charges will then move toward topographic highs of nearby mountain peaks. Radio waves are then shown to interact with such electrical charges and create collective oscillations of the surface charges to induce a surface plasmon. Here it is clarified with numerical analyses on a massively parallel supercomputer that such interactions occur on the peak of mountains, hence causing peculiar phenomena of random diffraction. Depending on the density of the electrical charges on the ground surface, the interaction becomes strong enough to cause intense and random scattering and diffraction of the radio wave from the rough surface of the mountain topography. Mountain peaks thus act as a secondary source of radio waves; unexpectedly, radio waves are reradiated from the peaks into various directions by the anomalous diffraction and scattering, and the reradiated wave can propagate beyond the line of sight over mountains to reach distant locations. Such effects may arise randomly but concurrently with some preseismic activity in the crustal rocks, of which observation may allow statistical analysis of the critical state of crustal rocks over a broad area of a few hundred kilometers.

  19. Study of interstellar molecular clouds using formaldehyde absorption toward extragalactic radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Andreev, N.; Dieter-Conklin, N.; Goss, W. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present new Very Large Array 6 cm H{sub 2}CO observations toward four extragalactic radio continuum sources (B0212+735, 3C 111, NRAO 150, and BL Lac) to explore the structure of foreground Galactic clouds as revealed by absorption variability. This project adds a new epoch in the monitoring observations of the sources reported by Marscher and collaborators in the mid-1990s. Our new observations confirm the monotonic increase in H{sub 2}CO absorption strength toward NRAO 150. We do not detect significant variability of our 2009 spectra with respect to the 1994 spectra of 3C111, B0212+735, and BL Lac; however, we find significant variability of the 3C111 2009 spectrum with respect to archive observations conducted in 1991 and 1992. Our analysis supports that changes in absorption lines could be caused by chemical and/or geometrical gradients in the foreground clouds and not necessarily by small-scale (∼10 AU) high-density molecular clumps within the clouds.

  20. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain. [radio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.; Marshall, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of the depolarization and attenuation that occur when millimeter wave radio signals propagate through rain are described. Progress was made in three major areas: the processing of recorded 1972 data, acquisition and processing of a large amount of 1973 data, and the development of a new theoretical model to predict rain cross polarization and attenuation. Each of these topics is described in detail along with radio frequency system design for cross polarization measurements.

  1. Variation of Langmuir wave polarization with electron beam speed in type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, David M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Ergun, Robert E.

    2013-06-13

    Observations by the twin STEREO spacecraft of in-situ electric field waveforms and radio signatures associated with type III radio bursts have demonstrated that the polarization of electron beam-driven waves near the local plasma frequency depends strongly on the speed of the driving electron beam. We expand upon a previous study by including all radio bursts with in-situ waveforms observed by STEREO in 2011. The expanded data set contains five times more radio bursts (35 up from 7) and three times as many Langmuir waves (663 up from 168). While this expanded study supports the results of the original study, that faster (slower) beam electrons drive waves with strong (weak) electric fields perpendicular to the local magnetic field, the larger data set emphasizes that the observation of strong perpendicular electric fields at high electron beam speeds is probabilistic rather than definite. This property supports the interpretation of wave polarization dependence on beam speed as Langmuir/z-mode waves shifted to small wave number through interaction with turbulent solar wind density fluctuations.

  2. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations at high southern heliographic latitudes.

    PubMed

    Stone, R G; Macdowall, R J; Fainberg, J; Kaiser, M L; Desch, M D; Goldstein, M L; Hoang, S; Bougeret, J L; Harvey, C C; Manning, R; Steinberg, J L; Kellogg, P J; Lin, N; Goetz, K; Osherovich, V A; Reiner, M J; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Lengyel-Frey, D; Thejappa, G

    1995-05-19

    Ulysses spacecraft radio and plasma wave observations indicate that some variations in the intensity and occurrence rate of electric and magnetic wave events are functions of heliographic latitude, distance from the sun, and phase of the solar cycle. At high heliographic latitudes, solartype Ill radio emissions did not descend to the local plasma frequency, in contrast to the emission frequencies of some bursts observed in the ecliptic. Short-duration bursts of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves were often found in association with depressions in magnetic field amplitude, known as magnetic holes. Extensive wave activity observed in magnetic clouds may exist because of unusually large electron-ion temperature ratios. The lower number of intense in situ wave events at high latitudes was likely due to the decreased variability of the high- latitude solar wind.

  3. Real-time HF Radio Absorption Maps Incorporating Riometer and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil; Honary, Farideh; Warrington, Mike; Stocker, Alan; Danskin, Donald

    2016-04-01

    A real-time model of HF radio propagation conditions is being developed as a service for aircraft communications at high latitudes. An essential component of this is a real-time map of the absorption of HF (3-30 MHz) radio signals in the D-region ionosphere. Empirical, climatological Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) models in common usage cannot account for day-to-day variations in ionospheric composition and are inaccurate during the large changes in recombination rate at twilight. However, parameters of such models may be optimised using an age-weighted regression to absorption measurements from riometers in Canada and Scandinavia. Such parameters include the day- and night-time sensitivity to proton flux as measured on a geostationary satellite (GOES). Modelling the twilight transition as a linear or Gauss error function over a range of solar-zenith angles (χl < χ < χu) is found to provide greater accuracy than 'Earth shadow' methods (as applied in the Sodankylä Ionospheric Chemistry (SIC) model, for example) due to a more gradual ionospheric response for χ < 90° . The fitted χl parameter is found to be most variable, with smaller values (as low as 60°) post-sunrise compared with pre-sunset. Correlation coefficients of model parameters between riometers are presented and these provide a means of appropriately weighting individual riometer contributions in an assimilative PCA model. At times outside of PCA events, the probability of absorption in the auroral zones is related to the energetic electron flux inside the precipitation loss cone, as measured on the polar-orbiting POES satellites. This varies with magnetic local time, magnetic latitude and geomagnetic activity, and its relation to the real-time solar wind - magnetospheric coupling function [Newell et al., 2007] will be presented. Reference: Newell, P. T., T. Sotirelis, K. Liou, C.-I. Meng, and F. J. Rich (2007), A nearly universal solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function inferred from 10

  4. The Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) onboard the BepiColombo/MMO: First measurement of electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and radio waves around Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, Y.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Kojima, H.; Yagitani, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Chanteur, G.; Kumamoto, A.; Kasahara, Y.; Lichtenberger, J.; Omura, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    The BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) spacecraft includes the plasma and radio wave observation system called Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). Since the receivers for electric field, plasma waves, and radio waves are not installed in any of the preceding spacecraft to Mercury, the PWI will provide the first opportunity for conducting in-situ and remote-sensing observations of electric fields, plasma waves, and radio waves in the Hermean magnetosphere and exosphere. These observations are valuable in studying structure, dynamics, and energy exchange processes in the unique magnetosphere of Mercury. They are characterized by the key words of the non-MHD environment and the peculiar interaction between the relatively large planet without ionosphere and the solar wind with high dynamic pressure. The PWI consists of three sets of receivers (EWO, SORBET, and AM 2P), connected to two sets of electric field sensors (MEFISTO and WPT) and two kinds of magnetic field sensors (LF-SC and DB-SC). The PWI will observe both waveforms and frequency spectra in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz for the electric field and from 0.3 Hz to 640 kHz for the magnetic field. From 2008, we will start the development of the engineering model, which is conceptually consistent with the flight model design. The present paper discusses the significance and objectives of plasma/radio wave observations in the Hermean magnetosphere, and describes the PWI sensors, receivers and their performance as well as the onboard data processing.

  5. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  6. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA. PMID:19257596

  7. Unprecedentedly Strong and Narrow Electromagnetic Emissions Stimulated by High-Frequency Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, L.; Leyser, T. B.; Nordblad, E.; Thide, B.; McCarrick, M.

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  8. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  9. Radio and Plasma Waves in the Magnetosphere of Saturn: Similarities to Earth and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D.; Kurth, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Persoon, A.; Cecconi, B.; Desch, M.; Farrell, W.; Kaiser, M.; Kellogg, P.; Goetz, K.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.; Pedersen, A.

    2005-05-01

    With a few notable exceptions, most of the radio and plasma waves observed in the magnetosphere of Saturn are remarkably similar to those observed in the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter. For example, Saturn kilometric radiation, terrestrial kilometric radiation, and Jovian decametric radiation have many characteristics in common and are all generated by the same basic plasma mechanism, namely the cyclotron maser instability. Similar statements can be made about a broad range of other radio and plasma wave phenomena, for example, electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid frequency, electrostatic waves near odd half-integral harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, and various whistler-mode electromagnetic emissions. What is different at these various planets are the plasma parameters and the types of interactions that lead to the plasma instabilities. Thus, the frequencies of the cyclotron maser radiation at Saturn, Earth and Jupiter are all different because the magnetic field strengths are different. And, there is no terrestrial analog of the Io-controlled Jovian decametric radiation, since there is no moon orbiting in the inner region of the terrestrial magnetosphere. In this talk, we will review the radio and plasma wave observations obtained by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument in the vicinity of Saturn, and compare these to similar observations at Earth and Jupiter with the objective of contrasting and understanding the physical processes involved.

  10. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  11. Solar Type III Radio Bursts Modulated by Homochromous Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  12. Detection of 21 Centimeter H I Absorption at z=0.78 in a Survey of Radio Continuum Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2004-10-01

    We report the detection of a deep broad H I 21 cm absorption system at z=0.78 toward the radio source [HB89] 2351+456 (4C +45.51) at z=1.992. The H I absorption was identified in a blind spectral line survey conducted at the Green Bank Telescope spanning 0.63radio continuum sources. The H I column density is NHI=2.35×1019(Ts/f) cm-2, where Ts is the spin temperature and f is the continuum covering factor of the absorbing gas. For Ts/f>8.5 K, this system is by definition a damped Lyα absorption system (NHI>=2×1020 cm-2). The line is unusually broad, with an FWHM of 53 km s-1 and a full span of 163 km s-1, suggesting a physically extended H I gas structure. Radio surveys identify damped Lyα systems in a manner that bypasses many of the selection effects present in optical/UV surveys, including dust extinction and the atmospheric cutoff for z<1.65. The smooth broad profile of this H I 21 cm absorption system is similar to the z=0.89 H I absorption toward PKS 1830-211, which suggests that the absorber toward [HB89] 2351+456 is also a gravitational lens and a molecular absorption system. However, very long baseline interferometry and Hubble Space Telescope observations show little evidence for gravitational lensing, and BIMA millimeter observations show no HCO+ (1-->2) or HCN (1-->2) absorption down to τ=0.15 (3 σ) in 5 km s-1 channels. Although this radio damped Lyα selection technique would include dusty, molecule-rich systems, [HB89] 2351+456 appears to be a ``vanilla'' H I 21 cm absorber.

  13. Energetic electrons and plasma waves associated with a solar type III radio burst

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.P.; Potter, D.W.; Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.

    1981-12-01

    We present detailed in situ observations from the ISEE 3 spacecraft of energetic electrons, plasma waves, and radio emission for the type III solar radio burst of 1979 February 17. The reduced one-dimensional distribution function f (v) of the electrons is constructed as a function of time. Since the faster electrons arrive before the slower ones, a bump on tail distribution is formed which is unstable on the growth of Langmuir waves. The plasma wave growth computed from f (v) agrees well with the observed onset of the Langmuir waves, and there is qualitative agreement between variations in the plasma wave levels and in the development of regions of positive slope in f (v). The evolution of f (v), however, predicts far higher plasma wave levels than those observed. The maximum levels observed are about equal to the threshold for nonlinear wave processes, such as oscillating two-stream instability and soliton collapse. Also, the lack of obvious plateauing of the distribution suggests that the observed waves have been removed from resonance with the beam electrons. Finally, the plasma waves are observed to be highly impulsive in nature.

  14. Radio Wave Generation by a Collision or Contact between Various Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, T.; Hanawa, R.; Saegusa, K.; Ikeda, H.

    2014-12-01

    In fracture of rock, radio wave emission was found experimentally [1]. This phenomenon could be used to detect a rock fracture during an earthquake or a volcanic activity [2]. The cause of the radio wave is expected to be micro-discharges, which are generated by an inhomogeneous potential distribution around micro-cracks. In order to better understand the phenomena and clarify the cause of radio wave emission, we carried out experiments to detect the emission in the cases of a collision or contact between various materials. We used receiving systems with great sensitivities and sufficient frequency bandwidths at 1 MHz-, 300 MHz-, 2 GHz-, and 18 GHz-bands. The specimen materials are as follows: Steel (2) Brass (3) Copper (4)Small coin (5)Celluloid. We obtained the following results: The signal was detected for the specimen of (1) to (4), but not for (5). The signal is composed of intermittent spikes which include waves with a frequency close to the center frequency of each frequency band. The power is strongest at the lower frequencies among all frequency bands. The more details will be given in the presentation. The origin of radio wave emission from the metal is supposed to be discharges between materials in these experiments. It is surprising that even a small coin can generate a significant amount of radio wave. Accordingly, it is inferred that all amount of charges are discharged through a conductive metal. On the other hand, celluloid did not generate radio wave, though the specimen was sufficiently charged by brushing. It is inferred that a quite localized charge was discharged but the remaining charges were blocked due to poor conductivity. Extending this hypothesis, large-scale contact should have occurred between broken fragments for the radio wave generation in the aforementioned rock fracture experiments. Turbulence of the fragments is a candidate for the explanation. [1] K. Maki et al., "An experimental study of microwave emission from compression

  15. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  16. The density and mass of unshocked ejecta in Cassiopeia a through low frequency radio absorption

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, Tracey; Kassim, Namir E.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Perley, R. A. E-mail: namir.kassim@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: rperley@nrao.edu

    2014-04-10

    Characterizing the ejecta in young supernova remnants is a requisite step toward a better understanding of stellar evolution. In Cassiopeia A the density and total mass remaining in the unshocked ejecta are important parameters for modeling its explosion and subsequent evolution. Low frequency (<100 MHz) radio observations of sufficient angular resolution offer a unique probe of unshocked ejecta revealed via free-free absorption against the synchrotron emitting shell. We have used the Very Large Array plus Pie Town Link extension to probe this cool, ionized absorber at 9'' and 18.''5 resolution at 74 MHz. Together with higher frequency data we estimate an electron density of 4.2 cm{sup –3} and a total mass of 0.39 M {sub ☉} with uncertainties of a factor of ∼2. This is a significant improvement over the 100 cm{sup –3} upper limit offered by infrared [S III] line ratios from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our estimates are sensitive to a number of factors including temperature and geometry. However using reasonable values for each, our unshocked mass estimate agrees with predictions from dynamical models. We also consider the presence, or absence, of cold iron- and carbon-rich ejecta and how these affect our calculations. Finally we reconcile the intrinsic absorption from unshocked ejecta with the turnover in Cas A's integrated spectrum documented decades ago at much lower frequencies. These and other recent observations below 100 MHz confirm that spatially resolved thermal absorption, when extended to lower frequencies and higher resolution, will offer a powerful new tool for low frequency astrophysics.

  17. The Density and Mass of Unshocked Ejecta in Cassiopeia A through Low Frequency Radio Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Kassim, Namir E.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Perley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Characterizing the ejecta in young supernova remnants is a requisite step toward a better understanding of stellar evolution. In Cassiopeia A the density and total mass remaining in the unshocked ejecta are important parameters for modeling its explosion and subsequent evolution. Low frequency (<100 MHz) radio observations of sufficient angular resolution offer a unique probe of unshocked ejecta revealed via free-free absorption against the synchrotron emitting shell. We have used the Very Large Array plus Pie Town Link extension to probe this cool, ionized absorber at 9'' and 18.''5 resolution at 74 MHz. Together with higher frequency data we estimate an electron density of 4.2 cm-3 and a total mass of 0.39 M ⊙ with uncertainties of a factor of ~2. This is a significant improvement over the 100 cm-3 upper limit offered by infrared [S III] line ratios from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our estimates are sensitive to a number of factors including temperature and geometry. However using reasonable values for each, our unshocked mass estimate agrees with predictions from dynamical models. We also consider the presence, or absence, of cold iron- and carbon-rich ejecta and how these affect our calculations. Finally we reconcile the intrinsic absorption from unshocked ejecta with the turnover in Cas A's integrated spectrum documented decades ago at much lower frequencies. These and other recent observations below 100 MHz confirm that spatially resolved thermal absorption, when extended to lower frequencies and higher resolution, will offer a powerful new tool for low frequency astrophysics.

  18. Differential phase shift of partially reflected radio waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to differential absorption experiments is shown to be both feasible and desirable. The phase information can provide a more sensitive measurement of electron density above about 75 km. The differential phase shift is only weakly dependent on collision frequency in this range, and so an accurate collision frequency profile is not a prerequisite. The differential phase shift and differential absorption measurements taken together can provide both electron density and collision frequency data from about 70 to 90 km.

  19. 21 centimeter HI absorption at z = 0. 437 against the extended radio structure of 3c 196

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Mitchell, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    We report the detection of an absorption line at 988.7. MHz toward the quasar 3C 196. We identify this line as the lambda21 cm line of neutral atomic hydrogen seen at a redshift of z/sub abs/ = 0.4366. No optical absorption lines have been noted in the z/sub em/ = 0.871 quasar 3C 196 heretofore. All the radio emission of 3C 196 is contained in two thetaroughly-equal3'' extended lobes symmetrically placed (position angle approx.26/sup 0/) about the optical object. The optical QSO itself is an extremely weak, <1 mJy, radio source. Thus to account for the approx.0.5 Jy seen in the absorption line we infer that the diameter of the absorbing region must be at least as large as 750 pc and perhaps as large as, or larger than, 30 kpc. We note further than an optical wisp is seen extending approx.3'' x 1'' from the QSO at position angle approx.120/sup 0/, that is in a direction perpendicular to the separation of the radio lobes. If this wisp is the disk of an intervening galaxy, then the H i absorption is direct evidence for absorption in a galactic halo. Puzzles abound; (1) If the optical wisp seen superposed on the QSO is an intervening galaxy then what aspects, if any, of the emission from 3C 196 are gravitational lens effects. (2) If the wisp is associated with the QSO, why is it radio quiet and why is it orthogonal to the extended radio structure of 3C 196. (3) Is it significant that z/sub abs/ is one-half z/sub em/ within the errors.

  20. Temporal-frequency spectra for plane and spherical waves in a millimetric wave absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Glaucio L.; Cole, Roy S.

    1991-02-01

    Complete analytical expressions for the temporal power spectral density functions in a millimetric wave absorption region for plane and spherical waves have been developed for both amplitude and phase fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence. Asymptotic expressions for both high and low scintillation frequencies are derived. Theoretical expressions for the differential phase power spectrum (i.e., the phase difference between two frequencies) are also presented. Experimental results of amplitude and differential phase scintillations measured on a 4.1-km link across central London, are presented. Results show that the plane wave case gives the best agreement with theory for this particular link. It is also shown that neglecting the cross-spectral density term at the higher scintillation frequencies for the differential phase spectrum can lead to a large difference between the theoretical and experimental power spectra. In particular, for a small frequency separation and a large value of the outer scale of turbulence, the highest scintillation frequencies are too low to neglect the cross term.

  1. Symmetrical and anti-symmetrical coherent perfect absorption for acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pengjiang; Croënne, Charles; Tak Chu, Sai; Li, Jensen

    2014-03-24

    We investigate tunable acoustic absorption enabled by the coherent control of input waves. It relies on coherent perfect absorption originally proposed in optics. By designing appropriate acoustic metamaterial structures with resonating effective bulk modulus or density, we show that complete absorption of incident waves impinging on the metamaterial can be achieved for either symmetrical or anti-symmetrical inputs in the forward and backward directions. By adjusting the relative phase between the two incident beams, absorption can be tuned effectively from unity to zero, making coherent control useful in applications like acoustic modulators, noise controllers, transducers, and switches.

  2. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Haspodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 k 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  3. Radio wave emitted by an extensive air showers in 10KHz to 1MHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichimura, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of radio waves in a frequency range of less than 1MHz in an EAS shower is discussed. Estimates of radio intensities at 10KHz, 100KHz and 1MHz in EAS showers made on the basis of the Kahn-Lerche theory. Negative charge excess in a shower is the main source of low frequency radio emission, in spite of the importance of the contribution of transverse current in the geomagnetic field in a higher frequency range. An estimate is also made for radio intensity produced when the shower hits the ground. The contribution of this process seems to be important at a large distance, i.e., beyond 1km from the shower axis.

  4. Non-contact prediction of soil moisture profiles using radio wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, Duane Lee

    Scope and method of study. This study investigated the potential of non-contact measurement of volumetric soil moisture profiles by detecting reflected VHF and UHF radio waves. The investigation included a variability analysis of the dielectric properties of soil, tests to relate volumetric moisture content to dielectric properties, a simulation of radio wave reflection from various profiles, and field trials in which antennas transmitted and received radio waves for detection of the moisture gradient in the soil directly below the instrument. In addition to the measurements, an algorithm was devised to resolve layers of moisture from radio wave reflections of multiple frequencies. Potential applications for such an instrument may include irrigation scheduling, detection of plant stress, and hydrological research. Findings and conclusions. The model that simulated reflection coefficients in the frequency range of 80 MHz to 1 GHz was tested using hypothetical and existent moisture profiles. Results of simulated profiles indicated that reflection coefficients could be used to distinguish between volumetric surface moisture and could detect subsurface moisture to a depth of 45.7 cm. Reflection measurements made in the field trials indicated that linear correlation could be made with volumetric moisture in the top 15.2 cm. The profile restoration algorithm closely predicted simulated surface moisture but had a high failure rate predicting subsurface moisture. Results of the study indicated that reflection coefficients could be used to detect soil moisture at depth, but the restoration algorithm did not effectively resolve moisture layers.

  5. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  6. Radio frequency interference effects of continuous wave signals on telemetry data, part 2. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of radio frequency interference tests and the derived telemetry bit SNR degradation model, which includes the telemetry data rate and the telemetry data power as independent variables for characterizing the continuous wave interference effects on telemetry data, are presented. The telemetry bit SNR degradation model was implemented in the second version of the Deep Space Interference Prediction software.

  7. Radio wave propagation experiments to probe the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Ionospheric bias corrections associated with radio tracking of spacecraft depend on the following measuring techniques for integrated electron content: (1) Faraday rotation measurements from an earth synchronous satellite; (2) ranging measurements at two frequencies; and (3) group and phase velocity measurements obtained from tracking data. The extraction of the integrated electron content directly from tracking data is achieved by comparison of range-rate measurements based on Doppler shift with differentiated range measurements based on tone delay. This method is most desirable because the measured corrections pertain directly to the spacecraft whose orbit is being determined and can be used in near earth as well as deep space tracking data.

  8. Design, fabrication, and measurement of reflective metasurface for orbital angular momentum vortex wave in radio frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shixing; Li, Long; Shi, Guangming; Zhu, Cheng; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Yan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a reflective metasurface is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate an orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex wave in radio frequency domain. Theoretical formula of phase-shift distribution is deduced and used to design the metasurface producing vortex radio waves. The prototype of a practical configuration is designed, fabricated, and measured to validate the theoretical analysis at 5.8 GHz. The simulated and experimental results verify that the vortex waves with different OAM mode numbers can be flexibly generated by using sub-wavelength reflective metasurfaces. The proposed method and metasurface pave a way to generate the OAM vortex waves for radio and microwave wireless communication applications.

  9. Motion of metric type 4 radio sources and its relation to shock waves responsible for type 2 radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1973-01-01

    The relation of the motion of type 4mA sources with shock waves responsible for type 2 bursts were considered using the observed data for these two radio sources. The difference of the emission mechanism between type 2 and type 4mA bursts suggest that the moving speed of the shock waves mentioned above is not necessarily equal to the metric type 4 sources. By analyzing the observed data on the speeds for both type 2 and type 4 sources., it was found that type 4 bursts decelerate and often cease to move in the solar envelop and that type 2 sources move at higher speeds than type 4 sources.

  10. The effect of plasma inhomogeneities on (i) radio emission generation by non-gyrotropic electron beams and (ii) particle acceleration by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [1]. Here recent progress in an alternative to the plasma emission model using Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts will be presented. In particular, (i) Fourier space drift (refraction) of non-gyrotropic electron beam-generated wave packets, caused by the density gradient [1,2], (ii) parameter space investigation of numerical runs [3], (iii) concurrent generation of whistler waves [4] and a separate problem of (iv) electron acceleration by Langmuir waves in a background magnetised plasma with an increasing density profile [5] will be discussed. In all considered cases the density inhomogeneity-induced wave refraction plays a crucial role. In the case of non-gyrotropic electron beam, the wave refaction transforms the generated wave packets from standing into freely escaping EM radiation. In the case of electron acceleration by Langmuir waves, a positive density gradient in the direction of wave propagation causes a decrease in the wavenumber, and hence a higher phase velocity vph=ω/k. The k-shifted wave is then subject to absorption by a faster electron by wave-particle interaction. The overall effect is an increased number of high energy electrons in the energy spectrum. [1] D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011) [2] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013) [3] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012) [4] M. Skender, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 042904 (2014) [5] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 012903 (2014)

  11. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  12. Kilometric radio waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities - A theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory of generation of radio waves observed by ground-based facilities in the frequency range 150-700 kHz is discussed. This work is a continuation of an earlier discussion (Wu et al., 1989) in which it was proposed that the trapped electrons along the auroral field lines can lead to a cyclotron instability which amplifies the whistler waves observed at ground level. The objective of the present study is to investigate the propagation effect on the wave amplification and to examine whether the proposed mechanism is indeed viable.

  13. Inconsistency of Ulysses Millisecond Langmuir Spikes with Wave Collapse in Type 3 Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent Ulysses observations of millisecond spikes superposed on broader Langmuir wave packets in type 3 radio sources are compared quantitatively with constraints from the theory of wave collapse. It is found that both the millisecond spikes and the wave packets have fields at least 10 times too small to be consistent with collapse, contrary to previous interpretations in terms of this process. Several alternative explanations are considered and it is argued that the spikes should be interpreted as either non-collapse phenomena or observational artifacts. To the extent the observations are representative, this rules out theories for type 3 bursts at approx. 1 - 4 AU that rely on collapse.

  14. Reflection of radio waves by sporadic-E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. L.; Smith, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    A full-wave analysis of the reflection coefficient is developed and applied to electron-density profiles of midlatitude sporadic-E layers observed by rocket-borne probes. It is shown that partial reflection from the large electron-density gradients at the upper and lower boundaries of sporadic-E layers does not account for the partial transparency observed by ionosondes.

  15. NONLINEAR WAVE INTERACTIONS AS EMISSION PROCESS OF TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganse, Urs; Kilian, Patrick; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2012-06-01

    The emission of fundamental and harmonic frequency radio waves of type II radio bursts are assumed to be products of three-wave interaction processes of beam-excited Langmuir waves. Using a particle-in-cell code, we have performed simulations of the assumed emission region, a coronal mass ejection foreshock with two counterstreaming electron beams. Analysis of wavemodes within the simulation shows self-consistent excitation of beam-driven modes, which yield interaction products at both fundamental and harmonic emission frequencies. Through variation of the beam strength, we have investigated the dependence of energy transfer into electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, confirming the quadratic dependence of electromagnetic emission on electron beam strength.

  16. The seasonal variation of the D region as inferred from propagation characteristics of LF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishimine, T.; Ishii, T.; Echizenya, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation data of JG2AS 40 kHz (Japanese Standard Frequency), Loran C 100 kHz radio waves, and meteorological data were analyzed to study the association of propagation characteristics of LF radio waves with the atmospheric circulation in the mesosphere. The monthly averaged electric fields were depicted on the complex plane for typical summer and winter months, June and November. The locus traced out by the electric field vector during daytime is nearly circular. This is because during daytime the amplitude of the sky wave remains nearly constant while its phase changes in accord with the height change of the reflection layer, and thus the electric field vector traces out a circular locus with its center at the tip of the supposed ground wave vector. The locus has a loop during the sunrise or sunset period, which seems to arise from interference of two waves reflected by two different layers. In June the amplitude of the sky wave decreases rapidly before the dawn or increases after the dusk. In November such rapid change is not observed. During nighttime, the sky wave phase changes in such a way as to suggest that the reflection height moves upwards with time before midnight or lowers after midnight in November. In June it changes similarly before midnight, but after midnight it varies erratically. These characteristics are closely related to the structure of the D region, which is clearly shown by simulating the loci traced out by electric fields.

  17. Nonlinear nonresonant forces by radio-frequency waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong; Myra, J. R.

    2007-08-15

    Nonresonant forces by applied rf waves in plasmas are analyzed. Along the background dc magnetic field, the force arises from the gradient of the ponderomotive potential. Only when the dc magnetic field is straight, however, is this parallel force completely consistent with that from the single particle picture, where the ponderomotive force depends on the gradients of rf fields only. Across the dc magnetic field, besides the ponderomotive force from the particle picture, additional Reynolds stress and polarization stress contribute to the total force. For waves with frequency much lower than the cyclotron frequency, the perpendicular forces from the particle and fluid pictures can have opposite signs. In plasmas with a symmetry angle (e.g., toroidal systems), nonresonant forces cannot drive net flow or current in the flux surface, but the radial force may influence macroscopic behavior of plasma. Moreover, nonresonant forces may drive flow or current in linear plasmas or in a localized region of toroidal plasmas.

  18. Artificial airglow excited by high-power radio waves.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, P A; Duncan, L M; Tepley, C A

    1988-11-18

    High-power electromagnetic waves beamed into the ionosphere from ground-based transmitters illuminate the night sky with enhanced airglow. The recent development of a new intensified, charge coupled-device imager made it possible to record optical emissions during ionospheric heating. Clouds of enhanced airglow are associated with large-scale plasma density cavities that are generated by the heater beam. Trapping and focusing of electromagnetic waves in these cavities produces accelerated electrons that collisionally excite oxygen atoms, which emit light at visible wavelengths. Convection of plasma across magnetic field lines is the primary source for horizontal motion of the cavities and the airglow enhancements. During ionospheric heating experiments, quasi-cyclic formation, convection, dissipation and reappearance of the cavites comprise a major source of long-term variability in plasma densities during ionospheric heating experiments.

  19. Full Quantum Analysis of Two-Photon Absorption Using Two-Photon Wave Function: Comparison of Two-Photon Absorption with One-Photon Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kitano, Masao

    2009-10-01

    For dissipation-free photon-photon interaction at the single photon level, we analyze one-photon and two-photon transitions induced by photon pairs in three-level atoms using two-photon wave functions. We show that two-photon absorption can be substantially enhanced by adjusting the time correlation of photon pairs. We study two typical cases: a Gaussian wave function and a rectangular wave function. In the latter, we find that under special conditions one-photon transition is completely suppressed, while two-photon transition is maintained with a high probability.

  20. AN INFRARED EXCESS IDENTIFIED IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Myers, A. D.

    2013-01-10

    If broad absorption line (BAL) quasars represent a high-covering-fraction evolutionary state (even if this is not the sole factor governing the presence of BALs), it is expected that they should show an excess of mid-infrared radiation compared to normal quasars. Some previous studies have suggested that this is not the case. We perform the first analysis of the IR properties of radio-loud BAL quasars, using IR data from WISE and optical (rest-frame ultraviolet) data from SDSS, and compare the BAL quasar sample with a well-matched sample of unabsorbed quasars. We find a statistically significant excess in the mid- to near-infrared luminosities of BAL quasars, particularly at rest-frame wavelengths of 1.5 and 4 {mu}m. Our sample was previously used to show that BALs are observed along many lines of sight toward quasars, but with an overabundance of more edge-on sources, suggesting that orientation factors into the appearance of BALs. The evidence here-of a difference in IR luminosities between BAL quasars and unabsorbed quasars-can be ascribed to evolution. This suggests that a merging of the current BAL paradigms is needed to fully describe the class.

  1. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  2. Invisible Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Radio Morphologies and Five New H i 21cm Absorption Line Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sharma, Soniya; Kanekar, Nissim

    2016-03-01

    This is the second paper directed toward finding new highly redshifted atomic and molecular absorption lines at radio frequencies. To this end, we selected a sample of 80 candidates for obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and presented their basic optical/near-infrared (NIR) properties in Paper I. In this paper, we present both high-resolution radio continuum images for all of these sources and H i 21 cm absorption spectroscopy for a few selected sources in this sample. A-configuration 4.9 and 8.5 GHz Very Large Array continuum observations find that 52 sources are compact or have substantial compact components with size <0.″5 and flux densities >0.1 Jy at 4.9 GHz. The 36 most compact sources were then observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at 1.4 GHz. One definite and 10 candidate Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) are newly identified, which is a detection rate of CSOs ∼three times higher than the detection rate previously found in purely flux-limited samples. Based on possessing compact components with high flux densities, 60 of these sources are good candidates for absorption-line searches. Twenty-seven sources were observed for H i 21 cm absorption at their photometric or spectroscopic redshifts with only six detections (five definite and one tentative). However, five of these were from a small subset of six CSOs with pure galaxy optical/NIR spectra (i.e., any AGN emission is obscured) and for which accurate spectroscopic redshifts place the redshifted 21 cm line in a radio frequency intereference (RFI)-free spectral “window” (i.e., the percentage of H i 21 cm absorption-line detections could be as high as ∼90% in this sample). It is likely that the presence of ubiquitous RFI and the absence of accurate spectroscopic redshifts preclude H i detections in similar sources (only 1 detection out of the remaining 22 sources observed, 13 of which have only photometric redshifts); that is, H i absorption may well be present but is masked by

  3. Excitation of small-scale waves in the F region of the ionosphere by powerful HF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Chernyshev, M. Y.; Kornienko, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Ionospheric small-scale waves in the F region, initiated by heating facilities in Nizhniy Novgorod, have been studied by the method of field-aligned scattering of diagnostic HF radio signals. Experimental data have been obtained on the radio path Kiev-N. Novgorod-St. Petersburg during heating campaigns with heater radiated power ERP = 20 MW and 100 MW. Observations of scattered HF signals have been made by a Doppler spectrum device with high temporal resolution. Analysis of the experimental data shows a relation between the heater power level and the parameters of ionospheric small-scale oscillations falling within the range of Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations. It is found that the periods of wave processes in the F region of the ionosphere, induced by the heating facility, decrease with increasing heating power. The level of heating power also has an impact on the horizontal east-west component of the electric field E, the vertical component of the Doppler velocity Vd and the amplitude of the vertical displacements M of the heated region. Typical magnitudes of these parameters are the following: E = 1.25 mVm, Vd = 6 ms, M = 600-1500 m for ERP = 20 MW and E = 2.5-4.5 mVm, Vd = 11-25 ms, M = 1000-5000 m for ERP = 100 MW. The results obtained confirm the hypothesis of excitation of the Alfvén resonator by powerful HF radio waves which leads to the generation of magnetic field oscillations in the heated region giving rise to artificial Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations and ionospheric small-scale wave processes. In this situation an increase of the heater power would lead to a growth of the electric field of hydromagnetic waves propagating in the ionosphere as well as the amplitude of the vertical displacements of the heated region.

  4. Numerical investigation of fast-wave propagation and radio-frequency sheath interaction with a shaped tokamak wall

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Interactions between propagating fast waves and radio-frequency (RF) sheaths in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies are numerically investigated based on a cold fluid plasma model coupled with a sheath boundary condition. In this two-dimensional study, the capability of the finite element code rfSOL, which was developed in previous numerical work, is extended to analyze self-consistent RF sheath-plasma interaction problems in a tokamak with a non-circular cross-section. It is found that a large sheath voltage is generated near the edges of the limiter-shaped deformation as a result of the conversion from fast to slow waves on the sheaths. The sheath voltage associated with this conversion is particularly significant in the localized region where the contact angle between the magnetic field line and the conducting wall varies rapidly along the curved sheath surface, which is consistent with the results in previous one-dimensional theoretical work. The dependences of the RF sheaths on various parameters in plasma such as the toroidal wavenumber, edge plasma density, and the degree of the RF wave absorption in the core region are also examined in detail.

  5. Evaluation of Coronal Shock Wave Velocities from the II Type Radio Bursts Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanin, V. V.; Isaeva, E. A.; Kravetz, R. O.

    The work presents the results of research of connection between the coronal shock waves and the parameters of type II (mII) meter-decameter bursts in 25-180 MHz band for 66 solar proton events. The velocities of coronal shock waves for this two cases where determined. In the first case the velocities of the shock waves was evaluated according to the Newkirck model and in the second case - directly from the type II radio burst parameters. The calculated values of shock waves velocity was compared with the same velocity values that is published on NGDC site. The comparative analysis showed that precision of coronal shock waves velocity estimation which gets directly from type II radio bursts parameters was higher than the same one which used the Newkirck model. Research showed that there is exist the sufficiently strong connection between the shock wave velocity and the delay of type II burst intensity maximum on the second harmonica. Correlation coefficient between the studied parameters was equal to ≍ 0.65.

  6. Antenna Construction & Propagation of Radio Waves, 5-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of five individualized, self-paced chapters dealing with antenna construction and propagation of radio waves. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: basic electricity; antenna transmission-line fundamentals; quarter-wave antennas, half-wave antennas, and associated radio…

  7. Spatial nonlinear absorption of Alfven waves by dissipative plasma taking account bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiurskii, A. A.; Gavrikov, M. B.

    2016-10-01

    We study numerically the nonlinear absorption of a plane Alfven wave falling on the stationary boundary of dissipative plasma. This absorption is caused by such factors as the magnetic viscosity, hydrodynamic viscosity, and thermal conductivity of electrons and ions, bremsstrahlung and energy exchange between plasma components. The relevance of this investigation is due to some works, published in 2011, with regard to the heating mechanism of the solar corona and solar wind generation as a result of the absorption of plasma Alfven waves generated in the lower significantly colder layers of the Sun. Numerical analysis shows that the absorption of Alfven waves occurs at wavelengths of the order of skin depth, in which case the classical MHD equations are inapplicable. Therefore, our research is based on equations of two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics that take into account the inertia of the electrons. The implicit difference scheme proposed here for calculating plane-parallel flows of two-fluid plasma reveals a number of important patterns of absorption and thus allows us to study the dependence of the absorption on the Alfven wave frequency and the electron thermal conductivity and viscosity, as well as to evaluate the depth and the velocity of plasma heating during the penetration of Alfven waves interacting with dissipative plasma.

  8. Harmonic structure of decametric Type III emission and radio wave group delay in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abranin, Eh. P.; Bazelyan, L. L.; Tsybko, Ya. G.; Abranin, Eh. P.; Bazelyan, L. L.; Tsybko, Ya. G.

    1993-08-01

    Solar observations with the UTR-2 decameter-wave radio telescope antenna, performed continuously at fixed frequencies from 25 to 10 MHz during Type III, IIIb-III noise storms from 1979 to 1984, have yielded new data on the frequency drift rates Delta(f)/Delta(tf) of numerous type IIIF, IIIFb, and IIIH(b) decameter radio bursts in several narrow bands Delta(f). The data confirm that the burst drift rates are virtually independent of the phase of the 11-yr solar activity cycle. Measurements of the drift time intervals for bursts drifting over narow bands (25-20 and 12.5-10 MHZ) separated by an octave prove the reliability of the radio burst harmonic classification in which there is a clear differentiation between the emission components coinciding with the fundamental and the second harmonic of the local plasma frequency.

  9. Modeling of fast wave absorption by beam ions in DIII-D discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Mau, T. K.; Petty, C. C.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    1999-09-20

    In recent discharges on DIII-D, neutron measurements indicated absorption of the fast wave by energetic deuterium beam ions when the fourth harmonic resonance is on axis, but little or no interaction for the fifth harmonic. In this work, a geometric optics code is used to quantify the beam ion absorption of fast waves as the frequency (or on-axis harmonic resonance) is varied. Isotropic and anisotropic Maxwellians are used to model the beam ion distribution. Wave power flow in this harmonic range has been found to exhibit a strong poloidal and toroidal behavior in its initial transits across the plasma. Absorption along the rays is calculated using the fully thermal and magnetized treatment. Competing with the beam ions for absorption are the minority hydrogen and background electrons. The modeling results are only in partial agreement with experimental observations, indicating that more detailed physics may need to be included. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Generation and Upper Atmospheric Propagation of Acoustic Gravity Waves according to Numerical Modeling and Radio Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan; Padokhin, Artem; Kurbatov, Grigory

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere can be generated by a variety of the phenomena in the near-Earth environment and atmosphere as well as by some perturbations of the Earth's ground or ocean surface. For instance, the role of the AGW sources can be played by the earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seisches, tsunami waves. We present the examples of AGWs excited by the tsunami waves traveling in the ocean, by seisches, and by ionospheric heating by the high-power radio wave. In the last case, the gravity waves are caused by the pulsed modulation of the heating wave. The AGW propagation in the upper atmosphere induces the variations and irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere, whose structure can be efficiently reconstructed by the method of the ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS). The input data for RT diagnostics are composed of the 150/400 MHz radio signals from the low-orbiting (LO) satellites and 1.2-1.5 GHz radio signals from the high-orbiting (HO) satellites with their orbits at ~1000 and ~20000 km above the ground, respectively. These data enable ionospheric imaging on different spatiotemporal scales with different spatiotemporal resolution and coverage, which is suitable, inter alia, for tracking the waves and wave-like features in the ionosphere. In particular, we demonstrate the maps of the ionospheric responses to the tornado at Moore (Oklahoma, USA) of May 20, 2013, which are reconstructed from the HO data. We present the examples of LORT images containing the waves and wavelike disturbances associated with various sources (e.g., auroral precipitation and high-power heating of the ionosphere). We also discuss the results of modeling the AGW generation by the surface and volumetric sources. The millihertz AGW from these sources initiate the ionospheric perturbation with a typical scale of a few hundred km at the

  11. Heating of solar chromosphere by electromagnetic wave absorption in a plasma slab model

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Pechhacker, R.

    2011-04-15

    The heating of solar chromospheric internetwork regions by means of the absorption of electromagnetic (EM) waves that originate from the photospheric blackbody radiation is studied in the framework of a plasma slab model. The absorption is provided by the electron-neutral collisions in which electrons oscillate in the EM wave field and electron-neutral collisions damp the EM wave. Given the uncertain nature of the collision cross-section due to the plasma microturbulence, it is shown that for plausible physical parameters, the heating flux produced by the absorption of EM waves in the chromosphere is between 20% and 45% of the chromospheric radiative loss flux requirement. It is also established that there is an optimal value for the collision cross-section, 5x10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, which produces the maximal heating flux of 1990 W m{sup -2}.

  12. A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material for electromagnetic wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Wu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Wang-Hua; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Fa; Yu, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2011-03-01

    A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material consisting of carbon fibers grown on micrometer-sized carbonyl iron sphere, was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of C2H2 and H2. The hollow-core carbon fibers (outer diameter: 140 nm and inner diameter: 40 nm) were composed of well-ordered graphene layers which were almost parallel to the long axis of the fibers. A composite (2 mm thick) consisting of the carbonyl iron/carbon fibers and epoxy resin demonstrated excellent electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Minimum reflection losses of -36 dB (99.95% of EM wave absorption) at 7.6 GHz and -32 dB (99.92% of EM wave absorption) at 34.1 GHz were achieved. The well-dispersed and network-like carbon fibers in the resin matrix affected the dielectric loss of the EM wave while the carbonyl iron affected the magnetic loss.

  13. Novel limiting circle theory in acoustic wave scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Changzheng

    Wave scattering theory is the basis for many key technologies that have important military and commercial applications. The familiar examples are radar, sonar, and various ultrasound instruments commonly used in remote sensing, target identification, non-destructive evaluation, medical diagnosis, and many other areas. Their mathematical model involves the solution of the so- called inverse scattering problem where an incident wave is used to probe a remote or inaccessible object. From the scattered field measurement, the shape and/or the material composition of the object can be determined. A new wave scattering theory, termed limiting circle theory (LCT), has been developed in this dissertation based on a novel approach of decomposing the wave scattering matrix. LCT has rigorously proved that the scattered wave field from any penetrable object (of cylinder and sphere geometries) is composed of three contributions: a rigid background, a soft background, and a pure resonance. This is a significant modification to the existing resonance scattering theory (RST) which states that the scattered field is made up of only two components: a proper background (either rigid or soft), and a pure resonance. LCT formalism led to the discovery of the limiting circle patterns associated with all normal modes or partial waves. These patterns provide a clear understanding of the resonance behavior such as the resonance period and the resonance intensity. The analytical LCT approach could also be the key to solving the background problems for shell structures that have remained unsolved for many years in acoustics.

  14. Detection of fundamental and harmonic type III radio emission and the associated Langmuir waves at the source region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    Type III radio emission generated in the vicinity of the Ulysses spacecraft has been detected at both the fundamental and harmonic of the local plasma frequency. The observations represent the first clear evidence of locally generated type III radio emission. This local emission shows no evidence of frequency drift, exhibits a relatively short rise time, is less intense than the observed remotely generated radio emission, and is temporally correlated with observed in situ Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the unified radio astronomy and wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft between 1990 November 4 and 1991 April 30, as it traveled from 1 to 3 AU from the sun. During this time period many thousands of bursts were observed. However, only three examples of local emission and associated Langmuir waves were identified. This supports previous suggestions that type III radio emission is generated in localized regions of the interplanetary medium, rather than uniformly along the extent of the electron exciter beam.

  15. Effect of shock waves on the absorption spectrum of ruby

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; Bellamy, P.M.; Duvall, G.E.; Wilson, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of shock loading upon the unpolarized absorption spectrum of ruby has been measured. Experiments were performed both above and below the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL), with the experiment above the elastic limit failing due to extinction of the light upon impact. The experiments below the elastic limit were both done at about the same pressure (approx. 100 kbar), and show a shift of both absorption bands in the visible region toward shorter wavelength, the shifts agreeing well with those measured at a comparable hydrostatic pressure.

  16. Gravitational-wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Thomas; Kanner, Jonah; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-07-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors.

  17. Detectable radio flares following gravitational waves from mergers of binary neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-09-28

    Mergers of neutron-star/neutron-star binaries are strong sources of gravitational waves. They can also launch subrelativistic and mildly relativistic outflows and are often assumed to be the sources of short γ-ray bursts. An electromagnetic signature that persisted for weeks to months after the event would strengthen any future claim of a detection of gravitational waves. Here we present results of calculations showing that the interaction of mildly relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium produces radio flares with peak emission at 1.4 gigahertz that persist at detectable (submillijansky) levels for weeks, out to a redshift of 0.1. Slower subrelativistic outflows produce flares detectable for years at 150 megahertz, as well as at 1.4 gigahertz, from slightly shorter distances. The radio transient RT 19870422 (ref. 11) has the properties predicted by our model, and its most probable origin is the merger of a compact neutron-star/neutron-star binary. The lack of radio detections usually associated with short γ-ray bursts does not constrain the radio transients that we discuss here (from mildly relativistic and subrelativistic outflows) because short γ-ray burst redshifts are typically >0.1 and the appropriate timescales (longer than weeks) have not been sampled.

  18. An Overview of Observations by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Zarka, P.; Tokarev, Y.

    2001-01-01

    On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew by Earth at an altitude of 1186 km on its way to Saturn. Although the flyby was performed exclusively to provide the spacecraft with sufficient velocity to get to Saturn, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument, along with several others, was operated to gain valuable calibration data and to validate the operation of a number of capabilities. In addition, an opportunity to study the terrestrial radio and plasma wave environment with a highly capable instrument on a swift fly-through of the magnetosphere was afforded by the encounter. This paper provides an overview of the RPWS observations, at Earth, including the identification of a number of magnetospheric plasma wave modes, an accurate measurement of the plasma density over a significant portion of the trajectory using the natural wave spectrum in addition to a relaxation sounder and Langmuir probe, the detection of natural and human-produced radio emissions, and the validation of the capability to measure the wave normal angle and Poynting flux of whistler-mode chorus emissions. The results include the observation of a double-banded structure at closest' approach including a band of Cerenkov emission bounded by electron plasma and upper hybrid frequencies and an electron cyclotron harmonic band just above the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. In the near-Earth plasma sheet, evidence for electron phase space holes is observed, similar to those first reported by Geotail in the magnetotail. The wave normal analysis confirms the Polar result that chorus is generated very close to the magnetic equator and propagates to higher latitudes. The integrated power flux of auroral kilometric radiation is also used to identify a series of substorms observed during the outbound passage through the magnetotail.

  19. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  20. A Minimal Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation For a Mercury Orbiter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    The primary thrust of the effort at The University of Iowa for the definition of an orbiter mission to Mercury is a minimum viable radio and plasma wave investigation. While it is simple to add sensors and capability to any payload, the challenge is to do reasonable science within limited resources; and viable missions to Mercury are especially limited in payload mass. For a wave investigation, this is a serious concern, as the sensor mass often makes up a significant fraction of the instrumentation mass.

  1. THE ABUNDANCE OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David H.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    Coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galaxy mergers is potentially the dominant contributor to the low frequency gravitational wave background (GWB). It was proposed by Merritt and Ekers that X-shaped radio galaxies are signposts of such coalescences and that their abundance might be used to predict the magnitude of the GWB. In Roberts et al. we presented radio images of all 52 X-shaped radio source candidates out of the sample of 100 selected by Cheung for which archival VLA data were available. These images indicate that at most 21% of the candidates might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that were formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following a major merger. This suggests that fewer than 1.3% of extended radio sources appear to be candidates for genuine axis reorientations (“spin flips”), much smaller than the 7% suggested by Leahy and Parma. Thus, the associated GWB may be substantially smaller than previous estimates. These results can be used to normalize detailed calculations of the SMBH coalescence rate and the GWB.

  2. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  3. Strategies for Finding Prompt Radio Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Transients with the Murchison Widefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Murphy, T.; Rowlinson, A.; Croft, S. D.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Wepresent and evaluate several strategies to search for prompt, low-frequency radio emission associated with gravitational wave transients using the Murchison Widefield Array. As we are able to repoint the Murchison Widefield Array on timescales of tens of seconds, we can search for the dispersed radio signal that has been predicted to originate along with or shortly after a neutron star-neutron star merger. We find that given the large, 600 deg2 instantaneous field of view of the Murchison Widefield Array, we can cover a significant fraction of the predicted gravitational wave error region, although due to the complicated geometry of the latter, we only cover > 50% of the error region for approximately 5% of events, and roughly 15% of events will be located < 10° from the Murchison Widefield Array pointing centre such that they will be covered in the radio images. For optimal conditions, our limiting flux density for a 10-s long transient would be 0.1 Jy, increasing to about 1 Jy for a wider range of events. This corresponds to luminosity limits of 1038-39 erg s-1 based on expectations for the distances of the gravitational wave transients, which should be sufficient to detect or significantly constrain a range of models for prompt emission.

  4. An Overview of Cassini Radio, Plasma Wave, and Langmuir Probe Observations in the Vicinity of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D.; Kurth, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Persoon, A.; Desch, M.; Farrell, W.; Kaiser, M.; Goetz, K.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.; Pedersen, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument detected a wide variety of radio and plasma wave phenomena during the approach and first flyby of Saturn. These include Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), Saturn electrostatic discharges (SEDs), upstream electrostatic waves, the bow shock, trapped continuum radiation, whistler-mode chorus emissions, electrostatic upper-hybrid emissions, impulsive signals from dust impacts, narrowband electromagnetic emissions in the low-density inner region of the magnetosphere, whistler-mode resonance-cone emissions similar to terrestrial auroral hiss, and many sporadic narrowband whistler-mode emissions apparently associated with the rings. In addition, electron density and temperature measurements were obtained from a Langmuir probe. In this paper we interpret these observations in terms of various key parameters and processes in the Saturnian system. These including new values for the radio rotation period of Saturn, long term variations in the occurrence of atmospheric lightning, the plasma density and temperature in the inner region of Saturn's magnetosphere, the distribution of micron-sized particle near the ring plane, evidence of an electrodynamic interaction between the rings and the co-rotating magnetosphere of Saturn, and the possible occurrence of meteoroid impacts on the rings.

  5. Millimeter wave technology IV and radio frequency power sources; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 21, 22, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.; Coleman, James T.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on mm-wave technology and radio-frequency power sources discusses topics in the fields of vacuum devices, mm-wave antennas and transmission lines, mm-wave systems and subsystems, and mm-wave techniques and components. Attention is given to recent experiments with planar orotrons, a high peak power X-band gyroklystron for linear supercolliders, cathode-driven crossed-field amplifiers, multi-MW quasi-optical gyrotrons, the radiation coupling of interinjection-locked oscillators, air-to-air mm-wave communications, mm-wave active and passive sensors for terrain mapping, and mm-wave components for electronically controllable antennas.

  6. Effect exerted by a radio wave electromagnetic field on the rheological properties of water and portland-cement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Belous, N. Kh.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Koshevar, V. D.; Shkadretsova, V. G.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. I.; Orlovich, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    We have studied the effect of the regimes of high-frequency (radio wave) electromagnetic treatment of gauging water on the process of structurization and on the technological characteristics of portland-cement systems. It has been established that the radio wave electromagnetic activation of water leads to a reduction in its surface tension, dynamic viscosity, and shear stress, as well as intensifies the formation of coagulation structures in a portlandcement slurry and aids in increasing the mobility of cement-sand mixtures.

  7. Experimental observations of the spatial structure of wave-like disturbances generated in midlatitude ionosphere by high power radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Andreeva, E.; Padokhin, A. M.; Nazarenko, M.; Frolov, V.; Komrakov, G.; Bolotin, I.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of the experiments carried out in 2009-2012 on the Sura heating facility (Radio Physical Research Institute, N. Novgorod, Russia) on modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves. The experiments were conducted using O-mode radiowaves at frequencies lower than critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer both in daytime and nighttime ionosphere. Various schemes of the radiation of the heating wave were used including square wave modulation of the effective radiated power (ERP) at various frequencies and power stepping. Radio transmissions of the low- (Parus/Tsikada) and high-orbital (GPS/GLONASS) navigational satellites received at the mobile network of receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated area of the ionosphere. The variations in the slant total electron content (TEC), which are proportional to the reduced phase of navigational signals, were studied for the satellite passes for which ionospheric penetration points crossed the disturbed area during HF heating. The variations in TEC caused by HF heating are identified in a number of examples. It is shown that the GNSS TEC spectra contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the ERP of the heating wave. The manifestations of the heating-induced variations in TEC are most prominent in the area of magnetic zenith of the pumping wave. Different behavior of TEC variations was observed during nighttime and daytime heating experiments. In daytime conditions the pump wave switched ON causes the increase of TEC while in the nighttime it causes a decrease in TEC. This can be explained by the different contribution of the processes responsible for the increase and decrease of TEC in daytime in nighttime conditions. In this work we also present the first time radiotomographic reconstructions of the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, generated in the ionosphere by high-power radio waves radiated by the Sura heater

  8. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  9. Frequency correlation of probe waves backscattered from small scale ionospheric irregularities generated by high power HF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    Aspect sensitive scattering of multi-frequency probe signals by artificial, magnetic field aligned density irregularities (with transverse size ∼ 1- 10 m) generated in the ionosphere by powerful radio waves is considered. Fluctuations of received signals depending on stochastic properties of the irregularities are calculated. It is shown that in the case of HF probe waves two mechanisms may contribute to the scattered signal fluctuations. The first one is due to the propagation of probe waves in the ionospheric plasma as in a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The second one lies in non-stationary stochastic behavior of irregularities which satisfy the Bragg conditions for the scattering geometry and therefore constitute centers of scattering. In the probe wave frequency band of the order of 10-100 MHz the second mechanism dominates which delivers opportunity to recover some properties of artificial irregularities from received signals. Correlation function of backscattered probe waves with close frequencies is calculated, and it is shown that detailed spatial distribution of irregularities along the scattering vector can be found experimentally from observations of this correlation function.

  10. Ray tracing and absorption of electron cyclotron waves in the L-2 stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfinger, R.C. ); Likin, K.M. . Inst. Obshchey Fiziki); Ochirov, B.D. . Inst. Avtomatiki i Ehlektrometrii)

    1991-01-01

    The absorption of electron cyclotron waves in L-2 stellarator plasmas has been investigated by adapting the RAYS geometrical optics code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to the parameters of L-2. Two heating schemes were considered: Low-field launching of the ordinary wave at the fundamental resonance and low-field launching of the extraordinary wave at the second harmonic. Significant power absorption (up to 100%) of the extraordinary mode at the second harmonic resonance was obtained. A multipass absorption model was used to estimate the contribution to plasma heating of the power that remains after the first pass which is subsequently reflected from the vessel walls. Finally, results obtained with the RAYS code and with a code developed at the Institute of Automation and Electrometry were compared and found to be in good agreement. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Investigation of Ion Absorption of the High Harmonic Fast Wave in NSTX using HPRT

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; Menard, J.E.; and LeBlanc, B.P.

    2001-05-18

    Understanding high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power absorption by ions in a spherical torus (ST) is of critical importance to assessing the wave's viability as a means of heating and especially driving current. In this work, the HPRT code is used to calculate absorption for helium and deuterium, with and without minority hydrogen in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas using experimental EFIT code equilibria and kinetic profiles. HPRT is a two-dimensional ray-tracing code which uses the full hot plasma dielectric to compute the perpendicular wave number along the hot electron and cold ion plasma ray path. Ion and electron absorption dependence on antenna phasing, ion temperature, beta (subscript t), and minority temperature and concentration is analyzed. These results form the basis for comparisons with other codes, such as CURRAY, METS, TORIC, and AORSA.

  12. Computational strategy for modeling radio wave propagation in lossy circular waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Ronald; Cai, D Michael

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of radio waves in lossy waveguides and tunnels has been researched extensively for many years as can be seen in the detailed book by Wait. The mathematics used to model waveguides for communications is essentially the same as that needed to model radio frequency (RF) propagation in simple tunnels. The presence or lack of conductors inside a waveguide or tunnel is a key driver in the nature of the solutions one will find for a particular application, Delogne. When there are conductors passing through a waveguide or tunnel, the simplest modes of propagation are surface-guided waves following the conductor and typically enabling long-range transmission. A tunnel containing a core conductor can act rather like a coaxial cable, propagating waves at a nearly constant speed, regardless of frequency. Conversely, a tunnel or waveguide without internal conductors is subject to very different wave patterns, resulting in a much more complex propagation analysis. Holloway et al. presented an exhaustive study of RF propagation in circular structures embedded in lossy surroundings. The work of Holloway et al. is the basis for this paper, where we discuss application of their computational techniques and present refinements gleaned from our work on similar problems.

  13. Absorption of THz electromagnetic wave in two mono-layers of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Cole B.; Shoufie Ukhtary, M.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-05-01

    Nearly 100% absorption of an electromagnetic (EM) wave in terahertz (THz) frequency is proposed for a system consisting of two mono-layers of graphene. Here, we demonstrate that the system can almost perfectly absorb an EM wave with frequency of 2 THz, even though we have a low electron mobility of roughly 1000 cm2  Vs‑1. The absorption probability is calculated by using the transfer matrix method. We show that the two mono-layers of the graphene system is needed to obtain nearly 100% absorption when the graphene has a relatively low Fermi energy. The absorption dependence on the distance between the graphene layers is also discussed.

  14. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  15. An Experiment Study of the Propagation of Radio Waves in a Scaled Model of Long-Wall Coal Mining Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, G.R.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, Y.P.

    2009-07-01

    A long-wall coal mining tunnel is the most important working area in a coal mine. It has long been realized that radio communications can improve both productivity and safety in this dangerous area. Hence, many attempts to use radio communications in such an environment have been made. Unfortunately, no radio system has satisfactorily provided communication services there, which, we believe, is partially due to poor understanding of the propagation characteristics of radio waves in the long-wall mining tunnel. To have deeper physical insight into the propagation problem, a scaled model of the long-wall mining tunnel was built, and the propagation characteristics of UHF radio waves were measured. The experiment and the measured results are presented and discussed.

  16. Self-compensated standing wave probe for characterization of radio-frequency plasmas.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ta-Lun; Matsumura, Shosaku; Teii, Kungen; Teii, Shinriki

    2014-06-01

    A simple self-compensated Langmuir probe using the character of a standing wave is developed for characterization of radio-frequency (RF) discharge plasmas. This probe is based on a concept that the interference of RF field is eliminated at the node of a standing wave which exists ideally at one-fourth of the RF wavelength (λ/4) away from the probe tip in the plasma. The fluctuation of plasma space potential is suppressed as confirmed by comparison with a non-compensated probe and a self-compensated probe using an inductor-capacitor (LC) resonant circuit. The plasma parameters obtained with the standing wave probe are in agreement with those with the LC resonant probe within discrepancy of 15% indicating high reliability of the results.

  17. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuley, Animesh; Wang, Z. X.; Lin, Z.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-01

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  18. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Wang, Z. X.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-15

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  19. Involuntary human hand movements due to FM radio waves in a moving van.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, P; Savinainen, A; Hänninen, Osmo; Myllylä, R

    2011-06-01

    Finland TRACT Involuntary movements of hands in a moving van on a public road were studied to clarify the possible role of frequency modulated radio waves on driving. The signals were measured in a direct 2 km test segment of an international road during repeated drives to both directions. Test subjects (n=4) had an ability to sense radio frequency field intensity variations of the environment. They were sitting in a minivan with arm movement detectors in their hands. A potentiometer was used to register the hand movements to a computer which simultaneously collected data on the amplitude of the RF signal of the local FM tower 30 km distance at a frequency of about 100 MHz. Involuntary hand movements of the test subjects correlated with electromagnetic field, i.e. FM radio wave intensity measured. They reacted also on the place of a geomagnetic anomaly crossing the road, which was found on the basis of these recordings and confirmed by the public geological maps of the area.In conclusion, RF irradiation seems to affect the human hand reflexes of sensitive persons in a moving van along a normal public road which may have significance in traffic safety. PMID:21616774

  20. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D- region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R.

    2008-12-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f = 3 - 100 kHz). The building-block of the calculation is a differential-equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's Equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular Direct Fourier Transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long- wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (200 - 500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, we use the classic D- region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Wait. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array.

  1. Damping of magnetohydrodynamic waves by resonant absorption in the solar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Goossens, M; Andries, J; Arregui, I

    2006-02-15

    In the last decade we have been overwhelmed by an avalanche of discoveries of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer observatories. Both standing and propagating versions of fast magnetoacoustic and slow magnetoacoustic MHD waves have been detected. Information on the damping times and damping distances of these waves is less detailed and less accurate than that on periods and amplitudes. Nevertheless, observations show the damping times and damping lengths are often short. Also, different types of MHD waves in different types of magnetic structures likely require different damping mechanisms. The phenomenon of fast damping is well documented for the standing fast magnetosonic kink waves in coronal loops. This paper concentrates on standing fast magnetosonic waves. It reports on results on periods and damping times due to resonant absorption in one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of coronal loops. Special attention is given to multiple modes. PMID:16414889

  2. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY MULTI-FREQUENCY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING OF RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Takayuki J.; Nagai, Hiroshi; Doi, Akihiro

    2013-07-20

    We conducted the first multi-frequency polarimetric imaging of four broad absorption line (BAL) quasars using the Very Long Baseline Array at milliarcsecond resolutions to investigate the inclination of the nonthermal jet and test the hypothesis that radio sources in BAL quasars are still young. Among these four sources, J0928+446, J1018+0530, and J1405+4056 show one-sided structures in parsec scales and polarized emission detected in the core. These characteristics are consistent with those of blazars. We set constraints on viewing angles to <66 Degree-Sign for these jets in the framework of a Doppler beaming effect. J1159+0112 exhibits an unpolarized gigahertz-peaked spectrum component and several discrete blobs with steep spectra on both sides of the central component across {approx}1 kpc. These properties are consistent with those of young radio sources. We discuss the structures of jets and active galactic nucleus wind.

  3. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-11-20

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  4. Millimeter and terahertz wave absorption in a lossy conducting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M. K.; Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, K. L.; Chu, K. R.

    2013-10-15

    Relativistic electronics research in recent years has produced powerful millimeter waves on the MW level, while also extending the frequency range into the terahertz (THz) region and beyond. These developments have opened up new horizons in applications. The current study is motivated by the associated need for high-power absorbers not readily available at such frequencies. Our focus is on effective absorber schemes which can handle high power while also possessing a structural simplicity for easy implementation. In and above the THz region, the electrical conductivity can no longer be treated as a real constant. We begin with a derivation of the field penetration depth applicable to all frequencies. Requirements to meet the intended criteria are then determined from the wave penetration and reflection properties. Design examples in the 1–1000 GHz range are illustrated, which consist of a thin lossy conducting layer on the surface of a pyramidal shaped metal base. It is shown in theory that such structures can function effectively in the millimeter and THz regions.

  5. Absorption of strain waves in porous media at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelidze, T. L.; Spetzler, H. A.; Sobolev, G. A.

    1996-06-01

    An understanding of strain wave propagation in fluid containing porous rocks is important in reservoir geophysics and in the monitoring in underground water in the vicinity of nuclear and toxic waste sites, earthquake prediction, etc. Both experimental and theoretical research are far from providing a complete explanation of dissipation mechanisms, especially the observation of an unexpectedly strong dependence of attenuation Q -1 on the chemistry of the solid and liquid phase involved. Traditional theories of proelasticity do not take these effects into account. In this paper the bulk of existing experimental data and theoretical models is reviewed briefly in order to elecidate the effect of environmental factors on the attenuation of seismic waves. Low fluid concentrations are emphasized. Thermodynamical analysis shows that changes in surface energy caused by weak mechanical disturbances can explain observed values of attenuation in real rocks. Experimental dissipation isotherms are interpreted in terms of monolayered surface adsorption of liquid films as described by Langmuir's equation. In order to describe surface dissipation in consolidated rocks, a surface tension term is added to the pore pressure term in the O'Connell-Budiansky proelastic equation for effective moduli of porous and fractured rocks. Theoretical calculations by this modified model, using reasonable values for elastic parameters, surface energy, crack density and their geometry, lead to results which qualitatively agree with experimental data obtained at low fluid contents.

  6. Scattering of radio frequency waves by cylindrical density filaments in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2016-02-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on the properties of RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, it is of interest to carry out a theoretical study to determine if fluctuations can affect the propagation characteristics of RF waves. Usually, the difference between the plasma density inside the filament and the background plasma density is sizable, the ratio of the density difference to the background density being of order one. Generally, this precludes the use of geometrical optics in determining the effect of fluctuations, since the relevant ratio has to be much less than one, typically, of the order of 10% or less. In this paper, a full-wave, analytical model is developed for the scattering of a RF plane wave by a cylindrical plasma filament. It is assumed that the plasma inside and outside the filament is cold and uniform and that the major axis of the filament is aligned along the toroidal magnetic field. The ratio of the density inside the filament to the density of the background plasma is not restricted. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any cold plasma wave. In order to satisfy the boundary conditions at the interface between the filament and the background plasma, the electromagnetic fields inside and outside the filament need to have the same k∥ , the wave vector parallel to the ambient magnetic field, as the incident plane wave. Consequently, in contrast to the scattering of a RF wave by a spherical blob [Ram et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056110-1-056110-10 (2013)], the scattering by a field-aligned filament does not broaden the k∥ spectrum. However, the filament induces side-scattering leading to surface

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  8. The coherer: with simple demonstrations of the generation, propagation and detection of radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2010-03-01

    A coherer is a bistable device based on metal filings loosely confined between solid metal electrodes. This granular material normally exhibits a very high electrical resistance (tens of kilohms), but passage of the high-frequency current generated by reception of a radio signal causes it to 'cohere' into a comparatively low resistance condition (tens of ohms). This state persists until the device is mechanically disturbed, whereupon the high resistance state is restored. This characteristic was employed by scientists in the 1890s to detect radio waves, and applied commercially by Marconi in his 'wireless' telegraph. It is easy to make a working coherer and directions are given for operating it from a distance with a spark transmitter based on a piezoelectric gas igniter. Incorporation of an 'aerial' and 'earth' enable a range of 7 m to be achieved and simple signals may be transmitted.

  9. Generation of type III solar radio bursts: the role of induced scattering of plasma waves by ions

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.N.; Lerner, A.M.; Rapoport, V.O.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma waves in type III solar radio-burst sources might have a spectrum which can explain why, in the quasilinear burst generation model, nonlinear scattering of the waves by ions is so weak. The agent exciting a burst would travel through the corona at velocities limited to a definite range.

  10. Beat-type Langmuir wave emissions associated with a type III solar radio burst: Evidence of parametric decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent measurements from the plasma wave instrument on the Galileo spacecraft have shown that Langmuir waves observed in conjunction with a type III solar radio burst contain many beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from about 150 to 650 Hz. Strong evidence exists that the beat pattern is produced by two closely spaced narrowband components. The most likely candidates for these two waves are a beam-generated Langmuir wave and an oppositely propagating Langmuir wave produced by parametric decay. In the parametric decay process, nonlinear interactions cause the beam-driven Langmuir wave to decay into a Langmuir wave and a low-frequency ion sound wave. Comparisons of the observed beat frequency are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a three-wave parametric decay process. Weak low-frequency emissions are also sometimes observed at the predicted frequency of the ion sound wave.

  11. Fokker-Planck simulations of X3 EC wave absorption experiments in the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, P.; Alberti, S.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T. P.; Harvey, R. W.; Nelson-Melby, E.; Sauter, O.

    2003-12-01

    Fokker-Planck modeling of the absorption of third harmonic electron cyclotron waves is presented. In the TCV tokamak an advanced electron cyclotron heating system is used to both heat the plasma (ECRH) and drive current (ECCD). Two frequencies are available for heating, 3 MW at 82.7 GHz in X-mode matching the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency(X2), and 1.5 MW at 117.7GHz which couples to the third harmonic (X3). The X3 waves have a smaller absorption coefficient as the optical thickness of the plasma strongly decreases with the harmonic number. In order to maximize the damping, waves are launched vertically from the top of the vacuum vessel, following the cold X3 resonance. This method alone has been measured to lead to 66% absorption. The Fokker-Planck (F-P) modeling is in agreement with the linear ray tracing code TORAY-GA and both satisfactory reproduce the experimental results. A second method is based on nonlinear enhancement of the absorption coefficient. A suprathermal electron population with a temperature of about 5 times the bulk temperature is created with the X2 waves. The X3 waves are efficiently damped by this electron population, leading to the measured full absorption of the X3 waves. In this scenario, nonlinear modeling is required, and the F-P calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experiments. However, the simulations suffer from numerical difficulties, and require a large number of mesh points in 3 dimensions (velocity, pitch angle, and radial coordinates). Work is in progress for a better quantitative comparison with the experiment.

  12. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stiles, D.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Berndsen, A.; Boyles, J.; Cardoso, R. F.; Chawla, P.; Cherry, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day, D.; Epstein, C. R.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.; Lunsford, G.; Lynch, R. S.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McPhee, C. A.; Penucci, T.; Ransom, S.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D. W.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast radio bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include starquakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second-generation interferometers.

  13. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  14. Experimental investigations of the characteristics of short-wave signals on short paths during modification of the ionosphere by powerful short-wave radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaia, N. F.; Bubnov, V. A.; Shelukhin, V. I.

    1992-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations of the fine structure and parameters of aspect-scattered short-wave signals are presented. The results are based on experimental observations obtained by a Doppler technique and the ionospheric oblique sounding technique. Measurement data of the Doppler and angular characteristics of shortwave signals during modification of the ionosphere by powerful short-wave radio emission are presented. The seasonal and diurnal variations of the short-wave scattering frequency range are considered.

  15. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  16. Significantly high wave trains in cosmic rays and solar radio flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rekha

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic field of the Sun disturbs the propagation of cosmic rays during their propagation through the Heliosphere, and introduces variations on time scales that range from hours to millennia. Changes in the heliosphere arising from fluctuations in the Sun's magnetic field mean that galactic cosmic rays are less able to reach the Earth when the Sun is more active so the cosmic ray flux is inversely related to solar activity. In the present work studies has been carried on the occurrence of a large number high amplitude wave train events in cosmic ray intensity and to identify a possible dependence on 10.7-cm solar radio flux (solar activity) using the hourly cosmic ray neutron monitor data for two different ground based neutron monitors. The phase for both high amplitude events as well as for all days is found to significantly deviate towards an earlier hour as compared to the corotational/azimuthal direction. The amplitude of first harmonic and 10.7-cm solar radio flux significantly deviates and reaches to its peak and phase remains in the corotational direction during the years close to solar activity maximum for these high amplitude events. The occurrence of high amplitude wave train events is dominant during solar activity minimum as well as maximum years. The amplitude as well as phase of the first harmonic of cosmic ray intensity during high amplitude events shows significant correlation with solar activity. However, the frequency of occurrence of high amplitude events shows a very nominal dependence on solar activity. Keywords: high amplitude wave trains, cosmic ray, solar activity, 10.7-cm solar radio flux, magnetic field.

  17. Radio Wave Propagation for Communication on and around Mars. Part 1; Highlights: Propagation Through Mars Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser

    1999-01-01

    We recommend to use the dayside Martian ionosphere as a reflector for global communication, because the dayside ionosphere has stable density peak and usable critic frequency. This is very crucial for the future Mars ground to around communication. The dayside ionosphere has been well modeled as a Chapman layer. We suggest to perform the Martian nightside ionospheric modeling study. Because the nightside ionosphere has very little measurements available, we propose to drop a digital ionosond instrument into the Mars surface for data collection. Even though the Martian tropospheric radio refractivity has small value, it still can cause the ray bending and multipath effects. We recommend to perform an accurate calculation on excess phase and group delays (range and time delays). Other effects, such as range rate errors, appearance angle deviation, defocusing loss on Mars, etc. are also needed to be estimated. Ice depolarization effects due to Martian clouds on radio waves is unknown yet, which is expected to be small, because lower optical depth and thinner layer of cloud: Total Martian atmospheric gaseous attenuation is expected to be less than 1 dB on microwaves band, because the Martian atmosphere has very low concentration in uncondensed H2O and O2. An accurate calculation for zenith opacity requires the information about scale heights of H2O and O2 distribution. An accurate water vapor altitude profile at Mars is not available yet. Under the normal condition, CO2 and N2 gases do not have electric or magnetic dipoles and do not absorb electromagnetic energy from the waves. However, they may generate the dipoles through a collision and interact with waves under a high density condition and absorb electromagnetic waves in the infrared and visible band. Dust storm is most dominant factor to the radio wave attenuation. Large Martian dust storm can cause at least 3 dB or higher loss to Ka band wave. For a normal dust storm, the attenuation is about 1 dB. The

  18. Suppression of the four-wave mixing amplification via Raman absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Gleb; O'Brien, Chris; Novikova, Irina

    2016-11-01

    We propose a method to controllably suppress the effect of the four-wave mixing caused by the coupling of the strong control optical field to both optical transitions in the ? system under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). At sufficiently high atomic density, this process leads to amplification of a weak optical signal field, that is detrimental for the fidelity of any EIT-based quantum information applications. Here we show that an additional absorption resonance centred around the Stokes field frequency, generated in such a four-wave mixing process, may efficiently suppress the unwanted probe amplification without affecting properties of the EIT interaction. We discuss the possibility of creating such tunable absorption using two-photon Raman absorption resonances in the other Rb isotope, and present some preliminary experimental results.

  19. The effect of plasma inhomogeneities on (i) radio emission generation by non-gyrotropic electron beams and (ii) particle acceleration by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2015-04-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [1]. Here recent progress in an alternative to the plasma emission model using Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts will be presented. In particular, (i) Fourier space drift (refraction) of non-gyrotropic electron beam-generated wave packets, caused by the density gradient [1,2], (ii) parameter space investigation of numerical runs [3], (iii) concurrent generation of whistler waves [4] and a separate problem of (iv) electron acceleration by Langmuir waves in a background magnetised plasma with an increasing density profile [5] will be discussed. In all considered cases the density inhomogeneity-induced wave refraction plays a crucial role. In the case of non-gyrotropic electron beam, the wave refraction transforms the generated wave packets from standing into freely escaping EM radiation. In the case of electron acceleration by Langmuir waves, a positive density gradient in the direction of wave propagation causes a decrease in the wavenumber, and hence a higher phase velocity vph = ω/k. The k-shifted wave is then subject to absorption by a faster electron by wave-particle interaction. The overall effect is an increased number of high energy electrons in the energy spectrum. [1] D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3590928 [2] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4812453 [3] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4768429 [4] M. Skender, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 042904 (2014); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4871723 [5] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI absorption in nearby radio galaxies (Allison+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Meekin, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Our sample selection was driven by the brightest radio sources in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS, ν=1.4GHz; Condon et al., 1998, Cat. VIII/65), the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS, ν=843MHz; Mauch et al., 2003, Cat. VIII/81) and the second epoch Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey (MGPS-2, ν=843MHz; Murphy et al., 2007, Cat. VIII/82). Together, the footprints of these three surveys fully overlap the sky coverage of HIPASS down to continuum flux densities of a few mJy. (2 data files).

  1. Jovian plasma sheet density profile from low-frequency radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Ladreiter, H. P.; Leblanc, Y.; Jones, D.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-04-01

    By using planetary radio astronomy (PRA), plasma wave system (PWS), and magnetometer (MAG) data from Voyager 1 and 2 (V1 and V2), essential features of the nightside Jovian plasma sheet are derived, and the density gradient of the corotating plasma structure in the middle Jovian magnetosphere is calculated. The PRA experiment gives information about the plasma wave polarization. The density profile of the plasma sheet is determined using the hinge point position of the plasma disk derived from MAG data, and the low-frequency cutoffs observed at three frequencies (562 Hz, 1 kHz, and 1.78 kHz) from the PWS experiment. It is shown that the hinge point position varies with the solar wind ram pressure.

  2. High Power Radio Wave Interactions within the D-Region Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper highlights the best results obtained during D-region modification experiments performed by the University of Florida at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory between 2007 and 2014. Over this period, we have seen a tremendous improvement in ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency. We have identified methods to characterize ambient and modified ionospheric properties and to discern and quantify specific types of interactions. We have demonstrated several important implications of HF cross-modulation effects, including "Doppler Spoofing" on HF radio waves. Throughout this talk, observations are compared with the predictions of an ionospheric HF heating model to provide context and guidance for future D-region modification experiments.

  3. Spatial Damping of Propagating Kink Waves Due to Resonant Absorption: Effect of Background Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Goossens, M.

    2011-06-01

    Observations show the ubiquitous presence of propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves in the solar atmosphere. Waves and flows are often observed simultaneously. Due to plasma inhomogeneity in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, kink waves are spatially damped by resonant absorption. The presence of flow may affect the wave spatial damping. Here, we investigate the effect of longitudinal background flow on the propagation and spatial damping of resonant kink waves in transversely nonuniform magnetic flux tubes. We combine approximate analytical theory with numerical investigation. The analytical theory uses the thin tube (TT) and thin boundary (TB) approximations to obtain expressions for the wavelength and the damping length. Numerically, we verify the previously obtained analytical expressions by means of the full solution of the resistive MHD eigenvalue problem beyond the TT and TB approximations. We find that the backward and forward propagating waves have different wavelengths and are damped on length scales that are inversely proportional to the frequency as in the static case. However, the factor of proportionality depends on the characteristics of the flow, so that the damping length differs from its static analog. For slow, sub-Alfvénic flows the backward propagating wave gets damped on a shorter length scale than in the absence of flow, while for the forward propagating wave the damping length is longer. The different properties of the waves depending on their direction of propagation with respect to the background flow may be detected by the observations and may be relevant for seismological applications.

  4. Systems having optical absorption layer for mid and long wave infrared and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    An optical system according to one embodiment includes a substrate; and an optical absorption layer coupled to the substrate, wherein the optical absorption layer comprises a layer of diamond-like carbon, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). A method for applying an optical absorption layer to an optical system according to another embodiment includes depositing a layer of diamond-like carbon of an optical absorption layer above a substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  5. Satellite radio occultation investigations of internal gravity waves in the planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs) modulate the structure and circulation of the Earth’s atmosphere, producing quasi-periodic variations in the wind velocity, temperature and density. Similar effects are anticipated for the Venus and Mars since IGWs are a characteristic of stably stratified atmosphere. In this context, an original method for the determination of IGW parameters from a vertical temperature profile measurement in a planetary atmosphere has been developed [Gubenko et al., 2008, 2011, 2012]. This method does not require any additional information not contained in the profile and may be used for the analysis of profiles measured by various techniques. The criterion for the IGW identification has been formulated and argued. In the case when this criterion is satisfied, the analyzed temperature fluctuations can be considered as wave-induced. The method is based on the analysis of relative amplitudes of the wave field and on the linear IGW saturation theory in which these amplitudes are restricted by dynamical (shear) instability processes in the atmosphere. When the amplitude of an internal wave reaches the shear instability threshold, energy is assumed to be dissipated in such a way that the IGW amplitude is maintained at the instability threshold level as the wave propagates upwards. We have extended the developed technique [Gubenko et al., 2008] in order to reconstruct the complete set of wave characteristics including such important parameters as the wave kinetic and potential energy per unit mass and IGW fluxes of the energy and horizontal momentum [Gubenko et al., 2011]. We propose also an alternative method to estimate the relative amplitudes and to extract IGW parameters from an analysis of perturbations of the Brunt-Vaislala frequency squared [Gubenko et al., 2011]. An application of the developed method to the radio occultation (RO) temperature data has given the possibility to identify the IGWs in the Earth's, Martian and Venusian atmospheres and

  6. The method of imbedded Lagrangian element to estimate wave power absorption by some submerged devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihous, Gérard C.

    2014-06-01

    A simple approach is described to estimate the wave power absorption potential of submerged devices known to cause wave focusing and flow enhancement. In particular, the presence of a flow-through power take-off (PTO) system, such as low-head turbines, can be accounted for. The wave radiation characteristics of an appropriately selected Lagrangian element (LE) in the fluid domain are first determined. In the limit of a vanishing mass, the LE reduces to a patch of distributed normal dipoles. The hydrodynamic coefficients of this virtual object are then input in a standard equation of motion where the effect of the PTO can be represented, for example, as a dashpot damping term. The process is illustrated for a class of devices recently proposed by Carter and Ertekin (2011), although in a simplified form. Favorable wave power absorption is shown for large ratios of the LE wave radiation coefficient over the LE added mass coefficient. Under optimal conditions, the relative flow reduction from the PTO theoretically lies between 0.50 and , with lower values corresponding to better configurations. Wave power capture widths, the sensitivity of results to PTO damping and sample spectral calculations at a typical site in Hawaiian waters are proposed to further illustrate the versatility of the method.

  7. Episodes of Ionospheric Disturbances caused by Solar Activity probed using Long Wave Terrestrial Radio Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugha Sundaram, GA; Shaik, Manoj

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic spectral record of long wave (LW) radio signals (kHz band) had registered a disturbed condition of the ionosphere region involved with propagation of these signals. The reason for such signatures in the dynamic spectrogram can be accredited to the impact of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) on the ionosphere along the propagation path of terrestrial long wave radiation, studied using the Multi-Hop propagation model. Points of reflection in the ionosphere directly above specific locations above the Earth where determined. Total Electron Content (TEC) values for such regions were obtained from interpretation of the global positioning system (GPS) data. From a comparisons of such results during periods when the Sun was quiet and active, the magnitude of ionosphere disturbance contributed by the various active solar phenomenae has been determined. The work reported here is based on the impact of Geomagnetic storm (K_{p}=6) on the TEC, that occurred on 16 April 2015. LW radio signals from transmitter locations operated by the United States Navy near Lualualei, Hawaii (Geomagnetic lat 21°25'13.38"}N, Geomagnetic long 158°09'14.35"W) and by France at Rosnay (Geomagnetic lat 46°42'47"N, Geomagnetic long 1°14'39"E) were monitored closely to know the extent of ionospheric impact.

  8. Development of data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave for implantable artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Hiroto; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize infection risks of patients with artificial hearts, wireless data transmission methods with electromagnetic induction or light have been developed. However, these methods tend to become difficult to transmit data if the external data transmission unit moves from its proper position. To resolve this serious problem, the purpose of this study is to develop a prototype wireless data communication system with ultra high frequency radio wave and confirm its performance. Due to its high-speed communication rate, low power consumption, high tolerance to electromagnetic disturbances, and secure wireless communication, we adopted Bluetooth radio wave technology for our system. The system consists of an internal data transmission unit and an external data transmission unit (53 by 64 by 16 mm, each), and each has a Bluetooth module (radio field intensity: 4 dBm, receiver sensitivity: -80 dBm). The internal unit also has a micro controller with an 8-channel 10-bit A/D converter, and the external unit also has a RS-232C converter. We experimented with the internal unit implanted into pig meat, and carried out data transmission tests to evaluate the performance of this system in tissue thickness of up to 3 mm. As a result, data transfer speeds of about 20 kbps were achieved within the communication distance of 10 m. In conclusion, we confirmed that the system can wirelessly transmit the data from the inside of the body to the outside, and it promises to resolve unstable data transmission due to accidental movements of an external data transmission unit. PMID:19964616

  9. MOF-Derived Porous Co/C Nanocomposites with Excellent Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties.

    PubMed

    Lü, Yinyun; Wang, Yiting; Li, Hongli; Lin, Yuan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Kuang, Qin; Zheng, Lansun

    2015-06-24

    Composites incorporating ferromagnetic metal nanopartices into a highly porous carbon matrix are promising as electromagnetic wave absorption materials. Such special composite nanomaterials are potentially prepared by the thermal decomposition of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials under controlled atmospheres. In this study, using Co-based MOFs (Co-MOF, ZIF-67) as an example, the feasibility of this synthetic strategy was demonstrated by the successful fabrication of porous Co/C composite nanomaterials. The atmosphere and temperature for the thermal decomposition of MOF precursors were crucial factors for the formation of the ferromagnetic metal nanopartices and carbon matrix in the porous Co/C composites. Among the three Co/C composites obtained at different temperatures, Co/C-500 obtained at 500 °C exhibited the best performance for electromagnetic wave absorption. In particular, the maximum reflection loss (RL) of Co/C-500 reached -35.3 dB, and the effective absorption bandwidth (RL ≤ -10 dB) was 5.80 GHz (8.40 GHz-14.20 GHz) corresponding to an absorber thickness of 2.5 mm. Such excellent electromagnetic wave absorption properties are ascribed to the synergetic effects between the highly porous structure and multiple components, which significantly improved impedance matching.

  10. The Dust, Nebular Emission, and Dependence on QSO Radio Properties of the Associated Mg II Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Pushpa; Berk Daniel, Vanden; Rahmani, Hadi; York, Donald G.

    2014-10-01

    We studied dust reddening and [O II] emission in 1730 Mg II associated absorption systems (AAS; relative velocity with respect to QSOs, <=3000 km s-1 in units of velocity of light, β, <=0.01) with 0.4 <=z abs <= 2 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, focusing on their dependence on the radio and other QSO properties. We used control samples, several with matching radio properties, to show that (1) AAS in radio-detected (RD) QSOs cause 2.6 ± 0.2 times higher dust extinction than those in radio-undetected (RUD) ones, which in turn cause 2.9 ± 0.7 times the dust extinction in the intervening systems; (2) AAS in core-dominated QSOs cause 2.0 ± 0.1 times higher dust extinction than those in lobe-dominated QSOs; (3) the occurrence of AAS is 2.1 ± 0.2 times more likely in RD QSOs than in RUD QSOs and 1.8 ± 0.1 time more likely in QSOs having black holes with masses larger than 1.23 × 109 M ⊙ than in those with lower-mass black holes; and (4) there is excess flux in [O II]λ3727 emission in the composite spectra of the AAS samples compared with those of the control samples, which is at the emission redshift. The presence of AAS enhances the O II emission from the active galactic nucleus and/or the host galaxy. This excess is similar for both RD and RUD samples and is 2.5 ± 0.4 times higher in lobe-dominated samples than in core-dominated samples. The excess depends on the black hole mass and Eddington ratio. All these point to the intrinsic nature of the AAS except for the systems with z abs > z em, which could be infalling galaxies.

  11. Ionospheric disturbances during November 30-December 1, 1988. XI - Abnormal propagations of HF and VHF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Masaru; Kamata, Mitsuhiro

    1992-07-01

    Unusual propagations of HF and VHF radio waves associated with a geomagnetic storm during the period from November 30 to December 1, 1988 are investigated using ionospheric data collected from Japan, China, and Taiwan. The increased field strength of the Japanese frequency standard signals (JJY 2.5 MHz and 5 MHz) which were received at Akita Radio Wave Observatory on the night of November 30 seem to have been caused by increased MUFs and/or scattering due to the disturbed ionosphere. The VHF-TV radio waves propagated from China were received at Kokubunji in Tokyo. One of the most probable mechanisms explaining this unusual propagation of VHF is a one-hop-F2 mode of propagation created by an ionosphere with an anomalously high f0F2. It was found out that these unusual HF and VHF propagations were attributed to unusual ionospheric conditions associated with these geomagnetic disturbances.

  12. New polarisation effects in saturated absorption spectroscopy in the field of counterpropagating light waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhnikov, D. V.; Novokreshchenov, V. K.; Ignatovich, S. M.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a double structure of saturated absorption resonance in the field of counterpropagating light waves interacting with atomic gas is considered, which was first studied experimentally and theoretically by Vasil'ev et al. [V.V. Vasil'ev et al., J. Exp. Theor. Phys., 112, 770 (2011)]. The effect manifests itself as a new nonlinear resonance formed as a peak in the absorption spectrum of the probe wave. The resonance is observed inside a 'conventional' dip in the spectrum of saturated absorption. Previously, this effect was theoretically described only in the frameworks of the two-level atomic model, i.e., without making allowance for degeneracy of atomic energy levels with respect to the projection of the total angular momentum and for the vector nature of light. We extend the theory of the effect to the case of real atomic systems with degenerate energy levels and arbitrary polarisations of light waves. In particular, on an example of the simple transition Fg = 1 → Fe = 0 we show that polarisation parameters of light waves may significantly affect the contrast of the new effect and the possibility of observing it at all. Conclusions of the work are confirmed both analytically and bnumerically.

  13. Millimeter-Wave Absorption as a Quality Control Tool for M-Type Hexaferrite Nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Afsar, Mohammed N.

    2013-01-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) absorption measurements have been conducted on commercial samples of large (micrometer-sized) and small (nanometer-sized) particles of BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 using a quasi-optical MMW spectrometer and a series of backwards wave oscillators encompassing the 30-120 GHz range. Effective anisotropy of the particles calculated from the resonant absorption frequency indicates lower overall anisotropy in the nano-particles. Due to their high magnetocrystalline anisotropy, both BaFe12O19 and SrFe12O19 are expected to have spin resonances in the 45-55 GHz range. Several of the sampled BaFe12O19 powders did not have MMW absorptions, so they were further investigated by DC magnetization and x-ray diffraction to assess magnetic behavior and structure. The samples with absent MMW absorption contained primarily iron oxides, suggesting that MMW absorption could be used for quality control in hexaferrite powder manufacture.

  14. SDN based millimetre wave radio over fiber (RoF) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amate, Ahmed; Milosavljevic, Milos; Kourtessis, Pandelis; Robinson, Matthew; Senior, John M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces software-defined, millimeter Wave (mm-Wave) networks with Radio over Fiber (RoF) for the delivery of gigabit connectivity required to develop fifth generation (5G) mobile. This network will enable an effective open access system allowing providers to manage and lease the infrastructure to service providers through unbundling new business models. Exploiting the inherited benefits of RoF, complete base station functionalities are centralized at the edges of the metro and aggregation network, leaving remote radio heads (RRHs) with only tunable filtering and amplification. A Software Defined Network (SDN) Central Controller (SCC) is responsible for managing the resource across several mm-Wave Radio Access Networks (RANs) providing a global view of the several network segments. This ensures flexible resource allocation for reduced overall latency and increased throughput. The SDN based mm-Wave RAN also allows for inter edge node communication. Therefore, certain packets can be routed between different RANs supported by the same edge node, reducing latency. System level simulations of the complete network have shown significant improvement of the overall throughput and SINR for wireless users by providing effective resource allocation and coordination among interfering cells. A new Coordinated Multipoint (CoMP) algorithm exploiting the benefits of the SCC global network view for reduced delay in control message exchange is presented, accounting for a minimum packet delay and limited Channel State Information (CSI) in a Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A), Cloud RAN (CRAN) configuration. The algorithm does not require detailed CSI feedback from UEs but it rather considers UE location (determined by the eNB) as the required parameter. UE throughput in the target sector is represented using a Cumulative Distributive Function (CDF). The drawn characteristics suggest that there is a significant 60% improvement in UE cell edge throughput following the

  15. Lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks in weak and strong absorption regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R. W.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G. W.; Valeo, E. J.; Phillips, C. K.

    2011-12-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons at (2.5-3)×vte, where vte = (2Te/me)1/2. The velocity at which damping occurs depends on the non-linear balance between quasilinear diffusion and collisions. For high efficiency current drive, a low parallel index of refraction, n∥, corresponding to a high phase velocity, is chosen. Depending on the plasma electron temperature this may put the wave propagation in a multi-pass regime. In cases of low parallel refractive index, ray tracing with no SOL has been shown to have differences with experiment [1] and collision effects in the scrape off layer may be important [2]. Using a coupled model of the full wave code, TORLH[3], and the Fokker-Planck code, CQL3D[4], the importance of full wave effects in weak and strong absorption regimes are studied.

  16. Theoretical analysis of gyrotropy and absorption of terahertz electromagnetic waves in layer of DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, A.; Vaks, V.

    2016-08-01

    Certain type of low-frequency DNA molecular oscillations was analysed within the self-consistent phonon approximation. There were calculated dispersion relationship, exiting the oscillations by electromagnetic wave and corresponding contribution to the absorption spectrum of ensemble of parallel DNA molecules. The dependence of the DNA spectral characteristics on the length and period of the DNA duplex structure is revealed. The method of experimental check of obtained results is suggested. If the described model is confirmed by experiment, the obtained results available to reconstruct the length and duplex period of the DNA in a sample by its absorption spectrum.

  17. Synergy in Two-Frequency Fast Wave Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F. W.; Hosea, J. C.

    2009-11-26

    Fast waves (FWs) at 60 MHz and at 90 MHz are coupled to DIII-D discharges for central heating and current drive at net FW power up to 3.5 MW. The primary absorption mechanism is intended to be direct electron damping in the plasma core. In discharges at B = 2 T with fast deuteron populations from neutral beam injection, 4th and 6th deuterium cyclotron harmonic absorption on the fast ions competes with direct electron damping. Previous experiments have shown that the 6{omega}{sub D} absorption of the 90 MHz FWs is weaker than the 4{omega}{sub D} absorption of 60 MHz FWs, in agreement with a model that includes unspecified edge losses. Recent experiments have shown that if the fast deuterons are accelerated by absorption of 60 MHz (4{omega}{sub D}) FWs, adding 90 MHz power (6{omega}{sub D}) can increase the fusion neutron rate by a larger increment than is obtained with 90 MHz power alone. Details of this synergy between 4{omega}{sub D} and 6{omega}{sub D} absorption are presented.

  18. Absorption of waves by large-scale winds in stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Mininni, P D

    2015-03-01

    The atmosphere is a nonlinear stratified fluid in which internal gravity waves are present. These waves interact with the flow, resulting in wave turbulence that displays important differences with the turbulence observed in isotropic and homogeneous flows. We study numerically the role of these waves and their interaction with the large-scale flow, consisting of vertically sheared horizontal winds. We calculate their space- and time-resolved energy spectrum (a four-dimensional spectrum) and show that most of the energy is concentrated along a dispersion relation that is Doppler shifted by the horizontal winds. We also observe that when uniform winds are let to develop in each horizontal layer of the flow, waves whose phase velocity is equal to the horizontal wind speed have negligible energy. This indicates a nonlocal transfer of their energy to the mean flow. Both phenomena, the Doppler shift and the absorption of waves traveling with the wind speed, are not accounted for in current theories of stratified wave turbulence. PMID:25871210

  19. Absorption of waves by large-scale winds in stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Mininni, P D

    2015-03-01

    The atmosphere is a nonlinear stratified fluid in which internal gravity waves are present. These waves interact with the flow, resulting in wave turbulence that displays important differences with the turbulence observed in isotropic and homogeneous flows. We study numerically the role of these waves and their interaction with the large-scale flow, consisting of vertically sheared horizontal winds. We calculate their space- and time-resolved energy spectrum (a four-dimensional spectrum) and show that most of the energy is concentrated along a dispersion relation that is Doppler shifted by the horizontal winds. We also observe that when uniform winds are let to develop in each horizontal layer of the flow, waves whose phase velocity is equal to the horizontal wind speed have negligible energy. This indicates a nonlocal transfer of their energy to the mean flow. Both phenomena, the Doppler shift and the absorption of waves traveling with the wind speed, are not accounted for in current theories of stratified wave turbulence.

  20. Reconstruction of an excited-state molecular wave packet with attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Chini, Michael; Wang, Xiaowei; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-08-01

    Attosecond science promises to allow new forms of quantum control in which a broadband isolated attosecond pulse excites a molecular wave packet consisting of a coherent superposition of multiple excited electronic states. This electronic excitation triggers nuclear motion on the molecular manifold of potential energy surfaces and can result in permanent rearrangement of the constituent atoms. Here, we demonstrate attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS) as a viable probe of the electronic and nuclear dynamics initiated in excited states of a neutral molecule by a broadband vacuum ultraviolet pulse. Owing to the high spectral and temporal resolution of ATAS, we are able to reconstruct the time evolution of a vibrational wave packet within the excited B'Σ1u+ electronic state of H2 via the laser-perturbed transient absorption spectrum.

  1. Measurements of standing waves and the absorption coefficients of Various materials with surface electromagnetic waves on Al.

    PubMed

    Bell, R J; Davarpanah, M; Goben, C A; Begley, D L; Bhasin, K; Alexander, R W

    1975-07-01

    The first measurements of the absorption coefficient of materials via surface electromagnetic wave (SEW) techniques are reported. By simply laying samples on a metal sheet on which SEW were passing, the transmittances and absorption coefficients of the sample have been determined. These measurements were made at microwave frequencies, but the general techniques are applicable over the entire frequency range from microwaves into the near ir. Solid samples were used in these measurements, but liquid or gases could also be studied by this new easy-to-use technique. Comments about the applicability of the technique to very thin samples are made. Another result reported is the existence of different propagating SEW modes as a function of the height of a sample (film thickness) measured from the metal-sample interface to the top of the sample at the sample-vacuum interface above.

  2. A One-Dimensional Solution of the Photoacoustic Wave Equation and its Relationship with Optical Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywiak, D.; Barreiro-Argüelles, M. D.; Cywiak, M.; Landa-Curiel, A.; Garcia-Segundo, C.; Gutierrez-Juárez, G.

    2013-09-01

    A study based on the general solution of the one-dimensional photoacoustic (PA) wave equation for an acoustic plane source is presented. This study relies on obtaining the impulse response of the PA system considering a heating function proportional to the Lambert-Beer law and spatially bounded by a rectangle function. The PA pressure is obtained by convoluting the impulse response with the temporal profile of the exciting pulse of light. With the obtained solution, it is possible to comprise, on a single expression, the PA pressure profile for optically thin samples (whose dimensions are smaller than the optical absorption length) and optically opaque samples (whose dimensions are larger than the optical absorption length). In the limit of weak absorption, the solution is in good agreement with the one for a uniform distribution of energy. Also, a study of the dependence of the acoustic pressure with the duration of the laser pulse is included.

  3. Plane-wave DFT-LDA calculation of the electronic structure and absorption spectrum of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Andrea; Onida, Giovanni; del Sole, Rodolfo

    2001-11-01

    We present an accurate, first-principles study of the electronic structure and absorption spectrum of bulk copper within density functional theory in the local density approximation, including the study of intraband transitions. We construct norm-conserving pseudopotentials (PP's) including the 3d shell (and optionally the underlying 3s and 3p shells) in the valence and requiring a relatively small plane-wave basis (60 and 140 Ry cutoff, respectively). As a consequence, these PP's are strongly nonlocal, yielding macroscopically wrong results in the absorption spectrum when momentum matrix elements are computed naively. Our results are compared with experimental photoemission, absorption, and electron energy loss data, and suggest nontrivial self-energy effects in the quasiparticle spectrum of Cu.

  4. Fabrication process and electromagnetic wave absorption characterization of a CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Mo, Chan Bin; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Since carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered in 1991, it has been considered as a viable type of conductive filler for electromagnetic wave absorption materials in the GHz range. In this paper, pearl-necklace-structure CNT/Ni nano-powders were fabricated by a polyol process as conductive fillers. Compared to synthesized CNT, pearl-necklace Ni-decorated CNT increased the electrical conductivity by an order of 1 due to the enhancement of the Ni-conductive network. Moreover, the decorated Ni particles prevented the agglomeration of CNTs by counterbalancing the Van der Walls interaction between the CNTs. A CNT/Ni nanocomposite showed a homogeneous dispersion in an epoxy-based matrix. This enhanced physical morphology and electrical properties lead to an increase in the loss tangent and reflection loss in the CNT/Ni/Epoxy nanocomposite compared to these characteristics of a CNT/Epoxy nanocomposite in range of 8-12 GHz. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for electronic applications where lightweight EMI shielding or electro-magnetic wave absorption properties are necessary.

  5. Fabrication process and electromagnetic wave absorption characterization of a CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Mo, Chan Bin; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Since carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered in 1991, it has been considered as a viable type of conductive filler for electromagnetic wave absorption materials in the GHz range. In this paper, pearl-necklace-structure CNT/Ni nano-powders were fabricated by a polyol process as conductive fillers. Compared to synthesized CNT, pearl-necklace Ni-decorated CNT increased the electrical conductivity by an order of 1 due to the enhancement of the Ni-conductive network. Moreover, the decorated Ni particles prevented the agglomeration of CNTs by counterbalancing the Van der Walls interaction between the CNTs. A CNT/Ni nanocomposite showed a homogeneous dispersion in an epoxy-based matrix. This enhanced physical morphology and electrical properties lead to an increase in the loss tangent and reflection loss in the CNT/Ni/Epoxy nanocomposite compared to these characteristics of a CNT/Epoxy nanocomposite in range of 8-12 GHz. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for electronic applications where lightweight EMI shielding or electro-magnetic wave absorption properties are necessary. PMID:24245312

  6. Electromagnetic particle simulation of the effect of toroidicity on linear mode conversion and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Kuley, A.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of toroidicity on linear mode conversion and absorption of lower hybrid (LH) waves in fusion plasmas have been studied using electromagnetic particle simulation. The simulation confirms that the toroidicity induces an upshift of parallel refractive index when LH waves propagate from the tokamak edge toward the core, which affects the radial position for the mode conversion between slow and fast LH waves. Furthermore, moving LH antenna launch position from low field side toward high field side leads to a larger upshift of the parallel refractive index, which helps the slow LH wave penetration into the tokamak core. The broadening of the poloidal spectrum of the wave-packet due to wave diffraction is also verified in the simulation. Both the upshift and broadening effects of the parallel spectrum of the wave-packet modify the parallel phase velocity and thus the linear absorption of LH waves by electron Landau resonance.

  7. The Radio & Plasma Wave Investigation (RPWI) for JUICE - Instrument Concept and Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, J. E. S.

    2013-09-01

    We present the concept and capabilities of the Radio & Plasma Waves Investigation (RPWI) instrument for the JUICE mission. The RPWI instrument provides measurements of plasma, electric- and magnetic field fluctuations from near DC up to 45 MHz. The RPWI sensors are four Langmuir probes for low temperature plasma diagnostics and electric field measurements, a three-axis searchcoil magnetometer for low-frequency magnetic field measurements, and a three-axial radio antenna, which operates from 80 kHz up to 45 MHz and thus gives RPWI remote sensing capabilities.. In addition, active mutual impedance measurements are used to diagnose the in situ plasma. The RPWI instrument is unique as it provides vector field measurements in the whole frequency range. This makes it possible to employ advanced diagnostics techniques, which are unavailable for scalar measurements. The RPWI instrument has thus outstanding new capabilities not previously available to outer planet missions, which and enables RPWI to address many fundamental planetary science objectives, such as the electrodynamic influence of the Jovian magnetosphere on the exospheres, surfaces and conducting oceans of Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto. RPWI will also be able to investigate the sources of radio emissions from auroral regions of Ganymede and Jupiter, in detail and with unprecedented sensitivity, and possibly also lightning. Moreover, RPWI can search for exhaust plumes from cracks on the icy moons, as well as μm-sized dust and related dust-plasmasurface interaction processes occurring near the icy moons of Jupiter. The top-level blockdiagram of the RPWI instrument is shown here. A detailed technical description of the RPWI instrument will be given.

  8. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: Application to gravitational wave searches

    SciTech Connect

    Tinto, Massimo; Dick, George J.; Prestage, John D.; Armstrong, J. W.

    2009-05-15

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multilink CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would give GW strain sensitivity of 3.7x10{sup -14} Hz{sup -1/2} for randomly polarized, monochromatic GW signals isotropically distributed over the celestial sphere, over a two-decade ({approx}0.0001-0.01 Hz) region of the low-frequency band. This is about an order of magnitude better than currently achieved with traditional two-way coherent Doppler experiments. The utility of optimally combining simultaneous up- and down-link observations is not limited to GW searches. The Doppler tracking technique discussed here could be performed at minimal incremental cost to improve also other radio science experiments (i.e., tests of relativistic gravity, planetary and satellite gravity field measurements, atmospheric and ring occultations) on future interplanetary missions.

  9. Simulation of Self-consistent Radio Wave Artificial Ionospheric Turbulence Pumping and Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Andrey

    The numerical simulations of the action of self-consistent incident powerful electromagnetic wave absorption arising in the regions of artificial plasma turbulence excitation at formation, saturation and relaxation stages of turbulent structures (Kochetov, A.V., Mironov, V.A., Te-rina, G.I., Bubukina V. N, Physica D, Nonlinear phenomena, 2001, 152-153, 723) to reflection index dynamics are carried out. The nonlinear Schrüdinger equation in inhomogeneous plasma layer with incident electromagnetic wave pumping and backscattered radiation damping (Ko-chetov, et al, Adv. Space Res., 2002, 29, 1369 and 2006, 38, 2490) is extended with the imagi-nary part of plasma dielectric constant (volume damping), which is should be taken into account in strong electromagnetic field plasma regions and results the energy transformation from elec-tromagnetic waves to plasma ones at resonance interaction (D.V. Shapiro, V.I. Shevchenko, in Handbook of Plasma Physics 2, eds. A.A Galeev, R.N. Sudan. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1984). The volume damping reproduces the basic energy transformation peculiarities: hard excitation, nonlinearity, hysteresis (A.V. Kochetov, E. Mjoelhus, Proc. of IV Intern. Workshop "SMP", Ed. A.G. Litvak, Vol.2, N. Novgorod, 2000, 491). Computer modeling demonstrates that the amplitude and period of reflection index oscillations at the formation stage slowly depend on damping parameters of turbulent plasma regions. The transformation from complicated: quasi-periodic and chaotic dynamics, to quasi-stationary regimes is shown at the saturation stage. Transient processes time becomes longer if the incident wave amplitude and nonlinear plasma response increase, but damping decreases. It is obtained that the calculated reflection and absorption index dynamics at the beginning of the saturation stage agrees qualitatively to the experimental results for ionosphere plasma modification study (Thide B., E.N. Sergeev, S.M. Grach, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 95, 255002). The

  10. Radio wave propagation in arch-shaped tunnels: Measurements and simulations by asymptotic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, E.; Combeau, P.; Cocheril, Y.; Berbineau, M.; Aveneau, L.; Vauzelle, R.

    2010-01-01

    Several wireless communication systems are developed for communication needs between train and ground and between trains in the railway or mass transit domains. They are developed for operational needs for security and comfort. In order to deploy these systems in specific environments, such as tunnels, straight or curved, rectangular or arch-shaped section, specific propagation models have to be developed. A modelisation of the radio wave propagation in straight arch-shaped tunnels is realized by using asymptotic methods, such as Ray Tracing and Ray Launching, combined with the tessellation of the arched section. A method of interpolation of the facets' normals was implemented in order to minimize the error made when using the tessellation. Results obtained are validated by comparison to the literature and to measurement results.

  11. Thermal response of the F region ionosphere in artificial modification experiments by HF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantas, G. P.; Lahoz, C. H.; Carlson, H. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal response of the nighttime F region ionosphere to local heating by HF radio waves has been observed with the incoherent scatter radar at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The observations consist of high-resolution space and time variation of the electron temperature as a high-power HF transmitter is switched on and off with a period 240 s. As soon as the HF transmitter is turned on, the electron temperature begins to rise rapidly in a narrow altitude region near 300 km, below the F2 layer peak. The electron temperature perturbation subsequently spreads over a broader altitude region. The observations are compared with the anticipated thermal response of the ionosphere based on numerical solutions of the coupled time-dependent heat conduction equations for the electron and composite ion gases and are found to be in good agreement over the entire altitude region covered by the observations.

  12. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  13. Automatic Recognition of Type III Solar Radio Bursts in STEREO/WAVES Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.; Zaslavsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency and/or near its harmonic by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time. This paper presents two new methods developed to detect type III bursts automatically in the data from High Frequency Receiver (HFR) of the STEREO/WAVES radio instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. The first technique is applicable to the low-frequency band (HFR-1: 125 kHz to 1.975 MHz) only. This technique can possibly be implemented in onboard satellite software aimed at preliminary detection of bursts and identification of time intervals with relatively high solar activity. In the second technique the bursts are detected in both the low-frequency band and the high-frequency band (HFR-2: 2.025 MHz to 16.025 MHz), with the computational burden being higher by 1 order of magnitude as compared with that for the first technique. Preliminary tests of the method show that for the first technique the pobability to detect is quite high, Pd L = 72% ± 3%. The performance of the second technique is considerably higher, Pd L+H = 81%±1%, while the number of false alarms does not exceed 10% for one daily spectrum.

  14. FDTD analysis of ELF radio waves propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Volodymyr; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    We developed an FDTD model of electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. We present the results of FDTD calculations assuming axisymmetric system with the source located at the north pole and with no dependence on azimuthal coordinate. Therefore we reduced the Maxwell equations to 2D spherical system of Maxwell equations. To model the conductivity profile of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide we used two models, namely one- and two-exponential profiles [Mushtak and Williams, 2002]. The day-night asymmetry was introduced by setting different model parameters for the north and south hemispheres. The ground was modeled as a perfect electric conductor. Also the upper boundary for the model was a perfect conductor but it was placed at a high enough altitude to make sure there is no reflection of the waves from this boundary. We obtained the results for the electric and magnetic field components of the propagating wave in the time and frequency domains and for various locations on Earth along the meridian. In the time domain we analyzed the evolution of the electric and magnetic field components of the radio wave generated by lighting for different probe position, the penetration of the ionosphere by the electromagnetic waves and the reflection of the waves on the terminator. In the frequency domain we analyzed the Schumann resonance spectra in different field components for different location in the computational space, the behavior of the Poynting vector and the wave impedance. We also calculated real and imaginary parts of the characteristic electric and magnetic altitudes for the daytime and nighttime ionosphere. The analysis in the frequency domain was performed up to 1 kHz. We compared the results of numerical calculations with our analytical model and found a reasonably good agreement between them. The results can be used in the analysis of global thunderstorm activity based on measurements of Schumann resonance spectra. Acknowledgements. This

  15. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  16. Radio-Frequency Downstream Plasma Production by Surface-Wave in a Very High-Permittivity Material Discharge Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuya; Endo, Masakatsu; Ikeda, Yasushi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yanagisawa, Michihiko; Shindo, Haruo

    2005-03-01

    A novel method of radio-frequency surface-wave plasma production is proposed, with a particular interest in use of a very high permittivity material discharge tube. A discharge tube of TiCa-TiMg composite, which has the permittivity of 140, is employed to produce SF6 plasma by the 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power. The axial distribution of optical emission lines of fluorine shows a rapid decay, more than 5 times faster than that in quartz tube. This is because the speed of the surface-wave is reduced in a condition of very high permittivity. It is concluded that the method is innovative in use of radio-frequency power to produce downstream plasma with a very high permittivity discharge tube.

  17. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  18. Radio Wave Reflections from Magnetized Plasma Bulges in the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Nielsen, E.; Xiao, L.; Liang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we propose a quantitative explanation of a special type of radio wave reflection phenomena observed by MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding), in light of the cold plasma theory. The phenomena in question appear as a type of traces in the AIS (Active Ionosphere Sounding) ionograms. The traces show the following characteristics: (1) They may appear only when the spacecraft is near to a magnetic cusp region (around 300km altitude) on dayside; (2) They are "C"-shaped curves, with their open ends pointing to the increasing frequency direction. Obviously, these traces represent 'reflection pairs' (two echoes corresponding to one transmission from the antenna). The two echoes of a 'pair' have approximately the same time delay at the lowest propagating frequency, and have increasing time delay separation with increasing wave frequency; (3) Their positions and sizes in ionograms (i.e., their frequency ranges and time delay ranges) change regularly with spacecraft motion; (4) They represent quite rare events, since they are clearly observed only in a few orbit segments among thousands of orbits of Mars Express. In order to investigate the origin of these features, we employ a 2D spatial configuration model of the magnetized plasma bulge to simulate the behavior of the AIS radio waves. In the model the magnetic field is assumed to be a deformed vertical cylinder (corresponding to the patched crustal field of Mars), with its transverse size expanding upward. Magnetic flux density decreases upward and sideward continuously into a low background field value (while the total flux is conserved). Electron density is positively related to the field flux density, meanwhile decreases upward in an exponential manner. Equilibrium between magnetic pressure and plasma pressure is assumed to hold the density bulge. A ray tracing method based on the cold plasma dispersion relation is used to produce artificial ionograms. We find that under some

  19. Heating of the solar corona by the resonant absorption of Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved method for calculating the resonance absorption heating rate is discussed and the results are compared with observations in the solar corona. To accomplish this, the wave equation for a dissipative, compressible plasma is derived from the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations for a plasma with transverse Alfven speed gradients. For parameters representative of the solar corona, it is found that a two-scale description of the wave motion is appropriate. The large-scale motion, which can be approximated as nearly ideal, has a scale which is on the order of the width of the loop. The small-scale wave, however, has a transverse scale much smaller than the width of the loop, with a width of about 0.3-250 km, and is highly dissipative. These two wave motions are coupled in a narrow resonance region in the loop where the global wave frequency equals the local Alfven wave frequency. Formally, this coupling comes about from using the method of matched asymptotic expansions to match the inner and outer (small and large scale) solutions. The resultant heating rate can be calculated from either of these solutions. A formula derived using the outer (ideal) solution is presented, and shown to be consistent with observations of heating and line broadening in the solar corona.

  20. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. I - Connection formulae at the resonant surfaces. II - Absorption of sound waves by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1991-01-01

    The present method of addressing the resonance problems that emerge in such MHD phenomena as the resonant absorption of waves at the Alfven resonance point avoids solving the fourth-order differential equation of dissipative MHD by recourse to connection formulae across the dissipation layer. In the second part of this investigation, the absorption of solar 5-min oscillations by sunspots is interpreted as the resonant absorption of sounds by a magnetic cylinder. The absorption coefficient is interpreted (1) analytically, under certain simplifying assumptions, and numerically, under more general conditions. The observed absorption coefficient magnitude is explained over suitable parameter ranges.

  1. Simultaneous excitation of large-scale geomagnetic field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities by powerful radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanism of thermal filamentation instability of radio waves whose frequencies can be as low as in the VLF band and as high as in the SHF band are investigated. This instability can excite large-scale magnetic and plasma density fluctuations simultaneously in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Relevant experiments are reviewed in terms of this instability and other mechanisms.

  2. Long-term integrated radiophysical studies of the ionosphere, near space, and the propagation of radio waves from space objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misyura, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    The radiophysical studies reported consist of direct measurements of certain effects induced in the propagation of radio waves from space objects. From measured effects and from data on the motion and position of space objects, physical parameters of the medium and bodies are determined.

  3. Reflection and Scattering of Acoustical Waves from a Discontinuity in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Leeman, S.; Nolan, E.; Lee, D.

    The reflection and transmission of a plane acoustical wave from a planar boundary at the interface between two homogeneous media of different acoustical properties is a classical problem in acoustics that has served as a basis for many developments in acoustics for over 100 years. This problem, detailed in virtually every textbook on acoustics, provides us with the acoustical analogue to Snell's Law in optics and gives us correspondingly simple results. Classical acoustics predicts that a reflection from a boundary occurs only if the characteristic acoustical impedances of the two media are different. Here we show that a reflection also occurs if the media have the same impedances but different absorption coefficients. Our analysis yields some surprising results. For example, a reflection will occur at a discontinuity in absorption even if the impedance is uniform and continuous across the interface. In addition, a discontinuity in impedance at an interface between two media that have constant and equal, but non-zero absorption, results in a reflection coefficient that is dependent on absorption as well as impedance. In general, reflection coefficients now become frequency dependent. To experimentally test our results, we measured the reflection at the interface between water and castor oil, two liquids with similar impedances but very different absorption coefficients. Measurement of the reflection coefficient between 1 and 50 MHz demonstrated a frequency dependence that was in good agreement with our analysis.

  4. Absorption of fast waves at moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Schaffner, D. A.; Baity, F. W.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Murakami, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    The absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from 4th to 8th is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on ions with an arbitrary distribution function which is symmetric about the magnetic field is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic if the fast ion beta, the beam injection energy and the background plasma density are high enough and the beam injection geometry is appropriate. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. The linear modelling predicts a strong dependence of the 8th harmonic absorption on the initial pitch-angle of the injected beam, which is not observed in the experiment. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  5. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves ({omega}{sub ci}<<{omega}<<{omega}{sub ce}, where {omega}{sub i,e}{identical_to}Z{sub i,e}eB/m{sub i,e}c) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D[R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B{sub 0}{approx_equal}5 T, n{sub e0}{approx_equal}1x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  6. The dust, nebular emission, and dependence on QSO radio properties of the associated Mg II absorption line systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Pushpa; Daniel, Vanden Berk; Rahmani, Hadi; York, Donald G.

    2014-10-10

    We studied dust reddening and [O II] emission in 1730 Mg II associated absorption systems (AAS; relative velocity with respect to QSOs, ≤3000 km s{sup –1}; in units of velocity of light, β, ≤0.01) with 0.4 ≤z {sub abs} ≤ 2 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, focusing on their dependence on the radio and other QSO properties. We used control samples, several with matching radio properties, to show that (1) AAS in radio-detected (RD) QSOs cause 2.6 ± 0.2 times higher dust extinction than those in radio-undetected (RUD) ones, which in turn cause 2.9 ± 0.7 times the dust extinction in the intervening systems; (2) AAS in core-dominated QSOs cause 2.0 ± 0.1 times higher dust extinction than those in lobe-dominated QSOs; (3) the occurrence of AAS is 2.1 ± 0.2 times more likely in RD QSOs than in RUD QSOs and 1.8 ± 0.1 time more likely in QSOs having black holes with masses larger than 1.23 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} than in those with lower-mass black holes; and (4) there is excess flux in [O II]λ3727 emission in the composite spectra of the AAS samples compared with those of the control samples, which is at the emission redshift. The presence of AAS enhances the O II emission from the active galactic nucleus and/or the host galaxy. This excess is similar for both RD and RUD samples and is 2.5 ± 0.4 times higher in lobe-dominated samples than in core-dominated samples. The excess depends on the black hole mass and Eddington ratio. All these point to the intrinsic nature of the AAS except for the systems with z {sub abs} > z {sub em}, which could be infalling galaxies.

  7. Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Property of Graphene with FeO4 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Dai, Shenglong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Tianyu; Yan, Shaojiu; Zhao, Xiuying

    2016-02-01

    Nanomaterials consisting of various ratios of Fe3O4 and graphene (defined C-Fe3O4/GR) were pre- pared by an in situ coordination complex hydro-thermal synthesis method. The structure and morphology of the nanomaterials C-Fe3O4/GR obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles distributed on the surfaces of graphene, and had a spinel structure and a uniform chemical phase when the weight ratios of Fe3O4 to graphene oxide (GO) were 9:1 or 9:2. It was suggested that GO had been successfully reduced to graphene and the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were chemically bonded to graphene. The SQUID vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID-VSM) indicated that the maximum of the saturation magnetization was 83.6 emmicro g(-1) when the mass ratio of Fe3O4 to GO was 9:2. Electromagnetic wave absorption showed that the chemical compound of Fe3O4 and graphene had a better electromagnetic property than the mechanical blend of Fe3O4 and graphene (M-Fe3O4/GR). The C-Fe3O4/GR had a reflection loss larger than -10 dB in the frequency range 12.9-17.0 GHz for an absorber thickness of 3 mm, and a maximum reflection loss of -12.3 dB at 14.8 GHz and a maximum reflection loss of -31.2 dB at 10.5 GHz for an absorber thickness of 10 mm. Theoretical analysis showed that the electromagnetic wave absorption behavior obeyed the quarter-wave principles. These results showed that the C-Fe3O4/GR nanomaterials can meet the requirements for some engineering applications, showing great application potential in electromagnetic wave absorption.

  8. Results of a study of the effect of high-power short-wave emissions on the propagation of radio waves on the Kiev-Ioshkar-Ola path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, N. M.; Ivanov, V. A.; Katkov, E. V.; Maksimenko, O. I.; Mitiakova, E. E.; Uriadov, V. P.; Frolov, V. A.; Erm, R..

    Experiments were performed during March-April 1982 and April-June 1983 to study the effect of ionospheric disturbances caused by high-power radio transmissions on the propagation of decameter waves on the Kiev-Ioshkar-Ola path. Sounding waves were emitted at four fixed frequencies: 10.8, 16.6, 18.2, and 19.85 MHz; and high-power (50 MW) heating waves were emitted at 5.8-9.3 MHz. An analysis of the data shows that the degree of the effect of high-power radio emissions on the decameter-signal characteristics depends on ionospheric conditions, e.g., the effect was strongest when the critical frequencies on the path were highest, the effect being observed most frequently at 10.8 MHz.

  9. Multi-Band (K- Q- and E-Band) Multi-Tone Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer for Radio Wave Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a space-borne transmitter for radio wave atmospheric studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). These studies would enable the design of robust multi-Gbps data rate space-to-ground satellite communication links. Lastly, the architecture for a compact multi-tone beacon transmitter, which includes a high frequency synthesizer, a polarizer, and a conical horn antenna, has been investigated for a notional CubeSat based space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment.

  10. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koettig, T.; Peters, B. J.; Avellino, S.; Junginger, T.; Bremer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to be superior to temperature sensors glued to the surface of the cavity.

  11. Radio-frequency sheath voltages and slow wave electric field spatial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, Laurent Lu, Ling-Feng; Křivská, Alena; Jacquot, Jonathan

    2015-12-10

    We investigate theoretically how sheath radio-frequency (RF) oscillations relate to the spatial structure of the RF parallel electric field emitted by Ion Cyclotron (IC) wave launchers, using a simple model of Slow Wave (SW) evanescence coupled with Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via sheath boundary conditions in a plasma-filled 2-dimensional (parallel, radial) rectangle. Within a “wide sheaths” asymptotic regime, valid for large-amplitude near RF fields, our model becomes partly linear: the sheath oscillating voltage at open field line boundaries is a linear combination of elementary contributions by every source point of the radiated RF field map. These individual contributions are all the more intense as the SW emission point is toroidally nearer to the sheath walls. A limit formula is given for a source infinitely close to the sheaths. The decay of sheath RF voltages with the sheath/source parallel distance is quantified as a function of two characteristic SW evanescence lengths. Decay lengths are smaller than antenna parallel extensions. The sheath RF voltages at an IC antenna side limiter are therefore mainly sensitive to SW emission near this limiter, as recent observations suggest. Toroidal proximity effects could also explain why sheath oscillations persist with antisymmetric strap toroidal phasing, despite the parallel anti-symmetry of the radiated field map. They could also justify current attempts at reducing the RF fields induced near antenna boxes to attenuate sheath oscillations in their vicinity.

  12. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits

    PubMed Central

    Balram, Krishna C.; Davanço, Marcelo I.; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains. PMID:27446234

  13. Radio frequency CD by LH waves in the reversed field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.

    1999-09-20

    We present a feasibility study for the active control of the poloidal current density profile in the RFX (reversed field pinch) experiment using radio frequency in the range of lower hybrid waves. The main goal of the rf current drive is to reduce the magnetic fluctuations and the magnetic stochasticity, so as to improve the energy confinement. The compelling constraints of accessibility and damping of the slow waves due to the present and extrapolated RFX plasma parameters are investigated; they have been used to fix the frequency ({approx_equal}1.3 GHz) and the best n{sub parallel} values ({approx_equal}8), and therefore the antenna size (Grill). A modified version of the FELICE code, which takes into account the strong shear of the magnetic field of the RFP plasmas, has been developed and used to estimate the antenna-plasma coupling: the reflected power for the proposed antenna is found to be less than 30% for a quite wide range of plasma parameters. In order to estimate the current drive profile and efficiency a one dimensional Fokker-Planck code has been used: an additional crucial contribution to the driven current is due to the enhancement of the plasma conductivity as consequence of the suprathermal electron population increase. Although the total estimated CD efficiency is promising, the rf-power required to drive the current necessary to produce a significant reduction of the magnetic fluctuations is found to be in the MW range.

  14. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter; Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei; Chen, Kevin; Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B.; Gough, Jonathan D.; Kanner, Jonah; Kavic, Michael

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  15. Multi-messenger astronomy of gravitational-wave sources with flexible wide-area radio transient surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Cregg C. Yancey, Brandon E. Bear, Bernadine Akukwe, Kevin Chen, Jayce Dowell, Jonathan D. Gough, Jonah Kanner, Kenneth Obenberger, Peter Shawhan, John H. Simonetti , Gregory B. Taylor , Jr-Wei Tsai

    2016-01-01

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ˜30 s time window and ˜200-500 deg(2) sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ˜2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  16. Multi-messenger Astronomy of Gravitational-wave Sources with Flexible Wide-area Radio Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Chen, Kevin; Dowell, Jayce; Gough, Jonathan D.; Kanner, Jonah; Kavic, Michael; Obenberger, Kenneth; Shawhan, Peter; Simonetti, John H.; -Wei Tsai, Gregory B. Taylor, Jr.

    2015-10-01

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ˜30 s time window and ˜200-500 deg2 sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ˜2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  17. Nanodust detection near 1 AU from spectral analysis of Cassini/Radio and Plasma Wave Science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, P.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Lecacheux, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; André, N.

    2014-08-01

    Nanodust grains of a few nanometers in size are produced near the Sun by collisional breakup of larger grains and picked up by the magnetized solar wind. They have so far been detected at 1 AU by only the two STEREO spacecraft. Here we analyze the spectra measured by the radio and plasma wave instrument onboard Cassini during the cruise phase close to Earth orbit; they exhibit bursty signatures similar to those observed by the same instrument in association with nanodust stream impacts on Cassini near Jupiter. The observed wave level and spectral shape reveal impacts of nanoparticles at about 300 km/s, with an average flux compatible with that observed by the radio and plasma wave instrument onboard STEREO and with the interplanetary flux models.

  18. Supporting Structure of the LSD Wave in an Energy Absorption Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Akihiro; Hatai, Keigo; Cho, Shinatora; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2008-04-28

    In Repetitively Pulsed (RP) Laser Propulsion, laser energy irradiated to a vehicle is converted to blast wave enthalpy during the Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) regime. Based on the measured post-LSD electron number density profiles by two-wavelength Mach Zehnder interferometer in a line-focusing optics, electron temperature and absorption coefficient were estimated assuming Local Thermal Equilibrium. A 10J/pulse CO{sub 2} laser was used. As a result, laser absorption was found completed in the layer between the shock wave and the electron density peak. Although the LSD-termination timing was not clear from the shock-front/ionization-front separation in the shadowgraph images, there observed drastic changes in the absorption layer thickness from 0.2 mm to 0.5 mm and in the peak heating rate from 12-17x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} at the termination.

  19. Resonant absorption and amplification of circularly-polarized waves in inhomogeneous chiral media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seulong; Kim, Kihong

    2016-01-25

    It has been found that in the media where the dielectric permittivity ε or the magnetic permeability μ is near zero and in transition metamaterials where ε or μ changes from positive to negative values, there occur a strong absorption or amplification of the electromagnetic wave energy in the presence of an infinitesimally small damping or gain and a strong enhancement of the electromagnetic fields. We attribute these phenomena to the mode conversion of transverse electromagnetic waves into longitudinal plasma oscillations and its inverse process. In this paper, we study analogous phenomena occurring in chiral media theoretically using the invariant imbedding method. In uniform isotropic chiral media, right-circularly-polarized and left-circularly-polarized waves are the eigen-modes of propagation with different effective refractive indices n(+) and n(-), whereas in the chiral media with a nonuniform impedance variation, they are no longer the eigenmodes and are coupled to each other. We find that both in uniform chiral slabs where either n(+) or n(-) is near zero and in chiral transition metamaterials where n(+) or n(-) changes from positive to negative values, a strong absorption or amplification of circularly-polarized waves occurs in the presence of an infinitesimally small damping or gain. We present detailed calculations of the mode conversion coefficient, which measures the fraction of the electromagnetic wave energy absorbed into the medium, for various configurations of ε and μ with an emphasis on the influence of a nonuniform impedance. We propose possible applications of these phenomena to linear and nonlinear optical devices that react selectively to the helicity of the circular polarization. PMID:26832557

  20. Resonant absorption and amplification of circularly-polarized waves in inhomogeneous chiral media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seulong; Kim, Kihong

    2016-01-25

    It has been found that in the media where the dielectric permittivity ε or the magnetic permeability μ is near zero and in transition metamaterials where ε or μ changes from positive to negative values, there occur a strong absorption or amplification of the electromagnetic wave energy in the presence of an infinitesimally small damping or gain and a strong enhancement of the electromagnetic fields. We attribute these phenomena to the mode conversion of transverse electromagnetic waves into longitudinal plasma oscillations and its inverse process. In this paper, we study analogous phenomena occurring in chiral media theoretically using the invariant imbedding method. In uniform isotropic chiral media, right-circularly-polarized and left-circularly-polarized waves are the eigen-modes of propagation with different effective refractive indices n(+) and n(-), whereas in the chiral media with a nonuniform impedance variation, they are no longer the eigenmodes and are coupled to each other. We find that both in uniform chiral slabs where either n(+) or n(-) is near zero and in chiral transition metamaterials where n(+) or n(-) changes from positive to negative values, a strong absorption or amplification of circularly-polarized waves occurs in the presence of an infinitesimally small damping or gain. We present detailed calculations of the mode conversion coefficient, which measures the fraction of the electromagnetic wave energy absorbed into the medium, for various configurations of ε and μ with an emphasis on the influence of a nonuniform impedance. We propose possible applications of these phenomena to linear and nonlinear optical devices that react selectively to the helicity of the circular polarization.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR THE OSCILLATING TWO STREAM INSTABILITY AND SPATIAL COLLAPSE OF LANGMUIR WAVES IN A SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; Papadopoulos, K.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu E-mail: Robert.MacDowall@nasa.gov

    2012-03-15

    We present observational evidence for the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) and spatial collapse of Langmuir waves in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. High time resolution observations from the STEREO A spacecraft show that Langmuir waves excited by the electron beam occur as isolated field structures with short durations {approx}3.2 ms and with high intensities exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. These short duration events are identified as the envelope solitons which have collapsed to spatial scales of a few hundred Debye lengths. The spectra of these wave packets contain an intense peak and two sidebands, corresponding to beam-resonant Langmuir waves, and down-shifted and up-shifted daughter Langmuir waves, respectively, and low-frequency enhancements below a few hundred Hz. The frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI. The observed high intensities, short scale lengths, sideband spectral structures, and low-frequency enhancements strongly suggest that the OTSI and spatial collapse of Langmuir waves probably control the nonlinear beam-plasma interactions in type III radio bursts.

  2. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of composites with ultrafine hollow magnetic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Bok; Kim, Jin Bong; Lee, Sang Kwan; Park, O. Ok

    2014-06-01

    Ultrafine hollow magnetic fibers were prepared by electroless plating using hydrolyzed polyester fiber as a sacrificial substrate. These hollow fibers can be served for lightweight and efficient electromagnetic (EM) absorbing materials. As observed from SEM and EDS analysis, hollow structures consisting of Ni inner layer and Fe or Fe-Co outer layer were obtained. By introducing Co onto Fe, oxidation of the Fe layer was successfully prevented making it possible to enhance the complex permeability compared to a case in which only Fe was used. Polymeric composites containing the hollow fibers with different weight fractions and fiber lengths were prepared by a simple mixing process. The electromagnetic wave properties of the composites were measured by a vector network analyzer and it was found that the hollow magnetic fibers show a clear resonance peak of the complex permittivity around the X-band range (8-12 GHz) and the resonance frequency strongly depends on the fiber concentration and length. A possible explanation for the unique resonance is that the hollow fibers possess relatively low electrical conductivity and a long mean free path due to their oxidized phase and hollow structure. The calculated EM wave absorption with the measured EM wave properties showed that the composite containing 30 wt% hollow Ni/Fe-Co (7:3) fibers in length of 180 μm exhibited multiple absorbance peaks resulting in a broad absorption bandwidth of 4.2 GHz. It is obvious that this multiple absorbance is attributed to the resonance characteristic of the composite.

  3. The radio waves and thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BEPICOLOMBO/MMO/PWI: Scientific objectives and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Issautier, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    2006-01-01

    SORBET ( Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio and du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5-640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500 kHz-10.2 MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and in the Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O, …) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in most highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ˜10 MHz in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We especially discuss the capabilities of SORBET for performing the QTN spectroscopy in Mercury's magnetosphere, using the two electric dipole antennas equipping MMO, called MEFISTO and WPT.

  4. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  5. Stability of widely tuneable, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade laser for absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, Vasili L.; Raja Ibrahim, R. K.; Martin, Philip A.

    2010-09-01

    The performance of widely tuneable, continuous wave (cw) external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) has been evaluated for direct absorption spectroscopy measurements of nitric oxide (NO) in the wavenumber range 1872-1958 cm -1 and with a 13.5 cm long optical cell. In order to reduce the absorption measurement errors due to the large variations of laser intensity, normalisation with a reference channel was used. Wavelength stability within the scans was analysed using the Allan plot technique for the reduced wavenumber range of 1892.4-1914.5 cm -1. The Allan variances of the NO absorption peak centres and areas were observed to increase with successive scan averaging for all absorption peaks across the wavelength scan, thus revealing short- and long-term drifts of the cw EC-QCL wavelength between successive scans. As an example application, the cw EC-QCL was used for NO measurements in the exhaust of an atmospheric pressure packed-bed plasma reactor applied to the decomposition of dichloromethane in waste gas streams. Etalon noise was reduced by subtracting a reference spectrum recorded when the plasma was off. The NO limit of detection (SNR = 1) was estimated to be ˜2 ppm at atmospheric pressure in a 20.5 cm long optical cell with a double pass and a single 7 s scan over 1892.4-1914.5 cm -1.

  6. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Baity, F. W.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Murakami, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2005-09-01

    The absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  7. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F.W.; Murakami, M.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2005-09-26

    The absorption of fast Alfven waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  8. DIII-D Experiments on Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption of Fast Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Baity, F. W.; Porkolab, M.

    2005-10-01

    In the presence of a sufficiently dense population of fast ions from either neutral beam heating or from fusion products in a burning plasma, ion cyclotron damping of fast waves (FW) is important even at moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics. DIII-D experiments have coupled up to 3 MW of FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz to investigate damping on fast ions at harmonics from the 2nd harmonic of hydrogen to the 8th harmonic of deuterium. In agreement with linear theory, strong absorption was observed on fast ions from an injected 81 keV deuterium beam at the 4th and 5th harmonics for 60 MHz FW. Comparison of 4th and 8th deuterium harmonic absorption at a fixed magnetic field have shown that the latter is weak at low density, also as expected. However, at high density the 8th harmonic absorption continued to be much weaker than at the 4th, in apparent contradiction to predictions of strong absorption at both harmonics under those conditions. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  9. ENHANCED ABSORPTION OF MILLIMETER WAVE ENERGY IN MURINE SUBCUTANEOUS BLOOD VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Stanislav I.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine millimeter wave (MMW) absorption by blood vessels traversing the subcutaneous fat layer of murine skin. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. We used two types of models: (1) a rectangular block of multilayer tissue with blood vessels traversing the fat layer and (2) cylindrical models with circular and elliptical cross sections simulating the real geometry of murine limbs. We found that the specific absorption rate (SAR) in blood vessels normally traversing the fat layer achieved its maximal value at the parallel orientation of the E-field to the vessel axis. At 42 GHz exposure, the maximal SAR in small blood vessels could be more than 30 times greater than that in the skin. The SAR increased with decreasing the blood vessel diameter and increasing the fat thickness. The SAR decreased with increasing the exposure frequency. When the cylindrical or elliptical models of murine limbs were exposed to plane MMW, the greatest absorption of MMW energy occurred in blood vessels located on the lateral areas of the limb model. At these areas the maximal SAR values were comparable with or were greater than the maximal SAR on the front surface of the skin. Enhanced absorption of MMW energy by blood vessels traversing the fat layer may play a primary role in initiating MMW effects on blood cells and vasodilatation of cutaneous blood vessels. PMID:21344460

  10. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  11. Facile synthesis of RGO/NiO composites and their excellent electromagnetic wave absorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Tian, Xingyou; Wang, Cuiping; Luo, Hailong; Hu, Jie; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian

    2014-09-01

    Reduced graphene oxide/NiO composite (RGO/NiO) was synthesized by a facile pyrolyzation process. The NiO nanoparticles with a small size of about 10-50 nm are uniformly dispersed onto the thin graphene nanosheets. The as-prepared RGO/NiO composite shows excellent microwave absorbability. The obtained composite with a coating layer thickness of 3.5 mm exhibits a maximum absorption of -55.5 dB at 10.6 GHz. And in particular, the product with a coating layer thickness of only 3.0 mm possesses a bandwidth of 6.7 GHz (from frequency of 10.2 to 16.9 GHz) corresponding to reflection loss at -10 dB (90% absorption). Thus, the as-prepared RGO/NiO composite is a very promising EM wave absorbing material as lightweight and high-performance.

  12. Parametric study of power absorption from electromagnetic waves by small ferrite spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Gerald W.

    1989-01-01

    Algebraic expressions in terms of elementary mathematical functions are derived for power absorption and dissipation by eddy currents and magnetic hysteresis in ferrite spheres. Skin depth is determined by using a variable inner radius in descriptive integral equations. Numerical results are presented for sphere diameters less than one wavelength. A generalized power absorption parameter for both eddy currents and hysteresis is expressed in terms of the independent parameters involving wave frequency, sphere radius, resistivity, and complex permeability. In general, the hysteresis phenomenon has a greater sensitivity to these independent parameters than do eddy currents over the ranges of independent parameters studied herein. Working curves are presented for obtaining power losses from input to the independent parameters.

  13. Degenerate four-wave mixing in semiconductor-doped glasses below the absorption edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindra, K. S.; Oak, S. M.; Rustagi, K. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report measurements of degenerate four-wave-mixing reflectivity at a frequency below the band gap of semiconductor-doped glasses in the intensity range 0.5-10 GW/cm2. Up to intensities ~2.5 GW/cm2, the conjugate reflectivity varies like the fourth power of intensity signifying a fifth-order nonlinearity due to band filling by two-photon absorption. Surprisingly, at a higher intensity range the conjugate signal showed a cubic dependence on the pump intensity, which is typical of the χ(3) process. We show that this cubic dependence does not necessarily indicate a third-order process as usually assumed. Instead, it is shown to arise due to a reduction of the effective intensity by nonlinear absorption of the interacting beams.

  14. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics: Experimental Results and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F. W.; Murakami, M.; Porkolab, M.

    2006-10-01

    Strong absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron damping has been observed in DIII-D at the 4th and 5th harmonic of an injected beam while only weak absorption is observed at the 8th harmonic. The experimental results are compared with three different theoretical models; differences between the predictions of the models suggest the possible importance of finite-width orbit effects at high harmonics. In a linear model, it is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic under experimentally relevant conditions. This is tested in experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. A novel Dα charge exchange recombination diagnostic is used to observe interaction of the FW power with beam ions. The results are compared with modeling with quasilinear and with orbit-following codes.

  15. Development and beam test of a continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Luo, Y.; Paskvan, D.; Perry, A.; Schrage, D.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Sommer, R.; Toter, W.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-11-01

    The front end of any modern ion accelerator includes a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). While many pulsed ion linacs successfully operate RFQs, several ion accelerators worldwide have significant difficulties operating continuous wave (CW) RFQs to design specifications. In this paper we describe the development and results of the beam commissioning of a CW RFQ designed and built for the National User Facility: Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). Several innovative ideas were implemented in this CW RFQ. By selecting a multisegment split-coaxial structure, we reached moderate transverse dimensions for a 60.625-MHz resonator and provided a highly stabilized electromagnetic field distribution. The accelerating section of the RFQ occupies approximately 50% of the total length and is based on a trapezoidal vane tip modulation that increased the resonator shunt impedance by 60% in this section as compared to conventional sinusoidal modulation. To form an axially symmetric beam exiting the RFQ, a very short output radial matcher with a length of 0.75βλ was developed. The RFQ is designed as a 100% oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper structure and fabricated with a two-step furnace brazing process. The radio frequency (rf) measurements show excellent rf properties for the resonator, with a measured intrinsic Q equal to 94% of the simulated value for OFE copper. An O5+ ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was used for the RFQ commissioning. In off-line beam testing, we found excellent coincidence of the measured beam parameters with the results of beam dynamics simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK, which was developed at Argonne. These results demonstrate the great success of the RFQ design and fabrication technology developed here, which can be applied to future CW RFQs.

  16. Accelerated two-wave mixing response in erbium-doped fibers with saturable optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Eliseo; Stepanov, Serguei; Plata Sanchez, Marcos

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of the spatially uniform variation of average optical absorption to the dynamics of the transient two-wave mixing (TWM) response is considered. It is shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that this transient effect, via dynamic population gratings in erbium-doped fibers (EDFs) can ensure a response nearly two times faster in such gratings as compared to the growth rate of fluorescence uniformly excited under similar conditions, and can also result in an additional overshot in the tail of the TWM response. This additional ‘accelerating’ contribution is of even type, and does not influence the odd transient TWM response for the refractive index component of such gratings in the EDFs reported earlier. It is also shown that this effect can be utilized to monitor the formation of the dynamic grating with an auxiliary probe wave of the essentially different non-Bragg wavelength.

  17. Synthesis, Morphology Control and Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties of Electrospun FeCo Alloy Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-In; Jang, Dae-Hwan; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2016-05-01

    Recently, increasing interest has been focused on one-dimensional (1 D) magnetic nanomaterials that have significant anisotropic electromagnetic parameters and size effects that can be used to achieve improved shielding efficiency. In this study, the simple, low-cost and scalable synthesis of FeCo nanofibers is demonstrated by combining an electrospinning process with sequential thermal treatment involving calcination in air followed by reduction in H2 atmosphere. A citric acid has an influence on the morphology of the electrospun product. The as-spun precursor nanofibers are transformed into CoFe2O4 and FeCo phases through the sequential thermal treatment while maintaining the fibrous shapes. To evaluate the electromagnetic (EM) wave-absorbing abilities of the FeCo nanofibers, epoxy matrix composites with the nanofibers are fabricated. The composites show excellent EM wave absorption properties where the power loss of the FeCo nanofibers increased to 20 GHz without any degradation. PMID:27483898

  18. Electron power absorption dynamics in capacitive radio frequency discharges driven by tailored voltage waveforms in CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Berger, B.; Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Bruneau, B.; Johnson, E.; Lafleur, T.; O'Connell, D.; Koepke, M.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-08-01

    The power absorption dynamics of electrons and the electrical asymmetry effect in capacitive radio-frequency plasmas operated in CF4 and driven by tailored voltage waveforms are investigated experimentally in combination with kinetic simulations. The driving voltage waveforms are generated as a superposition of multiple consecutive harmonics of the fundamental frequency of 13.56 MHz. Peaks/valleys and sawtooth waveforms are used to study the effects of amplitude and slope asymmetries of the driving voltage waveform on the electron dynamics and the generation of a DC self-bias in an electronegative plasma at different pressures. Compared to electropositive discharges, we observe strongly different effects and unique power absorption dynamics. At high pressures and high electronegativities, the discharge is found to operate in the drift-ambipolar (DA) heating mode. A dominant excitation/ionization maximum is observed during sheath collapse at the edge of the sheath which collapses fastest. High negative-ion densities are observed inside this sheath region, while electrons are confined for part of the RF period in a potential well formed by the ambipolar electric field at this sheath edge and the collapsed (floating potential) sheath at the electrode. For specific driving voltage waveforms, the plasma becomes divided spatially into two different halves of strongly different electronegativity. This asymmetry can be reversed electrically by inverting the driving waveform. For sawtooth waveforms, the discharge asymmetry and the sign of the DC self-bias are found to reverse as the pressure is increased, due to a transition of the electron heating mode from the α-mode to the DA-mode. These effects are interpreted with the aid of the simulation results.

  19. A theory for narrow-banded radio bursts at Uranus - MHD surface waves as an energy driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A possible scenario for the generation of the narrow-banded radio bursts detected at Uranus by the Voyager 2 planetary radio astronomy experiment is described. In order to account for the emission burstiness which occurs on time scales of hundreds of milliseconds, it is proposed that ULF magnetic surface turbulence generated at the frontside magnetopause propagates down the open/closed field line boundary and mode-converts to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) deep within the polar cusp. The oscillating KAW potentials then drive a transient electron stream that creates the bursty radio emission. To substantiate these ideas, Voyager 2 magnetometer measurements of enhanced ULF magnetic activity at the frontside magnetopause are shown. It is demonstrated analytically that such magnetic turbulence should mode-convert deep in the cusp at a radial distance of 3 RU.

  20. Public exposure to radio waves near GSM microcell and picocell base stations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, T G; Mann, S M; Khalid, M; Blackwell, R P

    2006-06-01

    Exposures of the general public to radio waves at locations near 20 randomly selected GSM microcell and picocell base stations in the UK have been assessed in the context of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Compliance distances were calculated for the antennas of the base stations from their reported radiated powers. Under pessimistic assumptions that would maximise exposures, the minimum height at which the general public reference level could potentially be exceeded near any of the base station antennas was calculated to be 2.4 m above ground level. The power densities of the broadcast carriers transmitted by the base stations have been measured and scaled to include all other possible carriers. Exposures were generally in the range 0.002-2% of the ICNIRP general public reference level, and the greatest exposure quotient near any of the base stations was 8.6%. Exposures close to microcell base stations were found to be generally greater than those close to macrocell base stations. PMID:16738416

  1. Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Property of Graphene with FeO4 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Dai, Shenglong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Tianyu; Yan, Shaojiu; Zhao, Xiuying

    2016-02-01

    Nanomaterials consisting of various ratios of Fe3O4 and graphene (defined C-Fe3O4/GR) were pre- pared by an in situ coordination complex hydro-thermal synthesis method. The structure and morphology of the nanomaterials C-Fe3O4/GR obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles distributed on the surfaces of graphene, and had a spinel structure and a uniform chemical phase when the weight ratios of Fe3O4 to graphene oxide (GO) were 9:1 or 9:2. It was suggested that GO had been successfully reduced to graphene and the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were chemically bonded to graphene. The SQUID vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID-VSM) indicated that the maximum of the saturation magnetization was 83.6 emmicro g(-1) when the mass ratio of Fe3O4 to GO was 9:2. Electromagnetic wave absorption showed that the chemical compound of Fe3O4 and graphene had a better electromagnetic property than the mechanical blend of Fe3O4 and graphene (M-Fe3O4/GR). The C-Fe3O4/GR had a reflection loss larger than -10 dB in the frequency range 12.9-17.0 GHz for an absorber thickness of 3 mm, and a maximum reflection loss of -12.3 dB at 14.8 GHz and a maximum reflection loss of -31.2 dB at 10.5 GHz for an absorber thickness of 10 mm. Theoretical analysis showed that the electromagnetic wave absorption behavior obeyed the quarter-wave principles. These results showed that the C-Fe3O4/GR nanomaterials can meet the requirements for some engineering applications, showing great application potential in electromagnetic wave absorption. PMID:27433608

  2. Reduced Graphene Oxide Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanocomposites for Enhanced Efficient and Lightweight Electromagnetic Wave Absorption.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Huijing; Sun, Yihui; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, reduced graphene oxide functionalized with cobalt ferrite nanocomposites (CoFe@rGO) as a novel type of electromagnetic wave (EW) absorbing materials was successfully prepared by a three-step chemical method including hydrothermal synthesis, annealing process and mixing with paraffin. The effect of the sample thickness and the amount of paraffin on the EW absorption properties of the composites was studied, revealing that the absorption peaks shifted toward the low frequency regions with the increasing thickness while other conditions had little or no effect. It is found that the CoFe@rGO enhanced both dielectric losses and magnetic losses and had the best EW absorption properties and the wide wavelength coverage of the hole Ku-Band when adding only 5wt% composites to paraffin. Therefore, CoFe@rGO could be used as an efficient and lightweight EW absorber. Compared with the research into traditional absorbing materials, this figures of merit are typically of the same order of magnitude, but given the lightweight nature of the material and the high level of compatibility with mass production standards, making use of CoFe@rGO as an electromagnetic absorber material shows great potential for real product applications. PMID:27587001

  3. 140 GHz EC waves propagation and absorption for normal/oblique injection on FTU tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, S.; Airoldi, A.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gandini, F.; Granucci, G.; Lazzaro, E.; Ramponi, G.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Buratti, P.; Panaccione, L.; Tudisco, O.; Zerbini, M.

    1999-09-20

    Most of the interest in ECRH experiments is linked to the high localization of EC waves absorption in well known portions of the plasma volume. In order to take full advantage of this capability a reliable code has been developed for beam tracing and absorption calculations. The code is particularly important for oblique (poloidal and toroidal) injection, when the absorbing layer is not simply dependent on the position of the EC resonance only. An experimental estimate of the local heating power density is given by the jump in the time derivative of the local electron pressure at the switching ON of the gyrotron power. The evolution of the temperature profile increase (from ECE polychromator) during the nearly adiabatic phase is also considered for ECRH profile reconstruction. An indirect estimate of optical thickness and of the overall absorption coefficient is given by the measure of the residual e.m. power at the tokamak walls. Beam tracing code predictions of the power deposition profile are compared with experimental estimates. The impact of the finite spatial resolution of the temperature diagnostic on profile reconstruction is also discussed.

  4. Reduced Graphene Oxide Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanocomposites for Enhanced Efficient and Lightweight Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Huijing; Sun, Yihui; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, reduced graphene oxide functionalized with cobalt ferrite nanocomposites (CoFe@rGO) as a novel type of electromagnetic wave (EW) absorbing materials was successfully prepared by a three-step chemical method including hydrothermal synthesis, annealing process and mixing with paraffin. The effect of the sample thickness and the amount of paraffin on the EW absorption properties of the composites was studied, revealing that the absorption peaks shifted toward the low frequency regions with the increasing thickness while other conditions had little or no effect. It is found that the CoFe@rGO enhanced both dielectric losses and magnetic losses and had the best EW absorption properties and the wide wavelength coverage of the hole Ku-Band when adding only 5wt% composites to paraffin. Therefore, CoFe@rGO could be used as an efficient and lightweight EW absorber. Compared with the research into traditional absorbing materials, this figures of merit are typically of the same order of magnitude, but given the lightweight nature of the material and the high level of compatibility with mass production standards, making use of CoFe@rGO as an electromagnetic absorber material shows great potential for real product applications.

  5. Reduced Graphene Oxide Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanocomposites for Enhanced Efficient and Lightweight Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Huijing; Sun, Yihui; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, reduced graphene oxide functionalized with cobalt ferrite nanocomposites (CoFe@rGO) as a novel type of electromagnetic wave (EW) absorbing materials was successfully prepared by a three-step chemical method including hydrothermal synthesis, annealing process and mixing with paraffin. The effect of the sample thickness and the amount of paraffin on the EW absorption properties of the composites was studied, revealing that the absorption peaks shifted toward the low frequency regions with the increasing thickness while other conditions had little or no effect. It is found that the CoFe@rGO enhanced both dielectric losses and magnetic losses and had the best EW absorption properties and the wide wavelength coverage of the hole Ku-Band when adding only 5wt% composites to paraffin. Therefore, CoFe@rGO could be used as an efficient and lightweight EW absorber. Compared with the research into traditional absorbing materials, this figures of merit are typically of the same order of magnitude, but given the lightweight nature of the material and the high level of compatibility with mass production standards, making use of CoFe@rGO as an electromagnetic absorber material shows great potential for real product applications. PMID:27587001

  6. Relativistic blast-wave model for the rapid flux variations of AO 0235+164 and other compact radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    A relativistic blast-wave version of a signal-screen model is developed which can adequately explain the details of the flux-density and structural variations of compact extragalactic radio sources. The relativistic motion implied by flux variations is analyzed with respect to the synchrotron spectrum of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 observed during outbursts, and a signal-screen model for rapidly expanding shells produced by ultrarelativistic blast waves is examined. The approximate observed structure of the blast wave at three stages in its evolution is illustrated, each stage is described, and the model is applied to the flux density outburst in AO 0235+164 observed in late 1975. The results show that a relativistic blast-wave model can in general reproduce the main features of the observed flux variations in compact sources. Some problems with the proposed model are briefly discussed.

  7. Generation of Acoustic Gravity Waves by Periodic Radio Transmissions from a High-Power Ionospheric Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Chernogor, Leonid; Rozumenko, Victor

    The Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) and Kharkiv V. N. Karazin National University (Kharkiv, Ukraine) have studied opportunities for the effective generation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in 3 - 180-min period range. The excitation of such waves was conducted for the last several years using the SURA heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod). The detection of the HF-induced AGWs was carried out in the Radiophysical Observatory located near Kharkiv City at a distance of about 960 km from the SURA. A coherent radar for vertical sounding, an ionosonde, and magnetometer chains were used in our measurements. The main results are the following (see [1-5]): 1. Infrasound oscillation trains with a period of 6 min are detected during periodic SURA heater turn-on and -off. Similar oscillation trains are detected after long time pumping, during periodic transmissions with a period of 20 s, as well as after pumping turn-off. The train recordings begin 28 - 54 min after the heater turn-on or -off, and the train propagation speeds are about 300 - 570 m/s, the value of which is close to the sound speed at upper atmospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the Doppler shift frequency is of 10 - 40 mHz, which fits to the 0.1 - 0.3% electron density disturbances at ionospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the infrasound oscillations depends on the SURA mode of operation and the state of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. 2. High-power radio transmissions stimulate the generation (or enhancement) of waves at ionospheric altitudes in the range of internal gravity wave periods. The HF-induced waves propagate with speeds of 360 - 460 m/s and produce changes in electron density with amplitudes of 2 - 3%. The generation of such periodic perturbations is more preferable with periods of 10 - 60 minutes. Their features depend significantly on the heater mode of operation. It should be stressed that perturbation intensity increases when a pumping wave frequency approaches

  8. Electrical conductivity of the lowermost mantle explains absorption of core torsional waves at the equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël.; Jault, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Torsional Alfvén waves propagating in the Earth's core have been inferred by inversion techniques applied to geomagnetic models. They appear to propagate across the core but vanish at the equator, exchanging angular momentum between core and mantle. Assuming axial symmetry, we find that an electrically conducting layer at the bottom of the mantle can lead to total absorption of torsional waves that reach the equator. We show that the reflection coefficient depends on GB_r, where Br is the strength of the radial magnetic field at the equator, and G the conductance of the lower mantle there. With Br=7×10-4 T, torsional waves are completely absorbed when they hit the equator if G≃1.3 × 108 S. For larger or smaller G, reflection occurs. As G is increased above this critical value, there is less attenuation and more angular momentum exchange. Our finding dissociates efficient core-mantle coupling from strong ohmic dissipation in the mantle.

  9. A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for associated H I 21 cm absorption in high-redshift flat-spectrum sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditya, J. N. H. S.; Kanekar, Nissim; Kurapati, Sushma

    2016-02-01

    We report results from a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for `associated' redshifted H I 21 cm absorption from 24 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), at 1.1 < z < 3.6, selected from the Caltech-Jodrell Bank Flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. 22 out of 23 sources with usable data showed no evidence of absorption, with typical 3σ optical depth detection limits of ≈0.01 at a velocity resolution of ≈30 km s-1. A single tentative absorption detection was obtained at z ≈ 3.530 towards TXS 0604+728. If confirmed, this would be the highest redshift at which H I 21 cm absorption has ever been detected. Including 29 CJF sources with searches for redshifted H I 21 cm absorption in the literature, mostly at z < 1, we construct a sample of 52 uniformly selected flat-spectrum sources. A Peto-Prentice two-sample test for censored data finds (at ≈3σ significance) that the strength of H I 21 cm absorption is weaker in the high-z sample than in the low-z sample; this is the first statistically significant evidence for redshift evolution in the strength of H I 21 cm absorption in a uniformly selected AGN sample. However, the two-sample test also finds that the H I 21 cm absorption strength is higher in AGNs with low ultraviolet or radio luminosities, at ≈3.4σ significance. The fact that the higher luminosity AGNs of the sample typically lie at high redshifts implies that it is currently not possible to break the degeneracy between AGN luminosity and redshift evolution as the primary cause of the low H I 21 cm opacities in high-redshift, high-luminosity AGNs.

  10. Stationary Planetary Waves in the Mars Winter Atmosphere as seen by the Radio Science Experiment MaRS on Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Tyler, Leonard G.; Hinson, David P.

    2015-11-01

    Stationary (Rossby) Waves are excited by the interaction of the zonally varying topography with the strong eastward winter jets. They lead to distinctive longitudinal temperature variations which contribute significantly to the asymmetry of the seasonal polar CO2 ice caps and are also important for the dust redistribution in the planetary atmosphere.Radio Science profiles from the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment MaRS at northern and southern high latitudes are used to gain insight into winter stationary wave structures on both hemispheres.Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation measurements from the same season and year with their exceptionally good longitudinal and temporal coverage can be used to estimate the influence of transient eddies. Transient waves are especially important in the northern winter hemisphere.Wave number 2 stationary waves, driven by topography, are dominant in the northern winter latitudes while the wave number 1 wave is the most significant wave number during southern winter. The wave amplitudes peak around winter solstice on both hemispheres.Radio occultation measurements provide the unique opportunity to determine simultaneous measurements of temperature and geopotential height structures. Assuming geostrophic balance, these measurements can be used to determine meridional winds and eddy heat fluxes which provide further insight into the contribution of stationary waves to the heat exchange between the poles and the lower latitudes.

  11. Experimental Studies of the Effects Observed During the Nonlinear Interaction of Two High-Power Radio Waves in a Magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Sergeev, E. N.; Thide, B.; Shorokhova, E. A.

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of experiments on modification of the ionospheric F region by two high-power (Peff ≈ 20 MW) O-mode electromagnetic waves. The experiments were performed at the “Sura” heating facility of the Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) in May 23 27, 1993 at the pump frequencies near the 4th, 5th, or 6th harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. Ionospheric perturbations were diagnosed by measuring the stationary spectral characteristics of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) of the ionospheric plasma. We determine the features of variation in the spectral characteristics of particular SEE components during the simultaneous heating of the ionospheric plasma by two radio waves in comparison with the case of a monochromatic pump wave. We observed the effect of enhanced generation of the broad up-shifted maximum (BUM) by the higher-frequency pump wave. This is accompanied by strong suppression of the BUM induced by the lower-frequency pump wave. It is shown that the effects observed during the two-frequency heating of the ionosphere have well pronounced gyroharmonic properties, i.e., depend on both the electron-gyroharmonic number and the frequency detuning of the pump waves from a harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. We also pointed out that a change in the properties of artificial small-scale ionospheric irregularities (striations) excited by high-power radio waves is not the cause of a change in the properties of the down-shifted maximum and the BUM during the two-frequency modification of the ionospheric plasma. Ways for the further development of these studies are discussed.

  12. Plasma wave phenomena at interplanetary shocks observed by the Ulysses URAP experiment. [Unified Radio and Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Harvey, C.; Mangeney, A.; Kellogg, P.; Thiessen, J.; Canu, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present Ulysses URAP observations of plasma waves at seven interplanetary shocks detected between approximately 1 and 3 AU. The URAP data allows ready correlation of wave phenomena from .1 Hz to 1 MHz. Wave phenomena observed in the shock vicinity include abrupt changes in the quasi-thermal noise continuum, Langmuir wave activity, ion acoustic noise, whistler waves and low frequency electrostatic waves. We focus on the forward/reverse shock pair of May 27, 1991 to demonstrate the characteristics of the URAP data.

  13. Long-Range Transhorizon Lunar Surface Radio Wave Propagation in the Presence of a Regolith and a Sparse Exospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-range, over-the-horizon (transhorizon) radio wave propagation is considered for the case of the Moon. In the event that relay satellites are not available or otherwise unwarranted for use, transhorizon communication provides for a contingency or backup option for non line-of-sight lunar surface exploration scenarios. Two potential low-frequency propagation mechanisms characteristic of the lunar landscape are the lunar regolith and the photoelectron induced plasma exosphere enveloping the Moon. Although it was hoped that the regolith would provide for a spherical waveguide which could support a trapped surface wave phenomena, it is found that, in most cases, the regolith is deleterious to long range radio wave propagation. However, the presence of the plasma of the lunar exosphere supports wave propagation and, in fact, surpasses the attenuation of the regolith. Given the models of the regolith and exosphere adopted here, it is recommended that a frequency of 1 MHz be considered for low rate data transmission along the lunar surface. It is also recommended that further research be done to capture the descriptive physics of the regolith and the exospheric plasma so that a more complete model can be obtained. This comprehensive theoretical study is based entirely on first principles and the mathematical techniques needed are developed as required; it is self-contained and should not require the use of outside resources for its understanding.

  14. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkina, D.; Aycock, L. M.; Stuhl, B. K.; Lu, H.-I.; Williams, R. A.; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B 0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing SNR on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  15. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkina, Dina; Aycock, Lauren; Stuhl, Benjamin; Lu, Hsin-I.; Williams, Ross; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40 K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B 0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing SNR on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  16. Making Radio Waves: Tune in to These Tips for Getting Your Campus News on the Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbee, Melinda

    1993-01-01

    Radio is a relatively simple and effective way to make campus news and information available to the public. Establishing a college radio news service is not difficult, and developing a sound-bite service requires little equipment or expertise, just careful attention to quality and technique. More sophisticated systems can be developed easily. (MSE)

  17. A passive low frequency instrument for radio wave sounding the subsurface oceans of the Jovian icy moons: An instrument concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartogh, P.; Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2016-10-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jovian icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Electromagnetic wave propagation is the only way to probe their icy mantles from the orbit. In the present paper, a principal concept of a passive interferometric instrument for deep sounding of the icy moons' crust is proposed. Its working principle is measuring and correlating Jupiter's radio wave emissions with reflections from the deep sub-surface of the icy moons. A number of the functional aspects of the proposed experiment are studied, in particular, impact of the wave scattering on the surface terrain on the instrument performance and digital sampling of the noisy signal. Results of the test of the laboratory prototype of the instrument are also presented in the paper.

  18. Sandwich-Like Graphite-Fullerene Composites with Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiachun; Jia, Kun; Pu, Zejun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-07-01

    Sandwich-like graphite-fullerene composites have been prepared via a simple solution mixing/evaporation method. The complex relative permittivity and permeability of the graphite-fullerene composites in the frequency range from 0.5 GHz to 18 GHz were measured using a vector network analyzer with the reflection/transmission technique. Additionally, the microwave reflection loss of the composites was calculated using the obtained complex microwave electromagnetic parameters. It was found that the microwave loss peaks in the Ku band were dependent on the concentration of fullerene nanoparticles in the composites. Maximum reflection loss of -30 dB was observed between 2 GHz and 8 GHz when the graphite composites were doped with 1 wt.% fullerene. This absorption loss dropped (-24 dB) when the composite contained 3 wt.% fullerene. In addition, the electrical properties of the graphite were independent of the presence of fullerene in the composites. The tunable microwave reflection loss indicates that these graphite-fullerene composites show promise as wideband electromagnetic wave absorption materials.

  19. Resonant absorption of kink magnetohydrodynamic waves by a magnetic twist in coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Zanyar; Karami, Kayoomars

    2016-10-01

    There is ample evidence of twisted magnetic structures in the solar corona. This motivates us to consider the magnetic twist as the cause of Alfvén frequency continuum in coronal loops, which can support the resonant absorption as a rapid damping mechanism for the observed coronal kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. We model a coronal loop with a straight cylindrical magnetic flux tube, which has constant but different densities in the interior and exterior regions. The magnetic field is assumed to be constant and aligned with the cylinder axis everywhere except for a thin layer near the boundary of the flux tube, which has an additional small magnetic field twist. Then, we investigate a number of possible instabilities that may arise in our model. In the thin tube thin boundary approximation, we derive the dispersion relation and solve it analytically to obtain the frequencies and damping rates of the fundamental (l = 1) and first/second overtone (l = 2, 3) kink (m = 1) MHD modes. We conclude that the resonant absorption by the magnetic twist can justify the rapid damping of kink MHD waves observed in coronal loops. Furthermore, the magnetic twist in the inhomogeneous layer can cause deviations from P1/P2 = 2 and P1/P3 = 3, which are comparable with the observations.

  20. Sandwich-Like Graphite-Fullerene Composites with Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiachun; Jia, Kun; Pu, Zejun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-11-01

    Sandwich-like graphite-fullerene composites have been prepared via a simple solution mixing/evaporation method. The complex relative permittivity and permeability of the graphite-fullerene composites in the frequency range from 0.5 GHz to 18 GHz were measured using a vector network analyzer with the reflection/transmission technique. Additionally, the microwave reflection loss of the composites was calculated using the obtained complex microwave electromagnetic parameters. It was found that the microwave loss peaks in the Ku band were dependent on the concentration of fullerene nanoparticles in the composites. Maximum reflection loss of -30 dB was observed between 2 GHz and 8 GHz when the graphite composites were doped with 1 wt.% fullerene. This absorption loss dropped (-24 dB) when the composite contained 3 wt.% fullerene. In addition, the electrical properties of the graphite were independent of the presence of fullerene in the composites. The tunable microwave reflection loss indicates that these graphite-fullerene composites show promise as wideband electromagnetic wave absorption materials.

  1. ON THE BRIGHTNESS AND WAITING-TIME DISTRIBUTIONS OF A TYPE III RADIO STORM OBSERVED BY STEREO/WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, J. P.; Hudson, H. S.; Krucker, S.; Bale, S. D.; Wheatland, M. S.; Maksimovic, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Goetz, K.

    2010-01-10

    Type III solar radio storms, observed at frequencies below {approx}16 MHz by space-borne radio experiments, correspond to the quasi-continuous, bursty emission of electron beams onto open field lines above active regions. The mechanisms by which a storm can persist in some cases for more than a solar rotation whilst exhibiting considerable radio activity are poorly understood. To address this issue, the statistical properties of a type III storm observed by the STEREO/WAVES radio experiment are presented, examining both the brightness distribution and (for the first time) the waiting-time distribution (WTD). Single power-law behavior is observed in the number distribution as a function of brightness; the power-law index is {approx}2.1 and is largely independent of frequency. The WTD is found to be consistent with a piecewise-constant Poisson process. This indicates that during the storm individual type III bursts occur independently and suggests that the storm dynamics are consistent with avalanche-type behavior in the underlying active region.

  2. On the radio wave group delay in the solar corona for the case of decameter type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkina, M. A.; Levin, B. N.; Tsybko, Ya. G.

    1993-11-01

    The excess time delay of the radio waves during their propagation through inhomogeneous plasma is due to two main reasons: (1) the electromagnetic wave group velocity differs from its vacuum value; (2) the ray path is lengthened by refraction. The group delay of type IIIb-III burst emission is estimated by analyzing observations made with the UTR-2 array (Abranin et al. 1984). Owing to the harmonic origin of the type IIIb-III events it is possible to probe one and the same coronal region at two largely different frequencies. The group delay effect has to be more significant for the fundamental emission (type IIIb burst) than for the second harmonic (type III burst). For the observed type IIIb-III pairs this difference is found smaller than the uncertainties in the data. The group delay time for the fundamental emission in the frequency range 12.5-6.25 MHz does not exceed 1 s and the differential group delay is less than 0.3-0.5 s with a degree of confidence of approximately 70%. Radio wave propagation through the coronal plasma is simulated numerically choosing the scale height of the coronal density which fits the mean frequency drift rate of the observed type IIIb-III bursts. The calculated group delay times are found considerably larger than the observed ones if the mean velocity vs of the burst source is assumed equal to 0.3 c. It is possible to reconcile the experimental and calculated group delay times choosing vs less than or equal to 0.1 c. Another possibility is to assume that the fundamental type III emission is produced by the coalescence of plasma (Langmuir) waves with low frequency waves instead of plasma wave Rayleigh scattering by thermal ions.

  3. Applicability of radio astronomy techniques to the processing and interpretation of aperture synthesis passive millimetre-wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Salmon, Neil A.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2012-06-01

    This PhD programme is contributing to the development of Passive Millimetre-Wave Imagers (PMMWI) using the principles of interferometric aperture synthesis and digital signal processing. The principal applications are security screening, all-weather flight aids and earth observation. To enhance the cost-effectiveness of PMMWI systems the number of collecting elements must be minimised whilst maintaining adequate image fidelity. A wide range of techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community for improving the fidelity of sparse interferometric array imagery. This paper brings to the attention of readers these techniques and discusses how they may be applied to imaging using software packages publicly available from the radio astronomy community. The intention of future work is to adapt these algorithms to process experimental data from a range of realistic simulations and real-world targets.

  4. Features of Excitation of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission of the Ionosphere Modified by an Oblique High-Power Radio Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Nedzvetsky, D. I.; Komrakov, G. P.

    2005-09-01

    We present the results of measuring the characteristics of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) of the ionosphere with variation in the zenith angle of a pump beam of high-power O-mode radio waves in the geomagnetic-meridian plane. The experiments were performed at the midlatitude heating facility “Sura.” It is established that the maximum intensity of the DM and BC components of SEE is observed for southward inclination angles θ ≈ 8°--12° of the antenna beam, for which the most intense generation of artificial small-scale ionospheric irregularities also takes place. Based on the results of measurements near the fourth and fifth harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency, it is found that the first component of the BUM (BUM-1) is generated only when the pump wave reaches the plasma-resonance region. This allows one to assume that, unlike the second component of the BUM (BUM-2), whose generation is determined by development of instability in the upper-hybrid resonance region, the BUM-1 generation mechanism should be related to processes of interaction between a high-power radio wave and the plasma in the plasma-resonance region.

  5. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  6. Modelling of the radio spectrum evolution in the binary pulsar B1259-63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Our model of the radio waves absorption in the binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 supports the hypothesis that the external factors have a significant impact on the observed radio emission of a pulsar. The model can also contribute to our understanding of the origin of some non-typical spectral shapes.

  7. Investigation on an evanescent wave fiber-optic absorption sensor based on fiber loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yaping; Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    An improved ring-down measurement principle for optical waveguides is presented. Fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy allows for measurement of minute optical losses in high-finesse fiber-optic cavities and immunity to the fluctuation of laser source. The evanescent wave absorption losses dependent on the absorption and the refractive index of ambient solution have been theoretically analyzed. The complex refractive index is introduced into our model and extinction coefficient can be calculated accurately through finite element analysis by setting the boundaries of the fiber and the ambient conditions. Using this method, the refractive index of environment can be taken into consideration. Our principle is validated by the highly-sensitive measurement of evanescent wave absorption loss. By chemically processing the surface of sensing segment along an extending ring-down cavity, the concentration of small volume Diethyl Sulphoxide solution where the etched fiber immersed into has been successfully measured and discussed.

  8. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs. I. Detection and statistical incidence of Fe K-shell absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Yaqoob, T.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines have been detected in recent years between 7 and 10 keV in the X-ray spectra of several radio-quiet AGNs. The derived blue-shifted velocities of the lines can often reach mildly relativistic values, up to 0.2-0.4c. These findings are important because they suggest the presence of a previously unknown massive and highly ionized absorbing material outflowing from their nuclei, possibly connected with accretion disk winds/outflows. Aims: The scope of the present work is to statistically quantify the parameters and incidence of the blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines through a uniform analysis on a large sample of radio-quiet AGNs. This allows us to assess their global detection significance and to overcome any possible publication bias. Methods: We performed a blind search for narrow absorption features at energies greater than 6.4 keV in a sample of 42 radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. A simple uniform model composed by an absorbed power-law plus Gaussian emission and absorption lines provided a good fit for all the data sets. We derived the absorption lines parameters and calculated their detailed detection significance making use of the classical F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We detect 36 narrow absorption lines on a total of 101 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observations. The number of absorption lines at rest-frame energies higher than 7 keV is 22. Their global probability to be generated by random fluctuations is very low, less than 3 × 10-8, and their detection have been independently confirmed by a spectral analysis of the MOS data, with associated random probability <10-7. We identify the lines as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonant absorption. They are systematically blue-shifted, with a velocity distribution ranging from zero up to ~0.3c, with a peak and mean value at ~0.1c. We detect variability of the lines on both EWs and blue-shifted velocities among different XMM-Newton observations

  9. Time-resolved evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of heme protein adsorption to glass.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi-Mei; Xia, Shanhong; Matsuda, Naoki

    2008-03-01

    Evanescent wave has been recognized as a highly sensitive optical probe for surface monitoring. By use of slab optical waveguides, time-resolved evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy was developed for the investigation of the interfacial behavior of biomolecules with a chromophore. In this study, 30-microm thick glass sheets served as freestanding multimode waveguides that were combined with a simple fiber-coupling method to lead to a broadband evanescent wave absorption spectrometer. With such a homemade instrument, adsorption of heme proteins onto glass slides from static aqueous solution was monitored in situ. The experimental results reveal that the interfacial behavior of myoglobin (Mb) is different from that of hemoglobin (Hb) and cytochrome c (Cc). Formation of dynamic equilibrium for Mb adsorption at both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces always is behind the occurrence of the maximum coverage. However, simultaneous formation of the dynamic equilibrium and the maximum coverage was observed for Hb and Cc adsorptions.

  10. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Announces Closure of Millimeter-Wave Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will close down its millimeter-wavelength telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, in July 2000, Director Paul Vanden Bout announced today. The closure will affect the activities of 24 NRAO employees. The Arizona telescope, known as the 12 Meter Telescope because of the diameter of its dish antenna, is the only millimeter-wavelength instrument in the U.S. that is operated full-time as a national facility, open to all scientists. The action was made necessary by the current and anticipated budget for the Observatory, Vanden Bout said. "We are forced to reduce the scope of our activities," Vanden Bout said. The NRAO also operates the Very Large Array and Very Long Baseline Array from its facilities in New Mexico and is completing construction of the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. The 12 Meter Telescope is used to observe electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths of a few millimeters down to one millimeter, a region that lies between what is traditionally considered radio waves and infrared radiation. The NRAO is currently participating in an international partnership to develop the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), an array of 64 antennas to observe at millimeter wavelengths from a 16,500-foot-high location in northern Chile. "We understood that ALMA eventually would replace the 12 Meter Telescope, but we had hoped to continue operating the 12 Meter until ALMA began interim operations, probably sometime in 2005. That is not possible, and we are forced to close the 12 Meter this year," Vanden Bout said. More than 150 scientists use the 12 Meter Telescope for their research every year. The NRAO's Tucson-based employees have been notified of the Observatory's decision. Some of the NRAO employees in Tucson already are working on the ALMA project. Over the next few months, the NRAO will seek to transfer 12 Meter staff to the ALMA project or to other positions within the Observatory, where that is possible. Where

  11. Absorption of Visible and Long-wave Radiation by Primary and Secondary Biogenic Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2008-12-01

    Field results for the 14C content of carbonaceous aerosols are presented that indicate significant biogenic sources of both primary and secondary aerosols in urban and regional environments. Samples collected in Mexico City and downwind of the urban area during the MILAGRO field study are compared with results reported previously in the literature indicating a significant amount of biogenic aerosols from both biomass burning and secondary photochemical production (e.g. terpene oxidations) are contributing to the overall carbonaceous aerosols in the optically active region of 0.1 to 1.0 micron. Samples in this size range collected on quartz fiber filters were also examined using an integrating sphere and FTIR diffuse reflectance techniques to obtain absorption spectra from 280 to the mid-IR. These data clearly indicate that the biogenic derived primary aerosols from agricultural and trash-burning, as well as secondary organic aerosols from isoprene and terpene oxidations will produce both UV-Visible (short-wave) absorbing substances as well as IR (long-wave) absorbing compounds including humic-like-substances (HULIS). With the anticipated increases in growing seasons (i.e. earlier springs and longer summers) the likely hood of increased fires (forest and grassland) as well as the continuing growth in agricultural burning activities, these primary sources are expected to increase and may play a role in heating of the atmosphere. The compound effects of these primary and secondary biogenic sources of absorbing aerosols to the total aerosol loading and regional climate will be discussed. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  12. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D region: Numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Abram R.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Holzworth, Robert

    2009-03-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f ~ 3-100 kHz). The building block of the calculation is a differential equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular direct Fourier transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long-wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (~200-500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, this article uses the classic D region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Volland. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array. A follow-on article will present a detailed comparison with data in order to retrieve ionospheric parameters.

  13. A survey of key-enabling components for remote millimetric wave generation in radio over fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Ivan; Beas, Joaquín; Castañón, Gerardo; Campuzano, Gabriel; Aragón-Zavala, Alejandro

    2013-07-01

    Radio over fiber systems have emerged as a cost effective solution for future multigigabit wireless networks operating at millimetric bands. Such networks are composed of three subsystems: central station, optical distribution network, and base stations, whose performance and architecture rely on key-enabling components. This issue is particularly significant for components located at the central station since it is there where the downlink optical signal is generated, which after detection in a simple base station, results in the desired mm-wave signal. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art components required in the most relevant remote mm-wave generation techniques, such as high-speed analog lasers, broad-bandwidth modulators, multiwavelength sources, and narrow-linewidth lasers, giving special attention to their performance in terms of reconfigurability, energy efficiency, and integrability. The different technologies for each key-enabling component are presented and compared, proposing the most promising candidates and some future research opportunities.

  14. Results of Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Atmospheric Turbulence, Internal Gravity Waves and Sporadic-E Layers by Resonant Scattering of Radio Waves on Artificial Periodic Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev; Tolmacheva, Ariadna V.

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) formed by the powerful standing radio waves in the ionospheric plasma give the good chance for the lower ionosphere comprehensive studies. In this paper we present some applications of the API technique for experimental studies of sporadic E-layers (E _{s}), internal gravity waves and turbulent events in the lower ionosphere. API are formed in the field of the standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one from the ionosphere (in more details about the API technique one can see in the book Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength Lambda or one-half the powerful wavelength lambda/2. API diagnostics are carried out at the API relaxation or decay stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. Based on the measurement of an amplitude and a phase of the API scattered signal their relaxation time and regular vertical plasma velocity are measured. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the non-uniformly heated plasma. The relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The diffusion time is tau=(K (2) D _{a}) (-1) where K=2pi/Lambda and D _{a} is the ambipolar diffusion rate. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the API relaxation time in comparison the diffusion time. Determination of the turbulent velocity is based on this fact. The vertical plasma velocity is determined by measuring the phase of the scattered signal. Atmospheric waves having the periods from 5-10 minutes to 5-6 hours give the contribution to temporal variations of the velocity. Parameters and effects of atmospheric waves and the turbulence on the API relaxation process are presented. Determination of the masses of the

  15. Connection between ambient density fluctuations and clumpy Langmuir waves in type III radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A recent stochastic-growth theory of clumpy Langmuir waves in type III sources is shown to imply that the clumps will have the same size distribution as the ambient low-frequency density fluctuations in the solar wind. Spectral analysis of Langmuir-wave time series from the ISEE 3 plasma wave instrument confirms this prediction to within the uncertainties in the spectra. The smallest Langmuir clump size is inferred to be in the range 0.4-30 km in general, and 2-30 km for beam-resonant waves, and it is concluded that the diffusion of waves in the source is anomalous.

  16. Near-ultraviolet absorption annealing in hafnium oxide thin films subjected to continuous-wave laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papernov, Semyon; Kozlov, Alexei A.; Oliver, James B.; Kessler, Terrance J.; Shvydky, Alexander; Marozas, Brendan

    2014-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is the most frequently used high-index material in multilayer thin-film coatings for high-power laser applications ranging from near-infrared to near-ultraviolet (UV). Absorption in this high-index material is also known to be responsible for nanosecond-pulse laser-damage initiation in multilayers. In this work, modification of the near-UV absorption of HfO2 monolayer films subjected to irradiation by continuous-wave (cw), 355-nm or 351-nm laser light focused to produce power densities of the order of ˜100 kW/cm2 is studied. Up to a 70% reduction in absorption is found in the areas subjected to irradiation. Temporal behavior of absorption is characterized by a rapid initial drop on the few-tens-of-seconds time scale, followed by a longer-term decline to a steady-state level. Absorption maps generated by photothermal heterodyne imaging confirm the permanent character of the observed effect. Nanosecond-pulse, 351-nm and 600-fs, 1053-nm laser-damage tests performed on these cw laser-irradiated areas confirm a reduction of absorption by measuring up to 25% higher damage thresholds. We discuss possible mechanisms responsible for near-UV absorption annealing and damage-threshold improvement resulting from irradiation by near-UV cw laser light.

  17. Evanescent wave absorption sensor based on tapered multimode fiber coated with monolayer graphene film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Gao, Saisai; Chen, Peixi; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yang, Cheng; Huo, Yanyan; Yue, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    An evanescent wave absorption (EWA) sensor based on tapered multimode fiber (TMMF) coated with monolayer graphene film for the detection of double-stranded DNA (DS-DNA) is investigated in this work. The TMMF is a silica multimode fiber (nominally at 62.5 μm), which was tapered to symmetric taper with waist diameters of ~30 μm and total length of ~3 mm. Monolayer graphene film was grown on a copper foil via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology and transferred onto skinless tapered fiber core via dry transfer technology. All the components of the sensor are coupled together by fusion splicer in order to eliminate the external disturbance. DS-DNA is created by the assembly of two relatively complemented oligonucleotides. The measurements are obtained by using a spectrometer in the optical wavelength range of 400-900 nm. With the increase of DS-DNA concentration, the output light intensity (OPLI) arisen an obvious attenuation. Importantly, the absorbance (A) and the DS-DNA concentrations shown a reasonable linear variation in a wide range of 5-400 μM. Through a series of comparison, the accuracy of TMMF sensor with graphene (G-TMMF) is much better than that without graphene (TMMF), which can be attributed to the molecular enrichment of graphene by π-π stacking.

  18. DNA interaction probed by evanescent wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy via functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi-Ju; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-04-11

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) is employed to study interaction and binding kinetics of DNA strands by using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as sensitive reporters. These Au NPs are connected to target DNA of study that hybridizes with the complementary DNA fixed on the silica surface. By the absorbance of Au NPs, the interaction between two DNA strands may be examined to yield an adsorption equilibrium constant of 2.2×10(10) M(-1) using Langmuir fit. The binding efficiency that is affected by ion concentration, buffer pH and temperature is also examined. This approach is then applied to the label-free detection of the DNA mutation diseases using the sandwich hybridization assay. For monitoring a gene associated with sickle-cell anemia, the detection limit and the adsorption equilibrium constant is determined to be 1.2 pM and (3.7±0.8)×10(10) M(-1), distinct difference from the perfectly matched DNA sequence that yields the corresponding 0.5 pM and (1.1±0.2)×10(11) M(-1). The EW-CRDS method appears to have great potential for the investigation of the kinetics of a wide range of biological reactions.

  19. Theoretical and experimental investigation of evanescent-wave absorption sensors for extreme temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, Michael P.; Ohodnicki, Paul; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    Recently, significant developments in evanescent wave absorption sensors have been demonstrated for high temperature sensing applications based upon the optical responses of advanced thin film materials. We will demonstrate how such sensors can be utilized in a mode that allows for chemical or temperature sensing starting from basic theoretical considerations. We will also present experimental high temperature sensing results for fabricated sensors. Potential applications of the sensors to be discussed include a range of high temperature systems relevant for fossil energy and combustion monitoring such as industrial combustors or reaction vessels, solid oxide fuel cells, and gas turbines. In these applications, even a small increase in operating efficiency realized via careful observation of in-process parameters and implementation of real-time process controls can result in dramatic savings across the energy industry, illustrating the necessity of pursuing such techniques. It is hoped that sensors of the type described here will allow for unprecedented measurement-access to processes which present challenging high-temperature and chemically reactive environments.

  20. Estimation of the intrinsic absorption and scattering attenuation in Northeastern Venezuela (Southeastern Caribbean) using coda waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ugalde, A.; Pujades, L.G.; Canas, J.A.; Villasenor, A.

    1998-01-01

    Northeastern Venezuela has been studied in terms of coda wave attenuation using seismograms from local earthquakes recorded by a temporary short-period seismic network. The studied area has been separated into two subregions in order to investigate lateral variations in the attenuation parameters. Coda-Q-1 (Q(c)-1) has been obtained using the single-scattering theory. The contribution of the intrinsic absorption (Q(i)-1) and scattering (Q(s)-1) to total attenuation (Q(t)-1) has been estimated by means of a multiple lapse time window method, based on the hypothesis of multiple isotropic scattering with uniform distribution of scatterers. Results show significant spatial variations of attenuation: the estimates for intermediate depth events and for shallow events present major differences. This fact may be related to different tectonic characteristics that may be due to the presence of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, because the intermediate depth seismic zone may be coincident with the southern continuation of the subducting slab under the arc.

  1. Possible radio wave precursors associated with the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9/Jupiter impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Macdowall, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We suggest that prior to its impact with Jupiter, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 will behave as an electrical generator in the Jovian magnetosphere, converting planetary rotational energy to electrical energy via a dust/plasma interaction. This electrical energy will then be deposited in the dayside auroral region where it may drive various auroral phenomena including cyclotron radio emission. Such emission could be detected by spacecraft like Ulysses and Galileo many hours prior to the actual comet impact with the upper atmosphere. We apply the theory originally developed to explain the spokes in Saturn's rings. This theory allows us to quantify the driving potential associated with the comet and, consequently, to determine the radio power created in the auroral region. We conclude that if enough fine dust is present in the cometary system, comet-induced auroral radio emissions will reach detectable levels. This emission should be observable in the dayside hemisphere about 12-24 hours prior to each fragment impact.

  2. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  3. Investigation of radio astronomy image processing techniques for use in the passive millimetre-wave security screening environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Hutchinson, Simon; Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2014-06-01

    Image processing techniques can be used to improve the cost-effectiveness of future interferometric Passive MilliMetre Wave (PMMW) imagers. The implementation of such techniques will allow for a reduction in the number of collecting elements whilst ensuring adequate image fidelity is maintained. Various techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community to enhance the imaging capability of sparse interferometric arrays. The most prominent are Multi- Frequency Synthesis (MFS) and non-linear deconvolution algorithms, such as the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) and variations of the CLEAN algorithm. This investigation focuses on the implementation of these methods in the defacto standard for radio astronomy image processing, the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package, building upon the discussion presented in Taylor et al., SPIE 8362-0F. We describe the image conversion process into a CASA suitable format, followed by a series of simulations that exploit the highlighted deconvolution and MFS algorithms assuming far-field imagery. The primary target application used for this investigation is an outdoor security scanner for soft-sided Heavy Goods Vehicles. A quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the aforementioned image processing techniques is presented, with thoughts on the potential cost-savings such an approach could yield. Consideration is also given to how the implementation of these techniques in CASA might be adapted to operate in a near-field target environment. This may enable a much wider usability by the imaging community outside of radio astronomy and thus would be directly relevant to portal screening security systems in the microwave and millimetre wave bands.

  4. Flare-generated Shock Wave Propagation through Solar Coronal Arcade Loops and an Associated Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ˜800 km s‑1 and it accelerated to ˜1490 km s‑1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan–spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (˜340 km s‑1) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan–spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  5. Flare-generated Shock Wave Propagation through Solar Coronal Arcade Loops and an Associated Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ˜800 km s-1 and it accelerated to ˜1490 km s-1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan-spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (˜340 km s-1) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan-spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  6. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation

    PubMed Central

    TSUDA, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10–100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50–90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10–50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  7. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet.

  8. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  9. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV Waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT Waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Kalashnikov, S. S.; Kubo, Y.

    We show examples of the excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few previously studied events.

  10. Coronal Shock Waves, EUV Waves, and Their Relation to CMEs. I. Reconciliation of "EIT Waves", Type II Radio Bursts, and Leading Edges of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Kalashnikov, S. S.; Kubo, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We show examples of the excitation of coronal waves by flare-related abrupt eruptions of magnetic rope structures. The waves presumably rapidly steepened into shocks and freely propagated afterwards like decelerating blast waves that showed up as Moreton waves and EUV waves. We propose a simple quantitative description for such shock waves to reconcile their observed propagation with drift rates of metric type II bursts and kinematics of leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Taking account of different plasma density falloffs for propagation of a wave up and along the solar surface, we demonstrate a close correspondence between drift rates of type II bursts and speeds of EUV waves, Moreton waves, and CMEs observed in a few previously studied events.

  11. The First Wave: The Beginnings of Radio in Canadian Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, George H.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes one of the first developments and deployment of radio for distance learning and education in Canada, beginning in the early 1920s. Anticipating a recent initiative of public-private partnerships, the impetus, infrastructure, and initial programs were provided by a large corporation. Description of the system, its purpose,…

  12. The Coherer: With Simple Demonstrations of the Generation, Propagation and Detection of Radio Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    A coherer is a bistable device based on metal filings loosely confined between solid metal electrodes. This granular material normally exhibits a very high electrical resistance (tens of kilohms), but passage of the high-frequency current generated by reception of a radio signal causes it to "cohere" into a comparatively low resistance condition…

  13. Revealing the Hidden Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach High School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Michael; Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and teachers have worked together to produce teaching materials for the Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT), an easy-to-use, low-cost apparatus that can be used in multiple laboratory experiments in high school and university physics and astronomy classes. In this article, we describe the motivation for the VSRT and several of the…

  14. Space-Borne Radio-Sounding Investigations Facilitated by the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.; Bilitza,Dieter; Garcia, Leonard N.; Shao, Xi; Galkin, Ivan A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) is to provide userfriendly access to heliophysics wave data. While the VWO initially emphasized the vast quantity of wave data obtained from passive receivers, the VWO infrastructure can also be used to access active sounder data sets. Here we use examples from some half-million Alouette-2, ISIS-1, and ISIS-2 digital topside-sounder ionograms to demonstrate the desirability of such access to the actual ionograms for investigations of both natural and sounder-stimulated plasma-wave phenomena. By this demonstration, we wish to encourage investigators to make other valuable space-borne sounder data sets accessible via the VWO.

  15. Dynamic of Langmuir and Ion-Sound Waves in Type 3 Solar Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type 3 sources is investigated, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. The resulting prediction for the electrostatic decay threshold is consistent with the observed high-field cutoff in the Langmuir field distribution. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; rather, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be fast enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The resulting levels of product Langmuir and ion-sound waves are estimated theoretically and shown to be consistent with in situ ISEE 3 observations of type 3 events at 1 AU. Nonlinear interactions slave the growth and decay of product sound waves to that of the product Langmuir waves. The resulting probability distribution of ion-sound field strengths is predicted to have a flat tail extending to a high-field cutoff. This prediction is consistent with statistics derived here from ISEE 3 observations. Agreement is also found between the frequencies of the observed waves and predictions for the product S waves. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasilinear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth. When wave and beam inhomogeneities are accounted for, arguments from quasi-linear relaxation yield an upper bound on the Langmuir fields that is too high to be relevant. Nor are the criteria for direct wave collapse of the beam-driven waves met, consistent with earlier simulation results that imply that this process is not responsible for saturation of the beam instability. Indeed, even

  16. Slow- and helicon-wave sustained discharges in HF/VHF bands of radio frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakawa, Youichi; Kunimatsu, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Hideki; Fukui, Yasuaki; Shoji, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    Helicon-wave sustained (HW) and slow-wave sustained (SW) discharges are studied in a whistler- or helicon-wave range of frequency using high-frequency (13.56 MHz) and very-high-frequency (50 and 144 MHz) bands of rf. For 13.56 and 50 MHz, in addition to capacitive-coupling (E) discharge and the HW discharge, the SW discharge is observed at an extremely low rf power and plasma density; lower than the E discharge region. For 144 MHz, no E discharges appear and the transition from the SW discharge to the HW discharge occurs. In the SW discharge, both the electromagnetic and electrostatic waves are observed. The results of two-dimensional wave code and analytic calculation indicate that the electrostatic component of the electric field parallel to a static magnetic field is dominant in plasma production in the SW discharge.

  17. Dynamics of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III solar radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The study traces the evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III sources, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; instead, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be rapid enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasi-linear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth.

  18. Estimate of a D region ionospheric electron density profile from MF radio wave observations by the S-310-37 rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashihara, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Miyake, T.

    2016-01-01

    The S-310-37 rocket, launched at 11:20 (JST) on 16 January 2007, was equipped with a radio receiver to observe the medium-frequency (MF) radio wave propagation characteristics in the ionosphere. The radio receiver measured the intensity and the waveform of the radio wave at 873 kHz from the NHK Kumamoto broadcasting station. The polarized mode waves' intensity characteristics were obtained by analyzing the observed waveform. In this study, the S-310-37 rocket-observed polarized mode waves' propagation characteristics are analyzed in order to estimate the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region. These observations become better measurement approach because the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region is difficult to be observed by other equipment such as a Langmuir probe. A Langmuir probe can measure in the ionospheric D region; however, the absolute values may be off by the influence of wake effects around the sounding rocket. It is demonstrated that the propagation characteristics of the polarized mode waves can be successfully used to derive the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region.

  19. Radio line and continuum observations of quasar-galaxy pairs and the origin of low reshift quasar absorption line systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Vangorkom, J. H.; Hauxthausen, E. M.; Stocke, J. T.; Salzer, J.

    1990-01-01

    There are a number of known quasars for which our line of sight to the high redshift quasar passes within a few Holmberg radii of a low redshift galaxy. In a few of these cases, spectra of the quasar reveal absorption by gas associated with the low redshift galaxy. A number of these pairs imply absorption by gas which lies well outside the optical disk of the associated galaxy, leading to models of galaxies with 'halos' or 'disks' of gas extending to large radii. The authors present observations of 4 such pairs. In three of the four cases, they find that the associated galaxy is highly disturbed, typically due to a gravitational interaction with a companion galaxy, while in the fourth case the absorption can be explained by clouds in the optical disk of the associated galaxy. They are led to an alternative hypothesis concerning the origin of the low redshift absorption line systems: the absorption is by gas clouds which have been gravitationally stripped from the associated galaxy. These galaxies are rapidly evolving, and should not be used as examples of absorption by clouds in halos of field spirals. The authors conclude by considering the role extended gas in interacting systems plays in the origin of higher redshift quasar absorption line systems.

  20. Effect of a progressive sound wave on the profiles of spectral lines. 2: Asymmetry of faint Fraunhofer lines. [absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, R. I.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficient profile was calculated for lines of different chemical elements in a medium with progressive sound waves. Calculations show that (1) the degree and direction of asymmetry depend on the atomic ionization potential and the potential of lower level excitation of the individual line; (2) the degree of asymmetry of a line decreases from the center toward the limb of the solar disc; and (3) turbulent motions 'suppress' the asymmetry.

  1. Facile Synthesis of Porous Nickel/Carbon Composite Microspheres with Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption by Magnetic and Dielectric Losses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Song; Lyu, Hailong; Liu, Jiurong; Liu, Yuzhen; Wu, Nannan; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-10

    Porous nickel/carbon (Ni/C) composite microspheres with diameters of ca. 1.2-1.5 μm were fabricated by a solvothermal method combined with carbon reduction. The pore size of the synthesized Ni/C composite microspheres ranged from several nanometers to 50 nm. The porous Ni/C composite microspheres exhibited a saturation magnetization (MS) of 53.5 emu g(-1) and a coercivity (HC) of 51.4 Oe. When tested as an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption material, the epoxy resin composites containing 60% and 75% porous Ni/C microspheres provided high-performance EM wave absorption at thicknesses of 3.0-11.0 and 1.6-7.0 mm in the corresponding frequency ranges of 2.0-12 and 2.0-18 GHz, respectively. The superior EM wave absorption performances of porous Ni/C composite microspheres were derived from the synergy effects generated by the magnetic loss of nickel, the dielectric loss of carbon, and the porous structure. PMID:27441382

  2. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-19

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4 · 7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  3. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4·7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures. PMID:25788158

  4. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4.7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  5. Facile Synthesis of Porous Nickel/Carbon Composite Microspheres with Enhanced Electromagnetic Wave Absorption by Magnetic and Dielectric Losses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Song; Lyu, Hailong; Liu, Jiurong; Liu, Yuzhen; Wu, Nannan; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-10

    Porous nickel/carbon (Ni/C) composite microspheres with diameters of ca. 1.2-1.5 μm were fabricated by a solvothermal method combined with carbon reduction. The pore size of the synthesized Ni/C composite microspheres ranged from several nanometers to 50 nm. The porous Ni/C composite microspheres exhibited a saturation magnetization (MS) of 53.5 emu g(-1) and a coercivity (HC) of 51.4 Oe. When tested as an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption material, the epoxy resin composites containing 60% and 75% porous Ni/C microspheres provided high-performance EM wave absorption at thicknesses of 3.0-11.0 and 1.6-7.0 mm in the corresponding frequency ranges of 2.0-12 and 2.0-18 GHz, respectively. The superior EM wave absorption performances of porous Ni/C composite microspheres were derived from the synergy effects generated by the magnetic loss of nickel, the dielectric loss of carbon, and the porous structure.

  6. [People taking care of people: the art of caring through radio waves].

    PubMed

    Cunha, I C

    2000-01-01

    The nurse as a primary care provider professional participates actively in health education activities. Within the spoken language, the radio, because of its power of penetration, assumes an important role in the dissemination of health information. Thus, the School of Nursing at Santo Amaro University, in São Paulo, Brazil, initiated a series of community health programs using the services of the university radio. The purpose of this paper is to report on the experience of elaborating and implementing the weekly programs "Healthy Life" and "People taking care of People", in first one implemented in 1996. Due to the positive results obtained, this activity became part of the University Extension Program with the participation of teachers and students.

  7. Internal wave activity in the polar atmospheric regions during 2006 - 2009 revealed by COSMIC radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Liou, Yuei-An

    The satellite mission Formosat-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) consists of six micro-satellites, and each of them has four GPS-antennas. It was launched in April 2006, orbiting around the Earth at approximately 800 km. The primary scientific goal of the mission is to demonstrate the value of near-real-time radio occultation (RO) observations in improving operational numerical weather predictions (NWP). The goal is readily shown by assimilating the measurements of atmospheric parameters into used NWP-models. These parameters include density, temperature, pressure and relative humidity fields in the atmosphere. An analysis of their geographic and seasonal distributions is necessary to the understanding of the energy and momentum transfer and the reaction of the polar atmosphere in response to global warming. This task is especially important as the Polar Regions are very sensitive to the change in global temperature and it may be a major cause of global sea level rising. In this work, a statistical analysis of the internal gravity wave (IGW) activity in polar atmospheric regions (latitudes more than 60º) using Formosat-3/COSMIC RO temperature data collected from July 2006 to March 2009 has been performed. Geographic and seasonal distributions of the IGW potential energy (wave activity indicator) in the altitude interval from 15 to 35 km have been determined and analyzed. The obtained results show that the wave activity in the polar atmosphere is strong in winter and spring. The potential energy of IGWs in spring is largest in Antarctic atmospheric region, while it is largest in winter in Arctic region. The wave potential energy increases with altitude up to 35 km in the atmosphere of both Earth’s hemispheres. In Antarctic region, internal waves with high potential energy occur in the atmosphere over the Antarctic Peninsula. In Arctic region, a high wave activity is mainly observed over North Atlantic Ocean (Iceland

  8. Controlled stimulation of magnetospheric electrons by radio waves Experimental model for lightning effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Curtis, S. A.; Barcus, J. R.; Siefring, C. L.; Kelley, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetospheric electrons precipitated by ground-based coded very low frequency radio transmissions have been detected by rocket measurement of bremsstrahlung X-rays, caused by impact of the electrons with the upper atmosphere. The direct correlations obtained between the very low frequency signals and the X-rays demonstrate the limits of sensitivity required and indicate that this remote sensing technique would be useful for future study of very low frequency effects induced by single lightning strokes.

  9. A millimeter wave radio spectrometer for material analysis below T<1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertiy, A. A.; Ivanchenko, I. V.; Popenko, N. A.; Tarapov, S. I.; Shestopalov, V. P.

    1989-03-01

    A radio spectrometer set suggesting wide fuctional possibilities and operating in the shortwave part of the millimeter band at temperatures below 1 K is described. The set is intended for analyzing materials of polarized nuclear targets under the conditions close to actual operation, with the use of magnetic resonance methods. The potential of spectrometer allows employing it in semiconductor physics, physics of disordered media, biology, et.c.

  10. Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, Jack D.

    1992-01-01

    The Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) was designed to determine density, bulk velocity and temperature of the electrons for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby Spacecraft, to define the MHD-SW IMF flow configuration; to clarify the role of impact ionization processes, to comment on the importance of anomalous ionization phenomena (via wave particle processes), to quantify the importance of wave turbulence in the cometary interaction, to establish the importance of photoionization via the presence of characteristic lines in a structured energy spectrum, to infer the presence and grain size of significant ambient dust column density, to search for the theoretically suggested 'impenetrable' contact surface, and to quantify the flow of heat (in the likelihood that no surface exists) that will penetrate very deep into the atmosphere supplying a good deal of heat via impact and charge exchange ionization. This final report provides an instrument description, instrument test plans, list of deliverables/schedule, flight and support equipment and software schedule, CREWE accommodation issues, resource requirements, status of major contracts, an explanation of the non-NASA funded efforts, status of EIP and IM plan, descope options, and Brinton questions.

  11. Simplification of millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber system employing heterodyning of uncorrelated optical carriers and self-homodyning of RF signal at the receiver.

    PubMed

    Islam, A H M Razibul; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Town, Graham E

    2012-02-27

    A simplified millimeter-wave (mm-wave) radio-over-fiber (RoF) system employing a combination of optical heterodyning in signal generation and radio frequency (RF) self-homodyning in data recovery process is proposed and demonstrated. Three variants of the system are considered in which two independent uncorrelated lasers with a frequency offset equal to the desired mm-wave carrier frequency are used to generate the transmitted signal. Uncorrelated phase noise in the resulting mm-wave signal after photodetection was overcome by using RF self-homodyning in the data recovery process. Theoretical analyses followed by experimental results and simulated characterizations confirm the system's performance. A key advantage of the system is that it avoids the need for high-speed electro-optic and electronic devices operating at the RF carrier frequency at both the central station and base stations.

  12. External heating of stents by radio waves Pilot studies in rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, Adam B.; Robinson, Keith; Chronos, Nicolas A.F.; Daum, Wolfgang

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: This experiment was designed to assess the feasibility of radio frequency energy delivered by a prototype radio frequency generator inductive heating device (REVAX) positioned external to the body, for transient heating of stents after arterial implant. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one New Zealand White rabbits underwent stenting of their infrarenal aorta. Nine rabbits were stented and immediately placed in the REVAX for external stent heating with internal temperature probes in place. Twelve rabbits were stented and 3 days later either heated or placed in the generator as a sham for 20 min. The animals were terminated 28 days later. Results: The REVAX was able to heat the aortic stents in a controlled fashion; in Phase II experiments, the stent temperature was raised to 42 deg. C for 20 min. In Phase I mild necrosis was noted at the stent struts. In Phase II, necrosis and mineralization of the media was seen at the stent struts, and evidence of neointimal suppression was observed. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that external heating of stents in a blood vessel in a live animal via radio frequency energy is feasible. Further studies will be needed to assess whether any specific heating regimen might inhibit fibrocellular neointimal hyperplasia.

  13. Onboard Signal Processing: Wave of the Future for Planetary Radio Science?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marouf, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Future spacecraft-based radio observations of planetary surfaces, rings, and atmospheres could significantly benefit from recent technological advances in real-time digital signal processing (DSP) hardware. Traditionally, the radio observations have been carried out in a 'down link' configuration in which about 20-W spacecraft transmitted RF power illuminates the target of interest and the perturbed signal is collected at an Earth receiving station. The down link configuration was dictated by the large throughput of received data, corresponding to a relatively large recording band width (about 50 kHz) needed to capture the coherent and scattered signal components in the presence of trajectory, ephemeris, and measurement uncertainties. An alternative 'up link' configuration in which powerful Earth-based radio transmitters (20-200 kW) are used to illuminate the target and data are recorded on board a spacecraft could enhance the measurements' signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 1000, allowing a quantum leap in scientific capabilities. Various aspects of alternative signal processing technologies are discussed.

  14. Field strength variations of LF radio waves prior to earthquakes in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, F.; Biagi, P. F.; Caputo, M.; Cozzi, E.; Della Monica, G.; Ermini, A.; Plastino, W.; Sgrigna, V.

    The electric field strength of the LF radio broadcasting RMC (Principality of Monaco) which operates at 216 kHz has been recorded since January 1991 by two receivers in central Italy. During the monitoring period we observed two evident attenuations of the field strength in one receiver, with durations of 6-10 days. The geomagnetic and ionospheric observations carried out in the same time interval do not seem able to explain the attenuation of the radio signal. An analysis of the seismic activity occurring in the area between transmitter and receiver has revealed that some days after the attenuations the energy released by earthquakes reaches a maximum. The observed attenuation might therefore be precursors of earthquakes. We also checked meteorological conditions and found that advections of warm air occurred during both the two anomalous periods. It seems possible that these conditions can help the action of preseismic effects in generating irregularities in the vertical gradient of the tropospheric radio refractivity able to produce defocusing of LF radiobroadcast propagation.

  15. Interplanetary conditions during 3-kHz radio-wave detections in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Gold, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma waves detected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft beyond about 12 AU that may be associated with the turbulence expected at the heliopause are interpreted in terms of the characteristics of the interplanetary medium at large heliocentric distances. The low-energy charged-particle environment in the outer heliosphere during the observations of the unusual plasma-wave signals is addressed. The particle data suggest that the outer heliosphere was unusually stable and free of transient shock and particle events for the roughly eight months during the wave observations.

  16. Temperature waves arising due to absorption of electromagnetic radiation in laminated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabibullin, I. L.; Konovalova, S. I.; Sadykova, L. A.

    2015-05-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a moving three-layer medium is studied. It is shown that travelling temperature waves are formed due to interference of the incident wave with the wave reflected from the interface between the layers with radiation energy dissipation. The frequency, length, and velocity of these waves are found to depend on the electromagnetic radiation frequency, electrophysical and thermophysical parameters of the medium, and velocity of medium motion.

  17. Method of Transverse Displacements Formulation for Calculating the HF Radio Wave Propagation Paths. Statement of the Problem and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosikov, I. A.; Bessarab, P. F.; Klimenko, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Fundamentals of the method of transverse displacements for calculating the HF radio-wave propagation paths are presented. The method is based on the direct variational principle for the optical path functional, but is not reduced to solving the Euler—Lagrange equations. Instead, the initial guess given by an ordered set of points is transformed successively into a ray path, while its endpoints corresponding to the positions of the transmitter and the receiver are kept fixed throughout the entire iteration process. The results of calculation by the method of transverse displacements are compared with known analytical solutions. The importance of using only transverse displacements of the ray path in the optimization procedure is also demonstrated.

  18. Radio-over-fiber system with tunable millimeter-wave generation and wavelength reuse for uplink connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chan; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Lin, Heng; Liu, Zhiming

    2016-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate a radio-over-fiber system to generate an optical millimeter wave (MMW) and realize wavelength reuse for an uplink connection. A tunable optical comb generated by a single Fabry-Perot laser serves as the optical source. The central carrier is separated by an optical circulator cascaded with a fiber Bragg grating. For the downlink, the unmodulated central carrier is coupled with one subcarrier, which has been modulated with 2.5-Gb/s data. Then, different MMWs can be generated by choosing different subcarriers. While for the uplink, the same central carrier is reused for an uplink connection with 1.25-Gb/s data. In the scheme, a 60-GHz MMW is obtained and the bidirectional data are simultaneously transmitted over 60-km transmission with <0.5-dB power penalty. This system shows a simple cost-efficient configuration and good performance over long-distance delivery.

  19. Detection of Transionospheric SuperDARN HF Waves by the Radio Receiver Instrument on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, R. G.; Yau, A. W.; James, H. G.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) Canadian small-satellite was launched in September 2013. Included in this suite of eight scientific instruments is the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI). The RRI has been used to measure VLF and HF radio waves from various ground and spontaneous ionospheric sources. The first dedicated ground transmission that was detected by RRI was from the Saskatoon Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar on Nov. 7, 2013 at 14 MHz. Several other passes over the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar have been recorded since then. Ground transmissions have also been observed from other radars, such as the SPEAR, HAARP, and SURA ionospheric heaters. However, the focus of this study will be on the results obtained from the SuperDARN passes. An analysis of the signal recorded by the RRI provides estimates of signal power, Doppler shift, polarization, absolute time delay, differential mode delay, and angle of arrival. By comparing these parameters to similar parameters derived from ray tracing simulations, ionospheric electron density structures may be detected and measured. Further analysis of the results from the other ground transmitters and future SuperDARN passes will be used to refine these results.

  20. Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S.P.; Radha, P.B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V.N.; Hu, S.X.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Boehly, T.R.; Sangster, T.C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R.C.

    2009-05-19

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (Te ~ 10–40 eV, rho ~ 3–11 g/cm^3) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10^14–10^15 W/cm^2 and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4–1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10–70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer Te and rho in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f =0.06 and f =0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f = 0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  1. Simultaneous observation of VHF radio wave transmission anomaly propagated beyond line of site prior to earthquakes in multiple sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, H.; Mogi, T.; Moriya, T.; Takada, M.; Morisada, M.

    2010-12-01

    The VHF radio wave transmission anomalies propagated beyond line of site prior to earthquakes (M>4), (hereafter termed EQ-echo) have been observed more than 20 times from 2004 at the Erimo observatory (ERM) in Hokkaido, Northern Japan. A statistical relationship between magnitude of preceding earthquake and total duration time of the EQ-echo has been proposed (Moriya et al.2009). To confirm a region where the EQ-echo simultaneously observed for each earthquake, we installed another 3 observatory with approximately 5 km spacing in the surroundings of ERM. The EQ-echoes have been observed simultaneously at two observatories prior to four earthquakes since 2008. The initial time and duration of each EQ echo were same time in several cases but different at some minutes each other in other cases. The wave forms of the EQ-echoes were similar in both records. In the Fuyushima observatory (FYS, 10km away from ERM) , three-way antennas were installed at every 120 degree to detect an arrival direction of EQ-echoes. Simultaneous observations of EQ-echoes at ERM and FYS for the preceding EQ (M=4.7) that occurred in the Hidaka mountains revealed that this EQ-echo came from direction of the epicenter based on the FYS observation and this direction was consistent with that of EQ-echo observed simultaneously in ERM. Although some of simultaneous observed EQ-echoes were observed in same time completely at both observatories, but some of them were with time rag of duration of each EQ-echo between multiple observed sites. We discussed what these time rags mean by considering possibilities of moving of scattering objects, generation of a radio duct, and so on, as in response to this fact.

  2. Cometary kilometric radio waves and plasma waves correlated with ion pick-up effect at Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.; Morioka, A.; Miyake, W.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Bow-shock movements at Comet Halley are inferred from the discrete spectra of the cometary kilometric radiation (30-195 kHz); the observed emissions can be interpreted as being generated and propagating from the moving shock. The shock motion is possibly associated with the time variation of the solar wind and cometary outgassing. It is concluded that these plasma wave phenomena are manifestations of ion pick-up processes, which occur even in a remote region 7 million to 10 million km from the cometary nucleus.

  3. Cometary kilometric radio waves and plasma waves correlated with ion pick-up effect at Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, H.; Morioka, A.; Miyake, W.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    Bow-shock movements at Comet Halley are inferred from the discrete spectra of the cometary kilometric radiation (30-195 kHz); the observed emissions can be interpreted as being generated and propagating from the moving shock. The shock motion is possibly associated with the time variation of the solar wind and cometary outgassing. It is concluded that these plasma wave phenomena are manifestations of ion pick-up processes, which occur even in a remote region 7 million to 10 million km from the cometary nucleus.

  4. Effect of gravity waves on the tropopause temperature, height and water vapor in Tibet from COSMIC GPS Radio Occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Attaullah; Jin, Shuanggen

    2016-02-01

    The tropopause plays an important role in climate change, particularly in Tibet with complex topography and climate change system. In this paper, the temperature and height of the Cold Point Tropopause (CPT) in Tibet are obtained and investigated from COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) GPS Radio Occultation (RO) during June 2006-Feb 2014, which are compared with Lapse Rate Tropopause (LRT) from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS/NASA). Furthermore, the impact of Gravity waves (GW) potential energy (Ep) on the CPT-Temperature, CPT-Height, and the variation of stratospheric water vapor with GW Ep variations are presented. Generally the coldest CPT temperature is in June-July-August (JJA) with -76.5 °C, resulting less water vapor into the stratosphere above the cold points. The temperature of the cold point increases up to -69 °C during the winter over the Tibetan Plateau (25-40°N, 70-100°E) that leads to increase in water vapor above the cold points (10 hPa). Mean vertical fluctuations of temperature are calculated as well as the mean gravity wave potential energy Ep for each month from June 2006 to Feb 2014. Monthly Ep is calculated at 5°×5° grids between 17 km and 24 km in altitude for the Tibetan Plateau. The Ep raises from 1.83 J/Kg to 3.4 J/Kg from summer to winter with mean Ep of 2.5 J/Kg for the year. The results show that the gravity waves affect the CPT temperature and water vapor concentration in the stratosphere. Water vapor, CPT temperature and gravity wave (Ep) have good correlation with each other above the cold points, and water vapor increases with increasing Ep.

  5. Dielectric Properties of Aliphatic Ketone at U.H.F. Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, R.; Datta, R. K.

    1981-02-01

    The attenuation coefficient α in db/cm at different temperatures and frequencies has been calculated from Lamberts’ absorption formula for three different liquids such as acetone, methylethylketone and diethylketone. The position of maximum absorption for all the three liquids shifts towards higher frequency with the increase of temperature and towards lower frequency with the increase of the number of CH2 groups in the molecules. Further it is observed that the height of the absorption peak for CH3COCH3 and C2H5COC2H5, which contain identical alkyl group increases with decrease of temperature where as in the case of CH3COC2H5 the height of the absorption peak instead of increasing diminishes with lowering of temperature. This may be due to the fact that the methyl compound in particular show certain abnormality as has been reported. In this paper the abnormality has been assumed to be due to the fact that at lower temperature the molecules abruptly form groups which produces a resultant electric moment less than that of single molecule.

  6. Solar gravitational deflection of radio waves measured by very-long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Kent, S. M.; Knight, C. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Clark, T. A.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Utilizing a four-antenna technique, simultaneous observations were made, at each end of an 845-km baseline, of the radio sources 3C279 and 3C273B, which are 10 deg apart in the sky. Differences in interferometric phases at 3.7-cm wavelength monitored near the time of the 1972 occultation of 3C279 by the sun, yielded a gravitational deflection of 0.99 plus or minus 0.03 times the value predicted by general relativity, corresponding to gamma = 0.98 plus or minus 0.06 (standard error).

  7. Disorder-induced absorption of far-infrared waves by acoustic modes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenashev, A. V.; Wiemer, M.; Koch, M.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Gebhard, F.; Baranovskii, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    A mechanism of light absorption at THz frequencies in nematic liquid crystals based on intermolecular dynamics is proposed. In this mechanism, the energy conservation is supplied by acoustic phonons, whereas momentum conservation is provided by static spatial fluctuations of the director field. The mechanism predicts a continuous absorption spectrum in a broad frequency range.

  8. Clumpy Langmuir waves in type III radio sources - Comparison of stochastic-growth theory with observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed comparisons are made between the Langmuir-wave properties predicted by the recently developed stochastic-growth theory of type III sources and those observed by the plasma wave experiment on ISEE 3, after correcting for the main instrumental and selection effects. Analysis of the observed field-strength distribution confirms the theoretically predicted form and implies that wave growth fluctuates both spatially and temporally in sign and magnitude, leading to an extremely clumpy distribution of fields. A cutoff in the field-strength distribution is seen at a few mV/m, corresponding to saturation via nonlinear effects. Analysis of the size distribution of Langmuir clumps yields results in accord with those obtained in earlier work and with the size distribution of ambient density fluctuations in the solar wind. This confirms that the inhomogeneities in the Langmuir growth rate are determined by the density fluctuations and that these fluctuations persist during type III events.

  9. A method to measure specific absorption rate of nanoparticles in colloidal suspension using different configurations of radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketharnath, Dhivya; Pande, Rohit; Xie, Leiming; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Godin, Biana; Wosik, Jarek

    2012-08-01

    We report a method for characterization of the efficiency of radio-frequency (rf) heating of nanoparticles (NPs) suspended in an aqueous medium. Measurements were carried out for water suspended 5 nm superparamagnetic iron-oxide NPs with 30 nm dextran matrix for three different configurations of rf electric and magnetic fields. A 30 MHz high-Q resonator was designed to measure samples placed inside a parallel plate capacitor and solenoid coil with or without an rf electric field shield. All components of rf losses were analyzed and rf electric and magnetic field induced heating of NPs and the dispersion medium was determined and discussed.

  10. A method to measure specific absorption rate of nanoparticles in colloidal suspension using different configurations of radio-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Ketharnath, Dhivya; Pande, Rohit; Xie, Leiming; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Godin, Biana; Wosik, Jarek

    2012-08-20

    We report a method for characterization of the efficiency of radio-frequency (rf) heating of nanoparticles (NPs) suspended in an aqueous medium. Measurements were carried out for water suspended 5 nm superparamagnetic iron-oxide NPs with 30 nm dextran matrix for three different configurations of rf electric and magnetic fields. A 30 MHz high-Q resonator was designed to measure samples placed inside a parallel plate capacitor and solenoid coil with or without an rf electric field shield. All components of rf losses were analyzed and rf electric and magnetic field induced heating of NPs and the dispersion medium was determined and discussed.

  11. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on radio frequency magnetron sputtered HfO2 thin films deposited with different oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Maidul Haque, S; Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-03-20

    Two sets of HfO2 thin film have been deposited by the radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique at various oxygen partial pressures, one set without any substrate bias and another set with a 50 W pulsed dc substrate bias. The films have been characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Hf L3 edge, and the structural information obtained from analysis of the EXAFS data has been used to explain the macroscopic behavior of the refractive index obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. It has been observed that the variation of refractive index with oxygen partial pressure depends on the Hf-Hf bond length for the set of films deposited without substrate bias, while for the other set of films deposited with pulsed dc substrate bias, it depends on the oxygen coordination of the nearest neighbor shell surrounding Hf sites.

  12. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  13. Part-body and multibody effects on absorption of radio-frequency electromagnetic energy by animals and by models of man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, O. P.; Hagmann, M. J.; Dandrea, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Fine structure in the whole-body resonant curve for radio-frequency energy deposition in man can be attributed to part-body resonances. As for head resonance, which occurs near 350 MHz in man, the absorptive cross section is nearly three times the physical cross section of the head. The arm has a prominent resonance at 150 MHz. Numerical solutions, antenna theory, and experimental results on animals have shown that whole-body energy deposition may be increased by 50 percent or more because of multiple bodies that are strategically located in the field. Empirical equations for SARs are also presented along with test data for several species of laboratory animals. Barbiturate anesthesia is sufficiently disruptive of thermoregulation that delta Ts of colonic temperature yield energy dose values in several mammals that compare quite favorably with those based on whole-body calorimetry.

  14. Observations of electron gyroharmonic waves and the structure of the Io torus. [jupiter 1 spacecraft radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Hubbard, R. F.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    Narrow-banded emissions were observed by the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment on the Voyager 1 spacecraft as it traversed the Io plasma torus. These waves occur between harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency and are the Jovian analogue of electrostatic emissions observed and theoretically studied for the terrestrial magnetosphere. The observed frequencies always include the component near the upper hybrid resonant frequency, (fuhr) but the distribution of the other observed emissions varies in a systematic way with position in the torus. A refined model of the electron density variation, based on identification of the fuhr line, is included. Spectra of the observed waves are analyzed in terms of the linear instability of an electron distribution function consisting of isotropic cold electrons and hot losscone electrons. The positioning of the observed auxiliary harmonics with respect to fuhr is shown to be an indicator of the cold to hot temperature ratio. It is concluded that this ratio increases systematically by an overall factor of perhaps 4 or 5 between the inner and outer portions of the torus.

  15. A MILLIMETER-WAVE INTERFEROMETRIC SEARCH FOR A MOLECULAR TORUS IN THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 4261

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Takeshi; Iguchi, Satoru; Kohno, Kotaro

    2013-05-01

    NGC 4261 is an elliptical galaxy with a pair of symmetric kiloparsec-scale jets. We observed a nucleus of NGC 4261 at 2.6 mm and 1.3 mm with the NRO RAINBOW interferometer, the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, and the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer to determine the excitation state of molecular gas. In this observation, neither CO(J = 2-1) nor CO(J = 1-0) absorption lines were detected even at higher sensitivity than the previous work. The 3{sigma} upper limits on the optical depths of CO lines were 0.098 for J = 2-1 and 0.042 for J = 1-0, respectively. These upper limits are much smaller than the optical depth obtained from the previous claimed detection of CO(J = 2-1) absorption (0.7), indicating that the claimed CO(J = 2-1) absorption profile could be a false feature. Our results suggest that there is a possibility that CO molecules are highly excited by the active galactic nucleus, since the optical depths of low-J CO molecules in NGC 4261 are significantly low.

  16. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser - Quantification for a narrowband absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brobst, William D.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors including transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power is presented for a CW dye laser with a narrow-band absorber (NO2). A Beer-Lambert type relationship is found over a small but useful range of these parameters. Quantitative measurement of intracavity absorption from the dye laser spectral profiles showed enhancements up to 12,000 (for pump powers near lasing threshold) when compared to extracavity measurements. The definition of an intracavity absorption coefficient allowed the determination of accurate transition strength ratios, demonstrating the reliability of the method.

  17. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X™). The skin model consisted of a 30 µm stratum corneum, 350 µm epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 µm dermis. Five SGD of 60 µm radius and 300 µm height were embedded linearly with 370 µm separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 µm from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  18. Effect of radio frequency waves of electromagnetic field on the tubulin.

    PubMed

    Taghi, Mousavi; Gholamhosein, Riazi; Saeed, Rezayi-Zarchi

    2013-09-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are macromolecular structures consisting of tubulin heterodimers and present in almost every eukaryotic cell. MTs fulfill all conditions for generation of electromagnetic field and are electrically polar due to the electrical polarity of a tubulin heterodimer. The calculated static electric dipole moment of about 1000 Debye makes them capable of being aligned parallel to the applied electromagnetic field direction. In the present study, the tubulin heterodimers were extracted and purified from the rat brains. MTs were obtained by polymerization in vitro. Samples of microtubules were adsorbed in the absence and in the presence of electromagnetic fields with radio frequency of 900 Hz. Our results demonstrate the effect of electromagnetic field with 900 Hz frequency to change the structure of MTs. In this paper, a related patent was used that will help to better understand the studied subject.

  19. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser: quantification for a narrowband absorber.

    PubMed

    Brobst, W D; Allen, J E

    1987-09-01

    Although it is recognized as a very sensitive detection technique, the general application of intracavity absorption to areas such as chemical kinetics and photochemistry has been somewhat limited. Concerns are frequently expressed about the nonlinear nature, experimental difficulty, and reliability of the technique. To allay some of these objections, the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors such as transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power has been investigated experimentally for a cw dye laser with a narrowband absorber (NO(2)). For this case a Beer-Lambert type relationship has been confirmed over a useful range of these parameters. The extent of intracavity absorption was quantitatively measured directly from the dye laser spectral profiles and, when compared to extracavity measurements, indicated enhancements as high as 12,000 for pump powers near lasing threshold. By defining an intracavity absorption coefficient, it was possible to demonstrate the reliability of the method by obtaining accurate transition strength ratios.

  20. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser: quantification for a narowband absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Brobst, W.D.; Allen J.E. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Although it is recognized as a very sensitive detection technique, the general application of intracavity absorption to areas such as chemical kinetics and photochemistry has been somewhat limited. Concerns are frequently expressed about the nonlinear nature, experimental difficulty, and reliability of the technique. To allay some of these objections, the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors such as transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power has been investigated experimentally for a cw dye laser with a narrowband absorber (NO/sub 2/). For this case a Beer-Lambert type relationship has been confirmed over a useful range of these parameters. The extent of intracavity absorption was quantitatively measured directly from the dye laser spectral profiles and, when compared to extracavity measurements, indicated enhancements as high as 12,000 for pump powers near lasing threshold. By defining an intracavity absorption coefficient, it was possible to demonstrate the reliability of the method by obtaining accurate transition strength ratios.

  1. Submillimeter wave absorption of n-type InSb at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption coefficient of two high-purity n-InSb samples is measured in the 10-40 per cm range using Fourier transform spectroscopy. The absorption coefficient spectrum is presented for both samples at 4.2 K. It is also shown for the lower resistance sample cooled to 2.2 K and heated by dc bias to elevated electron gas temperatures of 7.5 and 17.9 K. ac Drude theory gives rather poor agreement with experiment at 2.2 and 4.2 K but does much better when the sample electron gas is heated. In contrast, a simple quantum mechanical theory of absorption based on inverse Bremsstrahlung yields promising agreement at the lower temperatures although its applicability is questionable. The non-Drudian absorption is shown to have a favorable effect on the performance of InSb hot-electron bolometers.

  2. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-01

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg-1 with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings were confirmed

  3. Are type III radio aurorae directly excited by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, D.R.; Watermann, J.; McNamara, A.G. ); Koehler, J.A.; Sofko, G.J. )

    1989-10-01

    In 1981, a network of three 50-MHz radar transmitters and two receivers were operated in the CW mode on the Canadian prairies. The echoes obtained from coherent ionospheric backscatter were divided into segments of 205 ms such that their FFT spectra yielded frequency resolution of 4.9 Hz. The spectra were subsequently averaged over 10 s. Type III spectra (narrow spectra with sub ion-acoustic Doppler shifts) were observed (often simultaneously) on radar links whose wave vector components perpendicular to the geomagnetic field were almost identical while their components parallel to the field were significantly different. From a statistical analysis of more than 300 type III spectra it is inferred that these are in general unlikely to arise from electrostatic ion cyclotron waves directly excited by an essentially linear process. Doppler shifts around 55 Hz were much more frequently observed than around 30 Hz, the occurrence of type III spectra increased with increasing magnetic aspect angle (deviation of the scatter wave vector from perpendicular to the geomagnetic field), and the mean Doppler shifts of type III spectra simultaneously on different radar links went through a minimum for aspect angles between 4{degree} and 7{degree} (depending on the assumed backscatter height). These three results disagree with theoretical expectations. The spectral width the type III echoes decreased linearly with magnetic aspect by about 2 Hz/deg.

  4. Evidence for Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-shell Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-11-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s-1 and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from ~10,000 km s-1 (~0.03c) up to ~100,000 km s-1 (~0.3c), with a peak and mean value of ~42,000 km s-1 (~0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log ξ ~ 3-6 erg s-1 cm, with a mean value of log ξ ~ 4.2 erg s-1 cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N H ~ 1022-1024 cm-2, with a mean value of N H ~ 1023 cm-2. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can

  5. EVIDENCE FOR ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOWS IN RADIO-QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. DETAILED PHOTOIONIZATION MODELING OF Fe K-SHELL ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Tombesi, F.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.

    2011-11-20

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s{sup -1} and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from {approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.03c) up to {approx}100,000 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.3c), with a peak and mean value of {approx}42,000 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log {xi} {approx} 3-6 erg s{sup -1} cm, with a mean value of log {xi} {approx} 4.2 erg s{sup -1} cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 22}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}, with a mean value of N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of

  6. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs. 2; Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-Shell Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Clapp, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet AGNs. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000km/s and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blue shifted FeK absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. In the present paper we report a detailed curve of growth analysis and directly model the FeK absorbers with the Xstar photo-ionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35%. The outflow velocity distribution spans from \\sim10,000km/s (\\sim0.03c) up to \\siml00,000kmis (\\sim0.3c), with a peak and mean value of\\sim42,000km/s (\\sim0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log\\xi 3-6 erg s/cm, with a mean value of log\\xi 4.2 erg s/cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N_H\\siml0(exp 22)-10(exp 24)/sq cm, with a mean value of N_H\\siml0(exp23)/sq cm. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can provide important clues on the connection between accretion disks, winds and jets.

  7. FORTRAN source listing for simulating three-dimensional convergent beam patterns with absorption by the Bloch wave method.

    PubMed

    Zuo, J M; Gjonnes, K; Spence, J C

    1989-05-01

    The FORTRAN source code is given for a computer program that calculates the two-dimensional intensity distribution in convergent-beam transmission electron microdiffraction (CBED) patterns from perfect crystals. The program uses the eigenvalue or Bloch-wave method. It allows three-dimensional dynamical diffraction, and so includes all higher-order Laue zone effects without approximation. No symmetry reduction is included. The program accepts noncentrosymmetric or centrosymmetric crystal structures and allows absorption corrections to be included. It uses the "EISPACK" subroutines for the diagonalisation of a general complex matrix. Up to 100 CBED disks may be included. The code is also available via "Bitnet."

  8. Dispersion and absorption of longitudinal electro-kinetic wave in ion-implanted GaN semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Dilip; Sharma, Giriraj; Saxena, Ajay; Jadhav, Akhilesh

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study on propagation characteristics of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves is presented. Based on multi-fluid model of plasma, we have derived a dispersion relation for LEK waves in colloid laden GaN semiconductor plasmas. It is assumed that ions are implanted to form colloids in the GaN sample. The colloids are continuously bombarded by the plasma particles and stick on them, but they acquire a net negative charge due to relatively higher mobility of electrons. It is found from the dispersion relation that the presence of charged colloids not only modifies the existing modes but also supports new novel modes of LEKWs. It is hoped that the study would enhance understanding on dispersion and absorption of LEKWs and help in singling out the appropriate configurations in which GaN crystal would be better suited for fabrication of microwave devices.

  9. Statistical Survey of Type III Radio Bursts at Long Wavelengths Observed by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)/ Waves Instruments: Goniopolarimetric Properties and Radio Source Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupar, V.; Maksimovic, M.; Santolik, O.; Cecconi, B.; Kruparova, O.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed a statistical analysis of a large number of Type III radio bursts observed by STEREO between May 2007 and February 2013. Only intense, simple, and isolated cases have been included in our data set. We focused on the goniopolarimetric (GP, also referred to as direction-finding) properties at frequencies between 125 kHz and 2 MHz. The apparent source size γ is very extended (≈ 60∘) for the lowest analyzed frequencies. Observed apparent source sizes γ expand linearly with a radial distance from the Sun at frequencies below 1 MHz. We show that Type III radio bursts statistically propagate in the ecliptic plane. The calculated positions of radio sources indicate that scattering of the primary beam pattern plays an important role in the propagation of Type III radio bursts in the interplanetary medium.

  10. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  11. Calculating the density of states and optical-absorption spectra of large quantum systems by the plane-wave moments method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    1994-04-01

    The moments method is used to calculate the density of states and optical-absorption spectra of large quantum systems. This method uses random wave functions to calculate 500 Chebyshev moments of the density of states (5002 for the optical-absorption spectra), and transforms these moments back to energy space. The results compare well with direct calculations on a large, 2048 Si-atom bulklike supercell system. To demonstrate its utility, the spectra of a realistic quantum dot with 1035 Si and 452 H atoms are calculated using an empirical pseudopotential Hamiltonian and a plane-wave basis of wave functions.

  12. Radiation hazards of radio frequency waves on the early embryonic development of Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkless, Ryan; Al-Quraishi, Muntather; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    With the growing use of wireless devices in almost all day-to-day activities, exposure to radio-frequency radiation has become an immediate health concern. It is imperative that the effects of such radiation not only on humans, but also on other organisms be well understood. In particular, it is critical to understand if RF radiation has any bearing on the gene expression during embryonic development, as this is a crucial and delicate phase for any organism. Owing to possible effects that RF radiation may have on gene expression, it is essential to explore the carcinogenic or teratogenic properties that it may show. This study observed the effects of RF radiation emitted from a cellular telephone on the embryonic development of zebra fish. The expression of the gene shha plays a key role in the early development of the fish. This gene has homologs in humans as well as in other model organisms. Additionally, several biomarkers indicative of cell stress were examined: including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Results show a significant decrease in the expression of shha, a significant decrease in LDH activity. There was no significant increase in SOD and LPO activity. No morphological abnormalities were observed in the developing embryos. At present, these results indicate that exposure to cell phone radiation may have a suppressive effect on expression of shha in D. rerio, though such exposure does not appear to cause morphological detriments. More trials are underway to corroborate these results.

  13. Forecasting ionospheric space weather with applications to satellite drag and radio wave communications and scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Meng, Xing; Pi, Xiaoqing; Kuang, Da; Wang, Chunming; Rosen, Gary; Ridley, Aaron; Lynch, Erin; Sharma, Surja; Manchester, Ward B.; van der Holst, Bart

    2015-04-01

    The development of quantitative models that describe physical processes from the solar corona to the Earth’s upper atmosphere opens the possibility of numerical space weather prediction with a lead-time of a few days. Forecasting solar wind-driven variability in the ionosphere and thermosphere poses especially stringent tests of our scientific understanding and modeling capabilities, in particular of coupling processes to regions above and below. We will describe our work with community models to develop upper atmosphere forecasts starting with the solar wind driver. A number of phenomena are relevant, including high latitude energy deposition, its impact on global thermospheric circulation patterns and composition, and global electrodynamics. Improved scientific understanding of this sun to Earth interaction ultimately leads to practical benefits. We will focus on two ways the upper atmosphere affects life on Earth: by changing satellite orbits, and by interfering with long-range radio communications. Challenges in forecasting these impacts will be addressed, with a particular emphasis on the physical bases for the impacts, and how they connect upstream to the sun and the heliosphere.

  14. 146-GHz millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber photonic wireless transmission system.

    PubMed

    Fice, M J; Rouvalis, E; van Dijk, F; Accard, A; Lelarge, F; Renaud, C C; Carpintero, G; Seeds, A J

    2012-01-16

    We report the experimental implementation of a wireless transmission system with a 146-GHz carrier frequency which is generated by optical heterodyning the two modes from a monolithically integrated quantum dash dual-DFB source. The monolithic structure of the device and the inherent low noise characteristics of quantum dash gain material allow us to demonstrate the transmission of a 1 Gbps ON-OFF keyed data signal with the two wavelengths in a free-running state at 146-GHz carrier wave frequency. The tuning range of the device fully covers the W-band (75 - 110 GHz) and the F-band (90 - 140 GHz).

  15. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  16. Wave propagation in birefringent materials with off-axis absorption or gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabooni, Mahmood; Nilsson, Adam N.; Kristensson, Gerhard; Rippe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The polarization direction of an electromagnetic field changes and eventually reaches a steady state when propagating through a birefringent material with off-axis absorption or gain. The steady state orientation direction depends on the magnitude of the absorption (gain) and the phase retardation rate. The change in the polarization direction is experimentally demonstrated in weakly doped (0.05 %) Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystals, where the light polarization, if initially aligned along the most strongly absorbing principal axis, gradually switches to a much less absorbing polarization state during the propagation. This means that the absorption coefficient α in birefringent materials generally varies with length. This is important for, e.g., laser crystal gain media, highly absorbing and narrow band spectral filters and quantum memories.

  17. Quasi-millimeter-wave absorption behavior in Y/Yb-stabilized zirconia ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teranishi, Takashi; Akiyama, Naoki; Ayano, Keiko; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Kishimoto, Akira; Fujimori, Kazuhiro; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2012-06-01

    Broadband dielectric spectra from 10 to 1014 Hz were acquired for 8 mol. % Y2O3/Yb2O3-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ and 8YbSZ) ceramics that related the dipole and ionic polarization losses to the absorption efficiency of electromagnetic irradiation. For 24 GHz irradiation, 8YSZ exhibited a higher absorption efficiency than 8YbSZ, resulting in a higher dielectric loss. The difference in the dielectric loss was interpreted as the difference in the loss of the dipoles originating from the fluctuations in the defect associations (Y'ZrVo ¨ and Yb'ZrVo ¨).

  18. Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy of shock-wave heating and compression in laser-driven planar foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J. A.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R. C.

    2009-05-15

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (T{sub e}{approx}10-40 eV, {rho}{approx}3-11 g/cm{sup 3}) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4-1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10-70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer T{sub e} and {rho} in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f=0.06 and f=0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f=0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  19. Preparation and electromagnetic wave absorption properties of Sm2O3/α-Fe/Sm2Fe17Nx composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jinwen; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jiao; Chen, Xianfu; Yao, Mingying

    2013-06-01

    Sm2O3/α-Fe/Sm2Fe17Nx composites were prepared in situ by hydrogenation-disproportionation-oxygen-desorption-recombination and nitrogen process, and their electromagnetic wave absorption properties were measured in the frequency range of 0.5-18 GHz. The result showed that saturation magnetization and coercivity of as-prepared powder with 25.3 wt% Sm2O3, 64.4 wt% α-Fe and 10.3 wt% Sm2Fe17N3 were 134.57 emu/g and 654.5 G, respectively. The dielectric constant of composites was low over the frequency range of 0.5-18 GHz, and their resonance frequencies were at a high frequency range. The resin composite of Sm2O3/α-Fe/Sm2Fe17N3 exhibited effective electromagnetic wave absorption (RL≤20 dB) in a frequency range 3-9 GHz, for absorber thickness ranging from 3 to 8 mm, respectively. A minimum reflection loss of -53 dB from the samples was observed at 7 GHz with an absorber thickness of 3.59 mm.

  20. A High-Resolution Study of Quasiperiodic Radio Emissions Observed by the Galileo Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Christopher, I.; Granroth, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have conducted a study of quasiperiodic emission observed by the plasma wave instrument on board the Galileo spacecraft. These emissions appear as broadband bursts with dominant periods ranging from 10 min to over 40 min. For these emissions we have explicitly analyzed the high-resolution (waveform) data to determine the presence of impulsive, solitary signatures. Our investigations have indicated that the broadband bursts, as well as the background more narrowband continuum emission, are composed of a highly turbulent spectrum. Within the broadband burst, however, there are higher-frequency components present, but no impulsive electrostatic signatures. Also significantly, the broadband bursts show no low-frequency dispersion. We conclude that the bursts are consistent with a distant, electromagnetic source, probably in the near-Jupiter vicinity.

  1. Acoustic wave absorption as a probe of dynamical geometrical response of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    We show that an acoustic crystalline wave gives rise to an effect similar to that of a gravitational wave to an electron gas. Applying this idea to a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime, this allows for experimental study of its intra-Landau level dynamical response in the long-wavelength limit. To study such response we generalize Haldane's geometrical description of fractional quantum Hall states to situations where the external metric is time dependent. We show that such time-dependent metric (generated by acoustic wave) couples to collective modes of the system, including a quadrapolar mode at long wavelength, and magnetoroton at finite wavelength. Energies of these modes can be revealed in spectroscopic measurements, controlled by strain-induced Fermi velocity anisotropy. We argue that such geometrical probe provides a potentially highly useful alternative probe of quantum Hall liquids, in addition to the usual electromagnetic response.

  2. Study of effects of radio-wave frequency radiation emitted from cellular telephones on embryonic development of danio rerio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagula, Mary; Harkless, Ryan

    2013-05-01

    Radio wave frequency (RF) radiation emitted from cellular telephones has become increasingly ubiquitous as a result of the popularity of these phones. With the increasing and unavoidable exposure to RF radiation a reality, it is imperative that the effects of such radiation on living tissue be well understood. In particular, it is critical to understand any effects that RF radiation may have as a carcinogen and on embryonic development, as pregnant women are not exempt from such exposure. As a model organism, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been studied extensively, and their value in studies of gene expression cannot be overstated. This study observed the effects of RF radiation on the embryonic development of zebrafish. The expression of two genes, shha and hoxb9a, that are key to the early development of the fish was examined. Both genes have homologs in humans as well as in other model organisms. Preliminary results suggest that exposure to cell phone radiation might have an effect on the expression of shha in zebrafish embryos, causing under expression. More trials are necessary to validate these results.

  3. AzTEC/ASTE Millimeter-wave Monitoring and Target-of-opportunity Observations of Selected Radio-bright Fermi-detected Gamma-ray Blazars and GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, J. Gregory; Wilson, G.; AzTEC/ASTE Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    We report on correlative millimeter-wave radio observations at 1.1 mm of high-priority Fermi-detected gamma-ray blazars using the AzTEC bolometer-array camera mounted on the 10-m ASTE radio telescope in northern Chile. These observations were carried out during the latter part of the 2008 observing season, overlapping with the first months of operation of the Fermi Observatory. High-priority blazars were monitored and we responded as well to Fermi alerts of elevated gamma-ray emission or flaring activity. We also report on the upper limits obtained to millimeter-wave emission in the early afterglow from GRB 081121. These correlative measurements constituted a pilot observing program that will be extended and expanded to include numerous additional gamma-ray targets for the Large Millimeter Telescope as part of its commissioning operations over the coming year. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  4. Advances in Composite Reflectors: From X-Ray to Radio Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, S. J.; Abusafieh, A. A.; Mehle, G. V.; Sheikh, D. A.; Giles, D. C.

    2000-12-01

    In recent years, Composite Optics, Inc. (COI) has made significant advances in the use of graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) materials for astronomical instrument applications. The inherent low density, high stiffness, and thermal stability makes GFRC a natural candidate for many astronomy applications. In order to reap these inherent benefits in astronomical applications, basic research has focused on material and process improvement. This has been accompanied by the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype reflectors that cover a broad wavelength spectrum of astronomical interests. The results of, and applications for, these efforts are summarized in the following list. X-Ray Carrier Shell: Innovative composite process yields accuracy and moisture stability. Demonstrated by vacuum optical test of 6" Wolter-I shell. Applicable to Con-X, etc. Lightweight Mirror Substrate for Visible Astronomy: Composite/glass hybrid design. Areal density < 15 kg/m2. Demonstrated by cryo-optical test (to 35K) of 1.6m NMSD mirror. Applicable to NGST, etc. Polishable Composite Facesheet: Glass-like coating applied to composite. Polishable by conventional methods. Multiple six-inch substrates polished to 20 angstroms. Technology will enable future 5 kg/m2 visible to UV optics. 10 kg/m2 Submillimeter Reflector: Apertures to 5m possible with economical, all-composite mirror design, diffraction limited at 80 microns. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test (to 70K) of FIRST 2-meter prototype mirror. Applicable to FIRST and other IR astronomy. Large, Ultra-Stable Optical Support Structure: Uniform and near-zero CTE over broad dimensions. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test of 2-meter FIRST prototype. Applicable to NGST, SIM, LISSA. Ground Based Radio Telescope Reflector: Low-cost, accurate, stable, durable all-composite design for support structure & reflective surface. Demonstrated via fab & test of 3m adjustable and 5m static prototypes. Applicable to LMT, ALMA, etc. These

  5. Research of glass fibre used in the electromagnetic wave shielding and absorption composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Jia, F.; Bao, H. Q.; Cui, K.; Zhang, F.

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic shielding and absorption composite material plays an important role in the defence and economic field. Comparing with other filler, Glass fibre and its processed product—metal-coated glass fibre can greatly reduce the material's weight and costs, while it still remains the high strength and the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. In this paper, the electromagnetic absorption mechanism and the reflection mechanism have been investigated as a whole, and the shielding effectiveness of the double-layer glass fibre composite material is mainly focused. The relationship between the shielding effectiveness and the filled glass fibre as well as its metal-coated product's parameters has also been studied. From the subsequent coaxial flange and anechoic chamber analysis, it can be confirmed that the peak electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of this double-layer material can reach -78dB while the bandwidth is from 2GHz to 18GHz.

  6. Broadband light absorption with multiple surface plasmon polariton waves excited at the interface of a metallic grating and photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Hall, Anthony Shoji; Faryad, Muhammad; Barber, Greg D; Liu, Liu; Erten, Sema; Mayer, Theresa S; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2013-06-25

    Light incident upon a periodically corrugated metal/dielectric interface can generate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waves. This effect is used in many sensing applications. Similar metallodielectric nanostructures are used for light trapping in solar cells, but the gains are modest because SPP waves can be excited only at specific angles and with one linear polarization state of incident light. Here we report the optical absorptance of a metallic grating coupled to silicon oxide/oxynitride layers with a periodically varying refractive index, i.e., a 1D photonic crystal. These structures show a dramatic enhancement relative to those employing a homogeneous dielectric material. Multiple SPP waves can be activated, and both s- and p-polarized incident light can be efficiently trapped. Many SPP modes are weakly bound and display field enhancements that extend throughout the dielectric layers. These modes have significantly longer propagation lengths than the single SPP modes excited at the interface of a metallic grating and a uniform dielectric. These results suggest that metallic gratings coupled to photonic crystals could have utility for light trapping in photovoltaics, sensing, and other applications.

  7. An assessment of full wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Schmidt, A. E.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Brambilla, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves (Ωci≪ω≪Ωce, where Ωi ,e≡Zi ,eeB/mi ,ec) have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons and consequently are well-suited to driving current. Established modeling techniques use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) expansions with self-consistent non-Maxwellian distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wave number evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32, 1091 (1991)]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [J. C. Wright et al., Comm. Comp. Phys. 4, 545 (2008)] and coupled to an electron Fokker-Planck solver CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting, Montreal, 1992 (IAEA Institute of Physics Publishing, Vienna, 1993), USDOC/NTIS Document No. DE93002962, pp. 489-526] in order to self-consistently evolve nonthermal electron distributions characteristic of LH current drive (LHCD) experiments in devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER (B0≈5 T, ne0≈1×1020 m-3). These simulations represent the first ever self-consistent simulations of LHCD utilizing both a full wave and Fokker-Planck calculation in toroidal geometry.

  8. Radio wave propagation studies along an Earth-space satellite link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Jacques

    1990-03-01

    The use of superhigh microwave frequencies for satellite communications has many advantages, but its major drawback lies in the effects of atmospheric hydrometeors on electromagnetic wave propagation. One research effort under way to investigate this problem is being conducted by the European Space Agency, which will launch the Olympus-1 communications satellite in June 1989. One of this satellite's four payloads is a 12.5/20/30 GHz beacon package which will enable 17 countries, including Canada, to conduct propagation experiments. The main objective of the Canadian participation is to study propagation during adverse weather conditions. The present thesis provides a model of the propagation path so that the system induced depolarization impurities can be removed from the received beacon signals. The overall system configuration and requirements are given. A system polarization matrix which incorporates all effects existing on the satellite link is described. Analyses needed to obtain the medium propagation characteristics from measured data at 12.5, 20, and 30 GHz are presented. The development of software to perform data acquisition and control of the equipment is reviewed and program listings are included. The preprocessing of the data using the mathematical model will be integrated into the software, as well as other needed mathematical analysis.

  9. Systematic forward scatter radar observations of radio waves from meteoroid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevolani, G.; Bortolotti, G.; Foschini, L.; Franceschi, C.; Gabucci, M. F.; Trivellone, G.

    1996-07-01

    Forward scatter (FS) continuous wave (CW) meteor radar observations carried out during 1992-95 over the long baseline Bologna-Lecce in Italy, enabled us to determine the mass distribution versus duration of particles in main meteoroid streams (Lyrids, eta Aquarids, delta Aquarids, Perseids, Orionids, Leonids, Geminids) and the sporadic background. The unexpected high proportion of short-lived echoes with duration T < 0.2s suggests that the missing mass of meteor particles observed so far by backscatter radars in the 1E-6 - 1E-4 g mass range, is present in the form of faint high-velocity meteors, which ablate above the echo ceiling of conventional radars. The trends of the mass distribution of particles for the quoted meteor complexes are discussed in terms of variation of the mass index s and of steady-state conditions for each meteor population. The combined cumulative distributions of meteor trails vs peak signal amplitudes and vs durations represent a more reliable indicator of the meteoroid stream activity and, consequently, of the mass index variation. The mass index values of the sporadic background are generally higher than for meteor showers in the duration range of 0.1

  10. Design of a radio-linked implantable cochlear prosthesis using surface acoustic wave devices.

    PubMed

    Jeutter, D C; Josse, F

    1993-01-01

    Cochlear prosthesis systems for postlingually deaf individuals (those who have become deaf due to disease or injury after having developed mature speech capability) are considered. These systems require the surgical implantation of an array of electrodes within the cochlea and are driven by processed sound signals from outside the body. A system that uses an analog signal approach for transcutaneous transfer of six processed speech data channels using frequency multiplexing is described. The system utilizes a filterbank of six narrowband surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters in the range 72-78 MHz with a 1.2-MHz channel spacing to multiplex the six carrier signals, frequency modulated, by the processed speech signals, onto a composite signal. The same SAW filters are used in the receiver filterbank for signal separation, but are housed in a miniaturized package. The system includes a portable transmitter and a receiver package which is to be implanted in the patient. The implanted circuits are supplied exclusively from power transferred from outside the body via a separate 10-MHz transcutaneous link.

  11. Two-Way Radio in Schools (or, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Learner). An Evaluation of a High Frequency Short Wave, Two-Way Radio Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Ian

    The Country Education Project in Victoria, Australia, tested the use of two-way radios to bring educational resources to isolated children studying correspondence courses in small rural high schools and to increase interaction among rural schools. Eight rural Victoria schools and the Secondary Correspondence School in Melbourne used two-way…

  12. Controlling multi-wave mixing signals via photonic band gap of electromagnetically induced absorption grating in atomic media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqi; Wu, Zhenkun; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Huaibin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate dressed multi-wave mixing (MWM) and the reflection of the probe beam due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) grating can coexist in a five-level atomic ensemble. The reflection is derived from the photonic band gap (PBG) of EIA grating, which is much broader than the PBG of EIT grating. Therefore, EIA-type PBG can reflect more energy from probe than EIT-type PBG does, which can effectively affect the MWM signal. The EIA-type as well as EIT-type PBG can be controlled by multiple parameters including the frequency detunings, propagation angles and powers of the involved light fields. Also, the EIA-type PBG by considering both the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive indices is also investigated. The theoretical analysis agrees well with the experimental results. This investigation has potential applications in all-optical communication and information processing.

  13. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Jain, M.; Wicks, G.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T.; McEwan, K.; Howle, C.

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  14. Modulated Sine Waves for Differential Absorption Measurements Using a CW Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Lin, Bing (Inventor); Nehrir, Amin R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  15. Kramers-Kronig analysis of molecular evanescent-wave absorption spectra obtained by multimode step-index optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, R A; Ruddy, V P; Hieftje, G M

    1996-07-20

    Spectral distortions that arise in evanescent-wave absorption spectra obtained with multimode step-index optical fibers are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical analysis is performed by the application of Kramers-Kronig relations to the real and the imaginary parts of the complex refractive index of an absorbing external medium. It is demonstrated that even when the extinction coefficient of the external medium is small, anomalous dispersion of that medium in the vicinity of an absorption band must be considered. Deviations from Beer's law, band distortions, and shifts in peak position are quantified theoretically as a function of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient of the external medium; the effect of bandwidth for both Lorentzian and Gaussian bands is also evaluated. Numerical simulations are performed for two types of sensing sections in commonly used plastic-clad silica optical fibers. These sensors include an unclad fiber in contact with a lower-index absorbing liquid and a fiber with the original cladding modified with an absorbing species. The numerical results compare favorably with those found experimentally with these types of sensing sections.

  16. X-ray absorption spectra of water within a plane-wave Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalleri, Matteo; Odelius, Michael; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a simple technique to simulate core-level spectra within the Car-Parrinello plane-waves molecular dynamics framework. The x-ray absorption (XA) spectra are generated using the transition potential technique with the effect of the core hole included through a specifically developed pseudopotential for the core-excited atom. Despite the lack of 1s core orbitals in the pseudopotential treatment, the required transition moments are accurately calculated without reconstruction of the all-electron orbitals. The method is applied to the oxygen XA spectra of water in its various aggregation states, but it is transferable to any first-row element. The computed spectra are compared favorably with the results from all-electron cluster calculations, as well as with experimental data. The periodicity of the plane-wave technique improves the description of condensed phases. The molecular dynamics simulation enables in principle a proper treatment of thermal effects and dynamical averaging in complex systems.

  17. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  18. Excellent electromagnetic wave absorption property of quaternary composites consisting of reduced graphene oxide, polyaniline and FeNi3@SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiao; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jianguo; Wu, Haiwei; Liu, Panbo

    2015-12-01

    The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of the quaternary composites consisting of reduced graphene oxide (rGO), polyaniline (PANI), FeNi3@SiO2 (FeNi3 nanocrystals encapsulated in SiO2) nanoparticles had never been reported. In this case, we prepared FeNi3@SiO2@rGO-PANI quaternary composites and TEM results shows spherical nanoparticles are well distributed on the surface of rGO-PANI nanosheets. The investigation of the electromagnetic wave absorbability reveals that the quaternary composites exhibit wide absorption bandwidth and enhanced electromagnetic wave absorption properties. The absorption bandwidth with reflection loss less than -10 dB (90% attenuation) is up to 6.64 GHz (10.08-10.80 GHz, 12.08-18.0 GHz), and the maximum reflection loss reaches about -40.18 dB at 14.0 GHz with the thickness of 2.4 mm. It is believed that the FeNi3@SiO2@rGO-PANI composites can serve as excellent electromagnetic wave absorbent and can be widely used in practice.

  19. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-21

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg(-1) with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings

  20. Generation of plasma rotation in a tokamak by ion-cyclotron absorption of fast Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; P. Bonoli

    2000-06-13

    Control of rotation in tokamak plasmas provides a method for suppressing fine-scale turbulent transport by velocity shear and for stabilizing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities via a close-fitting conducting shell. The experimental discovery of rotation in a plasma heated by the fast-wave minority ion cyclotron process is important both as a potential control method for a fusion reactor and as a fundamental issue, because rotation arises even though this heating process introduces negligible angular momentum. This paper proposes and evaluates a mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport in a tokamak is governed by a diffusion equation with a no-slip boundary condition at the plasma surface and with a torque-density source that is a function of radius. When the torque density source consists of two separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a non-zero central rotation velocity results, even when the total angular momentum input vanishes. Secondly, the authors show that localized ion-cyclotron heating can generate regions of positive and negative torque density and consequently central plasma rotation.

  1. Specific absorption rate levels measured in a phantom head exposed to radio frequency transmissions from analog hand-held mobile phones

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, V.; Joyner, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    Electric fields (E-fields) induced within a phantom head from exposure to three different advanced mobile phone system (AMPS) hand-held telephones were measured using an implantable E-Field probe. Measurements were taken in the eye nearest the phone and along a lateral scan through the brain from its center to the side nearest the phone. During measurement, the phones were positioned alongside the phantom head as in typical use and were configured to transmit at maximum power (600 mW nominal). The specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated from the in situ E-field measurements, which varied significantly between phone models and antenna configuration. The SARs induced in the eye ranged from 0.007 to 0.21 W/kg. Metal-framed spectacles enhanced SAR levels in the eye by 9--29%. In the brain, maximum levels were recorded at the measurement point closest to the phone and ranged from 0.12 to 0.83 W/kg. These SARs are below peak spatial limits recommended in the US and Australian national standards and the IRPA guidelines for safe exposure to radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, a detailed thermal analysis of the eye indicated only a 0.022 C maximum steady-state temperature rise in the eye from a uniform SAR loading of 0.21 W/kg. A more approximate thermal analysis in the brain also indicated only a small maximum temperature rise of 0.034 C for a local SAR loading of 0.83 W/kg.

  2. Radio and mm-observations of active nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P.

    Radio, mm-wave, and X ray observations of active galactic nuclei are reviewed, together with theoretical models for the phenomena. Formulas are defined for the power law energy distribution of relativistic electrons observed near the sources, the characteristic radio emission, the local emission coefficient, and electron energy loss. Consideration is also given to nonsynchrotron self-absorption and to international cooperation to coordinate radio telescopy on different continents to perform VLBI research. Most sources detected at low frequencies exhibit a steep spectrum halo, while flat spectrum sources at 5 GHz show little extended emission. The low frequency cut-offs encountered due to thermal absorption by H II regions are quantified. Injection and equilibrium spectra are examined, along with the synchrotron loss time scale, the inverse Compton limit, and evidence for repeated explosions in the nuclei. Finally, recent work at the Bonn radioastronomy facility is described.

  3. Coronal heating by the resonant absorption of Alfven waves: Wavenumber scaling laws.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of global modes in coronal loop heating is well established. In the present work the scaling of the global-mode resonant heating rate with the perturbation wavenumbers is studied with the numerical solution of the linearized time-dependent MHD equations for a full compressible, low-beta, resistive plasma using an implicit integration scheme. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the dissipation on inhomogeneties in the background Alfven speed occurs in narrow resonant layer with the highest heating rate at the global-mode frequency. The global-mode heating rate H (sub r) was found to scale as H (Sub r) approximately k (sub y) (exp 1.03) when k (sub z) = 0.1, and as H (sub r) approximately k (sub y) (exp -1.93) when k (sub z) = 0.75, where k (sub y) and k (sub z) are the wavenumbers in the perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field directions, respectively, while the dependence of H (sub r) on k (sub z) is more complex. The quality factor Q of the MHD resonance cavity scales as Q approximately k (sub y) (exp -1.8) for k (sub z) = 0.75 and as Q approximately k (sub y) (exp -1.46) for k (sub z) = 0.1. The numerically determined heating rate scaling, the global-mode fequency, and the quality factor are in good agreement with the analytical linear theory. The magnitude of the perturbed velocities was found to decrease with k (sub y). Assuming typical coronal loop parameters (B (sub 0) = 100-200 G, upsilon (sub A) = 2000-4000 km/s), the Alfven waves can supply the required heating to a low-Q loops.

  4. Locating Radio Noise from Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Watson, R.; Gaffet, S.; Astin, I.; Evans, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into exponentially growing streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010). The acceleration of the electrons to a few eV results in the radiation of a small amount of electromagnetic energy. The incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the low frequency radio noise from sprites near ~40 km height (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this theoretically predicted radiation was recently confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). To locate the radio noise from sprites in the sky, an interferometric network of low frequency radio receivers was developed (Mezentsev and Fullekrug, JGR, 2013). The key parameter for the interferometric signal processing is the frequency dependent wave propagation velocity of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere. This wave propagation velocity is determined by the wave number vector which needs to be inferred from the measurements. Here we adapt and subsequently apply array analyses which have been developed for seismic and infrasound arrays to determine the horizontal wave number vectors of ~20-24 kHz radio waves measured with an array of ten radio receivers distributed over an area of ~1 km × 1 km. It is found that the horizontal slowness of ~20-24 kHz radio waves ranges from ~2.7 ns/m to ~4.1 ns/m depending on the arrival azimuth of the radio wave. For comparison, an electromagnetic wave in vacuum has a slowness of ~3.34 ns/m. A larger slowness indicates an apparent velocity which is smaller than the speed of light and a smaller slowness indicates that the radio wave arrives at the array from an elevation angle. The observed variability of the observed slowness almost certainly results from the distance dependent superposition of the transverse electric and magnetic TEn and TMn radio wave propagation modes.

  5. Investigation of the spatial structure and developmental dynamics of near-Earth plasma perturbations under the action of powerful HF radio waves

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Results of numerical simulations of the near-Earth plasma perturbations induced by powerful HF radio waves from the SURA heating facility are presented. The simulations were performed using a modified version of the SAMI2 ionospheric model for the input parameters corresponding to the series of in-situ SURA–DEMETER experiments. The spatial structure and developmental dynamics of large-scale plasma temperature and density perturbations have been investigated. The characteristic formation and relaxation times of the induced large-scale plasma perturbations at the altitudes of the Earth’s outer ionosphere have been determined.

  6. Advances in the Measurement of CO2 using Swept-Frequency, Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. W.; Ismail, S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Browell, E. V.; McGregor, D.; Kooi, S. A.; Dobler, J. T.; Collins, J. E.; Choi, Y.; Obland, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the carbon balance in the environment is critical to projections of the future evolution of the Earth's climate. Large uncertainties in the forecast of future atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and carbon sources and sinks persist due to the limited set of observations from the current network of in-situ and surface measurements. Global, spaceborne measurements of atmospheric CO2 can reduce these uncertainties. Feasibility studies of space column CO2 mixing ratio (XCO2) measurements using laser remote sensing have been initiated by NASA. The XCO2 measurement requires the simultaneous measurement of both CO2 and O2 number density columns weighted to the near surface and that biases from aerosols or clouds be minimized. This paper discusses the latest flight test results from the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), a laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) system under development by Exelis, Inc. in partnership with NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for the ASCENDS mission. The MFLL uses Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave narrow-band lasers operated on and off of a CO2 absorption feature to measure the differential absorption of atmospheric CO2. By simultaneously modulating the laser beam with range-encoded signals, the retrieval of column CO2 concentrations to the Earth's surface, to the top of optically thick clouds, and through optically thin clouds is enabled. In early 2013, MFLL participated in an intensive flight campaign designed to flight test three ASCENDS prototype instruments onboard the NASA DC-8. The campaign consisted of nine flights of the NASA DC-8 over surfaces of varying reflectivity and in atmospheric conditions including clouds. Here we report on the evaluation of MFLL remote measurements of CO2 column concentrations as compared to the CO2 columns derived from contemporaneous airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements. This paper describes the modulation techniques employed by MFLL, presents algorithms for

  7. The scientific case for a lunar radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Renewed interest in lunar exploration presents an opportunity to conduct unique radio heliophysics not possible on the Earth. The absorption and refraction of low frequency radio waves by the ionosphere limits ground-based heliospheric and astrophysical radio science: Below the ionospheric plasma frequency of 1- 10MHz, external radio waves are completely attenuated. Above the ionospheric cutoff variable refraction resulting from density fluctuations prevents high fidelity imaging. An interferometric array, consisting of a cluster of antennas on the lunar surface, is an ideal scientific experiment for the first phases of the return to the moon. Following deployment by astronauts, the array of simple antennas would be "pointed" towards a source by electronically delaying the signals from the individual receivers, meaning there would be no moving parts. Since transient radio emission at these frequencies is very intense, small antennas would be sufficient for a high signal to noise detection. The array would be easy to upgrade by adding antennas to improve the imaging fidelity and sensitivity, or computer power to increase the observed bandwidth. This presentation will address the heliophysics case for a lunar radio array. I will discuss solar, planetary, and heliospheric radio emission that could be detected with such an array, the scientific understanding that would result. In particular, I will show how the array could be used to image the quiet Sun, track coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space, and to localize solar radio bursts. I will review current efforts to design lunar radio arrays and outline a concept for implementation. The program could begin with a single antenna to perform spectroscopy, increase to several antennas to localize bursts by triangulation, and finally advance to a powerful imaging radio array.

  8. Decameter Radio Emission of the Sun: Recent Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.

    We present an overview of the recent results in solar observations obtained at decameter radio waves using the radio telescope UTR-2. Due to up-to-date recording facilities some newly discovered phenomena in the frequency range 10 - 30 MHz are given: fast type III bursts, fine time structures in normal type III bursts, solar S-bursts, type IV bursts with zebra-like fine structures, third harmonic in type II bursts and bursts in absorption of different time scale. Newly discovered properties of well known bursts such as type III bursts, type IIIb bursts, type II bursts and drift pairs were obtained too.

  9. Adaptive photonic-assisted M²-QAM millimeter-wave synthesis in multi-antenna radio-over-fiber system using M-ASK modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying; Xin, Xiangjun

    2014-11-01

    A novel method for generating an adaptive photonic-assisted M2-quadrature amplitude modulation (M2-QAM) millimeter-wave signal in a multiantenna radio-over-fiber system using M-ray amplitude-shift keying (M-ASK) modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. It takes full advantage of high-density small cells without introducing additional complexity into remote antenna units (RAUs) or mobile users. The 4, 8, and 12 Gb/s 4QAM millimeter-wave signals are obtained from two independent 2, 4, and 6 Gb/s on-off-keying 40 GHz channels, respectively. The experimental results show that a double bit rate can be received without additional digital signal processing in RAUs and mobile users. The results, including the constellation diagrams and bit error rate, show that the transmitted signals are received successfully. PMID:25361290

  10. Adaptive photonic-assisted M²-QAM millimeter-wave synthesis in multi-antenna radio-over-fiber system using M-ASK modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying; Xin, Xiangjun

    2014-11-01

    A novel method for generating an adaptive photonic-assisted M2-quadrature amplitude modulation (M2-QAM) millimeter-wave signal in a multiantenna radio-over-fiber system using M-ray amplitude-shift keying (M-ASK) modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. It takes full advantage of high-density small cells without introducing additional complexity into remote antenna units (RAUs) or mobile users. The 4, 8, and 12 Gb/s 4QAM millimeter-wave signals are obtained from two independent 2, 4, and 6 Gb/s on-off-keying 40 GHz channels, respectively. The experimental results show that a double bit rate can be received without additional digital signal processing in RAUs and mobile users. The results, including the constellation diagrams and bit error rate, show that the transmitted signals are received successfully.

  11. Gigabit radio-over-fiber link for converged baseband and millimeter-wave band signal transmission using cascaded injection-locked Fabry-Pérot laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Moon-Ki; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2009-05-11

    A novel scheme, for both baseband and millimeter-wave band gigabit data transmission in radio-over-fiber system, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated by using cascaded injection-locked Fabry- Pérot laser diodes. It was able to improve suppression ratio of carrier suppressed signal using the cascaded injection-locking. The suppression ratio improvement of the optical carrier suppressed signal of 20 dB was verified. Applying this mechanism, 60-GHz millimeter-wave carrier of enhanced signal quality could be accomplished. Its peak power and phase noise were obtained as -40 dBm and -103.5 dBm/Hz respectively, which was suitable for 60-GHz data transmission. In addition, a successful bidirectional transmission of 1.25-Gbps wired and wireless data was achieved by adopting remodulation technique using a gain-saturated reflective semiconductor optical amplifier for uplink. PMID:19434116

  12. A full-duplex multiband access radio-over-fiber link with frequency multiplying millimeter-wave generation and wavelength reuse for upstream signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin; Li, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    A full-duplex radio-over-fiber (RoF) link providing multiband wireless accesses including 20 GHz, 40 GHz and 60 GHz millimeter (mm)-wave signal using a 10 GHz RF signal source is proposed. According to our theoretical analysis and simulation of the transmission performance of the signal along the single mode fiber, the code form distortion caused by the sideband walk-off effect due to the fiber chromatic dispersion can be eliminated, and the degradation caused by the fading effect on the down-stream signal is removed by adjusting the relative phase shift between the two sidebands. The upstream signal carried by the optical carrier abstracted from the downlink signal is also immune to the code outline distortion. The numerical simulation results show that the 20 km full-duplex RoF link with our generated optical mm-wave signal maintains good performance.

  13. Full-duplex radio over fiber link with colorless source-free base station based on single sideband optical mm-wave signal with polarization rotated optical carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    A full-duplex radio-over fiber (RoF) link scheme based on single sideband (SSB) optical millimeter (mm)-wave signal with polarization-rotated optical carrier is proposed to realize the source-free colorless base station (BS), in which a polarization beam splitter (PBS) is used to abstract part of the optical carrier for conveying the uplink data. Since the optical carrier for the uplink does not bear the downlink signal, no cross-talk from the downlink contaminates the uplink signal. The simulation results demonstrate that both down- and up-links maintain good performance. The mm-wave signal distribution network based on the proposed full duplex fiber link scheme can use the uniform source-free colorless BSs, which makes the access system very simpler.

  14. Signatures and Characteristics of Internal Gravity Waves in the Venus' and Mars' Atmospheres as Revealed by the Radio Occultation Temperature Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Andreev, Vitali; Salimzyanov, Rishat; Pavelyev, Alexey

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that internal gravity waves (IGWs) affect the structure and mean circulation of the Earth' middle and upper atmosphere by transporting energy and horizontal momentum upward from the lower atmosphere. The IGWs modulate the background atmospheric structure, producing a periodic pattern of spatial and temporal variations in the wind velocity, temperature and density. Similar effects are anticipated for the Venus and Mars since IGWs are a characteristic of stably stratified atmosphere. For instance, Yakovlev et al. (1991) and Gubenko et al. (2008a) used the radio occultation (RO) data from Venera 15 and 16 missions to investigate the thermal structure and layering of the Venus' middle atmosphere. They noted that a wavelike periodic structure commonly appears in retrieved vertical profiles at altitudes above 60 km in the atmosphere where the static stability is large. Through comparisons between Magellan RO observations in the Venus' atmosphere, Hinson and Jenkins (1995) have demonstrated that small scale variations in retrieved temperature profiles at altitudes from 60 to 90 km are caused by a spectrum of vertical propagating IGWs. Temperature profiles from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) measurements reveal vertical wavelike structures assumed to be atmospheric IGWs in the Mars' lower atmosphere (Creasey et al., 2006). The very large IGW amplitudes inferred from MGS RO data imply a very significant role for IGWs in the atmospheric dynamics of Mars as well. There is one general problem inherent to all measurements of IGWs. Observed wavelike variations may alternatively be caused by the IGWs, turbulence or persistent layers in the atmosphere, and it is necessary to have an IGW identification criterion for the correct interpretation of obtained results. In this context, we have developed an original method for the determination of internal gravity wave parameters from a single vertical temperature profile measurement in a planetary atmosphere (Gubenko et

  15. Measurements of the absorption line strength of hydroperoxyl radical in the ν3 band using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yosuke; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2012-01-12

    Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy has been applied to the detection of the hydroperoxyl (HO(2)) radical in pulsed laser photolysis combined with a laser absorption kinetics reactor. Transitions of the ν(3) vibrational band assigned to the O-O stretch mode were probed with a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL). The HO(2) radicals were generated with the photolysis of Cl(2)/CH(3)OH/O(2) mixtures at 355 nm. The absorption cross section at each pressure was determined by three methods at 1065.203 cm(-1) for the F(1), 13(1,13) ← 14(1,14) transition in the ν(3) band. From these values, the absolute absorption cross section at zero pressure was estimated. The relative line strengths of other absorptions in the feasible emitting frequency range of the QCL from 1061.17 to 1065.28 cm(-1) were also measured, and agreed with values reproduced from the HITRAN database. The ν(3) band absorption strength was estimated from the analytically obtained absolute absorption cross section and the calculated relative intensity by spectrum simulation, to be 21.4 ± 4.2 km mol(-1), which shows an agreement with results of quantum chemical calculations. PMID:22148191

  16. Measurements of the absorption line strength of hydroperoxyl radical in the ν3 band using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yosuke; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2012-01-12

    Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy has been applied to the detection of the hydroperoxyl (HO(2)) radical in pulsed laser photolysis combined with a laser absorption kinetics reactor. Transitions of the ν(3) vibrational band assigned to the O-O stretch mode were probed with a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL). The HO(2) radicals were generated with the photolysis of Cl(2)/CH(3)OH/O(2) mixtures at 355 nm. The absorption cross section at each pressure was determined by three methods at 1065.203 cm(-1) for the F(1), 13(1,13) ← 14(1,14) transition in the ν(3) band. From these values, the absolute absorption cross section at zero pressure was estimated. The relative line strengths of other absorptions in the feasible emitting frequency range of the QCL from 1061.17 to 1065.28 cm(-1) were also measured, and agreed with values reproduced from the HITRAN database. The ν(3) band absorption strength was estimated from the analytically obtained absolute absorption cross section and the calculated relative intensity by spectrum simulation, to be 21.4 ± 4.2 km mol(-1), which shows an agreement with results of quantum chemical calculations.

  17. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Douglas H.; Petrin, Roger R.; MacKerrow, Edward P.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Quick, Charles R., Jr.; Zardecki, Andrew; Porch, William M.; Whitehead, Michael C.; Walters, Donald L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO2 differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We will address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO2 DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometer at 1.57 Micrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the earth's carbon cycle is essential for diagnosing current and predicting future climates, which requires precise global measurements of atmospheric CO2 through space missions. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission will provide accurate global atmospheric CO2 measurements to meet carbon science requirements. The joint team of NASA Langley Research Center and ITT Exelis, Inc. proposes to use the intensity-modulated, continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach for the ASCENDS mission. Prototype LAS instruments have been developed and used to demonstrate the power, signal-to-noise ratio, precision and accuracy, spectral purity, and stability of the measurement and the instrument needed for atmospheric CO2 observations from space. The ranging capability from laser platform to ground surfaces or intermediate backscatter layers is achieved by transmitted range-encoded IM laser signals. Based on the prototype instruments and current lidar technologies, space LAS systems and their CO2 column measurements are analyzed. These studies exhibit a great potential of using IM-CW LAS system for the active space CO2 mission ASCENDS.

  19. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  20. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of NiCoP alloy nanoparticles decorated on reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Weichun; Fu, Jiajia; Wang, Qin; Wang, Chunming; Xue, Desheng

    2015-12-01

    NiCoP alloy nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide (NiCoP/RGO) are synthesized by in situ co-reduction of Ni2+, Co2+ and graphene oxide (GO) with sodium hypophosphite in a one-pot reaction. This synthesis route is simple and can be used for industrial preparation. The different molar ratios of Ni/Co can be obtained by changing the molar ratio of their salts in the reaction bath. The effect of annealing temperature on the crystal structure of NiCoP alloys has been further investigated. After 500 °C annealing, NiCoP alloys exhibit good crystallinity. The as-prepared NiCoP/RGO composites demonstrate high dielectric constant and magnetic loss in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz due to the conductive and ferromagnetic behavior. Also, their coercivity and magnetization strength are decreased from magnetic measurement with the increase of Ni content. As the molar ratio of Ni/Co is 3:1, the maximum value of the reflection loss reaches to -17.84 dB. Furthermore, the NiCoP/RGO composites have better corrosion resistance than traditional iron series magnetic nanoparticles. It is expected that the composites with the thin, light-weighted and broadband absorbing and good anti-corrosion properties will have a great potential for electromagnetic wave absorption applications.

  1. Measurements of an Antenna Surface for a Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope. II. Metal Mesh Surface for Large Deployable Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Tsuboi, Masato

    2013-02-01

    Large deployable antennas with a mesh surface woven by fine metal wires are an important technology for communications satellites and space radio telescopes. However, it is difficult to make metal mesh surfaces with sufficient radio-frequency (RF) performance for frequencies higher than millimeter waves. In this paper, we present the RF performance of metal mesh surfaces at 43 GHz. For this purpose, we developed an apparatus to measure the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and radiative coefficient of the mesh surface. The reflection coefficient increases as a function of the metal mesh surface tension, whereas the radiative coefficient decreases. The anisotropic aspects of the reflection coefficient and the radiative coefficient are also clearly seen. They depend on the front and back sides of the metal mesh surface and the rotation angle. The transmission coefficient was measured to be almost constant. The measured radiative coefficients and transmission coefficients would cause significant degradation of the system noise temperature. In addition, we carried out an astronomical observation of a well-known SiO maser source, R Cas, by using a metal mesh mirror on the NRO 45-m radio telescope Coudé system. The metal mesh mirror considerably increases the system noise temperature, and slightly decreases the peak antenna temperature. These results are consistent with laboratory measurements.

  2. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were conducted to evaluate properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets. A significant addition to this effort was the capability to make such measurements at millimeter wavelengths. Measurements should soon be completed on the millimeter wave absorption from ammonia under Jovian conditions. Also studied will be the feasibility of measuring the microwave and millimeter wave properties of phosphine (PH3) under simulated Jovian conditions. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter wave absorption data for the outer planet, such as Voyager Radio Occultation experiments, will be pursued.

  3. A comparison of H-alpha intensity and radio wave scattering on eight low-latitude lines of sight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Reynolds, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    Radio scattering and H-alpha measurements for eight sources in Cygnus are compared. The diameter of the radio scattering disk at 1 GHz is found to be correlated with emission measure as determined from the H-alpha measurements, and that strong radio scattering characterized by a diameter of about 30 milliarcsec is produced in regions with emission measures of about 100/cm exp 6 pc or less. The slope of diameter-emission measure correlation is steeper than would be the case if all lines of sight were characterized by the same turbulent outer scale and modulation index. It is suggested that the lines of sight to unscattered or lightly scattered sources traverse only a diffuse medium which is revealed by H-alpha observations at high latitudes. Heavily scattered sources are viewed through an additional component of interstellar H II which has turbulence with different properties.

  4. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  5. Subionospheric VLF/LF radio waves propagation characteristics before, during and after the Sofia, Bulgaria Mw=5.6 earthquake occurred on 22 May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Iren Adelina; Emilian Toader, Victorin; Nenovski, Petko; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian; Ionescu, Constantin

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, INFREP, a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers, was put into operation in Europe having as principal goal, the study of disturbances produced by the earthquakes on the propagation properties of these signals. On May 22nd, 2012 an earthquake with Mw=567 occurred in Bulgaria, near Sofia, inside the "sensitive" area of the INFREP VLF/LF electromagnetic network. The data collected on different frequencies, during April-May 2012 were studied using different methods of analysis: daily correlation methods, spectral approaches and terminator time techniques, in order to find out possible connections between the seismic activity and the subionospheric propagation properties of radio waves. The studies were performed with the help of a specially designed LabVIEW application, which accesses the VLF/LF receiver through internet. This program opens the receiver's web-page and automatically retrieves the list of data files to synchronize the user-side data with the receiver's data. Missing zipped files are also automatically downloaded. The application performs primary, statistical correlation and spectral analysis, appends daily files into monthly and annual files and performs 3D colour-coded maps with graphic representations of VLF and LF signals' intensities versus the minute-of-the-day and the day-of-the-month, facilitating a near real-time observation of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves' propagation. Another feature of the software is the correlation of the daily recorded files for the studied frequencies by overlaying the 24 hours radio activity and taking into account the sunrise and sunset. Data are individually processed (spectral power, correlations, differentiation, filtered using bandpass, lowpass, highpass). JTFA spectrograms (Cone-Shaped Distribution CSD, Gabor, Wavelet, short-time Fourier transform STFT, Wigner-Ville Distribution WVD, Choi-Williams Distribution CWD) are used, too.

  6. A polar cap absorption model optimization based on the vertical ionograms analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaalov, N. Y.; Moskaleva, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    Space weather events significantly affect the high frequency (HF) radio wave propagation. The now-casting and forecasting of HF radio wave absorption is important for the HF communication industries. This paper assimilates vertical sounding data into an absorption model to improve its performance as a now-casting tool. The approach is a modification of the algorithm elaborated by Sauer and Wilkinson, which is based on the riometer data. The optimization is focused on accounting for short timescale variation of the absorption. It should be noted that the expression of the frequency dependence of absorption induced by the energetic particle precipitation employed in Sauer and Wilkinson model is based on the riometer data at frequencies of 20, 30, and 50 MHz. The approach suggested in this paper provides an opportunity for expanding the frequency dependence of the absorption for frequencies below 10 MHz. The simulation of the vertical ionograms in the polar cap region uses a computational model designed to overcome the high frequency wave propagation problem in high latitude of the Earth. HF radio wave absorption induced by solar UV illumination, X-ray flares and energetic particles precipitation is taken into consideration in our model. The absorption caused by the energetic particle precipitation is emphasized, because the study is focused on HF wave propagation in polar cap region. A comparison of observed and simulated vertical ionograms enables the coefficients, which relate absorption (day-time and night-time) to integral proton flux to be refined. The values of these coefficients determined from evaluation of the data recorded by any reliable ionosonde are valid for absorption calculation in high-latitude region.

  7. DO RADIO MAGNETARS PSR J1550-5418 AND J1622-4950 HAVE GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA?

    SciTech Connect

    Kijak, J.; Tarczewski, L.; Lewandowski, W.; Melikidze, G.

    2013-07-20

    We study the radio spectra of two magnetars, PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950. We argue that they are good candidates for pulsars with gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS), as their observed flux density decreases at frequencies below 7 GHz. We suggest that this behavior is due to the influence of the pulsars' environments on radio waves. Both of the magnetars are associated with supernova remnants and thus are surrounded by hot, ionized gas, which can be responsible for the free-free absorption of radio waves. We conclude that the GPS feature of both magnetars and typical pulsars are formed by similar processes in the surrounding media rather than by different radio-emission mechanisms. Thus, the radio magnetars PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950 can be included in the class of GPS pulsars.

  8. Experimental investigation of ULF/VLF radio wave generation and propagation in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere during EISCAT heating experiment in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryakhovskiy, Iliya; Gavrilov, Boris; Zetzer, Julius; Rietveld, Michael; Poklad, Yuriy; Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly

    Powerful high frequency radio waves transmitted from high-power HF heating facilities modify the ionospheric plasma. The X-mode HF pump wave generates strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities in the F region of the ionosphere when the heater frequency is near or above the critical frequency of F2 layer [Blagoveshchenskaya et al]. One of the tasks of the Russian EISCAT heating campaign in February 2012 was an investigation of the generation and propagation of ULF/VLF signals generated as the result of HF radiation modulation. Despite the numerous attempts of long-range detection of such signals, there are a few successful results. The most reliable and important results were obtained by [Barr et al.] more than 20 years ago. They measured the VLF radio waves in Lindau, Germany at the distance of about 2000 km from EISCAT Heater. We present the results of the ULF/VLF registrations at the same distance during heating campaign of February 2012. The measurements were conducted at Mikhnevo Geohysical Observatory located in 80 km to the south of Moscow and at the distance of about 1900 km from Tromsø. For measurements were used a sensitive receivers with crossed air-coil loop antennas in the frequency range from 800 Hz to 30 kHz in the femtotesla amplitude range. We recorded the radial and azimuthal magnetic component of the signals and from their ratio obtained the mode polarization. The radiated heater frequency was modulated by 517, 1017, 2017, 3017, 4017 and 6017 Hz. It was shown the signals with frequency less than 2 kHz propagate in the QTEM mode, and signals at the frequency from 2 to 4 kHz are in the QTE mode. Observed magnetic field strengths and waveguide polarizations are found to be in line with the predictions of simple waveguide models. Qualitative coincidence of the signals polarization character and its dependence on the frequency specifies adequacy of numerical models and reliability of the data received in campaign 2012

  9. Electromagnetically induced absorption and electromagnetically induced transparency for optical transitions F{sub g} → F{sub e} in the field of elliptically polarized waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lazebnyi, D. B. Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu. Yudin, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    Nonlinear laser spectroscopy is considered in the scheme of two collinear waves with arbitrary elliptical polarizations. Emphasis is placed on investigating the nonlinear corrections in the absorption spectrum of one of the waves. The spontaneous transfer of low-frequency Zeeman coherence is shown to affect the sign of the subnatural-width resonance. For a closed transition, the direction of the resonance profile has been found to depend only on the angular momenta F{sub e} and F{sub g}. On this basis, a classification has been developed for various transitions by the direction of the subnatural-width resonance profile.

  10. A wave based method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficient of two-dimensional rigid frame porous structures with periodic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Elke; Claeys, Claus; Atak, Onur; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier; Desmet, Wim

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an extension to the Wave Based Method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficients of a porous material with an embedded periodic set of inclusions. The porous unit cell is described using the Multi-Level methodology and by embedding Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions in the weighted residual scheme. The dynamic pressure field in the semi-infinite acoustic domains is approximated using a novel wave function set that fulfils the Helmholtz equation, the Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions and the Sommerfeld radiation condition. The method is meshless and computationally efficient, which makes it well suited for optimisation studies.

  11. Ionospheric Absorption on 1539 Khz in Relation to Solar Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boska, J.

    1984-01-01

    Radio wave absorption data on 1539 kHz for the summer period of 1978 to 1980 are considered in relation to variations of solar X-ray and L-alpha radiation. It is shown that under non-flare conditions L-alpha dominates in controlling absorption and that X-rays contribute about 10% to the total absorption. Optimum regression equations show that absorption is proportional to the m-th power of ionizing flux where m 1. The role of correcting L-alpha values, measured by the AE-E satellite, is discussed.

  12. Modification of the high latitude F region of the ionosphere by X-mode powerful HF radio waves: Experimental results from multi-instrument diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly; Rietveld, Michael; Haggstrom, Ingemar; Borisova, Tatiana; Yeoman, Tim

    We present the experimental results for strong plasma modifications induced by the X-mode powerful HF radio waves injected towards the magnetic zenith into the high latitude F region of the ionosphere. A large number of experiments in the course of Russian EISCAT heating campaigns were conducted in 2009 - 2013 under different background conditions in a wide heater frequency range from 4 to 8 MHz. The EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar at Tromsø, the CUTLASS (SuperDARN) HF coherent radar in Finland, SEE receiver at Tromsø, the HF Doppler equipment near St. Petersburg, and the EISCAT ionosonde (dynasonde) were used as diagnostic instruments. The results show that the X-mode HF pump wave can generate: (1) strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities (AFAIs); (2) HF-induced plasma and HF-enhanced ion lines (HFPLs and HFILs) from UHF radar spectra; (3) strong electron density enhancements along magnetic field line in a wide altitude range; (4) spectral components (few tens of Hz) in the Doppler spectra of the heater signal measured at a distance of 1200 km from the Tromsø HF heating facility. The experimental results obtained points to the strong magnetic zenith effect due to self-focusing powerful HF radio wave with X-mode polarization. For heater frequencies in the range of about 4 - 6 MHz the mentioned above phenomena are generated when the heater frequency is equal or above the ordinary-mode critical frequency (foF2). Under high background electron density and the heater frequencies used of 6.5 - 8.0 MHz, the strong X-mode HF-induced phenomena were observed both when the heater frequency is equal or above the foF2 and the heater frequency is below the foF2.

  13. Heat loads from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL: characterization on JET and implications for the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Arnoux, G.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, Ph.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Brix, M.; Fursdon, M.; Graham, M.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Riccardo, V.; Vizvary, Z.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.; Petrzilka, V.

    2011-12-23

    Heat loads from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL are characterized on JET from the de-convolution of surface temperatures measured by infrared thermography. The spatial localization, quantitative estimates, parametric dependence and physical origin of the observed heat fluxes are documented. Implications of these observations are discussed for the operation of JET with an ITER-Like Wall, featuring Beryllium tiles with reduced power handling capability.

  14. Modeling of intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser absorption spectrometer systems for atmospheric CO(2) column measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Wallace Harrison, F; Browell, Edward V; Nehrir, Amin R; Dobler, Jeremy; Moore, Berrien; Refaat, Tamer; Kooi, Susan A

    2013-10-10

    The focus of this study is to model and validate the performance of intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) CO(2) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) systems and their CO(2) column measurements from airborne and satellite platforms. The model accounts for all fundamental physics of the instruments and their related CO(2) measurement environments, and the modeling results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles that include noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems are based on existing technologies and their implementation in existing systems. The modeled instruments are specifically assumed to be IM-CW LAS systems such as the Exelis' airborne multifunctional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 μm CO(2) absorption band. Atmospheric effects due to variations in CO(2), solar radiation, and thin clouds, are also included in the model. Model results are shown to agree well with LAS atmospheric CO(2) measurement performance. For example, the relative bias errors of both MFLL simulated and measured CO(2) differential optical depths were found to agree to within a few tenths of a percent when compared to the in situ observations from the flight of 3 August 2011 over Railroad Valley (RRV), Nevada, during the summer 2011 flight campaign. In addition, the horizontal variations in the model CO(2) differential optical depths were also found to be consistent with those from MFLL measurements. In general, the modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the CO(2) column differential optical depths (τd) agreed to within about 30%. Model simulations of a spaceborne IM-CW LAS system in a 390 km dawn/dusk orbit for CO(2) column measurements showed that with a total of 42 W of transmitted power for one offline and two different sideline channels (placed at different locations on the side of the CO(2) absorption line), the accuracy of the

  15. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  16. Semiempirical Model for Ionospheric Absorption based on the NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederick, L. H.; Cervera, M. A.

    2014-02-01

    The strength of high-frequency radio signals, when refracted by the ionosphere, can be strongly influenced by ionospheric absorption. Accurate modeling of the amount of this absorption is a vital part of many studies of radio waves propagating in the ionosphere. We have developed a new, flexible model of ionospheric absorption, the Semiempirical Model for Ionospheric Absorption based on the NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model (SiMIAN). This article describes the methods and formulae used by SiMIAN, a comparison of SiMIAN with an older absorption model, and validation work performed by simulating the power returned in vertical incidence soundings of the ionosphere and comparing the results with real soundings.

  17. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grueff, G.; Alvito, G.; Ambrosini, R.; Bolli, P.; D'Amico, N.; Maccaferri, A.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Mureddu, L.; Natale, V.; Olmi, L.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Poma, A.; Porceddu, I.; Rossi, L.; Zacchiroli, G.

    We describe the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT), a new general purpose, fully steerable antenna of the National Institute for Astrophysics. The radio telescope is under construction near Cagliari (Sardinia). With its large aperture (64m diameter) and its active surface, SRT is capable of operations up to ˜100GHz, it will contribute significantly to VLBI networks and will represent a powerful single-dish radio telescope for many science fields. The radio telescope has a Gregorian optical configuration with a supplementary beam-waveguide (BWG), which provides additional focal points. The Gregorian surfaces are shaped to minimize the spill-over and standing wave. After the start of the contract for the radio telescope structural and mechanical fabrication in 2003, in the present year the foundation construction will be completed. The schedule foresees the radio telescope inauguration in late 2006.

  18. Cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier for radio-astronomical observations and centimeter-wave deep-space communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, V. F.; Grachev, V. G.; Dryagin, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. I.; Kamaletdinov, R. K.; Korotaev, D. V.; Lesnov, I. V.; Mansfeld, M. A.; Pevzner, E. L.; Perminov, V. G.; Pilipenko, A. M.; Sapozhnikov, B. D.; Saurin, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design solution for a highly reliable, low-noise and extremely efficient cryogenically cooled transmit/receive unit for a large antenna system meant for radio-astronomical observations and deep-space communications in the X band. We describe our design solution and the results of a series of laboratory and antenna tests carried out in order to investigate the properties of the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier developed. The transmit/receive unit designed for deep-space communications (Mars missions, radio observatories located at Lagrangian point L2, etc.) was used in practice for communication with live satellites including "Radioastron" observatory, which moves in a highly elliptical orbit.

  19. Excitation of guided ELF-VLF waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power radio waves

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, G. A.; Belov, A. S.; Komrakov, G. P.; Parrot, M.

    2012-03-15

    The possibility of controlled excitation of ELF-VLF electromagnetic waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power high-frequency emission is demonstrated in a natural experiment by using the Sura midlatitude heating facility. The excited low-frequency waves can be used to explore the near-Earth space and stimulate the excitation of a magnetospheric maser.

  20. Remote sensing and modeling of lightning caused long recovery events within the lower ionosphere using VLF/LF radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitter, E. D.

    2014-11-01

    On the 4 November 2012 at 3:04:27 UT a strong lightning in the midst of the North Sea affected the propagation conditions of VLF/LF transmitter radio signals from NRK (Iceland, 37.5 kHz) and GBZ (UK, 19.58 kHz) received at 5246° N 8° E (NW Germany). The amplitude and phase dips show a recovery time of 6-12 min pointing to a LOng Recovery Early VLF (LORE) event. Clear assignment of the causative return stroke in space and time was possible with data from the WWLLN (Worldwide Lightning Location Network). Based on a return stroke current model the electric field is calculated and an excess electron density distribution which decays over time in the lower ionosphere is derived. Ionization, attachment and recombination processes are modeled in detail. Entering the electron density distribution in VLF/LF radio wave propagation calculations using the LWPC (Long Wavelength Propagation Capability) code allows to model the VLF/LF amplitude and phase behavior by adjusting the return stroke current moment. The results endorse and quantify the conception of lower ionosphere EMP heating by strong - but not necessarily extremely strong - return strokes of both polarities.